Science.gov

Sample records for liebermann orthoptera tristiridae

  1. Diapause traits in Melanoplus sanguinipes and M. borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough understanding of diapause is needed for prediction of population responses to climate change, for realistic simulation models, and for the development of effective pest management. In Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius) and M. borealis (Fieber) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), diapause typically o...

  2. Mitochondrial genomics in Orthoptera using MOSAS.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Nathan C; Hiatt, Kevin D; Valentine, Mark C; Song, Hojun; Whiting, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    We present complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) for three orthopterans (Xyleus modestus, Physemacris variolosa, and Ellipes minuta) and describe MOSAS (manipulation, organization, storage, and analysis of sequences), software we developed to facilitate annotation and analysis. We analyze the base composition, start and stop codons, non-coding regions, and gene order among these and 18 other orthopteran mitogenomes from GenBank and reconstruct a phylogeny of Orthoptera. We propose a tetranucleotide start codon for cox1, and hypothesize that the tRNA(Asp)-tRNA(Lys) rearrangement is a synapomorphy for Acridomorpha, but not Caelifera. We further describe MOSAS, user-friendly software we used for this analysis. MOSAS streamlines sequence data storage, organization, annotation, and alignment, and provides convenient search tools for dataset construction and a robust annotation engine particularly suited to annotating mitogenomes (available at http://mosas.byu.edu). PMID:20795780

  3. Orthoptera, a new order of pollinator

    PubMed Central

    Micheneau, Claire; Fournel, Jacques; Warren, Ben H.; Hugel, Sylvain; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne; Pailler, Thierry; Strasberg, Dominique; Chase, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Pollinator-mediated selection and evolution of floral traits have long fascinated evolutionary ecologists. No other plant family shows as wide a range of pollinator-linked floral forms as Orchidaceae. In spite of the large size of this model family and a long history of orchid pollination biology, the identity and specificity of most orchid pollinators remains inadequately studied, especially in the tropics where the family has undergone extensive diversification. Angraecum (Vandeae, Epidendroideae), a large genus of tropical Old World orchids renowned for their floral morphology specialized for hawkmoth pollination, has been a model system since the time of Darwin. Methods The pollination biology of A. cadetii, an endemic species of the islands of Mauritius and Reunion (Mascarene Islands, Indian Ocean) displaying atypical flowers for the genus (white and medium-size, but short-spurred) was investigated. Natural pollinators were observed by means of hard-disk camcorders. Pollinator-linked floral traits, namely spur length, nectar volume and concentration and scent production were also investigated. Pollinator efficiency (pollen removal and deposition) and reproductive success (fruit set) were quantified in natural field conditions weekly during the 2003, 2004 and 2005 flowering seasons (January to March). Key Results Angraecum cadetii is self-compatible but requires a pollinator to achieve fruit set. Only one pollinator species was observed, an undescribed species of raspy cricket (Gryllacrididae, Orthoptera). These crickets, which are nocturnal foragers, reached flowers by climbing up leaves of the orchid or jumping across from neighbouring plants and probed the most ‘fresh-looking’ flowers on each plant. Visits to flowers were relatively long (if compared with the behaviour of birds or hawkmoths), averaging 16·5 s with a maximum of 41·0 s. At the study site of La Plaine des Palmistes (Pandanus forest), 46·5 % of flowers had pollen

  4. Annotated list of Ensifera (Orthoptera) and further records on Caelifera (Orthoptera) of Mt Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    A list of the Tettigoniidae and Gryllacrididae (Orthoptera: Ensifera) of Mt Kilimanjaro is presented. A total number of 63 Ensifera was recorded for this mountain, of which 25 species belonged to Phaneropterinae, 18 to Conocephalinae, 6 to Hetrodinae and three to Pseudophyllinae. The subfamily Meconematinae contributed two species while only one species of the subfamilies Hexacentrinae, Mecopodinae and Saginae was found. Gryllacrididae contributed six species. Three species recorded in literature were not found again during the research period. 15 species are newly recorded for Mt Kilimanjaro in this study and one species of Agraeciini newly described. Two new genera, Afroanthracites Hemp & Ingrisch n. gen. (type species: Anthracites montium Sjöstedt, 1910) and Afroagraecia Ingrisch & Hemp n. gen. (type species: Agraecia sansibara Redtenbacher, 1891), are erected on African Agraeciini (Conocephalinae). Anthracites kilimandjaricus Sjöstedt, 1910 is snonymized with A. montium Sjöstedt, 1910. Agraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891), Anthracites bloyeti Brongniart, 1897 and Anelytra panteli Karny are transferred to Afroagraecia. Aethiomerus stenorhinus Saussure, 1899 is synonymised with Afroagraecia sansibara (Redtenbacher, 1891). In Caelifera two Catantopinae (Acrididae) species are newly recorded for Mt Kilimanjaro and one pyrgomorphid species, Maura lurida (Fabricius, 1781), recovered again for the area. PMID:24698921

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Xenocatantops brachycerus (Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Liu, Nian

    2016-07-01

    Xenocatantops brachycerus (Orthoptera: Catantopidae), which is widely distributed through China and Southeast Asia, is harmful for the crops. The complete mitochondrial genome of X. brachycerus is 15 605 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 A + T-rich region. The gene order of the mitogenome is identical with most orthopteran insects. Most protein-coding genes start with typical ATN codon except for cox1, which initiates with ACC codon instead. While all PCGs use complete stop codons (TAA and TAG). In addition, 13 related species and 2 outgroup taxa were used to construct the phylogenetic tree to further validate the mitogenome of X. brachycerus and research the phylogenetic relationships of Catantopidae. PMID:26540373

  6. The impact of grazing management on Orthoptera abundance varies over the season in Mediterranean steppe-like grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonderflick, Jocelyn; Besnard, Aurélien; Beuret, Aurore; Dalmais, Mathieux; Schatz, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    As semi-natural grassland has a high level of biological diversity, understanding the effects of grazing and its variation over time is important in order to identify sustainable grazing practices. We measured temporal variation in Orthoptera abundance and spatial vegetation structure during seasonal grazing in an extensive sheep-farming system. We studied five grazed pasture areas (pre-grazing and post-grazing) and two adjacent ungrazed grasslands. We recorded the total abundance of Orthoptera and described the vegetation structure of 175 replicate plots (25 per pasture/grassland) during six field sampling sessions. We demonstrated that the impact of grazing on Orthoptera abundance is species-specific and greatly varies over the grazing season. The decrease of phytovolume is significant after 4-7 weeks of sheep grazing. Total Orthoptera abundance was higher in pre-grazed plots than in ungrazed plots, and higher in ungrazed plots than in post-grazed plots. These differences were particularly high during the peak of adult abundance. No difference in species richness was observed between grazing intensities. Total Orthoptera abundance positively correlated to phytovolume only when grazing pressure was high. However, the relationship between abundance and phytovolume differed between species. Extensive grazing by sheep tends to homogenize spatial vegetation structure and to temporarily reduce total Orthoptera abundance at pasture scale. However, rotational grazing allows spatial and temporal heterogeneity in vegetation structure to be maintained at farm scale, heterogeneity that is beneficial for Orthoptera. In contrast, absence of grazing has a negative impact on Orthoptera abundance as it favours the accumulation of litter, which is detrimental for a high proportion of xerothermophilic Orthoptera associated with bare ground and short vegetation.

  7. Rampant Nuclear Insertion of mtDNA across Diverse Lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J.; Whiting, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  8. Rampant nuclear insertion of mtDNA across diverse lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J; Whiting, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  9. A remarkable new pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae) in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Heads, Sam W.; Thomas, M. Jared; Wang, Yinan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) is described from Early Miocene (Burdigalian) Dominican amber. Electrotettix attenboroughi Heads & Thomas, gen. et sp. n. is assigned to the subfamily Cladonotinae based on the deeply forked frontal costa, but is remarkable for the presence of tegmina and hind wings, hitherto unknown in this subfamily. PMID:25147472

  10. Mitochondrial genomes of two Sinochlora species (Orthoptera): novel genome rearrangements and recognition sequence of replication origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Orthoptera, the largest polyneopteran insect order, contains 2 suborders and 235 subfamilies. Orthoptera mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) follow the ancestral insect gene order, with the exception of a trnD-trnK rearrangement in Acridomorphs and rare tRNA inversions. A question still remains regarding whether a long thymine-nucleotide stretch (T-stretch) involved in the recognition of the replication origin exists in the control region (CR) of Orthoptera mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Herein, we completed the sequencing of whole mitogenomes of two congeners (Sinochlora longifissa and S. retrolateralis), which possess overlapping distribution areas. Additionally, we performed comparative mitogenomic analysis to depict evolutionary trends of Orthoptera mitogenomes. Results Both Sinochlora mitogenomes possess 37 genes and one CR, a common gene orientation, normal structures of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA genes, rather low A+T bias, and significant C skew in the majority strand (J-strand), resembling all the other sequenced ensiferans. Both mitogenomes are characterized by (1) a large size resulting from multiple copies of an approximately 175 bp GC-rich tandem repeat within CR; (2) a novel gene order (rrnS-trnI-trnM-nad2-CR-trnQ-trnW), compared to the ancestral order (rrnS-CR-trnI-trnQ-trnM-nad2-trnW); and (3) redundant trnS(UCN) pseudogenes located between trnS(UCN) and nad1. Multiple independent duplication events followed by random and/or non-random loss occurred during Sinochlora mtDNA evolution. The Orthoptera mtDNA recognition sequence of the replication origin may be one of two kinds: a long T-stretch situated in or adjacent to a possible stem-loop structure or a variant of a long T-stretch located within a potential stem-loop structure. Conclusions The unique Sinochlora mitogenomes reveal that the mtDNA architecture within Orthoptera is more variable than previously thought, enriching our knowledge on mitogenomic genetic diversities. The novel

  11. Weather-dependent microhabitat use by Tetrix tenuicornis (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Musiolek, David; Kočárek, Petr

    2016-08-01

    For ectothermic animals, selection of a suitable microhabitat is affected by a combination of abiotic and biotic factors. Also important is the trade-off between those microhabitats with optimal microclimatic conditions and food availability vs. those with the lowest level of competition and lowest risk of predation. Central European species of groundhoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) live in locations with small-scale mosaics of patches formed by bare ground, moss cushions and vascular plants (grasses and forbs). Our research focused on the effects of selected weather components (current temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure and sunlight) on specific microhabitat selection by adults (during the reproductive season) and by the last-instar nymphs (during the non-reproductive season) of the groundhopper Tetrix tenuicornis. Using experimental conditions, we determined that microhabitat use by T. tenuicornis is sex-specific and that microhabitat preference differs between adults and nymphs. We suppose that microhabitats are used according to groundhopper current needs in relation to each habitat's suitability for maintaining body temperature, food intake and reproductive behaviour. Microhabitat preferences were significantly associated with temperature and atmospheric pressure. Changes in atmospheric pressure signal changes in weather, and insects respond to increases or decreases in pressure by adjusting their behaviour in order to enhance survival. We propose that, under low atmospheric pressure, T. tenuicornis actively seeks microhabitats that provide increased protection from adverse weather. PMID:27437707

  12. The complete mitogenome of Arcyptera coreana (Insecta: Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Huang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitogenome of Arcyptera coreana (Insecta: Orthoptera: Acrididae) is determined to be 15,783 bp in length, consisting of 37 typical mitochondrial genes and an AT-rich region. Its gene order and orientation are identical to those of most other grasshoppers. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by typical ATN codons, except for cox1 gene with the unusual TTA as its start codon. Eleven genes use complete termination codon (TAA), whereas the cox2 and nad5 genes end with a single T. Except for trnS(AGN), all tRNA genes display typical secondary cloverleaf structures as those of other insects. The two rRNA genes (rrnL and rrnS) are 1,309 bp and 792 bp, respectively. The 946-bp long AT-rich region contains several features common to those of other Caelifera insects, such as the stem-loop secondary structure and the motif "TATTTwATryAyAAA". PMID:25231716

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Angaracris barabensis Pallas (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    PubMed

    Han, Haibin; Zhou, Xiaorong; Pang, Baoping

    2016-05-01

    Angaracris barabensis Pallas (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) is one of important pests in the grasslands in northern China. The complete mitochondrial genome of this insect was sequenced. This genome is 15,930 bp long, with an AT content of 75.5%, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and a AT-rich region. All genes were arranged in the same order as most of other Acridoidea. All 13 mitochondrial PCGs share the start codon ATN, and the usual termination codons (TAA) are found from 13 protein-coding genes, except for ND2, COII, ND3 (T). All of the 22 typical animal tRNA genes were found in A. barabensis mt-genome, and most of the tRNAs could be folded into the classic cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNA-Ser (AGN), which lacks the dihydrouracil (DHU) stem. The sizes of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1319 and 830 bp, respectively. The AT content of the AT-rich region is 85.6%. PMID:25317639

  14. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Acrida cinerea (Acrididae: Orthoptera) and Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Orthoptera

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Huang, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The complete 15,599-bp mitogenome of Acrida cinerea was determined and compared with that of the other 20 orthopterans. It displays characteristic gene content, genome organization, nucleotide composition, and codon usage found in other Caelifera mitogenomes. Comparison of 21 orthopteran sequences revealed that the tRNAs encoded by the H-strand appear more conserved than those by the L-stand. All tRNAs form the typical clover-leaf structure except trnS (agn), and most of the size variation among tRNAs stemmed from the length variation in the arm and loop of TΨC and the loop of DHU. The derived secondary structure models of the rrnS and rrnL from 21 orthoptera species closely resemble those from other insects on CRW except a considerably enlarged loop of helix 1399 of rrnS in Caelifera, which is a potentially autapomorphy of Caelifera. In the A+T-rich region, tandem repeats are not only conserved in the closely related mitogenome but also share some conserved motifs in the same subfamily. A stem-loop structure, 16 bp or longer, is likely to be involved in replication initiation in Caelifera and Grylloidea. A long T-stretch (>17 bp) with conserved stem-loop structure next to rrnS on the H-strand, bounded by a purine at either end, exists in the three species from Tettigoniidae. PMID:21197069

  15. A contribution to the knowledge of Orthoptera diversity from Peninsular Malaysia: Bukit Larut, Perak.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai; Kamaruddin, Khairul Nizam

    2016-01-01

    Bukit Larut is a hill station at the southern tip of the Bintang Range, Perak of Peninsular Malaysia. While the biodiversity of Bukit Larut has been previously documented, its entomofauna, including the Orthoptera, remains relatively unknown. A faunistic survey was conducted in 2015 as part of the continuous exploration of the highlands in Malay Peninsula. An annotated species list of 71 (24 Caelifera and 47 Ensifera) species of Orthoptera from ten families (five from each order) is presented here. While the coverage of lineages in the orthopteran phylogeny is well-represented, the diversity in Bukit Larut is dominated by the three main families: Acrididae, Gryllidae and Tettigoniidae. Eight new locality records for Bukit Larut and/or Peninsular Malaysia and potential new species awaiting description highlight that the orthopteran diversity in Bukit Larut is not exhaustive. PMID:27394894

  16. A new species and a revised key of the genus Thoradonta (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Ling-Sheng; Sheng, Maoyin; Wen, Ting-Chi; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Thoradonta (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae), Thoradonta varispina Zha & Sheng, sp. n., was found in Lengshuihe Nature Preserve, Jinsha, Guizhou, China. It is introduced with a description and photographs and compared with similar taxa. Ecology, habits, and morphological variation of the new species are discussed and illustrated. Generic characteristics of Thoradonta are updated and an updated key to all known species of Thoradonta is given. PMID:27551231

  17. A new species and a revised key of the genus Thoradonta (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Zha, Ling-Sheng; Sheng, Maoyin; Wen, Ting-Chi; Hyde, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Thoradonta (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae), Thoradonta varispina Zha & Sheng, sp. n., was found in Lengshuihe Nature Preserve, Jinsha, Guizhou, China. It is introduced with a description and photographs and compared with similar taxa. Ecology, habits, and morphological variation of the new species are discussed and illustrated. Generic characteristics of Thoradonta are updated and an updated key to all known species of Thoradonta is given. PMID:27551231

  18. Nobloedischia rasnitsyni, a new genus and species of Oedischiidae (Orthoptera) from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Oklahoma, USA

    PubMed Central

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nobloedischia rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n. (Oedischiidae) is described from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Noble County, Oklahoma. The genus is similar to both Petrelcana (Oedischiidae: Mezenoedischiinae) and Oedischia (Oedischiidae: Oedischiinae) and is left unplaced at the subfamily level. The new species is the twelfth Orthoptera species and the fourth species of Oedischiidae from these deposits. PMID:22259269

  19. Hydrolutos piaroa sp.n. (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae), a new semiaquatic Lutosini species from south-western Venezuelan lowland streams.

    PubMed

    Derka, Tomáš; Svitok, Marek; Fedor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolutos piaroa, a new species of Lutosini (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae) from Tobogán de la Selva (Puerto Ayacucho region, SW Venezuela) is described and figured. Inhabiting aquatic environment it represents an unusual orthopteran with sternal and pleural area covered by fine microtrichia, forming a plastron. This is the first known Hydrolutos species sampled in lowland streams of Venezuelan Guayana. PMID:27395849

  20. New and little-known pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Dawwrueng, Pattarawich

    2015-01-01

    An annotated list of 39 species in 25 genera and seven subfamilies of the pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrididae) from Thailand is given; from these 18 species are recorded from this country for the first time. Five new species are described: Cotysoides gaponi sp. nov. (subfamily Metrodorinae), Eucriotettix anisyutkini sp. nov., Gavialidium bufocrocodil sp. nov., Scelimena bellula sp. nov. (subfamily Scelimeninae) and Phaesticus uvarovi sp. nov. (subfamily Discotettiginae). One species is transferred from Scelimena to Amphibotettix and a new combination is proposed: Scelimena hafizhaii Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007 = Amphibotettix hafizhaii (Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007), comb. nov. The previously unknown male of Falconius tschernovi Storozhenko, 2014 is described. PMID:26701451

  1. Occurrence of a new species of Letana (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) in India.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the Oriental genus Letana, Walker (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae), proposed as Letana dentata sp. nov., collected from the North-eastern province, Meghalaya, India (Ri bhoi 90°55'15 to 91°16' latitude and 25°40' to 25°21' longitude, 993 MSL), is described together with the morphological characterization of eight reported species. Of these, Letana rubescens (Stål, 1861) collected from Shalimar, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir (India) is being reported for the first time from India. The other species of Letana include: L. atomifera, L. bulbosa, L. inflata, L. infurcata, L. pyrifera and L. rufonatata. Taxonomic and diagnostic characters with illustrations of the head, pronotum, ventral view of left tegmina to show stridulatory file teeth and the genitalia (supra-anal plate and subgenital plate) including the phallus sclerite has been given. PMID:26624719

  2. A multi-scale study of Orthoptera species richness and human population size controlling for sampling effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarello, Elena; Steck, Claude E.; Fontana, Paolo; Fontaneto, Diego; Marini, Lorenzo; Pautasso, Marco

    2010-03-01

    Recent large-scale studies have shown that biodiversity-rich regions also tend to be densely populated areas. The most obvious explanation is that biodiversity and human beings tend to match the distribution of energy availability, environmental stability and/or habitat heterogeneity. However, the species-people correlation can also be an artefact, as more populated regions could show more species because of a more thorough sampling. Few studies have tested this sampling bias hypothesis. Using a newly collated dataset, we studied whether Orthoptera species richness is related to human population size in Italy’s regions (average area 15,000 km2) and provinces (2,900 km2). As expected, the observed number of species increases significantly with increasing human population size for both grain sizes, although the proportion of variance explained is minimal at the provincial level. However, variations in observed Orthoptera species richness are primarily associated with the available number of records, which is in turn well correlated with human population size (at least at the regional level). Estimated Orthoptera species richness (Chao2 and Jackknife) also increases with human population size both for regions and provinces. Both for regions and provinces, this increase is not significant when controlling for variation in area and number of records. Our study confirms the hypothesis that broad-scale human population-biodiversity correlations can in some cases be artefactual. More systematic sampling of less studied taxa such as invertebrates is necessary to ascertain whether biogeographical patterns persist when sampling effort is kept constant or included in models.

  3. Effect of food plants on the volume of repellent secretion obtained in adult Zonocerus variegatus (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Idowu, A B; Idowu, O A

    2001-06-01

    The volume of secretion obtained from adult Zonocerus variegatus (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae) was influenced by the type of food plants. Insects fed on leaves of cassava Manihot esculenta, bitter leaves Vernonia amygdalina, and a mixture of M. esculenta and Acalypha wilkesiana gave a good volume of secretion while Chromolaena odorata, Elaeis guinensis, Aspilia africana and Citrus sinensis did not favour secretion production. No significant difference was recorded in the volume of secretion obtained from Z. variegatus from the two seasons irrespective of the food plant. Similarly, food plants gave no significant difference on the volume of secretion between the two seasons. PMID:11935920

  4. Excretion of cadmium and zinc during moulting in the grasshopper Omocestus viridulus (Orthoptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindqvist, L.; Block, M. )

    1994-10-01

    Nymphs of Omocestus viridulus (Orthoptera) were reared on grass leaves containing known amounts of [sup 109]Cd or [sup 65]Zn. After the animals molted to adults, contents of these metals were measured in the grasshoppers, in the cast of exuviae and in the feces produced during rearing. Dry weights of adult bodies and exuviae were lower for [sup 109]Cd-treated grasshoppers than for those given [sup 65]Zn. Exuviae accounted for only a minor part of the excreted [sup 109]Cd and [sup 65]Zn. The [sup 109]Cd was assimilated from food to a much smaller extent than was [sup 65]Zn. After 15 d of rearing, [approximately] 50% of the ingested [sup 65]Zn, but only 10% of the ingested [sup 109]Cd, remained in the grasshoppers. Because the amount of [sup 109]Cd in the grasshopper nymphs decreased with time, whereas that of the exuviae were constant, content in exuviae constituted a larger portion of the total content of [sup 109]Cd with increasing time between feeding of [sup 109]Cd and molting. For [sup 65]Zn there was no such trend.

  5. Auditory-based defence against gleaning bats in neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Fullard, James H

    2010-05-01

    Neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are preyed on by gleaning bats, which are known to use male calling songs to locate them. At least one katydid species has been reported to stop singing in response to bat echolocation calls. To investigate the relationship between this behavioural defence and ecological and sensory factors, we surveyed calling song characteristics, song cessation in response to the echolocation calls of a sympatric gleaning bat (Trachops cirrhosus), and T-cell responses (an auditory interneuron sensitive to ultrasound) in five katydid species from Panamá. The two katydid species that stopped singing in response to bat calls (Balboa tibialis and Ischnomela gracilis, Pseudophyllinae) also had the highest T-cell spike number and rate in response to these stimuli. The third pseudophylline species (Docidocercus gigliotosi) did not reliably cease singing and had low T-cell spiking activity. Neoconocephalus affinis (Copiphorinae) produced continuous calling song, possibly preventing males from hearing the bat during singing, and did not show a behavioural response despite high T-cell activity in response to bat calls. Steirodon rufolineatum (Phaneropterinae) did not cease singing and differed in T-cell activity compared to the other species. T-cell function might not be conserved in katydids, and evidence for this idea is discussed. PMID:20237786

  6. Three new species of the genus Ripipteryx from Colombia (Orthoptera, Ripipterygidae)

    PubMed Central

    Baena-Bejarano, Nathalie; Heads, Sam W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Ripipteryx Newman (Orthoptera: Tridactyloidea: Ripipterygidae) are described from Colombia; namely Ripipteryx diegoi sp. n. (Forceps Group) and Ripipteryx guacharoensis sp. n. (Marginipennis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Cueva de los Guacharos in Huila, and Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. (Crassicornis Group) from Parque Nacional Natural Gorgona in Cauca. Ripipteryx diegoi sp. n. is characterized by the antennae black with white spots on flagellomeres 3–7, male subgenital plate with median ridge forming a bilobed setose process, epiproct produced laterally near its base and phallic complex with virga thickened distally and not reaching beyond the membrane. Ripipteryx guacharoensis sp. n. is characterized by the antennae thick with white spots present dorsally on flagellomeres 1–4 and 8, epiproct narrow and triangular, uncus reduced and lacking a distal hook, phallic complex with a concave ventral plate and a dorsal elevation in the middle extended to the virga, and the virga itself with two small projections basally. Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. is characterized by the epiproct with a lateral notch, antennae with a white dorsal spot on flagellomere 1 and flagellomeres 4–7 entirely white. The antennal color pattern of Ripipteryx gorgonaensis sp. n. strongly resembles that of Ripipteryx atra but differs from the latter in the absence of any significant morphological modification of the flagellomeres. PMID:26019667

  7. A summary of eight traits of Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Araneae, occurring in grasslands in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M; Simons, Nadja K; Achtziger, Roland; Blick, Theo; Dorow, Wolfgang H.O; Dziock, Frank; Köhler, Frank; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of species traits have increased our understanding of how environmental drivers such as disturbances affect the composition of arthropod communities and related processes. There are, however, few studies on which traits in the arthropod community are affected by environmental changes and which traits affect ecosystem functioning. The assembly of arthropod traits of several taxa is difficult because of the large number of species, limited availability of trait databases and differences in available traits. We sampled arthropod species data from a total of 150 managed grassland plots in three regions of Germany. These plots represent the spectrum from extensively used pastures to mown pastures to intensively managed and fertilized meadows. In this paper, we summarize information on body size, dispersal ability, feeding guild and specialization (within herbivores), feeding mode, feeding tissue (within herbivorous suckers), plant part (within herbivorous chewers), endophagous lifestyle (within herbivores), and vertical stratum use for 1,230 species of Coleoptera, Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha), Orthoptera (Saltatoria: Ensifera, Caelifera), and Araneae, sampled by sweep-netting between 2008 and 2012. We compiled traits from various literature sources and complemented data from reliable internet sources and the authors’ experience. PMID:25977817

  8. Male Responses to Conspecific Advertisement Signals in the Field Cricket Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yikweon

    2011-01-01

    In many species males aggregate and produce long-range advertisement signals to attract conspecific females. The majority of the receivers of these signals are probably other males most of the time, and male responses to competitors' signals can structure the spatial and temporal organization of the breeding aggregation and affect male mating tactics. I quantified male responses to a conspecific advertisement stimulus repeatedly over three age classes in Gryllus rubens (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in order to estimate the type and frequency of male responses to the broadcast stimulus and to determine the factors affecting them. Factors tested included body size, wing dimorphism, age, and intensity of the broadcast stimulus. Overall, males employed acoustic response more often than positive phonotactic response. As males aged, the frequency of positive phonotactic response decreased but that of the acoustic response increased. That is, males may use positive phonotaxis in the early stages of their adult lives, possibly to find suitable calling sites or parasitize calling males, and then later in life switch to acoustic responses in response to conspecific advertisement signals. Males with smaller body size more frequently exhibited acoustic responses. This study suggests that individual variation, more than any factors measured, is critical for age-dependent male responses to conspecific advertisement signals. PMID:21283758

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinese endemic grasshopper Fruhstorferiola kulinga (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Podismini).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Guan, De-Long; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-09-01

    The whole-genome Illumina sequence of the Chinese endemic grasshopper Fruhstorferiola kulinga mitogenome was constructed and reported in this study. In all, the circular genome was obtained with 15,655 bp in length and contains 75.4% A + T. It typically consists of 37 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 D-loop region. All PCGs are initiated with ATN codons. Most of the PCGs use TAA as their stop codons, while the others use TAG as stop codons (COX1 and ND1). The size of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1314 bp and 851 bp. The A + T-rich region (777 bp) showed strong resemblance to the other known Orthoptera insects. Our data would contribute to confirm the close relationship and other evolutionary researches of the F. kulinga. PMID:25630726

  10. DNA damage in grasshopper Chorthippus brunneus (Orthoptera) hatchlings following paraquat exposure.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, M; Nocoń, Ł; Kędziorski, A; Łaszczyca, P; Sawczyn, T; Tarnawska, M; Zawisza-Raszka, A

    2015-04-01

    Comet assay was applied to study genotoxic damage induced by paraquat (PQ) in brain cells of Chorthippus brunneus (Insecta: Orthoptera) hatchlings. Percentage of the comet fluorescence in the tail (TDNA), length of the comet tail (TL) and Olive tail moment (OTM) were used for quantitative assessment of the DNA damage. Multiple regression analysis supplemented standard statistical elaboration of the results. Increasing PQ concentrations applied either directly to the brain cells suspension (10, 50, and 250 μM PQ final concentration--in vitro protocol) or indirectly (50, 250, and 1250 μM PQ final concentration--in vivo protocol) provoked significant increase of oxidative damage to DNA (higher median TDNA and OTM values). The damage increased with time of exposure (0, 5, 15, and 30 min) following in vitro application, but decreased in longer interval (3 vs 24 h) after in vivo administration of paraquat. On contrary, median TL values did not correlate with paraquat concentration irrespectively of the exposure protocol. Possible reason of this discrepancy in light of paraquat toxicity is discussed. PMID:25592461

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Angaracris rhodopa Fischer & Walheim (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    PubMed

    Han, Haibin; Zhou, Xiaorong; Pang, Baoping

    2016-05-01

    Angaracris rhodopa Fischer & Walheim (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) is one of the important pests in the grasslands in northern China. The complete mitochondrial genome of this insect was sequenced. This genome is 15,930 bp long, with an AT content of 75.4%, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an AT-rich region. All 13 PCGs share the start codon ATN, and the usual termination codons (TAA) are found from 13 protein-coding genes, except for ND2, COII, ND3 (T). All of the 22 typical animal tRNA genes were found in A. rhodopa mt-genome, and most of the tRNAs could be folded into the classic cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNA-Ser (AGN), which lacks the dihydrouracil (DHU) stem. The sizes of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1319 and 830 bp long, respectively. The AT content of the AT-rich region is 85.3%. PMID:25418622

  12. Complete mitochondrial genomes of three crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and comparative analyses within Ensifera mitogenomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ren, Qianli; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of Velarifictorus hemelytrus, Loxoblemmus equestris and Teleogryllus emma are 16123 bp, 16314 bp and 15697 bp, in size, respectively. All three mitogenomes possess the same gene order of the inversion of the gene cluster trnE-trnS(AGN)-trnN compared with the ancestral gene order of Orthoptera. The atypical initiation codon for the cox1 gene in three crickets is TTA. Pronounced A skew and T skew have been found in Grylloidea comparing with Gryllotalpoidea and Tettigonioidea. The T-stretch in the minority strand is interrupted by C to form (T)n(C)2(T)n sequences in five species of Gryllinae (V. hemelytrus, L. equestris, T. emma, T. oceanicus, T. commodus). This T-stretch variant with its neighbouring A-stretch variant (A-stretch is interrupted by G), which were discovered in the A+T-rich regions of all taxa from infraorder Gryllidea, could form a conserved stem-loop structure (including 15 ~ 17 base pairs). This potential stem-loop structure is a favorable candidate that may participate in the replication origin of the minority strand of Gryllidea mitogenome. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that within the Gryllinae, genus Teleogryllus and Velarifictorus are closely related, sister to the genus Loxoblemmus. The relationships among the five superfamilies of Ensifera presented here were ((Grylloidea, Gryllotalpoidea) (Tettigonioidea, (Hagloidea, Rhaphidophoroidea))). PMID:27394472

  13. A summary of eight traits of Coleoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Araneae, occurring in grasslands in Germany.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Simons, Nadja K; Achtziger, Roland; Blick, Theo; Dorow, Wolfgang H O; Dziock, Frank; Köhler, Frank; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of species traits have increased our understanding of how environmental drivers such as disturbances affect the composition of arthropod communities and related processes. There are, however, few studies on which traits in the arthropod community are affected by environmental changes and which traits affect ecosystem functioning. The assembly of arthropod traits of several taxa is difficult because of the large number of species, limited availability of trait databases and differences in available traits. We sampled arthropod species data from a total of 150 managed grassland plots in three regions of Germany. These plots represent the spectrum from extensively used pastures to mown pastures to intensively managed and fertilized meadows. In this paper, we summarize information on body size, dispersal ability, feeding guild and specialization (within herbivores), feeding mode, feeding tissue (within herbivorous suckers), plant part (within herbivorous chewers), endophagous lifestyle (within herbivores), and vertical stratum use for 1,230 species of Coleoptera, Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha), Orthoptera (Saltatoria: Ensifera, Caelifera), and Araneae, sampled by sweep-netting between 2008 and 2012. We compiled traits from various literature sources and complemented data from reliable internet sources and the authors' experience. PMID:25977817

  14. Phylogeography and systematics of the westernmost Italian Dolichopoda species (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, Giuliana; Rampini, Mauro; Di Russo, Claudio; Lana, Enrico; Cocchi, Sara; Sbordoni, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Dolichopoda (Orthoptera; Rhaphidopohoridae) is present in Italy with 9 species distributed from northwestern Italy (Piedmont and Liguria) to the southernmost Apennines (Calabria), occurring also in the Tyrrhenian coastal areas and in Sardinia. Three morphologically very close taxa have been described in Piedmont and Liguria, i.e., D. ligustica ligustica, D. ligustica septentrionalis and D. azami azami. To investigate the delimitation of the northwestern species of Dolichopoda, we performed both morphological and molecular analyses. Morphological analysis was carried out by considering diagnostic characters generally used to distinguish different taxa, as the shape of epiphallus in males and the subgenital fig in females. Molecular analysis was performed by sequencing three mitochondrial genes, 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, partially sequenced and the entire gene of COI. Results from both morphological and molecular analyses highlighted a very homogeneous group of populations, although genetically structured. Three haplogroups geographically distributed could be distinguished and based on these results we suggest a new taxonomic arrangement. All populations, due to the priority of description, should be assigned to D. azami azami Saulcy, 1893 and to preserve the names ligustica and septentrionalis, corresponding to different genetic haplogroups, we assign them to D. azami ligustica stat. n. Baccetti & Capra, 1959 and to D. azami septentrionalis stat. n. Baccetti & Capra, 1959. PMID:25197209

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Banza (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), the endemic katydids of the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L H; Strazanac, J S; Roderick, G K

    2006-10-01

    The extant endemic katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) of the Hawaiian Archipelago include one to three species per high island and a single species on Nihoa, all currently placed in the genus Banza. These acoustic insects provide an excellent opportunity for investigating the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation, but such studies require an understanding of phylogenetic relationships within the group. We use maximum parsimony, likelihood-based Bayesian inference, and maximum likelihood to infer phylogenetic relationships among these taxa, based on approximately 2kb of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b. Our results strongly support two distinct high island clades: one clade ("Clade I") composed of species from Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Lanai and another clade ("Clade II") composed of species from Maui and Hawaii (Banza unica, from Oahu, may be basal to both these clades, but its placement is not well resolved). Within these clades, some inferred relationships are strongly supported, such as the sister status of B. kauaiensis (Kauai) and B. parvula (Oahu) within Clade I, but other relationships remain more ambiguous, such as the relative position of B. brunnea (Maui) within Clade II. Although a detailed reconstruction of the historical biogeography of the Hawaiian katydids is difficult, we use our genetic data combined with the known geological history of the Hawaiian Islands to set limits on plausible historical scenarios for diversification of this group. Beyond these historical biogeographic inferences, our results indicate possible cryptic speciation on both Oahu and Hawaii, as well as what may be unusually high average rates of nucleotide substitution. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of this group. PMID:16781170

  16. Mitochondrial genomes of four katydids (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae): New gene rearrangements and their phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Fei; Huang, Yuan

    2016-01-10

    Phaneropteridae is a family of Orthoptera that displays an amazing amount of diversity in terms of both forms and species. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of two bush katydids: Ruidocollaris obscura and Kuwayamaea brachyptera (Phaneropterinae), and two true katydids: Orophyllus montanus and Phyllomimus detersus (Pseudophyllinae), to obtain further insight into the characteristics of the katydid mitogenomes and to investigate the taxonomic status of subfamily Pseudophyllinae and the diversity of gene arrangements among Phaneropteridae. The following general genomic characteristics were observed in the four katydids: a longer length of the mitogenomes (16,007bp-16,667bp) compared with Caelifera, abundant intergenic spacers, and accepted atypical initiation codons (GTG and TTG, found in cox1, nad1 and nad2). A new orientation of the gene arrangement "trnM-trnI-trnQ" was identified in P. detersus, which is the first representative of Polyneoptera found to carry this gene cluster. Large identical fragments (492bp) were detected in control region 1 (CR1) and control region 2 (CR2) of R. obscura. The high similarity of the duplicated CRs is likely due to a recent gene duplication or concerted evolution. Analyses of the duplicated CRs revealed one conserved stem-loop (on the N-strand) located in the identical sequences of both CRs that might be linked to replication initiation. Phylogenetic analyses based on 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes from 20 Ensiferan species yielded the identical topologies between two different methods (maximum likelihood and bayesian inference). The newly sequenced Pseudophyllinae species was placed as the sister group of Phaneropterinae, and Mecopodinae clustered with Pseudophyllinae+Phaneropterinae. Additionally, we speculate that the species in Ruidocollaris and Sinochlora, as well as their closely related genera, may have undergone numerous rearrangement events. PMID:26410415

  17. Divergence in the calling songs between sympatric and allopatric populations of the southern wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Jang, Y; Gerhardt, H C

    2006-03-01

    In the eastern United States the wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) occurs in sympatry with G. vernalis in an area between eastern Kansas and west of the Appalachian Mountains. Calling songs were recorded from 13 sympatric and allopatric localities. Both field and laboratory recordings showed that chirp rate (CR) and pulse rate (PR) overlapped extensively between allopatric populations of G. fultoni and sympatric populations of G. vernalis; by contrast, there was little or no overlap in these variables between sympatric populations of these two species. Divergence in PR and CR between the two species was thus greater in areas of sympatry than in areas of allopatry. Our field and laboratory studies of G. fultoni calling songs thus demonstrate the pattern expected of character displacement and support the genetic assumptions of this hypothesis. Other possible explanations for the sympatric divergence such as ecological character displacement and clinal variation are discussed. PMID:16599922

  18. Primary succession of Acrididae (Orthoptera): Differences in displacement capacities in early and late colonizers of new habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picaud, F.; Petit, D. P.

    2007-07-01

    Rehabilitated mine sites are suitable environments for the study of primary ecological succession. Following the monitoring of Plant and Orthoptera communities for 4 years on 7 sites in the Limousin region (France), covering 9 years of rehabilitation, three grasshopper seres were defined. It is expected that these seres are conditioned by both displacement capacities and reproductive characteristics. This study compares by field experiments the jumping flights and walking speed of the most abundant Caelifera belonging to the defined seres. A strong link emerged between the successional stages, the distances covered by jumping flights and sexual dimorphism. Walking speed is poorly related to the successional stage. We show that the high density of some species, as observed in the medium stage of succession, significantly reduces the walking distance of late colonisers, suggesting a mechanism that reduces further colonisation.

  19. Remote sensing for environmental control of Dociostaurus maroccanus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) in Apulia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belviso, Luciano

    Background. Dociostaurus maroccanus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) is a locust widely spread all over the Mediterranean region. This insect is linked to particular oviposition sites (pseudosteppa or garigue). When locusts become adults, they feed on cultivated crops, expanding on wide areas of vegetations and farmlands, threatening economical operators of agriculture and food processing. In the past years, observation attempts have been made, however, the localization of concentrations of locusts as well as their egg-pods is extremely difficult. Moreover, most of the affected areas are under the protection of National Parks Authorities that makes unacceptable any chemical pesticide treatment. The objective of this study, carried out by the University of Bari, is to obtain a behavioural model of locusts propagation using data from remote sensing, in order to predict locusts concentration and promptly act with appropriate biological countermeasures, like enthomopathogenous fungi. Data evaluation. Although insects are affected by climate changes and meteo factors, it is extremely difficult to assess their precise behaviour and the relations among different environmental factors and the global insect population. The infestation of the past years is probably due to the increase of annual temperature means but no explicit relation is currently known. Considering this phenomenon affects wide areas, remote sensing represent the only applicable solution to obtain precise data concerning land coverage, surface temperature, incidence of solar radiation as well as atmospheric contribution. After data collection, clusters are selected using neural networks methods in order to classify big territories. At present, experiments (using MODIS, ASTER, ENVISAT) show that wide areas can be grouped in just a few clusters with some of them suitable for locusts life. In the next months further investigation will be performed to refine the classification procedure. Metamodeling techniques

  20. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of an ecdysone receptor homolog in Teleogryllus emma (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Xi, Gengsi; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that play important roles in the regulation of Arthropoda animal growth development, larvae ecdysis, and reproduction. The effect of ecdysteroids is mediated by ecdysteroid receptor (EcR). The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of a series of genes during development and reproduction. Here, we isolated and characterized cDNA of the cricket Teleopgryllus emma (Ohmachi & Matsuura) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and studied mRNA expression pattern using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA of T. emma EcR, termed TeEcR, is 2,558 bp and contains a 5'-untranslated region of 555 bp and a 3'-untranslated region of 407 bp. The open reading frame of TeEcR encodes deduced 531-amino acid peptides with a predicted molecular mass of 60.7 kDa. The amino acid sequence of T. emma EcR was similar to that of known EcR especially in the ligand-binding domain of insect EcR. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to compare TeEcR mRNA expression level at the whole body and gonad during T. emma development. The data revealed that TeEcR mRNA is differentially expressed during T. emma development, with the highest expression level in late-instar larvae of the body and lowest in third instar. The levels of TeEcR transcripts also vary among gonads development, and levels in ovaries were higher than in testes at every developmental stage. These results suggest that TeEcR may have potential significance to regulate the morphological structure and gonad development of T. emma, due to its expression in different developmental periods. PMID:25797799

  1. Radio-telemetric evidence of migration in the gregarious but not the solitary morph of the Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorch, Patrick D.; Gwynne, D. T.

    The Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, is one of just a few species of katydids (or bushcrickets, Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) that, like migratory locusts, appear to have solitary and migratory morphs. Using radio telemetry we studied movements of individuals of two morphs of this flightless species. Individuals within each migratory band had similar rates of movements along similar directional headings whereas solitary individuals moved little and showed little evidence of directionality in movement. Our results also add to other recent radio-telemetry studies showing that flightless insects of 1-2g in mass can be tracked successfully using these methods.

  2. Genetic variation and geographic differentiation among populations of the nonmigratory agricultural pest Oedaleus infernalis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Dong, Hui; Gao, Yue-Bo; Su, Qian-Fu; Qian, Hai-Tao; Bai, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Ting; Cong, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The nonmigratory grasshopper Oedaleus infernalis Saussure (Orthoptera : Acridoidea) is an agricultural pest to crops and forage grasses over a wide natural geographical distribution in China. The genetic diversity and genetic variation among 10 geographically separated populations of O. infernalis was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-based molecular markers, including the intersimple sequence repeat and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. A high level of genetic diversity was detected among these populations from the intersimple sequence repeat (H: 0.2628, I: 0.4129, Hs: 0.2130) and cytochrome oxidase analyses (Hd: 0.653). There was no obvious geographical structure based on an unweighted pair group method analysis and median-joining network. The values of FST, θ(II), and Gst estimated in this study are low, and the gene flow is high (Nm > 4). Analysis of the molecular variance suggested that most of the genetic variation occurs within populations, whereas only a small variation takes place between populations. No significant correlation was found between the genetic distance and geographical distance. Overall, our results suggest that the geographical distance plays an unimpeded role in the gene flow among O. infernalis populations. PMID:26496789

  3. Two functional types of attachment pads on a single foot in the Namibia bush cricket Acanthoproctus diadematus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Constanze; Henze, Miriam Judith; Nørgaard, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Insects have developed different structures to adhere to surfaces. Most common are smooth and hairy attachment pads, while nubby pads have also been described for representatives of Mantophasmatodea, Phasmida and Plecoptera. Here we report on the unusual combination of nubby and smooth tarsal attachment structures in the !nara cricket Acanthoproctus diadematus. Their three proximal tarsal pads (euplantulae) have a nubby surface, whereas the most distal euplantula is rather smooth with a hexagonal ground pattern resembling that described for the great green bush-cricket Tettigonia viridissima. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on nubby euplantulae in Orthoptera and the co-occurrence of nubby and smooth euplantulae on a single tarsus in a polyneopteran species. When adhering upside down to a horizontal glass plate, A. diadematus attaches its nubby euplantulae less often, compared to situations in which the animal is hanging upright or head down on a vertical plate. We discuss possible reasons for this kind of clinging behaviour, such as morphological constrains, the different role of normal and shear forces in attachment enhancement of the nubby and smooth pads, ease of the detachment process, and adaptations to walking on cylindrical substrates. PMID:26213740

  4. Grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Community Composition in the Rangeland of the Northern Slopes of the Qilian Mountains in Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, T.; Liu, Z. Y.; Qin, L. P.; Long, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In order to describe grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) species composition, diversity, abundance, and density of four rangelands types, we compared the grasshopper community composition and dynamics in the rangeland of the northern slopes of the Qilian Mountains. In total, 55 grasshopper species were collected from 2007 to 2009, representing three families and six subfamilies. The subfamily Oedipodinae was dominant, followed by Gomphocerinae and Catantopinae. Species abundance varied among rangeland types (RTs). The greatest abundance of grasshoppers was found in mountain rangeland, while the lowest abundance of grasshoppers was caught in alpine shrublands. Three species (Chorthippus cf. brunneus (Thunberg) (Acrididae), Chorthippus Dubius (Zubovski), and Gomphocerus licenti (Chang) were broadly distributed in the four RTs and constituted 7.5% of all grasshoppers collected. Ch. dubius was very abundant in desert rangeland and alpine shrubland. Bryodema dolichoptera Yin et Feng Eremippus qilianshanensis Lian and Zheng, and Filchnerella qilianshanensis Xi and Zheng (Pamphagidae) were endemic to the region of the Qilian Mountains. Species similarity between RTs ranged from 17.8 to 51.6 based on the Renkonen index. Similarly, the Sörensen index indicated a wide separation in species composition among RTs. The abundance of the eight most common species showed obvious differences among RTs and years. On average, mountain rangeland had the highest density values in 2007 and 2008, and alpine shrubland supported the smallest density. The densities in desert and mountain rangeland in 2007 were significantly higher than in 2008, while alpine rangeland and shrublands did not present obvious differences among years. PMID:25688084

  5. How many mechanosensory organs in the bushcricket leg? Neuroanatomy of the scolopidial accessory organ in Tettigoniidae (Insecta: Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes; Riesterer, Anja S; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The subgenual organ and associated scolopidial organs are well studied in Orthoptera and related taxa. In some insects, a small accessory organ or Nebenorgan is described posterior to the subgenual organ. In Tettigoniidae (Ensifera), the accessory organ has only been noted in one species though tibial sensory organs are well studied for neuroanatomy and physiology. Here, we use axonal tracing to analyse the posterior subgenual organ innervated by the main motor nerve. Investigating seven species from different groups of Tettigoniidae, we describe a small group of scolopidial sensilla (5-9 sensory neurons) which has features characteristic of the accessory organ: posterior tibial position, innervation by the main leg nerve rather than by the tympanal nerve, orientation of dendrites in proximal or ventro-proximal direction in the leg, and commonly association with a single campaniform sensillum. The neuroanatomy is highly similar between leg pairs. We show differences in the innervation in two species of the genus Poecilimon as compared to the other species. In Poecilimon, the sensilla of the accessory organ are innervated by one nerve branch together with the subgenual organ. The results suggest that the accessory organ is part of the sensory bauplan in the leg of Tettigoniidae and probably Ensifera. PMID:26627978

  6. Grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) community composition in the rangeland of the northern slopes of The Qilian Mountains in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Liu, Z Y; Qin, L P; Long, R J

    2015-01-01

    In order to describe grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) species composition, diversity, abundance, and density of four rangelands types, we compared the grasshopper community composition and dynamics in the rangeland of the northern slopes of the Qilian Mountains. In total, 55 grasshopper species were collected from 2007 to 2009, representing three families and six subfamilies. The subfamily Oedipodinae was dominant, followed by Gomphocerinae and Catantopinae. Species abundance varied among rangeland types (RTs). The greatest abundance of grasshoppers was found in mountain rangeland, while the lowest abundance of grasshoppers was caught in alpine shrublands. Three species (Chorthippus cf. brunneus (Thunberg) (Acrididae), Chorthippus Dubius (Zubovski), and Gomphocerus licenti (Chang) were broadly distributed in the four RTs and constituted 7.5% of all grasshoppers collected. Ch. dubius was very abundant in desert rangeland and alpine shrubland. Bryodema dolichoptera Yin et Feng Eremippus qilianshanensis Lian and Zheng, and Filchnerella qilianshanensis Xi and Zheng (Pamphagidae) were endemic to the region of the Qilian Mountains. Species similarity between RTs ranged from 17.8 to 51.6 based on the Renkonen index. Similarly, the Sörensen index indicated a wide separation in species composition among RTs. The abundance of the eight most common species showed obvious differences among RTs and years. On average, mountain rangeland had the highest density values in 2007 and 2008, and alpine shrubland supported the smallest density. The densities in desert and mountain rangeland in 2007 were significantly higher than in 2008, while alpine rangeland and shrublands did not present obvious differences among years. PMID:25688084

  7. Genetic Variation and Geographic Differentiation Among Populations of the Nonmigratory Agricultural Pest Oedaleus infernalis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Dong, Hui; Gao, Yue-Bo; Su, Qian-Fu; Qian, Hai-Tao; Bai, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Ting; Cong, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The nonmigratory grasshopper Oedaleus infernalis Saussure (Orthoptera : Acridoidea) is an agricultural pest to crops and forage grasses over a wide natural geographical distribution in China. The genetic diversity and genetic variation among 10 geographically separated populations of O. infernalis was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-based molecular markers, including the intersimple sequence repeat and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase sequences. A high level of genetic diversity was detected among these populations from the intersimple sequence repeat (H: 0.2628, I: 0.4129, Hs: 0.2130) and cytochrome oxidase analyses (Hd: 0.653). There was no obvious geographical structure based on an unweighted pair group method analysis and median-joining network. The values of FST, θII, and Gst estimated in this study are low, and the gene flow is high (Nm > 4). Analysis of the molecular variance suggested that most of the genetic variation occurs within populations, whereas only a small variation takes place between populations. No significant correlation was found between the genetic distance and geographical distance. Overall, our results suggest that the geographical distance plays an unimpeded role in the gene flow among O. infernalis populations. PMID:26496789

  8. Forms of Melanoplus bowditchi (Orthoptera: Acrididae) collected from different host plants are indistinguishable genetically and in aedeagal morphology.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Irfan; Mustafa, Fatima; Kneeland, Kate M; Brust, Mathew L; Hoback, W Wyatt; Kamble, Shripat T; Foster, John E

    2014-01-01

    The sagebrush grasshopper, Melanoplus bowditchi Scudder (Orthoptera: Acrididae), is a phytophilous species that is widely distributed in the western United States on sagebrush species. The geographical distribution of M. bowditchi is very similar to the range of its host plants and its feeding association varies in relation to sagebrush distribution. Melanoplus bowditchi bowditchi Scudder and M. bowditchi canus Hebard were described based on their feeding association with different sagebrush species, sand sagebrush and silver sagebrush, respectively. Recently, M. bowditchi have been observed feeding on other plant species in western Nebraska. We collected adult M. bowditchi feeding on four plant species, sand sagebrush, Artemisia filifolia, big sagebrush, A. tridentata, fringed sagebrush, A. frigidus, and winterfat, Krascheninnikovia lanata. We compared the specimens collected from the four plant species for their morphological and genetic differences. We observed no consistent differences among the aedeagal parameres or basal rings among the grasshoppers collected from different host plants. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism markers were used to test the genetic relationships among the grasshoppers. Analysis of Molecular Variance and distance-based Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean dendrogram failed to reveal significant differences. Although the forms showed behavioral and minor color and size differences, the genetic data suggest all forms under study likely interbreed, which indicates they are a single species instead of four species or subspecies. These results indicate that host plant use may influence melanopline phenotype and suggest the need of further genetic analysis of subspecies recognized based on morphology, distribution, and ecology. PMID:24949237

  9. Transcriptional response of two metallothionein genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) and histological changes in Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) exposed to three trace metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Yu, Zhitao; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the transcriptional responses of two metallothionein (MT) genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) in various tissues (brain, optic lobe, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, foregut, gastric caeca, midgut and hindgut) of Oxya chinensis (Thunberg) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) after exposed to the trace metals cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) for 48h. The study revealed that the exposure of O. chinensis to each of the three metals at the median lethal concentration (LC50) or lower concentration(s) up-regulated the transcriptions of both OcMT1 and OCMT2 in the eight tissues except for OcMT1 and OcMT2 with Cd in brain and gastric caeca, respectively, and OcMT2 with Cu in gastric caeca. These results suggested that the exposure of O. chinensis to the metals may enhance MT biosynthesis that protects tissues by binding these metals in various tissues. To examine possible histopathological effect of the metals, we examined the histological changes in the fat bodies after O. chinensis was exposed to each of these metals at LC50. The exposure of Cd significantly reduced the size and number of adipocytes as compared with the control. However, such an effect was not observed in O. chinensis exposed to either Cu or Zn. These results suggested that fat bodies might be either significantly affected by Cd or play a crucial role in detoxification of excessive trace metals. PMID:26159299

  10. Genetic differentiation among populations of Brachytrupes portentosus (Lichtenstein 1796) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in Thailand and the Lao PDR: the Mekong River as a biogeographic barrier.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, C; Saijuntha, W; Pilab, W; Sakdakham, K; Pasorn, P; Thanonkeo, S; Thiha; Satrawaha, R; Petney, T

    2011-12-01

    The Mekong River is known to act as a boundary between a number of terrestrial and freshwater species, including various parasites and their intermediate hosts as well as endangered mammal species. Little information is available, however, on the genetic differentiation between terrestrial invertebrates to the east and the west of this wide river. The genetic diversity among eight natural populations of Brachytrupes portentosus (Lichtenstein, 1796) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) collected from Thailand and the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) were analyzed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The allelic profiles of 20 enzymes encoding 23 loci were analyzed. An average of 41% fixed differences was detected between the populations from Thailand and Lao PDR, which are separated by the Mekong River. The percent fixed differences ranged between 4% and 26% within the populations from Thailand and between 4% and 22% within the populations from Lao PDR. A phenogram shows that the eight populations fell into two major clusters based on the Thai and Lao sampling sites. The genetic distance between the samples within Thailand and within Lao PDR was related to the distances between sampling areas. The genetic variability between populations of this cricket indicates that genetic relationships are influenced by a natural barrier as well as by the geographical distance between these allopatric populations. PMID:21554800

  11. Shrinking wings for ultrasonic pitch production: hyperintense ultra-short-wavelength calls in a new genus of neotropical katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Sarria-S, Fabio A; Morris, Glenn K; Windmill, James F C; Jackson, Joseph; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the discovery of a new genus and three species of predaceous katydid (Insecta: Orthoptera) from Colombia and Ecuador in which males produce the highest frequency ultrasonic calling songs so far recorded from an arthropod. Male katydids sing by rubbing their wings together to attract distant females. Their song frequencies usually range from audio (5 kHz) to low ultrasonic (30 kHz). However, males of Supersonus spp. call females at 115 kHz, 125 kHz, and 150 kHz. Exceeding the human hearing range (50 Hz-20 kHz) by an order of magnitude, these insects also emit their ultrasound at unusually elevated sound pressure levels (SPL). In all three species these calls exceed 110 dB SPL rms re 20 µPa (at 15 cm). Males of Supersonus spp. have unusually reduced forewings (<0.5 mm(2)). Only the right wing radiates appreciable sound, the left bears the file and does not show a particular resonance. In contrast to most katydids, males of Supersonus spp. position and move their wings during sound production so that the concave aspect of the right wing, underlain by the insect dorsum, forms a contained cavity with sharp resonance. The observed high SPL at extreme carrier frequencies can be explained by wing anatomy, a resonant cavity with a membrane, and cuticle deformation. PMID:24901234

  12. Shrinking Wings for Ultrasonic Pitch Production: Hyperintense Ultra-Short-Wavelength Calls in a New Genus of Neotropical Katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sarria-S, Fabio A.; Morris, Glenn K.; Windmill, James F. C.; Jackson, Joseph; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the discovery of a new genus and three species of predaceous katydid (Insecta: Orthoptera) from Colombia and Ecuador in which males produce the highest frequency ultrasonic calling songs so far recorded from an arthropod. Male katydids sing by rubbing their wings together to attract distant females. Their song frequencies usually range from audio (5 kHz) to low ultrasonic (30 kHz). However, males of Supersonus spp. call females at 115 kHz, 125 kHz, and 150 kHz. Exceeding the human hearing range (50 Hz–20 kHz) by an order of magnitude, these insects also emit their ultrasound at unusually elevated sound pressure levels (SPL). In all three species these calls exceed 110 dB SPL rms re 20 µPa (at 15 cm). Males of Supersonus spp. have unusually reduced forewings (<0.5 mm2). Only the right wing radiates appreciable sound, the left bears the file and does not show a particular resonance. In contrast to most katydids, males of Supersonus spp. position and move their wings during sound production so that the concave aspect of the right wing, underlain by the insect dorsum, forms a contained cavity with sharp resonance. The observed high SPL at extreme carrier frequencies can be explained by wing anatomy, a resonant cavity with a membrane, and cuticle deformation. PMID:24901234

  13. Geographic distribution of Gryllotalpa stepposa in south-eastern Europe, with first records for Romania, Hungary and Serbia (Insecta, Orthoptera, Gryllotalpidae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuț Ștefan; Iorgu, Elena Iulia; Puskás, Gellért; Ivković, Slobodan; Borisov, Simeon; Gavril, Viorel Dumitru; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Described from the steppe zones north of the Black Sea, Caucasus, and central Asia, Gryllotalpa stepposa Zhantiev was recently recorded from a few localities in Greece, R. Macedonia, and Bulgaria. In May 2015, several specimens were collected from Ivrinezu Mare in Romania, which suggested a continuous distribution area of the species, stretching from the central Balkans to central Asia. Thus, to reveal its actual range of occurrence, a survey of several Orthoptera collections became mandatory and, as expected, a large number of misidentified specimens of Gryllotalpa stepposa were discovered, providing new data on the species distribution in south-eastern Europe, including also the first records of this mole cricket in Serbia and Hungary. Here a full locality list is presented of this species west of Ukraine and Moldova and the current geographic distribution of the genus Gryllotalpa in the Balkans is revised. A key for distinguishing the mole crickets in south-eastern Europe and a distribution map for this region are presented. PMID:27551213

  14. Understanding the genetic effects of recent habitat fragmentation in the context of evolutionary history: Phylogeography and landscape genetics of a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.; Weissman, D.B.; Fisher, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation due to urbanization are the most pervasive threats to biodiversity in southern California. Loss of habitat and fragmentation can lower migration rates and genetic connectivity among remaining populations of native species, reducing genetic variability and increasing extinction risk. However, it may be difficult to separate the effects of recent anthropogenic fragmentation from the genetic signature of prehistoric fragmentation due to previous natural geological and climatic changes. To address these challenges, we examined the phylogenetic and population genetic structure of a flightless insect endemic to cismontane southern California, Stenopelmatus 'mahogani' (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae). Analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence data suggest that diversification across southern California began during the Pleistocene, with most haplotypes currently restricted to a single population. Patterns of genetic divergence correlate with contemporary urbanization, even after correcting for (geographical information system) GIS-based reconstructions of fragmentation during the Pleistocene. Theoretical simulations confirm that contemporary patterns of genetic structure could be produced by recent urban fragmentation using biologically reasonable assumptions about model parameters. Diversity within populations was positively correlated with current fragment size, but not prehistoric fragment size, suggesting that the effects of increased drift following anthropogenic fragmentation are already being seen. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity can hinder a population's ability to adapt to ecological perturbations commonly associated with urbanization, such as habitat degradation, climatic changes and introduced species. Consequently, our results underscore the importance of preserving and restoring landscape connectivity for long-term persistence of low vagility native species. Journal compilation ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Evidence for diet-driven habitat partitioning of Melanoplinae and Gomphocerinae (Orthoptera: Acrididae) along a vegetation gradient in a western Oklahoma grassland.

    PubMed

    Masloski, Kenneth; Greenwood, Carmen; Reiskind, Michael; Payton, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) are important arthropods in the grassland ecosystem as sources of herbivory, nutrient recycling through frass production, and as prey items for other insects, mammals, and birds. It has been observed in previous research that common Acrididae subfamilies have dietary preferences: many species of Gomphocerinae are specialists on grass plants, many Melanoplinae species are polyphagous forb eaters. We characterized the community of Acrididae along a vegetation gradient in the Beaver River Wildlife Management Area, Beaver County, OK, and tested the hypothesis that these subfamilies would be in greater abundance in areas dominated by their preferred food resource. Vegetation types were characterized into four different functional groups: grass, forb, litter, and bare ground. The proportion of cover of functional groups was found to be correlated with relative abundance of Gomphocerinae and Melanoplinae grasshoppers. Gomphocerinae were in greater abundance in vegetation types consisting of a larger proportion of grass. Melanoplinae were in greater abundance in vegetation types consisting of larger proportions of forb cover. A factor analysis indicated that forb cover and grass cover contributed more than litter and bare ground cover to the relative abundance of these grasshopper subfamilies and it is our conclusion that this is evidence for dietary-based habitat partitioning as observed through subfamilial relative abundance. PMID:25203904

  16. Monograph of the Afrotropical species of Scelio Latreille (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae), egg parasitoids of acridid grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Matthew J.; Valerio, Alejandro A.; Polaszek, Andrew; van Noort, Simon; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Scelio is a cosmopolitan and speciose group of solitary parasitoids of the eggs of short-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae). A number of these hosts are important pests, including plague locusts of the genus Schistocerca. Species of Scelio are recognized as potentially important biological control agents, but this possibility has yet to be fully realized, in part because the species-level taxonomy is still incompletely developed. The species of the pulchripennis group have been recently revised. As a continuation of this effort, here we revise the Afrotropical species of Scelio, excluding the pulchripennis species group. Sixty two (62) species are treated, 48 of which are new. Species are classified into the following species groups: ernstii (12 species, 9 new), howardi (23 species, 19 new), ipomeae (6 species, 5 new), irwini (4 species, 3 new), simoni (3 new species) and walkeri (12 species, 9 new). Keys to species groups and to the species within each group are provided. New species described are: S. albatus Yoder, sp. n., S. aphares Yoder, sp. n., S. apospastos Yoder, sp. n., S. ardelio Yoder, sp. n., S. aurantium Yoder, sp. n., S. balo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. bayanga Yoder, sp. n., S. bubulo Yoder, sp. n., S. cano Yoder, sp. n., S. clypeatus Yoder, sp. n., S. concavus Yoder, sp. n., S. copelandi Yoder, sp. n., S. crepo Yoder, sp. n., S. destico Yoder, sp. n., S. dupondi Yoder, sp. n., S. effervesco Yoder, sp. n., S. erugatus Yoder, sp. n., S. exophthalmus Yoder, sp. n., S. fremo Valerio & Yoder, sp. n., S. gemo Yoder, sp. n., S. grunnio Yoder, sp. n., S. harinhalai Yoder, sp. n., S. igland Yoder, sp. n., S. impostor Yoder, sp. n., S. irwini Yoder, sp. n., S. janseni Yoder, sp. n., S. latro Yoder, sp. n., S. memorabilis Yoder, sp. n., S. modulus Yoder, sp. n., S. mutio Yoder, sp. n., S. ntchisii Yoder, sp. n., S. parkeri Yoder, sp. n., S. phaeoprora Yoder, sp. n., S. pilosilatus Yoder, sp. n., S. pipilo Yoder, sp. n., S

  17. The level of DNA damage in adult grasshoppers Chorthippus biguttulus (Orthoptera, Acrididae) following dimethoate exposure is dependent on the insects' habitat.

    PubMed

    Karpeta-Kaczmarek, Julia; Kubok, Magdalena; Dziewięcka, Marta; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Augustyniak, Maria

    2016-08-01

    The comet assay was used to study the DNA damage that was induced by dimethoate in the hemocyte cells of adult Chorthippus biguttulus grasshoppers (Insecta: Orthoptera) that originated from two sites with varying levels of pollution. The primary focus of the study was to examine whether continuous exposure to environmental stress can modify the effect of pesticides on genome stability. After three days of acclimation to laboratory conditions, the level of DNA damage in the hemocytes of Bow-winged grasshoppers was within a similar range in the insects from both areas. However, the level of DNA damage following dimethoate treatment was significantly higher in the insects from the reference area (Pogoria) than in the individuals from the heavily polluted location (Szopienice). Four hours after pesticide treatment, the Tail DNA (TDNA) in the hemocytes of the male and female specimens from Pogoria was as high as 75% and 50% respectively, whereas the values in males and females from Szopienice only reached 30% and 20%, respectively. A rapid decrease in DNA damage was observed in both populations 24 h after the pesticide application. The habitat of an insect (site), the administration of the dimethoate (treatment), and the period following the application of the pesticide (time), all significantly influenced the levels of DNA damage. No interactions related to TDNA were observed between the variables 'sex' and 'treatment'. Similarly, the variable 'sex', when analyzed alongside 'treatment' and 'site' (the area from which the insects were collected), or 'treatment' and 'time' had no influence on TL. Exposure to dimethoate undoubtedly contributed to the formation of DNA damage in the hemocytes of adult C. biguttulus. However, the level of damage was clearly dependent on the place where the insects were captured. PMID:27213568

  18. New species of Anisophya Karabag from Chile (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phanopterinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many of the most primitive Neotropical bush katydids (Phaneropterinae) — including species of Cosmophyllum Blanchard, Stenophylla Brunner von Wattenwyl, Marenestha Brunner von Wattenwyl, Anisophya Karabag, Coryphoda Brunner von Wattenwyl, and Burgilis Stål — are endemic in Chile. The Chilean species...

  19. Review of the genus Apotrechus in China (Orthoptera, Gryllacrididae, Gryllacridinae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miao-Miao; Liu, Xian-Wei; Li, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the present paper, the genus Apotrechus Brunner-Wattenwyl, 1888 is revised. Two new species from China are described and illustrated: Apotrechus quadratus sp. n. and Apotrechus truncatolobus sp. n.. A new key and the distributional data are given. PMID:25709533

  20. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bugrov, Alexander G.; Jetybayev, Ilyas E.; Karagyan, Gayane H.; Rubtsov, Nicolay B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in the Pamphagidae species studied make the family a very promising and useful model for studying sex chromosome evolution. PMID:27186337

  1. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae).

    PubMed

    Bugrov, Alexander G; Jetybayev, Ilyas E; Karagyan, Gayane H; Rubtsov, Nicolay B

    2016-01-01

    Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in the Pamphagidae species studied make the family a very promising and useful model for studying sex chromosome evolution. PMID:27186337

  2. Taxonomic Study of the Genus Apalacris Walker (Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z M; Lin, L L; Niu, Y

    2016-02-01

    The research history of the genus Apalacris is reviewed; a key to all known species of the genus is given, and one new species, Apalacris eminifronta n. sp., and one new combination, Apalacris maculifemura (Lin & Zheng), are described. The new species is very closely related to Apalacris antennata Liang, but differs in the following characters: (1) tegmen longer, reaching apex of hind femur; (2) basal part of inner side of hind femur orange red; (3) frontal ridge more protruded, obviously depressed under median ocellus in lateral view; and (4) epiphallus bridge prominent, ancora shorter than anterior projection. PMID:26514365

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bryodema miramae (Orthoptera: Oedipodidae).

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing; Liu, Nian; Zhou, Fei; Huang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    The complete circular mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Bryodema miramae is 15,919 bp in length, containing 37 typical genes and 1 non-coding AT-rich region. The AT content of the AT-rich region is 84.7%. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with standard ATN initiation codon and end with complete termination codons TAG or TAA except for cox1 gene using an incomplete stop codon T. tRNA genes are predicted with a characteristic cloverleaf secondary structure except for trnS(AGN), whose dihydrouridine (DHU) arm is replaced by a simple loop. The lengths of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1319 and 836 bp, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis found: (i) Bryodema miramae has a close relationship with Bryodema luctuosum luctuosum, but with low credibility, the bootstrap value was under 50% and (ii) the Bryodema clade forms a sister group with another clade containing Orinhippus tibetanus and Pacris xizangensis. PMID:26024137

  4. Notes on southern Africa Jerusalem crickets (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Sia).

    PubMed

    Weissman, David B; Bazelet, Corinna S

    2013-01-01

    The Old World Jerusalem cricket (JC) subfamily Siinae contains one genus, Sia, with two subgenera: Sia (Sia) with two fully winged species from southeast Asia, and Sia (Maxentius) with four wingless species from southern Africa. Because there is a dearth of published data about the behavior and biology of these insects, we present new field and laboratory research on southern African Sia (Maxentius), gather museum and literature information, and present guidelines for collecting and rearing specimens. While we make no taxonomic decisions, this review should be useful for future studies, including a needed taxonomic revision. We also compare results from these southern African JCs with recent investigations on related New World taxa, where fascinating biological traits and extensive cryptic biodiversity have been uncovered. DNA analysis reveals that these Old and New World JCs are polyphyletic. PMID:24758791

  5. Revision of the genus Prionotropis Fieber, 1853 (Orthoptera: Pamphagidae: Thrinchinae).

    PubMed

    Massa, Bruno; Ünal, Mustafa; Lo Verde, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The genus Prionotropis Fieber, 1853 is revised. It is distributed in scattered areas of the Mediterranean region from Turkey in the East to Spain in the West. Overall, seven species are listed, namely P. maculinervis (Stål, 1878) (Turkey; P. urfensis Ramme, 1933 is here considered its synonym), P. willemsorum n. sp. (Greece, Epirus; previously considered P. appula), P. appula (O.G. Costa, 1836) (South Italy), P. hystrix (Germar, 1817) (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Croatia, North-East Italy; P. hystrix sontiaca is here synonymized), P. rhodanica Uvarov, 1923 resurrected status (France, Crau, Rhone delta; here considered a valid species), P. azami Uvarov, 1923 n. status (France, Var region; here considered a valid species), and P. flexuosa (Serville, 1838) (Spain; the ssp. pereezi Bolívar, 1921 and sulphurans Bolívar, 1921 are here considered its synonyms). A key to species is presented. PMID:26701575

  6. Jumping mechanisms and performance of pygmy mole crickets (Orthoptera, Tridactylidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, M; Picker, M D

    2010-07-15

    Pygmy mole crickets live in burrows at the edge of water and jump powerfully to avoid predators such as the larvae and adults of tiger beetles that inhabit the same microhabitat. Adults are 5-6 mm long and weigh 8 mg. The hind legs are dominated by enormous femora containing the jumping muscles and are 131% longer than the body. The ratio of leg lengths is: 1:2.1:4.5 (front:middle:hind, respectively). The hind tarsi are reduced and their role is supplanted by two pairs of tibial spurs that can rotate through 180 deg. During horizontal walking the hind legs are normally held off the ground. Jumps are propelled by extension of the hind tibiae about the femora at angular velocities of 68,000 deg s(-1) in 2.2 ms, as revealed by images captured at rates of 5000 s(-1). The two hind legs usually move together but can move asynchronously, and many jumps are propelled by just one hind leg. The take-off angle is steep and once airborne the body rotates backwards about its transverse axis (pitch) at rates of 100 Hz or higher. The take-off velocity, used to define the best jumps, can reach 5.4 m s(-1), propelling the insect to heights of 700 mm and distances of 1420 mm with an acceleration of 306 g. The head and pronotum are jerked rapidly as the body is accelerated. Jumping on average uses 116 microJ of energy, requires a power output of 50 mW and exerts a force of 20 mN. In jumps powered by one hind leg the figures are about 40% less. PMID:20581268

  7. Mechanical Vectors Enhance Fungal Entomopathogen Reduction of the Grasshopper Pest Camnula pellucida (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Kistner, Erica J; Saums, Marielle; Belovsky, Gary E

    2015-02-01

    Mounting scientific evidence indicates that pathogens can regulate insect populations. However, limited dispersal and sensitivity to abiotic conditions often restricts pathogen regulation of host populations. While it is well established that arthropod biological vectors increase pathogen incidence in host populations, few studies have examined whether arthropod mechanical vectors (an organism that transmits pathogens but is not essential to the life cycle of the pathogen) influence host-pathogen dynamics. The importance of mechanical dispersal by ant scavengers, Formica fusca (L.), in a grasshopper-fungal entomopathogen system was investigated. We examined the ability of ants to mechanically disperse and transmit the pathogen, Entomophaga grylli (Fresenius) pathotype 1, to its host, the pest grasshopper Camnula pellucida (Scudder), in a series of laboratory experiments. Fungal spores were dispersed either externally on the ant's body surface or internally through fecal deposition. In addition, a third of all grasshoppers housed with fungal-inoculated ants became infected, indicating that ants can act as mechanical vectors of E. grylli. The effect of ant mechanical vectors on E. grylli incidence was also examined in a field experiment. Ant access to pathogen-exposed experimental grasshopper populations was restricted using organic ant repellent, thereby allowing us to directly compare mechanical and natural transmission. Ants increased grasshopper pathogen mortality by 58%, which led to greater pathogen reductions of grasshopper survival than natural transmission. Taken together, our results indicate that ants enhance E. grylli reduction of grasshopper pest numbers. Therefore, mechanical transmission of pathogens may be an important overlooking component of this grasshopper-fungal pathogen system. PMID:26308817

  8. Synonymies of wasp-mimicking species within the katydid genus Aganacris (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five neotropical wasp-mimicking species of the genus Aganacris—two known from females only and three from males only—are reviewed. Based on observations of interspecific interactions and morphological comparisons, sexual dimorphism is shown to occur within species, and that female species are consp...

  9. A new species of Platydecticus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Tettigoniinae; Nedubini) from the Andes of Chile.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alejandro Vera

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the genus Platydecticus is described based on adult male and female specimens and the egg. The new species, Platydecticus diaguita, inhabits the Andes Range at 27º S latitude, above 3000 m elevation. Both sexes are easily identifiable by genital morphology characters and by the external characters of the fastigium of the vertex and the reduced number of spines in the hind tibia. It is also the smallest species described for the genus. PMID:26624664

  10. Oviposition site selection by the grasshoppers Melanoplus borealis and M. sanguinipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female grasshoppers can affect the fitness of their offspring through their selection of oviposition sites. Successful embryological development depends on suitable temperature and moisture levels, factors which may vary considerably on a fine scale in natural environments where grasshoppers occur. ...

  11. Drought Impacts on Competition in Phoetaliotes nebrascensis (Orthoptera Acrididae) in a Northern Mixed Grassland.

    PubMed

    Branson, David H

    2016-04-01

    Global climate change is predicted to significantly modify patterns of precipitation, making it critical to develop a better understanding of how this will modify biotic interactions. Short-term to decadal-scale weather patterns can impact grasshopper population dynamics, but drought impacts on grasshoppers have rarely been studied in manipulative experiments. A cage experiment was conducted in eastern Montana to examine the impact of intra- and interspecific competition and precipitation manipulation treatments on performance of a common melanopline grasshopper Phoetaliotes nebrascensis (Thomas). High-density and drought treatments had similarly strong negative impacts on food availability. Proportional grasshopper survival did not differ significantly by treatment, but density dependence was evident in both body size and reproductive traits. The impact of precipitation and density treatments on grasshopper body size and reproduction were typically similar in magnitude and much larger than interspecific competition, with the exception of male femur length. Even with high late summer precipitation, drought had strong effects on individual body size and future reproduction. This study provides valuable information on population dynamics of an abundant grasshopper, with moderate precipitation reductions negatively affecting reproduction and body size. No positive impacts of drought as predicted by the plant stress hypothesis were observed. The study reinforces the need to examine drought manipulations to better predict grasshopper population changes due to changing climate conditions. PMID:26744453

  12. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Acridoidea (Orthoptera: Caelifera) based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit sequences.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lijun; Shi, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yulong; Li, Xinjiang; Yin, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Acridoidea were examined using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit sequences (COI, COII and COIII, total 2970bp). Fourteen grasshopper species of thirteen genera from seven families were sequenced to obtain mitochondrial genes data, along with twenty-two grasshopper species were obtained from the GenBank nucleotide database. The purpose of this study is to infer the phylogenetic relationships among families within Acridoidea and testing the monophyly of Acridoidea and each families of it. Phylogenic trees were reconstructed using Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) methods with Tettigonioidea and Gryllotalpoidea as outgroups. The putative initiation codon for COI is CCG in thirteen studied species and ATC in Bryodema luctuosum luctuosum. The 2970 bp concatenated sequences included 1431 conserved sites, 1539 variable sites, and 1216 parsimony-informative sites, the nucleotide compositions were significantly biased toward A and T (68.8%). The resulted phylogenetic trees supported the monophyly of Acridoidea, but did not entirely agree with the traditional morphology-based taxonomic system of grasshoppers within Acridoidea. The monophyly of three families of Acrididae, Catantopidae and Arcypteridae were not supported; Gomphoceridae and Arcypteridae were recovered together as a monophyletic group because of closer phylogenetic relationships; Pyrgomorphidae and Chrotogonidae have the same closer relationships; Pneumoridae, Pyrgomorphidae and Chrotogonidae were the most basal groups; while the taxonomic status of Pamphagidae, which was revealed as a monophyletic group, was not clear in this analysis. Moreover, the results indicate that a phylogeny inferred from the combination of several genes is more reliable than that from only a single gene sequence, and the third codon positions of protein coding genes can improve the topology and node supports of the phylogenetic trees. PMID:26624048

  13. [Biomass of Cornops aquaticum (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in wetlands of Northeast Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Luciana Irene; Celeste Franceschini, María; Guadalupe Poi, Alicia Susana; Laura de Wysiecki, María

    2015-03-01

    The estimation of biomass in insect populations is a key factor to quantify the available resources and energy fluxes in ecosystems food webs. Cornops aquaticum is a common herbivore in Eichhornia plants in wetlands of Northeast Argentina. We aimed to analyse its biomass variation, related to the different grasshopper age categories populations in two host-plants: Eichhornia azurea and Eichhornia crassipes. For this, standard samplings of C. aquaticum populations were carried out with an entomological net of 70 cm diameter in two wetlands with E. azurea and E. crassipes, in Corrientes and Chaco Provinces; besides, dry weight was also obtained (directly and indirectly), and a regression model to indirectly estimate the biomass from a linear dimension measure (hind femur length) is proposed. A total of 2307 individuals were collected and separated in different age categories; their abundance and linear dimension data were obtained. The model proposed was InDM=lna+b*lnH (where DM=dry mass, a and b are constants and H=hind femur length) (R2 = 0.97). The population biomass variations of C. aquaticum were due to the relative abundance of each age category and the grasshopper individual dry weight. No significant differences were found between populations biomasses obtained by direct and indirect methods in E. azurea and E. crassipes floating meadows. This model made easier the C. aquaticum biomass calculation for both individuals and the population, and accelerated the processing of high number of samples. Finally, high biomass values of populations and individual age category (especially in adults) emphasize the importance of C. aquaticum as a consumer and a resource for predators on Eichhornia floating meadows food webs. PMID:26299119

  14. DNA barcoding reveals polymorphism in the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix bolivari (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Lin, Li-Liang; Zheng, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many pygmy grasshopper species exhibit colour-marking polymorphism. However, this polymorphism in some species, such as Tetrix bolivari, is almost unknown. The aim of this work is to identify using DNA barcoding the colour-marking polymorphic morphs of this pygmy grasshopper species collected from both grass and sand microhabitats. Analysis by NJ clustering and pairwise distances indicated that all specimens collected showing colour-marking polymorphism are species of Tetrix bolivari. Haplotype network construction showed ten different haplotypes from a total of 57 Tetrix bolivari individuals with H1(82.5%) being the most common type and it also displayed low divergence within Tetrix bolivari population. The haplotype analyses were consistent with the NJ clustering. Our field census showed the frequency of Tetrix bolivari morphs differed significantly, with the rank order of morphs (from high to low) typeA1, type B1, type A2, type A3, type A4, type A5, type A6, type A7, type B2, type B3, and type B4. The most common type A morphs were without contrasting markings, while the rarer type B morphs have contrasting white markings. We suggest that type B morphs have greater camouflage effects against natural backgrounds such as grass or sand than type A morphs. Both our field census and haplotype analysis revealed that type A has higher frequency and more haplotypes than type B. PMID:27199587

  15. Taxonomic and Functional Resilience of Grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Caelifera) to Fire in South Brazilian Grasslands.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, C P R; Podgaiski, L R; Costa, M K M; Mendonça, M D S

    2016-08-01

    Fire is a frequent disturbance in grassland ecosystems enabling variability in habitat characteristics and creating important environmental filters for community assembly. Changes in vegetation have a large influence on herbivore insect assemblages. Here, we explored the responses of grasshoppers to disturbance by fire in grasslands of southern Brazil through a small-scale experiment based in paired control and burned plots. The resilience of grasshoppers was assessed by monitoring changes to their abundance, taxonomic, and functional parameters along time. Burned patches have been already recolonized by grasshoppers 1 month after fire and did not differ in terms of abundance and richness from control areas in any evaluated time within 1 year. Simpson diversity decreased 1 month after fire due to the increased dominance of Dichroplus misionensis (Carbonell) and Orphulella punctata (De Geer). In this period, grasshoppers presented in average a smaller body and a larger relative head size; these are typically nymph characteristics, which are possibly indicating a preference of juveniles for the young high-quality vegetation, or a diminished vulnerability to predation in open areas. Further, at 6 months after fire grasshoppers with smaller relative hind femur and thus lower dispersal ability seemed to be benefitted in burned patches. Finally, 1 year after fire grasshoppers became more similar to each other in relation to their set of traits. This study demonstrates how taxonomic and functional aspects of grasshopper assemblages can be complementary tools to understand their responses to environmental change. PMID:26957086

  16. Influence of individual body size on reproductive traits in Melanopline grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body size is a fundamental trait of an organism, affecting most aspects of its performance, including reproduction. Numerous biotic and environmental factors can influence individual body size and reproduction in grasshoppers. Using data from four experiments, I examined intraspecific relationships ...

  17. Characterization of cellulolytic activity from digestive fluids of Dissosteira carolina (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous screening of head-derived and gut fluid extracts of Carolina grasshoppers, Dissosteira carolina (L.), revealed relatively high activity against cellulase substrates when compared to other insect groups. In this work we report on the characterization and identification of enzymes involved i...

  18. Populations of the northern grasshopper, Melanoplus borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae), in Alaska are rarely food limited

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasshoppers can cause substantial losses to forage on rangelands and pastures and to field crops, but chemical control of grasshopper pests is rarely justified because of the low per-area value of forages, the extensive areas needed to be treated to protect crops, and because of potential impacts t...

  19. Phenotypic Variation and Sexual Size Dimorphism in Dichroplus elongatus (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Rosetti, N; Remis, M I

    2015-08-01

    Patterns of body size evolution are of particular interest because body size can affect virtually all the physiological and life history traits of an organism. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD), a difference in body size between males and females, is a widespread phenomenon in insects. Much of the variation in SSD is genetically based and likely due to differential selection acting on males and females. The importance of environmental variables and evolutionary processes affecting phenotypeic variation in both sexes may be useful to gain insights into insect ecology and evolution. Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos is a South American grasshopper widely distributed throughout Argentina, Uruguay, most of Chile, and southern Brazil. In this study, we analyzed 122 adult females of D. elongatus collected in eight natural populations from central-east Argentina. Females show large body size variation among the analyzed populations and this variation exhibits a strong relationship with fecundity. Our results have shown that larger females were more fecund than smaller ones. We found that ovariole number varied along a latitudinal gradient, with higher ovariole numbers in populations from warmer locations. A considerable female-biased SSD was detected. SSD for three analyzed morphometric traits scaled isometrically. However, SSD for thorax length displayed a considerable variation across the studied area, indicating a larger relative increase in female size than in male size in warmer environmental conditions. PMID:26314070

  20. Three new species of the genus Conophyma Zubovsky, 1898 (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Catantopidae, Conophyminae) from Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Long; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Dao-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of the genus Conophyma Zobovsky, 1898 from Xinjiang, West China are described in this paper. The Conophyma xiai sp. nov. is similar to C. olive Huang, 2006, but differs from latter by: vertical diameter of eyes 1.7 times subocular furrow, minimum width of interspace of mesosternum 1.6 times length, hind tibia yellow and furculae smaller. The new species Conophyma nigrifemora sp. nov. is similar to C. xiai sp. nov., but differs from latter by: vertex of head longer, apex narrower; posterior margin of pronotum straight; minimum width 1.6 times its length in interspace of mesosternum; posterior margin of epiproct with curve projection in the middle; epiphallus almost straight on the lower margin, The new species Conophyma hejinensis sp. nov. is similar to C. rufitibia Li & Ti, 1995, but differs from latter by: anterior and posterior margin of pronotum excised in the middle, minimum width of interspace of mesosternum 1.2 times length, hind tibia yellow and posterior margin of epiproct straight, with acute projection in the middle. Type specimens are deposited in the Natural Museum of Hebei University, Baoding, Hebei, China. PMID:26624643

  1. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Urbán, Salomón; Song, Hojun; Oyama, Ken; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Serrano-Meneses, Martin A; Cueva Del Castillo, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group. PMID:26684616

  2. Embryonic development rates of northern grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae): implications for climate change and habitat management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature-dependent rates of embryonic development are a primary determinant of the life cycle of many species of grasshoppers which, in cold climates, spend two winters in the egg stage. Knowledge of embryonic developmental rates is important for an assessment of the effects of climate change and...

  3. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea)

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  4. Oxya hyla hyla (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Alternative Protein Source for Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mousumi; Mandal, Suman Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient composition of the grasshoppers Oxya hyla hyla showed that they are a rich nutrient source containing 687.7 g protein/kg of dry body weight. Their antinutrient values fell within nutritionally acceptable values of the poultry bird Coturnix japonica japonica (Japanese quail). The most required essential amino acids and fatty acids were also present in sufficient amount. For feeding trial nine diets were formulated on an equal crude protein (230 g/kg) basis with grasshopper meal, fish meal, and soybean meal. Three sets of diets with grasshopper meal were prepared with 50 g/kg, 100 g/kg, and 150 g/kg grasshopper of total feed. Similarly, other diet sets were prepared with fish meal and also with soybean meal. Results were compared with another group of Japanese quails fed on a reference diet that was considered as control. Two experiments were conducted with a total number of 600, seven-day-old, Japanese quails. In experiment 1 for determination of growth performance, quails were randomly distributed into ten groups of males and ten groups of females containing 30 birds each. In experiment 2 for determination of laying performance, identical ten groups were prepared in ten repetitions (2 females and 1 male in each group) from the six-week-old birds of experiment 1. Birds of diet set GM2 have gained the highest body weight (male 4.04 g/bird/day; female 5.01 g/bird/day) followed by birds of FM3 diet set (male 3.72 g/bird/day; female 4.40 g/bird/day), whereas birds of reference diet have gained 3.05 g/bird/day for male and 3.23 g/bird/day for female. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) of birds fed with GM2 was the lowest (male 3.33; female 2.97) whereas FCR of R group was higher (male 4.37; female 4.65) than grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. Hen day production percentage was higher (72.2) in GM2 group, followed by FM3 (63.5) group. R group had lower 1st egg weight (9.0 g), weight gain (8.2 g), percentage of hen day production (41.8%), higher feed intake (33.6 g/day/bird), and age at 1st laid egg than the grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. So growth and laying performance of the birds were significantly better in grasshopper meal and fish meal added diet fed sets than the reference diet fed group; among all the dietary groups 100 g/kg grasshopper meal added diet mostly gave significantly better results followed by 150 g/kg fish meal added diets. It was ascertained that the O. hyla hyla meal had pronounced positive response on the birds. So, the quails could be easily fed 100 g/kg grasshopper meal added diet as it was the most suitable alternative feedstuff compared to the conventional protein source based diets. PMID:27355015

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Spathosternum prasiniferum sinense Uvarov, 1931 (Orthoptera: Acridoidea: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Huang, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitogenome of Spathosternum prasiniferum sinense was sequenced and annotated in this work. It is 15,591 bp in size and contains 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes, meanwhile, A + T content is high as 74.1%. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) use standard ATN initiation codons. Twelve PCGs utilize complete termination codons TAG or TAA, except for DN5 gene uses an incomplete stop codon TA. tRNA genes were predicted with a characteristic cloverleaf secondary structure except trnS(AGN). The sizes of the lrRNA and srRNA genes are 1315 and 788 bp, respectively. The AT content of the A + T-rich region is 86.5%. PMID:25329291

  6. Divergent egg physiologies in two closely related grasshopper species: Taeniopoda eques versus Romalea microptera (Orthoptera: Romaleidae).

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Timothy W; Hatle, John D; Whitman, Douglas W

    2011-02-01

    We compared egg survivorship and egg development time at different soil moistures for two closely related grasshopper species from divergent habitats: marsh-inhabiting Romalea microptera (Beauvois) versus desert-inhabiting Taeniopoda eques (Burmeister). These two species can interbreed and produce viable offspring. In nature, both species have a similar 8-9 mo subterranean egg stage, but their soil environments differ dramatically in water content. We predicted that the eggs of the two species would exhibit differential survivorship and development times under different moisture levels. Our laboratory results show that the eggs of both species survived a wide range of soil moistures (≈ 0.5 to 90%), maintained for 3 mo. However, the eggs of the marsh grasshopper, R. microptera, better tolerated the highest soil moistures (95 and 100%), whereas the eggs of the desert species, T. eques, better tolerated the lowest soil moistures (0.0 and 0.1%). Sixty-five percent of marsh-inhabiting R. microptera eggs, but no desert T. eques eggs, survived 3 mo submersion under water. In contrast, 49% of desert T. eques eggs, but only 3.5% of R. microptera eggs, survived after being laid into oven-dried sand and then maintained with no additional water until hatch. In the laboratory at 26 °C, the two species differed significantly in the mean length of the oviposition-to-hatch interval: 176 d for R. microptera versus 237 d for T. eques. These divergent traits presumably benefit these insects in their divergent habitats. Our results suggest the evolution of physiological divergence that is consistent with adaptations to local environments. PMID:22182625

  7. Neuronal correlates of a preference for leading signals in the synchronizing bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, M. E.; Römer, H.; Hashim, R.; Hartbauer, M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Acoustically interacting males of the tropical katydid Mecopoda elongata synchronize their chirps imperfectly, so that one male calls consistently earlier in time than the other. In choice situations, females prefer the leader signal, and it has been suggested that a neuronal mechanism based on directional hearing may be responsible for the asymmetric, stronger representation of the leader signal in receivers. Here, we investigated the potential mechanism in a pair of interneurons (TN1 neuron) of the afferent auditory pathway, known for its contralateral inhibitory input in directional hearing. In this interneuron, conspecific signals are reliably encoded under natural conditions, despite high background noise levels. Unilateral presentations of a conspecific chirp elicited a TN1 response where each suprathreshold syllable in the chirp was reliably copied in a phase-locked fashion. Two identical chirps broadcast with a 180 deg spatial separation resulted in a strong suppression of the response to the follower signal, when the time delay was 20 ms or more. Muting the ear on the leader side fully restored the response to the follower signal compared with unilateral controls. Time–intensity trading experiments, in which the disadvantage of the follower signal was traded against higher sound pressure levels, demonstrated the dominating influence of signal timing on the TN1 response, and this was especially pronounced at higher sound levels of the leader. These results support the hypothesis that the female preference for leader signals in M. elongata is the outcome of a sensory mechanism that originally evolved for directional hearing. PMID:22071183

  8. Evolution of Novel Signal Traits in the Absence of Female Preferences in Neoconocephalus Katydids (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Sarah L.; Schul, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Background Significance Communication signals that function to bring together the sexes are important for maintaining reproductive isolation in many taxa. Changes in male calls are often attributed to sexual selection, in which female preferences initiate signal divergence. Natural selection can also influence signal traits if calls attract predators or parasitoids, or if calling is energetically costly. Neutral evolution is often neglected in the context of acoustic communication. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a signal trait that appears to have evolved in the absence of either sexual or natural selection. In the katydid genus Neoconocephalus, calls with a derived pattern in which pulses are grouped into pairs have evolved five times independently. We have previously shown that in three of these species, females require the double pulse pattern for call recognition, and hence the recognition system of the females is also in a derived state. Here we describe the remaining two species and find that although males produce the derived call pattern, females use the ancestral recognition mechanism in which no pulse pattern is required. Females respond equally well to the single and double pulse calls, indicating that the derived trait is selectively neutral in the context of mate recognition. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that 1) neutral changes in signal traits could be important in the diversification of communication systems, and 2) males rather than females may be responsible for initiating signal divergence. PMID:20805980

  9. Mechanisms for synchrony and alternation in song interactions of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Kratzer, Silvia; Steiner, Klaus; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Males of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata synchronise or alternate their chirps with their neighbours in an aggregation. Since synchrony is imperfect, leader and follower chirps are established in song interactions; females prefer leader chirps in phonotactic trials. Using playback experiments and simulations of song oscillator interactions, we investigate the mechanisms that result in synchrony and alternation, and the probability for the leader role in synchrony. A major predictor for the leader role of a male is its intrinsic chirp period, which varies in a population from 1.6 to 2.3 s. Faster singing males establish the leader role more often than males with longer chirp periods. The phase-response curve (PRC) of the song oscillators differs to other rhythmically calling or flashing insects, in that only the disturbed cycle is influenced in duration by a stimulus. This results in sustained leader or follower chirps of one male, when the intrinsic chirp periods of two males differ by 150 ms or more. By contrast, the individual shape of the male’s PRC has only little influence on the outcome of chirp interactions. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of synchrony in this species are discussed. PMID:15614532

  10. New species of Microcentrum Scudder, 1862 (Orthoptera: Tettigonioidea:
    Phaneropteridae) from Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Da Silva Sovano, Rafael S; Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J

    2015-01-01

    A regional study is performed for the Amazonian species of the genus Microcentrum Scudder, 1862, its proposed Microcentrum punctifrons Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1891 as nomen dubium n. stat. and two new species are described: Microcentrum amacayacu Cadena-Casteñada, Sovano n. sp. and Microcentrum xavieri Sovano, Cadena-Casteñada n. sp. the Colombian and Brazilian Amazon, respectively. A list and a key to the Amazonian species are also provided, along with a discussion on their distribution, according to endemism areas established to Amazon rainforest. PMID:25947488

  11. Taxonomic, bioacoustic and faunistic data on a collection of Tettigonioidea from Eastern Congo (Insecta: Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Hemp, Claudia; Liu, Chunxiang; Volleth, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    During a 14-day excursion in March 1990, 28 species of tettigonioids were found at Irangi (1º54'S, 28º27'E), ca.100 km north west of Bukavu at Lake Kivu (Democratic Republic of the Congo, formerly Zaire), and at other localities near Bukavu. One species -Arantia (Arantia) gracilicercata Heller sp. n. - is new to science, another one-Pantecphyllus helleri Schmidt et al. 2004-was already described as new in a generic revision. All our specimens of the morphologically quite diverse and sexually dimorphic phaneropterine genus Arantia were studied using molecular methods. We propose a new subgenus Arantia (Euarantia) Heller subgen. n. based on relative tegmen width. Songs and stridulatory organs were studied in 9 species. Two phaneropterines, Horatosphaga leggei and Pardalota asymmetrica, showed remarkable calling songs lasting more than 10 s and produced by quite complicated stridulatory movements. The song of the large phaneropterine Zeuneria biramosa is noteworthy because of its unusually low carrier frequency of 3.7 kHz. Based on the examination of other specimens and species, some taxonomic changes are proposed (Phaneropteridae Burmeister, 1838 stat. rev.; Afromecopoda monroviana (Karsch, 1886) stat. rev.; Leproscirtus ebneri Karny, 1919, syn. n., Leproscirtus karschi Karny, 1919, syn. n., Leproscirtus granulosus aptera Karny, 1919, syn. n., all synonyms of Leproscirtus granulosus (Karsch, 1886); Lanistoides Sjöstedt, 1913 stat. rev.; Plastocorypha cabrai Griffini, 1909 stat. n.). PMID:24872232

  12. Additions to the reported Elimaea species (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae: Phaneropterinae) from India.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Mal, Jhabar; Swaminathan, R

    2014-01-01

    The genus Elimaea (Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) has reportedly been represented in India by eight species. Four species in addition to the existing checklist are described, which were earlier reported from the Malay Peninsula, based on the teeth on stridulatory file (on the underside of male left tegmen) and modifications of the gonangulum of the ovipositor. The morphometric variations in the reported species have been given, which include E. securigera, E. subcarinata, E. thaii, E. chloris, E. nautica and E. subcarinata sp. nov. (that differs from E. subcarinata).  PMID:25283289

  13. Extent and divergence of heteroplasmy of the DNA barcoding region in Anapodisma miramae (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Ah Rang; Kim, Min Jee; Park, In Ah; Kim, Kee Young; Kim, Iksoo

    2016-09-01

    A partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is widely used as a molecular marker for species identification in animals, also termed a DNA barcode. However, the presence of more than one sequence type in a single individual, also known as heteroplasmy, is one of the shortcomings of barcode identification. In this study, we examined the extent and divergence of COI heteroplasmy, including nuclear-encoded mitochondrial pseudogenes (NUMTs), at the genomic-DNA level from 13 insect species including orthopteran Anapodisma miramae, and a long fragment of mitochondrial DNA and cDNA from A. miramae as templates. When multiple numbers of clones originated from genomic DNA were sequenced, heteroplasmy was prevalent in all species and NUMTs were observed in five species. Long fragment DNA (∼13.5 kb) also is a source of heteroplasmic amplification, but the divergent haplotypes and NUMTs obtained from genomic DNA were not detected in A. miramae. On the other hand, cDNA was relatively heteroplasmy-free. Consistently, one dominant haplotype was always obtained from the genomic DNA-origin clones in all species and also from the long fragment- and cDNA-origin clones in the two tested individuals of A. miramae. Furthermore, the dominant haplotype was identical in sequence, regardless of the DNA source in A. miramae. Thus, one possible solution to avoid the barcoding problem in relationship to heteroplasmy could be the acquisition of multiple numbers of barcoding sequences to determine a dominant haplotype that can be assigned as barcoding sequence for a given species. PMID:25835040

  14. Acoustic analysis reveals a new cryptic bush–cricket in the Carpathian Mountains (Orthoptera, Phaneropteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush–cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. PMID:23378813

  15. Evidence for Widespread Genomic Methylation in the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Katie L.; Tohidi-Esfahani, Donya; Lo, Nathan; Simpson, Stephen J.; Sword, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of DNA methylation in mammalian and plant systems is well established. In recent years there has been renewed interest in DNA methylation in insects. Accumulating evidence, both from mammals and insects, points towards an emerging role for DNA methylation in the regulation of phenotypic plasticity. The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) is a model organism for the study of phenotypic plasticity. Despite this, there is little information available about the degree to which the genome is methylated in this species and genes encoding methylation machinery have not been previously identified. We therefore undertook an initial investigation to establish the presence of a functional DNA methylation system in L. migratoria. We found that the migratory locust possesses genes that putatively encode methylation machinery (DNA methyltransferases and a methyl-binding domain protein) and exhibits genomic methylation, some of which appears to be localised to repetitive regions of the genome. We have also identified a distinct group of genes within the L. migratoria genome that appear to have been historically methylated and show some possible functional differentiation. These results will facilitate more detailed research into the functional significance of DNA methylation in locusts. PMID:22163001

  16. Four new species of the genus Phryganogryllacris (Orthoptera, Gryllacrididae, Gryllacridinae) in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaomiao; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic study of the genus Phryganogryllacris Karny, 1937 is presented. Four new species are described: Phryganogryllacris brevipennis sp. nov., Phryganogryllacris hubeiensis sp. nov., Phryganogryllacris sigillata sp. nov., Phryganogryllacris fanjingshanensis sp. nov.. A key to the species and the distributional data of Phryganogryllacris are provided. PMID:27395630

  17. A taxonomic study on the species of the genus Diestramima Storozhenko (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae; Aemodogryllinae).

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanyan; Wang, Hanqiang; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic study of the genus Diestramima Storozhenko, 1990 is presented. Eleven new species are described: D. excavata sp. nov., D. parabispinosa sp. nov., D. tibetensis sp. nov., D. guangxiensis sp. nov., D. subrectis sp. nov., D. curvicaudata sp. nov., D. beybienkoi sp. nov., D. triangulata sp. nov., D. brevis sp. nov., D. emeiensis sp. nov., D. conica sp. nov.. A key to the species of Diestramima is given. PMID:27395603

  18. A note on Agraeciini species (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) in India.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, Tatiana; Swaminathan, R

    2016-01-01

    The present paper re-describes three known species of the tribe Agraeciini (Tettigonidae: Conocephalinae), as well as recording Palaeoagraecia brunnea Ingrisch, 1998 for the first time from India. These descriptions hold to be useful in the identification of Indian agraeciine species. The important morphological characters of the head, pronotum, cerci, spines on the fore tibiae, hind femora and the ovipositor have been illustrated with suitable line drawings to distinguish the newly reported species. PMID:27615984

  19. Four new species of the subfamily Gryllacridinae (Orthoptera: Gryllacrididae) from China.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaomiao; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic study of the subfamily Gryllacridinae is presented. Four new species belonging to two genera are described: Larnaca sinica sp. nov., Larnaca hainanica sp. nov.; Prosopogryllacris chinensis sp. nov., Prosopogryllacris incisa sp. nov.. A revised key and distributional data are given. PMID:27615930

  20. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of the Epacromius coerulipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yongling; Cong, Bin; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Yugang; Zhang, Haiyan; Dong, Hui; Lin, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Epacromius coerulipes (Ivanov) is one of the most widely distributed locusts. To date, the main methods to kill locusts still rely on chemical controls, which can result in the selection of locusts with resistance to chemical pesticides. Butene-fipronil is a new pesticide that was discovered by the structural modification of fipronil. This pesticide has been used to control various agricultural pests and has become an important pesticide product to control pests that exhibit resistance to other pesticides, including locusts. To extend its useful half-life, studies of the initiation and progression of resistance to this pesticide are needed. Herein, two E. coerulipes strains, a pesticide-sensitive (PS) and a pesticide-resistant (PR) strain, were chosen to undergo de novo assembly by paired-end transcriptome Illumina sequencing. Overall, 63,033 unigenes were detected; the average gene length was 772 bp and the N50 was 1,589 bp. Among these unigenes, ∼25,132 (39.87% of the total) could be identified as known proteins in bioinformatic databases from national centers. A comparison of the PR and PS strains revealed that 2,568 genes were differentially expressed, including 1,646 and 922 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively. According to the Gene Ontology (GO) database, among biological processes the metabolic process group was the largest group (6,900 genes, 22.47%) and contained a high frequency of differentially expressed genes (544 genes, 27.54%). According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) categories, 28 genes, representing 2.98% of all genes, belonged to the group of genes involved in the biosynthesis, transportation, and catabolism of secondary metabolites. The differentially expressed genes that we identified are involved in 50 metabolic pathways. Among these pathways, the metabolism pathway was the most represented. After enrichment analysis of differential gene expression pathways, six pathways—ribosome; starch, and sucrose metabolism; ascorbate and aldarate metabolism; drug metabolism-cytochrome P450; metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450; and glutathione metabolism—showed a high degree of enrichment. Among these pathways, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and glutathione metabolism have been associated with pesticide metabolism. Furthermore, 316 unigenes in the E. coerulipes transcriptome encode detoxifying enzymes and 76 unigenes encode target proteins of pesticides. Among these genes, 23 genes that encode detoxifying enzymes in the resistance group were found to be up-regulated. The transcriptome sequencing results of E. coerulipes established a genomics database of E. coerulipes for the first time. This study also establishes a molecular basis for gene function analysis of E. coerulipes. Moreover, it provides a theoretical resource for mechanistic studies on pesticide resistance through the screening and investigation of resistance genes. PMID:27142308

  1. Crickets (Insecta, Orthoptera, Grylloidea) from Southern New Caledonia,
    with descriptions of new taxa.

    PubMed

    Anso, Jérémy; Jourdan, Hervé; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Intensive sampling of cricket communities has been undertaken in southern New Caledonia in selected plots of vegetation, i.e. rain forest, preforest and maquis shrubland. This leads to the discovery of many new taxa, which are described in the present paper, together with closely related species from nearby areas. Descriptions are based on general morphology and characters of genitalia. Calling songs are described for all acoustic taxa but two, and observations about species habitats are given. In total, 35 species belonging to 13 genera are studied, including 21 new species and two new genera. The pattern of assemblages of cricket species in New Caledonia is discussed. PMID:27395569

  2. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  3. Acoustic, genetic and morphological variations within the katydid Gampsocleis sedakovii (Orthoptera, Tettigonioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Wen, Ming; Li, Junjian; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Yinliang; Ren, Bingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In an attempt to explain the variation within this species and clarify the subspecies classification, an analysis of the genetic, calling songs, and morphological variations within the species Gampsocleis sedakovii is presented from Inner Mongolia, China. Recordings were compared of the male calling songs and analysis performed of selected acoustic variables. This analysis is combined with sequencing of mtDNA - COI and examination of morphological traits to perform cluster analyses. The trees constructed from different datasets were structurally similar, bisecting the six geographical populations studied. Based on two large branches in the analysis, the species Gampsocleis sedakovii was partitioned into two subspecies, Gampsocleis sedakovii sedakovii (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) and Gampsocleis sedakovii obscura (Walker, 1869). Comparing all the traits, the individual of Elunchun (ELC) was the intermediate type in this species according to the acoustic, genetic, and morphological characteristics. This study provides evidence for insect acoustic signal divergence and the process of subspeciation. PMID:26692795

  4. Review of the genus Pentacentrus Saussure (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Pentacentrinae) from China .

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Mao, Shao-Li; Shi, Fu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Four new species of Pentacentrus Gorochov from China are described and illustrated, P. acutiparamerus Liu & Shi sp. nov., P. biflexuous Liu & Shi sp. nov., P. emarginatus Liu & Shi sp. nov. and P. parvulus Liu & Shi sp. nov. A key and a distribution map of the Chinese species of this genus are provided. PMID:25081797

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gryllotalpa unispina Saussure, 1874 (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpoidea: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Shao, Dandan; Cai, Miao; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Daochuan

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Gryllotalpa unispina was 15,513 bp in length and contained 70.9% AT. All G. unispina protein-coding sequences except for the nad2 started with a typical ATN codon. The usual termination codons (TAA) and incomplete stop codons (T) were found from 13 protein-coding genes. All tRNA genes were folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except trnS(AGN) lacking the dihydrouridine arm. The sizes of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes were 1245 and 725 bp, respectively. The A + T-rich region was 917 bp in length with 76.8%. The orientation and gene order of the G. unispina mitogenome were identical to the G. orientalis and G. pluvialis, there was no phenomenon of "DK rearrangement" which has been widely reported in Caelifera. PMID:24450714

  6. Taxonomic studies on the Neotropical Landrevinae with description of new taxa (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    De Campos, Lucas Denadai; De Mello, Francisco De A G

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the subfamily Landrevinae has been modified by different authors since its creation. In the neotropics three genera are known to the present: Odontogryllus Saussure, 1877 (one from México, the others amazonian), Brasilodontus de Mello, 1992 with two species (from Brazilian Atlantic Forest), e Valchica de Mello, 1992 with one species (from Costa Rica). De Mello (1992) erroneously created the tribe Odontogryllini for this cluster of neotropical genera, here suppressed. In the present paper we revise and add new species to Brasilodontus and describe two monotypic genera, Xulavuna n. gen. and Yarrubura, n. gen. An identification key to the genera of neotropical Landrevinae is presented as well as one for the species of Brasilodontus. The male fore wings of Xulavuna adenoptera n. sp. is remarkable regarding its shape and its glandular condition. PMID:25284392

  7. Two new species of the genus Comidoblemmus Storozhenko & Paik from China (Orthoptera, Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haoyu; Shi, Fuming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Comidoblemmus Storozhenko & Paik, 2009 are described and illustrated, Comidoblemmus sororius sp. n. (CHINA, Zhejiang) and Comidoblemmus excavatus sp. n. (CHINA, Guizhou). A key and a distribution map of all species in the world are presented. PMID:26019679

  8. Morphological characterization of some representative species of the genus Loxoblemmus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae; Gryllinae; Gryllini) from India.

    PubMed

    Mal, Jhabar; Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2015-01-01

    Morphological characterization of some common species of the genus Loxoblemmus (Gryllidae: Gryllinae) from India is presented. In all, 5 species were identified that included two, Loxoblemmus equestris Saussure and Loxoblemmus haani Saussure, from the sub-humid regions of Rajasthan (South West India) and Madhya Pradesh (Central India); while three species, Loxoblemmus taicoun Saussure, Loxoblemmus jacobsoni Chopard and Loxoblemmus intermedius Chopard from the humid hilly regions of Meghalaya and Assam (North East India). Of the 5 reported species, based on the comparative linear measurements, L. haani is relatively larger than the other species encountered. PMID:25947856

  9. Body Size, Fecundity, and Sexual Size Dimorphism in the Neotropical Cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Cueva Del Castillo, R

    2015-04-01

    Body size is directly or indirectly correlated with fitness. Body size, which conveys maximal fitness, often differs between sexes. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) evolves because body size tends to be related to reproductive success through different pathways in males and females. In general, female insects are larger than males, suggesting that natural selection for high female fecundity could be stronger than sexual selection in males. I assessed the role of body size and fecundity in SSD in the Neotropical cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure). This species shows a SSD bias toward males. Females did not present a correlation between number of eggs and body size. Nonetheless, there were fluctuations in the number of eggs carried by females during the sampling period, and the size of females that were collected carrying eggs was larger than that of females collected with no eggs. Since mating induces vitellogenesis in some cricket species, differences in female body size might suggest male mate choice. Sexual selection in the body size of males of M. macilenta may possibly be stronger than the selection of female fecundity. Even so, no mating behavior was observed during the field observations, including audible male calling or courtship songs, yet males may produce ultrasonic calls due to their size. If female body size in M. macilenta is not directly related to fecundity, the lack of a correlated response to selection on female body size could represent an alternate evolutionary pathway in the evolution of body size and SSD in insects. PMID:26013128

  10. Position-dependent hearing in three species of bushcrickets (Tettigoniidae, Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Scherberich, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A primary task of auditory systems is the localization of sound sources in space. Sound source localization in azimuth is usually based on temporal or intensity differences of sounds between the bilaterally arranged ears. In mammals, localization in elevation is possible by transfer functions at the ear, especially the pinnae. Although insects are able to locate sound sources, little attention is given to the mechanisms of acoustic orientation to elevated positions. Here we comparatively analyse the peripheral hearing thresholds of three species of bushcrickets in respect to sound source positions in space. The hearing thresholds across frequencies depend on the location of a sound source in the three-dimensional hearing space in front of the animal. Thresholds differ for different azimuthal positions and for different positions in elevation. This position-dependent frequency tuning is species specific. Largest differences in thresholds between positions are found in Ancylecha fenestrata. Correspondingly, A. fenestrata has a rather complex ear morphology including cuticular folds covering the anterior tympanal membrane. The position-dependent tuning might contribute to sound source localization in the habitats. Acoustic orientation might be a selective factor for the evolution of morphological structures at the bushcricket ear and, speculatively, even for frequency fractioning in the ear. PMID:26543574

  11. Libanasa kilomeni, a new species of East African Lutosinae (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia; Johns, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    A new species of Libanasa, L. kilomeni, is described. In contrast to L. brachyura, an inhabitant of lowland wet to submontane forest along the Tanzanian coast and part of the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, this new species is found in montane forest in the North Pare Mountains. L. kilomeni n. sp. is restricted to a small forest reserve and due to forest clearing at lower elevations probably driven to its upper ecological border. Therefore this species is considered endangered and should be included in the IUCN red list. PMID:26624379

  12. Exposure to Exogenous Enkephalins Disrupts Reproductive Development in the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper, Romalea microptera (Insecta: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju; Song, Hojun; von Kalm, Laurence; Borst, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Enkephalins play a major role in reproductive physiology in crustaceans; however their role in reproductive development in insects is largely unknown. We investigated the effect of exposure to exogenous leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk), methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk), and the opioid antagonist naloxone on gonad development in the Eastern lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera. Injection of either Leu-Enk or naloxone alone significantly increased the testicular index and testicular follicular diameter in males, and the ovarian index, oocyte length, and oocyte diameter in females. In contrast, injection of Met-Enk inhibited all measures of reproductive development in both sexes. Surprisingly, co-injection of naloxone with either enkephalin enhanced the effect associated with administration of the enkephalin alone. This study clearly demonstrates the ability of enkephalins to disrupt insect sexual development and also suggests the existence of conserved enkephaline-dependent regulatory mechanisms in insects and crustaceans. PMID:23226477

  13. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of the Epacromius coerulipes (Orthoptera: Acrididae) Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongling; Cong, Bin; Wang, Liyan; Gao, Yugang; Zhang, Haiyan; Dong, Hui; Lin, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Epacromius coerulipes (Ivanov) is one of the most widely distributed locusts. To date, the main methods to kill locusts still rely on chemical controls, which can result in the selection of locusts with resistance to chemical pesticides. Butene-fipronil is a new pesticide that was discovered by the structural modification of fipronil. This pesticide has been used to control various agricultural pests and has become an important pesticide product to control pests that exhibit resistance to other pesticides, including locusts. To extend its useful half-life, studies of the initiation and progression of resistance to this pesticide are needed. Herein, two E. coerulipes strains, a pesticide-sensitive (PS) and a pesticide-resistant (PR) strain, were chosen to undergo de novo assembly by paired-end transcriptome Illumina sequencing. Overall, 63,033 unigenes were detected; the average gene length was 772 bp and the N50 was 1,589 bp. Among these unigenes, ∼ 25,132 (39.87% of the total) could be identified as known proteins in bioinformatic databases from national centers. A comparison of the PR and PS strains revealed that 2,568 genes were differentially expressed, including 1,646 and 922 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively. According to the Gene Ontology (GO) database, among biological processes the metabolic process group was the largest group (6,900 genes, 22.47%) and contained a high frequency of differentially expressed genes (544 genes, 27.54%). According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) categories, 28 genes, representing 2.98% of all genes, belonged to the group of genes involved in the biosynthesis, transportation, and catabolism of secondary metabolites. The differentially expressed genes that we identified are involved in 50 metabolic pathways. Among these pathways, the metabolism pathway was the most represented. After enrichment analysis of differential gene expression pathways, six pathways--ribosome; starch, and sucrose metabolism; ascorbate and aldarate metabolism; drug metabolism-cytochrome P450; metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450; and glutathione metabolism--showed a high degree of enrichment. Among these pathways, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, and glutathione metabolism have been associated with pesticide metabolism. Furthermore, 316 unigenes in the E. coerulipes transcriptome encode detoxifying enzymes and 76 unigenes encode target proteins of pesticides. Among these genes, 23 genes that encode detoxifying enzymes in the resistance group were found to be up-regulated. The transcriptome sequencing results of E. coerulipes established a genomics database of E. coerulipes for the first time. This study also establishes a molecular basis for gene function analysis of E. coerulipes Moreover, it provides a theoretical resource for mechanistic studies on pesticide resistance through the screening and investigation of resistance genes. PMID:27142308

  14. One new species of the genus Nigrimacula Shi, Bian & Zhou, 2016 (Orthoptera: Meconematinae) from Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Jian; Shi, Fu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The paper describels one new species, i.e. Nigrimacula sichuanensis Wang & Shi, sp. nov. from Sichuan, China, and provides photographs of morphological characters. The type material is deposited in the Museum of Hebei University. PMID:27395697

  15. Two new species of the genus Haplotropis Saussure, 1888 (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bao-Hua; Yin, Zhan; Li, Xin-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Haplotropis Saussure, 1888 from China are described in this paper. The new species Haplotropis xiai sp. nov. is similar to Haplotropis brunneriana Saussure, 1888, but differs from latter by frontal ridge of male widened at median ocellus; tegmina narrower, cover 2/5 tympanum; cercus of male apical half part gently tapering; lower margin of epiphallus with high projection in the middle; anterior margin of pronotum in female with distinct acute angular in middle; length of subgenital plate shorter than width in female. The Haplotropis zhuoluensis sp. nov. is similar to Haplotropis xiai sp. nov., but differs from latter by anterior margin of pronotum reaching hind margin of eyes; length of temina is 1.6 times in male and 1.3 times in female of width; length of interspace shorter than narrowest in mesosternum of male; ancorae of epiphallus oblique inward distinctly, lower margin with high projection in the middle; length of subgenital plate longer than width in female. Type specimens are deposited in the College of Life Sciences, Hebei University, Baoding, China. PMID:27395684

  16. DNA Barcoding and Species Boundary Delimitation of Selected Species of Chinese Acridoidea (Orthoptera: Caelifera)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhua; Zhang, Aibing; Mao, Shaoli; Huang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We tested the performance of DNA barcoding in Acridoidea and attempted to solve species boundary delimitation problems in selected groups using COI barcodes. Three analysis methods were applied to reconstruct the phylogeny. K2P distances were used to assess the overlap range between intraspecific variation and interspecific divergence. “Best match (BM)”, “best close match (BCM)”, “all species barcodes (ASB)” and “back-propagation neural networks (BP-based method)” were utilized to test the success rate of species identification. Phylogenetic species concept and network analysis were employed to delimitate the species boundary in eight selected species groups. The results demonstrated that the COI barcode region performed better in phylogenetic reconstruction at genus and species levels than at higher-levels, but showed a little improvement in resolving the higher-level relationships when the third base data or both first and third base data were excluded. Most overlaps and incorrect identifications may be due to imperfect taxonomy, indicating the critical role of taxonomic revision in DNA barcoding study. Species boundary delimitation confirmed the presence of oversplitting in six species groups and suggested that each group should be treated as a single species. PMID:24376533

  17. Spreading of heterochromatin and karyotype differentiation in two Tropidacris Scudder, 1869 species (Orthoptera, Romaleidae)

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marília de França; Pine, Mariana Bozina; Oliveira, Elizabeth Felipe Alves dos Santos; Loreto, Vilma; Gallo, Raquel Bozini; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; de Domenico, Fernando Campos; da Rosa, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tropidacris Scudder, 1869 is a genus widely distributed throughout the Neotropical region where speciation was probably promoted by forest reduction during the glacial and interglacial periods. There are no cytogenetic studies of Tropidacris, and information allowing inference or confirmation of the evolutionary events involved in speciation within the group is insufficient. In this paper, we used cytogenetic markers in two species, Tropidacris collaris (Stoll, 1813) and Tropidacris cristata grandis (Thunberg, 1824), collected in different Brazilian biomes. Both species exhibited 2n=24,XX for females and 2n=23,X0 for males. All chromosomes were acrocentric. There were some differences in the karyotype macrostructure, e.g. in the chromosome size. A wide interspecific variation in the chromosome banding (C-banding and CMA3/DAPI staining) indicated strong differences in the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences. Specifically, Tropidacris cristata grandis had a higher number of bands in relation to Tropidacris collaris. FISH with 18S rDNA revealed two markings coinciding with the NORs in both species. However, two analyzed samples of Tropidacris collaris revealed a heterozygous condition for the rDNA site of S10 pair. In Tropidacris collaris, the histone H3 genes were distributed on three chromosome pairs, whereas in Tropidacris cristata grandis, these genes were observed on 14 autosomes and on the X chromosome, always in terminal regions. Our results demonstrate that, although the chromosome number and morphology are conserved in the genus, Tropidacris cristata grandis substantially differs from Tropidacris collaris in terms of the distribution of repetitive sequences. The devastation and fragmentation of the Brazilian rainforest may have led to isolation between these species, and the spreading of these repetitive sequences could contribute to speciation within the genus. PMID:26312132

  18. Molecular characterization of a c-type lysozyme from the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amr A; Zhang, Long; Dorrah, Moataza A; Elmogy, Mohamed; Yousef, Hesham A; Bassal, Taha T M; Duvic, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Lysozymes are bacteriolytic peptides that are implicated in the insect nonspecific innate immune responses. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding a c-type lysozyme from Schistocerca gregaria (SgLys) has been cloned and characterized from the fat body of immune-challenged 5(th) instar. The deduced mature lysozyme is 119 amino acid residues in length, has a calculated molecular mass of 13.4 kDa and an isoelectric point (Ip) of 9.2. SgLys showed high identities with other insect lysozymes, ranging from 41.5% to 93.3% by BLASTp search in NCBI. Eukaryotic in vitro expression of the SgLys ORF (rSgLys) with an apparent molecular mass of ∼16 kDa under SDS-PAGE is close to the calculated molecular weight of the full-length protein. rSgLys displayed growth inhibitory activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. 3D structure modeling of SgLys, based on comparison with that of silkworm lysozyme, and sequence comparison with the helix-loop-helix (α-hairpin) structure of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) were employed to interpret the antibacterial potencies. Phylogenetic alignments indicate that SgLys aligns well with insect c-type lysozymes that expressed principally in fat body and hemocytes and whose role has been defined as immune-related. Western blot analysis showed that SgLys expression was highest at 6-12 h post-bacterial challenge and subsequently decreased with time. Transcriptional profiles of SgLys were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. SgLys transcript was upregulated at the highest level in fat body, hemocytes, salivary gland, thoracic muscles, and epidermal tissue. It was expressed in all developmental stages from egg to adult. These data indicate that SgLys is a predominant acute-phase protein that is expressed and upregulated upon immune challenge. PMID:26997372

  19. The attraction of Zonocerus variegatus (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae) to different types of lure.

    PubMed

    Idowu, A B; Akinsete, A

    2001-06-01

    Zonocerus variegatus is a common grasshopper in parts of west and equtorial Africa. The distribution in Nigeria extends from the lowland rainforest zone to the savannah in the north. The influence of lure on the behaviour of grasshopper inside cages (120 insect per cage) was investigated. Nymphs and adults of Zonocerus variegatus responded positively to intact leaves, crushed leaves and inflorescence of the common compositae weed Chromolaena odorata inside muslin bags, and intact plants. There were significant differences in the attraction recorded for starved nymphs, fed nymphs and starved adults. Attraction was more to intact leaves and is by olfaction. The increase in the attraction of starved nymphs is time dependent. Attraction to plant parts ceased after the plants were dried for 24 and 48 hours at room temperature and when plants were placed in transparent polythene bags. Gut motility and gut activity were higher during the day than at night. Nymphs, adults and egg pods placed separately inside muslin bags were not attractive to adults or nymphs. PMID:11935919

  20. Taxonomic recovery of the ant cricket Myrmecophilus albicinctus from M. americanus (Orthoptera, Myrmecophilidae).

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takashi; Maruyama, Munetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myrmecophilus americanus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus are typical myrmecophilous insects living inside ant nests. These species are ecologically important due to the obligate association with tramp ant species, including harmful invasive ant species. However, the taxonomy of these "white-banded ant crickets" is quite confused owing to a scarcity of useful external morphological characteristics. Recently, Myrmecophilus albicinctus was synonymized with Myrmecophilus americanus regardless of the apparent host use difference. To clarify taxonomical relationship between Myrmecophilus albicinctus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus, we reexamined morphological characteristics of both species mainly in the viewpoint of anatomy. Observation of genitalia parts, together with a few external body parts, revealed that Myrmecophilus albicinctus showed different tendency from them of Myrmecophilus americanus. Therefore, we recover Myrmecophilus albicinctus as a distinct species on the basis of the morphology. PMID:27408536

  1. Re-Visiting Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Relationships in the Genus Saga (Insecta: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kolics, Balázs; Ács, Zoltán; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov; Orci, Kirill Márk; Qiang, Lo Shun; Kovács, Balázs; Kondorosy, Előd; Decsi, Kincső; Taller, János; Specziár, András; Orbán, László; Müller, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Twelve of the 13 bushcricket species of the Saga genus are bisexuals and diploids, except the parthenogenetic and tetraploid bush cricket, Saga pedo. Despite a continuous research effort stretching through the 1900s, the taxonomic relationships of the Saga species are still disputed. In this study, our primary aim was to reveal natural relationships of the European Saga species and three of their Asian relatives, with special attention to the problematic taxonomy of two subspecies: S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis. Following a phylogenetic analysis of eight species, a comprehensive study was carried out on the above three taxa by using acoustic and morphometric approaches in parallel. Our phylogenetic data showed that European Saga species evolved from a monophyletic lineage. The geographical transitional species S. cappadocica was positioned between European and Asian lineages supporting the idea that the European Saga lineage originated phylogeographically from the Asian clade. The above results showed better agreement with the morphological data than with earlier ones based either on karyology or acoustic information only. After reviewing our data, we concluded that Saga pedo has most likely evolved from S. c. gracilis and not from S. rammei or S. ephippigera, as proposed by earlier studies. S. c. gracilis shares the same ITS2 haplotype with S. pedo, indicating that the latter could have evolved from populations of the former, probably through whole genome duplication. Based on acoustic and morphometric differences, we propose to elevate the two subspecies, S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis, to species level status, as Saga gracilis Kis 1962, and Saga campbelli Uvarov 1921. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of Saginae and highlights the need for additional comprehensive analysis involving more Asian Saga species. PMID:22912691

  2. Re-visiting phylogenetic and taxonomic relationships in the genus Saga (Insecta: Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Kolics, Balázs; Ács, Zoltán; Chobanov, Dragan Petrov; Orci, Kirill Márk; Qiang, Lo Shun; Kovács, Balázs; Kondorosy, Előd; Decsi, Kincső; Taller, János; Specziár, András; Orbán, László; Müller, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Twelve of the 13 bushcricket species of the Saga genus are bisexuals and diploids, except the parthenogenetic and tetraploid bush cricket, Saga pedo. Despite a continuous research effort stretching through the 1900s, the taxonomic relationships of the Saga species are still disputed. In this study, our primary aim was to reveal natural relationships of the European Saga species and three of their Asian relatives, with special attention to the problematic taxonomy of two subspecies: S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis. Following a phylogenetic analysis of eight species, a comprehensive study was carried out on the above three taxa by using acoustic and morphometric approaches in parallel. Our phylogenetic data showed that European Saga species evolved from a monophyletic lineage. The geographical transitional species S. cappadocica was positioned between European and Asian lineages supporting the idea that the European Saga lineage originated phylogeographically from the Asian clade. The above results showed better agreement with the morphological data than with earlier ones based either on karyology or acoustic information only. After reviewing our data, we concluded that Saga pedo has most likely evolved from S. c. gracilis and not from S. rammei or S. ephippigera, as proposed by earlier studies. S. c. gracilis shares the same ITS2 haplotype with S. pedo, indicating that the latter could have evolved from populations of the former, probably through whole genome duplication. Based on acoustic and morphometric differences, we propose to elevate the two subspecies, S. campbelli campbelli and S. c. gracilis, to species level status, as Saga gracilis Kis 1962, and Saga campbelli Uvarov 1921. The present work sets the stage for future genetic and experimental investigations of Saginae and highlights the need for additional comprehensive analysis involving more Asian Saga species. PMID:22912691

  3. Are solitary and gregarious Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex, Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae) genetically distinct?

    PubMed

    Bailey, N W; Gwynne, D T; Ritchie, M G

    2005-08-01

    Phase polyphenisms are usually thought to reflect plastic responses of species, independent of genetic differences; however, phase differences could correlate with genetic differentiation for various reasons. Mormon crickets appear to occur in two phases that differ in morphology and behaviour. Solitary individuals are cryptic and sedentary whereas gregarious individuals form bands, migrate, and are aposematically coloured. These traits have been thought to be phenotypically plastic and induced by environmental conditions. However, there has been no previous investigation of the extent of genetic differences between solitary and gregarious populations of this widespread North American species. We sequenced two mitochondrial genes, COII and COIII, in samples of Mormon crickets from gregarious populations west of the continental divide and solitary mountain populations primarily east of the divide. Sequencing revealed two genetically distinct clades that broadly correspond with the solitary eastern populations and the mainly gregarious western populations. We used coalescent modelling to test the hypothesis that the species consists of two deep genetic clades, as opposed to a series of equally distinct populations. Results allowed us to reject the null hypothesis that a radiation independent of phase produced these clades, and molecular clock estimates indicate the time of divergence to be approximately 2 million years ago. This work establishes that the solitary populations found in the mountains on the eastern slope are part of a clade that is genetically distinct from the western populations, which are primarily gregarious, and the implications of this apparent correlation between phase and genetic differentiation are discussed. PMID:15999141

  4. Divergent Egg Physiologies in Two Closely Related Grasshopper Species: Taeniopoda eques versus Romalea microptera (Orthoptera: Romaleidae)

    PubMed Central

    STAUFFER, TIMOTHY W.; HATLE, JOHN D.; WHITMAN, DOUGLAS W.

    2013-01-01

    We compared egg survivorship and egg development time at different soil moistures for two closely related grasshopper species from divergent habitats: marsh-inhabiting Romalea microptera (Beauvois) versus desert-inhabiting Taeniopoda eques (Burmeister). These two species can interbreed and produce viable offspring. In nature, both species have a similar 8–9 mo subterranean egg stage, but their soil environments differ dramatically in water content. We predicted that the eggs of the two species would exhibit differential survivorship and development times under different moisture levels. Our laboratory results show that the eggs of both species survived a wide range of soil moistures (≈ 0.5 to 90%), maintained for 3 mo. However, the eggs of the marsh grasshopper, R. microptera, better tolerated the highest soil moistures (95 and 100%), whereas the eggs of the desert species, T. eques, better tolerated the lowest soil moistures (0.0 and 0.1%). Sixty-five percent of marsh-inhabiting R. microptera eggs, but no desert T. eques eggs, survived 3 mo submersion under water. In contrast, 49% of desert T. eques eggs, but only 3.5% of R. microptera eggs, survived after being laid into oven-dried sand and then maintained with no additional water until hatch. In the laboratory at 26°C, the two species differed significantly in the mean length of the oviposition-to-hatch interval: 176 d for R. microptera versus 237 d for T. eques. These divergent traits presumably benefit these insects in their divergent habitats. Our results suggest the evolution of physiological divergence that is consistent with adaptations to local environments. PMID:22182625

  5. Improving the Degree-Day Model for Forecasting Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiongbing; Li, Zhihong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xunbing; Yang, Jiwen; Fan, Chunbin; Wu, Huihui; Wang, Qinglei; Zhang, Zehua

    2014-01-01

    The degree-day (DD) model is an important tool for forecasting pest phenology and voltinism. Unfortunately, the DD model is inaccurate, as is the case for the Oriental migratory locust. To improve the existing DD model for this pest, we first studied locust development in seven growth chambers, each of which simulated the complete growing-season climate of a specific region in China (Baiquan, Chengde, Tumotezuoqi, Wenan, Rongan, Qiongzhong, or Qiongshan). In these seven treatments, locusts completed 0.95, 1, 1.1, 2.2, 2.95, 3.95, and 4.95 generations, respectively. Hence, in the Baiquan (700), Rongan (2400), Qiongzhong (3200), and Qiongshan (2400) treatments, the final generation were unable to lay eggs. In a second experiment, we reared locusts for a full generation in growth chambers, at different constant temperatures. This experiment provided two important findings. First, temperatures between 32 and 42°C did not influence locust development rate. Hence, the additional heat provided by temperatures above 32°C did not add to the total heat units acquired by the insects, according to the traditional DD model. Instead, temperatures above 32°C represent overflow heat, and can not be included when calculating total heat acquired during development. We also noted that females raised at constant 21°C failed to oviposit. Hence, temperatures lower than 21°C should be deducted when calculating total heat acquired during adult development. Using our experimental findings, we next micmiked 24-h temperature curve and constructed a new DD model based on a 24-h temperature integral calculation. We then compared our new model with the traditional DD model, results showed the DD deviation was 166 heat units in Langfang during 2011. At last we recalculated the heat by our new DD model, which better predicted the results from our first growth chamber experiment. PMID:24599091

  6. [Phase morphometric differences among Locusta migratoria cinerascens, Locusta migratoria migratorioides, and their mutant albinos (Orthoptera)].

    PubMed

    Rakotondrainibe, K; Nicolas, G; Fuzeau-Braesch, S

    1975-12-22

    A first canonical variate analysis (factor analysis) of two geographic strains of L. m. shows that the same axes distinguish crowded from isolated animals as well as their geographical origins. Two other analyses between normal and albino strains of both localities show no differences for one strain; however for the other strain, the pigmentary mutation coincides with a solitary tendency. PMID:816517

  7. Taxonomy and distribution of some katydids (Orthoptera Tettigoniidae) from tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Results of the study of specimens collected in tropical Africa and preserved in different European collections and museums are reported and extensively illustrated. The following three new species are described: Horatosphaga aethiopica sp. n., Dapanera occulta sp. n. and Cestromoecha laeglae sp. n. In addition, new diagnostic characters or distributional data for Ruspolia differens (Serville, 1838), Thyridorhoptrum senegalense Krauss, 1877, Horatosphaga leggei (Kirby, 1909), Horatosphaga linearis (Rehn, 1910), Preussia lobatipes Karsch, 1890 and Dapanera eidmanni Ebner, 1943 are reported. Finally, Symmetropleura plana (Walker, 1869) is proposed to be transferred to the genus Symmetrokarschia Massa, 2015, Conocephalus carbonarius (Redtenbacher, 1891) to the genus Thyridorhoptrum Rehn & Hebard, 1915; the genus Gonatoxia Karsch, 1889 is proposed to be synonymized with Dapanera Karsch, 1889. PMID:26478704

  8. Micromorphological differentiation of left and right stridulatory apparatus in crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Xue; Luo, Wenqi; Wang, Yinliang; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared micromorphological differentiation of stridulatory apparatus between the functional right tegmen and non-functional left tegmen, analyzed under scanning electron microscope (SEM), among eight Gryllidae species. The results showed that the main differences were found on the length and shape of files and teeth. The length of stridulatory file and teeth number were lower on the left stridulatory apparatus than that on right stridulatory apparatus in all species. However, the ratio between the length of stridulatory teeth and the interval of stridulatory teeth was significantly higher on the left stridulatory apparatus than that on right stridulatory apparatus in Dianemobius fascipes, Polionemobius taprobanensis, Pteronemobius gifuensis, Teleogryllus occipitalis and Oecanthus longicauda. In addition, the length of stridulatory teeth was positively related to number of stridulatory teeth, however, the interval of stridulatory teeth was negatively related to the ratio between the length of stridulatory teeth and the interval of stridulatory teeth for left and right stridulatory apparatus. Our result illustrated that the length of left and right stridulatory file and teeth length could be an effective character to distinguish species. Left stridulatory apparatus was not entirely degraded than right stridulatory apparatus. PMID:27395640

  9. Age- and density-dependent prophylaxis in the migratory Mormon cricket Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of the increased potential for disease transmission, insects are predicted to show an increased constitutive immunity when crowded. Nymphal Mormon crickets were collected in Montana and reared in the laboratory either solitarily or at densities similar to that experienced by Mormon cric...

  10. Two new species of Eneopterinae crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) from Luzon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baroga, Jessica B; Yap, Sheryl A; Robillard, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Luzon Island is considered as the largest island in the Philippines and is characterized by a considerable biodiversity encompassing many endemic plant and animal species. In this paper, two new species of Eneopterinae crickets: (1) Lebinthus polillensis n. sp., and (2) Paranisitra septentria n. sp. are described and an updated key to the Philippines species of the subfamily Eneopterinae is provided. PMID:27470787

  11. Annotated checklist and key to species of Gryllotalpa (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) from the Oriental region.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming Kai

    2016-01-01

    The cosmopolitan Gryllotalpa mole cricket is the most speciose genus (70 species) in the family Gryllotalpidae. The taxonomy and diversity of Oriental species are not well understood. A species list with 26 species is presented here. An artificial key is also presented aimed to help with species identification, new species discovery and future taxonomic revision in the biodiverse Oriental region. PMID:27395653

  12. Development of a toxic bait for control of eastern lubber grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Barbara, Kathryn A; Capinera, John L

    2003-06-01

    This study assessed baits for eastern lubber grasshopper, Romalea guttata (Houttuyn). When offered a choice among several grain-based baits (rolled oats, wheat bran, oat bran, yeast, corn meal, cornflakes) and vegetable oils (canola, corn, peanut, soybean), eastern lubber grasshopper adults preferred bait consisting of wheat bran carrier with corn oil as an added phagostimulant. Other carriers were accepted but consumed less frequently. Discrimination by eastern lubber grasshoppers among oils was poor. Similarly, addition of flavorings (peppermint, anise, lemon, banana) resulted in few significant effects. The carbaryl, wheat bran, and oil bait developed in this study was effective at causing eastern lubber grasshopper mortality in field-cage studies. Significant mortality occurred even though grasshoppers had to locate dishes of bait in a large cage, and could feed on daylilies, or grass growing through the bottom of the cage, rather than on the bran flakes. Consumption of as little as a single carbaryl-treated bran flake could induce mortality, although individuals varied greatly in their susceptibility. The bait matrix developed in this study was readily consumed when in the presence of some plant species. We expect that wheat bran and corn oil bait would be most effective as protection for less preferred plants (tomato, pepper, eggplant, leek, parsley, fennel, daylily, lily of the Nile, and canna lily) because baits were readily consumed in the presence of these plants. Plants that are readily consumed in the presence of bait (preferred plants) included butter crunch lettuce, carrot, yellow squash, cauliflower, collards, green onion, chive, cucumber, cabbage, cantalope, endive, red leaf lettuce, society garlic, caladium, and amaryllis. Baits are likely to be less effective in the presence of such plants. On average, vegetables in Solanaceae (i.e., tomato, pepper, and eggplant) and Apiaceae (i.e., fennel and parsley) elicited high levels of bait-feeding activity, indicating that these vegetables were not highly preferred. The plants tested from Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, and Brassicaceae elicited an intermediate-to-low level of bait feeding. PMID:12852592

  13. Effect of temperature on efficacy of insecticides to differential grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Amarasekare, Kaushalya G; Edelson, J V

    2004-10-01

    The effect of temperature on activity of insecticides for controlling grasshoppers in leafy green vegetables was evaluated. Insecticides evaluated had differing modes of action and included diflubenzuron, azadirachtin, Beauveria bassiana, spinosad, endosulfan, esfenvalerate, and naled. We evaluated these insecticides for efficacy to third instars of differential grasshopper, Melanoplus differentialis (Thomas), at temperatures ranging from 10 to 35 degrees C. In the laboratory, treatment with esfenvalerate resulted in 100% mortality at temperatures of 10 to 35 degrees C, and efficacy was not temperature dependent. Treatment with spinosad resulted in similar mortality as with esfenvalerate at all temperatures except 10 degrees C. The activity of B. bassiana was greatest at 25 degrees C and was adversely affected by high and low temperatures. Treatment with diflubenzuron resulted in increased mortality at high temperatures, and at 35 degrees C its activity was similar to that of esfenvalerate and spinosad. The activity of azadirachtin ranged from 19 to 31% and was not influenced by temperature. In field studies, spinosad, diflubenzuron, and esfenvalerate provided differing levels of mortality both at application and when nymphs were exposed to 1-h-old residues. However, only spinosad and diflubenzuron provided similar levels of mortality when nymphs were exposed to 24-h-old residues. The residual activity of endosulfan, naled, esfenvalerate, and spinosad decreased with increasing time (0-24 h) after exposure to sunlight and high summer temperatures. Compared with other insecticides, naled had a short residual activity period and activity was dependent upon immediate contact with the nymphs or their substrate. B. bassiana was inactive under high temperatures and intense sunlight as occurs in summer. PMID:15568348

  14. DNA barcoding reveals polymorphism in the pygmy grasshopper Tetrix bolivari (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Lin, Li-Liang; Zheng, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    Many pygmy grasshopper species exhibit colour-marking polymorphism. However, this polymorphism in some species, such as Tetrix bolivari, is almost unknown. The aim of this work is to identify using DNA barcoding the colour-marking polymorphic morphs of this pygmy grasshopper species collected from both grass and sand microhabitats. Analysis by NJ clustering and pairwise distances indicated that all specimens collected showing colour-marking polymorphism are species of Tetrix bolivari. Haplotype network construction showed ten different haplotypes from a total of 57 Tetrix bolivari individuals with H1(82.5%) being the most common type and it also displayed low divergence within Tetrix bolivari population. The haplotype analyses were consistent with the NJ clustering. Our field census showed the frequency of Tetrix bolivari morphs differed significantly, with the rank order of morphs (from high to low) typeA1, type B1, type A2, type A3, type A4, type A5, type A6, type A7, type B2, type B3, and type B4. The most common type A morphs were without contrasting markings, while the rarer type B morphs have contrasting white markings. We suggest that type B morphs have greater camouflage effects against natural backgrounds such as grass or sand than type A morphs. Both our field census and haplotype analysis revealed that type A has higher frequency and more haplotypes than type B. PMID:27199587

  15. Taxonomic recovery of the ant cricket Myrmecophilus albicinctus from M. americanus (Orthoptera, Myrmecophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Takashi; Maruyama, Munetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myrmecophilus americanus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus are typical myrmecophilous insects living inside ant nests. These species are ecologically important due to the obligate association with tramp ant species, including harmful invasive ant species. However, the taxonomy of these “white-banded ant crickets” is quite confused owing to a scarcity of useful external morphological characteristics. Recently, Myrmecophilus albicinctus was synonymized with Myrmecophilus americanus regardless of the apparent host use difference. To clarify taxonomical relationship between Myrmecophilus albicinctus and Myrmecophilus albicinctus, we reexamined morphological characteristics of both species mainly in the viewpoint of anatomy. Observation of genitalia parts, together with a few external body parts, revealed that Myrmecophilus albicinctus showed different tendency from them of Myrmecophilus americanus. Therefore, we recover Myrmecophilus albicinctus as a distinct species on the basis of the morphology. PMID:27408536

  16. Sound radiation and wing mechanics in stridulating field crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Jonsson, Thorin; Robert, Daniel

    2011-06-15

    Male field crickets emit pure-tone mating calls by rubbing their wings together. Acoustic radiation is produced by rapid oscillations of the wings, as the right wing (RW), bearing a file, is swept across the plectrum borne on the left wing (LW). Earlier work found the natural resonant frequency (f(o)) of individual wings to be different, but there is no consensus on the origin of these differences. Previous studies suggested that the frequency along the song pulse is controlled independently by each wing. It has also been argued that the stridulatory file has a variable f(o) and that the frequency modulation observed in most species is associated with this variability. To test these two hypotheses, a method was developed for the non-contact measurement of wing vibrations during singing in actively stridulating Gryllus bimaculatus. Using focal microinjection of the neuroactivator eserine into the cricket's brain to elicit stridulation and micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we monitored wing vibration in actively singing insects. The results show significantly lower f(o) in LWs compared with RWs, with the LW f(o) being identical to the sound carrier frequency (N=44). But during stridulation, the two wings resonate at one identical frequency, the song carrier frequency, with the LW dominating in amplitude response. These measurements also demonstrate that the stridulatory file is a constant resonator, as no variation was observed in f(o) along the file during sound radiation. Our findings show that, as they engage in stridulation, cricket wings work as coupled oscillators that together control the mechanical oscillations generating the remarkably pure species-specific song. PMID:21613528

  17. Habitat-dependent transmission of male advertisement calls in bladder grasshoppers (Orthoptera; Pneumoridae).

    PubMed

    Couldridge, Vanessa C K; van Staaden, Moira J

    2004-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that the physical properties of the environment exert selection pressure on long-range acoustic communication signals to match the local habitat by promoting signal characteristics that minimize excess attenuation and distortion. We tested this in a unique family of bladder grasshoppers notable for producing a signal with a 2 km maximum transmission distance. In direct performance comparisons, male advertisement calls of seven species were broadcast through four vegetation biomes--forest, fynbos, savanna and succulent karoo. The calls of species native to forest and fynbos biomes propagated with lower levels of distortion over distance in their respective habitats relative to those of non-native species, while fynbos species also performed best in the remaining two habitats. In addition, both forest and fynbos species had low levels of signal attenuation over distance in all environments. The fynbos biome was characterized by high inconsistency in signal degradation, while the forest biome had the highest levels of environmental noise. Innate habitat characteristics, leading to comparatively limited acoustic communication distances in the forest and fynbos relative to the savanna and succulent karoo, may therefore explain the need for a higher quality of signal transmission in grasshoppers inhabiting the former two environments. PMID:15235006

  18. Supercooling capacity and cold hardiness of band-winged grasshopper eggs (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Pang, Bao-Ping; Li, Na; Zhou, Xiao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The band-winged grasshopper, Oedaleus asiaticus Bei-Bienko, is one of the most dominant and economically important grasshopper species in the steppe grasslands and farming-pastoral ecotone in northern China. It is a univoltine species and overwinters as eggs in soil. The cold hardiness of its eggs was examined in the laboratory. Water content in soil significantly affected the supercooling points (SCPs), water content and fat content of prediapause eggs. With the increase of water content in soil, the SCP, and water content of prediapause eggs rose whereas the fat content declined. There was a significant relationship between the SCP and water content or fat content of prediapause eggs. The SCPs of prediapause and diapause eggs varied from -7.6 to -28.4°C and the SCPs of eggs 30 d after oviposition could be divided into two groups. The means of high SCP group (-11.0 to -11.9°C) were much higher than those of low SCP group (-21.8 to -21.9°C), and the majority belonged to the latter (90.48-93.33%). The SCPs of prediapause eggs and early-diapause eggs 30 d after oviposition were significantly higher than those of deep-diapause eggs 60 d after oviposition. The survival rates of diapause eggs were significantly different among different temperature treatments. The survival rate was higher than 88% at greater than -20°C and declined significantly to 57% at -25°C, and suddenly dropped to zero at -30°C. The lower lethal temperature (Ltemp50) for 12 h exposure was -25.3°C and the lower lethal time (Ltime50) at -20°C was 32.8 d. As the mean SCPs of diapause eggs were similar to their Ltemp50, the SCP of eggs can be considered as a good indicator of cold hardiness for O. asiaticus and that this grasshopper is a freeze-intolerant insect. PMID:25527594

  19. DNA Barcoding of genus Hexacentrus in China reveals cryptic diversity within Hexacentrus japonicus (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui-Fang; Guan, Bei; Shi, Fu-Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract DNA barcoding has been proved successful to provide resolution beyond the boundaries of morphological information. Hence, a study was undertaken to establish DNA barcodes for all morphologically determined Hexacentrus species in China collections. In total, 83 specimens of five Hexacentrus species were barcoded using standard mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Except for Hexacentrus japonicus, barcode gaps were present in the remaining Hexacentrus species. Taxon ID tree generated seven BOLD’s barcode index numbers (BINs), four of which were in agreement with the morphological species. For Hexacentrus japonicus, the maximum intraspecific divergence (4.43%) produced a minimal overlap (0.64%), and 19 specimens were divided into three different BINs. There may be cryptic species within the current Hexacentrus japonicus. This study adds to a growing body of DNA barcodes that have become available for katydids, and shows that a DNA barcoding approach enables the identification of known Hexacentrus species with a very high resolution. PMID:27408576

  20. Little walking leaves from southeast Ecuador: biology and taxonomy of Typophyllum species (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Pterochrozinae).

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Eight katydid species of the leaf-mimicking specialist genus Typophyllum were found in the southeast of Ecuador in an area comprising part of the eastern Andean cordillera and foothills toward the Cordillera del Cóndor in elevations between 850 and 3000 m. They are described along with the peculiar calling songs and other interesting aspects of their biology. Three of these species are new: T. morrisi sp. nov., T. onkiosternum sp. nov. and T. vignoni sp. nov. A fourth species represented by a single male is possibly new as well. In males and females of a species considered as identical with T. egregium Hebard 1924, which was previously known from a unique female specimen, was found a remarkable variation of coloration, in addition to the striking sexual dimorphism typical for the genus, with the females being twice as large as the small males. The latter is related to the curious mating behaviour, which is documented for this species and T. erosifolium Walker 1870. The two other species found in the region are T. bolivari Vignon 1925 and T. mortuifolium Walker 1870. The calling songs of four species were recorded. In T. erosifolium and T. morrisi sp. nov. the sounds are almost pure sine waves at the lower boundary of ultrasound. In T. egregium and T. onkiosternum sp. nov. the spectrum of the carrier frequency is broader, which might be related to lower and denser vegetation at higher elevation. Based on the intraspecific variety found in T. egregium and T. erosifolium, which includes variation in tegmina shape and venation pattern, are established several syonymies among Typophyllum species from western South America. T. erosifolium is found to be identical with T. peruvianum Pictet 1888 syn. nov. Additionally are considered identical T. inflatum Vignon 1925 and T. gibbosusm Vignon 1925 syn. nov., T. trigonum Vignon 1925 and T. quadriincisum Vignon 1925 syn. nov., and finally T. lacinipenne Enderlein 1917 and T. acutum Vignon 1925 syn. nov. and T. undulatum Caudell 1918 syn. nov. The discussion treats the problematic taxonomy of the little walking leaves, bioacoustics, the pre-copulatory riding behaviour, the sophisticated mimesis, and very briefly the uncertain position within the katydid phylogeny. PMID:26623843

  1. A hierarchy of factors influence discontinuous gas exchange in the grasshopper Paracinema tricolor (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Berlizé; Chown, Steven L; Terblanche, John S

    2014-10-01

    The evolutionary origin and maintenance of discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) in tracheate arthropods are poorly understood and highly controversial. We investigated prioritization of abiotic factors in the gas exchange control cascade by examining oxygen, water and haemolymph pH regulation in the grasshopper Paracinema tricolor. Using a full-factorial design, grasshoppers were acclimated to hypoxic or hyperoxic (5% O2, 40% O2) gas conditions, or dehydrated or hydrated, whereafter their CO2 release was measured under a range of O2 and relative humidity (RH) conditions (5%, 21%, 40% O2 and 5%, 60%, 90% RH). DGE was significantly less common in grasshoppers acclimated to dehydrating conditions compared with the other acclimations (hypoxia, 98%; hyperoxia, 100%; hydrated, 100%; dehydrated, 67%). Acclimation to dehydrating conditions resulted in a significant decrease in haemolymph pH from 7.0±0.3 to 6.6±0.1 (mean ± s.d., P=0.018) and also significantly increased the open (O)-phase duration under 5% O2 treatment conditions (5% O2, 44.1±29.3 min; 40% O2, 15.8±8.0 min; 5% RH, 17.8±1.3 min; 60% RH, 24.0±9.7 min; 90% RH, 20.6±8.9 min). The observed acidosis could potentially explain the extension of the O-phase under low RH conditions, when it would perhaps seem more useful to reduce the O-phase to lower respiratory water loss. The results confirm that DGE occurrence and modulation are affected by multiple abiotic factors. A hierarchical framework for abiotic factors influencing DGE is proposed in which the following stressors are prioritized in decreasing order of importance: oxygen supply, CO2 excretion and pH modulation, oxidative damage protection and water savings. PMID:25063854

  2. The secret stridulatory file under the right tegmen in katydids (Orthoptera, Ensifera, Tettigonioidea).

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Braun, Holger; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Males of most species of crickets and katydids produce species-specific calling songs to attract conspecific females. The typical stridulatory apparatus of the Ensifera consists of a file-and-scraper system in the basal dorsal region of the forewings (tegmina): the file on the underside of the cubital vein of one tegmen is composed of a series of lamelliform teeth and is run against the sclerotized scraper at the edge of the other tegmen. The region directly distal of the cubital vein is often thin and glassy and serves to amplify and spread the sound. In stridulating crickets the tegmina are quite symmetrical with both the left and the right one containing a file, which is considered the ancestral condition (Béthoux 2012). Most of these crickets adopted a right-over-left wing overlap and use only the right file. The few extant species of the ancient group Hagloidea have bilaterally symmetrical tegmina, both with functional files, and individual males can change the overlap (Morris & Gwynne 1978). Katydids are distinguished by a left-over-right wing overlap, with a stridulatory file on the underside of the left tegmen, and a scraper on the right one, which usually is also equipped with a mirror as resonating structure. PMID:24989770

  3. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group. PMID:26684616

  4. First song descriptions of some Anatolian species of Tettigoniidae Krauss, 1902 (Orthoptera, Ensifera)

    PubMed Central

    Şirin, Deniz; Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Mol, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fourteen endemic and two sub-endemic species belonging to three subfamilies of Tettigoniidae (Tettigoniinae, Bradyporinae and Saginae) were sampled during field trips throughout the different ranges of Anatolia between the years of 2004 and 2013. Acoustic parameters of these 16 species affiliated to 8 genera (Anterastes, Apholidoptera, Gampsocleis, Parapholidoptera, Pezodrymadusa, Psorodonotus, Bradyporus and Saga) have been described for the first time in this study. Acoustical analysis showed that song characters are species-specific in the genera Saga and Psorodonotus. On the other hand, we could not find big differences among species of the genus Pezodrymadusa and Parapholidoptera castaneoviridis species-group. PMID:24478585

  5. Montane and coastal species diversification in the economically important Mexican grasshopper genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Barrientos-Lozano, Ludivina; Rocha-Sánchez, Aurora Y; Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    The genus Sphenarium (Pyrgomorphidae) is a small group of grasshoppers endemic to México and Guatemala that are economically and culturally important both as a food source and as agricultural pests. However, its taxonomy has been largely neglected mainly due to its conserved interspecific external morphology and the considerable intraspecific variation in colour pattern of some taxa. Here we examined morphological as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data to assess the species boundaries and evolutionary history in Sphenarium. Our morphological identification and DNA sequence-based species delimitation, carried out with three different approaches (DNA barcoding, general mixed Yule-coalescent model, Bayesian species delimitation), all recovered a higher number of putative species of Sphenarium than previously recognised. We unambiguously delimit seven species, and between five and ten additional species depending on the data/method analysed. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus strongly support two main clades, one exclusively montane, the other coastal. Divergence time estimates suggest late Miocene to Pliocene ages for the origin and most of the early diversification events in the genus, which were probably influenced by the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A series of Pleistocene events could have led to the current species diversification in both montane and coastal regions. This study not only reveals an overlooked species richness for the most popular edible insect in Mexico, but also highlights the influence of the dynamic geological and climatic history of the region in shaping its current diversity. PMID:25593084

  6. A new species of Mongolodectes (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) from Alashan Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Xiang; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Chun-Tian

    2015-01-01

    The genus Mongolodectes is endemic to vast Mongolian Plateau and has two recorded species in the Mongolian People's Republic and one species in China's Inner Mongolia. Here we describe one new species Mongolodectes huangi sp. n. from China's Inner Mongolia. Further investigations are needed for precise identification and complete understanding on the fauna of the Mongolian Plateau. PMID:26701430

  7. Listening for males and bats: spectral processing in the hearing organ of Neoconocephalus bivocatus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Höbel, Gerlinde; Schul, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    Tettigoniids use hearing for mate finding and the avoidance of predators (mainly bats). Using intracellular recordings, we studied the response properties of auditory receptor cells of Neoconocephalus bivocatus to different sound frequencies, with a special focus on the frequency ranges representative of male calls and bat cries. We found several response properties that may represent adaptations for hearing in both contexts. Receptor cells with characteristic frequencies close to the dominant frequency of the communication signal were more broadly tuned, thus extending their range of high sensitivity. This increases the number of cells responding to the dominant frequency of the male call at low signal amplitudes, which should improve long distance call localization. Many cells tuned to audio frequencies had intermediate thresholds for ultrasound. As a consequence, a large number of receptors should be recruited at intermediate amplitudes of bat cries. This collective response of many receptors may function to emphasize predator information in the sensory system, and correlates with the amplitude range at which ultrasound elicits evasive behavior in tettigoniids. We compare our results with spectral processing in crickets, and discuss that both groups evolved different adaptations for the perceptual tasks of mate and predator detection. PMID:17572897

  8. 75 FR 45194 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Drawing from Nature...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Drawing from Nature: Landscapes by... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Drawing from Nature: Landscapes by Max Liebermann,...

  9. 75 FR 47337 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “German Impressionist...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``German Impressionist Landscape... the exhibition ``German Impressionist Landscape Painting: Liebermann--Corinth--Slevogt,''...

  10. Molecular Phylogeny of Nematodes (Oxyurida: Travassosinematidae) from Orthoptera (Gryllotalpidae) Inferred by Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neetu; Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we sequenced mt Cox 1 gene sequences of five nematode spp. that were infective to arthropod, Gryllotalpa africana. The nematode belongs to Thelastomatoidea, a group of pinworms that parasitizes only invertebrates. Currently, in India spp. of this group are distinguished mainly on the basis of morphological characters that present possible confusions. Therefore, we identified the species through morphological and genetic analysis. We selected mt Cox 1 gene region to show their phylogenetic position with closely related spp. and confirmed their molecular validation. The present findings are important to confirm the phylogenetic position and relationship among five nematode spp. and avoid misidentification regarding their validation, as it is more necessary in that case when many species harbours the same host. PMID:26339150

  11. Dichroplus vittatus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) follows the converse to Bergmann's rule although male morphological variability increases with latitude.

    PubMed

    Bidau, C J; Martí, D A

    2007-02-01

    Geographic body size variation was analysed in males and females of 19 populations of the South American grasshopper Dichroplus vittatus Bruner spanning 20 degrees of latitude and 2700 m of altitude. Using mean and maximum body length of each sex and factors obtained from principal components analyses of six morphometric linear characters it was shown that D. vittatus followed the converse to Bergmann's rule latitudinally but not altitudinally where no significant trends were observed. For males, variability of body size increased with latitude but not with altitude. Both types of trends were significantly correlated with mean annual temperature and minimum annual temperature (positive correlations), and two estimators of seasonality, the coefficients of variation of mean annual temperature (negative) and mean annual precipitation (positive). Some allometric relationships also showed geographic variation. It is suggested that the observed decrease in size with latitude together with the increase in morphological variability is a consequence of a number of factors: the shortening of the growing season southwards; the increasing seasonality and climatic unpredictability; and the fact that the species exhibits protandry which contributes to smaller and more variable size in males and smaller but more constant body size in females. PMID:17298684

  12. The effect of discontinuous gas exchange on respiratory water loss in grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) varies across an aridity gradient.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Talal, Stav; Ayali, Amir; Gefen, Eran

    2015-08-01

    The significance of discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC) in reducing respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects is contentious. Results from single-species studies are equivocal in their support of the classic 'hygric hypothesis' for the evolution of DGC, whereas comparative analyses generally support a link between DGC and water balance. In this study, we investigated DGC prevalence and characteristics and RWL in three grasshopper species (Acrididae, subfamily Pamphaginae) across an aridity gradient in Israel. In order to determine whether DGC contributes to a reduction in RWL, we compared the DGC characteristics and RWL associated with CO2 release (transpiration ratio, i.e. the molar ratio of RWL to CO2 emission rates) among these species. Transpiration ratios of DGC and continuous breathers were also compared intraspecifically. Our data show that DGC characteristics, DGC prevalence and the transpiration ratios correlate well with habitat aridity. The xeric-adapted Tmethis pulchripennis exhibited a significantly shorter burst period and lower transpiration ratio compared with the other two mesic species, Ocneropsis bethlemita and Ocneropsis lividipes. However, DGC resulted in significant water savings compared with continuous exchange in T. pulchripennis only. These unique DGC characteristics for T. pulchripennis were correlated with its significantly higher mass-specific tracheal volume. Our data suggest that the origin of DGC may not be adaptive, but rather that evolved modulation of cycle characteristics confers a fitness advantage under stressful conditions. This modulation may result from morphological and/or physiological modifications. PMID:26290590

  13. Organization of some repetitive DNAs and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Leptysminae)

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Allison; Loreto, Vilma; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes occur in approximately 15% of eukaryotes and are usually heterochromatic and rich in repetitive DNAs. Here we describe characteristics of a B chromosome in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) through classical cytogenetic methods and mapping of some repetitive DNAs, including multigene families, telomeric repeats and a DNA fraction enriched with repetitive DNAs obtained from DOP-PCR. Eumastusia koebelei koebelei presented 2n=23, X0 and, in one individual, two copies of the same variant of a B chromosome were noticed, which are associated during meiosis. The C-positive blocks were located in the pericentromeric regions of the standard complement and along the entire length of the B chromosomes. Some G+C-rich heterochromatic blocks were noticed, including conspicuous blocks in the B chromosomes. The mapping of 18S rDNA and U2 snDNA revealed only autosomal clusters, and the telomeric probe hybridized in terminal regions. Finally, the DOP-PCR probe obtained from an individual without a B chromosome revealed signals in the heterochromatic regions, including the entire length of the B chromosome. The possible intraspecific origin of the B chromosomes, due to the shared pool of repetitive DNAs between the A and B chromosomes and the possible consequences of their association are discussed. PMID:27551344

  14. Systematic status of true katydids Sathrophyllia (Orthoptera, Tettigonioidea, Pseudophyllinae) from Pakistan, with description of two new species

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Riffat; Panhwar, Waheed Ali; Wagan, Muhammad Saeed; Khatri, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The genus Sathrophyllia Stål, 1874 from Pakistan is reviewed with four species recorded. The diagnostic characters are given and two new species Sathrophyllia saeedi sp. n. and Sathrophyllia irshadi sp. n. are described. In addition to that Sathrophyllia nr. rugosa (Linnaeus, 1758) and Sathrophyllia femorata (Fabricius, 1787) are re-described. Further information on the distribution and ecology of the species is given and a key to studied species of Sathrophyllia is presented. Sathrophyllia femorata (Fabricius, 1787) and Sathrophyllia rugosa (Linnaeus, 1758) are recorded from Rawalakot (KPK) and Tharparker (Sindh), Pakistan for first the time. PMID:25610332

  15. Multivariate sexual selection on male song structure in wild populations of sagebrush crickets, Cyphoderris strepitans (Orthoptera: Haglidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ower, Geoffrey D; Judge, Kevin A; Steiger, Sandra; Caron, Kyle J; Smith, Rebecca A; Hunt, John; Sakaluk, Scott K

    2013-01-01

    While a number of studies have measured multivariate sexual selection acting on sexual signals in wild populations, few have confirmed these findings with experimental manipulation. Sagebrush crickets are ideally suited to such investigations because mating imposes an unambiguous phenotypic marker on males arising from nuptial feeding by females. We quantified sexual selection operating on male song by recording songs of virgin and mated males captured from three wild populations. To determine the extent to which selection on male song is influenced by female preference, we conducted a companion study in which we synthesized male songs and broadcast them to females in choice trials. Multivariate selection analysis revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface, the highest peak of which corresponded to longer train and pulse durations, and longer intertrain intervals. Longer trains and pulses likely promote greater mate attraction, but selection for longer intertrain durations suggests that energetic constraints may necessitate “time outs”. Playback trials confirmed the selection for longer train and pulse durations, and revealed significant stabilizing selection on dominant frequency, suggesting that the female auditory system is tightly tuned to the species-specific call frequency. Collectively, our results revealed a complex pattern of multivariate nonlinear selection characterized primarily by strong stabilizing and disruptive selection on male song traits. PMID:24223293

  16. The tribe Dysoniini part IV: New species of Quiva Hebard, 1927 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae) from Brazilian rainforest and some clarifications.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Sovano, Rafael S Da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Quiva: Quiva buhrnheimi n. sp. and Quiva gutjahrae n. sp. from Brazilian Amazon are described. Determinations for distributional data previously published by Sovano & Mendes (2013) are clarified and the synonymy of Ituana dorisae under Q. abacata is confirmed. In this paper, an updated key to subgenus Quiva is provided. PMID:26249483

  17. Identification and Characterization of Two “Sensory Neuron Membrane Proteins” (SNMPs) of the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xingcong; Pregitzer, Pablo; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive neurons of insects not only require specific receptors but in addition several auxiliary components, including the “sensory neuron membrane protein,” SNMP. Accordingly, SNMP is considered as a marker for neurons responding to pheromones. For the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, it is known that the behavior, including aggregation behavior and courtship inhibition, is largely controlled by pheromones. However, little is known about pheromones, their receptors, and the pheromone-responsive cells in locusts. In this study, we have identified two SNMP subtypes, SNMP1 and SNMP2, and compared their phylogenetic relationship and primary structure motifs with SNMPs from other species. Both SNMPs were found in chemosensory tissues, especially the antennae. Employing double in situ hybridization, we identified and localized the SNMP-expressing cells in the antennae. Cells expressing SNMP1 were localized to sensilla trichodea but also to sensilla basiconica, which in locust respond to pheromones. One or a few cells express SNMP1 within the multineuron clusters from sensilla basiconica, whereas the SNMP2 subtype was expressed in cells surrounding the neuron clusters, possibly supporting cells. Based on the finding that SNMP1 is expressed in distinct neurons under chemosensory sensilla, it is conceivable that these cells may represent pheromone-responsive neurons of the desert locust. PMID:27012870

  18. Review of the cave cricket genus Tamdaotettix Gorochov with a new species and some new descriptions (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae, Aemodogryllinae).

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanyan; Liu, Xianwei; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A review of the rhaphidophorid genus Tamdaotettix Gorochov, 1998 is presented. One new species, one newly-recorded species from China and one species from Vietnam are identified and described. These are namely Tamdaotettix (Tamdaotettix) tridenticulatus sp. nov., Tamdaotettix (Laotettix) curvatus Gorochov, 2015 and Tamdaotettix (Tamdaotettix) semipullus Gorochov, 1998. At the same time, Megadiestramima extensa Gorochov, 1998 is redescribed. A key to the species of Tamdaotettix is provided. PMID:27615845

  19. Habitat Association and Seasonality in a Mosaic and Bimodal Hybrid Zone between Chorthippus brunneus and C. jacobsi (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuta, Haruki; Butlin, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding why some hybrid zones are bimodal and others unimodal can aid in identifying barriers to gene exchange following secondary contact. The hybrid zone between the grasshoppers Chorthippus brunneus and C. jacobsi contains a mix of allopatric parental populations and inter-mingled bimodal and unimodal sympatric populations, and provides an ideal system to examine the roles of local selection and gene flow between populations in maintaining bimodality. However, it is first necessary to confirm, over a larger spatial scale, previously identified associations between population composition and season and habitat. Here we use cline-fitting of one morphological and one song trait along two valley transects, and intervening mountains, to confirm previously identified habitat associations (mountain versus valley) and seasonal changes in population composition. As expected from previous findings of studies on a smaller spatial scale, C. jacobsi dominated mountain habitats and mixed populations dominated valleys, and C. brunneus became more prevalent in August. Controlling for habitat and incorporating into the analysis seasonal changes in cline parameters and the standard errors of parental trait values revealed wider clines than previous studies (best estimates of 6.4 to 24.5 km in our study versus 2.8 to 4.7 km in previous studies) and increased percentage of trait variance explained (52.7% and 61.5% for transects 1 and 2 respectively, versus 17.6%). Revealing such strong and consistent patterns within a complex hybrid zone will allow more focused examination of the causes of variation in bimodality in mixed populations, in particular the roles of local selection versus habitat heterogeneity and gene flow between differentiated populations. PMID:22675485

  20. Taxonomic notes on Pternoscirtapulchripes Uvarov, 1925 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Oedipodinae) with proposal of new synonyms in the genera Flatovertex and Mioscirtus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Storozhenko, Sergey Yurievich; Mao, Benyong; Zheng, Zhemin

    2013-01-01

    Based on the examination of types and additional materials, the morphology of Pternoscirtapulchripes Uvarov, 1925 and Flatovertex species were reviewed. As a result of our study, the genus Flatovertex Zheng, 1981 was synonymized with the genus Pternoscirta Saussure, 1884, the species Flatovertex cyaneitibialis Zhang & Han, 2010 was synonymized with Pternoscirta caliginosa (Haan, 1842), Flatovertex rufotibialis Zheng, 1981 with Pternoscirta pulchripes Uvarov, 1925, and Flatovertex nigritibialis Zheng & Zhang, 2006 with Mioscirtus wagneri wagneri (Eversmann, 1859), respectively. Mioscirtus varentzowi Zubowsky, 1896 was considered as a junior synonym of Mioscirtus wagneri wagneri (Eversmann, 1849) but not that of Mioscirtus wagneri rogenhoferi (Saussure, 1888). PMID:26258245

  1. Discrimination of grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) diet and niche overlap using next-generation sequencing of gut contents

    PubMed Central

    McClenaghan, Beverly; Gibson, Joel F; Shokralla, Shadi; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Species of grasshopper have been divided into three diet classifications based on mandible morphology: forbivorous (specialist on forbs), graminivorous (specialist on grasses), and mixed feeding (broad-scale generalists). For example, Melanoplus bivittatus and Dissosteira carolina are presumed to be broad-scale generalists, Chortophaga viridifasciata is a specialist on grasses, and Melanoplus femurrubrum is a specialist on forbs. These classifications, however, have not been verified in the wild. Multiple specimens of these four species were collected, and diet analysis was performed using DNA metabarcoding of the gut contents. The rbcLa gene region was amplified and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Levins’ measure and the Shannon–Wiener measure of niche breadth were calculated using family-level identifications and Morisita’s measure of niche overlap was calculated using operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Gut contents confirm both D. carolina and M. bivittatus as generalists and C. viridifasciata as a specialist on grasses. For M. femurrubrum, a high niche breadth was observed and species of grasses were identified in the gut as well as forbs. Niche overlap values did not follow predicted patterns, however, the low values suggest low competition between these species. PMID:26356479

  2. Ommexecha virens (Thunberg, 1824) and Descampsacris serrulatum (Serville, 1831) (Orthoptera, Ommexechidae): karyotypes, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizing regions

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, D.B.; Rocha, M.F.; Loreto, V.; Silva, A.E.B.; Souza, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chromosomes of Ommexecha virens and Descampsacris serrulatum (Ommexechidae) were analyzed through conventional staining, C-banding, base specific fluorochromes, silver nitrate impregnation (AgNO3), and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probe for 45S rDNA. The two species presented diploid number 2n= 23,X0 in males and acrocentric autosomes, except the pair one that presented submetacentric morphology. The X chromosome has distinct morphology in the two analyzed species, being a medium acrocentric in Ommexecha virens and large submetacentric in Descampsacris serrulatum. The C-banding revealed pericentromeric blocks of constitutive heterochromatin (CH) in all the chromosomes of Descampsacris serrulatum. For Ommexecha virens it was evidenced that the blocks of CH are preferentially located in the pericentromeric area (however some bivalents presents additional blocks) or in different positions. The staining with CMA3/DA/DAPI showed GC rich CH blocks (CMA3+) in some chromosomes of the two species. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were located in the bivalents L2, S9, S10 of Ommexecha virens and M5, M6, M7, S11 of Descampsacris serrulatum. The FISH for rDNA showed coincident results with the pattern of active NORs revealed by AgNO3. This work presents the first chromosomal data, obtained through differential cytogenetics techniques in Ommexechidae, contributing to a better characterization of karyotypic evolution for this grasshopper family. PMID:24260624

  3. Molecular systematics of the genus Troglophilus (Rhaphidophoridae, Orthoptera) in Turkey: mitochondrial 16S rDNA evidences

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Mehmet Sait; Russo, Claudio Di; Rampini, Mauro; Ketmaier, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study focuses on the evolutionary relationships among Turkish species of the cave cricket genus Troglophilus.Fifteen populations were studied for sequence variation in a fragment (543 base pairs) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 16S rDNA gene (16S) to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic history. Genetic data retrieved three main clades and at least three divergent lineages that could not be attributed to any of the taxa known for the area. Molecular time estimates suggest that the diversification of the group took place between the Messinian and the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:23653493

  4. A new genus and two new species of Luzarinae cricket from the Atlantic Forest of Northeast Brazil (Orthoptera, Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2014-01-01

    A new genus and two new species of Luzarinae crickets (Grylloidea, Phalangopsidae) are described from the Atlantic Forest of Northeast Brazil. Marcgraviella muriciensis Souza-Dias n. gen., n. sp. and M. christianae Desutter-Grandcolas & Souza-Dias n. gen., n. sp. are described using characters of morphology and male genitalia. The new genus is characterized by male genitalia singularities, presenting elongated and inflatable pseudepiphallic parameres, which lies in vertical or almost vertical position, and long and tubular pseudepiphallic arms associated to phallic glands. We provide a discussion about the morphology of male genitalia and the function of the phallic glands and pseudepiphallic arms in Marcgraviella n. gen. and related taxa. An identification key for Marcgraviella n. gen. and related genera is proposed. These genera, which bear phallic glands, are placed in the newly named group, the Aracambiae. PMID:25544098

  5. Notes on the genus Conocephalus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Conocephalinae; Conocephalini) from India and description of two new species.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra; Swaminathan, R

    2016-01-01

    The present paper describes two new species of Conocephalus: Conocephalus decaspinosus sp. nov. and C. kwasiphaiensis sp. nov., as additions to the previously known species of the genus; among these, two species have been reported for the first time from India, viz., C. concolor peneri and C. vaginalis. The key morphological characters of the head, pronotum, cerci, spines on the fore tibiae, hind femora, stridulatory file and the ovipositor have been illustrated with suitable line drawings to distinguish the reported new species. The distribution map of the species in India has been provided with a key to the subgenera. PMID:27395571

  6. New Records Reveal the Actual Distribution of Cratomelus meritus Gorochov (Orthoptera: Anostostomatidae), a Giant Red Cricket from Chile.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, F M; Zuñiga-Reinoso, A; Muñoz-Ramírez, C; Elgueta, M

    2015-04-01

    The geographic distribution of the red cricket Cratomelus meritus Gorochov had remained unknown until now due to mislabeling and lack of new records. The aim of this short communication is to uncover and establish the actual distribution of the species on the basis of new records and discuss potential biogeographic hypotheses about its distribution. PMID:26013139

  7. DAMAGE POTENTIAL OF GRASSHOPPERS (ORTHOPTERA: ACRIDIDAE) ON EARLY GROWTH STAGES OF SMALL-GRAINS AND CANOLA UNDER SUBARCTIC CONDITIONS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small-grains, such as barley and oats, have been successfully grown under subarctic conditions but little is known about their response to herbivory by grasshoppers, especially during seedling stages. A growth chamber study quantified and characterized damage to above- and below-ground plant parts ...

  8. Microbial Ecology of the Gut in Laboratory Stocks of the Migratory Grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fab.) (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Lorna J.; Khachatourians, G. G.; Jones, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    Mean pH values in pooled samples of foregut, midgut, and hindgut from adult Melanoplus sanguinipes, which had been raised in the laboratory on barley shoots and wheat bran, were 5.15, 6.39, and 5.98, respectively. Homogenates of midgut/hindgut sections and frass (feces) yielded colony counts of bacteria by the spread plate method of 5.7 to 5.9 and 5.3 to 5.5 log10 colonies per mg, respectively; there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) between counts obtained on several media or on media incubated aerobically or anaerobically. There was no evidence of significant populations of protozoa, fungi, or obligately anaerobic bacteria associated with the gut. A total of 168 pure strains of bacteria isolated from the gut sections were characterized and assigned to 11 taxonomic groups, including Enterococcus spp., Serratia liquefaciens, Pseudomonas spp., and Enterobacter spp. Numbers of Enterococcus spp. in the gut were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of the other genera. Strains representing only four of the groups were recovered from bran fed to the grasshoppers; the barley shoots, which were raised in sterile soil, appeared virtually sterile. Examination of the gut wall by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of epimural bacteria in the foregut and hindgut but not in the midgut. The distribution of epimural cocci and bacilli differed with the gut section examined. Numerous spherical to ovoid structures up to 10 μm in diameter, which were not identified, were associated with the microvillous surface of the midgut epithelium. Acetate was present in gut, hemolymph, and frass, and it was shown that representative isolates of Enterococcus spp. and Enterobacter agglomerans produced acetate when incubated in an aqueous suspension of bran. The egestion time of solid digesta, as measured with methylene blue-stained barley shoots, was 3.0 to 5.7 h. The results show that M. sanguinipes supported extensive indigenous populations of luminal and epimural bacteria in the gut which were composed predominantly of facultatively anaerobic species; the relatively short egestion time, indicating rapid passage of digesta through the gut, was consistent with the microscopic appearance of digesta residues in frass and could account, at least in part, for the absence of a significant population of obligately anaerobic bacteria from the gut. Images PMID:16347630

  9. [Variations in the permeability of the testicular follicle of Locusta migratoria migratorioides (Orthoptera) during the last larval instar].

    PubMed

    Marcaillou, C; Szöllösi, A

    1975-12-22

    Variations of the testicular permeability are demonstrated in Locusta migratoria by using tracers such as iron-containing particles of protein. The testicular region containing spermatids is never penetrated by the tracers in contrast to the apical region containing gonia and young spermatocytes. Permeability of this compartment shows variations during the intermoult. PMID:816514

  10. [Transmission analysis of the B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria migratorioides R. et F. (Orthoptera, Acrididae) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lepinasse, R

    1977-02-23

    In a African grasshopper population of Locusta migratoria migratorioides reared in the laboratory, B chromosome transmission is analysed in progeny of pairs taken at radom from the population. An accumulation mechanism of Bs exists in the females which presumably results from preferential egregation of the Bs in the female pronucleus. The analysis also shows B chromosome elimination during embryonic and larval development by means of mitotic non-kisjunction: these non-disjunctions induce interfollicular variations in the number of Bs but all the cells of a follicle have the same number of Bs. The frequency of animals with B chromosome rises from 34% to 75% as the diurnal temperature rises from 27 degrees C to 35 degrees C. Thus frequency is controlled by genetic and environmental factors. PMID:837806

  11. A Modified Mole Cricket Lure and Description of Scapteriscus borellii (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) Range Expansion and Calling Song in California

    PubMed Central

    Dillman, Adler R.; Cronin, Christopher J.; Tang, Joseph; Gray, David A.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mole cricket species in the genus Scapteriscus have become significant agricultural pests and are continuing to expand their range in North America. Though largely subterranean, adults of some species such as S. borellii are capable of long dispersive flights and phonotaxis to male calling songs to find suitable habitats and mates. Mole crickets in the genus Scapteriscus are known to be attracted to and can be caught by audio lure traps that broadcast synthesized or recorded calling songs. We report improvements in the design and production of electronic controllers for the automation of semi-permanent mole cricket trap lures as well as highly portable audio trap collection designs. Using these improved audio lure traps we collected the first reported individuals of the pest mole cricket S. borellii in California. We describe several characteristic features of the calling song of the California population including that the pulse rate is a function of soil temperature, similar to Florida populations of S. borellii. Further, we show that other calling song characteristics (carrier frequency, intensity, and pulse rate) are significantly different between the populations. PMID:24472207

  12. Spore loads of Paranosema locustae (Microsporidia) in heavily infected grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) of the Argentine Pampas and Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Plischuk, Santiago; Bardi, Christian J; Lange, Carlos E

    2013-09-01

    Paranosema locustae, an entomopathogen of grasshoppers and locusts, remains the only microsporidium registered as a biocontrol agent. After introductions from North America, it became established in grasshopper communities of Argentina. We measured the infection intensity of field collected, heavily infected male and female adults of individuals belonging to six grasshopper species, five melanoplines (Melanoplinae) (Baeacris pseudopunctulatus, Dichroplus maculipennis, Dichroplus vittatus, Neopedies brunneri, Scotussa lemniscata), and one gomphocerine (Gomphocerinae) (Staurorhectus longicornis). Average spore load among heavily infected grasshoppers ranged from 8.7±0.5×10(7) to 1.1±0.7×10(9). Only females of B. pseudopunctulatus and S. longicornis showed significantly higher spore loads than the males. PMID:23796497

  13. Immediate Protein Dietary Effects on Movement and the Generalised Immunocompetence of Migrating Mormon Crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Mormon crickets form large migratory bands that march over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Immune defense is particularly relevant to survival in migratory bands, but little is known about the role of nutrition in insect immunocompetence. We hypothesized that imm...

  14. Ecology of the tawny mole cricket, Scapteriscus vicinus (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae): population estimation, spatial distribution, movement, and host relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    Scapteriscus vicinus is the most important pest of turf and pasture grasses in Florida. This study develops a method of correlating sample results with true population density and provides the first quantitative information on spatial distribution and movement patterns of mole crickets. Three basic techniques for sampling mole crickets were compared: soil flushes, soil corer, and pitfall trapping. No statistical difference was found between the soil corer and soil flushing. Soil flushing was shown to be more sensitive to changes in population density than pitfall trapping. No technique was effective for sampling adults. Regression analysis provided a means of adjusting for the effects of soil moisture and showed soil temperature to be unimportant in predicting efficiency of flush sampling. Cesium-137 was used to label females for subsequent location underground. Comparison of mean distance to nearest neighbor with the distance predicted by a random distribution model showed that the observed distance in the spring was significantly greater than hypothesized (Student's T-test, p < 0.05). Fall adult nearest neighbor distance was not different than predicted by the random distribution hypothesis.

  15. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  16. First record of Sonotrella Gorochov (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) from Laos, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Zhang, Dong-Xiao; Shi, Fu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The genus Sonotrella Gorochov, 1988 is recorded to Laos for the first time. A new species is described and illustrated, S. (Sonotrella) laosensis sp. nov. (type locality: Laos). A distribution map of the species of Sonotrella (Sonotrella) and a key to the subgenera of Sonotrella worldwide are given. PMID:27395125

  17. Complete mitogenome of the semi-aquatic grasshopper Oxya intricate (Stål.) (Insecta: Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    PubMed

    Dong, Jia-Jia; Guan, De-Long; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitogenome of Oxya intricate (Stål.) has been reconstructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data with an average coverage of 294×. The circular genome is 15,466 bp in length, and consists of 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 D-loop region. All PCGs are initiated with ATN codons, and are terminated with TAR codons except for ND5 with the incomplete stop codon T. The nucleotide composition is asymmetric (42.5%A, 14.6%C, 10.6%G, 32.3%T) with an overall GC content of 25.2%. These data would contribute to the design of novel molecular markers for population and evolutionary studies of this and related orthopteran species. PMID:25806577

  18. Potential of the Desert Locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Unconventional Source of Dietary and Therapeutic Sterols

    PubMed Central

    Cheseto, Xavier; Kuate, Serge Philibert; Tchouassi, David P.; Ndung’u, Mary; Teal, Peter E. A.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2015-01-01

    Insects are increasingly being recognized not only as a source of food to feed the ever growing world population but also as potential sources of new products and therapeutic agents, among which are sterols. In this study, we sought to profile sterols and their derivatives present in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, focusing on those with potential importance as dietary and therapeutic components for humans. Using coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we analyzed and compared the quantities of sterols in the different sections of the gut and tissues of the locust. In the gut, we identified 34 sterols which showed a patchy distribution, but with the highest composition in the foregut (55%) followed by midgut (31%) and hindgut (14%). Fed ad libitum on wheat seedlings, five sterols unique to the insect were detected. These sterols were identified as 7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, fucosterol, (3β, 5α) cholesta-8, 14, 24-trien-3-ol, 4, 4-dimethyl, and (3β, 20R) cholesta-5, 24-dien-3, 20-diol with the first three having known health benefits in humans. Incubation of the fore-, mid- and hindgut with cholesterol-[4-13C] yielded eight derivatives, three of these were detected in the gut of the desert locust after it had consumed the vegetative diet but were not detected in the diet. Our study shows that the desert locust ingests phytosterols from a vegetative diet and, amplifies and metabolizes them into derivatives with potential salutary benefits and we discuss our findings in this context. PMID:25970517

  19. Organization of some repetitive DNAs and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Leptysminae).

    PubMed

    Anjos, Allison; Loreto, Vilma; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes occur in approximately 15% of eukaryotes and are usually heterochromatic and rich in repetitive DNAs. Here we describe characteristics of a B chromosome in the grasshopper Eumastusia koebelei koebelei (Rehn, 1909) through classical cytogenetic methods and mapping of some repetitive DNAs, including multigene families, telomeric repeats and a DNA fraction enriched with repetitive DNAs obtained from DOP-PCR. Eumastusia koebelei koebelei presented 2n=23, X0 and, in one individual, two copies of the same variant of a B chromosome were noticed, which are associated during meiosis. The C-positive blocks were located in the pericentromeric regions of the standard complement and along the entire length of the B chromosomes. Some G+C-rich heterochromatic blocks were noticed, including conspicuous blocks in the B chromosomes. The mapping of 18S rDNA and U2 snDNA revealed only autosomal clusters, and the telomeric probe hybridized in terminal regions. Finally, the DOP-PCR probe obtained from an individual without a B chromosome revealed signals in the heterochromatic regions, including the entire length of the B chromosome. The possible intraspecific origin of the B chromosomes, due to the shared pool of repetitive DNAs between the A and B chromosomes and the possible consequences of their association are discussed. PMID:27551344

  20. [Molecular phylogenetic relationships among species in Oxya serville(Orthoptera: Catantopidae) based on random amplified polymorphic DNA(RAPD)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, En-Bo; Guo, Ya-Ping

    2003-06-01

    The molecular phylogenetic relationships of five species of Oxya Audient-serville including O. chinensis, O. brachyptera, O. agavisa, O. japonica and O. intricata were studied with RAPD. Genomic DNA of forty-one individuals were amplified with eight oligonucleotide (10 mer) primers which were previously selected, the specifical bands occured in all them, a total of 96 clear and reproducible bands (rang from 200-2500 bp) were generated, 95 of which were polymorphic band, the only one band (850 bp) which was amplified with S362 was common to five species of Oxya. The obtaining segments of individual primer were between 8-16, the average was 12. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on was constructed Euclidean distance among five species of rice grasshopper by between-groups linkage method, the result indicated O. chinensis was closely related to O. brachyptera, the genetic relationship of O. japonica and O. agavisa was also close, whereas O. intricata had far phylogenetic relationship with them. The results of dendrogram were consistent with the previous conclusion of morphologic classification and cytotaxonomy, and suggested RAPD was suitable for analysis of phylogenetic relationships among species of Oxya. PMID:12939798

  1. Identification and Characterization of Two "Sensory Neuron Membrane Proteins" (SNMPs) of the Desert Locust, Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingcong; Pregitzer, Pablo; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive neurons of insects not only require specific receptors but in addition several auxiliary components, including the "sensory neuron membrane protein," SNMP. Accordingly, SNMP is considered as a marker for neurons responding to pheromones. For the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, it is known that the behavior, including aggregation behavior and courtship inhibition, is largely controlled by pheromones. However, little is known about pheromones, their receptors, and the pheromone-responsive cells in locusts. In this study, we have identified two SNMP subtypes, SNMP1 and SNMP2, and compared their phylogenetic relationship and primary structure motifs with SNMPs from other species. Both SNMPs were found in chemosensory tissues, especially the antennae. Employing double in situ hybridization, we identified and localized the SNMP-expressing cells in the antennae. Cells expressing SNMP1 were localized to sensilla trichodea but also to sensilla basiconica, which in locust respond to pheromones. One or a few cells express SNMP1 within the multineuron clusters from sensilla basiconica, whereas the SNMP2 subtype was expressed in cells surrounding the neuron clusters, possibly supporting cells. Based on the finding that SNMP1 is expressed in distinct neurons under chemosensory sensilla, it is conceivable that these cells may represent pheromone-responsive neurons of the desert locust. PMID:27012870

  2. Turn the temperature to turquoise: cues for colour change in the male chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L

    2011-09-01

    Rapid, reversible colour change is unusual in animals, but is a feature of male chameleon grasshoppers (Kosciuscola tristis). Understanding what triggers this colour change is paramount to developing hypotheses explaining its evolutionary significance. In a series of manipulative experiments the author quantified the effects of temperature, and time of day, as well as internal body temperature, on the colour of male K. tristis. The results suggest that male chameleon grasshoppers change colour primarily in response to temperature and that the rate of colour change varies considerably, with the change from black to turquoise occurring up to 10 times faster than the reverse. Body temperature changed quickly (within 10min) in response to changes in ambient temperature, but colour change did not match this speed and thus colour is decoupled from internal temperature. This indicates that male colour change is driven primarily by ambient temperature but that their colour does not necessarily reflect current internal temperature. I propose several functional hypotheses for male colour change in K. tristis. PMID:21708162

  3. Humidity and seasonality drives body size patterns in males of the bush cricket Isophya rizeensis Sevgili, 2003 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae).

    PubMed

    Cağlar, Selim S; Karacaoğlu, Cağaşan; Kuyucu, A Cem; Sağlam, Ismail K

    2014-04-01

    Two primary patterns of body size variation have been recorded in ectotherms in relation to latitudinal/altitudinal shifts. In some, body size increases with increasing latitude/altitude whereas, in others, body size decreases with increasing latitude/altitude. This clinal variation is generally assumed to be caused by local adaptation to environmental conditions however the selective variable(s) (temperature, humidity, diet quality, etc.) is still heavily debated. Here we investigate geographic variation in body size of dark and pale color morphs of males of the bush-cricket Isophya rizeensis collected from 15 locations along an elevation gradient ranging from 350 to 2 500 m. Using an information theoretical approach we evaluate the relative support of four different hypotheses (the temperature size rule, the moisture gradient hypothesis, the seasonal constraint hypothesis, and the primary productivity hypothesis) explaining body size variation along the altitudinal gradient. Body size variation in pale color morphs showed a curvilinear relationship with altitude while dark color morphs showed no variation in body size. Body size variation in pale color morphs was highly correlated with precipitation and temperature seasonality values thus giving strong support for the moisture gradient and seasonal constraint hypothesis. Our results reinforce the importance of gradients in humidity and seasonality over temperature in the creation of altitudinal body size clines and the role of selection for resistance to stress factors in the establishment of these clines. Whether a body size cline is observed or not might also depend on the phenotypic properties of the individuals, like coloration. PMID:23956203

  4. The subgenual organ complex in the cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae): comparative innervation and sensory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Johannes; Stritih, Nataša; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of the organization of nervous systems and sensory organs can reveal their evolution and specific adaptations. In the forelegs of some Ensifera (including crickets and tettigoniids), tympanal hearing organs are located in close proximity to the mechanosensitive subgenual organ (SGO). In the present study, the SGO complex in the non-hearing cave cricket Troglophilus neglectus (Rhaphidophoridae) is investigated for the neuronal innervation pattern and for organs homologous to the hearing organs in related taxa. We analyse the innervation pattern of the sensory organs (SGO and intermediate organ (IO)) and its variability between individuals. In T. neglectus, the IO consists of two major groups of closely associated sensilla with different positions. While the distal-most sensilla superficially resemble tettigoniid auditory sensilla in location and orientation, the sensory innervation does not show these two groups to be distinct organs. Though variability in the number of sensory nerve branches occurs, usually either organ is supplied by a single nerve branch. Hence, no sensory elements clearly homologous to the auditory organ are evident. In contrast to other non-hearing Ensifera, the cave cricket sensory structures are relatively simple, consistent with a plesiomorphic organization resembling sensory innervation in grasshoppers and stick insects. PMID:26064547

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a lysozyme cDNA from the mole cricket Gryllotalpa orientalis (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyojung; Bang, Kyeongrin; Lee, Minsup; Cho, Saeyoull

    2014-09-01

    A full-length lysozyme cDNA from Gryllotalpa orientalis was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lysozyme protein was 143 amino acids in length, with a calculated molecular mass of 15.84 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.74. Sequence motifs, together with alignment and phylogenetic results, confirmed that G. orientalis lysozyme belongs to the C (chicken)-type lysozyme family of proteins. The protein sequence of lysozyme from G. orientalis showed high identity to that of Drosophila melanogaster (51.7 %); however, in contrast to D. melanogaster lysozyme, G. orientalis lysozyme was immune inducible and expressed in a wide range of tissues. Expression of G. orientalis lysozyme mRNA was highest at 8 h post-infection and subsequently decreased with time after bacterial infection. We also expressed G. orientalis lysozyme protein in vitro using the pET expression system. Compared with the negative control, over-expressed G. orientalis lysozyme showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis by radial diffusion assay, with minimal inhibitory concentration values of 30.3 and 7.55 µM, respectively. These results indicate that G. orientalis lysozyme may have stronger antimicrobial activity than other lysozymes against a broad range of microorganisms. PMID:24929538

  6. A test of Allen's rule in ectotherms: the case of two south American Melanopline Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) with partially overlapping geographic ranges.

    PubMed

    Bidau, Claudio J; Martí, Dardo A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the geographic variation of three morphometric characters in relation to body size in two South American grasshoppers (Acrididae), Dichroplus vittatus Bruner and D. pratensis Bruner to test Allen's rule in these ectotherms. Since both species follow the converse to Bergmann's rule owing to latitudinal and/or altitudinal variation in time available for growth and reproduction, geographic variation in body size proportions of protruding parts may obey to differential allometric growth in different geographic areas. Alternatively, it could reflect true Allenian variation related to thermoregulation. Body proportions were studied by correlation/regression analyses with geographic and climatic variables. In D. pratensis, body proportions increased with latitude and decreased with altitude. These results probably obey to the effects of water balance and seasonality on final body size, and on the allometric growth of the three studied characters not being related to thermoregulation. In D. vittatus, a generally non-significant trend towards the decrease of the mean proportions of all three characters with increasing latitude was observed. Nevertheless, also in this species, it is probable that the environmental gradient responds to seasonality factors (although not to water balance) that affect the length of growing season and, in consequence, body size and its allometric relationships. We conclude that the regularities in the geographic distribution of body proportions of D. pratensis and D. vittatus do not follow Allen's rule in the sense of thermoregulation, and result from variables that determine growing season length and the allometric growth of different body parts. PMID:18813738

  7. A new species and a key to 19 species of the genus Traulia Stål, 1873 (Orthoptera: Catantopidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cheng-Quan; Shi, Jian-Ping; Yin, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the genus Traulia Stål, 1873 namely Traulia xiai sp. nov. is described from China in this paper. The new species is similar to Traulia brachypeza Bi, 1986, but differs from the latter by the short tegmina, reaching the middle of third abdominal tergite only. The new species is also similar to Traulia ornate Shiraki, 1910, but differs from the latter by hind tibia all orange red and furculae of male absent. We think that Traulia yifengensis Wang, Xiangyu & Liu, 1997 is a valid species, not a synonym of Traulia brachypeza Bi, 1985 by Wei & Huang (2012), because the tegmina of Traulia yifengensis is very long, extending over the end of abdomen distinctly. A key to 19 species of this genus from China is also given in this paper. The type specimens are deposited in the National Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan, China. PMID:26624686

  8. A new species in the genus Alectorolophus Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1898 from Indonesia with discussion on its position compared to allied genera in subfamily Catantopinae (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Kim, Taewoo

    2016-01-01

    Alectorolophus impunctus Storozhenko et Kim, sp. nov. from Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, is described here. Keys to both sexes of all known species and subspecies of Alectorolophus are also provided in this report. The position of genus Alectorolophus in the systematics of grasshoppers is clarified. It belongs to subtribe Ecphantina (Catantopinae: Catantopini) consisting of nine genera distributed in Australia and Oriental regions. The diagnosis of Ecphantina is clarified and a key to genera is provided. An annotated list of the genera and species of Ecphantina is given. Moreover, the correct name of the subfamily Coptacridinae is Coptacrinae Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1893. PMID:27395214

  9. The Grasshopper and the Taxonomer. Use of Song and Structure in Orthoptera Saltatoria for Teaching the Principles of Taxonomy. Part 1. Field and Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the coordinated study of European grasshoppers as living specimens in the field and as permanent laboratory preparations for introducing taxonomic principles. Provides details for the preparation of specimens and sample instructions provided to students. Part I of a three-part series. (AL)

  10. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of pre-diapause and non-diapause eggs of migratory locust, Locusta migratoria L. (Orthoptera: Acridoidea).

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongbing; Wang, Jie; Hao, Kun; Whitman, Douglas W; Fan, Yaoli; Cao, Guangchun; Zhang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature induces diapause in locusts. However, the physiological processes and initiation mechanism of diapause are not well understood. To understand the molecular basis of diapause, 'omics' analyses were performed to examine the differences between diapause and non-diapause eggs at both transcriptional and translational levels. Results indicated that a total of 62,241 mRNAs and 212 proteins were differentially expressed. Among them, 116 transcripts had concurrent transcription and translation profiles. Up-regulated genes related to diapause included glutathiones-S-transferase et al., and down-regulated genes including juvenile hormone esterase-like protein et al. KEGG analysis mapped 7,243 and 99 differentially expressed genes and proteins, to 83 and 25 pathways, respectively. Correlation enriched pathways indicated that there were nine identical pathways related to diapause. Gene Ontology analysis placed these genes and proteins into three categories, and a higher proportion of genes related to metabolism was up-regulated than down-regulated. Furthermore, three up-regulated pathways were linked to cryoprotection. This study demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput omics tools to identify molecules linked to diapause in the locust. In addition, it reveals cellular metabolism in diapause eggs is more active than in non-diapause eggs, and up-regulated enzymes may play roles in cryoprotection and storing energy for diapause and post-diapause stages. PMID:26091374

  11. First record of the subfamily Anoplophilinae (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) from Russia with description of a new species of the genus Alpinanoplophilus Ishikawa, 1993.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu

    2015-01-01

    The subfamily Anoplophilinae (Rhaphidophopridae) is recorded from Russia for the first time. Alpinanoplophilus kurilensis Storozhenko, sp. nov. is described from Kunashir Island. The holotype of the new species is deposited in the Zoological Institute of Russian Academy of Science (St. Petersburg, Russia). A revised key to the species of the genus Alpinanoplophilus Ishikawa, 1993 is provided. PMID:26249867

  12. Convergent and divergent patterns of morphological differentiation provide more evidence for reproductive character displacement in a wood cricket Gryllus fultoni (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yikweon; Won, Yong-Jin; Choe, Jae Chun

    2009-01-01

    Background In ecological character displacement, traits involved in reproductive isolation may not evolve in arbitrary directions when changes in these traits are by-products of adaptation to an ecological niche. In reproductive character displacement, however, selection acts directly on reproductive characters to enhance the degree of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations. Thus, the direction of change in reproductive characters may be arbitrary in relation to changes in other morphological characters. We characterized both tegminal characters and characters indicative of body size in sympatric and allopatric populations of Gryllus fultoni, a species displaying character displacement in its calling song characters in areas of sympatry with G. vernalis populations, to infer the nature and direction of selection acting on reproductive and morphological characters in sympatry. Results Except for mirror area, the number of teeth in a file, and ovipositor length of G. fultoni, all male and female morphological characters in G. fultoni and G. vernalis exhibited a uniform tendency to decrease in size with increasing latitude. There was no significant variation in female morphological characters between sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations. However, males of sympatric and allopatric G. fultoni populations significantly differed in head width, hind femur length, and mirror area even after controlling for clinal factors. Head width and hind femur length of G. fultoni were more similar to those of G. vernalis in sympatric populations than in allopatric populations, resulting in morphological convergence of G. fultoni and G. vernalis in sympatry. However, the mirror area of G. fultoni displayed the divergent pattern in relation to the sympatric G. vernalis populations. Conclusion Divergence-enhancing selection may be acting on mirror area as well as calling song characters, whereas local adaptation or clinal effects may explain variation in other morphological characters in sympatric populations of G. fultoni. This study also suggests that structures and behaviors that directly enhance reproductive isolation may evolve together, independently of other morphological traits. PMID:19183503

  13. Lethal effects of treatment with a special dimeticone formula on head lice and house crickets (Orthoptera, Ensifera: Acheta domestica and Anoplura, phthiraptera: Pediculus humanus). Insights into physical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Richling, Ira; Böckeler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The present study provides the first convincing explanation of the mode of action of the medical device NYDA, a special dimeticone (CAS 9006-65-9) formula containing 92% of two dimeticones with different viscosities specifically designed for the physical treatment of head lice infestations (pediculosis capitis) by suffocation. Both, lice (Pediculus humanus) and house crickets (Acheta domestica) treated with this anti-head lice product are knocked out to the status "of no major vital signs" within less than 1 min that in consequence is accompanied irreversibly with the death of the respective insects. Scanning electron microscopical investigations have revealed that the cuticle is coated by a thin closed layer of the dimeticone formula that also enters the stigmata. In vivo observations and dissections of Acheta domestica have shown that application of the medical device to the thoracic stigmata invariably leads to rapid death; this is strongly correlated with the influx of the special dimeticone formula into the head trachea, whereby the solution effectively blocks the oxygen supply of the central nervous system. Dissections after application of the stained product show that it also enters the finest tracheal branches. Analogous in vivo observations in Pediculus humanus have confirmed the correlation between the disappearance of major vital signs and the displacement of air by the dimeticone formula in the tracheal system of the head. For both insect species, statistical data are provided for the chronological sequence of the filling of the tracheal system in relation to the respective vitality conditions of the Insects. On average, the special dimeticone formula reaches the insect's head tracheae within 0.5 min in house crickets and in less than 1 min in lice with a complete filling of the entire head tracheal system of lice within 3.5 min. In addition, a timed sequence of images illustrates this process for lice. The experiments clearly reveal the exclusive and pure physical mode of action of the tested dimeticone formula. PMID:18589559

  14. Isolation, characterization, kinetics, and enzymatic and nonenzymatic microbicidal activities of a novel c-type lysozyme from plasma of Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Elmogy, Mohamed; Bassal, Taha T M; Yousef, Hesham A; Dorrah, Moataza A; Mohamed, Amr A; Duvic, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A protein, designated as Sgl, showing a muramidase lytic activity to the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus lysodeikticus was isolated for the first time from plasma of Escherichia coli-immunized fifth instar Schistocerca gregaria. The isolated Sgl was detected as a single protein band, on both native- and SDS-PAGE, has a molecular weight of ∼15.7 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of ca 9.3 and its antiserum has specifically recognized its isolated form. Fifty-nine percentage of Sgl lytic activity was recovered in the isolated fractions and yielded ca 126-fold increase in specific activity than that of the crude. The partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Sgl has 55 and 40% maximum identity with Bombyx mori and Gallus gallus c-type lysozymes, respectively. The antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive and the Gram-negative bacteria were comparatively stronger than that of the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The detected Sgl poration to the inner membrane that reach a maximum ability after 3 h was suggested to operate as a nonenzymatic mechanism for Gram-negative bacterial cell lysis, as tested in a permease-deficient E. coli, ML-35 strain. Sgl showed a maximal muramidase activity at pH 6.2, 30-50°C, and 0.05 M Ca(2+) or Mg(2+); and has a Km of 0.5 μg/ml and a Vmax of 0.518 with M. lysodeikticus as a substrate. The Sgl displayed a chitinase activity against chitin with a Km of 0.93 mg/ml and a Vmax of 1.63. PMID:25972507

  15. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity in urban microreserves in a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica")

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Lewallen, E.A.; Deas, J.; Bohonak, A.J.; Weissman, D.B.; Fisher, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Microreserves may be useful in protecting native arthropod diversity in urbanized landscapes. However, species that do not disperse through the urban matrix may eventually be lost from these fragments. Population extinctions may be precipitated by an increase in genetic differentiation among fragments and loss of genetic diversity within fragments, and these effects should become stronger with time. We analyzed population genetic structure in the dispersal limited Jerusalem cricket Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica" in the Santa Monica Mountains and Simi Hills north of Los Angeles, California (CA), to determine the impacts of fragmentation over the past 70 years. MtDNA divergence was greater among urban fragments than within contiguous habitat and was positively correlated with fragment age. MtDNA genetic diversity within fragments increased with fragment size and decreased with fragment age. Genetic divergence across 38 anonymous nuclear Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) loci was influenced by the presence of major highways and highway age, but there was no effect of additional urban fragmentation. ISSR diversity was not correlated with fragment size or age. Differing results between markers may be due to male-biased dispersal, or different effective population sizes, sorting rates, or mutation rates among sampled genes. Results suggest that genetic connectivity among populations has been disrupted by highways and urban development, prior to declines in local population sizes. We emphasize that genetic connectivity can rapidly erode in fragmented landscapes and that flightless arthropods can serve as sensitive indicators for these effects. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  16. Geographic variation in wing size and shape of the grasshopper Trilophidia annulata (Orthoptera: Oedipodidae): morphological trait variations follow an ecogeographical rule.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yi; Dong, Jia-Jia; Guan, De-Long; Xie, Juan-Ying; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of wing variation in grasshoppers can help us to understand how environmental heterogeneity affects the phenotypic patterns of insects. In this study, geometric morphometric methods were used to measure the differences in wing shape and size of Trilophidia annulata among 39 geographical populations in China, and a regression analysis was applied to identify the major environmental factors contributing to the observed morphological variations. The results showed that the size of the forewing and hindwing were significantly different among populations; the shape of the forewing among populations can be divided into geographical groups, however hindwing shape are geographical overlapped, and populations cannot be divided into geographical groups. Environmental PCA and thin-plate spline analysis suggested that smaller individuals with shorter and blunter-tip forewings were mainly distributed in the lower latitudes and mountainous areas, where they have higher temperatures and more precipitation. Correspondingly, the larger-bodied grasshoppers, those that have longer forewings with a longer radial sector, are distributed in contrary circumstances. We conclude that the size variations in body, forewing and hindwing of T. annulata apparently follow the Bergmann clines. The importance of climatic variables in influencing morphological variation among populations, forewing shape of T. annulata varies along an environmental gradient. PMID:27597437

  17. Isolation, Characterization, Kinetics, and Enzymatic and Nonenzymatic Microbicidal Activities of a Novel c-Type Lysozyme from Plasma of Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    PubMed Central

    Elmogy, Mohamed; Bassal, Taha T. M.; Yousef, Hesham A.; Dorrah, Moataza A.; Mohamed, Amr A.; Duvic, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A protein, designated as Sgl, showing a muramidase lytic activity to the cell wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus lysodeikticus was isolated for the first time from plasma of Escherichia coli-immunized fifth instar Schistocerca gregaria. The isolated Sgl was detected as a single protein band, on both native- and SDS-PAGE, has a molecular weight of ∼15.7 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of ca 9.3 and its antiserum has specifically recognized its isolated form. Fifty-nine percentage of Sgl lytic activity was recovered in the isolated fractions and yielded ca 126-fold increase in specific activity than that of the crude. The partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Sgl has 55 and 40% maximum identity with Bombyx mori and Gallus gallus c-type lysozymes, respectively. The antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive and the Gram-negative bacteria were comparatively stronger than that of the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The detected Sgl poration to the inner membrane that reach a maximum ability after 3 h was suggested to operate as a nonenzymatic mechanism for Gram-negative bacterial cell lysis, as tested in a permease-deficient E. coli, ML-35 strain. Sgl showed a maximal muramidase activity at pH 6.2, 30–50°C, and 0.05 M Ca2+ or Mg2+; and has a Km of 0.5 μg/ml and a Vmax of 0.518 with M. lysodeikticus as a substrate. The Sgl displayed a chitinase activity against chitin with a Km of 0.93 mg/ml and a Vmax of 1.63. PMID:25972507

  18. A new species of Endecous Saussure, 1878 (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) from northeast Brazil with the first X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae.

    PubMed

    Zefa, Edison; Redü, Darlan Rutz; Da Costa, Maria Kátia Matiotti; Fontanetti, Carmem S; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; Padilha, Giovanna Boff; Fernandes e Silva, Anelise; Martins, Luciano De P

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new species of Luzarinae cricket collected from the cave "Gruta de Ubajara, municipality of Ubajara, State of Ceará, Brazil, highlighting phallic sclerites morphology and chromosome complement as diagnostic characters. We presented meiotic and mitotic characterization in order to define the karyotype with 2n = 12 + X1X2♂/12 + X1X1X2X2♀. This represents the first record of X1X20 chromosomal sex system in Gryllidae. PMID:25112329

  19. Zebragryllus Desutter-Grandcolas & Cadena-Casteñada, n.gen. a new Gryllinae genus from Eastern and Western Amazonia, South America (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Jaiswara, Ranjana; Anso, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new genus of grylline cricket, Zebragryllus Desutter-Grandcolas & Cadena-Casteñada n. gen., from the Neotropical Region, using characters of morphology and male genitalia; genitalic characters clearly show that Zebragryllus n. gen. is closely related to Anurogryllus Saussure, 1878. Six species are described as new to science, originating from western (Peru, Colombia) and eastern (French Guiana) Amazonia: Zebragryllus fuscus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. guianensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. intermedius Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Zebragryllus nauta Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Zebragryllus nouragui Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., and Zebragryllus wittoto Desutter-Grandcolas and Cadena-Casteñada, n. sp., type species of the genus. They are characterized by their size, coloration (shining black, most often with white patterns of coloration, hence the genus name), and male and female genitalia. The calling songs of Z. guianensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. intermedius Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Z. nouragui Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., and Z. wittoto Desutter-Grandcolas and Cadena-Casteñada, n. sp. are described. An identification key is proposed for both males and females. PMID:24871163

  20. A comparative study of genome organization and inferences for the systematics of two large bushcricket genera of the tribe Barbitistini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Phaneropterinae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poecilimon and Isophya are the largest genera of the tribe Barbitistini and among the most systematically complicated and evolutionarily intriguing groups of Palearctic tettigoniids. We examined the genomic organization of 79 taxa with a stable chromosome number using classical (C–banding, silver and fluorochrome staining) and molecular (fluorescence in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG) n telomeric probes) cytogenetic techniques. These tools were employed to establish genetic organization and differences or similarities between genera or species within the same genus and determine if cytogenetic markers can be used for identifying some taxonomic groups of species. Results Differences between the karyotypes of the studied genera include some general changes in the morphology of the X chromosome in Isophya (in contrast to Poecilimon). The number of major rDNA clusters per haploid genome divided Poecilimon into two main almost equal groups (with either one or two clusters), while two rDNA clusters predominated in Isophya. In both genera, rDNA loci were preferentially located in the paracentromeric region of the autosomes and rarely in the sex chromosomes. Our results demonstrate a coincidence between the location of rDNA loci and active NORs and GC-rich heterochromatin regions. The C/DAPI/CMA3 bands observed in most Poecilimon chromosomes suggest the presence of more families of repetitive DNA sequences as compared to the heterochromatin patterns in Isophya. Conclusions The results show both differences and similarities in genome organization among species of the same genus and between genera. Previous views on the systematics and phylogenetic grouping of certain lineages are discussed in light of the present cytogenetic results. In some cases, variation of chromosome markers was observed to correspond with variation in other evolutionary traits, which is related to the processes of ongoing speciation and hybridization in zones of secondary contact. It was concluded that the physical mapping of rDNA sequences and heterochromatin may be used as an additional marker for understanding interspecific relationships in these groups and their routes of speciation. PMID:24625118

  1. Endecous apterus: a new species of cave cricket from northeast Brazil, with comments on the use of subterranean habitats by Luzarinae crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae: Luzarinae).

    PubMed

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Bolfarini, Márcio P; Nihei, Silvio S; De Mello, Francisco A G

    2014-01-01

    In this study we describe the first apterous species of Endecous Saussure (1878), collected in two caves at Ituaçu, Bahia State, Brazil. In Brazil, Endecous is the most widespread cricket in hypogean environments and its species can colonize caves and inhabit the entrance and the aphotic zones; Endecous species can also be found in the litter, rock gullies, crevices, burrows, and any natural cavities. The use of subterranean habitat by Endecous crickets and its related genera are discussed. PMID:24872041

  2. Revision of Paraloxoblemmus Karny (Orthoptera: Gryllidae; Gryllinae) with a new combination, Paraloxoblemmus longifrons (Chopard 1969), and lectotype designation for Paraloxoblemmus loxoblemmoides (Karny).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeng-Tze

    2015-01-01

    The genus Paraloxoblemmus Karny has not been revised since 1907. In this paper, I present a lectotype designation and photographs of the type species, Paraloxoblemmus loxoblemmoides (Karny). In addition, a new combination Paraloxoblemmus longifrons (Chopard, 1969) is established. This species is transferred from Loxoblemmus Saussure based on the structure of the male genitalia of the holotype. Loxoblemmus longifrons Chopard is relegated as a subjective synonym. PMID:25661948

  3. Description of the female and notes on distribution, habitat, nymphal development, song and chromosomes of Tropidonotacris grandis Ragge (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae).

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Warchałowska-Śliwa, Elżbieta; Hemp, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The female of Tropidonotacris grandis is described and information on distribution, habitat, song, chromosomes and nymphal development of this species given. The populations of northern Tanzania all occur in deciduous dry forest, a habitat highly endangered by destruction and therefore T. grandis must be regarded at least as a vulnerable species according to the IUCN red list.  PMID:25544539

  4. Simulated aerial sprays for field cage evaluation of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum (Ascomycetes: Hypocreales) against Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) in Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field efficacy of the entomopathogenic Ascomycete Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Metarhizium brunneum strain F52 was evaluated against nymphs of the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex. Fungi were applied with a new apparatus that allows simulated aerial sprays to 0.1m2 areas in the field. The Mormon...

  5. Effects of a methanolic extract of the plant Haplophyllum tuberculatum and of teflubenzuron on female reproduction in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria (Orthoptera: Oedipodinae).

    PubMed

    Acheuk, Fatma; Cusson, Michel; Doumandji-Mitiche, Bahia

    2012-03-01

    The effects of a methanolic extract of the plant Haplophyllum tuberculatum (ME-Ht) and of teflubenzuron (TFB) were compared on several reproductive variables and ecdysteroid titers in the females of Locusta migratoria. The test products were administered orally to newly emerged females at doses of 1500 (ME-Ht) and 10μg/female (TFB). The methanolic extract and TFB had comparable effects on several of the variables examined. Both significantly delayed the first oviposition and reduced fecundity and fertility. ME-Ht and TFB also displayed similar effects on ovarian growth, vitellogenesis and ecdysteroid titers. Both treatments induced a drop in hemolymph protein levels as well as a reduction in vitellogenin uptake by oocytes. This delay in oogenesis was accompanied by a resorption of terminal oocytes. However, whereas TFB completely blocked egg hatch, ME-Ht only had a modest inhibitory effect on this variable. Hemolymph and ovarian ecdysteroid titers, as measured by radioimmunoassay, were similar and low in both control and treated females, except for a peak observed only in control females at the end of vitellogenesis. We discuss the functional significance of the observed effects in the context of the putative modes of action of the methanolic plant extract and TFB. PMID:22206884

  6. Geographic variation in wing size and shape of the grasshopper Trilophidia annulata (Orthoptera: Oedipodidae): morphological trait variations follow an ecogeographical rule

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yi; Dong, Jia-Jia; Guan, De-Long; Xie, Juan-Ying; Xu, Sheng-Quan

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of wing variation in grasshoppers can help us to understand how environmental heterogeneity affects the phenotypic patterns of insects. In this study, geometric morphometric methods were used to measure the differences in wing shape and size of Trilophidia annulata among 39 geographical populations in China, and a regression analysis was applied to identify the major environmental factors contributing to the observed morphological variations. The results showed that the size of the forewing and hindwing were significantly different among populations; the shape of the forewing among populations can be divided into geographical groups, however hindwing shape are geographical overlapped, and populations cannot be divided into geographical groups. Environmental PCA and thin-plate spline analysis suggested that smaller individuals with shorter and blunter-tip forewings were mainly distributed in the lower latitudes and mountainous areas, where they have higher temperatures and more precipitation. Correspondingly, the larger-bodied grasshoppers, those that have longer forewings with a longer radial sector, are distributed in contrary circumstances. We conclude that the size variations in body, forewing and hindwing of T. annulata apparently follow the Bergmann clines. The importance of climatic variables in influencing morphological variation among populations, forewing shape of T. annulata varies along an environmental gradient. PMID:27597437

  7. Endecous peruassuensis n. sp. (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae) from caves of Eastern Brazil: evidence of isolation in the subterranean realm and discussion about troglomorphisms.

    PubMed

    Bolfarini, Marcio P; Bichuette, Maria Elina

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new species of the genus Endecous Saussure (1878), recorded at the Lapa do Cipó and Olhos d'Água caves, which are located in the Itacarambi municipality, Minas Gerais state, Eastern Brazil. Another species, E. aguassay Mews, 2008 was recordedin the surroundings of the caves. The genus Endecous corresponds to the most common cricket in Brazilian hypogean environments. In general, these crickets inhabit the areas around cave entrances up to the aphotic zones of caves. The genus Endecous is the only cave cricket to present troglobiomorphosis, i.e., an apterous condition. The distribution of the new species is limited to these two caves, which suggests an endemism in this karst system similar to the distribution of other endemic animals, such as harvestmen and amblypygid arachnids. This species is the sixth troglobitic one described for Olhos d'Água cave, which sets this cave as a spot of subterranean fauna in Brazil. PMID:26624364

  8. Cerium chloride heptahydrate (CeCl3 · 7H2O) induces muscle paralysis in the generalist herbivore, Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), fed contaminated plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Allison, Jane E; Boutin, Céline; Carpenter, David; Ellis, Deanna M; Parsons, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Of increasing economic importance are the rare earth elements (REEs). Pollution from mining and processing activity is expected to rise with industrial demand. Plants are known to accumulate REEs, although levels vary with species and soil content. However, the effect on wildlife of ingesting REE contaminated vegetation is not well understood. Here we examined the effect of consuming vegetation with elevated levels of cerium on the generalist grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius). Adults excreted a substantial portion of ingested contamination. However, after only four-days of feeding, accumulation in the body occurred at all doses and paralysis of appendages resulted at the highest doses. Short-term toxicity studies may underestimate the impact of ingesting REE contamination. Metals tend to be low in toxicity; however, their persistence in the environment may be better represented by exposure over longer portions of the life cycle. PMID:25462312

  9. A review of the genus Eotmethis (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae) with two new species and key to known species of the genus from China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Jiang; Shi, Jian-Ping; Dang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Eotmethis Bey-Bienko, 1948, namely Eotmethis inditibialis sp. nov. and Eotmethis shizuishanensis sp. nov. from the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region are described in this paper. The new species Eotmethis inditibialis sp. nov. differs from all known species of the genus by inner side of hind tibia purple in the middle. The new species Eotmethis shizuishanensis sp. nov. is similar to Eotmethis xiai Ye, Shi & Zhi, 2015, differs from latter by tegmina of male shorter, reaching to 4th abdominal tergite, R vein without branch, M vein with one branch, Cu vein without branch and lower knee-lobe of hind femur yellow on inner side. The type specimens are deposited in College of Life Sciences, Hebei University, Baoding, China. Key to known species of the genus Eotmethis Bey-Bienko, 1948 is given. PMID:27470844

  10. Analysis and Modeling of Time-Dose-Mortality of Melanoplus sanguinipes, Locusta migratoria migratorioides, and Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) from Beauveria, Metarhizium, and Paecilomyces Isolates from Madagascar

    PubMed

    Nowierski; Zeng; Jaronski; Delgado; Swearingen

    1996-05-01

    A complementary log-log (CLL) model was used to model time-dose-mortality relationships from bioassay tests of 26 fungal isolates mostly from Madagascar, Africa, against three acridid species, all referred to here as "grasshoppers." The fungal pathogens included 15 isolates of Beauveria bassiana, 9 isolates of Metarhizium flavoviridae, and 2 isolates of Paecilomyces spp. Grasshopper species tested included Melanoplus sanguinipes, Locusta migratoria migratorioides, and Schistocerca gregaria. The scaled deviance, mean deviance, Pearson X2 statistic, Hosmer-Lemeshow (H-L) C statistic, and three-dimensional time-dose-mortality graphs were used to assess extra-binomial variation, data points that were potential outliers, conformance of the scaled deviance statistic and Pearson's X2 statistic to a chi2 distribution, and the fit of the CLL model. The H-L C statistic also was found to be useful in showing the goodness of fit of the CLL model for the fungal isolates prior to modeling the extra-binomial variation. After the extra-binomial variation was modeled using Williams' method, the slope from maximum likelihood estimation, modified log(LD50) estimates (which were corrected for background mortality using the CLL model), a dynamic ranking of the log(LD50) values over time, and a three-dimensional plot of time, dose, and mortality of the three grasshopper species were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the fungal isolates. In general, the CLL model provided a rather poor fit of the fungal isolates which had a large number of replicate trials in the bioassay tests (i.e., a large sample size) due to extra-binomial variation. The CLL model provided an excellent fit of the time-dose-mortality relationships of such isolates after the extra-binomial variation was modeled and included in the CLL model. Metarhizium isolates MFV and SP5 were found to be the most virulent isolates tested against M. sanguinipes, followed by Metarhizium isolates: SP8, SP7, SP9, SP6, and SP1, and Beauveria isolate S33B. Metarhizium isolates SP3, SP5, SP6, and SP9, and Beauveria isolates SP11, SP12, SP13, and SP16 showed higher levels of virulence against L. migratoria migratorioides over more of the time periods tested than the other pathogen isolates examined. Metarhizium isolates SP9 and SP5 were the most effective isolates tested against S. gregaria. In general, the Metarhizium isolates were more virulent against the grasshoppers than the Beauveria isolates, which were more virulent than the Paecilomyces isolates. The CLL model was found to be very useful in describing grasshopper mortality as a function of time and dose. This approach combined with model and fungal isolate assessment statistics will be helpful for determining which pathogen isolates have the greatest potential for controlling grasshoppers and other pests in the future. PMID:8812605

  11. New and little known Orthoptera (Ensifera and Caelifera) from the Ñambí River Natural Reserve, Nariño, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Gutiérrez, Yeisson; Bacca, Tito

    2016-01-01

    A preliminary checklist of the Orthopterans from the Ñambí River Natural reserve is presented. A total of 26 species were studied, five new species are herein described: Championica nambiensis n. sp., Cocconotus awa n. sp., Cocconotus levyi n. sp. (Tettigoniidae: Pseudophyllinae), Antillicharis kwaiker n. sp. (Gryllidae) and Brachybaenus nariniensis n. sp. (Gryllacrididae). Three species are recorded from Colombia for the first time (Legua crenulata, Uvaroviella (Holacla) nebulosa and Anabropsis alata) and seven species are new records for Nariño department (Allotettix peruvianus, Ripipteryx ecuadoriensis, Neoconocephalus affinis, Anaulacomera poculigera, Orophus conspersus, Orophus tessellatus and Neocurtilla hexadactyla). Further comments on species distribution and taxonomy are given. PMID:27615970

  12. Two new species and key to six species of the genus Taipodisma Yin, Zheng & Yin, 2014 from Taiwan, China (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Catantopidae, Podisminae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang-Qiang; Shi, Jian-Ping; Dang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Taipodisma Yin et al, 2014 from Taiwan, China are described in this paper. The new species Taipodisma viriditibia sp. nov. is similar to Taipodisma hsiehi Yin et al., 2014, it differs from the latter by antennae longer, length of a middle segment 4.0 times its width; interspace of mesosternum longer in male, the length 2.0 times the narrowest; lateral lobes of metasternum slightly separated in male; epiproct of male with longitudinal sulcus at base only and length of subgenital plate of female longer than width. The new species Taipodisma kaohsiungensis sp. nov. is similar to Taipodisma nigritibia Yin et al., 2014, it differs from the latter by prozona of pronotum 1.2 times metazona; length of interspace as long as the narrowest in mesosternum of male; hind tibia yellowish green on lower side and length of subgenital plate longer than width in female. The type specimens are deposited in the National Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan, China and the Institute of Entomology, Taiwan University, Taibei, Taiwan, China, respectively. PMID:27395722

  13. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Orthoptera: Blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum), when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. We did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. Our results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr was lost by defecation.

  14. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (orthoptera: blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum) are described when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. The authors did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. The results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr, which was lost by defecation.

  15. Does insecticide drift adversely affect grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Saltatoria) in field margins? A case study combining laboratory acute toxicity testing with field monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Rebecca; Schmitz, Juliane; Bundschuh, Mirco; Brühl, Carsten Albrecht

    2012-08-01

    The current terrestrial risk assessment of insecticides regarding nontarget arthropods considers exclusively beneficial organisms, whereas herbivorous insects, such as grasshoppers, are ignored. However, grasshoppers living in field margins or meadows adjacent to crops may potentially be exposed to insecticides due to contact with or ingestion of contaminated food. Therefore, the present study assessed effects of five active ingredients of insecticides (dimethoate, pirimicarb, imidacloprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and deltamethrin) on the survival of Chorthippus sp. grasshopper nymphs by considering two routes of exposure (contact and oral). The experiments were accompanied by monitoring field margins that neighbored cereals, vineyards, and orchards. Grasslands were used as reference sites. The laboratory toxicity tests revealed a sensitivity of grasshoppers with regard to the insecticides tested in the present study similar to that of the standard test species used in arthropod risk assessments. In the field monitoring program, increasing grasshopper densities were detected with increasing field margin width next to cereals and vineyards, but densities remained low over the whole range of field margins from 0.5 to 20 m next to orchards. Grasshopper densities equivalent to those of grassland sites were only observed in field margins exceeding 9 m in width, except for field margins next to orchards. These results may indicate that current insecticide risk assessments are insufficiently protective for grasshoppers in field margins. PMID:22619160

  16. Laboratory evaluation of Melia azedarach L. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Extracts in order to control Ocneridia volxemi Bolivar (Orthoptera, Pamphaginae) hoppers.

    PubMed

    Bounechada, M; Doumandji, S E; Laouer, H

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of Melia azedarach L. (Meliaceae) dry fruit extracts (oil and water) and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (Myrtaceae) dry leaves extracts (water) on Oneridia volxemi hoppers (fifth-instar) feeding on cereals leaves (Triticum durum) under laboratory conditions. Larva feeding reduced and mortality was significatly (p < 0.05) on cereals leaves sprayed with three concentrations 0, 5, 1 and 2% of oil extracted from Melia azederach. In addition, O. volxemi feeding and mortality was significantly (p < 0.05) on cereals leaves sprayed with two concentrations 50 g/l and 80 g/l of water extracts from Melia azedarach dry fruits soaked for 24 hours. the water extract solution of 80 g/l significantly reduced feeding than the other concentrations 50 and 25 g/l. This study showed also the water extract solution from Eucalyptus globulus dry leaves reduced also feeding and induced the mortality of O. volxemi but not better than Melia azedarach dry fruit extracts water at the same concentration (80 g/l). The aim of this study is in an integrated management program for control of O. PMID:15759419

  17. New species of Zygoclistron Rehn, 1905 (Insecta: Orthoptera: Acrididae: Copiocerinae) in the central corridor of the Atlantic Forest biome.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniela Santos Martins; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Domenico, Fernando Campos De; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2016-01-01

    Herein we describe a new species of Copiocerinae, Zygoclistron ruschii Silva n. sp., from Atlantic Forest remnants in southeastern Brazil, collected from the Reserva Biológica Augusto Ruschi in the Santa Teresa municipality, Espírito Santo state, Brazil. The diagnosis of this new species is based on phallic complex and terminalia characters. PMID:27395585

  18. Feeding preference for and impact on an invasive weed (Crepis tectorum L.) by a native, generalist insect herbivore, Melanoplus borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crepis tectorum L., narrow leaf hawksbeard, was first collected in Alaska in 1974 and by 2004 was a common weed in agricultural fields. Introduction and establishment of a new plant species in a region represents a potential new resource for herbivores, as well as a new competitor for plant species ...

  19. A new genus of katydid from the Amazon Rainforest (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; Phaneropterinae; Steirodontini): Ninth contribution to the suprageneric organization of the Neotropical phaneropterines.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Alves-Oliveira, João Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Emsleyfolium diasae n. gen. et n. sp., from the Brazilian, Colombian, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazon is described in this contribution. This new genus is morphologically very similar to Stilpnochlora, but is distinguished from the other Steirodiontini genera by its cone-head (similar to some genera of subfamily Conocephalinae, e.g. Neoconocephalus and Bucrates), modification of the tenth tergite into three lobes and absence of styles on subgenital plate. Thanatosis behavior is described as a defense mechanism. PMID:27615685

  20. Weighing costs and benefits of mating in bushcrickets (Insecta: Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae), with an emphasis on nuptial gifts, protandry and mate density

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sexual selection is a major force driving evolution and is intertwined with ecological factors. Differential allocation of limited resources has a central role in the cost of reproduction. In this paper, I review the costs and benefits of mating in tettigoniids, focussing on nuptial gifts, their trade-off with male calling songs, protandry and how mate density influences mate choice. Tettigoniids have been widely used as model systems for studies of mating costs and benefits; they can provide useful general insights. The production and exchange of large nuptial gifts by males for mating is an important reproductive strategy in tettigoniids. As predicted by sexual selection theory spermatophylax size is condition dependent and is constrained by the need to invest in calling to attract mates also. Under some circumstances, females benefit directly from the nuptial gifts by an increase in reproductive output. However, compounds in the nuptial gift can also benefit the male by prolonging the period before the female remates. There is also a trade-off between adult male maturation and mating success. Where males mature before females (protandry) the level of protandry varies in the direction predicted by sperm competition theory; namely, early male maturation is correlated with a high level of first inseminations being reproductively successful. Lastly, mate density in bushcrickets is an important environmental factor influencing the behavioural decisions of individuals. Where mates are abundant, individuals are more choosey of mates; when they are scarce, individuals are less choosey. This review reinforces the view that tettigoniids provide excellent models to test and understand the economics of matings in both sexes. PMID:22894685

  1. Phylogenetic footprinting of non-coding RNA: hammerhead ribozyme sequences in a satellite DNA family of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The great variety in sequence, length, complexity, and abundance of satellite DNA has made it difficult to ascribe any function to this genome component. Recent studies have shown that satellite DNA can be transcribed and be involved in regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Some satellite DNAs, such as the pDo500 sequence family in Dolichopoda cave crickets, have a catalytic hammerhead (HH) ribozyme structure and activity embedded within each repeat. Results We assessed the phylogenetic footprints of the HH ribozyme within the pDo500 sequences from 38 different populations representing 12 species of Dolichopoda. The HH region was significantly more conserved than the non-hammerhead (NHH) region of the pDo500 repeat. In addition, stems were more conserved than loops. In stems, several compensatory mutations were detected that maintain base pairing. The core region of the HH ribozyme was affected by very few nucleotide substitutions and the cleavage position was altered only once among 198 sequences. RNA folding of the HH sequences revealed that a potentially active HH ribozyme can be found in most of the Dolichopoda populations and species. Conclusions The phylogenetic footprints suggest that the HH region of the pDo500 sequence family is selected for function in Dolichopoda cave crickets. However, the functional role of HH ribozymes in eukaryotic organisms is unclear. The possible functions have been related to trans cleavage of an RNA target by a ribonucleoprotein and regulation of gene expression. Whether the HH ribozyme in Dolichopoda is involved in similar functions remains to be investigated. Future studies need to demonstrate how the observed nucleotide changes and evolutionary constraint have affected the catalytic efficiency of the hammerhead. PMID:20047671

  2. The role of egg pod foam and rearing conditions of the phase state of the Asian migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratoria (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Ben Hamouda, Amel; Ammar, Mohamed; Ben Hamouda, Mohamed Habib; Bouain, Abderrahmen

    2009-07-01

    Coloration phase state, morphometrical ratios and the numbers of mature oocytes of Locusta migratoria migratoria were examined in a series of experiments to determine the means by which phase characteristics are passed to the next generation. Washing with distilled water of eggs from egg pods laid by gregarious crowd-reared females resulted in solitarization of the hatchlings after their isolation, indicating that a factor present in eggs encapsulated in foam is causal to gregarization. Such locusts showed a significant shift towards the typical solitarious body coloration, morphometry and number of mature oocytes as compared to locusts resulting from unwashed eggs. Gregarious coloration, morphometrical ratios and oocyte numbers could be partially restored when hatchlings from washed eggs were regrouped. When gregarious locusts were reared in isolation, they showed a solitary body color, whereas, morphometry and oocyte numbers were not affected by isolation. PMID:19482135

  3. Interactions of two insect pathogens, Paranosema locustae (Protista: Microsporidia) and Metarhizium acridum (Fungi: Hypocreales), during a mixed infection of Locusta migratoria (Insecta: Orthoptera) nymphs.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Yuri S; Levchenko, Maxim V; Naumov, Anton M; Senderskiy, Igor V; Lednev, Georgiy R

    2011-02-01

    Locusta migratoria nymphs were fed Paranosema locustae spores and/or surface-treated with Metarhizium acridum 3 (assay 1), 6 (assay 2) or 9 days (assay 3) post microsporidia application (p.m.a.). These three dates corresponded to the key phases of P. locustae development: (a) mass proliferation, (b) transition to sporogenesis and (c) onset of spore maturation, respectively. As a result, locust mortality due to mixed treatment increased slower, equally and faster, as compared to mortality expected from the combination of two pathogens in assays 1-3, respectively. However, a statistically significant difference in survival times was observed only in assay 3, indicating that only at the phase of spore maturation microsporidia drastically increase locust susceptibility to fungal infection. Analysis of perished nymphs showed that fungal treatment 3 days p.m.a. impeded development of microsporidia. Fungal sporulation on locust cadavers was not affected by co-occurring microsporidiosis. PMID:20932843

  4. Clarification of the katydid genus Uchuca Giglio-tos, 1898 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae): A new species in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Gustavo Costa; Sovano, Rafael Segtowick Da Silva; Gutjahr, Ana Lúcia Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This paper accomplishes three tasks: Firstly, description of a new species, Uchuca almeirina sp. nov., from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, specifically from Monte Dourado, Almeirim, Pará. Secondly, it is proposed that Uchuca macroptera Montealegre-Z & Morris, 2003 be made a synonym of Uchuca ferreirai (Piza, 1976). Thirdly, a compilation of the generic distribution is presented, which includes new records of Uchuca amacayaca Montealegre-Z & Morris (2003) in Brazil and Uchuca similis Montealegre-Z & Morris (2003) in Colombia and Brazil, and the amplification of the occurrences of U. ferreirai. PMID:27470824

  5. Divergent Host Plant Adaptation Drives the Evolution of Sexual Isolation in the Grasshopper Hesperotettix viridis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the Absence of Reinforcement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beginning stages of lineage divergence can be difficult to detect, as correlations between altered genotypic and phenotypic attributes are often weak early in the process. Shifts in host plant use and divergence in mating signals can lead to sexual isolation and ultimately speciation. To underst...

  6. Hematoxylin substitutes: fluorone black and methyl fluorone black (9-phenyl- and 9-methyl-2,3,7-trihydroxy-6-fluorone) as metachrome iron alum mordant dyes.

    PubMed

    Lillie, R D; Pizzolato, P; Donaldson, P T

    1975-03-01

    The phenyl and methyl trihydroxyfluorones, hitherto used histologically only in the rather difficult and unreliable Turchini technics for discriminating deoxyribonucleic from ribonucleic acid, find a new use as iron mordant metachrome dyes which act as nuclear stains. Nuclear staining is unaffected by acid extraction of nucleic acids, as with hematoxylin lakes. The two dyes, named by Liebermann and Lindenbaum 9-phenyl-2, 3, 7-trihydroxy-6-fluorone, have also acquired (illustrating with the phenyl homolog) longer chemical names of the form 2,6,7-trihydroxy-9-phenylisoxanthene-3-one (Eastman). Aldrich and Pfalz-Bauer adhere to the Liebermann-Lindenbaum nomenclature. The trivial name fluorone black is proposed for the phenyl homolog and methyl fluorone black for the methyl homolog. The iron lake of fluorone black appears to be a useful substitute for iron hematoxylin, methyl flurone black less useful. Neither dye has the diverse capability of hematoxylin. PMID:49945

  7. The Entomophaga grylli (Fresenius) Batko species complex (Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) infecting grasshoppers in Ilheus (Bahia) Brazil: notes and new records

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi from the Entomophthoraceae (Zygomycotina; Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) belonging to the Entomophaga grylli species complex have been found in the state of Bahia, Brazil, to affect populations of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) of the species Rhammatocerus brasiliensis Bruner, Rhammatoce...

  8. Coping with uncertainty: Nutrient deficiencies motivate insect migration at a cost to immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migration is often associated with movement away from areas with depleted nutrients or other resources, and yet migration itself is energetically demanding. Migrating Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) lack nutrients, and supplementation of deficient nutrients slows migrator...

  9. Treatment of pastures with diflubenzuron suppresses Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diflubenzuron is an insect growth regulator labeled for application to pastures and rangeland to suppress grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) populations. Livestock are permitted access to land immediately after treatment. We hypothesized that the development and survivorship of horn fly Haematobia ...

  10. Effects of temperature and moisture on Mormon cricket reproduction with implications for responses to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the last decade, populations of flightless Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) increased suddenly over vast areas of the western United States, suggesting that climate is an important factor driving outbreaks. Moreover summer temperatures are predicted to increase and...

  11. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses. PMID:26180048

  12. A revision of the Axylus group of Agraeciini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) and of some other species formerly included in Nicsara or Anthracites Revision of the Indo-Australian Conocephalinae, Part 3.

    PubMed

    Ingrisch, Sigfrid

    2015-01-01

    Axylus group is used to include the five genera Axylus Stål, 1877, Anthracites Redtenbacher, 1891 sensu stricto, Eucoptaspis Willemse, 1966, Eulobaspis gen. nov., and Heminicsara Karny, 1912. It is mainly based on a combination of the characters shape of pronotum, spiniform meso- and metasternal lobes, and similar basic ground plans of the male cerci, titillators and female subgenital plates. The five genera together with two superficially similar genera Euanthracites gen. nov. and Sulasara gen. nov. are fully revised. Papuacites gen. nov. is proposed for two New Guinean species formerly included in Anthracites. Nicsara Walker, 1869 is restricted to Australian species; Spinisternum Willemse, 1942 is synonymised with Heminicsara Karny, 1912; Odontocoryphus Karny, 1907 based on two nymphs is synonymised with Macroxiphus Pictet, 1888; Pseudoliara Karny, 1907 described after one nymph is regarded incertae sedis. 40 new combination of species are proposed: Axylus bimaculatus (Redtenbacher, 1891) comb. nov., A. inferior (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. inflatus (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. loboensis (De Haan, 1842) comb. nov., A. minutus (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov., A. nigrifrons (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov., A. philippinus (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., A, taylori (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., and A. thoracicus (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov. (all from Nicsara); Euanthracites apoensis (Hebard, 1922) comb. nov., E. femoralis (Dohrn, 1905) comb. nov., E. rufus (Ingrisch, 1998) comb. nov., and E. tibialis (Karny, 1931) comb. nov. (from Anthracites); Eucoptaspis inexpectatus (Willemse, 1953) comb. nov. (from Gonatacanthus Karny, 1907); Eulobaspis dehaani (Karny, 1920) comb. nov., E. emarginata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. moluccana (Redtenbacher, 1891) comb. nov., E. personata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. quadrimaculata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., E. rotundata (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., and E. strigatipes (Bolivar, 1898) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Eulobaspis lobaspoides (Karny, 1907) comb. nov. and E. ornata (Brunner, 1898) comb. nov. (from Axylus); Heminicsara excisa (Karny, 1926) comb. nov., H. insulana (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov., H. schlaginhaufeni (Karny, 1912) comb. nov., and H. viridipes (Karny, 1912) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Heminicsara castaneipictus (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov., H. insularis (Willemse, 1942) comb. nov., and H. palauensis (Vickery & Kevan, 1999) comb. nov. (from Spinisternum); Heminicsara decipiens (Karny, 1926) comb. nov. and H. griffinii (Karny, 1911) comb. nov. (from Gonatacanthus); Heminicsara novaeguineae (Willemse, 1966) comb. nov. (from Eucoptaspis); Sulasara aethiops (Karny, 1931) comb. nov., S. karnyi (Willemse, 1932) comb. nov., and Sulasara sarasini (Karny, 1931) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Papuacites nigrifrons (Karny, 1912) comb. nov. and P. nakanaiensis (Naskrecki & Rentz, 2010) comb. nov. (from Anthracites); Paramacroxiphus multispinosa (Bolivar, 1898) comb. nov. (from Nicsara); Palaeoagraecia globiceratus Vickery & Kevan, 1999 comb. nov. (from Macroxiphus). Odontocoryphus pullus Karny, 1907 becomes a new synonym of Macroxiphus sumatranus sumatranus (Haan, 1842). 87 species are described as new: nine species in Axylus: A. brachypterus sp. nov., A. dulang sp. nov., A. furcatus sp. nov., A. mengkoka sp. nov., A. montanus sp. nov., A. negros sp. nov. , A. superior sp. nov., A. totop sp. nov. , A. unicolor sp. nov.; six species in Anthracites: A. bilineatus sp. nov., A. flagellatus sp. nov., A. pyramidalis sp. nov., A. romblon sp. nov., A. sinuatus sp. nov., A. unispinus sp. nov.; four species in Euanthracites: E. bispinus sp. nov., E. eboreus sp. nov., E. ile sp. nov., E. uru sp. nov.; six species in Eucoptaspis: E. adonara sp. nov., E. hexamaculatus sp. nov., E. remotus sp. nov., E. stylatus sp. nov., E. trapezoides sp. nov., E. wawo sp. nov.; eight species in Eulobaspis: E. bacan C.Willemse & Ingrisch sp. nov., E. baduri sp. nov., E. buruensis sp. nov., E. ceramica C.Willemse & Ingrisch sp. nov., E. morotai sp. nov., E. sudirman sp. nov., E. ternate sp. nov., E. variata sp. nov.; 51 species in Heminicsara: H. albatros sp. nov., H. albipuncta sp. nov., H. albogeniculata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. alticola sp. nov., H. ammea sp. nov., H. anggi sp. nov., H. bilobata sp. nov., H. cingima sp. nov., H. comprima sp. nov., H. coriformis sp. nov., H. corneli sp. nov., H. cyclops sp. nov., H. despecta Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. dilatata sp. nov., H. dividata sp. nov., H. dobo sp. nov., H. elongata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. furcata sp. nov., H. gibba sp. nov., H. gugusu Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. illugi sp. nov., H. jacobii Karny, 1912, H. jayawijaya sp. nov., H. kelila sp. nov., H. kolombangara sp. nov., H. lamas Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. longiloba sp. nov., H. lord sp. nov., H. malu sp. nov., H. mamberamo sp. nov., H. manus sp. nov., H. montana sp. nov., H. nigra sp. nov., H. nomoensis sp. nov., H. obiensis sp. nov., H. ohu sp. nov., H. pak sp. nov., H. parallela Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. pinniger sp. nov., H. popoman sp. nov., H. rugosa sp. nov., H. scutula sp. nov., H. sica sp. nov., H. sinewit sp. nov., H. siwi sp. nov., H. stylata sp. nov., H. tabtab sp. nov., H. truncata Naskrecki & Ingrisch sp. nov., H. tumulus sp. nov., H. umasani sp. nov., H. wanuma sp. nov., H. zugi sp. nov.; and three species in Sulasara: S. armata sp. nov., S. renschi sp. nov., S. tambu sp. nov. PMID:26624732

  13. Synchrony during acoustic interactions in the bushcricket Mecopoda 'Chirper' (Tettigoniidae:Orthoptera) is generated by a combination of chirp-by-chirp resetting and change in intrinsic chirp rate.

    PubMed

    Nityananda, Vivek; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2007-01-01

    In several bushcricket species, individual males synchronise their chirps during acoustic interactions. Synchrony is imperfect with the chirps of one male leading or lagging the other by a few milliseconds. Imperfect synchrony is believed to have evolved in response to female preferences for leading chirps. We investigated the mechanism underlying synchrony in the bushcricket species Mecopoda 'Chirper' from Southern India using playback experiments and simulations of pairwise interactions. We also investigated whether intrinsic chirp period is a good predictor of leading probability during interactions between males. The mechanism underlying synchrony in this species differs from previously reported mechanisms in that it involves both a change in the oscillator's intrinsic rate and resetting on a chirp-by-chirp basis. The form of the phase response curve differs from those of previously reported firefly and bushcricket species including the closely related Malaysian species Mecopoda elongata. Simulations exploring oscillator properties showed that the outcome of pairwise interactions was independent of initial phase and alternation was not possible. Solo intrinsic chirp period was a relatively good predictor of leading probability. However, changing the intrinsic period during interactions could enable males with longer periods to lead during acoustic interactions. PMID:16983544

  14. Review of the Balkan Isophya (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae) with particular emphasis on the Isophya modesta group and remarks on the systematics of the genus based on morphological and acoustic data.

    PubMed

    Chobanov, Dragan P; Grzywacz, Beata; Iorgu, Ionuţ Ş; Ciplak, Battal; Ilieva, Maya B; Warchałowska-Śliwa, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    A critical review of the taxonomy and systematics of the genus Isophya from the Balkan Peninsula, together with a revision of the I. modesta group, including its representatives outside the Balkans, has been made using morphological, bioacoustic and karyological data. As a result, the following taxonomic considerations have been proposed: (1) the status of two taxa has been reconsidered: Isophya rhodopensis leonorae Kaltenbach, stat.n., I. rhodopensis petkovi Peshev, stat.n.; (2) five synonymies have been established: I. hospodar (Saussure) = I. hospodar medimontana Nedelkov, syn.n.; I. plevnensis Peshev, sensu novo = I. pravdini pravdini Peshev, syn.n.; I. rhodopensis leonorae Kaltenbach = I. kisi Peshev, syn.n.; I. obtusa = I. pravdini bazyluki Peshev, syn.n.; I. modesta Frivaldszky = I. modesta intermedia Kis syn.n. The descriptions of the taxa under consideration are supplemented with unpublished morphological and/or bioacoustic data. An updated list of the taxa occurring on the Balkans includes 24 taxa (21 species, including the doubtful data on I. camptoxypha). A dichotomic and tabulated key for recognition and maps of distribution of the established taxa are presented. PMID:25333087

  15. The Eastern Arc Mountains and coastal forests of East Africa-an archive to understand large-scale biogeographical patterns: Pseudotomias, a new genus of African Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    PubMed

    Hemp, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A new genus of Pseudophyllinae restricted to East Africa is described. Data on the ecology, and the habitat are provided. The biogeographical pattern and morphology suggests an old radiation since Tomias from Central and West Africa is the closest relative to Pseudotomias. The old forests of East Africa could hereby be the source of representatives of this old radiation since venation is less reduced in East African taxa of Phyllomimini. PMID:27395601

  16. Natural History Museum Sound Archive I: Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae Leach, 1815, including 3D scans of burrow casts of Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa (Linnaeus, 1758) and Gryllotalpa vineae Bennet-Clark, 1970

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Yoke-Shum

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The Natural History Museum (NHM) sound archive contains recordings of Gryllotalpidae, and the NHM collection holds plaster casts of the burrows of two species. These recordings and burrows have until now not been made available through the NHM's collection database, making it hard for researchers to make use of these resources. New information Eighteen recordings of mole crickets (three identified species) held by the NHM have been made available under open licenses via BioAcoustica. 3D scans of the burrows of Gryllotalpa gryllotalpa (Linnaeus, 1758) and Gryllotalpa vineae Bennet-Clark, 1970 have been made available via the NHM Data Portal. PMID:26752971

  17. Review of the genus Endoreticulatus (Microsporidia, Encephalitozoonidae) with description of a new species isolated from the grasshopper Poecilimon thoracicus (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) and transfer of Microsporidium itiiti Malone to the genus.

    PubMed

    Pilarska, Daniela K; Radek, Renate; Huang, Wei-Fong; Takov, Danail I; Linde, Andreas; Solter, Leellen F

    2015-01-01

    The historic genus Pleistophora (Plistophora) is a highly polyphyletic clade with invertebrate Microsporidia reassigned to several new genera since the 1980s. Two genera, Endoreticulatus and Cystosporogenes, clearly separate into distinct but closely related clades based on small subunit ribosomal RNA analysis but are included in different families that are each polyphyletic. A microsporidium with morphology resembling the Endoreticulatus/Cystosporogenes clade was isolated from the grasshopper Poecilimon thoracicus from a site in Northwest Bulgaria. It produced intense infections in the digestive tract of the host but no behavioral changes were noted in infected individuals. Prevalence of the microsporidium increased over the active feeding season yearly. Mature spores were oval and measured 2.58±0.21 μm×1.34±0.24 μm, with 16 to approximately 32 spores in a parasitophorous vacuole. The spores were uninucleate and polar filament coils numbered 8-9 situated in a single row. The spore polaroplast consisted of an anterior lamellar section and a posterior vesicular section, and the posterior vacuole was reduced. Analyses of a 1221 bp partial SSU-rRNA sequence indicated that the isolate is more closely related to the Endoreticulatus clade than to Cystosporogenes, but shows earlier phylogenetic separation from species infecting Lepidoptera and represents a new species, Endoreticulatus poecilimonae. To compare sequences of Endoreticulatus spp. from Lepidoptera to those infecting other insect orders, an isolate, Microsporidium itiitiMalone (1985), described from the Argentine stem weevil, Listronotus bonariensis, was sequenced. Like the grasshopper isolate, the weevil isolate is closely related but basal to the lepidopteran Endoreticulatus clade. The original description combined with the new sequence data confirms species status and permits transfer of the isolate from Microsporidium, a genus erected for microsporidian species of uncertain taxonomic status, to Endoreticulatus. PMID:25450951

  18. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses. PMID:26180048

  19. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s). PMID:3821135

  20. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  1. Catalog of insect type specimens preserved at the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science with corrections of some specimens

    PubMed Central

    LI, Kai-Qin; WANG, Yun-Zhen; DONG, Da-Zhi; ZHANG, Li-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a list of insect types preserved in Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology (KNHMZ). As of March, 2015, 3 412 type specimens belonging to 266 species/subspecies of 37 families in 9 orders (Odonata, Isoptera, Mantodea, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) are included. Information corrections of some specimens are provided in this article. PMID:26452692

  2. Relationships between plant diversity and grasshopper diversity and abundance in the Little Missouri National Grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A continuing challenge in Orthoptera ecology is to understand what determines grasshopper species diversity at a given site. In this study, the objective was to determine if variation in grasshopper abundance and diversity between 23 sites in western North Dakota (USA) could be explained by variatio...

  3. Radiotelemetric Analysis of the Effects of Prevailing Wind Direction on Mormon Cricket Migratory Band Movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During outbreaks, flightless Mormon crickets [Anabrus simplex Haldeman (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)] form large mobile groups known as migratory bands. These bands can contain millions of individuals that march en masse across the landscape. The role of environmental cues in influencing the movement ...

  4. CONTROL OF RANGELAND GRASSHOPPERS USING PRESCRIBED FIRE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) are considered among the most damaging rangeland pests yet desired for the development of many wildlife species. Most grasshoppers are innocuous, but control with insecticides is non-discriminatory among species. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of p...

  5. SELECTIVE CONTROL OF RANGELAND GRASSHOPPERS WITH PRESCRIBED FIRE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) are considered among the most damaging rangeland pests, but are necessary for the survival of many wildlife species. Most grasshoppers are innocuous, but control with insecticides is non-discriminatory among species. The objectives were to evaluate the effects ...

  6. [Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, an oviparous filaria parasite of ploceid birds from Tchad. Larval morphogenesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Quentin, J C; Troncy, P M; Barre, N

    1976-01-01

    Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, was identified in Africa (Tchad) from Passeriform birds Ploceidae belonging to the species Quelea quelea quelea (L), Ploceus capitalis (Latham), P. cucullatus (Müller) and Euplectes orix (Insert). Its experimental life cycle achieved in Orthoptera Locusta migratoria allows the study of the three first larval stages. PMID:937983

  7. Characterization of a new iridovirus isolated from crickets and investigations on the host range

    PubMed

    Kleespies; Tidona; Darai

    1999-01-01

    Typical signs of an iridovirus infection were observed in two species of fatally diseased crickets, Gryllus campestris L. and Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae). The infection was manifested by hypertrophy and bluish iridescence of the affected fat body cells. Electron microscope investigations led to the identification of a new iridovirus, which was termed cricket iridovirus (CrIV). In negatively stained preparations the size of the icosahedral virus particles ranged from 151 nm (side-side) to 167 nm (apex-apex). Assembly of virions occurred in the cytoplasm of hypertrophied fat body cells, where they often accumulated in paracrystalline arrays. Genetic analyses of purified viral DNA using a variety of restriction enzymes revealed that CrIV is distinct from all other known iridoviruses that have been isolated from insects and reported so far. In host range studies it was shown that CrIV can be transmitted perorally to other orthopteran species, causing characteristic symptoms and fatal disease. These species include Gryllus bimaculatus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) and the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides (R. & F.) (Orthoptera, Acrididae), which represents one of the most important pest insects in developing countries, as well as the cockroaches Blattella germanica L. and Blatta orientalis L. (both Orthoptera, Blattidae). Consequently, the isolation and characterization of this new cricket iridovirus is of particular interest in view of its possible use in biological or integrated control. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9878293

  8. Grasshoppers and Crickets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The order Orthoptera includes many commonly recognized insects, including grasshoppers, crickets, and katydids. Among those that may cause damage in forage and rangeland crops, short-horned grasshoppers (Acrididae) are the best known. Long-horned grasshoppers (Tettigoniidae), mole crickets (Gryllota...

  9. Discriminating tastes: self-selection of macronutrients in two populations of grasshoppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The capacity to self-select an optimal balance of macronutrients (protein and carbohydrate) was studied in two populations of Melanoplus sanguinipes F. (Orthoptera: Acrididae). One population was derived from subarctic Alaska, and the other from temperate Idaho, USA. During the 4th and 5th stadia, A...

  10. Dynamic Pattern Formation for Wings of Pterygota in an Eclosion ---Pattern Analysis for Wings with the Imago---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, M.; Kakazu, Y.

    The vein and cell patterns for the fore and hind wing of Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Odonata are analyzed and discussed. For vein patterns of them, the fractal properties are shown and the inequality between four orders is obtained. The nature of wings observed by mass distributions for fractal dimensions of the vein pattern is presented.