Science.gov

Sample records for ligand-field analysis inspiration

  1. INSPIRE and SPIRES Log File Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Cole; /Wheaton Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    SPIRES, an aging high-energy physics publication data base, is in the process of being replaced by INSPIRE. In order to ease the transition from SPIRES to INSPIRE it is important to understand user behavior and the drivers for adoption. The goal of this project was to address some questions in regards to the presumed two-thirds of the users still using SPIRES. These questions are answered through analysis of the log files from both websites. A series of scripts were developed to collect and interpret the data contained in the log files. The common search patterns and usage comparisons are made between INSPIRE and SPIRES, and a method for detecting user frustration is presented. The analysis reveals a more even split than originally thought as well as the expected trend of user transition to INSPIRE.

  2. INSPIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bill; Pine, Bill

    2003-01-01

    INSPIRE (Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment - http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire) is a non-profit scientific, educational organization whose objective is to bring the excitement of observing natural and manmade radio waves in the audio region to high school students and others. The project consists of building an audio frequency radio receiver kit, making observations of natural and manmade radio waves and analyzing the data. Students also learn about NASA and our natural environment through the study of lightning, the source of many of the audio frequency waves, the atmosphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere where the waves travel.

  3. LCS analysis of a biologically inspired wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Melissa; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to investigate the wakes of rigid pitching panels with a trapezoidal panel geometry, chosen to model idealized fish caudal fins. Experiments were performed for Strouhal numbers from 0.23 to 0.65. The three dimensional flow field around the panel is reconstructed by integrating two-dimensional PIV results across the volume surrounding the panel. A Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) analysis is employed to investigate the formation and evolution of the panel wake. A classic reverse von Kármán vortex street pattern was observed along the mid-span of the near wake, but the complexity and three-dimensionality of the wake increases away from the mid-span as streamwise vortices interact with the swept edges of the panel.

  4. Reverse engineering for biologically inspired cognitive architectures: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Schierwagen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Research initiatives on both sides of the Atlantic try to utilize the operational principles of organisms and brains to develop biologically inspired, artificial cognitive systems. This paper describes the standard way bio-inspiration is gained, i.e. decompositional analysis or reverse engineering. The indisputable complexity of brain and mind raise the issue of whether they can be understood by applying the standard method. Using Robert Rosen's modeling relation, the scientific analysis method itself is made a subject of discussion. It is concluded that the fundamental assumption of cognitive science, i.e. complex cognitive systems are decomposable, must be abandoned. Implications for investigations of organisms and behavior as well as for engineering artificial cognitive systems are discussed. PMID:21744214

  5. Sound Classification in Hearing Aids Inspired by Auditory Scene Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchler, Michael; Allegro, Silvia; Launer, Stefan; Dillier, Norbert

    2005-12-01

    A sound classification system for the automatic recognition of the acoustic environment in a hearing aid is discussed. The system distinguishes the four sound classes "clean speech," "speech in noise," "noise," and "music." A number of features that are inspired by auditory scene analysis are extracted from the sound signal. These features describe amplitude modulations, spectral profile, harmonicity, amplitude onsets, and rhythm. They are evaluated together with different pattern classifiers. Simple classifiers, such as rule-based and minimum-distance classifiers, are compared with more complex approaches, such as Bayes classifier, neural network, and hidden Markov model. Sounds from a large database are employed for both training and testing of the system. The achieved recognition rates are very high except for the class "speech in noise." Problems arise in the classification of compressed pop music, strongly reverberated speech, and tonal or fluctuating noises.

  6. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  7. Black hole binary inspiral: Analysis of the plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-02-01

    Binary black hole coalescence has its peak of gravitational-wave generation during the "plunge," the transition from quasicircular early motion to late quasinormal ringing (QNR). Although advances in numerical relativity have provided plunge waveforms, there is still no intuitive or phenomenological understanding of plunge comparable to that of the early and late stages. Here we make progress in developing such understanding by relying on insights of the linear mathematics of the particle perturbation model for the extreme mass limit. Our analysis, based on the Fourier-domain Green function, and a simple initial model, point to the crucial role played by the kinematics near the "light ring" (the circular photon orbit) in determining the plunge radiation and the excitation of QNR. That insight is then shown to successfully explain results obtained for particle motion in a Schwarzschild background.

  8. Writing Inspired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  9. Weak Ligand-Field Effect from Ancillary Ligands on Enhancing Single-Ion Magnet Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2016-08-26

    A series of bis-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-supported Dy complexes containing different ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. Magnetic studies showed that 1 Dy [Cp*2 DyCl(THF)], 1 Dy' [Cp*2 DyCl2 K(THF)]n , 2 Dy [Cp*2 DyBr(THF)], 3 Dy [Cp*2 DyI(THF)] and 4 Dy [Cp*2 DyTp] (Tp=hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) were single-ion magnets (SIMs). The 1D dysprosium chain 1 Dy' exhibited a hysteresis at up to 5 K. Furthermore, 3 Dy featured the highest energy barrier (419 cm(-1) ) among the complexes. The effects of ancillary ligands on single-ion magnetic properties were studied by experimental, ab initio calculations and electrostatic analysis methods in detail. These results demonstrated that the QTM rate was strongly dependent on the ancillary ligands and that a weak equatorial ligand field could be beneficial for constructing Dy-SIMs. PMID:27417884

  10. Improved Ligand-Field Theory with Effect of Electron-Phonon Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dong-Ping; Chen, Ju-Rong

    2005-03-01

    Traditional ligand-field theory has to be improved by taking into account both ``pure electronic'' contribution and electron-phonon interaction one (including lattice-vibrational relaxation energy). By means of improved ligand-field theory, R1, R2, R'3, R'2, and R'1 lines, U band, ground-state zero-field-splitting (GSZFS), and ground-state g factors of ruby and/or GSGG: Cr3+ as well as thermal shifts of GSZFS, R1 line and R2 line of ruby have been calculated. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, it is found that the value of cubic-field parameter given by traditional ligand-field theory is inappropriately large. For thermal shifts of GSZFS, R1 line and R2 line of ruby, several conclusions have also been obtained.

  11. Two dimensional barcode-inspired automatic analysis for arrayed microfluidic immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Qiao, Lingbo; Ren, Yunke; Wang, Xuwei; Gao, Ming; Tang, Yunfang; Jeff Xi, Jianzhong; Fu, Tzung-May; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-01

    The usability of many high-throughput lab-on-a-chip devices in point-of-care applications is currently limited by the manual data acquisition and analysis process, which are labor intensive and time consuming. Based on our original design in the biochemical reactions, we proposed here a universal approach to perform automatic, fast, and robust analysis for high-throughput array-based microfluidic immunoassays. Inspired by two-dimensional (2D) barcodes, we incorporated asymmetric function patterns into a microfluidic array. These function patterns provide quantitative information on the characteristic dimensions of the microfluidic array, as well as mark its orientation and origin of coordinates. We used a computer program to perform automatic analysis for a high-throughput antigen/antibody interaction experiment in 10 s, which was more than 500 times faster than conventional manual processing. Our method is broadly applicable to many other microchannel-based immunoassays. PMID:24404030

  12. Vortex formation analysis of a piston-cylinder apparatus with passively varying output inspired by jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2012-11-01

    The flow analysis of a robotic jellyfish (Robojelly) has led to the observation of an increase in performance due to passive flexible margin. Flexible margin are common on animals using an oscillating mode of propulsion. The understanding of flexible margins is therefore important for a better understanding of animal propulsion and bio-inspired propulsion. This work focuses on analyzing the effects of stiffness and geometry of flexible margins. A piston-cylinder apparatus was used with flexible margin at the output to test the different flexible margin configurations. These results characterize the effects of the different flexible margin parameters on vortex circulation and size. Office of Naval Research through contract number N00014-08-1-0654.

  13. Viscous-Inviscid Methods in Unsteady Aerodynamic Analysis of Bio-Inspired Morphing Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruv, Akash V.

    Flight has been one of the greatest realizations of human imagination, revolutionizing communication and transportation over the years. This has greatly influenced the growth of technology itself, enabling researchers to communicate and share their ideas more effectively, extending the human potential to create more sophisticated systems. While the end product of a sophisticated technology makes our lives easier, its development process presents an array of challenges in itself. In last decade, scientists and engineers have turned towards bio-inspiration to design more efficient and robust aerodynamic systems to enhance the ability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be operated in cluttered environments, where tight maneuverability and controllability are necessary. Effective use of UAVs in domestic airspace will mark the beginning of a new age in communication and transportation. The design of such complex systems necessitates the need for faster and more effective tools to perform preliminary investigations in design, thereby streamlining the design process. This thesis explores the implementation of numerical panel methods for aerodynamic analysis of bio-inspired morphing wings. Numerical panel methods have been one of the earliest forms of computational methods for aerodynamic analysis to be developed. Although the early editions of this method performed only inviscid analysis, the algorithm has matured over the years as a result of contributions made by prominent aerodynamicists. The method discussed in this thesis is influenced by recent advancements in panel methods and incorporates both viscous and inviscid analysis of multi-flap wings. The surface calculation of aerodynamic coefficients makes this method less computationally expensive than traditional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers available, and thus is effective when both speed and accuracy are desired. The morphing wing design, which consists of sequential feather-like flaps installed

  14. Improved analytic extreme-mass-ratio inspiral model for scoping out eLISA data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Alvin J. K.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2015-12-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave detector eLISA has been selected as the ESA L3 mission, and the mission design will be finalized by the end of this decade. To prepare for mission formulation over the next few years, several outstanding and urgent questions in data analysis will be addressed using mock data challenges, informed by instrument measurements from the LISA Pathfinder satellite launching at the end of 2015. These data challenges will require accurate and computationally affordable waveform models for anticipated sources such as the extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) of stellar-mass compact objects into massive black holes. Previous data challenges have made use of the well-known analytic EMRI waveforms of Barack and Cutler, which are extremely quick to generate but dephase relative to more accurate waveforms within hours, due to their mismatched radial, polar and azimuthal frequencies. In this paper, we describe an augmented Barack-Cutler model that uses a frequency map to the correct Kerr frequencies, along with updated evolution equations and a simple fit to a more accurate model. The augmented waveforms stay in phase for months and may be generated with virtually no additional computational cost.

  15. Computational analysis of a tip vortex structure shed from a bio-inspired blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Sebastian; Gilkey, Lindsay N.; Kaiser, Bryan E.; Poroseva, Svetlana V.

    2013-11-01

    Understanding and predicting a tip vortex structure and its dynamics is of significant importance for all branches of aerodynamics. A particular focus of our research is the rotorcraft performance which is substantially influenced by a tip vortex. A tip vortex also is a major source of energy losses and acoustic noise. In the present study, an impact of a blade shape on a tip vortex structure is analyzed. Simulations are conducted of flows around a rectangular blade and a bio-inspired blade of the same area. An insect wing is chosen as a blade prototype. Indeed, insects developed physical characteristics that reduce energy consumption while permitting sustained and controlled flight at low level of noise. Analysis has been done to determine what insect poses flight characteristics closest to the small rotorcraft design goals. Commercial CFD software STAR-CCM + is used for conducting computations on structured and unstructured grids and for data post-processing. The authors acknowledge support from UNM CARC in a form of access to HPC and from CD-Adapco for providing Star-CCM+ for academic purposes. The first author's work was supported by the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium.

  16. Visual Cortex Inspired CNN Model for Feature Construction in Text Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongping; Niu, Zhendong; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Jing; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biologically inspired models are gradually proposed to solve the problem in text analysis. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) are hierarchical artificial neural networks, which include a various of multilayer perceptrons. According to biological research, CNN can be improved by bringing in the attention modulation and memory processing of primate visual cortex. In this paper, we employ the above properties of primate visual cortex to improve CNN and propose a biological-mechanism-driven-feature-construction based answer recommendation method (BMFC-ARM), which is used to recommend the best answer for the corresponding given questions in community question answering. BMFC-ARM is an improved CNN with four channels respectively representing questions, answers, asker information and answerer information, and mainly contains two stages: biological mechanism driven feature construction (BMFC) and answer ranking. BMFC imitates the attention modulation property by introducing the asker information and answerer information of given questions and the similarity between them, and imitates the memory processing property through bringing in the user reputation information for answerers. Then the feature vector for answer ranking is constructed by fusing the asker-answerer similarities, answerer's reputation and the corresponding vectors of question, answer, asker, and answerer. Finally, the Softmax is used at the stage of answer ranking to get best answers by the feature vector. The experimental results of answer recommendation on the Stackexchange dataset show that BMFC-ARM exhibits better performance. PMID:27471460

  17. Visual Cortex Inspired CNN Model for Feature Construction in Text Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongping; Niu, Zhendong; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Jing; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biologically inspired models are gradually proposed to solve the problem in text analysis. Convolutional neural networks (CNN) are hierarchical artificial neural networks, which include a various of multilayer perceptrons. According to biological research, CNN can be improved by bringing in the attention modulation and memory processing of primate visual cortex. In this paper, we employ the above properties of primate visual cortex to improve CNN and propose a biological-mechanism-driven-feature-construction based answer recommendation method (BMFC-ARM), which is used to recommend the best answer for the corresponding given questions in community question answering. BMFC-ARM is an improved CNN with four channels respectively representing questions, answers, asker information and answerer information, and mainly contains two stages: biological mechanism driven feature construction (BMFC) and answer ranking. BMFC imitates the attention modulation property by introducing the asker information and answerer information of given questions and the similarity between them, and imitates the memory processing property through bringing in the user reputation information for answerers. Then the feature vector for answer ranking is constructed by fusing the asker-answerer similarities, answerer's reputation and the corresponding vectors of question, answer, asker, and answerer. Finally, the Softmax is used at the stage of answer ranking to get best answers by the feature vector. The experimental results of answer recommendation on the Stackexchange dataset show that BMFC-ARM exhibits better performance. PMID:27471460

  18. Bio-inspired group modeling and analysis for intruder detection in mobile sensor/robotic networks.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Xiao, Yang; Liang, Xiannuan; Philip Chen, C L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates (such as ants), mammals such as primates with higher cognitive function are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates' social and communication systems, and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains is likely to inspire solutions to a number of problems. This paper presents a novel bio-inspired approach to determine group size by researching and simulating primate society. Group size does matter for both primate society and digital entities. It is difficult to determine how to group mobile sensors/robots that patrol in a large area when many factors are considered such as patrol efficiency, wireless interference, coverage, inter/intragroup communications, etc. This paper presents a simulation-based theoretical study on patrolling strategies for robot groups with the comparison of large and small groups through simulations and theoretical results. PMID:24846688

  19. Influence of the ligand field on slow magnetization relaxation versus spin crossover in mononuclear cobalt complexes.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fatemah; Luca, Oana R; Vieru, Veacheslav; Shiddiq, Muhandis; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Takase, Michael K; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Hill, Stephen; Crabtree, Robert H; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-10-18

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the complexes [Co(terpy)Cl2 ] (1), [Co(terpy)(NCS)2 ] (2), and [Co(terpy)2 ](NCS)2 (3) were investigated. The coordination environment around Co(II) in 1 and 2 leads to a high-spin complex at low temperature and single-molecule magnet properties with multiple relaxation pathways. Changing the ligand field and geometry with an additional terpy ligand leads to spin-crossover behavior in 3 with a gradual transition from high spin to low spin. PMID:24009214

  20. Ligand field effects on the multiplet structure of the U4f XPS of UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Bagus, Paul S.

    2008-03-01

    Ab initio, fully relativistic four component theory was used to determine atomic and interatomic many-body effects for the 4f X-ray photoelectron spectrum of an embedded UO8-12 cluster representing UO2. Many-body effects were included through the use of configuration interaction wavefunctions that allow the mixing of XPS allowed and XPS forbidden configurations. Charge transfer configurations were not included. This work extends our earlier studies on simulations of the U 4f XPS for the free U4+ cation. While the main XPS features are similar in both cases, ligand field effects changed the multiplet structure in important ways that better simulated experimental data for UO2. Neither initial nor final state covalency significantly reduced the 4f-5f exchange integrals, and the differences between the atom and cluster model was due to ligand field splitting of the 5f band and increased distributions of intensity from XPS allowed to XPS forbidden peaks. The prominent 7 eV satellites associated with UO2 were absent in the simulations, and provides further evidence that these satellites are due to charge transfer and not other interatomic effects.

  1. Inspired Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Robert; Spruch, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    It has been nearly 400 years since Harvard College was created, and since then, thousands of colleges and universities have been built across the United States. From the classically inspired lines of Thomas Jefferson's University of Virginia to the Spanish architecture at Stanford University, every campus has its own personality. It's not unusual,…

  2. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  3. Analysis of a Scenario for Chaotic Quantal Slowing Down of Inspiration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    On exposure to opiates, preparations from rat brain stems have been observed to continue to produce regular expiratory signals, but to fail to produce some inspiratory signals. The numbers of expirations between two successive inspirations form an apparently random sequence. Here, we propose an explanation based on the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. A relatively simple scenario for the dynamics of interaction between the generators of expiratory and inspiratory signals produces pseudo-random behaviour of the type observed. PMID:24040967

  4. A Fluid-solid Numerical Model for the Analysis of Bio-inspired UUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Santanu; Krishnamurthy, Nagendra; Tafti, Danesh; Priya, Shashank

    2012-11-01

    This research will describe how a biology-inspired approach to engineering has placed jellyfish at the center of efforts to build next-generation underwater vehicles. In order to swim, jellyfish contract the circular muscles that line the undersurface of their bell. The motion of the bell from the relaxed position to the fully contracted position results in the mesoglea interacting with the surrounding water in such a way that causes the jellyfish to move forward. The present method uses two-dimensional fluid elements and plain strain hyperelastic structural elements for the numerical simulation of the problem. The equations of motion of the fluid are expressed as full N-S equation. A new type of bio-inspired boundary condition has been proposed. A prototype of the jellyfish setup has been developed for the experimental validation of the simulation results. The solution of the coupled system is accomplished by solving the two systems separately with the interaction effects using immersed boundary method. This study will be useful in accurate calculation of pressure distribution, maximum blocking stress, strain rate and actuator system for submerged autonomous vehicle. This study will also help in designing efficient propulsion and thruster mechanism for unmanned underwater vehicle. It is believed that the research presented in this paper advances the understanding of the dynamic behavior of bio-inspired UUV.

  5. From Widely Accepted Concepts in Coordination Chemistry to Inverted Ligand Fields.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Roald; Alvarez, Santiago; Mealli, Carlo; Falceto, Andrés; Cahill, Thomas J; Zeng, Tao; Manca, Gabriele

    2016-07-27

    We begin with a brief historical review of the development of our understanding of the normal ordering of nd orbitals of a transition metal interacting with ligands, the most common cases being three below two in an octahedral environment, two below three in tetrahedral coordination, and four below one in a square-planar environment. From the molecular orbital construction of these ligand field splittings evolves a strategy for inverting the normal order: the obvious way to achieve this is to raise the ligand levels above the metal d's; that is, make the ligands better Lewis bases. However, things are not so simple, for such metal/ligand level placement may lead to redox processes. For 18-electron octahedral complexes one can create the inverted situation, but it manifests itself in the makeup of valence orbitals (are they mainly on metal or ligands?) rather than energy. One can also see the effect, in small ways, in tetrahedral Zn(II) complexes. We construct several examples of inverted ligand field systems with a hypothetical but not unrealistic AlCH3 ligand and sketch the consequences of inversion on reactivity. Special attention is paid to the square-planar case, exemplified by [Cu(CF3)4](-), in which Snyder had the foresight to see a case of an inverted field, with the empty valence orbital being primarily ligand centered, the dx2-y2 orbital heavily occupied, in what would normally be called a Cu(III) complex. For [Cu(CF3)4](-) we provide theoretical evidence from electron distributions, geometry of the ligands, thermochemistry of molecule formation, and the energetics of abstraction of a CF3 ligand by a base, all consistent with oxidation of the ligands in this molecule. In [Cu(CF3)4](-), and perhaps more complexes on the right side of the transition series than one has imagined, some ligands are σ-noninnocent. Exploration of inverted ligand fields helps us see the continuous, borderless transition from transition metal to main group bonding. We also give

  6. Phase stability of transition metal dichalcogenide by competing ligand field stabilization and charge density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C, Santosh K.; Zhang, Chenxi; Hong, Suklyun; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been investigated extensively for potential application as device materials in recent years. TMDs are found to be stable in trigonal prismatic (H), octahedral (T), or distorted octahedral (Td) coordination of the transition metal. However, the detailed understanding of stabilities of TMDs in a particular phase is lacking. In this work, the detailed TMD phase stability using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) has been investigated to clarify the mechanism of phase stabilities of TMDs, consistent with the experimental observation. Our results indicate that the phase stability of TMDs can be explained considering the relative strength of two competing mechanisms: ligand field stabilization of d-orbitals corresponding to transition metal coordination geometry, and charge density wave (CDW) instability accompanied by a periodic lattice distortion (PLD) causing the phase transition in particular TMDs.

  7. Computational speech segregation based on an auditory-inspired modulation analysis.

    PubMed

    May, Tobias; Dau, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    A monaural speech segregation system is presented that estimates the ideal binary mask from noisy speech based on the supervised learning of amplitude modulation spectrogram (AMS) features. Instead of using linearly scaled modulation filters with constant absolute bandwidth, an auditory-inspired modulation filterbank with logarithmically scaled filters is employed. To reduce the dependency of the AMS features on the overall background noise level, a feature normalization stage is applied. In addition, a spectro-temporal integration stage is incorporated in order to exploit the context information about speech activity present in neighboring time-frequency units. In order to evaluate the generalization performance of the system to unseen acoustic conditions, the speech segregation system is trained with a limited set of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions, but tested over a wide range of SNRs up to 20 dB. A systematic evaluation of the system demonstrates that auditory-inspired modulation processing can substantially improve the mask estimation accuracy in the presence of stationary and fluctuating interferers. PMID:25480079

  8. Ligand field and Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters of samarium doped tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanko, Y. A.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Sahar, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report the samarium ions (Sm3+) contents dependent ligand field and Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) of zinc tellurite glass. The amorphous nature of the melt-quench synthesized glasses is confirmed using XRD. The lower energy region of the absorption spectra is used to calculate JO intensity parameters and the UV edge is exploited to determine the Nephelauxetic ratio, bonding, and Racah parameters. The Nephelauxetic ratio and Racah parameter is reduced and the bonding parameter is enhanced with the increase of Sm3+ concentration. The enhancement in covalency is found to increase the non-bridging oxygen and crystal field strength by delocalizing more d-shell electrons. Furthermore, Nephelauxetic function revealed an increase due to the reduction of localized d-electrons that is aroused from the overlap of d-orbital and ligand orbital. The JO intensity parameters displayed the Ω4>Ω6>Ω2 trend. Increase in Ω2 and decrease in Ω2 and Ω2 with the increase of Sm3+ concentration indicated an increase in the Smsbnd O covalency and coordination in the asymmetry of the prepared glasses. The large vale of spectroscopic quality factor (greater than unity) makes the proposed glass system prospective for various optical devices fabrication.

  9. Ligand field spectroscopy of Cu(II) and Ag(II) complexes in the gas phase: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Cox, Hazel; Goren, Alan; Aitken, Georgina D C; Stace, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    Ligand field spectra have been recorded in the gas phase for the two series of complexes containing either Cu(II) or Ag(II) in association with pyridine. Where comparisons are possible, the gas phase spectra match those recorded in the condensed phase; however, for Ag(II) systems the results differ in interpretation. The Ag(II) data are attributed to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer process, and the Cu(II) data (spectral region and extinction coefficient) match the characteristics of a d-d transition. A detailed theoretical analysis of two complexes. [Cu(py)4]2+ and [Ag(py)4]2+ provides evidence of a minimum energy, D4h structure and two less stable D2h and D2d structures within approximately 60 kJ mol(-1). From these structures it is possible to identify a range of optically and vibronically allowed transitions that could contribute to spectra observed in the gas phase. In the case of calculations on [Ag(py)4]2+ there is strong evidence of an electronic transition that would account for the observation of charge transfer in the experiments. Less detailed calculations on [Cu(py)6]2+ and [Ag(py)6]2+ show structural evidence of extensive Jahn Teller distortion. Taken together with incremental binding energies calculated for complexes containing between two and six pyridine molecules, these results show that the level of theory adopted is capable of providing a semi-quantitative understanding of the experimental data. PMID:14527220

  10. Entropy-based analysis and bioinformatics-inspired integration of global economic information transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Gunn; An, Sungbae; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs) between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis. PMID:23300959

  11. Entropy-Based Analysis and Bioinformatics-Inspired Integration of Global Economic Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungbae; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Yoon, Sungroh

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of information transfer in the global economic network helps to understand the current environment and the outlook of an economy. Most approaches on global networks extract information transfer based mainly on a single variable. This paper establishes an entirely new bioinformatics-inspired approach to integrating information transfer derived from multiple variables and develops an international economic network accordingly. In the proposed methodology, we first construct the transfer entropies (TEs) between various intra- and inter-country pairs of economic time series variables, test their significances, and then use a weighted sum approach to aggregate information captured in each TE. Through a simulation study, the new method is shown to deliver better information integration compared to existing integration methods in that it can be applied even when intra-country variables are correlated. Empirical investigation with the real world data reveals that Western countries are more influential in the global economic network and that Japan has become less influential following the Asian currency crisis. PMID:23300959

  12. Numerical analysis of bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha Protim; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic performance of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at the chord Reynolds number of Rec=80,000 to explore the potential advantages of such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers. This study represents the transient nature of corrugated airfoils at low Reynolds number where flow is assumed to be laminar, unsteady, incompressible and two dimensional. The simulations include a sharp interface Cartesian grid based meshing employed with laminar viscous model. The flow field surrounding the corrugated airfoil has been analyzed using structured grid Finite Volume Method (FVM) based on Navier-Stokes equation. All parameters used in flow simulation are expressed in non-dimensional quantities for better understanding of flow behavior, regardless of dimensions or the fluid that is used. The simulated results revealed that the corrugated airfoil provides high lift with moderate drag and prevents large scale flow separation at higher angles of attack. This happens due to the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which occurs in the valleys of the corrugated airfoils. The existence of small circulation bubbles sitting in the valleys prevents large scale flow separation thus increasing the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil.

  13. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8) mol L(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8) mol L(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9) mol L(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis. PMID:26745790

  14. Inspiral, merger, and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries: A multipolar analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Sperhake, Ulrich; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Bruegmann, Bernd

    2007-09-15

    We study the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries by analyzing a catalogue of numerical simulations for seven different values of the mass ratio (from q=M{sub 2}/M{sub 1}=1 to q=4). We compare numerical and post-Newtonian results by projecting the waveforms onto spin-weighted spherical harmonics, characterized by angular indices (l,m). We find that the post-Newtonian equations predict remarkably well the relation between the wave amplitude and the orbital frequency for each (l,m), and that the convergence of the post-Newtonian series to the numerical results is nonmonotonic. To leading order, the total energy emitted in the merger phase scales like {eta}{sup 2} and the spin of the final black hole scales like {eta}, where {eta}=q/(1+q){sup 2} is the symmetric mass ratio. We study the multipolar distribution of the radiation, finding that odd-l multipoles are suppressed in the equal mass limit. Higher multipoles carry a larger fraction of the total energy as q increases. We introduce and compare three different definitions for the ringdown starting time. Applying linear-estimation methods (the so-called Prony methods) to the ringdown phase, we find resolution-dependent time variations in the fitted parameters of the final black hole. By cross correlating information from different multipoles, we show that ringdown fits can be used to obtain precise estimates of the mass and spin of the final black hole, which are in remarkable agreement with energy and angular momentum balance calculations.

  15. LINEBACkER: Bio-inspired Data Reduction Toward Real Time Network Traffic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Teuton, Jeremy R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Nordwall, Douglas J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2013-09-28

    Abstract—One essential component of resilient cyber applications is the ability to detect adversaries and protect systems with the same flexibility adversaries will use to achieve their goals. Current detection techniques do not enable this degree of flexibility because most existing applications are built using exact or regular-expression matching to libraries of rule sets. Further, network traffic defies traditional cyber security approaches that focus on limiting access based on the use of passwords and examination of lists of installed or downloaded programs. These approaches do not readily apply to network traffic occurring beyond the access control point, and when the data in question are combined control and payload data of ever increasing speed and volume. Manual analysis of network traffic is not normally possible because of the magnitude of the data that is being exchanged and the length of time that this analysis takes. At the same time, using an exact matching scheme to identify malicious traffic in real time often fails because the lists against which such searches must operate grow too large. In this work, we introduce an alternative method for cyber network detection based on similarity-measuring algorithms for gene sequence analysis. These methods are ideal because they were designed to identify similar but nonidentical sequences. We demonstrate that our method is generally applicable to the problem of network traffic analysis by illustrating its use in two different areas both based on different attributes of network traffic. Our approach provides a logical framework for organizing large collections of network data, prioritizing traffic of interest to human analysts, and makes it possible to discover traffic signatures without the bias introduced by expert-directed signature generation. Pattern recognition on reduced representations of network traffic offers a fast, efficient, and more robust way to detect anomalies.

  16. The Clubbers' Guide: "Be Inspired, Inspire Others"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Liz

    2012-01-01

    "Be inspired, inspire others" is this author's school motto and also something she aims to achieve by running the Science Club at The Warwick School in Redhill, Surrey, UK, an 11-16 specialist technology comprehensive. The Science Club is part of an extensive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programme that has developed…

  17. Stress-induced ligand field distribution and consequent multi-mode spin crossover in Fe II(phen) 2(NCS) 2 and Fe II[HB(pz) 3] 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Ohshita, Tadashi; Isobe, Tetsuhiko; Senna, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Naoki; Inoue, Hidenari

    2001-09-01

    Changes in the nature of spin crossover caused by mechanical stressing exerted on the crystalline powders were studied for Fe II(phen) 2(NCS) 2 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and Fe II[HB(pz) 3] 2 (pz = pyrazol-1-yl) by means of a multi-component fitting of the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility. The analysis revealed the development and broadening of the ligand field distribution as a consequence of mechanical stressing. This was confirmed by the broadening of Mössbauer and far-infrared spectra.

  18. The Inspirational Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benigni, Mark D.; Hughes, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Amid the focus on improved standardized test scores, differentiated instruction, value-added initiatives and improved teacher evaluation, one must not ignore an education leader's need to inspire and be inspired. But how do education leaders inspire their students and teachers during some of the most difficult economic times the nation has ever…

  19. Effect of Ligand Field Tuning on the SMM Behavior for Three Related Alkoxide-Bridged Dysprosium Dimers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Mereacre, Valeriu; Baniodeh, Amer; Lan, Yanhua; Schlageter, Martin; Kostakis, George E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three Dy2 compounds, [Dy2(HL1)2(NO3)4] (1), [Dy2(L2)2(NO3)4] (2), and [Dy2(HL3)2(NO3)4] (3), formed using related tripodal ligands with a central tertiary amine bearing picolyl and alkoxy arms, 2-[(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino]-ethanol (H2L1), 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-ethanol (HL2), and 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-propane-1,3-diol (H2L3), are reported. The compounds are rare examples of alkoxide-bridged {Dy2} complexes and display capped square antiprism coordination geometry around each Dy(III) ion. Changes in the ligand field environment around the Dy(III) ions brought about through variations in the ligand donors can be gauged from the magnetic properties, with compounds 1 and 2 showing antiparallel coupling between the Dy(III) ions and 3 showing parallel coupling. Furthermore, slow relaxation of the magnetization typical of SMM behavior could be observed for compounds 2 and 3, suggesting that small variations in the ligand field can have a significant influence on the slow relaxation processes responsible for SMM behavior of Dy(III)-based systems. PMID:26652937

  20. Efficient enhancement of magnetic anisotropy by optimizing the ligand-field in a typically tetranuclear dysprosium cluster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Jiang, Zhong-Xia; Liu, Jun-Liang; Jia, Jian-Hua; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Quan-Wen; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2015-05-01

    The perturbation to the ligand field around the lanthanide ion may significantly contribute to the magnetic dynamics of single molecule magnets. This can be demonstrated by two typical Dy4 cluster-based single molecular magnets (SMMs), [Dy4X2(μ3-OH)2(μ-OH)2(2,2-bpt)4(H2O)4]X2·2H2O·4EtOH (X = Cl and Br for and , respectively), which were constructed by using 3,5-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-1,2,4-triazole (2,2-bptH) as the polynuclear-chelating ligand. Alternating-current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the energy barriers in complexes and were immensely enhanced by comparing with our previous work due to the optimization of the ligand field around Dy(III) ions. Remarkably, their high thermal active barriers at 190 K () and 197 K () under a zero applied external dc magnetic field are also among the highest within the reported tetranuclear lanthanide-based SMMs. PMID:25837027

  1. Ligand field density functional theory calculation of the 4f2→ 4f15d1 transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr3+.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Urland, Werner; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Daul, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Herein we present a Ligand Field Density Functional Theory (LFDFT) based methodology for the analysis of the 4f(n)→ 4f(n-1)5d(1) transitions in rare earth compounds and apply it for the characterization of the 4f(2)→ 4f(1)5d(1) transitions in the quantum cutter Cs2KYF6:Pr(3+) with the elpasolite structure type. The methodological advances are relevant for the analysis and prospection of materials acting as phosphors in light-emitting diodes. The positions of the zero-phonon energy corresponding to the states of the electron configurations 4f(2) and 4f(1)5d(1) are calculated, where the praseodymium ion may occupy either the Cs(+)-, K(+)- or the Y(3+)-site, and are compared with available experimental data. The theoretical results show that the occupation of the three undistorted sites allows a quantum-cutting process. However size effects due to the difference between the ionic radii of Pr(3+) and K(+) as well as Cs(+) lead to the distortion of the K(+)- and the Cs(+)-site, which finally exclude these sites for quantum-cutting. A detailed discussion about the origin of this distortion is also described. PMID:23846586

  2. Tunable infrared solid-state laser materials based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.T.; Andrews, L.; Lempick, A.; McCollum, B.

    1982-08-01

    A new class of solid-state tunable lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand field materials is described. Spectroscopic and calculated laser properties have been obtained for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ emission in two low field crystals: K/sub 2/Na Sc/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/F/sub 6/ and Al/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/ (PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. A comparison is made with two d/sup 3/ laser materials (Cr/sup 3 +/:alexandrite and V/sup 2 +/:MgF/sub 2/). The prospect of expanding this class of materials is assessed.

  3. Extending ligand field molecular mechanics to modelling organometallic π-bonded systems: applications to ruthenium-arenes.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Ralf; Deeth, Robert J

    2011-11-14

    The ligand field molecular mechanics method has been extended to treat η(6)-arene ligands coordinated to a ruthenium(II) centre by employing a dummy atom located at the centroid of the arene ring and distributing the forces on the dummy to the arene carbon atoms. Angular overlap model parameters based on orbital energies derived from Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) calculations show that, relative to the Ru-dummy vector, the arene behaves as a very strong π donor and weak σ donor. Based on KS-DFT geometries, partial atomic charges and potential energy scans for a series of homoleptic and half sandwich complexes spanning arene, am(m)ine, imine, pyridyl, hydride and chloride ligands, a new LFMM force field has been developed which accurately reproduces the KS-DFT data. This FF was validated against 47 half-sandwich complexes obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database which, after minor corrections to account for the systematic errors between our chosen functional (BP86) and the experimental structures, yields a 'structurally tuned' FF where 93% of the Ru-L contacts are reproduced to 0.05 Å or better and all bar two bond lengths are within 0.1 Å of experiment. Over half the systems have non-hydrogen-atom rmsds of less than 0.5 Å. Larger differences are usually due to rotation of the arene moiety which is shown by ligand field molecular dynamics (LFMD) simulations to be an inherently low-energy process. Comparisons between LFMD and Car-Parrinello MD for [Ru(p-cymene)(ethylenediamine)Cl](+)show that LFMD is equally accurate but much faster enabling modelling of dynamic properties which occur on a timescale beyond the scope of CPMD. PMID:21792446

  4. Inspire Your Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, William E.; Taylor, William W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a science project, Interactive Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE), that allows students to work with physicists to address unanswered questions about the physics of space. (ZWH)

  5. Clay Bells: Edo Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The ceremonial copper and iron bells at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art were the author's inspiration for an interdisciplinary unit with a focus on the contributions various cultures make toward the richness of a community. The author of this article describes an Edo bell-inspired ceramic project incorporating slab-building…

  6. Origin of the Anomalous Color of Egyptian and Han Blue Historical Pigments: Going beyond the Complex Approximation in Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Fernandez, Pablo; Moreno, Miguel; Aramburu, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The complex approximation is widely used in the framework of the Ligand Field Theory for explaining the optical properties of crystalline coordination compounds. Here, we show that there are essential features of these systems that cannot be understood with the usual approximation that only considers an isolated complex at the correct equilibrium…

  7. Using a Combination of Experimental and Computational Methods to Explore the Impact of Metal Identity and Ligand Field Strength on the Electronic Structure of Metal Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernicone, Naomi C.; Geri, Jacob B.; York, John T.

    2011-01-01

    In this exercise, students apply a combination of techniques to investigate the impact of metal identity and ligand field strength on the spin states of three d[superscript 5] transition-metal complexes: Fe(acac)[subscript 3], K[subscript 3][Fe(CN)[subscript 6

  8. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(II) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Kim, Tae Kyu; Groot, Frank M. F. de; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-02-28

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  9. Momentum flow in black-hole binaries. I. Post-Newtonian analysis of the inspiral and spin-induced bobbing

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Drew; Nichols, David A.; Chen Yanbei; Thorne, Kip S.

    2009-12-15

    A brief overview is presented of a new Caltech/Cornell research program that is exploring the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime in binary black-hole collisions and mergers, and of an initial project in this program aimed at elucidating the flow of linear momentum in binary black holes (BBHs). The 'gauge-dependence' (arbitrariness) in the localization of linear momentum in BBHs is discussed, along with the hope that the qualitative behavior of linear momentum will be gauge-independent. Harmonic coordinates are suggested as a possibly preferred foundation for fixing the gauge associated with linear momentum. For a BBH or other compact binary, the Landau-Lifshitz formalism is used to define the momenta of the binary's individual bodies in terms of integrals over the bodies' surfaces or interiors, and define the momentum of the gravitational field (spacetime curvature) outside the bodies as a volume integral over the field's momentum density. These definitions will be used in subsequent papers that explore the internal nonlinear dynamics of BBHs via numerical relativity. This formalism is then used, in the 1.5 post-Newtonian approximation, to explore momentum flow between a binary's bodies and its gravitational field during the binary's orbital inspiral. Special attention is paid to momentum flow and conservation associated with synchronous spin-induced bobbing of the black holes, in the so-called 'extreme-kick configuration' (where two identical black holes have their spins lying in their orbital plane and antialigned)

  10. On the efficient swimming of a ray-inspired underwater vehicle. Part II: Computational analysis of fin hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Ren, Yan; Zhu, Jianzhou; Bart-Smith, Hilary; Dong, Haibo

    2014-11-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations are being used to examine the key hydrodynamic features and thrust performance of the fin of a manta ray-inspired underwater vehicle (MantaBot) which is moving at a constant forward velocity. The numerical modeling approach employs a parallelized DNS immersed boundary solver for low-Reynolds number flows past highly deformable bodies such as fish pectoral fins and insect wings. The three-dimensional, time-dependent fin kinematics is obtained via a stereo-videographic technique. The primary objectives of the CFD effort are to quantify the thrust performance of the MantaBot fin with different bending stiffness as well as to establish the mechanisms responsible for thrust production. Simulations show that the bending angle and bending rate of the fin play important roles in thrust producing. A distinct system of connected vortices produced by the deformable fins is also examined in detail for understanding the thrust producing mechanisms. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) under the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  11. Inspiration is "Mission Critical"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. W.; DeVore, E.; Lebofsky, L.

    2014-07-01

    In spring 2013, the President's budget proposal restructured the nation's approach to STEM education, eliminating ˜$50M of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) funding with the intent of transferring it to the Dept. of Education, National Science Foundation, and Smithsonian Institution. As a result, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) would no longer be a NASA mission requirement and funds that had already been competed, awarded, and productively utilized were lost. Since 1994, partnerships of scientists, engineers, and education specialists were required to create innovative approaches to EPO, providing a direct source of inspiration for today's youth that may now be lost. Although seldom discussed or evaluated, "inspiration" is the beginning of lasting education. For decades, NASA's crewed and robotic missions have motivated students of all ages and have demonstrated a high degree of leverage in society. Through personal experiences we discuss (1) the importance of inspiration in education, (2) how NASA plays a vital role in STEM education, (3) examples of high-leverage educational materials showing why NASA should continue embedding EPO specialists within mission teams, and (4) how we can document the role of inspiration. We believe that personal histories are an important means of assessing the success of EPO. We hope this discussion will lead other people to document similar stories of educational success and perhaps to undertake longitudinal studies of the impact of inspiration.

  12. Design and experimental gait analysis of a multi-segment in-pipe robot inspired by earthworm's peristaltic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Wang, Chenghao; Li, Suyi; Xu, Jian; Wang, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the experimental progress towards developing a multi-segment in-pipe robot inspired by earthworm's body structure and locomotion mechanism. To mimic the alternating contraction and elongation of a single earthworm's segment, a robust, servomotor based actuation mechanism is developed. In each robot segment, servomotor-driven cords and spring steel belts are utilized to imitate the earthworm's longitudinal and circular muscles, respectively. It is shown that the designed segment can contract and relax just like an earthworm's body segment. The axial and radial deformation of a single segment is measured experimentally, which agrees with the theoretical predictions. Then a multisegment earthworm-like robot is fabricated by assembling eight identical segments in series. The locomotion performance of this robot prototype is then extensively tested in order to investigate the correlation between gait design and dynamic locomotion characteristics. Based on the principle of retrograde peristalsis wave, a gait generator is developed for the multi-segment earthworm-like robot, following which gaits of the robot can be constructed. Employing the generated gaits, the 8-segment earthworm-like robot can successfully perform both horizontal locomotion and vertical climb in pipes. By changing gait parameters, i.e., with different gaits, locomotion characteristics including average speed and anchor slippage can be significantly tailored. The proposed actuation method and prototype of the multi-segment in-pipe robot as well as the gait generator provide a bionic realization of earthworm's locomotion with promising potentials in various applications such as pipeline inspection and cleaning.

  13. In Search of Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Keeping one's self inspired in the music classroom is all about connections. Sometimes educators need to look at what they're doing from a different perspective. Luckily, there's no shortage of ways to revitalize one's classroom approach, and to help the author explores a few, he made use of some connections of his own, turning to five educators…

  14. Inspired by Nevelson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egenes, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Louise Nevelson's circular assemblage, "Collegiate School" (1972), was the inspiration for an art class with the preschoolers at the Kent Children's Center. Nevelson (1899-1988) was the ultimate "found art" artist. Finding interesting throwaway objects, in and out of trash bins, she constructed assemblages that completely changed their former use.…

  15. Haring-Inspired Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, Marie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring Keith Haring's Web site one day, the author discovered two untitled pieces from 1982 that became inspiration pieces for a lesson on symmetry and complementary colors for her second graders. Haring's simple shapes and colors and playful images are very similar to those found in the margins or on the cover of any typical child's…

  16. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  17. Inspired by Oceans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Several years ago, the school system discussed in this article, agreed on a five-year cycle of nature themes to integrate instruction across disciplines. Last year, students studied artists and artworks inspired by oceans. Students also explored the theme with their own artistic expressions. Teachers began the year with lessons based on sea…

  18. Laptops and Inspired Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschauer, Mark; Arada, Kathleen; Zheng, Binbin

    2010-01-01

    Can daily access to laptop computers help students become better writers? Are such programs affordable? Evidence from the Inspired Writing program in Littleton Public Schools, Colorado, USA, provides a resounding yes to both questions. The program employs student netbooks, open-source software, cloud computing, and social media to help students in…

  19. Summer Reading That Inspires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    Why did you decide on science as a career? For many, it was the inspiration of a mentor or model--an explorer who could communicate excitement and a sense of adventure to others. During the school year, teachers take on that role of motivator for students. But as they recharge over summer break, it is great to treat themselves again to the stories…

  20. An Ark of Inspiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project suitable for middle and high school students in which they either combine identifiable parts from different animals to create one creature or take one animal and creatively distort it. Explains that this lesson enables students to be satisfied with their animal-inspired artwork. (CMK)

  1. Intrinsically incompatible crystal (ligand) field parameter sets for transition ions at orthorhombic and lower symmetry sites in crystals and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Gnutek, P.

    2010-01-01

    Central quantities in spectroscopy and magnetism of transition ions in crystals are crystal (ligand) field parameters (CFPs). For orthorhombic, monoclinic, and triclinic site symmetry CF analysis is prone to misinterpretations due to large number of CFPs and existence of correlated sets of alternative CFPs. In this review, we elucidate the intrinsic features of orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFPs and their implications. The alternative CFP sets, which yield identical energy levels, belong to different regions of CF parameter space and hence are intrinsically incompatible. Only their ‘images’ representing CFP sets expressed in the same region of CF parameter space may be directly compared. Implications of these features for fitting procedures and meaning of fitted CFPs are categorized into negative: pitfalls and positive: blessings. As a case study, the CFP sets for Tm 3+ ions in KLu(WO 4) 2 are analysed and shown to be intrinsically incompatible. Inadvertent, so meaningless, comparisons of incompatible CFP sets result in various pitfalls, e.g., controversial claims about the values of CFPs obtained by other researchers as well as incorrect structural conclusions or faulty systematics of CF parameters across rare-earth ion series based on relative magnitudes of incompatible CFPs. Such pitfalls bear on interpretation of, e.g., optical spectroscopy, inelastic neutron scattering, and magnetic susceptibility data. An extensive survey of pertinent literature was carried out to assess recognition of compatibility problems. Great portion of available orthorhombic and lower symmetry CFP sets are found intrinsically incompatible, yet these problems and their implications appear barely recognized. The considerable extent and consequences of pitfalls revealed by our survey call for concerted remedial actions of researchers. A general approach based on the rhombicity ratio standardization may solve compatibility problems. Wider utilization of alternative CFP sets in the

  2. Network theory inspired analysis of time-resolved expression data reveals key players guiding P. patens stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Bao, Jie; Hanke, Sebastian T; Hiss, Manuel; Tiko, Theodhor; Rensing, Stefan A

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems. PMID:23637751

  3. Network Theory Inspired Analysis of Time-Resolved Expression Data Reveals Key Players Guiding P. patens Stem Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Rensing, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems. PMID:23637751

  4. Data specifications for INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portele, Clemens; Woolf, Andrew; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    In Europe a major recent development has been the entering in force of the INSPIRE Directive in May 2007, establishing an infrastructure for spatial information in Europe to support Community environmental policies, and policies or activities which may have an impact on the environment. INSPIRE is based on the infrastructures for spatial information established and operated by the 27 Member States of the European Union. The Directive addresses 34 spatial data themes needed for environmental applications, with key components specified through technical implementing rules. This makes INSPIRE a unique example of a legislative "regional" approach. One of the requirements of the INSPIRE Directive is to make existing spatial data sets with relevance for one of the spatial data themes available in an interoperable way, i.e. where the spatial data from different sources in Europe can be combined to a coherent result. Since INSPIRE covers a wide range of spatial data themes, the first step has been the development of a modelling framework that provides a common foundation for all themes. This framework is largely based on the ISO 19100 series of standards. The use of common generic spatial modelling concepts across all themes is an important enabler for interoperability. As a second step, data specifications for the first set of themes has been developed based on the modelling framework. The themes include addresses, transport networks, protected sites, hydrography, administrative areas and others. The data specifications were developed by selected experts nominated by stakeholders from all over Europe. For each theme a working group was established in early 2008 working on their specific theme and collaborating with the other working groups on cross-theme issues. After a public review of the draft specifications starting in December 2008, an open testing process and thorough comment resolution process, the draft technical implementing rules for these themes have been

  5. Inspiral into Gargantua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Hughes, Scott A.; Warburton, Niels

    2016-08-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact object into a more massive black hole rotating very near the theoretical maximum. We find that once the body enters the near-horizon regime the gravitational radiation is characterized by a constant frequency, equal to (twice) the horizon frequency, with an exponentially damped profile. This contrasts with the usual ‘chirping’ behavior and, if detected, would constitute a ‘smoking gun’ for a near-extremal black hole in nature.

  6. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazić (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maletić (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djukić, Nenad Jeremić, Olivera Obradović, Romana Vujasinović, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  7. Biologically inspired intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Breazeal, Cynthia

    2003-07-01

    Humans throughout history have always sought to mimic the appearance, mobility, functionality, intelligent operation, and thinking process of biological creatures. This field of biologically inspired technology, having the moniker biomimetics, has evolved from making static copies of human and animals in the form of statues to the emergence of robots that operate with realistic behavior. Imagine a person walking towards you where suddenly you notice something weird about him--he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your reaction would probably be "I can't believe it but this robot looks very real" just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. You may even proceed and touch the robot to check if your assessment is correct but, as oppose to the flower case, the robot may be programmed to respond physical and verbally. This science fiction scenario could become a reality as the current trend continues in developing biologically inspired technologies. Technology evolution led to such fields as artificial muscles, artificial intelligence, and artificial vision as well as biomimetic capabilities in materials science, mechanics, electronics, computing science, information technology and many others. This paper will review the state of the art and challenges to biologically-inspired technologies and the role that EAP is expected to play as the technology evolves.

  8. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  9. Professional caregivers' work with the dying in nursing homes--a Foucault-inspired analysis of discourses in the last decade in a Danish context.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Karen T; Glasdam, Stinne

    2013-12-01

    International studies on the death of elderly nursing home residents show the complexity in the understanding of the professionals who care for the dying. The aim of this study is to explore the discourses about professional caregivers caring for those dying in Denmark in the last decade. A discourse analysis inspired by Foucault was constructed. The material consists of different source documents: research articles, newspaper articles, theses, books, websites - 35 sources in total. There are constructed six positions of speech, five discourses and three themes: (1) 'the work of the professional caregivers - a complex low-status work'; (2) 'the education of the professionals - the way to ensure a good death or possessing the right qualifications' and (3) 'the vulnerable professionals'. The study concludes that an economical/political discourse is dominating and sets up the frames within which the professionals care for dying residents, although the medical, the social/critical and the religious discourses attempt to speak against it. All positions articulate that the professional caregivers' job has a low status and that it is not possible to provide an optimal care due to lack of time, resources and education. Psychical or mental demands make the professionals vulnerable. The meaning of optimal care varies according to the positions of speech. PMID:23336738

  10. Novel Integral Equation Methods Applied to the Analysis of New Guiding and Radiating Structures and Optically-Inspired Phenomena at Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Diaz, Juan Sebastian

    This PhD. dissertation presents a multidisciplinary work, which involves the development of different novel formulations applied to the accurate and efficient analysis of a wide variety of new structures, devices, and phenomena at themicrowave frequency region. The objectives of the present work can be divided into three main research lines: (1) The first research line is devoted to the Green's function analysis of multilayered enclosures with convex arbitrarily-shaped cross section. For this purpose, three accurate spatial-domain formulations are developed at the Green's functions level. These techniques are then efficiently incorporated into a mixed-potential integral equation framework, which allows the fast and accurate analysis of multilayered printed circuits in shielded enclosures. The study of multilayered shielded circuits has lead to the development of the novel hybridwaveguide-microstrip filter technology, which is light, compact, low-loss and presents important advantages for the space industry. (2) The second research line is related to the impulse-regime study ofmetamaterial-based composite right/left-handed (CRLH) structures and the subsequent theoretical and practical demonstration of several novel optically-inspired phenomena and applications at microwaves, in both, the guided and the radiative region. This study allows the development of new devices for ultra wide band and high data-rate communications systems. Besides, this research line also deals with the simple and accurate characterization of CRLH leaky-wave antennas using transmission line theory. (3) The third and last research line presents a novel CRLH parallel-plate waveguide leaky-wave antenna structure, and a rigorous iterative modal-based technique for its fast and complete characterization, including a systematic calculation of the antenna physical dimensions. It is important to point out that all the theoretical developments and novel structures presented in thiswork have been

  11. A Bio-Inspired, Motion-Based Analysis of Crowd Behavior Attributes Relevance to Motion Transparency, Velocity Gradients, and Motion Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of motion crowds is concerned with the detection of potential hazards for individuals of the crowd. Existing methods analyze the statistics of pixel motion to classify non-dangerous or dangerous behavior, to detect outlier motions, or to estimate the mean throughput of people for an image region. We suggest a biologically inspired model for the analysis of motion crowds that extracts motion features indicative for potential dangers in crowd behavior. Our model consists of stages for motion detection, integration, and pattern detection that model functions of the primate primary visual cortex area (V1), the middle temporal area (MT), and the medial superior temporal area (MST), respectively. This model allows for the processing of motion transparency, the appearance of multiple motions in the same visual region, in addition to processing opaque motion. We suggest that motion transparency helps to identify “danger zones” in motion crowds. For instance, motion transparency occurs in small exit passages during evacuation. However, motion transparency occurs also for non-dangerous crowd behavior when people move in opposite directions organized into separate lanes. Our analysis suggests: The combination of motion transparency and a slow motion speed can be used for labeling of candidate regions that contain dangerous behavior. In addition, locally detected decelerations or negative speed gradients of motions are a precursor of danger in crowd behavior as are globally detected motion patterns that show a contraction toward a single point. In sum, motion transparency, image speeds, motion patterns, and speed gradients extracted from visual motion in videos are important features to describe the behavioral state of a motion crowd. PMID:23300930

  12. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei; Amestoy, William; Wright, Jean

    2015-04-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V{sub 20} (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation.

  13. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nambou, Komi; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Xinkai; Wei, Liujing; Lou, Jiajia; Madzak, Catherine; Hua, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA) and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species. PMID:26703753

  14. Flux Balance Analysis Inspired Bioprocess Upgrading for Lycopene Production by a Metabolically Engineered Strain of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Nambou, Komi; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Xinkai; Wei, Liujing; Lou, Jiajia; Madzak, Catherine; Hua, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models embody a significant advantage of systems biology since their applications as metabolic flux simulation models enable predictions for the production of industrially-interesting metabolites. The biotechnological production of lycopene from Yarrowia lipolytica is an emerging scope that has not been fully scrutinized, especially for what concerns cultivation conditions of newly generated engineered strains. In this study, by combining flux balance analysis (FBA) and Plackett-Burman design, we screened chemicals for lycopene production from a metabolically engineered strain of Y. lipolytica. Lycopene concentrations of 126 and 242 mg/L were achieved correspondingly from the FBA-independent and the FBA-assisted designed media in fed-batch cultivation mode. Transcriptional studies revealed upregulations of heterologous genes in media designed according to FBA, thus implying the efficiency of model predictions. Our study will potentially support upgraded lycopene and other terpenoids production from existing or prospect bioengineered strains of Y. lipolytica and/or closely related yeast species. PMID:26703753

  15. Sequentially-coupled space-time FSI analysis of bio-inspired flapping-wing aerodynamics of an MAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Kostov, Nikolay

    2014-08-01

    We present a sequentially-coupled space-time (ST) computational fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a micro aerial vehicle (MAV). The wing motion and deformation data, whether prescribed fully or partially, is from an actual locust, extracted from high-speed, multi-camera video recordings of the locust in a wind tunnel. The core computational FSI technology is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized ST (DSD/SST) formulation. This is supplemented with using NURBS basis functions in temporal representation of the wing and mesh motion, and in remeshing. Here we use the version of the DSD/SST formulation derived in conjunction with the variational multiscale (VMS) method, and this version is called "DSD/SST-VMST." The structural mechanics computations are based on the Kirchhoff-Love shell model. The sequential-coupling technique is applicable to some classes of FSI problems, especially those with temporally-periodic behavior. We show that it performs well in FSI computations of the flapping-wing aerodynamics we consider here. In addition to the straight-flight case, we analyze cases where the MAV body has rolling, pitching, or rolling and pitching motion. We study how all these influence the lift and thrust.

  16. Design of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong attachment and easy-removal properties: a numerical analysis of peel-zone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Wan, Jin; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu; Tian, Yu

    2012-10-01

    Despite successful fabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong adhesion forces, how to achieve an easy-removal property becomes a major concern that may restrict the wide applications of these bio-inspired surfaces. Research on how geckos detach rapidly has inspired the design of novel adhesive surfaces with strong and reversible adhesion capabilities, which relies on further fundamental understanding of the peeling mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the peel-zone plays an important role in the peeling off of adhesive tapes or fibrillar surfaces. In this study, a numerical method was developed to evaluate peel-zone deformation and the resulting mechanical behaviour due to the deformations of fibrillar surfaces detaching from a smooth rigid substrate. The effect of the geometrical parameters of pillars and the stiffness of backing layer on the peel-zone and peel strength, and the strong attachment and easy-removal properties have been analysed to establish a design map for bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces, which shows that the optimized strong attachment and easy-removal properties can vary by over three orders of magnitude. The adhesion and peeling design map established provides new insights into the design and development of novel gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces. PMID:22572030

  17. Modeling protein conformational transitions by a combination of coarse-grained normal mode analysis and robotics-inspired methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obtaining atomic-scale information about large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins is a challenging problem for both experimental and computational methods. Such information is, however, important for understanding the mechanisms of interaction of many proteins. Methods This paper presents a computationally efficient approach, combining methods originating from robotics and computational biophysics, to model protein conformational transitions. The ability of normal mode analysis to predict directions of collective, large-amplitude motions is applied to bias the conformational exploration performed by a motion planning algorithm. To reduce the dimension of the problem, normal modes are computed for a coarse-grained elastic network model built on short fragments of three residues. Nevertheless, the validity of intermediate conformations is checked using the all-atom model, which is accurately reconstructed from the coarse-grained one using closed-form inverse kinematics. Results Tests on a set of ten proteins demonstrate the ability of the method to model conformational transitions of proteins within a few hours of computing time on a single processor. These results also show that the computing time scales linearly with the protein size, independently of the protein topology. Further experiments on adenylate kinase show that main features of the transition between the open and closed conformations of this protein are well captured in the computed path. Conclusions The proposed method enables the simulation of large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins using very few computational resources. The resulting paths are a first approximation that can directly provide important information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the conformational transition. This approximation can be subsequently refined and analyzed using state-of-the-art energy models and molecular modeling methods. PMID:24564964

  18. Inspirals into Gargantua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Niels; Gralla, Samuel; Hughes, Scott

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact, stellar mass object into a massive black hole rotating at or just below the theoretical maximum. We find that once the compact object enters the near-horizon regime the gravitational radiation is characterized by a constant frequency, equal to the horizon frequency, with an exponentially damped profile. This contrasts with the usual `chirping' behaviour of a black hole binary system and were such a waveform observed it would constitute a `smoking gun' for a (near) extremal black hole in nature.

  19. Ligand field splittings in core level transitions for transition metal (TM) oxides: Tanabe-Sugano diagrams and (TM) dangling bonds in vacated O-atom defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerry; Wu, Kun; Pappas, Brian; Whitten, Jerry

    2013-04-01

    Defect states in the forbidden band-gap below the conduction band edge are active as electron traps in nano-grain high-) transition metal (TM) oxides with thickness >0.3 nm, e.g., ZrO2 and HfO2. These oxides have received considerable attention as gate-dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices, and more recently are emerging as candidates for charge storage and memory devices. To provide a theoretical basis for device functionality, ab-initio many-electron theory is combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study O K edge and TM core level transitions. These studies identify ligand field splittings (ΔLF) for defect state features,. When compared with those obtained from O-atom and TM-atom core spectroscopic transitions, this provides direct information about defect state sun-nm bonding arrangements. comparisons are made for (i) elemental TiO2 and Ti2O3 with different formal ionic charges, Ti4+ and Ti3+ and for (ii) Magneli Phase alloys, TinO2n-1, n is an integer 9>=n>3, and (TiO2)x(HfO2)1-x alloys. The alloys display multi-valent behavior from (i) different ionic-charge states, (ii} local bond-strain, and (iii) metallic hopping transport. The intrinsic bonding defects in TM oxides are identified as pairs of singly occupied dangling bonds. For 6-fold coordinated Ti-oxides defect excited states in 2nd derivative O K pre-edge spectra are essentially the same as single Ti-atom d2 transitions in Tanabe-Sugano (T-S) diagrams. O-vacated site defects in 8-fold coordinated ZrO2 and HfO2 are described by d8 T-S diagrams. T-S defect state ordering and splittings are functions of the coordination and symmetry of vacated site bordering TM atoms. ΔLF values from the analysis of T-S diagrams indicate medium range order (MRO) extending to 3rd and 4th nearest-neighbor (NN) TM-atoms. Values are different for 6-fold Ti, and 8-fold ZrO2 and HfO2, and scale inversely with differences in respective formal ionic radii. O-vacated site bonding

  20. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  1. Magneto-Structural Correlations in a Series of Pseudotetrahedral [Co(II)(XR)4](2-) Single Molecule Magnets: An ab Initio Ligand Field Study.

    PubMed

    Suturina, Elizaveta A; Maganas, Dimitrios; Bill, Eckhard; Atanasov, Mihail; Neese, Frank

    2015-10-19

    Over the past several decades, tremendous efforts have been invested in finding molecules that display slow relaxation of magnetization and hence act as single-molecule magnets (SMMs). While initial research was strongly focused on polynuclear transition metal complexes, it has become increasingly evident that SMM behavior can also be displayed in relatively simple mononuclear transition metal complexes. One of the first examples of a mononuclear SMM that shows a slow relaxation of the magnetization in the absence of an external magnetic field is the cobalt(II) tetra-thiolate [Co(SPh)4](2-). Fascinatingly, substitution of the donor ligand atom by oxygen or selenium dramatically changes zero-field splitting (ZFS) and relaxation time. Clearly, these large variations call for an in-depth electronic structure investigation in order to develop a qualitative understanding of the observed phenomena. In this work, we present a systematic theoretical study of a whole series of complexes (PPh4)2[Co(XPh)4] (X = O, S, Se) using multireference ab initio methods. To this end, we employ the recently proposed ab initio ligand field theory, which allows us to translate the ab initio results into the framework of ligand field theory. Magneto-structural correlations are then developed that take into account the nature of metal-ligand covalent bonding, ligand spin-orbit coupling, and geometric distortions away from pure tetrahedral symmetry. The absolute value of zero-field splitting increases when the ligand field strength decreases across the series from O to Te. The zero-field splitting of the ground state of the hypothetical [Co(TePh)4](2-) complex is computed to be about twice as large as for the well-known (PPh4)2[Co(SPh)4] compound. It is shown that due to the π-anisotropy of the ligand donor atoms (S, Se) magneto-structural correlations in [Co(OPh)4](2-) complex differ from [Co(S/SePh)4](2-). In the case of almost isotropic OPh ligand, only variations in the first

  2. Analysis of usefulness of airborne laser scanning for preparation of 3D buildings model consistent with inspire specification. (Polish Title: Analiza przydatności lotniczego skaningu laserowego do opracowania modelu budynków 3D zgodnego ze specyfikacją INSPIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisło-Lesicka, U.; Borowiec, N.; Marmol, U.; Pyka, K.

    2014-12-01

    The inspiration to undertake the subject was the announcement of preparations for project Poland 3D+. First the presentation of background analysis of modelling methods was sketched. Then the principles of buildings modelling, imposed by INSPIRE specification, were recalled. Next the conditions of conversion of 2D spatial database to 3D ones, on the basis of experience acquired thanks to the research project performed in AGH in the years 2009 - 2012, was discussed. The research indicated airborne scanning as the best data source but at the same time indicated that highly detailed models considered for large areas may turn out to be poorly efficient for the GIS technology. Then t he systematization of modelling methods of airborne scanning, with emphasis on advantages and disadvantages of the approach model driven and date driven, was presented. The thesis is concluded with a suggestion of modelling strategy in the context of condition of geo - reference databases in Poland, prospects of their development and demand for spatial data from the social and economic point of view. A gradual solution was suggested, in which, firstly, attempts are made to apply the model driven method and in case of failure, the data driven method is applied, which enables modelling the buildings of complex shapes but doe s not guarantee full automation. Such a procedure, in the opinion of the authors, would be optimal at implementation of project Poland 3D+.

  3. Microflyers: inspiration from nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Jayant

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable interest in miniaturizing aircraft to create a class of extremely small, robotic vehicles with a gross mass on the order of tens of grams and a dimension on the order of tens of centimeters. These are collectively refered to as micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) or microflyers. Because the size of microflyers is on the same order as that of small birds and large insects, engineers are turning to nature for inspiration. Bioinspired concepts make use of structural or aerodynamic mechanisms that are observed in insects and birds, such as elastic energy storage and unsteady aerodynamics. Biomimetic concepts attempt to replicate the form and function of natural flyers, such as flapping-wing propulsion and external appearance. This paper reviews recent developments in the area of man-made microflyers. The design space for microflyers will be described, along with fundamental physical limits to miniaturization. Key aerodynamic phenomena at the scale of microflyers will be highlighted. Because the focus is on bioinspiration and biomimetics, scaled-down versions of conventional aircraft, such as fixed wing micro air vehicles and microhelicopters will not be addressed. A few representative bioinspired and biomimetic microflyer concepts developed by researchers will be described in detail. Finally, some of the sensing mechanisms used by natural flyers that are being implemented in man-made microflyers will be discussed.

  4. Biogenetically Inspired Synthesis of Lingzhiol.

    PubMed

    Sharmah Gautam, Krishna; Birman, Vladimir B

    2016-04-01

    A concise stereo- and enantioselective synthesis of lingzhiol has been achieved featuring a biogenetically inspired Brønsted acid catalyzed semipinacol rearrangement of a glycidyl alcohol intermediate. PMID:26974229

  5. The Role of INSPIRE in HEP Data Preservation Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Travis C.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    INSPIRE is a new community resource for HEP literature and associated information. It is based on the combination of SPIRES content and features and the powerful Invenio software developed at CERN. The INSPIRE service will come online in fall of 2009, and be run by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. Data preservation, to be successful, must not only preserve the data, but must also organize it and allow it to be found by those who would make use of it, and resources such as INSPIRE are ideally positioned and ready to provide this organization and context. In addition, INSPIRE will soon be ready to provide storage of smaller datasets, such as high-level analysis objects, as stand-alone objects placed in the repository or as objects associated with an analysis paper. This small project could pave the way towards the context and organization which is one piece of the infrastructure needed for all levels of data preservation.

  6. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  7. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  8. Bio-Inspired Antifouling Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Chelsea M.; Brennan, Anthony B.

    2012-08-01

    Biofouling is a complex, dynamic problem that globally impacts both the economy and environment. Interdisciplinary research in marine biology, polymer science, and engineering has led to the implementation of bio-inspired strategies for the development of the next generation of antifouling marine coatings. Natural fouling defense mechanisms have been mimicked through chemical, physical, and/or stimuli-responsive strategies. This review outlines the detrimental effects associated with biofouling, describes the theoretical basis for antifouling coating design, and highlights prominent advances in bio-inspired antifouling technologies.

  9. Inspiring Independent Learning: Successful Classroom Strategies. The Inspired Classroom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafoth, Mary Ann

    This book provides examples of embedded learning and study strategies, all of which represent success stories used by teachers and support teams in real classrooms. Seven chapters focus on: (1) "Overview: The Teacher's Role in Inspiring Independent Learning"; (2) "Primary Grades: Building a Strong Foundation" (e.g., simple memory strategies,…

  10. Inspiring the Best in Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Jonathan C.

    2010-01-01

    Students' success in school and later in life is highly dependent on their ability to 1) regulate their emotions and control their behavior and 2) get along with their teachers and peers. In this book, the author wants to teach you how to inspire students to learn, behave responsibly, and improve their relationships with themselves, other…

  11. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop had much to…

  12. Inspiring Teachers: Perspectives and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Pam; Kington, Alison; Lindorff-Vijayendran, Ariel; Ortega, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the notion of "inspiring" teaching through case studies of a purposive sample of 17 primary and secondary school teachers in England. The research was commissioned by CfBT Education Trust as part of a collaborative professional development initiative involving its schools. It arose from headteachers'…

  13. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  14. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  15. INSPIRED High School Computing Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerschuk, Peggy; Liu, Jiangjiang; Mann, Judith

    2011-01-01

    If we are to attract more women and minorities to computing we must engage students at an early age. As part of its mission to increase participation of women and underrepresented minorities in computing, the Increasing Student Participation in Research Development Program (INSPIRED) conducts computing academies for high school students. The…

  16. Core electron excitations in U(4+): modelling of the nd(10)5f(2)→nd(9)5f(3) transitions with n = 3, 4 and 5 by ligand field tools and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Kuri, Goutam; Daul, Claude; Bertsch, Johannes

    2016-07-28

    Ligand field density functional theory (LFDFT) calculations have been used to model the uranium M4,5, N4,5 and O4,5-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) in UO2, characterized by the promotion of one electron from the core and the semi-core 3d, 4d and 5d orbitals of U(4+) to the valence 5f. The model describes the procedure to resolve non-empirically the multiplet energy levels originating from the two-open-shell system with d and f electrons and to calculate the oscillator strengths corresponding to the dipole allowed d(10)f(2)→ d(9)f(3) transitions appropriate to represent the d electron excitation process. In the first step, the energy and UO2 unit-cell volume corresponding to the minimum structures are determined using the Hubbard model (DFT+U) approach. The model of the optical properties due to the uranium nd(10)5f(2)→nd(9)5f(3) transitions, with n = 3, 4 and 5, has been tackled by means of electronic structure calculations based on the ligand field concept emulating the Slater-Condon integrals, the spin-orbit coupling constants and the parameters of the ligand field potential needed by the ligand field Hamiltonian from Density Functional Theory. A deep-rooted theoretical procedure using the LFDFT approach has been established for actinide-bearing systems that can be valuable to compute targeted results, such as spectroscopic details at the electronic scale. As a case study, uranium dioxide has been considered because it is a nuclear fuel material, and both atomic and electronic structure calculations are indispensable for a deeper understanding of irradiation driven microstructural changes occurring in this material. PMID:27356168

  17. Inspire Me! Pupils' Views of What Inspires Them and What Constitutes an Inspiring Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darlington, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Both "pupil voice" and "staff voice" can be powerful tools in developing various aspects of a school, but only if there is a strong dialogue between the two. This project used a number of different approaches--questionnaires, lesson observations and planning discussions--to investigate pupils' views of what inspires them to learn in science and…

  18. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  19. Jellyfish inspired underwater unmanned vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Alex; Bresser, Scott; Chung, Sanghun; Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) was designed inspired by the form and functionality of a Jellyfish. These natural organisms were chosen as bio-inspiration for a multitude of reasons including: efficiency of locomotion, lack of natural predators, proper form and shape to incorporate payload, and varying range of sizes. The structure consists of a hub body surrounded by bell segments and microcontroller based drive system. The locomotion of UUV was achieved by shape memory alloy "Biometal Fiber" actuation which possesses large strain and blocking force with adequate response time. The main criterion in design of UUV was the use of low-profile shape memory alloy actuators which act as artificial muscles. In this manuscript, we discuss the design of two Jellyfish prototypes and present experimental results illustrating the performance and power consumption.

  20. Inspiration of psychotherapists by patients.

    PubMed

    Messner, E

    1976-12-01

    Many patients possess such exemplary traits and virtues that their psychotherapists are inspired to emulate them. This process can benefit the clinician and reinforce the therapeutic alliance, rapport, and the spirit of reciprocity; however, it can also arouse responses by the clinician that are therapeutically detrimental. Awareness of this hazard can enable the clinican to avert it and enhance the benefits provided by the patient's outstanding strengths. PMID:984249

  1. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. PMID:25583299

  2. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  3. What Students Value as Inspirational and Transformative Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Sally; Kirby, Emma; Madriaga, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Evidence presented here stems from an analysis of student comments derived from a student-nominated inspirational teaching awards scheme at a large university in the United Kingdom (UK). There is a plethora of literature on teaching excellence and the scholarship of teaching, frequently based upon portfolios or personal claims of excellence, and…

  4. Bio-inspired odor-based navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Maynard J., III; Vasquez, Juan R.

    2006-05-01

    The ability of many insects, especially moths, to locate either food or a member of the opposite sex is an amazing achievement. There are numerous scenarios where having this ability embedded into ground-based or aerial vehicles would be invaluable. This paper presents results from a 3-D computer simulation of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) autonomously tracking a chemical plume to its source. The simulation study includes a simulated dynamic chemical plume, 6-degree of freedom, nonlinear aircraft model, and a bio-inspired navigation algorithm. The emphasis of this paper is the development and analysis of the navigation algorithm. The foundation of this algorithm is a fuzzy controller designed to categorize where in the plume the aircraft is located: coming into the plume, in the plume, exiting the plume, or out of the plume.

  5. Prospecting Lighting Applications with Ligand Field Tools and Density Functional Theory: A First-Principles Account of the 4f(7)-4f(6)5d(1) Luminescence of CsMgBr3:Eu(2+).

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Göttel, Christian; Sahnoun, Mohammed; Herden, Benjamin; Suta, Markus; Wickleder, Claudia; Urland, Werner; Daul, Claude

    2015-09-01

    The most efficient way to provide domestic lighting nowadays is by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) technology combined with phosphors shifting the blue and UV emission toward a desirable sunlight spectrum. A route in the quest for warm-white light goes toward the discovery and tuning of the lanthanide-based phosphors, a difficult task, in experimental and technical respects. A proper theoretical approach, which is also complicated at the conceptual level and in computing efforts, is however a profitable complement, offering valuable structure-property rationale as a guideline in the search of the best materials. The Eu(2+)-based systems are the prototypes for ideal phosphors, exhibiting a wide range of visible light emission. Using the ligand field concepts in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT), conducted in nonroutine manner, we develop a nonempirical procedure to investigate the 4f(7)-4f(6)5d(1) luminescence of Eu(2+) in the environment of arbitrary ligands, applied here on the CsMgBr3:Eu(2+)-doped material. Providing a salient methodology for the extraction of the relevant ligand field and related parameters from DFT calculations and encompassing the bottleneck of handling large matrices in a model Hamiltonian based on the whole set of 33,462 states, we obtained an excellent match with the experimental spectrum, from first-principles, without any fit or adjustment. This proves that the ligand field density functional theory methodology can be used in the assessment of new materials and rational property design. PMID:26270436

  6. Maitotoxin: An Inspiration for Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aversa, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Maitotoxin holds a special place in the annals of natural products chemistry as the largest and most toxic secondary metabolite known to date. Its fascinating, ladder-like, polyether molecular structure and diverse spectrum of biological activities elicited keen interest from chemists and biologists who recognized its uniqueness and potential as a probe and inspiration for research in chemistry and biology. Synthetic studies in the area benefited from methodologies and strategies that were developed as part of chemical synthesis programs directed toward the total synthesis of some of the less complex members of the polyether marine biotoxin class, of which maitotoxin is the flagship. This account focuses on progress made in the authors’ laboratories in the synthesis of large maitotoxin domains with emphasis on methodology development, strategy design, and structural comparisons of the synthesized molecules with the corresponding regions of the natural product. The article concludes with an overview of maitotoxin’s biological profile and future perspectives. PMID:21709816

  7. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  8. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  9. An Exploration of Design Students' Inspiration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dazkir, Sibel S.; Mower, Jennifer M.; Reddy-Best, Kelly L.; Pedersen, Elaine L.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore how different sources of inspiration influenced two groups of students' inspiration process and their attitudes toward their design projects. Assigned sources of inspiration and instructor's assistance in the search for inspiration varied for two groups of students completing a small culture inspired product…

  10. Inspiring Teachers: Perspectives and Practices. Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Pam; Kington, Alison; Lindorff-Vijayendran, Ariel; Ortega, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the notion of "inspiring" teaching. The research was commissioned by CfBT as part of a collaborative professional development initiative involving its schools. It arose from headteachers' suggestions that schools nominate a number of "inspiring" teachers so that their practice could be studied and…

  11. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  12. Vibration isolation by exploring bio-inspired structural nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijing; Jing, Xingjian; Bian, Jing; Li, Fengming; Allen, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the limb structures of animals/insects in motion vibration control, a bio-inspired limb-like structure (LLS) is systematically studied for understanding and exploring its advantageous nonlinear function in passive vibration isolation. The bio-inspired system consists of asymmetric articulations (of different rod lengths) with inside vertical and horizontal springs (as animal muscle) of different linear stiffness. Mathematical modeling and analysis of the proposed LLS reveal that, (a) the system has very beneficial nonlinear stiffness which can provide flexible quasi-zero, zero and/or negative stiffness, and these nonlinear stiffness properties are adjustable or designable with structure parameters; (b) the asymmetric rod-length ratio and spring-stiffness ratio present very beneficial factors for tuning system equivalent stiffness; (c) the system loading capacity is also adjustable with the structure parameters which presents another flexible benefit in application. Experiments and comparisons with existing quasi-zero-stiffness isolators validate the advantageous features above, and some discussions are also given about how to select structural parameters for practical applications. The results would provide an innovative bio-inspired solution to passive vibration control in various engineering practice. PMID:26448392

  13. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive nonrotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as e ˜0.8 and initial separations as large as p ˜50 to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within ˜0.1 radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  14. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  15. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  16. Berengario's drill: origin and inspiration.

    PubMed

    Chorney, Michael A; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Craniotomies are among the oldest neurosurgical procedures, as evidenced by early human skulls discovered with holes in the calvaria. Though devices change, the principles to safely transgress the skull are identical. Modern neurosurgeons regularly use electric power drills in the operating theater; however, nonelectric trephining instruments remain trusted by professionals in certain emergent settings in the rare instance that an electric drill is unavailable. Until the late Middle Ages, innovation in craniotomy instrumentation remained stunted without much documented redesign. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi's (c. 1457-1530 CE) text Tractatus de Fractura Calvae sive Cranei depicts a drill previously unseen in a medical volume. Written in 1518 CE, the book was motivated by defeat over the course of Lorenzo II de'Medici's medical care. Berengario's interchangeable bit with a compound brace ("vertibulum"), known today as the Hudson brace, symbolizes a pivotal device in neurosurgery and medical tool design. This drill permitted surgeons to stock multiple bits, perform the craniotomy faster, and decrease equipment costs during a period of increased incidence of cranial fractures, and thus the need for craniotomies, which was attributable to the introduction of gunpowder. The inspiration stemmed from a school of thought growing within a population of physicians trained as mathematicians, engineers, and astrologers prior to entering the medical profession. Berengario may have been the first to record the use of such a unique drill, but whether he invented this instrument or merely adapted its use for the craniotomy remains clouded. PMID:24684339

  17. Biologically-inspired soft exosuit.

    PubMed

    Asbeck, Alan T; Dyer, Robert J; Larusson, Arnar F; Walsh, Conor J

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of a novel soft cable-driven exosuit that can apply forces to the body to assist walking. Unlike traditional exoskeletons which contain rigid framing elements, the soft exosuit is worn like clothing, yet can generate moments at the ankle and hip with magnitudes of 18% and 30% of those naturally generated by the body during walking, respectively. Our design uses geared motors to pull on Bowden cables connected to the suit near the ankle. The suit has the advantages over a traditional exoskeleton in that the wearer's joints are unconstrained by external rigid structures, and the worn part of the suit is extremely light, which minimizes the suit's unintentional interference with the body's natural biomechanics. However, a soft suit presents challenges related to actuation force transfer and control, since the body is compliant and cannot support large pressures comfortably. We discuss the design of the suit and actuation system, including principles by which soft suits can transfer force to the body effectively and the biological inspiration for the design. For a soft exosuit, an important design parameter is the combined effective stiffness of the suit and its interface to the wearer. We characterize the exosuit's effective stiffness, and present preliminary results from it generating assistive torques to a subject during walking. We envision such an exosuit having broad applicability for assisting healthy individuals as well as those with muscle weakness. PMID:24187272

  18. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Biologically Inspired Technology Using Electroactive Polymers (EAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Evolution allowed nature to introduce highly effective biological mechanisms that are incredible inspiration for innovation. Humans have always made efforts to imitate nature's inventions and we are increasingly making advances that it becomes significantly easier to imitate, copy, and adapt biological methods, processes and systems. This brought us to the ability to create technology that is far beyond the simple mimicking of nature. Having better tools to understand and to implement nature's principles we are now equipped like never before to be inspired by nature and to employ our tools in far superior ways. Effectively, by bio-inspiration we can have a better view and value of nature capability while studying its models to learn what can be extracted, copied or adapted. Using electroactive polymers (EAP) as artificial muscles is adding an important element to the development of biologically inspired technologies.

  20. NASA Celebrates Atlantis as Pioneer, Inspiration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts and senior NASA management noted the contributions of space shuttle Atlantis as they signed the spacecraft over for a new mission of inspiration as it goes on public display at the Kenne...

  1. Development of OA Abroad and Its Inspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the concept and characteristics of open access (OA), analyses the status quo and development of OA in foreign countries, and discusses its inspiration to its future development in China.

  2. Biologically inspired toys using artificial muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in electroactive polymers, so-called artificial muscles, could one day be used to make bionics possible. Meanwhile, as this technology evolves novel mechanisms are expected to emerge that are biologically inspired.

  3. Engaging Students through Astronomically Inspired Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a lesson outline in which astronomically inspired musical compositions are used to teach astronomical concepts via an introductory activity, close listening, and critical/creative reflection.

  4. Transient resonances in the inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, Tanja; Flanagan, Eanna

    2009-05-01

    We show that the two body problem in general relativity in the highly relativistic regime has a qualitatively new feature: the occurence of transient resonances. The resonances occur when the ratio of polar and radial orbital frequencies, which is slowly evolving under the influence of gravitational radiation reaction, passes through a low order rational number. The resonances make the orbit more sensitive to changes in the initial data (though not quite chaotic), and are genuine non-perturbative effects that are not seen at any order in the standard post-Newtonian expansion used for two body systems at large separation. Our results directly apply to an important potential source of gravitational waves, namely the gradual inspiral of compact objects into much more massive black holes. Exploiting observations of these gravitational waves to map the spacetime geometry of black holes is contingent upon accurate theoretical models (templates) of the binary dynamics. At present, only the leading order in the mass ratio gravitational waveforms can be computed. Corrections to the waveform's phase due to resonance effects scale as the square root of the inverse of the mass ratio and are characterized by sudden jumps in the time derivatives of the phase. We numerically estimate the net size of these corrections and find indications that the phase error is of order a few cycles for mass ratios ˜10^- 3 but will be significant (of order tens of cycles) for mass ratios ˜10-6. Computations of these corrections will require the computation of pieces of the forcing terms in the equations of motion which are currently unknown.

  5. Bio-inspired dynamic robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alan S.; Wax, Steven G.; Christodoulou, Leo

    2003-09-01

    The unique performance of biological systems across a wide spectrum of phylogenetic species has historically provided inspirations for roboticists in new designs and fabrication of new robotic platforms. Of particular interest to a number of important applications is to create dynamic robots able to adapt to a change in their world, unplanned events that are sometimes unexpected, and sometimes unstable, harsh conditions. It is likely that the exploring dynamics in biological systems will continue to provide rich solutions to attaining robots capable of more complex tasks for this purpose. This is because the long-term design process of evolution utilizes a natural selection process that responds to such changes. Recently, there have been significant advances across a number of interdisciplinary efforts that have generated new capabilities in biorobotics. Whole body dynamics that capture the force dynamics and functional stability of legged systems over rough terrain have been elucidated and applied in legged robotic systems. Exploying the force dynamics of flapping winged insect flight has provided key discoveries and enabled the fabrication of new micro air vehicles. New classes of materials are being developed that emulate the ability of natural muscle, capturing the compliant and soft subtle movement and performance of biological appendages. In addition, classes of new multifunctional materials are being developed to enable the design of biorobotics with the structural and functional efficiency of living organisms. Optical flow and other sensors based on the principles of invertebrate vision have been implemented on robotic platforms for autonomous robotic guidance and control. These fundamental advances have resulted in the emergence of a new generation of bioinspired dynamic robots which show significant performance improvements in early prototype testing and that could someday be useful in a number of significant applications such as search and rescue and

  6. Laser Spectroscopy of Dysprosium Monofluoride: Ligand Field Assignments of States Belonging to the 4 f96 s2, 4 f106 s, and 4 f96 s6 pSuperconfigurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Bloch, Jonathan C.; Field, Robert W.; Kaledin, Leonid A.

    1996-10-01

    The techniques of selectively detected fluorescence excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to characterize two [19.3]8.5 and [20.3]8.5 electronic states of DyF in the region of ∼2.5 eV and five electronic states withT0< 6500 cm-1. Superconfigurational assignments of the observed low-lying states have been made on the basis of vibrational frequencies. TheX(1)7.5 ground state, with ΔG1/2≈ 605 cm-1, is assigned to the Dy+4f96s2superconfiguration, whereas four states, (1)8.5, (2)7.5, (3)7.5, and (4)7.5, with ΔG1/2≈ 508-544 cm-1are assigned to the Dy+4f106ssuperconfiguration. The lowest 4f106s(Ω = 8.5) state is found to lie 2431 cm-1above the 4f96s2X(1)7.5 ground state, thus establishing the linkage between the 4f96s2and 4f106ssuperconfigurations. The upper states in the region of ∼2.5 eV ([19.3]8.5 and [20.3]8.5) are assigned to the Dy+4f96s6psuperconfiguration on the basis of computed ligand field monopoleB00(nl,nl) orbital destabilization energies. The observed electronic states are discussed in relation to predictions of the ligand field theoretical model.

  7. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m. PMID:26602094

  8. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  9. The Inspiring Teacher: New Beginnings for the 21st Century. The Inspired Classroom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullo, Robert A.

    This book provides educators with information on how to become an inspiring teacher. Nine chapters look at: (1) "The Qualities of an Inspiring Teacher" (e.g., passion for learning, lifelong learners, and actions match words); (2) "Choice Theory" (genetic instructions affecting behavior, the quality world, and perception); (3) "Brain-Based…

  10. Product and technology innovation: what can biomimicry inspire?

    PubMed

    Lurie-Luke, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Biomimicry (bio- meaning life in Greek, and -mimesis, meaning to copy) is a growing field that seeks to interpolate natural biological mechanisms and structures into a wide range of applications. The rise of interest in biomimicry in recent years has provided a fertile ground for innovation. This review provides an eco-system based analysis of biomimicry inspired technology and product innovation. A multi-disciplinary framework has been developed to accomplish this analysis and the findings focus on the areas that have been most strikingly affected by the application of biomimicry and also highlight the emerging trends and opportunity areas. PMID:25316672

  11. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  12. Biologically Inspired Micro-Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Waszak, Martin R.

    2003-01-01

    Natural fliers demonstrate a diverse array of flight capabilities, many of which are poorly understood. NASA has established a research project to explore and exploit flight technologies inspired by biological systems. One part of this project focuses on dynamic modeling and control of micro aerial vehicles that incorporate flexible wing structures inspired by natural fliers such as insects, hummingbirds and bats. With a vast number of potential civil and military applications, micro aerial vehicles represent an emerging sector of the aerospace market. This paper describes an ongoing research activity in which mechanization and control concepts for biologically inspired micro aerial vehicles are being explored. Research activities focusing on a flexible fixed- wing micro aerial vehicle design and a flapping-based micro aerial vehicle concept are presented.

  13. Biologically inspired technologies in NASA's morphing project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Cox, David E.; Lazos, Barry S.; Waszak, Martin R.; Raney, David L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Pao, S. Paul

    2003-07-01

    For centuries, biology has provided fertile ground for hypothesis, discovery, and inspiration. Time-tested methods used in nature are being used as a basis for several research studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center as a part of Morphing Project, which develops and assesses breakthrough vehicle technologies. These studies range from low drag airfoil design guided by marine and avian morphologies to soaring techniques inspired by birds and the study of small flexible wing vehicles. Biology often suggests unconventional yet effective approaches such as non-planar wings, dynamic soaring, exploiting aeroelastic effects, collaborative control, flapping, and fibrous active materials. These approaches and other novel technologies for future flight vehicles are being studied in NASA's Morphing Project. This paper will discuss recent findings in the aeronautics-based, biologically-inspired research in the project.

  14. Nostalgia-Evoked Inspiration: Mediating Mechanisms and Motivational Implications.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Elena; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Routledge, Clay; Arndt, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    Six studies examined the nostalgia-inspiration link and its motivational implications. In Study 1, nostalgia proneness was positively associated with inspiration frequency and intensity. In Studies 2 and 3, the recollection of nostalgic (vs. ordinary) experiences increased both general inspiration and specific inspiration to engage in exploratory activities. In Study 4, serial mediational analyses supported a model in which nostalgia increases social connectedness, which subsequently fosters self-esteem, which then boosts inspiration. In Study 5, a rigorous evaluation of this serial mediational model (with a novel nostalgia induction controlling for positive affect) reinforced the idea that nostalgia-elicited social connectedness increases self-esteem, which then heightens inspiration. Study 6 extended the serial mediational model by demonstrating that nostalgia-evoked inspiration predicts goal pursuit (intentions to pursue an important goal). Nostalgia spawns inspiration via social connectedness and attendant self-esteem. In turn, nostalgia-evoked inspiration bolsters motivation. PMID:26228477

  15. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate

  16. Auxiliary ligand field dominated single-molecule magnets of a series of indole-derivative β-diketone mononuclear Dy(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanping; Yan, Pengfei; Zou, Xiaoyan; Yao, Xu; Hou, Guangfeng; Li, Guangming

    2016-05-31

    A series of four indole-derivative β-diketone mononuclear dysprosium complexes, namely, Dy(EIFD)3(bpy)·CH3CN (), Dy(EIFD)3(phen)·CH2Cl2 (), Dy(EIFD)3(dpq)·CH2Cl2 (), and Dy(EIFD)3(dppz)·2H2O () (EIFD = 1-(1-ethyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-4,4,4-trifluorobutane-1,3-dione, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, dpq = dipyrazine[2,3-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) have been isolated by reactions of EIFD, DyCl3·6H2O and a series of auxiliary ligands. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that complexes are all eight-coordinated mononuclear structures. Magnetic studies indicate that complexes are all single-molecule magnets. Notably, the auxiliary ligands play an essential role in regulating their magnetism. The corresponding structural and magnetic parameters have been discussed in detail. PMID:27167701

  17. Multiple Unmanned Air Vehicles Control Using Neurobiologically Inspired Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Li

    In order to develop and evaluate future Unmanned Air Vehicles for the hazardous environmental monitoring, the comprehensive simulation test and analysis of new advanced concepts is imperative. This paper details an on-going proof of concept focused on development of a neurobiologically-inspired system for the high level control of a Air Vehicle team. This study, entitled Neurobiologically Enabled Autonomous Vehicle Operations, will evaluate initial System-Under-Test concept data by selecting well defined tasks, and evaluating performance based on assignment effectiveness, cooperation, and adaptability of the system. The system will be tested thoroughly in simulation, and if mature, will be implemented in hardware.

  18. MCMC exploration of supermassive black hole binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2006-10-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna will be able to detect the inspiral and merger of super massive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) anywhere in the universe. Standard matched filtering techniques can be used to detect and characterize these systems. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are ideally suited to this and other LISA data analysis problems as they are able to efficiently handle models with large dimensions. Here we compare the posterior parameter distributions derived by an MCMC algorithm with the distributions predicted by the Fisher information matrix. We find excellent agreement for the extrinsic parameters, while the Fisher matrix slightly overestimates errors in the intrinsic parameters.

  19. Towards a Pedagogy of Inspirational Parables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pio, Edwina; Haigh, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to present a rationale for a learning and assessment activity involving students in the construction of inspirational parables for diversity management within a university business studies programme. The paper reviews processes from teacher and student perspectives, describes initial outcomes and foreshadows further…

  20. Inspiring Students to Create the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Cynthia; Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    An exemplary program based at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay greatly increases the odds that at-risk youngsters will not only graduate from high school, but will go on to higher education. The program is also a model of university/community collaboration. ["Inspiring Students to Create the Future" was written with Timothy U. Kaufman, Linda…

  1. Inspire: A Mars Network Science Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voirin, T.; Larranaga, J.; Taylor, G.; Sanchez Perez, J. M.; Prost, J. P.; Cavel, C.; Falkner, P.

    2014-06-01

    INSPIRE is a Mars Network Science mission which is been studied by ESA in the frame of its Mars Robotic Exploration Program. It consists of three probes performing a direct entry on Mars for geophysics and meteorology science over one full martian year.

  2. Water Treatment Technologies Inspire Healthy Beverages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Mike Johnson, a former technician at Johnson Space Center, drew on his expertise as a wastewater engineer to create a line of kombucha-based probiotic drinks. Unpeeled Inc., based in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, employs 12 people and has sold more than 6 million units of its NASA-inspired beverage.

  3. Inspired by Athletes, Myths, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melvin, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Tales of love and hate, of athleticism, heroism, devotion to gods and goddesses that influenced myth and culture are a way of sharing ancient Greece's rich history. In this article, the author describes how her students created their own Greek-inspired clay vessels as artifacts of their study. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  4. Bio-Inspired Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Self-cleaning surfaces have drawn a lot of interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review focuses on the recent progress in mechanism, preparation, and application of self-cleaning surfaces. To date, self-cleaning has been demonstrated by the following four conceptual approaches: (a) TiO2-based superhydrophilic self-cleaning, (b) lotus effect self-cleaning (superhydrophobicity with a small sliding angle), (c) gecko setae-inspired self-cleaning, and (d) underwater organisms-inspired antifouling self-cleaning. Although a number of self-cleaning products have been commercialized, the remaining challenges and future outlook of self-cleaning surfaces are also briefly addressed. Through evolution, nature, which has long been a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers, has arrived at what is optimal. We hope this review will stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration among material science, chemistry, biology, physics, nanoscience, engineering, etc., which is essential for the rational design and reproducible construction of bio-inspired multifunctional self-cleaning surfaces in practical applications.

  5. Inspiring a Life Full of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlam, John

    2012-01-01

    The Secrets and Words films had everything one would expect from a BBC drama--great writing, acting and directing allied with high production values. But the dramas were also powerful learning tools, co-commissioned by BBC Learning and aimed at inspiring people who have difficulty with reading and writing to seek help. The BBC's learning vision is…

  6. Basket Weaving Inspired by the Gullah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Many different cultures created and used the basket not only for utilitarian purposes, but also for ceremonial uses. In this article, the author describes an eighth-grade project inspired by the basket making of the Gullah people, who live along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  7. Eric Carle-Inspired Insect Collages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palamountain, Eileen; Turner, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Describes a lesson in which students create collage insects inspired by the work of Eric Carle (The Very Hungry Caterpillar). Connects art, language arts, and science. Discusses how students make paper to use as the collage material and how students create the insects. (CMK)

  8. Great Quotes To Inspire Great Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    benShea, Noah

    This book provides a collection of quotes designed to offer support and inspiration to teachers as they face the daily emotional, spiritual, intellectual, and physical challenges of their professional and personal lives. The book's 26 sections focus on: the art of teaching; adversity; behavior; character; children; collaboration and teamwork;…

  9. Pop Art--Inspired Self-Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donna J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art lesson that was inspired by Andy Warhol's mass-produced portraits. Warhol began his career as a graphic artist and illustrator. His artwork was a response to the redundancy of the advertising images put in front of the American public. Celebrities and famous people in magazines and newspapers were seen…

  10. Art Works ... when Students Find Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Artworks are not produced in a vacuum, but by the interaction of experiences, and interrelationships of ideas, perceptions and feelings acknowledged and expressed in some form. Students, like mature artists, may be inspired and motivated by their memories and observations of their surroundings. Like adult artists, students may find that their own…

  11. Using "1 = 2" to Inspire and Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Premadasa, Kirthi; Samaranayake, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical fallacies have an embedded sense of awe and mystery that can be used effectively in a classroom to inspire students to tackle a fallacy and find the "hidden" violation. In doing so, the student may discover the consequence of a rule violation in a stimulating manner, thus making a lasting impact of the rule as well as providing the…

  12. NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... turn Javascript on. Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Fogarty scholar helps Zambians fight cervical ...

  13. The Inspiration of Hope in Substance Abuse Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne; Cutcliffe, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a grounded theory method to explore how counselors inspire hope in clients struggling with substance abuse. Findings from 10 participants revealed that hope inspiration occurred in 3 phases and consisted of several categories of hope-inspiring processes. Implications for counseling practice, counselor education, and research are…

  14. Bio-inspired method and system for actionable intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Chelian, Suhas E.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a bio-inspired VISion based actionable INTelligence system (VISINT) that provides automated capabilities to (1) understand objects, patterns, events and behaviors in vision data; (2) translate this understanding into timely recognition of novel and anomalous entities; and (3) discover underlying hierarchies and relationships between disparate labels entered by multiple users to provide a consistent data representation. VISINT is both a system and a novel collection of novel bio-inspired algorithms/modules. These modules can be used independently for various aspects of the actionable intelligence problem or sequenced together for an end-to-end actionable intelligence system. The algorithms can be useful in many other applications such as scene understanding, behavioral analysis, automatic surveillance systems, etc. The bio-inspired algorithms are a novel combination of hierarchical spatial and temporal networks based on the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART). The novel aspects of this work are that it is an end-to-end system for actionable intelligence that combines existing and novel implementations of various modules in innovative ways to develop a system concept for actionable intelligence. Although there are other algorithms/implementations of several of the modules in VISINT, they suffer from various limitations and often system integration is not considered. The overall VISINT system can be viewed an incremental learning system where no offline training is required and data from multiple sources and times can be seamlessly integrated. The user is in the loop, but due to the semi-supervised nature of the underlying algorithms, only significant variations of entities, not all false alarms, are shown to the user. It does not forget the past even with new learning. While VISINT is designed as a vision-based system, it could also work with other kinds of sensor data that can recognize and locate individual objects in the scene. Beyond that stage

  15. Taxonomic etymology - in search of inspiration.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Piotr; Rewicz, Tomasz; Pabis, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common - given after morphological features - through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons), science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names. PMID:26257573

  16. Voros Product and Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2013-03-01

    We emphasize the importance of the Voros product in defining the noncommutative (NC) inspired black holes. The computation of entropy for both the noncommutative inspired Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström (RN) black holes show that the area law holds up to order (1)/(√ {θ )}e-M2/θ . The leading correction to the entropy (computed in the tunneling formalism) is shown to be logarithmic. The Komar energy E for these black holes is then obtained and a deviation from the standard identity E = 2STH is found at the order √ {θ }e-M2/θ . This deviation leads to a nonvanishing Komar energy at the extremal point TH = 0 of these black holes. The Smarr formula is finally worked out for the NC Schwarzschild black hole. Similar features also exist for a de Sitter-Schwarzschild geometry.

  17. Shadow of noncommutative geometry inspired black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Cheng, Peng; Zhong, Yi; Zhou, Xiang-Nan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the shadow casted by the rotating black hole inspired by noncommutative geometry is investigated. In addition to the dimensionless spin parameter a/M0 with M0 black hole mass and inclination angle i, the dimensionless noncommutative parameter √vartheta/M0 is also found to affect the shape of the black hole shadow. The result shows that the size of the shadow slightly decreases with the parameter √vartheta/M0, while the distortion increases with it. Compared to the Kerr black hole, the parameter √vartheta/M0 increases the deformation of the shadow. This may offer a way to distinguish noncommutative geometry inspired black hole from Kerr one via astronomical instruments in the near future.

  18. Recent developments in biologically inspired seeker technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Massie, Mark A.

    2001-06-01

    As electro-optic sensors increase in size and frame rate, the data transfer and digital processing resource requirements also increase. In many missions, the spatial area of interest is but a small fraction of the available field of view. Choosing the right region of interest, however, is a challenge and still requires an enormous amount of downstream digital processing resources. In order to filter this ever-increasing amount of data, we look at how nature solves the problem. The Advanced Guidance Division of the Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/MNG) at Eglin AFB, Florida, has been pursuing research in the area of advanced sensor and image processing concepts based on biologically inspired sensory information processing. A summary of some vertebrate and invertebrate inspired 'neuromorphic' processing efforts will be presented along with a seeker system concept utilizing this innovative technology. Concepts and requirements for future such efforts will also be discussed.

  19. Additive manufacturing of biologically-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2016-01-21

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer an attractive pathway towards the fabrication of functional materials featuring complex heterogeneous architectures inspired by biological systems. In this paper, recent research on the use of AM approaches to program the local chemical composition, structure and properties of biologically-inspired materials is reviewed. A variety of structural motifs found in biological composites have been successfully emulated in synthetic systems using inkjet-based, direct-writing, stereolithography and slip casting technologies. The replication in synthetic systems of design principles underlying such structural motifs has enabled the fabrication of lightweight cellular materials, strong and tough composites, soft robots and autonomously shaping structures with unprecedented properties and functionalities. Pushing the current limits of AM technologies in future research should bring us closer to the manufacturing capabilities of living organisms, opening the way for the digital fabrication of advanced materials with superior performance, lower environmental impact and new functionalities. PMID:26750617

  20. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwiak, Piotr; Rewicz, Tomasz; Pabis, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons), science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names. PMID:26257573

  1. Spider's web inspires fibres for industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2010-03-01

    Spiders may not be everybody's idea of natural beauty, but nobody can deny the artistry in the webs that they spin, especially when decorated with water baubles in the morning dew. Inspired by this spectacle, a group of researchers in China has mimicked the structural properties of the spider's web to create a fibre for industry that can manipulate water with the same skill and efficiency, writes James Dacey.

  2. Neurobiologically Inspired Mobile Robot Navigation and Planning

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlier, Nicolas; Quoy, Mathias; Gaussier, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    After a short review of biologically inspired navigation architectures, mainly relying on modeling the hippocampal anatomy, or at least some of its functions, we present a navigation and planning model for mobile robots. This architecture is based on a model of the hippocampal and prefrontal interactions. In particular, the system relies on the definition of a new cell type “transition cells” that encompasses traditional “place cells”. PMID:18958274

  3. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications. PMID:27014918

  4. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  5. Understanding fly-ear inspired directional microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Xuming; Yu, Miao

    2009-03-01

    In this article, the equivalent two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model for the hypersensitive ear of fly Ormia ocharacea is revisited. It is found that in addition to the mechanical coupling between the ears, the key to the remarkable directional hearing ability of the fly is the proper contributions of the rocking mode and bending mode of the ear structure. This can serve as the basis for the development of fly-ear inspired directional microphones. New insights are also provided to establish the connection between the mechanics of the fly ear and the prior biological experiments, which reveals that the fly ear is a nature-designed optimal structure that might have evolved to best perform its localization task at 5 kHz. Based on this understanding, a new design of the fly-ear inspired directional microphone is presented and a corresponding normalized continuum mechanics model is derived. Parametric studies are carried out to study the influence of the identified non-dimensional parameters on the microphone performance. Directional microphones are developed to verify the understanding and concept. This study provides a theoretical guidance to develop miniature bio-inspired directional microphones, and can impact many fronts that require miniature directional microphones.

  6. The temperature of inspired air influences respiratory water loss in young lambs.

    PubMed

    Riesenfeld, T; Hammarlund, K; Norsted, T; Sedin, G

    1994-01-01

    The temperature of inspired air influences respiratory water loss (RWL) in young lambs. Water loss from the airways, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured using an open flow-through system with a mass spectrometer, specially equipped with a water channel, for gas analysis. Measurements were made in 9 newborn lambs at 3 different inspired air temperatures keeping all other environmental factors stable, including the ambient air temperature. The water content of the inspired air was also kept constant. RWL was found to be 9.9 +/- 3.9 (SD) mg/kg/min when the temperature of the inspired air was 30 degrees C and its humidity 30%. At 40 degrees C this loss increased to 11.5 +/- 3.6 mg/kg/min, and at about 60 degrees C it increased further to 26.0 +/- 8.2 mg/kg/min. The oxygen consumption was 10.0 +/- 0.8 (SD) ml/kg/min at 30 degrees C and 10.4 +/- 2.0 ml/kg/min at 60 degrees C, a change which is not significant. Thus RWL is influenced by the temperature of the inspired air, with greater loss at higher temperatures. PMID:8054401

  7. Clinically-inspired automatic classification of ovarian carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    BenTaieb, Aïcha; Nosrati, Masoud S; Li-Chang, Hector; Huntsman, David; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Context: It has been shown that ovarian carcinoma subtypes are distinct pathologic entities with differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. Histotyping by pathologists has good reproducibility, but occasional cases are challenging and require immunohistochemistry and subspecialty consultation. Motivated by the need for more accurate and reproducible diagnoses and to facilitate pathologists’ workflow, we propose an automatic framework for ovarian carcinoma classification. Materials and Methods: Our method is inspired by pathologists’ workflow. We analyse imaged tissues at two magnification levels and extract clinically-inspired color, texture, and segmentation-based shape descriptors using image-processing methods. We propose a carefully designed machine learning technique composed of four modules: A dissimilarity matrix, dimensionality reduction, feature selection and a support vector machine classifier to separate the five ovarian carcinoma subtypes using the extracted features. Results: This paper presents the details of our implementation and its validation on a clinically derived dataset of eighty high-resolution histopathology images. The proposed system achieved a multiclass classification accuracy of 95.0% when classifying unseen tissues. Assessment of the classifier's confusion (confusion matrix) between the five different ovarian carcinoma subtypes agrees with clinician's confusion and reflects the difficulty in diagnosing endometrioid and serous carcinomas. Conclusions: Our results from this first study highlight the difficulty of ovarian carcinoma diagnosis which originate from the intrinsic class-imbalance observed among subtypes and suggest that the automatic analysis of ovarian carcinoma subtypes could be valuable to clinician's diagnostic procedure by providing a second opinion. PMID:27563487

  8. Optimized bio-inspired stiffening design for an engine nacelle.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Neil; Vodenitcharova, Tania; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Structural efficiency is a common engineering goal in which an ideal solution provides a structure with optimized performance at minimized weight, with consideration of material mechanical properties, structural geometry, and manufacturability. This study aims to address this goal in developing high performance lightweight, stiff mechanical components by creating an optimized design from a biologically-inspired template. The approach is implemented on the optimization of rib stiffeners along an aircraft engine nacelle. The helical and angled arrangements of cellulose fibres in plants were chosen as the bio-inspired template. Optimization of total displacement and weight was carried out using a genetic algorithm (GA) coupled with finite element analysis. Iterations showed a gradual convergence in normalized fitness. Displacement was given higher emphasis in optimization, thus the GA optimization tended towards individual designs with weights near the mass constraint. Dominant features of the resulting designs were helical ribs with rectangular cross-sections having large height-to-width ratio. Displacement reduction was at 73% as compared to an unreinforced nacelle, and is attributed to the geometric features and layout of the stiffeners, while mass is maintained within the constraint. PMID:26531222

  9. Bio-inspired approach for intelligent unattended ground sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueber, Nicolas; Raymond, Pierre; Hennequin, Christophe; Pichler, Alexander; Perrot, Maxime; Voisin, Philippe; Moeglin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Improving the surveillance capacity over wide zones requires a set of smart battery-powered Unattended Ground Sensors capable of issuing an alarm to a decision-making center. Only high-level information has to be sent when a relevant suspicious situation occurs. In this paper we propose an innovative bio-inspired approach that mimics the human bi-modal vision mechanism and the parallel processing ability of the human brain. The designed prototype exploits two levels of analysis: a low-level panoramic motion analysis, the peripheral vision, and a high-level event-focused analysis, the foveal vision. By tracking moving objects and fusing multiple criteria (size, speed, trajectory, etc.), the peripheral vision module acts as a fast relevant event detector. The foveal vision module focuses on the detected events to extract more detailed features (texture, color, shape, etc.) in order to improve the recognition efficiency. The implemented recognition core is able to acquire human knowledge and to classify in real-time a huge amount of heterogeneous data thanks to its natively parallel hardware structure. This UGS prototype validates our system approach under laboratory tests. The peripheral analysis module demonstrates a low false alarm rate whereas the foveal vision correctly focuses on the detected events. A parallel FPGA implementation of the recognition core succeeds in fulfilling the embedded application requirements. These results are paving the way of future reconfigurable virtual field agents. By locally processing the data and sending only high-level information, their energy requirements and electromagnetic signature are optimized. Moreover, the embedded Artificial Intelligence core enables these bio-inspired systems to recognize and learn new significant events. By duplicating human expertise in potentially hazardous places, our miniature visual event detector will allow early warning and contribute to better human decision making.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of diatom inspired nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutu, Timothy

    This dissertation addresses the investigation of two novel methods to synthesize composite nanomaterials inspired by marine microalgae called diatoms. Diatoms are inspirational sources of silica structures, ordered at micro- to nanoscale, that possess unique optical properties. The fabrication of nanomaterials with well-defined and controllable micro-to nanoscale features has been of great interest for chemical, optical, electronic, catalytic, environmental, and medical applications. While bottom-up and top-down approaches have been extensively used to fabricate two-dimensional structures and devices, there is a need for inexpensive methods to mass-produce complex micro- to nanoscale structures with a variety of three-dimensional (3D) morphologies at high degrees of precision, reproducibility, and chemical tailorability. To explore the fabrication of 3D nanostructures, this study harnessed the biomineralization capacity of diatom cell cultures to fabricate Si-Ge oxide nanocomposites on one hand and the chemical bath deposition on the other hand. A two-stage photobioreactor strategy was used to metabolically insert nanostructured germanium into the silica microstructure of diatom of diatom Pinnularia sp. In the first stage, diatom cells were grown to the point of silicon starvation. In the second stage, a pulse of silicon and germanium solution was added to the silicon-starved cells. Various electron microscopy techniques were utilized to validate the extent of the insertion and the subsequent incorporation of germanium into the diatom silica matrix. In the second method to form diatom inspired nanocomposites, we utilize a simple, inexpensive chemical bath deposition technique to deposit a cadmium sulfide nanocrystals on the patterned surface of diatom biosilica. A parametric investigation of the factors affecting the chemical bath process was carried out. The morphology, structural and compositional properties of the composites were characterized by electron

  11. Performance of an active inspired hypoxic guard.

    PubMed

    Ghijselings, Idris E; De Cooman, Sofie; Carette, Rik; Peyton, Philip J; De Wolf, Andre M; Hendrickx, Jan F A

    2016-02-01

    Current hypoxic guards systems fail to maintain the inspired O2 concentration (FIO2) ≥ 21 % across the entire fresh gas flow (FGF) range when a second carrier gas is used (N2O or air). We examined the performance of the Maquet O2 Guard(®), a smart hypoxic guard that increases O2 delivery if an inspired hypoxic mixture is formed. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, 12 ASA I-II patients were enrolled. During anesthesia with sevoflurane in O2/air, the O2 Guard(®) was tested by administering O2/air at the following delivered hypoxic guard limits [expressed as (total FGF in L min(-1); FDO2 in %)] for 4 min each: [0.3;67], [0.4;50], [0.6;34], [0.8;25], [1.0;21], [1.2;21], [1.5;21], [2;21], [3;21], and [5;21]. The following data were collected: (1) time from FIO2 = 30 to 20 %; (2) time from FIO2 = 20 % to O2 Guard(®) activation; (3) time from O2 Guard(®) activation to FIO2 = 25 %; (4) FGF and FDO2 used by the O2 Guard. If SpO2 was <90 % for 10 s or longer at any time, the patient was excluded. Three patients were excluded for low SpO2. The incidence of FIO2 < 21 % was 100 % within the 1-2 L min(-1) FGF range. The O2 Guard(®) was activated within 20 s after FIO2 became 20 %, except in one patient where FIO2 oscillated between 20 and 21 %. FDO2 was increased to 60 % and FGF to 1 L min(-1) (the latter only if it was lower than 1 L min(-1) prior to activation of the O2 Guard). FIO2 increased to 25 % within 55 s after O2 Guard activation in all patients. The O2 Guard(®), an active inspired hypoxic guard, rapidly reverses and limits the duration of inspired hypoxic episodes when the delivered hypoxic guard fails to do so. PMID:25757405

  12. The "Biologically-Inspired Computing" Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Self-managing systems, whether viewed from the perspective of Autonomic Computing, or from that of another initiative, offers a holistic vision for the development and evolution of biologically-inspired computer-based systems. It aims to bring new levels of automation and dependability to systems, while simultaneously hiding their complexity and reducing costs. A case can certainly be made that all computer-based systems should exhibit autonomic properties [6], and we envisage greater interest in, and uptake of, autonomic principles in future system development.

  13. Bio-inspired color image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, Laurence; Susstrunk, Sabine

    2004-06-01

    Capturing and rendering an image that fulfills the observer's expectations is a difficult task. This is due to the fact that the signal reaching the eye is processed by a complex mechanism before forming a percept, whereas a capturing device only retains the physical value of light intensities. It is especially difficult to render complex scenes with highly varying luminances. For example, a picture taken inside a room where objects are visible through the windows will not be rendered correctly by a global technique. Either details in the dim room will be hidden in shadow or the objects viewed through the window will be too bright. The image has to be treated locally to resemble more closely to what the observer remembers. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for rendering images based on human local adaptation. We take inspiration from a model of color vision called Retinex. This model determines the perceived color given spatial relationships of the captured signals. Retinex has been used as a computational model for image rendering. In this article, we propose a new solution inspired by Retinex that is based on a single filter applied to the luminance channel. All parameters are image-dependent so that the process requires no parameter tuning. That makes the method more flexible than other existing ones. The presented results show that our method suitably enhances high dynamic range images.

  14. Bio-inspired Fillers for Mechanical Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korley, Lashanda

    2012-02-01

    An examination of natural materials has offered a new perspective on the development of multi-functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties. One important lesson from nature is the utilization of composite structures to impart improved mechanical behavior and enhanced functionality using nanofillers. A relatively unexplored expansion of this bio-inspired, nanoscale filler approach to high performance materials is the incorporation of responsive, multi-functional reinforcing elements in polymeric composites with the goal of combining superior mechanical behavior that can be tuned with additional functionality, such as sensing and bioactivity. One approach is the use of self-assembling small molecules that form uniform, one-dimensional nanostructures as an emerging class of filler components. Another pathway toward mechanical enhancement is the incorporation of stimuli-responsive and high-modulus electrospun nanofibers. We have probed the utilization of high-aspect ratio, self-assembled small molecules and responsive electrospun nanofibers as all-organic nanofillers to achieve significant modulus changes within elastomeric matrices. The influence of matrix-filler interactions and the role of hierarchical organization in these nature-inspired composites will be discussed. Potential applications in barrier technology and drug delivery have also been explored.

  15. Biomimetic multifunctional surfaces inspired from animals.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiwu; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yin, Wei; Li, Wen; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2016-08-01

    Over millions of years, animals have evolved to a higher intelligent level for their environment. A large number of diverse surface structures on their bodies have been formed to adapt to the extremely harsh environment. Just like the structural diversity existed in plants, the same also applies true in animals. Firstly, this article provides an overview and discussion of the most common functional surface structures inspired from animals, such as drag reduction, noise reduction, anti-adhesion, anti-wear, anti-erosion, anti-fog, water capture, and optical surfaces. Then, some typical characteristics of morphologies, structures, and materials of the animal multifunctional surfaces were discussed. The adaptation of these surfaces to environmental conditions was also analyzed. It mainly focuses on the relationship between their surface functions and their surface structural characteristics. Afterwards, the multifunctional mechanisms or principles of these surfaces were discussed. Models of these structures were provided for the development of structure materials and machinery surfaces. At last, fabrication techniques and existing or potential technical applications inspired from biomimetic multifunctional surfaces in animals were also discussed. The application prospects of the biomimetic functional surfaces are very broad, such as civil field of self-cleaning textile fabrics and non-stick pots, ocean field of oil-water separation, sports field of swimming suits, space development field of lens arrays. PMID:27085632

  16. Measurement of the flow past a cactus-inspired cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; El-Makdah, Adnan M.

    2012-11-01

    Desert cacti are tall cylindrical plants characterized by longitudinal u- or v-shaped grooves that run parallel to the plant axis, covering its surface area. We study the wake flow modifications resulting from the introduction of cactus-inspired surface grooves to a circular cylinder. Particle image velocimetry PIV is implemented in a wind tunnel to visualize and quantify the wake flow from a cactus cylinder in cross wind and an equivalent circular cylinder at Re O(1E5). The cactus wake exhibits superior behavior over its circular counterpart as seen from the mean and turbulent velocity profiles. The surface flow within the grooves is also probed to elucidate the origins of the wake alterations. Lastly, we use simple statistical analysis based only on the wake velocity fields, under the assumption of periodicity of the shedding, to recover the time varying flow from the randomly acquired PIV snapshots.

  17. A sawtooth waveform inspired pitch estimator for speech and music.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Arturo; Harris, John G

    2008-09-01

    A sawtooth waveform inspired pitch estimator (SWIPE) has been developed for speech and music. SWIPE estimates the pitch as the fundamental frequency of the sawtooth waveform whose spectrum best matches the spectrum of the input signal. The comparison of the spectra is done by computing a normalized inner product between the spectrum of the signal and a modified cosine. The size of the analysis window is chosen appropriately to make the width of the main lobes of the spectrum match the width of the positive lobes of the cosine. SWIPE('), a variation of SWIPE, utilizes only the first and prime harmonics of the signal, which significantly reduces subharmonic errors commonly found in other pitch estimation algorithms. The authors' tests indicate that SWIPE and SWIPE(') performed better on two spoken speech and one disordered voice database and one musical instrument database consisting of single notes performed at a variety of pitches. PMID:19045655

  18. INSPIRE Natural Risk Zones Data Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M.; Thomas, F.; Tomas, R.

    2012-04-01

    INSPIRE Directive (2007/2/EC) defines Natural Risk Zones theme as: "Vulnerable areas characterised according to natural hazards (all atmospheric, hydrologic, seismic, volcanic and wildfire phenomena that, because of their location, severity, and frequency, have the potential to seriously affect society), e.g. floods, landslides and subsidence, avalanches, forest fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions." This specification is the work of the Natural Risk Zones thematic working group. A multinational team of experts volunteered from the community of SDICs (Spatial Data Interest Communities) and LMOs (Legally Mandated Organisations) of INSPIRE. The data specification has been compiled using reference material submitted by SDICs and LMOs and the responses to a user requirements survey. The team themselves have had to draw on their own expertise and that of their organisations and other groups to develop agreed use cases in a selection of areas pertinent to Natural Risk Zones. The scope of the Natural Risk Zones data specification is potentially very large and this presentation will demonstrate this fact. Natural Risk Zones also involves significant engagement with other thematic areas from INSPIRE. This involvement stems from the nature of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk. Several other thematic areas input attributes vital to understanding the nature of hazard, yet others are vital in the understanding of exposure. In working on the scope of the Natural Risk Zones theme four use cases have been created for; Floods, Landslide, Forest Fire and Earthquake. These will be used in the presentation to demonstrate the use of the data specification. The approach taken to model Natural Risk Zones is generic in its treatment of each of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk, with a core model, whilst allowing extensibility to be more specific where possible and required. Flood risk is significantly more precisely defined than other hazards, due in part to the

  19. Compact stars in Eddington inspired gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor; Delsate, Térence

    2011-07-15

    A new, Eddington inspired theory of gravity was recently proposed by Bañados and Ferreira. It is equivalent to general relativity in vacuum, but differs from it inside matter. This viable, one-parameter theory was shown to avoid cosmological singularities and turns out to lead to many other exciting new features that we report here. First, for a positive coupling parameter, the field equations have a dramatic impact on the collapse of dust, and do not lead to singularities. We further find that the theory supports stable, compact pressureless stars made of perfect fluid, which provide interesting models of self-gravitating dark matter. Finally, we show that the mere existence of relativistic stars imposes a strong, near optimal constraint on the coupling parameter, which can even be improved by observations of the moment of inertia of the double pulsar. PMID:21838345

  20. Inspiration Today: Music, Astronomy, and Popular Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We explore a variety of examples of music inspired by serious astronomy (as opposed to simply an astronomical title or quick allusion to spooning in June to the light of the Moon). The examples are drawn from my recently published catalog of 133 such pieces, including both classical and popular genres of music. We discuss operas based on the life and work of astronomers, six songs based on a reasonable understanding of the properties of black holes, constellation pieces written by composers from around the world who are or were active amateur astronomers, the song that compares walking on the Moon to being in love, the little-known rock song that became a reference in the Astrophysical Journal, pieces that base the patterns of the music on the rhythms of astronomical phenomena, and a number of others.

  1. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  2. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider’s silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  3. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caponetti, Laura; Buscicchio, Cosimo Alessandro; Castellano, Giovanna

    2011-12-01

    Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  4. Vibration driven vehicle inspired from grass spike

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Suo; Xu, Qi; Qin, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Searching and detecting in some harsh environments such as collapsed buildings, pipes, small cracks are crucial for human rescue and industrial detection, military surveillance etc. However, the drawbacks of traditional moving modes of current vehicles make them difficult to perform such tasks. So developing some new vehicles is urgent. Here, we report a Setaria viridis spike's interesting behavior on a vibrating track, and inspired by that phenomena we develop a concept for cargo delivery, and give a detailed discussion about its working mechanism. This vehicle can move on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces. Moreover, its climbing capability in tilted and even vertical smooth pipe is also outstanding. These features make it suitable for search-rescue, military reconnaissance, etc. Finally, this vehicle can be reduced into micro/nano-scale, which makes it would play an important role in target-drug delivery, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). PMID:23677337

  5. Tree-inspired piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, William B.; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    We design and test micro-watt energy-harvesters inspired by tree trunks swaying in the wind. A uniform flow vibrates a linear array of four cylinders affixed to piezoelectric energy transducers. Particular attention is paid to measuring the energy generated as a function of cylinder spacing, flow speed, and relative position of the cylinder within the array. Peak power is generated using cylinder center-to-center spacings of 3.3 diameters and flow speeds in which the vortex shedding frequency is 1.6 times the natural frequency of the cylinders. Using these flow speeds and spacings, the power generated by downstream cylinders can exceed that of leading cylinders by more than an order of magnitude. We visualize the flow in this system by studying the behavior of a dynamically matched flowing soap film with imbedded styrofoam disks. Our qualitative visualizations suggest that peak energy harvesting occurs under conditions in which vortices have fully detached from the leading cylinder.

  6. A Biologically Inspired Network Design Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T.S.; Deng, Yong; Yang, Hai; Yang, Xin-She; Tsompanas, Michail-Antisthenis I.; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    A network design problem is to select a subset of links in a transport network that satisfy passengers or cargo transportation demands while minimizing the overall costs of the transportation. We propose a mathematical model of the foraging behaviour of slime mould P. polycephalum to solve the network design problem and construct optimal transport networks. In our algorithm, a traffic flow between any two cities is estimated using a gravity model. The flow is imitated by the model of the slime mould. The algorithm model converges to a steady state, which represents a solution of the problem. We validate our approach on examples of major transport networks in Mexico and China. By comparing networks developed in our approach with the man-made highways, networks developed by the slime mould, and a cellular automata model inspired by slime mould, we demonstrate the flexibility and efficiency of our approach. PMID:26041508

  7. Mapping the 2017 Eclipse: Education, Navigation, Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    Eclipse maps are a unique vessel of knowledge. At a glance, they communicate the essential knowledge of where and when to successfully view a total eclipse of the sun. An eclipse map also provides detailed knowledge of eclipse circumstances superimposed on the highway system for optimal navigation, especially in the event that weather forces relocation. Eclipse maps are also a vital planning tool for solar physicists and astrophotographers capturing high-resolution imagery of the solar corona. Michael Zeiler will speak to the role of eclipse maps in educating the American public and inspiring people to make the effort to reach the path of totality for the sight of a lifetime. Michael will review the role of eclipse maps in astronomical research and discuss a project under development, the 2017 Eclipse Atlas for smartphones, tablets, and desktop computers.

  8. The periodic table: icon and inspiration.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Tang, Samantha

    2015-03-13

    To start this discussion meeting on the new chemistry of the elements held on 12 May 2014, Martyn Poliakoff, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society, was invited to give the opening remarks. As a chemist and a presenter of the popular online video channel 'The periodic table of videos', Martyn communicates his personal and professional interest in the elements to the public, who in turn use these videos both as an educational resource and for entertainment purposes. Ever since Mendeleev's first ideas for the periodic table were published in 1869, the table has continued to grow as new elements have been discovered, and it serves as both icon and inspiration; its form is now so well established that it is recognized the world over as a symbol for science. This paper highlights but a few of the varied forms that the table can take, such as an infographic, which can convey the shortage of certain elements with great impact. PMID:25666072

  9. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  10. Aurelia aurita bio-inspired tilt sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Colin; Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2012-10-01

    The quickly expanding field of mobile robots, unmanned underwater vehicles, and micro-air vehicles urgently needs a cheap and effective means for measuring vehicle inclination. Commonly, tilt or inclination has been mathematically derived from accelerometers; however, there is inherent error in any indirect measurement. This paper reports a bio-inspired tilt sensor that mimics the natural balance organ of jellyfish, called the ‘statocyst’. Biological statocysts from the species Aurelia aurita were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to investigate the morphology and size of the natural sensor. An artificial tilt sensor was then developed by using printed electronics that incorporates a novel voltage divider concept in conjunction with small surface mount devices. This sensor was found to have minimum sensitivity of 4.21° with a standard deviation of 1.77°. These results open the possibility of developing elegant tilt sensor architecture for both air and water based platforms.

  11. Quest for excellence: inspiration from the ileum.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2010-01-01

    The occasion of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 33rd Presidential Address was used to glean wisdom and inspiration from the ileum. Not only is this intestinal segment so central to the chief organ involved in specialized nutrition support, but it is a complex, yet elegant system that: (1) is interdisciplinary with actions coordinated to achieve a common goal; (2) looks to the future by mentoring the next generation of leaders; (3) constantly seeks evidence of its effectiveness and accordingly adjusts its practice; and (4) strategically forges synergistic partnerships with other habitants within its environment. As relevant within many other realms, it remains true that much can be learned from looking within. PMID:21097772

  12. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  13. Cognition inspired framework for indoor scene annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Xianglong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple yet effective scene annotation framework based on a combination of bag-of-visual words (BoVW), three-dimensional scene structure estimation, scene context, and cognitive theory. From a macroperspective, the proposed cognition-based hybrid motivation framework divides the annotation problem into empirical inference and real-time classification. Inspired by the inference ability of human beings, common objects of indoor scenes are defined for experience-based inference, while in the real-time classification stage, an improved BoVW-based multilayer abstract semantics labeling method is proposed by introducing abstract semantic hierarchies to narrow the semantic gap and improve the performance of object categorization. The proposed framework was evaluated on a variety of common data sets and experimental results proved its effectiveness.

  14. Bio-inspired Computing for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Living creatures may provide algorithms to enable active sensing/control systems in robots. Active sensing could enable planetary rovers to feel their way in unknown environments. The surface of Jupiter's moon Europa consists of fractured ice over a liquid sea that may contain microbes similar to those on Earth. To explore such extreme environments, NASA needs robots that autonomously survive, navigate, and gather scientific data. They will be too far away for guidance from Earth. They must sense their environment and control their own movements to avoid obstacles or investigate a science opportunity. To meet this challenge, CICT's Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR) Project is funding neurobiologists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and selected universities to search for biologically inspired algorithms that enable robust active sensing and control for exploratory robots. Sources for these algorithms are living creatures, including rats and electric fish.

  15. A skin-inspired organic digital mechanoreceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Chortos, Alex; Berndt, Andre; Nguyen, Amanda Kim; Tom, Ariane; McGuire, Allister; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Tien, Kevin; Bae, Won-Gyu; Wang, Huiliang; Mei, Ping; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Cui, Bianxiao; Deisseroth, Karl; Ng, Tse Nga; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-10-01

    Human skin relies on cutaneous receptors that output digital signals for tactile sensing in which the intensity of stimulation is converted to a series of voltage pulses. We present a power-efficient skin-inspired mechanoreceptor with a flexible organic transistor circuit that transduces pressure into digital frequency signals directly. The output frequency ranges between 0 and 200 hertz, with a sublinear response to increasing force stimuli that mimics slow-adapting skin mechanoreceptors. The output of the sensors was further used to stimulate optogenetically engineered mouse somatosensory neurons of mouse cortex in vitro, achieving stimulated pulses in accordance with pressure levels. This work represents a step toward the design and use of large-area organic electronic skins with neural-integrated touch feedback for replacement limbs.

  16. A skin-inspired organic digital mechanoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Tee, Benjamin C-K; Chortos, Alex; Berndt, Andre; Nguyen, Amanda Kim; Tom, Ariane; McGuire, Allister; Lin, Ziliang Carter; Tien, Kevin; Bae, Won-Gyu; Wang, Huiliang; Mei, Ping; Chou, Ho-Hsiu; Cui, Bianxiao; Deisseroth, Karl; Ng, Tse Nga; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-10-16

    Human skin relies on cutaneous receptors that output digital signals for tactile sensing in which the intensity of stimulation is converted to a series of voltage pulses. We present a power-efficient skin-inspired mechanoreceptor with a flexible organic transistor circuit that transduces pressure into digital frequency signals directly. The output frequency ranges between 0 and 200 hertz, with a sublinear response to increasing force stimuli that mimics slow-adapting skin mechanoreceptors. The output of the sensors was further used to stimulate optogenetically engineered mouse somatosensory neurons of mouse cortex in vitro, achieving stimulated pulses in accordance with pressure levels. This work represents a step toward the design and use of large-area organic electronic skins with neural-integrated touch feedback for replacement limbs. PMID:26472906

  17. NASA Missions Inspire Online Video Games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Fast forward to 2035. Imagine being part of a community of astronauts living and working on the Moon. Suddenly, in the middle of just another day in space, a meteorite crashes into the surface of the Moon, threatening life as you know it. The support equipment that provides oxygen for the entire community has been compromised. What would you do? While this situation is one that most people will never encounter, NASA hopes to place students in such situations - virtually - to inspire, engage, and educate about NASA technologies, job opportunities, and the future of space exploration. Specifically, NASA s Learning Technologies program, part of the Agency s Office of Education, aims to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines through interactive technologies. The ultimate goal of these educational programs is to support the growth of a pool of qualified scientific and technical candidates for future careers at places like NASA. STEM education has been an area of concern in the United States; according to the results of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment, 23 countries had higher average scores in mathematics literacy than the United States. On the science literacy scale, 18 countries had higher average scores. "This is part of a much bigger picture of trying to grow skilled graduates for places like NASA that will want that technical expertise," says Daniel Laughlin, the Learning Technologies project manager at Goddard Space Flight Center. "NASA is trying to increase the number of students going into those fields, and so are other government agencies."

  18. Bio-inspired nano tools for neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Das, Suradip; Carnicer-Lombarte, Alejandro; Fawcett, James W; Bora, Utpal

    2016-07-01

    Research and treatment in the nervous system is challenged by many physiological barriers posing a major hurdle for neurologists. The CNS is protected by a formidable blood brain barrier (BBB) which limits surgical, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. The hostile environment created by reactive astrocytes in the CNS along with the limited regeneration capacity of the PNS makes functional recovery after tissue damage difficult and inefficient. Nanomaterials have the unique ability to interface with neural tissue in the nano-scale and are capable of influencing the function of a single neuron. The ability of nanoparticles to transcend the BBB through surface modifications has been exploited in various neuro-imaging techniques and for targeted drug delivery. The tunable topography of nanofibers provides accurate spatio-temporal guidance to regenerating axons. This review is an attempt to comprehend the progress in understanding the obstacles posed by the complex physiology of the nervous system and the innovations in design and fabrication of advanced nanomaterials drawing inspiration from natural phenomenon. We also discuss the development of nanomaterials for use in Neuro-diagnostics, Neuro-therapy and the fabrication of advanced nano-devices for use in opto-electronic and ultrasensitive electrophysiological applications. The energy efficient and parallel computing ability of the human brain has inspired the design of advanced nanotechnology based computational systems. However, extensive use of nanomaterials in neuroscience also raises serious toxicity issues as well as ethical concerns regarding nano implants in the brain. In conclusion we summarize these challenges and provide an insight into the huge potential of nanotechnology platforms in neuroscience. PMID:27107796

  19. Engaging Generation Now, Inspiring Generation Next

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Mike; Gay, P.

    2008-05-01

    In 2008, the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) initiated several new strategies for disseminating accurate, stimulating, engaging information on general astronomy and variable star science to thousands of students, parents, and amateur astronomers each year through astronomy clubs, societies, and star party events. We are initiating contact with astronomy clubs and organizations to offer qualified speakers from the AAVSO Speakers Bureau for their meetings and activities. The current roster of speakers include, professional astronomers, doctors, engineers, teachers and some of the world's leading variable star observers. Request information is available on the AAVSO website. For organizations and individuals unable to engage one of our speakers due to time, distance or financial constraints, we have made PowerPoint presentations used in previous talks available free for download from the same web pages. Thousands of amateur astronomers and their children attend star parties each year. As an extension of our speakers’ bureau, our goal is to have an AAVSO representative at each of the major star parties each year giving an enthusiastic talk on variable stars or related astronomical subject and supplying inspirational printed materials on astronomy and amateur contributions to science. The nation's largest astronomy clubs have monthly newsletters they distribute to their membership. Newsletter editors are constantly in need of quality, interesting content to fill out their issues each month. We are offering a `writers’ bureau’ service to newsletter editors, similar to the news wire services used by newspapers. We will supply up to a half dozen articles on astronomy and variable star science each month for editors to use at their discretion in their publications. Our goal is to provide information, inspiration and encourage participation among amateur astronomers and their kids, our next

  20. Origami-inspired active structures: a synthesis and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Hartl, Darren J.; Malak, Richard J., Jr.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-09-01

    Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, has inspired the design of engineering devices and structures for decades. The underlying principles of origami are very general, which has led to applications ranging from cardboard containers to deployable space structures. More recently, researchers have become interested in the use of active materials (i.e., those that convert various forms of energy into mechanical work) to effect the desired folding behavior. When used in a suitable geometry, active materials allow engineers to create self-folding structures. Such structures are capable of performing folding and/or unfolding operations without being kinematically manipulated by external forces or moments. This is advantageous for many applications including space systems, underwater robotics, small scale devices, and self-assembling systems. This article is a survey and analysis of prior work on active self-folding structures as well as methods and tools available for the design of folding structures in general and self-folding structures in particular. The goal is to provide researchers and practitioners with a systematic view of the state-of-the-art in this important and evolving area. Unifying structural principles for active self-folding structures are identified and used as a basis for a quantitative and qualitative comparison of numerous classes of active materials. Design considerations specific to folded structures are examined, including the issues of crease pattern identification and fold kinematics. Although few tools have been created with active materials in mind, many of them are useful in the overall design process for active self-folding structures. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of open questions for the field of origami-inspired engineering.

  1. BATMAV: a 2-DOF bio-inspired flapping flight platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Seelecke, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Due to the availability of small sensors, Micro-Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) can be used for detection missions of biological, chemical and nuclear agents. Traditionally these devices used fixed or rotary wings, actuated with electric DC motortransmission, a system which brings the disadvantage of a heavier platform. The overall objective of the BATMAV project is to develop a biologically inspired bat-like MAV with flexible and foldable wings for flapping flight. This paper presents a flight platform that features bat-inspired wings which are able to actively fold their elbow joints. A previous analysis of the flight physics for small birds, bats and large insects, revealed that the mammalian flight anatomy represents a suitable flight platform that can be actuated efficiently using Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) artificial-muscles. A previous study of the flight styles in bats based on the data collected by Norberg [1] helped to identify the required joint angles as relevant degrees of freedom for wing actuation. Using the engineering theory of robotic manipulators, engineering kinematic models of wings with 2 and 3-DOFs were designed to mimic the wing trajectories of the natural flier Plecotus auritus. Solid models of the bat-like skeleton were designed based on the linear and angular dimensions resulted from the kinematic models. This structure of the flight platform was fabricated using rapid prototyping technologies and assembled to form a desktop prototype with 2-DOFs wings. Preliminary flapping test showed suitable trajectories for wrist and wingtip that mimic the flapping cycle of the natural flyer.

  2. Bio-inspired synthesis of metal nanomaterials and applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiale; Lin, Liqin; Sun, Daohua; Chen, Huimei; Yang, Dapeng; Li, Qingbiao

    2015-10-01

    This critical review focuses on recent advances in the bio-inspired synthesis of metal nanomaterials (MNMs) using microorganisms, viruses, plants, proteins and DNA molecules as well as their applications in various fields. Prospects in the design of bio-inspired MNMs for novel applications are also discussed. PMID:26083903

  3. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and…

  4. Concept Mapping in the Classroom with Inspiration Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scappaticci, F. Thomas

    This paper gives an overview of the Inspiration Software, a package that is designed to facilitate the construction and use of concept maps in the classroom. The first section discusses concept mapping, defined as any graphic production that is constructed specifically to represent knowledge. The following basic functions of Inspiration are then…

  5. Cultural Contrasts and Commonalities in Inspiring Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Martin; Wedell, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Inspiring teaching is the kind of pedagogy that motivates pupils to study autonomously, in their own time, of their own volition beyond the classroom, and may be particularly important for long-term endeavours such as learning a second language. This study aimed to find out the prevalence and nature of inspiring English language teaching in the…

  6. Bio-inspired flapping UAV design: a university perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Lee, Jun-Seong; Kim, Dae-Kwan

    2009-03-01

    Bio-inspired design to make artificial flappers fly does not just imitate biological systems as closely as possible, but also transferring the flappers' own functionalities to engineering solutions. This paper summarizes some key technical issues and the states-of-art of bio-inspired design of flapping UAVs with an introduction to authors' recent research results in this field.

  7. Supporting STEM Teachers to Inspire through Everyday Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienkowski, Marie; Shechtman, Nicole; Remold, Julie; Knudsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Science teachers inspire in part by their constant adaptation to the learning needs of their students and to evolving content, curriculum, technology, and student populations. Innovation--bringing novel things to a situation to confer a benefit--is an integral part of teaching overall, and in especially inspired science teaching. While innovation…

  8. Kids as Airborne Mission Scientists: Designing PBL To Inspire Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszalka, Tiffany A.; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Kim, Younghoon

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has great potential for inspiring K-12 learning. KaAMS, a NASA funded project and an example of PBL, was designed to help teachers inspire middle school students to learn science. The students participate as scientists investigating environmental problems using NASA airborne remote sensing data. Two PBL modules were…

  9. INSPIRE: A VLF Radio Project for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jill A.; Pine, Bill; Taylor, William W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1988 the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionospheric Radio Experiment, or INSPIRE, has given students the opportunity to build research-quality VLF2 radio receivers and make observations of both natural and stimulated radio waves in the atmosphere. Any high school science class is eligible to join the INSPIRE volunteer observing network and contribute to our understanding of near-Earth space.

  10. Frequency and time-domain inspiral templates for comparable mass compact binaries in eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanay, Sashwat; Haney, Maria; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-03-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries with non-negligible orbital eccentricities are plausible gravitational wave (GW) sources for the upcoming network of GW observatories. In this paper, we present two prescriptions to compute post-Newtonian (PN) accurate inspiral templates for such binaries. First, we adapt and extend the postcircular scheme of Yunes et al. [Phys. Rev. D 80, 084001 (2009)] to obtain a Fourier-domain inspiral approximant that incorporates the effects of PN-accurate orbital eccentricity evolution. This results in a fully analytic frequency-domain inspiral waveform with Newtonian amplitude and 2PN-order Fourier phase while incorporating eccentricity effects up to sixth order at each PN order. The importance of incorporating eccentricity evolution contributions to the Fourier phase in a PN-consistent manner is also demonstrated. Second, we present an accurate and efficient prescription to incorporate orbital eccentricity into the quasicircular time-domain TaylorT4 approximant at 2PN order. New features include the use of rational functions in orbital eccentricity to implement the 1.5PN-order tail contributions to the far-zone fluxes. This leads to closed form PN-accurate differential equations for evolving eccentric orbits, and the resulting time-domain approximant is accurate and efficient to handle initial orbital eccentricities ≤0.9 . Preliminary GW data analysis implications are probed using match estimates.

  11. Supramolecular Nanostructure Formation of Coassembled Amyloid Inspired Peptides.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Goksu; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U-Ser; Ide, Semra; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-06-28

    Characterization of amyloid-like aggregates through converging approaches can yield deeper understanding of their complex self-assembly mechanisms and the nature of their strong mechanical stability, which may in turn contribute to the design of novel supramolecular peptide nanostructures as functional materials. In this study, we investigated the coassembly kinetics of oppositely charged short amyloid-inspired peptides (AIPs) into supramolecular nanostructures by using confocal fluorescence imaging of thioflavin T binding, turbidity assay and in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. We showed that coassembly kinetics of the AIP nanostructures were consistent with nucleation-dependent amyloid-like aggregation, and aggregation behavior of the AIPs was affected by the initial monomer concentration and sonication. Moreover, SAXS analysis was performed to gain structural information on the size, shape, electron density, and internal organization of the coassembled AIP nanostructures. The scattering data of the coassembled AIP nanostructures were best fitted into to a combination of polydisperse core-shell cylinder (PCSC) and decoupling flexible cylinder (FCPR) models, and the structural parameters were estimated based on the fitting results of the scattering data. The stability of the coassembled AIP nanostructures in both fiber organization and bulk viscoelastic properties was also revealed via temperature-dependent SAXS analysis and oscillatory rheology measurements, respectively. PMID:27267733

  12. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related

  13. Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sanita

    2003-01-01

    The multidisciplinary concept of "bioinspired engineering of exploration systems" (BEES) is described, which is a guiding principle of the continuing effort to develop biomorphic explorers as reported in a number of articles in the past issues of NASA Tech Briefs. The intent of BEES is to distill from the principles found in successful nature-tested mechanisms of specific crucial functions that are hard to accomplish by conventional methods but that are accomplished rather deftly in nature by biological organisms. The intent is not just to mimic operational mechanisms found in a specific biological organism but to imbibe the salient principles from a variety of diverse bio-organisms for the desired crucial function. Thereby, we can build explorer systems that have specific capabilities endowed beyond nature, as they will possess a combination of the best nature-tested mechanisms for that particular function. The approach consists of selecting a crucial function, for example, flight or some selected aspects of flight, and develop an explorer that combines the principles of those specific attributes as seen in diverse flying species into one artificial entity. This will allow going beyond biology and achieving unprecedented capability and adaptability needed in encountering and exploring what is as yet unknown. A classification of biomorphic flyers into two main classes of surface and aerial explorers is illustrated in the figure, with examples of a variety of biological organisms that provide the inspiration in each respective subclass. Such biomorphic explorers may possess varied mobility modes: surface-roving, burrowing, hopping, hovering, or flying, to accomplish surface, subsurface, and aerial exploration. Preprogrammed for a specific function, they could serve as one-way communicating beacons, spread over the exploration site, autonomously looking for/at the targets of interest. In a hierarchical organization, these biomorphic explorers would report to the next

  14. Perspective of an Artist Inspired by Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanborn, Jim

    2010-02-01

    Using digital images and video I will be presenting thirty years of my science based artwork. Beginning in the late 1970's my gallery and museum installations used lodestones and suspended compasses to reveal the earths' magnetic field. Through the 1980's my work included these compass installations and geologically inspired tableaux that had one thing in common, they were designed to expose the invisible forces of nature. Tectonics, the Coriolis force, and magnetism were among the subjects of study. In 1988, on the basis of my work with invisible forces, I was selected for a commission from the General Services Administration for the new Central Intelligence Agency headquarters in Langley Virginia. This work titled Kryptos included a large cryptographic component that remains undeciphered twenty years after its installation. In the 1990's Kryptos inspired several of my museum and gallery installations using cryptography and secrecy as their main themes. From 1995-1998 I completed a series of large format projections on the landscape in the western US and Ireland. These projections and the resulting series of photographs emulated the 19th century cartographers hired by the United States Government to map the western landscape. In 1998 I began my project titled Atomic Time. This installation shown for the first time in 2004 at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington DC, then again in the Gwangju Biennale in South Korea was a recreation of the 1944 Manhattan Project laboratory that built the first Atomic Bomb. This installation used original equipment and prototypes from the Los Alamos Lab and was an extremely accurate representation of the laboratory and the first nuclear bomb called the ``Trinity Device.'' I began my current project Terrestrial Physics in 2005. This installation to be shown in June 2010 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver is a recreation of the large particle accelerator and the experiment that fissioned Uranium in 1939 at the Carnegie

  15. A Retinal Mechanism Inspired Color Constancy Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Shi; Gao, Shao-Bing; Li, Ruo-Xuan; Du, Xin-Yu; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model for the computational color constancy, inspired by the amazing ability of the human vision system (HVS) to perceive the color of objects largely constant as the light source color changes. The proposed model imitates the color processing mechanisms in the specific level of the retina, the first stage of the HVS, from the adaptation emerging in the layers of cone photoreceptors and horizontal cells (HCs) to the color-opponent mechanism and disinhibition effect of the non-classical receptive field in the layer of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In particular, HC modulation provides a global color correction with cone-specific lateral gain control, and the following RGCs refine the processing with iterative adaptation until all the three opponent channels reach their stable states (i.e., obtain stable outputs). Instead of explicitly estimating the scene illuminant(s), such as most existing algorithms, our model directly removes the effect of scene illuminant. Evaluations on four commonly used color constancy data sets show that the proposed model produces competitive results in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods for the scenes under either single or multiple illuminants. The results indicate that single opponency, especially the disinhibitory effect emerging in the receptive field's subunit-structured surround of RGCs, plays an important role in removing scene illuminant(s) by inherently distinguishing the spatial structures of surfaces from extensive illuminant(s). PMID:26766375

  16. Biology-inspired Architecture for Situation Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2006-01-01

    Situation Management is a rapidly developing science combining new techniques for data collection with advanced methods of data fusion to facilitate the process leading to correct decisions prescribing action. Current research focuses on reducing increasing amounts of diverse data to knowledge used by decision makers and on reducing time between observations, decisions and actions. No new technology is more promising for increasing the diversity and fidelity of observations than sensor networks. However, current research on sensor networks concentrates on a centralized network architecture. We believe this trend will not realize the full potential of situation management. We propose a new architecture modeled after biological ecosystems where motes are autonomous and intelligent, yet cooperate with local neighborhoods. Providing a layered approach, they sense and act independently when possible, and cooperate with neighborhoods when necessary. The combination of their local actions results in global effects. While situation management research is currently dominated by military applications, advances envisioned for industrial and business applications have similar requirements. NASA has requirements for intelligent and autonomous systems in future missions that can benefit from advances in situation management. We describe requirements for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management program where our biology-inspired architecture provides a layered approach and decisions can be made at the proper level to improve safety, reduce costs, and improve efficiency in making diagnostic and prognostic assessments of the structural integrity, aerodynamic characteristics, and operation of aircraft.

  17. Enhanced photovoltaics inspired by the fovea centralis

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Gil; Schmitt, Sebastian W.; Embrechts, Heidemarie; Brönstrup, Gerald; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The fovea centralis is a closely-packed vertical array of inverted-cone photoreceptor cells located in the retina that is responsible for high acuity binocular vision. The cones are operational in well-lit environments and are responsible for trapping the impinging illumination. We present the vertical light-funnel silicon array as a light-trapping technique for photovoltaic applications that is bio-inspired by the properties of the fovea centralis. We use opto-electronic simulations to evaluate the performance of light-funnel solar cell arrays. Light-funnel arrays present ~65% absorption enhancement compared to a silicon film of identical thickness and exhibit power conversion efficiencies that are 60% higher than those of optimized nanowire arrays of the same thickness although nanowire arrays consist of more than 2.3 times the amount of silicon. We demonstrate the superior absorption of the light-funnel arrays as compared with recent advancements in the field. Fabrication of silicon light-funnel arrays using low-cost processing techniques is demonstrated. PMID:25709091

  18. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cédric; Welch, Victoria; Pol Vigneron, Jean; Lucas, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO2/SiO2 multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO2/SiO2 layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions.

  19. The nanotechnology of life-inspired systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2016-07-01

    For some decades now, nanotechnology has been touted as the 'next big thing' with potential impact comparable to the steam, electricity or Internet revolutions -- but has it lived up to these expectations? While advances in top-down nanolithography, now reaching 10-nm resolution, have resulted in devices that are rapidly approaching mass production, attempts to produce nanoscale devices using bottom-up approaches have met with only limited success. We have been inundated with nanoparticles of almost any shape, material and composition, but their societal impact has been far from revolutionary, with growing concerns over their toxicity. Despite nebulous hopes that making hierarchical nanomaterials will lead to new, emergent properties, no breakthrough applications seem imminent. In this Perspective, we argue that the time is ripe to look beyond individual nano-objects and their static assemblies, and instead focus on systems comprising different types of 'nanoparts' interacting and/or communicating with one another to perform desired functions. Such systems are interesting for a variety of reasons: they can act autonomously without external electrical or optical connections, can be dynamic and reconfigurable, and can act as 'nanomachines' by directing the flow of mass, energy or information . In thinking how this systems nanoscience approach could be implemented to design useful -- as opposed to toy-model -- nanosystems, our choice of applications and our nanoengineering should be inspired by living matter.

  20. Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    2009-11-01

    The areas of solar-powered catalysts for energy rich fuels formation and bio-inspired molecular assemblies for integrating photon-to-fuels pathways have been identified by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy as challenges for the next generation of sustainable, high-efficiency solar energy conversion systems [1]. The light-harvesting, energy-transducing and carbon compound-synthesizing (carbon dioxide-fixing) reactions that are encompassed by natural photosynthesis offer molecular paradigms for efficient free energy capture and storage. We seek to emulate these features in cell-free, protein-based systems. Our goal is to transform the robust (alpha,beta)8-barrel fold of an enzyme that naturally catalyzes radical reactions into a catalytic module for the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate, by using the cobalt-containing cobalamins and other organocobalt centers. The activation of the catalytic center will be driven by photo-reduction, by using soluble and attached organic or semiconductor architectures. Progress on the biochemical, chemical, physical, and molecular biological (including rational design of high binding affinity and reactivity towards carbon dioxide) approaches to the development of the photocatalytic system will be presented.[4pt] [1] Lewis, N.; Crabtree, G. In: Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science: 2005.

  1. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  2. Biologically inspired robots as artificial inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2002-06-01

    Imagine an inspector conducting an NDE on an aircraft where you notice something is different about him - he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your first reaction would probably be to say 'it's unbelievable but he looks real' just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. This science fiction scenario could become a reality at the trend in the development of biologically inspired technologies, and terms like artificial intelligence, artificial muscles, artificial vision and numerous others are increasingly becoming common engineering tools. For many years, the trend has been to automate processes in order to increase the efficiency of performing redundant tasks where various systems have been developed to deal with specific production line requirements. Realizing that some parts are too complex or delicate to handle in small quantities with a simple automatic system, robotic mechanisms were developed. Aircraft inspection has benefitted from this evolving technology where manipulators and crawlers are developed for rapid and reliable inspection. Advancement in robotics towards making them autonomous and possibly look like human, can potentially address the need to inspect structures that are beyond the capability of today's technology with configuration that are not predetermined. The operation of these robots may take place at harsh or hazardous environments that are too dangerous for human presence. Making such robots is becoming increasingly feasible and in this paper the state of the art will be reviewed.

  3. Bio-inspired Artificial Apposition Compound Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Youngmin; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John

    2014-03-01

    In arthropods, evolution has created a remarkably sophisticated class of imaging system, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. A challenge in building digital cameras with the hemispherical, compound apposition layouts of arthropod eyes is that essential design requirements cannot be met with existing planar sensor technologies or conventional optics. We present ideas in materials, mechanics and integration schemes that enable scalable pathways to working, arthropod-inspired cameras in nearly full hemispherical shapes with surfaces densely populated by imaging elements (i.e. artificial ommatidia). The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, in co-integrated sheets that can be elastically transformed from the planar geometries in which they are fabricated, to hemispherical shapes for integration into apposition cameras. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal key aspects of the materials science and physics of these systems. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing based modeling illustrate essential features of their operation.

  4. The nanotechnology of life-inspired systems.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2016-07-01

    For some decades now, nanotechnology has been touted as the 'next big thing' with potential impact comparable to the steam, electricity or Internet revolutions - but has it lived up to these expectations? While advances in top-down nanolithography, now reaching 10-nm resolution, have resulted in devices that are rapidly approaching mass production, attempts to produce nanoscale devices using bottom-up approaches have met with only limited success. We have been inundated with nanoparticles of almost any shape, material and composition, but their societal impact has been far from revolutionary, with growing concerns over their toxicity. Despite nebulous hopes that making hierarchical nanomaterials will lead to new, emergent properties, no breakthrough applications seem imminent. In this Perspective, we argue that the time is ripe to look beyond individual nano-objects and their static assemblies, and instead focus on systems comprising different types of 'nanoparts' interacting and/or communicating with one another to perform desired functions. Such systems are interesting for a variety of reasons: they can act autonomously without external electrical or optical connections, can be dynamic and reconfigurable, and can act as 'nanomachines' by directing the flow of mass, energy or information . In thinking how this systems nanoscience approach could be implemented to design useful - as opposed to toy-model - nanosystems, our choice of applications and our nanoengineering should be inspired by living matter. PMID:27380745

  5. Development of a biologically inspired hydrobot tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Danielle; Janneh, Alhaji; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, has a large ocean underneath a thick layer of ice. In order to determine whether life exists, it has been proposed that an underwater glider (hydrobot) capable of propulsion could be sent to explore the vast ocean. In this research, we considered various smart materials to create a propulsion device inspired by dolphin tails. Dolphins are highly efficient and excellent gliders, which makes them the ideal candidate for ocean exploration. In order to select the best dolphin species, we began by reviewing literature and then utilized the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to compare the different species. Lagenorhynchus obliquidens (Pacific White-Sided Dolphin) was found to be the best choice for creating a bioinspired hydrobot. We then conducted literature review of various smart materials and using this knowledge constructed a hydrobot tail prototype. This prototype demonstrates that smart materials can be fashioned into suitable actuators to control a tail fashioned after a dolphin.

  6. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  7. Enhanced photovoltaics inspired by the fovea centralis.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Gil; Schmitt, Sebastian W; Embrechts, Heidemarie; Brönstrup, Gerald; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The fovea centralis is a closely-packed vertical array of inverted-cone photoreceptor cells located in the retina that is responsible for high acuity binocular vision. The cones are operational in well-lit environments and are responsible for trapping the impinging illumination. We present the vertical light-funnel silicon array as a light-trapping technique for photovoltaic applications that is bio-inspired by the properties of the fovea centralis. We use opto-electronic simulations to evaluate the performance of light-funnel solar cell arrays. Light-funnel arrays present ~65% absorption enhancement compared to a silicon film of identical thickness and exhibit power conversion efficiencies that are 60% higher than those of optimized nanowire arrays of the same thickness although nanowire arrays consist of more than 2.3 times the amount of silicon. We demonstrate the superior absorption of the light-funnel arrays as compared with recent advancements in the field. Fabrication of silicon light-funnel arrays using low-cost processing techniques is demonstrated. PMID:25709091

  8. Biologically inspired path to quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogryzko, Vasily; Ozhigov, Yuri

    2014-12-01

    We describe an approach to quantum computer inspired by the information processing at the molecular level in living cells. It is based on the separation of a small ensemble of qubits inside the living system (e.g., a bacterial cell), such that coherent quantum states of this ensemble remain practically unchanged for a long time. We use the notion of a quantum kernel to describe such an ensemble. Quantum kernel is not strictly connected with certain particles; it permanently exchanges atoms and molecules with the environment, which makes quantum kernel a virtual notion. There are many reasons to expect that the state of quantum kernel of a living system can be treated as the stationary state of some Hamiltonian. While the quantum kernel is responsible for the stability of dynamics at the time scale of cellular life, at the longer inter-generation time scale it can change, varying smoothly in the course of biological evolution. To the first level of approximation, quantum kernel can be described in the framework of qubit modification of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the relaxation corresponds to the exchange of matter between quantum kernel and the rest of the cell and is represented as Lindblad super-operators.

  9. A novel biologically inspired local feature descriptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Tian, Tian; Tian, Jinwen; Gong, Junbin; Ming, Delie

    2014-06-01

    Local feature descriptor is a fundamental representation for image patch which has been extensively used in many computer vision applications. In this paper, different from state-of-the-art features, a novel biologically inspired local descriptor (BILD) is proposed based on the visual information processing mechanism of ventral pathway in human brain. The local features used for constructing BILD are extracted by a two-layer network, which corresponds to the simple-to-complex cell hierarchy in the primary visual cortex (V1). It works in a similar way as the simple cell and complex cell do to get responses by applying the lateral inhibition from different orientations and operating an improved cortical pooling. To enhance the distinctiveness of BILD, we combine the local features from different orientations. Extensive evaluations have been performed for image matching and object recognition. Experimental results reveal that our proposed BILD outperforms many widely used descriptors such as SIFT and SURF, which demonstrate its efficiency for representing local regions. PMID:24677037

  10. Bio-inspired tactile sensing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Ravinder S.; Valle, Maurizio; Metta, Giorgio; Lorenzelli, Leandro

    2009-05-01

    This work presents the development of tactile sensing arrays, inspired by cutaneous sensing in humans, for the fingertips of a humanoid robot. The tactile sensing arrays have been developed in two phases. Microelectrode arrays (MEA), having 32 sensing elements - each epoxy adhered with 25μm thick piezoelectric polymer (PVDF-TrFE) film, were fabricated in the first phase. When connected to the gate of FET devices (external to the chip), each element on MEA acts like an extended gate; thereby facilitating modulation of charge in the induced channel by the charge generated in PVDF-TrFE film - as a result of applied force. Thus, each sensing element converts force into voltage. The tactile sensing arrays developed in second phase work on the same principle but are free from any extended gate. These arrays (having 25 sensing elements) use POSFET (Piezoelectric Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) touch sensing elements - in which, piezoelectric polymer film is directly spin coated on the gate area of the FET devices. Thus, a POSFET touch sensing element 'senses and partially processes at same site' - as is done by receptors in human skin. The spatial-temporal performance of these chips is similar to that of skin in the human fingertips.

  11. Biologically inspired circuitry that mimics mammalian hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Allyn; Cohen, Howard; Karl, Christian; Freedman, David; Mountain, David; Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Nourzad Karl, Marianne; Kelsall, Sarah; Gore, Tyler; Pu, Yirong; Yang, Zibing; Xing, Xinyu; Deligeorges, Socrates

    2009-05-01

    We are developing low-power microcircuitry that implements classification and direction finding systems of very small size and small acoustic aperture. Our approach was inspired by the fact that small mammals are able to localize sounds despite their ears may be separated by as little as a centimeter. Gerbils, in particular are good low-frequency localizers, which is a particularly difficult task, since a wavelength at 500 Hz is on the order of two feet. Given such signals, crosscorrelation- based methods to determine direction fail badly in the presence of a small amount of noise, e.g. wind noise and noise clutter common to almost any realistic environment. Circuits are being developed using both analog and digital techniques, each of which process signals in fundamentally the same way the peripheral auditory system of mammals processes sound. A filter bank represents filtering done by the cochlea. The auditory nerve is implemented using a combination of an envelope detector, an automatic gain stage, and a unique one-bit A/D, which creates what amounts to a neural impulse. These impulses are used to extract pitch characteristics, which we use to classify sounds such as vehicles, small and large weaponry from AK-47s to 155mm cannon, including mortar launches and impacts. In addition to the pitchograms, we also use neural nets for classification.

  12. Medical Imaging Inspired Vertex Reconstruction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageböck, S.; von Toerne, E.

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional image reconstruction in medical applications (PET or X-ray CT) utilizes sophisticated filter algorithms to linear trajectories of coincident photon pairs or x-rays. The goal is to reconstruct an image of an emitter density distribution. In a similar manner, tracks in particle physics originate from vertices that need to be distinguished from background track combinations. In this study it is investigated if vertex reconstruction in high energy proton collisions may benefit from medical imaging methods. A new method of vertex finding, the Medical Imaging Vertexer (MIV), is presented based on a three-dimensional filtered backprojection algorithm. It is compared to the open-source RAVE vertexing package. The performance of the vertex finding algorithms is evaluated as a function of instantaneous luminosity using simulated LHC collisions. Tracks in these collisions are described by a simplified detector model which is inspired by the tracking performance of the LHC experiments. At high luminosities (25 pileup vertices and more), the medical imaging approach finds vertices with a higher efficiency and purity than the RAVE “Adaptive Vertex Reconstructor” algorithm. It is also much faster if more than 25 vertices are to be reconstructed because the amount of CPU time rises linearly with the number of tracks whereas it rises quadratically for the adaptive vertex fitter AVR.

  13. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  14. Enhanced photovoltaics inspired by the fovea centralis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Gil; Schmitt, Sebastian W.; Embrechts, Heidemarie; Brönstrup, Gerald; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-02-01

    The fovea centralis is a closely-packed vertical array of inverted-cone photoreceptor cells located in the retina that is responsible for high acuity binocular vision. The cones are operational in well-lit environments and are responsible for trapping the impinging illumination. We present the vertical light-funnel silicon array as a light-trapping technique for photovoltaic applications that is bio-inspired by the properties of the fovea centralis. We use opto-electronic simulations to evaluate the performance of light-funnel solar cell arrays. Light-funnel arrays present ~65% absorption enhancement compared to a silicon film of identical thickness and exhibit power conversion efficiencies that are 60% higher than those of optimized nanowire arrays of the same thickness although nanowire arrays consist of more than 2.3 times the amount of silicon. We demonstrate the superior absorption of the light-funnel arrays as compared with recent advancements in the field. Fabrication of silicon light-funnel arrays using low-cost processing techniques is demonstrated.

  15. Viscous pumping inspired by flexible propulsion.

    PubMed

    Arco, Roger M; Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Fluid-suspended microorganisms have evolved different swimming and feeding strategies in order to cope with an environment dominated by viscous effects. For instance, ciliated organisms rely on the collective motion of flexible appendages to move and feed. By performing a non-reciprocal motion, flexible filaments can produce a net propulsive force, or pump fluid, in the absence of inertia. Inspired by such a fundamental concept, we propose a strategy to produce macroscopic pumping and mixing in creeping flow. We measured experimentally the net motion of a Newtonian viscous fluid induced by the reciprocal motion of a flapper. When the flapper is rigid no net motion is induced. In contrast, when the flapper is made of a flexible material, a net fluid pumping is measured. We quantify the effectiveness of this pumping strategy and show that optimal pumping is achieved when the length of the flapper is on the same order as the elasto-hydrodynamic penetration length. We finally discuss the possible applications of flexible impellers in mixing operations at low Reynolds numbers. PMID:24667497

  16. Biologically Inspired Purification and Dispersion of SWCNTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S.; Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired method has been developed for (1) separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from other materials (principally, amorphous carbon and metal catalysts) in raw production batches and (2) dispersing the SWCNTs as individual particles (in contradistinction to ropes and bundles) in suspension, as required for a number of applications. Prior methods of purification and dispersal of SWCNTs involve, variously, harsh physical processes (e.g., sonication) or harsh chemical processes (e.g., acid reflux). These processes do not completely remove the undesired materials and do not disperse bundles and ropes into individual suspended SWCNTs. Moreover, these processes cut long SWCNTs into shorter pieces, yielding typical nanotube lengths between 150 and 250 nm. In contrast, the present method does not involve harsh physical or chemical processes. The method involves the use of biologically derived dispersal agents (BDDAs) in an aqueous solution that is mechanically homogenized (but not sonicated) and centrifuged. The dense solid material remaining after centrifugation is resuspended by vortexing in distilled water, yielding an aqueous suspension of individual, separated SWCNTs having lengths from about 10 to about 15 microns.

  17. Planck-scale nonthermal correlations in a noncommutative geometry inspired Vaidya black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, S. Hamid

    2012-05-01

    Using the noncommutative geometry inspired Vaidya metric obtained in terms of coordinate coherent states and also utilizing the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), we show that the nonthermal nature of the Hawking spectrum leads to Planck-scale nonthermal correlations between emitted modes of evaporation. Our analysis thus exhibits that owing to self-gravitational effects plus noncommutativity and GUP influences, information can emerge in the form of Planck-scale correlated emissions from the black hole.

  18. Ant- and Ant-Colony-Inspired ALife Visual Art.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Gary; Machado, Penousal

    2015-01-01

    Ant- and ant-colony-inspired ALife art is characterized by the artistic exploration of the emerging collective behavior of computational agents, developed using ants as a metaphor. We present a chronology that documents the emergence and history of such visual art, contextualize ant- and ant-colony-inspired art within generative art practices, and consider how it relates to other ALife art. We survey many of the algorithms that artists have used in this genre, address some of their aims, and explore the relationships between ant- and ant-colony-inspired art and research on ant and ant colony behavior. PMID:26280070

  19. Copper removal using bio-inspired polydopamine coated natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Shapter, Joseph G; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel; Bennett, John W; Ellis, Amanda V

    2014-05-30

    Herein, for the first time, natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite powders modified with a bio-inspired adhesive, polydopamine (PDA), have been systematically studied as an adsorbent for copper cations (Cu(II)) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed successful grafting of PDA onto the zeolite surface. The effects of pH (2-5.5), PDA treatment time (3-24h), contact time (0 to 24h) and initial Cu(II) ion concentrations (1 to 500mgdm(-3)) on the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were studied using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The adsorption behavior was fitted to a Langmuir isotherm and shown to follow a pseudo-second-order reaction model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II) were shown to be 14.93mgg(-1) for pristine natural zeolite and 28.58mgg(-1) for PDA treated zeolite powders. This impressive 91.4% increase in Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity is attributed to the chelating ability of the PDA on the zeolite surface. Furthermore studies of recyclability using NAA showed that over 50% of the adsorbed copper could be removed in mild concentrations (0.01M or 0.1M) of either acid or base. PMID:24731937

  20. Recent Advances in Skin-Inspired Sensors Enabled by Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Azhari, Faezeh

    2012-07-01

    The highly optimized performance of nature's creations and biological assemblies has inspired the development of their bio-inspired artificial counterparts that can potentially outperform conventional systems. In particular, the skin of humans, animals, and insects exhibits unique functionalities and properties and has subsequently led to active research in developing skin-inspired sensors. This paper presents a summary of selected work related to skin-inspired tactile, distributed strain, and artificial hair cell flow sensors, with a particular focus on technologies enabled by recent advancements in the nanotechnology domain. The purpose is not to present a comprehensive review on this broad subject matter but rather to use selected work to outline the diversity of current research activities.

  1. Biomimetics - using nature as an inspiring model for innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, various aspects of the field of biomimetics will be reviewed, examples of inspiring biological models and practical applications will be described, and challenges and potential direction of the field will be discussed.

  2. Biologically Inspired Flagella-Templated Silica Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonjin

    The desire and need for various types of nanostructures have been met with challenges of feasibility, reproducibility, and long fabrication time. To work towards improved bottom-up methods of nanofabrication, bacterial flagella are particularly attractive bio-templates for nanotubes due to their tubular structures and small inner and outer diameters. In this work, flagella isolated from Salmonella typhimurium are used as bio-templates to fabricate silica mineralized nanotubes. The process involves as well-controlled hydrolysis and condensation reaction with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), followed by the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). By controlling the concentration of TEOS and the reaction time, a simple and precise method is developed for creating silica-mineralized flagella nanotubes (SMFNs) with various thicknesses of the silica layer. In addition, the SMFNs are further modified to multifunctional nanotubes by coating metal nanoparticles (NPs) or metal oxide NPs such as gold, palladium, and iron oxide. The metallized SMFNs are achieved through reactions including reductive metallization or oxidative hydrolysis. The results from these studies provide evidence for the complete coating of SMFNs with uniform metal NP sizes and high surface area coverage. The metallized SMFNs are found to be electrically conductive along their network structures. The current-voltage characteristics show remarkably improved electrical conductivities depending on the types of metal NPs loading and SMFN networks concentration. The biologically inspired SMFNs with metal loading will allow have controlled electrical properties that can lead to the potential of creating unique and precise nanoelectronic materials. Lastly, the randomly entangled SMFNs are characterized to demonstrate their capabilities for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface applications.

  3. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  4. Functional MRI localisation of central nervous system regions associated with volitional inspiration in humans

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Karleyton C; Shea, Steven A; Saykin, Andrew J

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a means of studying neuronal circuits that control respiratory muscles in humans with better spatial and temporal resolution than in previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Whole brain blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) changes determined by fMRI were used to identify areas of neuronal activation associated with volitional inspiration in five healthy men. Four series of scans of each subject were acquired during voluntary breathing (active task) and mechanical ventilation (passive task). Ventilation and end-tidal PCO2 were similar between tasks. Scan data were re-aligned to correct for movement artefacts and cross-referenced breath by breath to respiratory data for selective averaging of inspiratory and expiratory images. Group analysis identified significant increases in the fMRI signal with volitional inspiration in the superior motor cortex, premotor cortex and supplementary motor area at loci similar to those detected in earlier studies that used PET. Additional regions activated by volitional inspiration included inferolateral sensorimotor cortex, prefrontal cortex and striatum (these foci were only revealed by PET under significant inspiratory load). This study represents the first synchronised breath-by-breath analysis of respiratory-related neuronal activity with whole brain imaging in humans. Temporal resolution is sufficient to distinguish individual breaths at a normal breathing frequency. PMID:10523407

  5. The flow past a cactus-inspired grooved cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Makdah, Adnan M.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-02-01

    The star-shaped cross section of giant cylindrical cactus plants is thought to be aerodynamically favorable for protection against toppling by strong winds. Particle image velocimetry is used to investigate the flow details within the surface grooves and in the immediate wake of a cactus-inspired model cylinder with eight longitudinal grooves, at biologically relevant Reynolds numbers between 50 × 103 and 170 × 103. The wake flow is analyzed and compared to a similarly sized circular cylinder. At the lowest Re tested, the wakes from the two geometries are similar. At higher Re, the cactus wake exhibits superior behavior as seen from the mean and turbulent velocities, suggesting that the flow mechanisms are Re dependent. The flow within the surface grooves reveals counter rotating rollers, while the geometrical ridges act as vortex generators known to help with the surface flow attachment. Lastly, a simplistic analysis is described to recover, qualitatively, certain time-dependent flow features from the randomly acquired PIV realizations.

  6. Spontaneous structural transition in phospholipid-inspired aromatic phosphopeptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pellach, Michal; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Simonovsky, Eyal; Gottlieb, Hugo; Jacoby, Guy; Beck, Roy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Miller, Yifat; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid membranes could be considered a prime example of the ability of nature to produce complex yet ordered structures, by spontaneous and efficient self-assembly. Inspired by the unique properties and architecture of phospholipids, we designed simple amphiphilic decapeptides, intended to fold in the center of the peptide sequence, with a phosphorylated serine "head" located within a central turn segment, and two hydrophobic "tails". The molecular design also included the integration of the diphenylalanine motif, previously shown to facilitate self-assembly and increase nanostructure stability. Secondary structure analysis of the peptides indeed indicated the presence of stabilized conformations in solution, with a central turn connecting two hydrophobic "tails", and interactions between the hydrophobic strands. The mechanisms of assembly into supramolecular structures involved structural transitions between different morphologies, which occurred over several hours, leading to the formation of distinctive nanostructures, including half-elliptical nanosheets and curved tapes. The phosphopeptide building blocks appear to self-assemble via a particular combination of aromatic, hydrophobic and ionic interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding, as demonstrated by proposed constructed simulated models of the peptides and self-assembled nanostructures. Molecular dynamics simulations also gave insight into mechanisms of structural transitions of the nanostructures at a molecular level. Because of the biocompatibility of peptides, the phosphopeptide assemblies allow for expansion of the library of biomolecular nanostructures available for future design and application of biomedical devices. PMID:25802000

  7. Bio-inspired interfacial strengthening strategy through geometrically interlocking designs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuming; Yao, Haimin; Ortiz, Christine; Xu, Jinquan; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    Many biological materials, such as nacre and bone, are hybrid materials composed of stiff brittle ceramics and compliant organic materials. These natural organic/inorganic composites exhibit much enhanced strength and toughness in comparison to their constituents and inspires enormous biomimetic endeavors aiming to synthesize materials with superior mechanical properties. However, most current synthetic composites have not exhibited their full potential of property enhancement compared to the natural prototypes they are mimicking. One of the key issues is the weak junctions between stiff and compliant phases, which need to be optimized according to the intended functions of the composite material. Motivated by the geometrically interlocking designs of natural biomaterials, here we propose an interfacial strengthening strategy by introducing geometrical interlockers on the interfaces between compliant and stiff phases. Finite element analysis (FEA) shows that the strength of the composite depends strongly on the geometrical features of interlockers including shape, size, and structural hierarchy. Even for the most unfavorable scenario when neither adhesion nor friction is present between stiff and compliant phases, the tensile strength of the composites with proper interlocker design can reach up to 70% of the ideal value. The findings in this paper would provide guidelines to the improvement of the mechanical properties of current biomimetic composites. PMID:23032427

  8. Biologically inspired highly efficient buoyancy engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar; Habchi, Wassim; Abdelnour, Rita; Blottman, John, III; Leo, Donald

    2012-04-01

    Undersea distributed networked sensor systems require a miniaturization of platforms and a means of both spatial and temporal persistence. One aspect of this system is the necessity to modulate sensor depth for optimal positioning and station-keeping. Current approaches involve pneumatic bladders or electrolysis; both require mechanical subsystems and consume significant power. These are not suitable for the miniaturization of sensor platforms. Presented in this study is a novel biologically inspired method that relies on ionic motion and osmotic pressures to displace a volume of water from the ocean into and out of the proposed buoyancy engine. At a constant device volume, the displaced water will alter buoyancy leading to either sinking or floating. The engine is composed of an enclosure sided on the ocean's end by a Nafion ionomer and by a flexible membrane separating the water from a gas enclosure. Two electrodes are placed one inside the enclosure and the other attached to the engine on the outside. The semi-permeable membrane Nafion allows water motion in and out of the enclosure while blocking anions from being transferred. The two electrodes generate local concentration changes of ions upon the application of an electrical field; these changes lead to osmotic pressures and hence the transfer of water through the semi-permeable membrane. Some aquatic organisms such as pelagic crustacean perform this buoyancy control using an exchange of ions through their tissue to modulate its density relative to the ambient sea water. In this paper, the authors provide an experimental proof of concept of this buoyancy engine. The efficiency of changing the engine's buoyancy is calculated and optimized as a function of electrode surface area. For example electrodes made of a 3mm diameter Ag/AgCl proved to transfer approximately 4mm3 of water consuming 4 Joules of electrical energy. The speed of displacement is optimized as a function of the surface area of the Nafion

  9. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center or operate autonomously. This paper will present an update of the results and lessons learned during the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. It will also preview the 2012 competition with a review of the revised rules. In 2010,22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation. In 2011, 36 teams actually competed from 26 USA states and 4 foreign countries (India, Bangladesh, Colombia and Canada). This combined total directly inspired an

  10. Neurally inspired rapid detection of sparse objects in videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Huber, David J.; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Daily, Mike; Tasinga, Penn

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe COGNIVA, a closed-loop Cognitive-Neural method and system for image and video analysis that combines recent technological breakthroughs in bio-vision cognitive algorithms and neural signatures of human visual processing. COGNIVA is an "operational neuroscience" framework for intelligent and rapid search and categorization of Items Of Interest (IOI) in imagery and video. The IOI could be a single object, group of objects, specific image regions, specific spatio-temporal pattern/sequence or even the category that the image itself belongs to (e.g., vehicle or non-vehicle). There are two main types of approach for rapid search and categorization of IOI in imagery and video. The first approach uses conventional machine vision or bio-inspired cognitive algorithms. These usually need a predefined set of IOI and suffer from high false alarm rates. The second class of algorithms is based on neural signatures of target detection. These algorithms usually break the entire image into sub-images and process EEG data from these images and classify them based on it. This approach may suffer from high false alarms and is slow because the entire image is chipped and presented to the human observer. The proposed COGNIVA overcomes the limitations of both methods by combining them resulting in a low false alarm rate and high detection with high throughput making it applicable to both image and video analysis. In the most basic form, COGNIVA first uses bioinspired cognitive algorithms for deciding potential IOI in a sequence of images/video. These potential IOI are then shown to a human and neural signatures of visual detection of IOI are collected and processed. The resulting signatures are used to categorize and provide final IOI. We will present the concept and typical results of COGNIVA for detecting Items of interest in image data.