Science.gov

Sample records for ligand-induced global transitions

  1. Minimum Free Energy Path of Ligand-Induced Transition in Adenylate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Terada, Tohru; Furuta, Tadaomi; Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale conformational changes in proteins involve barrier-crossing transitions on the complex free energy surfaces of high-dimensional space. Such rare events cannot be efficiently captured by conventional molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that, by combining the on-the-fly string method and the multi-state Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR) method, the free energy profile of a conformational transition pathway in Escherichia coli adenylate kinase can be characterized in a high-dimensional space. The minimum free energy paths of the conformational transitions in adenylate kinase were explored by the on-the-fly string method in 20-dimensional space spanned by the 20 largest-amplitude principal modes, and the free energy and various kinds of average physical quantities along the pathways were successfully evaluated by the MBAR method. The influence of ligand binding on the pathways was characterized in terms of rigid-body motions of the lid-shaped ATP-binding domain (LID) and the AMP-binding (AMPbd) domains. It was found that the LID domain was able to partially close without the ligand, while the closure of the AMPbd domain required the ligand binding. The transition state ensemble of the ligand bound form was identified as those structures characterized by highly specific binding of the ligand to the AMPbd domain, and was validated by unrestrained MD simulations. It was also found that complete closure of the LID domain required the dehydration of solvents around the P-loop. These findings suggest that the interplay of the two different types of domain motion is an essential feature in the conformational transition of the enzyme. PMID:22685395

  2. A novel transition pathway of ligand-induced topological conversion from hybrid forms to parallel forms of human telomeric G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Fu; Li, Ming-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-05-01

    The folding topology of DNA G-quadruplexes (G4s) depends not only on their nucleotide sequences but also on environmental factors and/or ligand binding. Here, a G4 ligand, 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridium iodide)-9-(1-(1-methyl-piperidinium iodide)-3,6,9-trioxaundecane) carbazole (BMVC-8C3O), can induce topological conversion of non-parallel to parallel forms in human telomeric DNA G4s. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) reveals the presence of persistent imino proton signals corresponding to the central G-quartet during topological conversion of Tel23 and Tel25 G4s from hybrid to parallel forms, implying that the transition pathway mainly involves local rearrangements. In contrast, rapid HDX was observed during the transition of 22-CTA G4 from an anti-parallel form to a parallel form, resulting in complete disappearance of all the imino proton signals, suggesting the involvement of substantial unfolding events associated with the topological transition. Site-specific imino proton NMR assignments of Tel23 G4 enable determination of the interconversion rates of individual guanine bases and detection of the presence of intermediate states. Since the rate of ligand binding is much higher than the rate of ligand-induced topological conversion, a three-state kinetic model was evoked to establish the associated energy diagram for the topological conversion of Tel23 G4 induced by BMVC-8C3O. PMID:26975658

  3. A novel transition pathway of ligand-induced topological conversion from hybrid forms to parallel forms of human telomeric G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Fu; Li, Ming-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2016-01-01

    The folding topology of DNA G-quadruplexes (G4s) depends not only on their nucleotide sequences but also on environmental factors and/or ligand binding. Here, a G4 ligand, 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridium iodide)-9-(1-(1-methyl-piperidinium iodide)-3,6,9-trioxaundecane) carbazole (BMVC-8C3O), can induce topological conversion of non-parallel to parallel forms in human telomeric DNA G4s. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) reveals the presence of persistent imino proton signals corresponding to the central G-quartet during topological conversion of Tel23 and Tel25 G4s from hybrid to parallel forms, implying that the transition pathway mainly involves local rearrangements. In contrast, rapid HDX was observed during the transition of 22-CTA G4 from an anti-parallel form to a parallel form, resulting in complete disappearance of all the imino proton signals, suggesting the involvement of substantial unfolding events associated with the topological transition. Site-specific imino proton NMR assignments of Tel23 G4 enable determination of the interconversion rates of individual guanine bases and detection of the presence of intermediate states. Since the rate of ligand binding is much higher than the rate of ligand-induced topological conversion, a three-state kinetic model was evoked to establish the associated energy diagram for the topological conversion of Tel23 G4 induced by BMVC-8C3O. PMID:26975658

  4. Ligand-Induced Changes of the Apparent Transition-State Position in Mechanical Protein Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Johannes; Rief, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Force-spectroscopic measurements of ligand-receptor systems and the unfolding/folding of nucleic acids or proteins reveal information on the underlying energy landscape along the pulling coordinate. The slope Δx‡ of the force-dependent unfolding/unbinding rates is interpreted as the distance from the folded/bound state to the transition state for unfolding/unbinding and, hence, often related to the mechanical compliance of the sample molecule. Here we show that in ligand-binding proteins, the experimentally inferred Δx‡ can depend on the ligand concentration, unrelated to changes in mechanical compliance. We describe the effect in single-molecule, force-spectroscopy experiments of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and explain it in a simple model where mechanical unfolding and ligand binding occur on orthogonal reaction coordinates. This model predicts changes in the experimentally inferred Δx‡, depending on ligand concentration and the associated shift of the dominant barrier between the two reaction coordinates. We demonstrate quantitative agreement between experiments and simulations using a realistic six-state kinetic scheme using literature values for calcium-binding kinetics and affinities. Our results have important consequences for the interpretation of force-spectroscopic data of ligand-binding proteins. PMID:26200872

  5. Global transition in health.

    PubMed

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Meyrowitsch, Dan W

    2007-02-01

    "Tempora mutantur et nos in illis" King Lothar I remarked by year 900 AD. What exactly changed in us over time, i.e. how patterns of the epidemiological transition in populations locally and globally might appear, was described by Omran in 1971 [1]. The effect of transition on health and diseases in populations was demonstrated by Frenkl et al in 1991 [2]. And which major public health problems following each other, and why, was underscored by LaPorte in 1995 [3]. In 2000, leaders of the world society decided to identify a range of common goals, the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), to be reached by year 2015. Many of the MDG are directly or indirectly related with the major health problems, particularly those hitting the poorest: lack of clean drinking water, unhealthy environment, high maternal mortality due to lack of care for the pregnant, and lack of control of major communicable, often fatal diseases like child diseases, malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. It is remarkable that the specific chronic diseases of major public health relevance are in fact not mentioned in the MDG, even if these diseases increasingly are hitting populations in low- and middle-income societies, i.e. developing countries. The world community seems to prioritize the diseases that are most visible, and most often linked with poverty, namely the infectious diseases mentioned above, which together kill about 17 million people annually, often in combination with malnutrition, and the 0.6 million deaths related to birth and pregnancy. With the exception of HIV/AIDS, which also hit richer societies, these diseases of poverty have been under-prioritized regarding research as well. However, at the turn of the Millennium, the burden of "Western" non-communicable diseases was increasing fast in developing countries. And by 2025, the burden of non-communicable diseases is expected to have doubled globally, with half of the burden on developing countries. Therefore it may be rewarding to look

  6. GLOBAL TRANSITION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global transition to sustainable development is possible but many obstacles lie in the way and it will require acts of political will on the part of both the developed and developing nations to become a reality. In this paper, sustainable development is defined as continuous prog...

  7. GLOBAL TRANSITION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental accounting using emergy is a tool for evaluating development and determining what is sustainable. Global sustainable development means that all nations will become better places for their inhabitants to live. Development follows a cycle of change from rapid growth ...

  8. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  9. Gravitational waves from global second order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier; Vlcek, Brian E-mail: larryp@caltech.edu E-mail: bvlcek@uwm.edu

    2012-11-01

    Global second-order phase transitions are expected to produce scale-invariant gravitational wave spectra. In this manuscript we explore the dynamics of a symmetry-breaking phase transition using lattice simulations. We explicitly calculate the stochastic gravitational wave background produced during the transition and subsequent self-ordering phase. We comment on this signal as it compares to the scale-invariant spectrum produced during inflation.

  10. Biotic transitions in global marine diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. I.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term transitions in the composition of Earth's marine biota during the Phanerozoic have historically been explained in two different ways. One view is that they were mediated through biotic interactions among organisms played out over geologic time. The other is that mass extinctions transcended any such interactions and governed diversity over the long term by resetting the relative diversities of higher taxa. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that macroevolutionary processes effecting biotic transitions during background times were not fundamentally different from those operating during mass extinctions. Physical perturbations at many geographic scales combined to produce the long-term trajectory of Phanerozoic diversity.

  11. Nutrition Transition and the Global Diabetes Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a rapid change in the nutrition transition toward increases in noncommunicable diseases. Underlying this transition are shifts in the agricultural system and the subsequent growth of the modern retail and food service sectors across all regions and countries, a change in technology affecting physical activity and inactivity, mass media access, urbanization, and penetration of modern food systems into all societies. The resulting major shifts in diet are toward increased refined carbohydrates, added sweeteners, edible oils, and animal-source foods and reduced legumes, other vegetables, and fruits. Most countries are seeing increases in body mass index (BMI), overweight, and waist circumference (WC), and an increased WC-BMI ratio appears to be emerging in many regions. The implications of these rapidly changing diets and body compositions include the prevalence and severity of diabetes in LMICs. PMID:26209940

  12. Nutrition Transition and the Global Diabetes Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Barry M

    2015-09-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a rapid change in the nutrition transition toward increases in noncommunicable diseases. Underlying this transition are shifts in the agricultural system and the subsequent growth of the modern retail and food service sectors across all regions and countries, a change in technology affecting physical activity and inactivity, mass media access, urbanization, and penetration of modern food systems into all societies. The resulting major shifts in diet are toward increased refined carbohydrates, added sweeteners, edible oils, and animal-source foods and reduced legumes, other vegetables, and fruits. Most countries are seeing increases in body mass index (BMI), overweight, and waist circumference (WC), and an increased WC-BMI ratio appears to be emerging in many regions. The implications of these rapidly changing diets and body compositions include the prevalence and severity of diabetes in LMICs. PMID:26209940

  13. Learning in Global Settings: Developing Transitions for Meaning-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norden, Birgitta; Avery, Helen; Anderberg, Elsie

    2012-01-01

    Global teaching and learning for sustainable development reaches from the classroom to the world outside, and is therefore a particularly interesting setting for practising transition skills. The article suggests a number of features perceived as crucial in developing young people's capability to act in a changing world and under circumstances…

  14. Including Ligand Induced Protein Flexibility into Protein Tunnel Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Laura J.; Lill, Markus A.

    2014-01-01

    In proteins with buried active sites, understanding how ligands migrate through the tunnels that connect the exterior of the protein to the active site can shed light on substrate specificity and enzyme function. A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of protein flexibility in the binding site upon ligand binding; however, the influence of protein flexibility throughout the body of the protein during ligand entry and egress is much less characterized. We have developed a novel tunnel prediction and evaluation method named IterTunnel, which includes the influence of ligand-induced protein flexibility, guarantees ligand egress, and provides detailed free energy information as the ligand proceeds along the egress route. IterTunnel combines geometric tunnel prediction with steered MD in an iterative process to identify tunnels that open as a result of ligand migration and calculates the potential of mean force (PMF) of ligand egress through a given tunnel. Applying this new method to cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6), we demonstrate the influence of protein flexibility on the shape and accessibility of tunnels. More importantly, we demonstrate that the ligand itself, while traversing through a tunnel, can reshape tunnels due to its interaction with the protein. This process results in the exposure of new tunnels and the closure of pre-existing tunnels as the ligand migrates from the active site. PMID:25043499

  15. Forest transitions, trade, and the global displacement of land use

    PubMed Central

    Meyfroidt, Patrick; Rudel, Thomas K.; Lambin, Eric F.

    2010-01-01

    Reducing tropical deforestation is an international priority, given its impacts on carbon emissions and biodiversity. We examined whether recent forest transitions—a shift from net deforestation to net reforestation—involved a geographic displacement of forest clearing across countries through trade in agricultural and forest products. In most of the seven developing countries that recently experienced a forest transition, displacement of land use abroad accompanied local reforestation. Additional global land-use change embodied in their net wood trade offset 74% of their total reforested area. Because the reforesting countries continued to export more agricultural goods than they imported, this net displacement offset 22% of their total reforested area when both agriculture and forestry sectors are included. However, this net displacement increased to 52% during the last 5 y. These countries thus have contributed to a net global reforestation and/or decrease in the pressure on forests, but this global environmental benefit has been shrinking during recent years. The net decrease in the pressure on forests does not account for differences in their ecological quality. Assessments of the impacts of international policies aimed at reducing global deforestation should integrate international trade in agricultural and forest commodities. PMID:21078977

  16. The epidemiological transition and the global childhood obesity epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is now recognized as a global public health issue. Social patterning of obesity, consistent with the theory of epidemiologic transition, has not been well described in children, and the limited research has focused on developed settings. The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between childhood obesity and household income using objective measures of adiposity and to explore how this relationship differs across levels of country human development. METHODS: The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) was a multi-national cross-sectional study conducted in 12 urban/suburban study sites that represented all inhabited continents and wide ranges of development. ISCOLE collected objectively measured height, body mass and percentage body fat in 7341 10-year-old children. Multi-level random-effects models were used to examine income gradients in several obesity measures. RESULTS: The mean age of the children was 10.4 years, and 12.6% were obese, ranging from 5.4% (Finland) to 23.8% (China). For both boys and girls, obesity prevalence, body fat percentage and body mass index (BMI) z-score increased linearly with higher income at lower levels of development (all P for trend ⩽0.0012), but decreased linearly with higher income at higher levels of development (all P for trend ⩽0.0003). Country human development explained 75% of the variation in the country-specific income–obesity relationships (r=−0.87, P=0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with the theory of epidemiologic transition. Global efforts to control obesity must account for socioeconomic factors within a country's context. Future research should seek to understand global socioeconomic patterns in obesity-related lifestyle behaviors. PMID:27152182

  17. The global metabolic transition: Regional patterns and trends of global material flows, 1950–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schaffartzik, Anke; Mayer, Andreas; Gingrich, Simone; Eisenmenger, Nina; Loy, Christian; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-01-01

    Since the World War II, many economies have transitioned from an agrarian, biomass-based to an industrial, minerals-based metabolic regime. Since 1950, world population grew by factor 2.7 and global material consumption by factor 3.7–71 Gigatonnes per year in 2010. The expansion of the resource base required by human societies is associated with growing pressure on the environment and infringement on the habitats of other species. In order to achieve a sustainability transition, we require a better understanding of the currently ongoing metabolic transition and its potential inertia. In this article, we present a long-term global material flow dataset covering material extraction, trade, and consumption of 177 individual countries between 1950 and 2010. We trace patterns and trends in material flows for six major geographic and economic country groupings and world regions (Western Industrial, the (Former) Soviet Union and its allies, Asia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa) as well as their contribution to the emergence of a global metabolic profile during a period of rapid industrialization and globalization. Global average material use increased from 5.0 to 10.3 tons per capita and year (t/cap/a) between 1950 and 2010. Regional metabolic rates range from 4.5 t/cap/a in Sub-Saharan Africa to 14.8 t/cap/a in the Western Industrial grouping. While we can observe a stabilization of the industrial metabolic profile composed of relatively equal shares of biomass, fossil energy carriers, and construction minerals, we note differences in the degree to which other regions are gravitating toward a similar form of material use. Since 2000, Asia has overtaken the Western Industrial grouping in terms of its share in global resource use although not in terms of its per capita material consumption. We find that at a sub-global level, the roles of the world regions have changed. There are, however, no signs yet

  18. Nucleation of an Allosteric Response via Ligand-induced Loop Folding

    PubMed Central

    Naganathan, Saranga; Beckett, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, BirA, is an allosteric transcription regulatory protein to which binding of the small ligand corepressor, biotinyl-5’-AMP, promotes homodimerization and subsequent DNA binding. Structural data indicate that the apo- or unliganded repressor is characterized by four partially disordered loops that are ordered in the ligand-bound dimer. While three of these loops participate directly in the dimerization, the fourth, consisting of residues 212-234 is distal to the interface. This loop, which is ordered around the adenine ring of the adenylate in the BirA adenylate structure, is referred to as the adenylate binding loop or ABL. Although residues in the loop do not directly interact with the ligand, a hydrophobic cluster consisting of a tryptophan and two valine side chains assembles over the adenine base. Results of previous measurements suggest that folding of the ABL is integral to the allosteric response. This idea and the role of the hydrophobic cluster in the process were investigated by systematic replacement of each side chain in the cluster with alanine and analysis of the variant proteins for small ligand binding and dimerization. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate defects in adenylate binding for all ABL variants. Additionally, sedimentation equilibrium measurements reveal that coupling between adenylate binding and dimerization is compromised in each mutant. Partial proteolysis measurements indicate that the mutants are defective in ligand-linked folding of the ABL. These results indicate that the hydrophobic cluster is critical to the ligand-induced disorder-to-order transition in the ABL and that this transition is integral to the allosteric response in the biotin repressor. PMID:17765263

  19. Global Warming and Energy Transition: A Public Policy Imperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, G. T.

    2006-12-01

    The historic transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy resources has begun. This development is commonly attributed to increasing energy costs and the need for energy security. Looming ever larger, however, is the issue that will soon drive the third energy revolution: global warming. A preponderance of evidence documents accelerating warming, enlarging impacts, and human causes -- principally combustion of fossil fuels. The carbon dioxide (C02) content of Earth's atmosphere has increased more than 35 percent since the beginning of the industrial revolution and is the highest in 650,000 years. This dramatic rise of C02 and attendant positive feedbacks are already forcing significant impacts worldwide. These include atmospheric warming with shifting climatic and habitat zones, spreading tropical disease, and more extreme weather events; rapid ice loss at high latitude and high altitude; ocean warming and acidification with coral reef bleaching and intensifying tropical storms; rising sea level; and accelerating extinction rates. The 2007 draft report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts greater warming than in previous models. A tipping point to abrupt climate change may be imminent. It is incumbent upon geoscientists and geoscience educators to assume leadership in addressing this challenge through public outreach and general education. The following topics should be integrated into all appropriate courses: the evidence of global warming and its causes; observed present and predicted future impacts of global warming; mitigation and adaptation strategies; and implications for energy policies and economic opportunities. New entry-level science and general education courses -- such as Climate Change Fundamentals and Energy in Nature, Technology, and Society -- are proving to be effective should be widely developed In addition, by workshops and presentations to civic and business organizations and by demonstrated examples of

  20. Global Natural Disaster Risk Hotspots: Transition to a Regional Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner-Lam, A.; Chen, R.; Dilley, M.

    2005-12-01

    The "Hotspots Project" is a collaborative study of the global distribution and occurrence of multiple natural hazards and the associated exposures of populations and their economic output. In this study we assess the global risks of two disaster-related outcomes: mortality and economic losses. We estimate risk levels by combining hazard exposure with historical vulnerability for two indicators of elements at risk-gridded population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per unit area - for six major natural hazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, drought, and cyclones. By calculating relative risks for each grid cell rather than for countries as a whole, we are able to estimate risk levels at sub-national scales. These can then be used to estimate aggregate relative multiple hazard risk at regional and national scales. Mortality-related risks are assessed on a 2.5' x 2.5' latitude-longitude grid of global population (GPW Version 3). Economic risks are assessed at the same resolution for gridded GDP per unit area, using World Bank estimates of GDP based on purchasing power parity. Global hazard data were compiled from multiple sources. The project collaborated directly with UNDP and UNEP, the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction (IRI) at Columbia, and the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI) in the creation of data sets for several hazards for which global data sets did not previously exist. Drought, flood and volcano hazards are characterized in terms of event frequency, storms by frequency and severity, earthquakes by frequency and ground acceleration exceedance probability, and landslides by an index derived from probability of occurrence. The global analysis undertaken in this project is clearly limited by issues of scale as well as by the availability and quality of data. For some hazards, there exist only 15- to 25-year global records with relatively crude spatial information. Data on historical disaster losses, and particularly on

  1. Insensitivity of Global Neolithic Transition Patterns On Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, K. W.

    Aiming to assess the relative importance of climate events on human history through- out the Holocene here a recently build model is employed. In the model 196 world regions are resolved which mainly differ in their food extraction potential (FEP) and potential number of agricultures. Both regional features are estimated using exist- ing vegetation maps. An array of state variables describes farming to foraging ratio, domestication success, technological and organizational development and population density. Deterministic rules for their time evolution are derived from a growth func- tion, an adaptation principle and a diffusion submodel. Overall model validity can be demonstrated by a striking similarity of simulated patterns and archaeological evi- dence. It is demonstrated that abrupt as well as smooth climatic changes, induced by FEP modifications, do not significantly affect development trajectories of Neolithic communities or global transition patterns. The stability of this result is tested through conducting numerical experiments based on massive parameter variation. However, population density always reacts sensitively, leading to the emergence of distinct mi- gration waves. An in-depth analysis of the differential model behavior provides new arguments in the face of recent or established theories linking climatic factors with human development.

  2. Monitoring and Evaluating the Transition of Large-Scale Programs in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Bao, James; Rodriguez, Daniela C; Paina, Ligia; Ozawa, Sachiko; Bennett, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Donors are increasingly interested in the transition and sustainability of global health programs as priorities shift and external funding declines. Systematic and high-quality monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such processes is rare. We propose a framework and related guiding questions to systematize the M&E of global health program transitions. Methods: We conducted stakeholder interviews, searched the peer-reviewed and gray literature, gathered feedback from key informants, and reflected on author experiences to build a framework on M&E of transition and to develop guiding questions. Findings: The conceptual framework models transition as a process spanning pre-transition and transition itself and extending into sustained services and outcomes. Key transition domains include leadership, financing, programming, and service delivery, and relevant activities that drive the transition in these domains forward include sustaining a supportive policy environment, creating financial sustainability, developing local stakeholder capacity, communicating to all stakeholders, and aligning programs. Ideally transition monitoring would begin prior to transition processes being implemented and continue for some time after transition has been completed. As no set of indicators will be applicable across all types of health program transitions, we instead propose guiding questions and illustrative quantitative and qualitative indicators to be considered and adapted based on the transition domains identified as most important to the particular health program transition. The M&E of transition faces new and unique challenges, requiring measuring constructs to which evaluators may not be accustomed. Many domains hinge on measuring “intangibles” such as the management of relationships. Monitoring these constructs may require a compromise between rigorous data collection and the involvement of key stakeholders. Conclusion: Monitoring and evaluating transitions in global

  3. Global epidemic invasion thresholds in directed cattle subpopulation networks having source, sink, and transit nodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through the characterization of a metapopulation cattle disease model on a directed network having source, transit, and sink nodes, we derive two global epidemic invasion thresholds. The first threshold defines the conditions necessary for an epidemic to successfully spread at the global scale. The ...

  4. The Research University in Transition: The Emerging Global Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrman, Kathryn; Ma, Wanhua; Baker, David

    2008-01-01

    In a knowledge intensive society, the research university is a key institution for social and economic development. Focused on the discovery of new knowledge and the development of the next generation of scholars, research universities are also becoming more international in focus. This article presents the Emerging Global Model (EGM) of the…

  5. The Subtropical Cloud Transition: From the Turbulence Scale to Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J.

    2014-12-01

    Subtropical boundary layer cloud regimes such as stratocumulus, cumulus and the transition from stratocumulus to cumulus, play a key role in cloud-climate interactions. Recent studies have highlighted the lack of complete understanding of this transition and the fact that climate models do not simulate in a realistic manner the physics of the transition. In this presentation, recent results on the global characterization of the subtropical cloud transition from satellite data are used to illustrate its essential properties and the key questions remaining for a complete understanding of the transition. Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) and observations of the cloud transition are used to develop parameterizations, simple models of the transition and a better understanding of the dynamics that leads to the ultimate demise of stratocumulus and its potential impact on climate change.

  6. Information geometry and phase transitions of fluids with global anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowka, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Fluid helicity is an important observable that captures topological properties of hydrodynamics. It naturally emerges in the context of parity-breaking fluids with knotted vortex lines. If the fluid constituents exhibit quantum anomalies the topological nature of fluid helicity can be elucidated using microscopic physics. In this case the helicity is given by a polynomial function of temperature and chiral chemical potential and completely fixed by the anomalies. We explain this relation and address the question of phase structure of such fluids using methods of information geometry. We introduce the metric on a parameter space and show that a non-zero vorticity leads to a curvature on the statistical manifold. We calculate the curvature invariant and analyze its divergences, which contain the information about phase transitions of the system. The transition points are universal and expressed in terms of ratios of anomaly coefficients.

  7. Phase transition-like behavior of magnetospheric substorms: Global MHD simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, S. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we statistically investigate whether the simulated substorms from global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have a combination of global and multiscale features, revealed in substorm dynamics by [2000] and featured the phase transition-like behavior. We simulate seven intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the data set used in the above works [, 1985]. We analyze the input-output (vBs-pseudo AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those inferred from the original set (vBs-observed AL index). The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs-observed AL index system. Although the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo AL index system also shows multiscale behavior (scale-invariant power law dependence) in SSA power spectrum. Besides, we find the critical exponent of the nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multiscale behavior when compared to the real system.

  8. Local conformational fluctuations can modulate the coupling between proton binding and global structural transitions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Steven T.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2005-01-01

    Local conformational fluctuations in proteins can affect the coupling between ligand binding and global structural transitions. This finding was established by monitoring quantitatively how the population distribution in the ensemble of microstates of staphylococcal nuclease was affected by proton binding. Analysis of acid unfolding and proton-binding data with an ensemble-based model suggests that local fluctuations: (i) can be effective modulators of ligand-binding affinities, (ii) are important determinants of the cooperativity of ligand-driven global structural transitions, and (iii) are well represented thermodynamically as local unfolding processes. These studies illustrate how an ensemble-based description of proteins can be used to describe quantitatively the interdependence of local conformational fluctuations, ligand-binding processes, and global structural transitions. This level of understanding of the relationship between conformation, energy, and dynamics is required for a detailed mechanistic understanding of allostery, cooperativity, and other complex functional and regulatory properties of macromolecules. PMID:15767576

  9. Transition of absolute instability from global to local modes in a gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chang, T H; Chen, N C

    2006-07-01

    The gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier employing the distributed-loss scheme is capable of very high gain and effective in suppressing the global absolute instabilities. This study systematically characterizes the local absolute instabilities and their transitional behavior. The local absolute instabilities are analyzed using a model that incorporates the penetration of the field from the copper section into the lossy section. The axial modes were characterized from the perspective of beam-wave interaction and were found to share many characteristics with the global modes. The transition from global modes to local modes as the distributed loss increases was demonstrated. The electron transit angle in the copper section, which determines the feedback criterion, governs the survivability of an oscillation. In addition, the oscillation thresholds predicted using this model are more accurate than those obtained using a simplified model. PMID:16907193

  10. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  11. Ligand Induced Conformational Changes of the Human Serotonin Transporter Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  12. Non-Ligand-Induced Dimerization is Sufficient to Initiate the Signalling and Endocytosis of EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kourouniotis, George; Wang, Yi; Pennock, Steven; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGF receptor (EGFR) stimulates cell mitogenesis and survival through various signalling cascades. EGF also stimulates rapid EGFR endocytosis and its eventual degradation in lysosomes. The immediate events induced by ligand binding include receptor dimerization, activation of intrinsic tyrosine kinase and autophosphorylation. However, in spite of intensified efforts, the results regarding the roles of these events in EGFR signalling and internalization is still very controversial. In this study, we constructed a chimeric EGFR by replacing its extracellular domain with leucine zipper (LZ) and tagged a green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C-terminus. We showed that the chimeric LZ-EGFR-GFP was constitutively dimerized. The LZ-EGFR-GFP dimer autophosphorylated each of its five well-defined C-terminal tyrosine residues as the ligand-induced EGFR dimer does. Phosphorylated LZ-EGFR-GFP was localized to both the plasma membrane and endosomes, suggesting it is capable of endocytosis. We also showed that LZ-EGFR-GFP activated major signalling proteins including Src homology collagen-like (Shc), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt. Moreover, LZ-EGFR-GFP was able to stimulate cell proliferation. These results indicate that non-ligand induced dimerization is sufficient to activate EGFR and initiate cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. We conclude that receptor dimerization is a critical event in EGF-induced cell signalling and EGFR endocytosis. PMID:27463710

  13. Phase Transition-like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global MHD Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Guzdar, P. N.; Goodrich, C. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2001-12-01

    Because of their relevance to massive global energy loading and unloading, lots of observations and studies have been made for magnetic substorm events. Using nonlinear dynamical techniques, we investigate whether the simulated substorms from global MHD models have the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features revealed by \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000]}. We simulated 6 intervals of total duration of 240 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. We analyzed the input-output (vBs--pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compared the results to those in \\markcite{Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]}. The analysis of the coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition map, which is consistent with the map obtained for the vBs--observed-AL index system from Sitnov et al. [2000]. The explanation lies in the cusp catastrophe model proposed by Lewis [1991]. Although, the comparison between observation and individual global MHD simulations may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) is consistent between simulations and observations. This is an important validation of the global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. The coupled vBs--pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invarianet power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We found critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere and distinguish the second order phase transition model from the self-organized criticality model. We also discuss the limitations of the global MHD model in reproducing the multi-scale behavior when compared to the real system.

  14. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  15. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha

  16. Ligand-Induced Proton Transfer and Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bond Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Derek A; Hargis, Jacqueline C; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Defrees, Kyle; Smith, Emmanuel W; Wang, Kenneth K; Prati, Fabio; Renslo, Adam R; Woodcock, H Lee; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Ligand binding can change the pKa of protein residues and influence enzyme catalysis. Herein, we report three ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystal structures of CTX-M β-lactamase, directly visualizing protonation state changes along the enzymatic pathway: apo protein at 0.79 Å, precovalent complex with nonelectrophilic ligand at 0.89 Å, and acylation transition state (TS) analogue at 0.84 Å. Binding of the noncovalent ligand induces a proton transfer from the catalytic Ser70 to the negatively charged Glu166, and the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) between Ser70 and Lys73, with a length of 2.53 Å and the shared hydrogen equidistant from the heteroatoms. QM/MM reaction path calculations determined the proton transfer barrier to be 1.53 kcal/mol. The LBHB is absent in the other two structures although Glu166 remains neutral in the covalent complex. Our data represents the first X-ray crystallographic example of a hydrogen engaged in an enzymatic LBHB, and demonstrates that desolvation of the active site by ligand binding can provide a protein microenvironment conducive to LBHB formation. It also suggests that LBHBs may contribute to stabilization of the TS in general acid/base catalysis together with other preorganized features of enzyme active sites. These structures reconcile previous experimental results suggesting alternatively Glu166 or Lys73 as the general base for acylation, and underline the importance of considering residue protonation state change when modeling protein-ligand interactions. Additionally, the observation of another LBHB (2.47 Å) between two conserved residues, Asp233 and Asp246, suggests that LBHBs may potentially play a special structural role in proteins. PMID:26057252

  17. Princess Nourah Bint Abudulrhman University's Challenge: Transition from a Local to a Global Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almansour, Sana; Kempner, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses the transition of a university from a local to a global institution in the unique cultural and economic circumstances of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Specifically, the authors investigate the case of Princess Nourah Bint Abudulrhman University (PNU), the largest women's university in the world with over 39,000 students.…

  18. Phase Transition like Behavior of Magnetospheric Substorms: Global and Multiscale Features from MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Milikh, G. M.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Lyon, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    Studies of the magnetosphere during substorms based on the observational data of the solar wind and the geomagnetic indices have shown clear features of phase transition-like behavior [Sitnov et al., 2000]. The global MHD simulations of the events in the Bargatze et al. [1985] database are used to study the non-equilibrium phase transition-like features of substorms. We simulated 7 intervals of total duration of 280 hours from the same data set used in Sitnov et al. [2000]. From the simulations the AL index is computed from the maximum of the westward Hall current and is referred to as the pseudo-AL index. We analyzed the input-output (vBs-pseudo-AL index) system obtained from the global MHD model and compare the results to those in Sitnov et al. [2000, 2001]. The analysis of the coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows the first-order phase transition characterizing global beahavior, similar to the case of vBs-observed-AL index [Sitnov et al., 2000]. Although, the comparison between observations and global MHD simulations for individual events may vary, the overall global transition pattern during the substorm cycle revealed by singular spectrum snalysis is statistically consistent between simulations and observations. The coupled vBs-pseudo-AL index system shows multi-scale behavior (scale-invariant power-law dependence) in singular power spectrum. We find critical exponents of the non-equilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere, which reflect the multi-scale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency of autonomous systems. The exponents relate input and output parameters of the magnetosphere.

  19. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to death ligand-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guillermet, Julie; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Rochaix, Philippe; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry; Schally, Andrew V; Pradayrol, Lucien; Buscail, Louis; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) gene expression is lost in 90% of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We previously demonstrated that stable sst2 transfection of human pancreatic BxPC-3 cells, which do not endogenously express sst2, inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. These sst2 effects occur as a consequence of an autocrine sst2-dependent loop, whereby sst2 induces expression of its own ligand, somatostatin. Here we investigated whether sst2 induces apoptosis in sst2-transfected BxPC-3 cells. Expression of sst2 induced a 4.4- +/- 0.05-fold stimulation of apoptosis in BxPC-3 through the activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. sst2 also sensitized these cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), enhancing it 4.1- +/- 1.5-fold. Apoptosis in BxPC-3 cells mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD95L was likewise increased 2.3- +/- 0.5-fold and 7.4- +/- 2.5-fold, respectively. sst2-dependent activation and cell sensitization to death ligand-induced apoptosis involved activation of the executioner caspases, key factors in both death ligand- or mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. sst2 affected both pathways: first, by up-regulating expression of TRAIL and TNFalpha receptors, DR4 and TNFRI, respectively, and sensitizing the cells to death ligand-induced initiator capase-8 activation, and, second, by down-regulating expression of the antiapoptotic mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein. These results are of interest for the clinical management of chemoresistant pancreatic adenocarcinoma by using a combined gene therapy based on the cotransfer of genes for both the sst2 and a nontoxic death ligand. PMID:12490654

  20. The Global Epidemiologic Transition: Noncommunicable Diseases and Emerging Health Risk of Allergic Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atiim, George A.; Elliott, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there has been a shift in the causes of illness and death from infectious diseases to noncommunicable diseases. This changing pattern has been attributed to the effects of an (ongoing) epidemiologic transition. Although researchers have applied epidemiologic transition theory to questions of global health, there have been relatively few…

  1. Columbus State University Global Observation and Outreach for the 2012 Transit of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Matthew; McCarty, C.; Bartow, M.; Hood, J. C.; Lodder, K.; Johnson, M.; Cruzen, S. T.; Williams, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty, staff and students from Columbus State University’s (CSU’s) Coca-Cola Space Science Center presented a webcast of the 2012 Transit of Venus from three continents to a global audience of 1.4 million unique viewers. Team members imaged the transit with telescopes using white-light, hydrogen-alpha, and calcium filters, from Alice Springs, Australia; the Gobi Desert, Mongolia; Bryce Canyon, UT; and Columbus, GA. Images were webcast live during the transit in partnership with NASA’s Sun-Earth Day program, and Science Center staff members were featured on NASA TV. Local members of the public were brought in for a series of outreach initiatives, in both Georgia and Australia, before and during the transit. The data recorded from the various locations have been archived for use in demonstrating principles such as the historical measurement of the astronomical unit.

  2. The Global Polio Eradication Initiative: Progress, Lessons Learned, And Polio Legacy Transition Planning.

    PubMed

    Cochi, Stephen L; Hegg, Lea; Kaur, Anjali; Pandak, Carol; Jafari, Hamid

    2016-02-01

    The world is closer than ever to achieving global polio eradication, with record-low polio cases in 2015 and the impending prospect of a polio-free Africa. Tens of millions of volunteers, social mobilizers, and health workers have participated in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. The program contributes to efforts to deliver other health benefits, including health systems strengthening. As the initiative nears completion after more than twenty-five years, it becomes critical to document and transition the knowledge, lessons learned, assets, and infrastructure accumulated by the initiative to address other health goals and priorities. The primary goals of this process, known as polio legacy transition planning, are both to protect a polio-free world and to ensure that investments in polio eradication will contribute to other health goals after polio is completely eradicated. The initiative is engaged in an extensive transition process of consultations and planning at the global, regional, and country levels. A successful completion of this process will result in a well-planned and -managed conclusion of the initiative that will secure the global public good gained by ending one of the world's most devastating diseases and ensure that these investments provide public health benefits for years to come. PMID:26858381

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimerization and Activation Require Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jessica P.; Berger, Mitchell B.; Lin, Chun-Chi; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemmon, Mark A.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies have shown that ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization involves major domain rearrangements that expose a critical dimerization arm. However, simply exposing this arm is not sufficient for receptor dimerization, suggesting that additional ligand-induced dimer contacts are required. To map these contributions to the dimer interface, we individually mutated each contact suggested by crystallographic studies and analyzed the effects on receptor dimerization, activation, and ligand binding. We find that domain II contributes >90% of the driving energy for dimerization of the extracellular region, with domain IV adding little. Within domain II, the dimerization arm forms much of the dimer interface, as expected. However, a loop from the sixth disulfide-bonded module (immediately C-terminal to the dimerization arm) also makes a critical contribution. Specific ligand-induced conformational changes in domain II are required for this loop to contribute to receptor dimerization, and we identify a set of ligand-induced intramolecular interactions that appear to be important in driving these changes, effectively “buttressing” the dimer interface. Our data also suggest that similar conformational changes may determine the specificity of ErbB receptor homo- versus heterodimerization. PMID:16107719

  4. Nearly scale invariant spectrum of gravitational radiation from global phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Krauss, Lawrence M; Mathur, Harsh

    2008-04-01

    Using a large N sigma model approximation we explicitly calculate the power spectrum of gravitational waves arising from a global phase transition in the early Universe and we confirm that it is scale invariant, implying an observation of such a spectrum may not be a unique feature of inflation. Moreover, the predicted amplitude can be over 3 orders of magnitude larger than the naive dimensional estimate, implying that even a transition that occurs after inflation may dominate in cosmic microwave background polarization or other gravity wave signals. PMID:18517931

  5. Global electromagnetic induction constraints on transition-zone water content variations.

    PubMed

    Kelbert, Anna; Schultz, Adam; Egbert, Gary

    2009-08-20

    Small amounts of water can significantly affect the physical properties of mantle materials, including lowering of the solidus, and reducing effective viscosity and seismic velocity. The amount and distribution of water within the mantle thus has profound implications for the dynamics and geochemical evolution of the Earth. Electrical conductivity is also highly sensitive to the presence of hydrogen in mantle minerals. The mantle transition zone minerals wadsleyite and ringwoodite in particular have high water solubility, and recent high pressure experiments show that the electrical conductivity of these minerals is very sensitive to water content. Thus estimates of the electrical conductivity of the mantle transition zone derived from electromagnetic induction studies have the potential to constrain the water content of this region. Here we invert long period geomagnetic response functions to derive a global-scale three-dimensional model of electrical conductivity variations in the Earth's mantle, revealing variations in the electrical conductivity of the transition zone of approximately one order of magnitude. Conductivities are high in cold, seismically fast, areas where slabs have subducted into or through the transition zone. Significant variations in water content throughout the transition zone provide a plausible explanation for the observed patterns. Our results support the view that at least some of the water in the transition zone has been carried into that region by cold subducting slabs. PMID:19693081

  6. Ligand-induced Dimerization of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronavirus nsp5 Protease (3CLpro)

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Sakshi; Johnston, Melanie L.; St. John, Sarah E.; Osswald, Heather L.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Denison, Mark R.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    All coronaviruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from the β-CoV subgroup, require the proteolytic activity of the nsp5 protease (also known as 3C-like protease, 3CLpro) during virus replication, making it a high value target for the development of anti-coronavirus therapeutics. Kinetic studies indicate that in contrast to 3CLpro from other β-CoV 2c members, including HKU4 and HKU5, MERS-CoV 3CLpro is less efficient at processing a peptide substrate due to MERS-CoV 3CLpro being a weakly associated dimer. Conversely, HKU4, HKU5, and SARS-CoV 3CLpro enzymes are tightly associated dimers. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies support that MERS-CoV 3CLpro is a weakly associated dimer (Kd ∼52 μm) with a slow off-rate. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of MERS-CoV 3CLpro were synthesized and utilized in analytical ultracentrifugation experiments and demonstrate that MERS-CoV 3CLpro undergoes significant ligand-induced dimerization. Kinetic studies also revealed that designed reversible inhibitors act as activators at a low compound concentration as a result of induced dimerization. Primary sequence comparisons and x-ray structural analyses of two MERS-CoV 3CLpro and inhibitor complexes, determined to 1.6 Å, reveal remarkable structural similarity of the dimer interface with 3CLpro from HKU4-CoV and HKU5-CoV. Despite this structural similarity, substantial differences in the dimerization ability suggest that long range interactions by the nonconserved amino acids distant from the dimer interface may control MERS-CoV 3CLpro dimerization. Activation of MERS-CoV 3CLpro through ligand-induced dimerization appears to be unique within the genogroup 2c and may potentially increase the complexity in the development of MERS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitors as antiviral agents. PMID:26055715

  7. Transition process of abrupt climate change based on global sea surface temperature over the past century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengcheng; Hou, Wei; Feng, Guolin

    2016-05-01

    A new detection method has been proposed to study the transition process of abrupt climate change. With this method, the climate system transiting from one stable state to another can be verified clearly. By applying this method to the global sea surface temperature over the past century, several climate changes and their processes are detected, including the start state (moment), persist time, and end state (moment). According to the spatial distribution, the locations of climate changes mainly have occurred in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific before the middle twentieth century, in the 1970s in the equatorial middle-eastern Pacific, and in the middle and southern Pacific since the end of the twentieth century. In addition, the quantitative relationship between the transition process parameters is verified in theory and practice: (1) the relationship between the rate and stability parameters is linear, and (2) the relationship between the rate and change amplitude parameters is quadratic.

  8. High Impact Weather Events in the Transition Seasons: Linked to Global Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    For over a decade the author has been involved in a call-in radio show concerning climate and weather issues. From among several common themes visited frequently in the context of the show is the question of whether or not a recent high impact weather event is (or is not) directly related to global warming/climate change. A plausible physical connection between global change and high impact, mid-latitude weather events in the transition seasons is suggested. The mechanism centers on an elevation of the subtropical tropopause that occurs either as a result of direct in-situ latent heating or as a result of outflow from upstream, organized tropical convection. When the subtropical tropopause is raised in proximity to the polar jet, an anomalously deep tropopause fold is steepened rapidly leading to an intensification of the juxtaposed subtropical and polar jet streams. The resulting "superjet" is shown to underlie a number of high impact, continental cyclones over a 50 year census. Several notable convective outbreaks also appear to originate from similar "superjets" including the deadly Tuscaloosa tornado outbreak of April 2011. It is suggested that the transition seasons are preferred times of year for such jet interactions and that the length of the transition seasons, so defined, may be extended in a warmer climate thus leading to a larger number of high impact, transition season weather events in the future.

  9. Global Infrared Observations of Roughness Induced Transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Wood, William A.; Berry, Scott A.; Schwartz, Richard J.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution infrared observations made from a mobile ground based optical system captured the laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition process as it occurred during Space Shuttle Endeavour's return to earth following its final mission in 2011. The STS-134 imagery was part of a larger effort to demonstrate an emerging and reliable non-intrusive global thermal measurement capability and to complement a series of boundary layer transition flight experiments that were flown on the Shuttle. The STS-134 observations are believed to be the first time that the development and movement of a hypersonic boundary layer transition front has been witnessed in flight over the entire vehicle surface and in particular, at unprecedented spatial resolution. Additionally, benchmark surface temperature maps of the Orbiter lower surface collected over multiple flights and spanning a Mach range of 18 to 6 are now available and represent an opportunity for collaborative comparison with computational techniques focused on hypersonic transition and turbulence modeling. The synergy of the global temperature maps with the companion in-situ thermocouple measurements serve as an example of the effective leveraging of resources to achieve a common goal of advancing our understanding of the complex nature of high Mach number transition. It is shown that quantitative imaging can open the door to a multitude of national and international opportunities for partnership associated with flight-testing and subsequent validation of numerical simulation techniques. The quantitative imaging applications highlighted in this paper offer unique and complementary flight measurement alternatives and suggest collaborative instrumentation opportunities to advance the state of the art in transition prediction and maximize the return on investment in terms of developmental flight tests for future vehicle designs.

  10. Global vegetation distribution and terrestrial climate evolution at the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Eocene - Oligocene transition (EOT; ca. 34-33.5 Ma) is widely considered to be the biggest step in Cenozoic climate evolution. Geochemical marine records show both surface and bottom water cooling, associated with the expansion of Antarctic glaciers and a reduction in the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, the global response of the terrestrial biosphere to the EOT is less well understood and not uniform when comparing different regions. We present new global vegetation and terrestrial climate reconstructions of the Priabonian (late Eocene; 38-33.9 Ma) and Rupelian (early Oligocene; 33.9-28.45 Ma) by synthesising 215 pollen and spore localities. Using presence/absence data of pollen and spores with multivariate statistics has allowed the reconstruction of palaeo-biomes without relying on modern analogues. The reconstructed palaeo-biomes do not show the equator-ward shift at the EOT, which would be expected from a global cooling. Reconstructions of mean annual temperature, cold month mean temperature and warm month mean temperature do not show a global cooling of terrestrial climate across the EOT. Our new reconstructions differ from previous global syntheses by being based on an internally consistent statistically defined classification of palaeo-biomes and our terrestrial based climate reconstructions are in stark contrast to some marine based climate estimates. Our results raise new questions on the nature and extent of terrestrial global climate change at the EOT.

  11. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J.; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A.; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  12. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Mashanov, Gregory I; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  13. Diversity of actions of GnRHs mediated by ligand-induced selective signaling

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Robert P.; Pawson, Adam J.; Morgan, Kevin; Rissman, Emilie F.; Lu, Zhi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Geoffrey Wingfield Harris’ demonstration of hypothalamic hormones regulating pituitary function led to their structural identification and therapeutic utilization in a wide spectrum of diseases. Amongst these, Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and its analogs are widely employed in modulating gonadotropin and sex steroid secretion to treat infertility, precocious puberty and many hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostatic cancer. While these effects are all mediated via modulation of the pituitary gonadotrope GnRH receptor and the Gq signaling pathway, it has become increasingly apparent that GnRH regulates many extrapituitary cells in the nervous system and periphery. This review focuses on two such examples, namely GnRH analog effects on reproductive behaviors and GnRH analog effects on the inhibition of cancer cell growth. For both effects the relative activities of a range of GnRH analogs is distinctly different from their effects on the pituitary gonadotrope and different signaling pathways are utilized. As there is only a single functional GnRH receptor type in man we have proposed that the GnRH receptor can assume different conformations which have different selectivity for GnRH analogs and intracellular signaling proteins complexes. This ligand-induced selective-signaling recruits certain pathways while by-passing others and has implications in developing more selective GnRH analogs for highly specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:17976709

  14. Ligand-Induced Dynamics of Neurotrophin Receptors Investigated by Single-Molecule Imaging Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Laura; Luin, Stefano; Bonsignore, Fulvio; de Nadai, Teresa; Beltram, Fabio; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are secreted proteins that regulate neuronal development and survival, as well as maintenance and plasticity of the adult nervous system. The biological activity of neurotrophins stems from their binding to two membrane receptor types, the tropomyosin receptor kinase and the p75 neurotrophin receptors (NRs). The intracellular signalling cascades thereby activated have been extensively investigated. Nevertheless, a comprehensive description of the ligand-induced nanoscale details of NRs dynamics and interactions spanning from the initial lateral movements triggered at the plasma membrane to the internalization and transport processes is still missing. Recent advances in high spatio-temporal resolution imaging techniques have yielded new insight on the dynamics of NRs upon ligand binding. Here we discuss requirements, potential and practical implementation of these novel approaches for the study of neurotrophin trafficking and signalling, in the framework of current knowledge available also for other ligand-receptor systems. We shall especially highlight the correlation between the receptor dynamics activated by different neurotrophins and the respective signalling outcome, as recently revealed by single-molecule tracking of NRs in living neuronal cells. PMID:25603178

  15. Microscopic study of a ligand induced electroless plating process onto polymers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexandre; Berthelot, Thomas; Viel, Pascal; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Palacin, Serge

    2010-11-01

    The ligand induced electroless plating (LIEP) process was recently developed and thoroughly demonstrated with one of the most used polymers for plating processes: acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS). This generic process is based, thanks to the use of diazonium salts as precursors, on the covalent grafting of a thin layer of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) acting as ligand for metallic salts onto pristine polymer surfaces. This strategy takes advantage of the PAA ion exchange properties. Indeed, carboxylate groups contained in PAA allow one to complex copper ions which are eventually reduced and used as catalysts of the metallic deposition. Essentially based on ABS, ABS-PC (ABS-polycarbonate) and PA (polyamide) substrates, the present paper focuses on the role of the polymer substrate and the relationships between the macroscopic properties and microscopic characterizations such as infrared (IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adhesion strength of the metallic layer deposited via that LIEP process with the bulk polymer substrates was successfully compared with the adhesion of similar copper films deposited by the usual process based on chromic acid etching and palladium-based seed layer, by measuring the T-peel adhesion strength, and by carrying out the common industrial scotch tape test. Lastly, the electrical properties of the deposited layer were studied thanks to a four-point probe and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. PMID:21053943

  16. Global seismic data reveal little water in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the Earth's present water content is necessary to constrain the amount of water and other volatiles the Earth acquired during its formation and the amount that is cycled back into the interior from the surface. This study compares 410 and 660 km discontinuity depth with shear wave tomography within the mantle transition zone to identify regions with seismic signals consistent with water. The depth of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities is determined from a large updated dataset of SS-S410S and SS-S660S differential travel times, known as SS precursors. The discontinuity depths measured from binning and stacking the SS precursor data are then compared to the shear velocity model HMSL-S06 in the transition zone. Mapping all the possible combinations, very few locations match the predictions from mineral physics for the effects of water on discontinuity depth and shear velocity. The predictions, although not yet measured at actual transition zone temperatures and pressures, are a shallow 410 km discontinuity, a deep 660 km discontinuity, and a slow shear velocity. Only 8% of the bins with high-quality data are consistent with these predictions, and the calculated average water content within these bins is around 0.6 wt.%. A few isolated locations have patterns of velocity/topography that are consistent with water, while there are large regional-scale patterns consistent with cold/hot temperature anomalies. Combining this global analysis of long period seismic data and the current mineral physics predictions for water in transition zone minerals, I find that the mantle transition zone is generally dry, containing less than one Earth ocean of water. Although subduction zones could be locally hydrated, the combined discontinuity and velocity data show no evidence that wadsleyite or ringwoodite have been globally hydrated by subduction or initial Earth conditions.

  17. Global distribution of azimuthal anisotropy within the lithosphere, asthenosphere, and transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Andrew; Lebedev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    We present our new global, azimuthally anisotropic model of the upper mantle, crust, and transition zone. We compare two versions of this new model, the rough SL2013svAr and smooth SL2013svA, which are constrained by a larger, updated waveform fit dataset (>900, 000 vertical component seismogram fits) than that used in the construction of the isotropic model SL2013sv (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013). These two anisotropy models are computed using a more precise regularization of anisotropy, which is tuned to honour the both the amplitude and orientation of the anisotropic terms uniformly, including near the poles. Automated, multimode waveform inversion was used to extract structural information from surface and S wave forms, yielding resolving power from the crust down to the transition zone. Our unprecedentedly large waveform dataset, with complementary high-resolution regional array subsets within larger global networks, produces improved resolution of global azimuthal anisotropy patterns. The model also reveals smaller scale patterns of 3D anisotropy variations related to regional lithospheric deformation and mantle flow, in particular in densely sampled regions. In oceanic regions, we examine the strength of azimuthal anisotropy, as a function of depth, spatial position with respect to the spreading ridge, and deviation in fast axis orientation from the current and fossil spreading directions. Furthermore, we explore correlations between anisotropic tomography models and a new reference frame developed such that the net rotation of spreading ridges is minimized (RNR; Becker et al, 2014). In continental regions, azimuthal anisotropy is more complex. Reconciling complementary observations given by shear wave splitting, surface-wave array analysis, and large-scale, global 3D models offers new insights into the mechanisms of continental deformation and the architecture and evolution of the lithosphere. Finally, quantitative comparisons with other recently published

  18. Silibinin suppresses EGFR ligand-induced CD44 expression through inhibition of EGFR activity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Han, Jeonghun; Kim, Jee Soo; Kim, Jung-Han; Choe, Jun-Ho; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2011-11-01

    CD44, the transmembrane receptor for hyaluronan, is implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The expression of CD44 and its variants is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here, we investigated the effect of silibinin (a polyphenolic flavonolignan of the herbal plant of Silybum marianum, milk thistle) on the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand-induced CD44 expression in human breast cancer cells. The levels of CD44 mRNA and protein expression were greatly increased by EGF and by TGF-α in SKBR3 and BT474 breast cancer cells. In contrast, EGFR ligand-induced CD44 expression was reduced by EGFR inhibitors, AG1478 and lapatinib, respectively. Interestingly, we observed that EGFR ligand-induced CD44 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression was reduced by silibinin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, silibinin suppressed the EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), a downstream signaling molecule of EGFR. Therefore, we suggest that silibinin prevents the EGFR signaling pathway and may be used as an effective drug for the inhibition of metastasis of human breast cancer. PMID:22110198

  19. Sequential assignment of proton resonances in the NMR spectrum of Zn-substituted alpha chains from human hemoglobin. Ligand-induced tertiary changes in the heme pocket.

    PubMed

    Martineau, L; Craescu, C T

    1993-06-01

    We constructed an artificial holoprotein as a complex between alpha globin from human adult hemoglobin and the protoporphyrin IX-Zn(II). The prosthetic group is bound in a single conformation to the apoglobin via a coordinative bond between Zn(II) ion and the proximal histidine (His87). The complex is diamagnetic and does not bind either CO nor O2 thus representing a diamagnetic model of deoxygenated alpha chains. In the present paper we report extensive resonance assignment in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the Zn-substituted alpha chains in phosphate buffer pH 5.6. A large number of aromatic and aliphatic side chain spin systems were identified in the two-dimensional homonuclear COSY spectra. Based on the assigned resonances of heme substituent protons and their NOE cross-peaks, we assigned the majority of resonances representing the heme pocket side chains. Using the main-chain-directed assignment strategy, we could establish several continuous patterns of sequential assignment and identify partial or total spin systems for a large number of side chains. The final assignment corresponds to 73% of the amino acids. Analysis of chemical shift of assigned resonances and of nuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities provides structural information on the global and local tertiary conformation in solution and on the ligand-induced conformational changes. Comparison of observed and calculated ring current shifts enabled us to compare the solution structure with the X-ray crystal structure of alpha subunits in deoxy and carbonmonoxy hemoglobin. The global tertiary structure of unliganded chains is highly similar to both ligand and unliganded counterparts in the crystalline state. On the distal side of the heme pocket. Val62 is significantly closer to the heme center, in agreement with its conformation in the crystallographic structure. In contrast, the position of the proximal histidine (His87) relative to the heme is clearly more closely related

  20. Global Transition Zone Anisotropy and Consequences for Mantle Flow and Earth's Deep Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2011-12-01

    The transition zone has long been at the center of the debate between multi- and single-layered convection models that directly relate to heat transport and chemical mixing throughout the mantle. It has also been suggested that the transition zone is a reservoir that collects water transported by subduction of the lithosphere into the mantle. Since water lowers mantle minerals density and viscosity, thereby modifying their rheology and melting behavior, it likely affects global mantle dynamics and the history of plate tectonics. Constraining mantle flow is therefore important for our understanding of Earth's thermochemical evolution and deep water cycle. Because it can result from deformation by dislocation creep during convection, seismic anisotropy can help us model mantle flow. It is relatively well constrained in the uppermost mantle, but its presence in the transition zone is still debated. Its detection below 250 km depth has been challenging to date because of the poor vertical resolution of commonly used datasets. In this study, we used global Love wave overtone phase velocity maps, which are sensitive to structure down to much larger depths than fundamental modes alone, and have greater depth resolution than shear wave-splitting data. This enabled us to obtain a first 3-D model of azimuthal anisotropy for the upper 800km of the mantle. We inverted the 2Ψ terms of anisotropic phase velocity maps [Visser, et al., 2008] for the first five Love wave overtones between 35s and 174s period. The resulting model shows that the average anisotropy amplitude for vertically polarized shear waves displays two main stable peaks: one in the uppermost mantle and, most remarkably, one in the lower transition zone. F-tests showed that the presence of 2Ψ anisotropy in the transition zone is required to improve the third, fourth, and fifth overtones fit. Because of parameter trade-offs, however, we cannot exclude that the anisotropy is located in the upper transition zone as

  1. A global transition to ferruginous conditions in the early Neoproterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbaud, Romain; Poulton, Simon W.; Butterfield, Nicholas J.; Zhu, Maoyan; Shields-Zhou, Graham A.

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic life expanded during the Proterozoic eon, 2.5 to 0.542 billion years ago, against a background of fluctuating ocean chemistry. After about 1.8 billion years ago, the global ocean is thought to have been characterized by oxygenated surface waters, with anoxic and sulphidic waters in middle depths along productive continental margins and anoxic and iron-containing (ferruginous) deeper waters. The spatial extent of sulphidic waters probably varied through time, but this surface-to-deep redox structure is suggested to have persisted until the first Neoproterozoic glaciation about 717 million years ago. Here we report an analysis of ocean redox conditions throughout the Proterozoic using new and existing iron speciation and sulphur isotope data from multiple cores and outcrops. We find a global transition from sulphidic to ferruginous mid-depth waters in the earliest Neoproterozoic, coincident with the amalgamation of the supercontinent Rodinia at low latitudes. We suggest that ferruginous conditions were initiated by an increase in the oceanic influx of highly reactive iron relative to sulphate, driven by a change in weathering regime and the uptake of sulphate by extensive continental evaporites on Rodinia. We propose that this transition essentially detoxified ocean margin settings, allowing for expanded opportunities for eukaryote diversification following a prolonged evolutionary stasis before one billion years ago.

  2. Global transition path search for dislocation formation in Ge on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maras, E.; Trushin, O.; Stukowski, A.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Jónsson, H.

    2016-08-01

    Global optimization of transition paths in complex atomic scale systems is addressed in the context of misfit dislocation formation in a strained Ge film on Si(001). Such paths contain multiple intermediate minima connected by minimum energy paths on the energy surface emerging from the atomic interactions in the system. The challenge is to find which intermediate states to include and to construct a path going through these intermediates in such a way that the overall activation energy for the transition is minimal. In the numerical approach presented here, intermediate minima are constructed by heredity transformations of known minimum energy structures and by identifying local minima in minimum energy paths calculated using a modified version of the nudged elastic band method. Several mechanisms for the formation of a 90° misfit dislocation at the Ge-Si interface are identified when this method is used to construct transition paths connecting a homogeneously strained Ge film and a film containing a misfit dislocation. One of these mechanisms which has not been reported in the literature is detailed. The activation energy for this path is calculated to be 26% smaller than the activation energy for half loop formation of a full, isolated 60° dislocation. An extension of the common neighbor analysis method involving characterization of the geometrical arrangement of second nearest neighbors is used to identify and visualize the dislocations and stacking faults.

  3. Bifurcation and scaling at the aging transition boundary in globally coupled excitable and oscillatory units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroaki; Nishio, Kazuho

    2016-05-01

    Following a previous paper [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052907 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.052907], we study in detail the mechanism of aging transition in globally and diffusively coupled excitable and oscillatory units. Here two of the three models taken up in the earlier work are used, each composed of a large number of units with their bifurcation parameters forming a uniform distribution. The control parameters are the coupling strength and the average of the bifurcation parameters. The present work is mostly devoted to a region of the phase diagram near the aging transition boundary with the coupling strength greater than its critical value for the onset of bistability and hysteresis. The bifurcation structure of each system at the aging transition boundary is investigated theoretically as well as numerically. Moreover, we show that critical scaling laws of order parameters S and M used in the previous paper are different depending on which region of the coupling strength to be chosen.

  4. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  5. A Global View Programming Abstraction for Transitioning MPI Codes to PGAS Languages

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, Tiffany M; Hernandez, Oscar R; Bernholdt, David E

    2014-01-01

    The multicore generation of scientific high performance computing has provided a platform for the realization of Exascale computing, and has also underscored the need for new paradigms in coding parallel applications. The current standard for writing parallel applications requires programmers to use languages designed for sequential execution. These languages have abstractions that only allow programmers to operate on the process centric local view of data. To provide suitable languages for parallel execution, many research efforts have designed languages based on the Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model. Chapel is one of the more recent languages to be developed using this model. Chapel supports multithreaded execution with high-level abstractions for parallelism. With Chapel in mind, we have developed a set of directives that serve as intermediate expressions for transitioning scientific applications from languages designed for sequential execution to PGAS languages like Chapel that are being developed with parallelism in mind.

  6. Complexity transitions in global algorithms for sparse linear systems over finite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, A.; Leone, M.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.; Zecchina, R.

    2002-09-01

    We study the computational complexity of a very basic problem, namely that of finding solutions to a very large set of random linear equations in a finite Galois field modulo q. Using tools from statistical mechanics we are able to identify phase transitions in the structure of the solution space and to connect them to the changes in the performance of a global algorithm, namely Gaussian elimination. Crossing phase boundaries produces a dramatic increase in memory and CPU requirements necessary for the algorithms. In turn, this causes the saturation of the upper bounds for the running time. We illustrate the results on the specific problem of integer factorization, which is of central interest for deciphering messages encrypted with the RSA cryptosystem.

  7. Global transcriptional analysis of nuclear reprogramming in the transition from MEFs to iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fulu; Song, Zhenwei; Zhang, Jinping; Lu, Youde; Song, Chunlei; Jiang, BaoChun; Zhang, Baole; Cong, Peiqing; Sun, Hongyan; Shi, Fangxiong; Liu, Honglin

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are flourishing in the investigation of cell reprogramming. However, we still know little about the sequential molecular mechanism during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR). Here, we first observed rapid generation of colonies whereas mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were induced by OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 (OSK), and vitamin C for 7 days. The colony's global transcriptional profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix microarray. Microarray data confirmed that SCR was a process in which transcriptome got reversed and pluripotent genes expressed de novo. There were many changes, especially substantial growth expression of epigenetic factors, on transcriptome during the transition from Day 7 to iPSCs indicating that this period may provide 'flexibility' genome structure, chromatin remodeling, and epigenetic modifications to rebind to the transcriptional factors. Several biological processes such as viral immune response, apoptosis, cell fate specification, and cell communication were mainly involved before Day 7 whereas cell cycle, DNA methylation, and histone modification were mainly involved after Day 7. Furthermore, it was suggested that p53 signaling contributed to the transition 'hyperdynamic plastic' cell state and assembled cell niche for SCR, and small molecular compounds useful for chromatin remodeling can enhance iPSCs by exciting epigenetic modification rather than the exogenous expression of more TFs vectors. PMID:23231677

  8. A global calibration model for a-Si EPIDs used for transit dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Nijsten, S M J J G; van Elmpt, W J C; Jacobs, M; Mijnheer, B J; Dekker, A L A J; Lambin, P; Minken, A W H

    2007-10-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are not only applied for patient setup verification and detection of organ motion but are also increasingly used for dosimetric verification. The aim of our work is to obtain accurate dose distributions from a commercially available amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPID for transit dosimetry applications. For that purpose, a global calibration model was developed, which includes a correction procedure for ghosting effects, field size dependence and energy dependence of the a-Si EPID response. In addition, the long-term stability and additional buildup material for this type of EPID were determined. Differences in EPID response due to photon energy spectrum changes have been measured for different absorber thicknesses and field sizes, yielding off-axis spectrum correction factors based on transmission measurements. Dose measurements performed with an ionization chamber in a water tank were used as reference data, and the accuracy of the dosimetric calibration model was determined for a large range of treatment conditions. Gamma values using 3% as dose-difference criterion and 3 mm as distance-to-agreement criterion were used for evaluation. The field size dependence of the response could be corrected by a single kernel, fulfilling the gamma evaluation criteria in case of virtual wedges and intensity modulated radiation therapy fields. Differences in energy spectrum response amounted up to 30%-40%, but could be reduced to less than 3% using our correction model. For different treatment fields and (in)homogeneous phantoms, transit dose distributions satisfied in almost all situations the gamma criteria. We have shown that a-Si EPIDs can be accurately calibrated for transit dosimetry purposes. PMID:17985633

  9. Ligand-induced folding of the thiM TPP riboswitch investigated by a structure-based fluorescence spectroscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Kathrin; Rieder, Renate; Micura, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Riboswitches are genetic control elements within non-coding regions of mRNA. They consist of a metabolite-sensitive aptamer and an adjoining expression platform. Here, we describe ligand-induced folding of a thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) responsive riboswitch from Escherichia coli thiM mRNA, using chemically labeled variants. Referring to a recent structure determination of the TPP/aptamer complex, each variant was synthesized with a single 2-aminopurine (AP) nucleobase replacement that was selected to monitor formation of tertiary interactions of a particular region during ligand binding in real time by fluorescence experiments. We have determined the rate constants for conformational adjustment of the individual AP sensors. From the 7-fold differentiation of these constants, it can be deduced that tertiary contacts between the two parallel helical domains (P2/J3-2/P3/L3 and P4/P5/L5) that grip the ligand's ends in two separate pockets, form significantly faster than the function-critical three-way junction with stem P1 fully developed. Based on these data, we characterize the process of ligand binding by an induced fit of the RNA and propose a folding model of the TPP riboswitch aptamer. For the full-length riboswitch domain and for shorter constructs that represent transcriptional intermediates, we have additionally evaluated ligand-induced folding via AP-modified variants and provide insights into the sequential folding pathway that involves a finely balanced equilibrium of secondary structures. PMID:17693433

  10. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  11. The global gene expression profile of the secondary transition during pancreatic development.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Stefanie J; Mueller, Nikola S; Engert, Silvia; Sterr, Michael; Burtscher, Ingo; Raducanu, Aurelia; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas organogenesis is a highly dynamic process where neighboring tissue interactions lead to dynamic changes in gene regulatory networks that orchestrate endocrine, exocrine, and ductal lineage formation. To understand the spatio-temporal regulatory logic we have used the Forkhead transcription factor Foxa2-Venus fusion (FVF) knock-in reporter mouse to separate the FVF(+) pancreatic epithelium from the FVF(−) surrounding tissue (mesenchyme, neurons, blood, and blood vessels) to perform a genome-wide mRNA expression profiling at embryonic days (E) 12.5-15.5. Annotating genes and molecular processes suggest that FVF marks endoderm-derived multipotent epithelial progenitors at several lineage restriction steps, when the bulk of endocrine, exocrine and ductal cells are formed during the secondary transition. In the pancreatic epithelial compartment, we identified most known endocrine and exocrine lineage determining factors and diabetes-associated genes, but also unknown genes with spatio-temporal regulated pancreatic expression. In the non-endoderm-derived compartment, we identified many well-described regulatory genes that are not yet functionally annotated in pancreas development, emphasizing that neighboring tissue interactions are still ill defined. Pancreatic expression of over 635 genes was analyzed with them RNA in situ hybridization Genepaint public database. This validated the quality of the profiling data set and identified hundreds of genes with spatially restricted expression patterns in the pancreas. Some of these genes are also targeted by pancreatic transcription factors and show active chromatin marks in human islets of Langerhans. Thus, with the highest spatio-temporal resolution of a global gene expression profile during the secondary transition, our study enables to shed light on neighboring tissue interactions, developmental timing and diabetes gene regulation. PMID:26643664

  12. Evolutionary Transition from Pathogenicity to Commensalism: Global Regulator Mutations Mediate Fitness Gains through Virulence Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Crummenerl, Lena L.; Gilbert, Felix; Mohr, Timm; Pfefferkorn, Roxana; Thänert, Robert; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic interactions are indispensable for metazoan function, but their origin and evolution remain elusive. We use a controlled evolution experiment to demonstrate the emergence of novel commensal interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an initially pathogenic bacterium, and a metazoan host, Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that commensalism evolves through loss of virulence, because it provides bacteria with a double fitness advantage: Increased within-host fitness and a larger host population to infect. Commensalism arises irrespective of host immune status, as the adaptive path in immunocompromised C. elegans knockouts does not differ from that in wild type. Dissection of temporal dynamics of genomic adaptation for 125 bacterial populations reveals highly parallel evolution of incipient commensalism across independent biological replicates. Adaptation is mainly achieved through frame shift mutations in the global regulator lasR and nonsynonymous point mutations in the polymerase gene rpoB that arise early in evolution. Genetic knockouts of lasR not only corroborate its role in virulence attenuation but also show that further mutations are necessary for the fully commensal phenotype. The evolutionary transition from pathogenicity to commensalism as we observe here is facilitated by mutations in global regulators such as lasR, because few genetic changes cause pleiotropic effects across the genome with large phenotypic effects. Finally, we found that nucleotide diversity increased more quickly in bacteria adapting to immunocompromised hosts than in those adapting to immunocompetent hosts. Nevertheless, the outcome of evolution was comparable across host types. Commensalism can thus evolve independently of host immune state solely as a side-effect of bacterial adaptation to novel hosts. PMID:26199376

  13. Phase transition and hysteresis loop in structured games with global updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Guanrong; Hui, P. M.

    2008-04-01

    We present a global payoff-based strategy updating model for studying cooperative behavior of a networked population. We adopt the Prisoner’s Dilemma game and the snowdrift game as paradigms for characterizing the interactions among individuals. We investigate the model on regular, small-world, and scale-free networks, and find multistable cooperation states depending on the initial cooperator density. In particular for the snowdrift game on small-world and scale-free networks, there exist a discontinuous phase transition and hysteresis loops of cooperator density. We explain the observed properties by theoretical predictions and simulation results of the average number of neighbors of cooperators and defectors, respectively. Our work indicates that individuals with more neighbors have a trend to preserve their initial strategies, which has strong impacts on the strategy updating of individuals with fewer neighbors; while the fact that individuals with few neighbors have to become cooperators to avoid gaining the lowest payoff plays significant roles in maintaining and spreading of cooperation strategy.

  14. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  15. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  16. Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    2003-11-14

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at

  17. An Estrogen Receptor-α Knock-In Mutation Provides Evidence of Ligand-Independent Signaling and Allows Modulation of Ligand-Induced Pathways in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sinkevicius, Kerstin W.; Burdette, Joanna E.; Woloszyn, Karolina; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Hamilton, Katherine; Sugg, Sonia L.; Temple, Karla A.; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen-nonresponsive estrogen receptor-α (ERα) knock-in (ENERKI) mice were generated to distinguish between ligand-induced and ligand-independent ER-α actions in vivo. These mice have a mutation [glycine 525 to leucine (G525L)] in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which significantly reduces ERα interaction with and response to endogenous estrogens, whereas not affecting growth factor activation of ligand-independent pathways. ENERKI mice had hypoplastic uterine tissues and rudimentary mammary gland ductal trees. Females were infertile due to anovulation, and their ovaries contained hemorrhagic cystic follicles because of chronically elevated levels of LH. The ENERKI phenotype confirmed that ligand-induced activation of ERα is crucial in the female reproductive tract and mammary gland development. Growth factor treatments induced uterine epithelial proliferation in ovariectomized ENERKI females, directly demonstrating that ERα ligand-independent pathways were active. In addition, the synthetic ERα selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) and ER agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES) were still able to activate ligand-induced G525L ERα pathways in vitro. PPT treatments initiated at puberty stimulated ENERKI uterine development, whereas neonatal treatments were needed to restore mammary gland ductal elongation, indicating that neonatal ligand-induced ERα activation may prime mammary ducts to become more responsive to estrogens in adult tissues. This is a useful model for in vivo evaluation of ligand-induced ERα pathways and temporal patterns of response. DES did not stimulate an ENERKI uterotrophic response. Because ERβ may modulate ERα activation and have an antiproliferative function in the uterus, we hypothesize that ENERKI animals were particularly sensitive to DES-induced inhibition of ERα due to up-regulated uterine ERβ levels. PMID:18339713

  18. Ligand-Induced Asymmetry in Histidine Sensor Kinase Complex Regulates Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Neiditch,M.; Federle, M.; Pompeani, A.; Kelly, R.; Swem, D.; Jeffrey, P.; Bassler, B.; Hughson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria sense their environment using receptors of the histidine sensor kinase family, but how kinase activity is regulated by ligand binding is not well understood. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), a secreted signaling molecule originally identified in studies of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, regulates quorum-sensing responses and allows communication between different bacterial species. AI-2 signal transduction in V. harveyi requires the integral membrane receptor LuxPQ, comprised of periplasmic binding protein (LuxP) and histidine sensor kinase (LuxQ) subunits. Combined X-ray crystallographic and functional studies show that AI-2 binding causes a major conformational change within LuxP, which in turn stabilizes a quaternary arrangement in which two LuxPQ monomers are asymmetrically associated. We propose that formation of this asymmetric quaternary structure is responsible for repressing the kinase activity of both LuxQ subunits and triggering the transition of V. harveyi into quorum-sensing mode.

  19. The Global Epidemiologic Transition: Noncommunicable Diseases and Emerging Health Risk of Allergic Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Atiim, George A; Elliott, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    Globally, there has been a shift in the causes of illness and death from infectious diseases to noncommunicable diseases. This changing pattern has been attributed to the effects of an (ongoing) epidemiologic transition. Although researchers have applied epidemiologic transition theory to questions of global health, there have been relatively few studies exploring its relevance especially in the context of emerging allergic disorders in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In this article, we address the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa through the lens of epidemiologic transition theory. After a brief review of the literature on the evolution of the epidemiologic transition with a particular emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss existing frameworks designed to help inform our understanding of changing health trends in the developing world. We subsequently propose a framework that privileges "place" as a key construct informing our understanding. In so doing, we use the example of allergic disease, one of the fastest growing chronic conditions in most parts of the world. PMID:27037146

  20. Global Conceptualization of the Professional Learning Community Process: Transitioning from Country Perspectives to International Commonalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Jane B.; Olivier, Dianne F.; Wang, Ting; Chen, Peiying; Hairon, Salleh; Pang, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The authors seek to find common PLC structures and actions among global educational systems to enhance understanding and practice. Six international researchers formed the Global Professional Learning Community Network (GloPLCNet), conducted literature reviews of each country's involvement with PLC actions, and noted similarities and common…

  1. Ligand-induced IFN gamma receptor tyrosine phosphorylation couples the receptor to its signal transduction system (p91).

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, A C; Farrar, M A; Viviano, B L; Schreiber, R D

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) induces the rapid and reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of the IFN gamma receptor. Using a panel of receptor intracellular domain mutants, we show that a membrane-proximal LPKS sequence (residues 266-269) is required for ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activation and/or kinase-receptor association and biological responsiveness, and a functionally critical membrane-distal tyrosine residue (Y440) is a target of the activated enzyme. The biological significance of Y440 phosphorylation was demonstrated by showing that a receptor-derived nonapeptide corresponding to receptor residues 436-444 and containing phosphorylated Y440 bound specifically to p91, blocked p91 phosphorylation and inhibited the generation of an active p91-containing transcription factor complex. In contrast, nonphosphorylated wild-type, phosphorylated mutant, or phosphorylated irrelevant peptides did not. Moreover, the phosphorylated Y440-containing peptide did not interact with a related but distinct latent transcription factor (p113) which is activatible by IFN alpha but not IFN gamma. These results thus document the specific and inducible association of p91 with the phosphorylated IFN gamma receptor and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which ligand couples the IFN gamma receptor to its signal transduction system. Images PMID:8156998

  2. Ligand-induced structural changes in the cyclic nucleotide-modulated potassium channel MloK1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Julia; Chami, Mohamed; Baumgartner, Paul; Arheit, Marcel; Chiu, Po-Lin; Rangl, Martina; Scheuring, Simon; Schröder, Gunnar F.; Nimigean, Crina M.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channels are important for signal transduction and pacemaking in eukaryotes. The molecular determinants of ligand gating in these channels are still unknown, mainly because of a lack of direct structural information. Here we report ligand-induced conformational changes in full-length MloK1, a cyclic nucleotide-modulated potassium channel from the bacterium Mesorhizobium loti, analysed by electron crystallography and atomic force microscopy. Upon cAMP binding, the cyclic nucleotide-binding domains move vertically towards the membrane, and directly contact the S1-S4 voltage sensor domains. This is accompanied by a significant shift and tilt of the voltage sensor domain helices. In both states, the inner pore-lining helices are in an ‘open’ conformation. We propose a mechanism in which ligand binding can favour pore opening via a direct interaction between the cyclic nucleotide-binding domains and voltage sensors. This offers a simple mechanistic hypothesis for the coupling between ligand gating and voltage sensing in eukaryotic HCN channels.

  3. pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    The activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGFR) involves a large conformational change in its soluble extracellular domains (sECD, residues 1-620), from a tethered to an extended conformation upon binding of ligands, such as EGF. It has been reported that this dynamic process is pH-dependent, that is, hEGFR can be activated by EGF at high pH to form an extended dimer but remains as an inactive monomer at low pH. In this paper, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations starting from the tethered conformation of sECD:EGF complex, at pH 5.0 and 8.5, respectively. Simulation results indicate that sECD:EGF shows different dynamic properties between the two pHs, and the complex may have a higher tendency of activation at pH 8.5. Twenty residues, including 13 histidines, in sECD:EGF have different protonation states between the two pHs (calculated by the H++ server). The charge distribution at pH 8.5 is more favorable for forming an extended conformation toward the active state of sECD than that at pH 5.0. Our study may shed light on the mechanism of pH dependence of hEGFR activation. Graphical abstract pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation. PMID:27179806

  4. A Global Model Simulation of Aerosol Effects of Surface Radiation Budget- Toward Understanding of the "Dimming to Brightening" Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study on the role aerosols play in the change of solar radiation at Earth's surface that transitioned from a decreasing (dimming) trend to an increasing (brightening) trend. Our primary objective is to understand the relationship between the long-term trends of aerosol emission, atmospheric burden, and surface solar radiation. More specifically, we use the recently compiled comprehensive global emission datasets of aerosols and precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions and other sources from 1980 to 2006 to simulate long-term variations of aerosol distributions and optical properties, and then calculate the multi-decadal changes of short-wave radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere by coupling the GOCART model simulated aerosols with the Goddard radiative transfer model. The model results are compared with long-term observational records from ground-based networks and satellite data. We will address the following critical questions: To what extent can the observed surface solar radiation trends, known as the transition from dimming to brightening, be explained by the changes of anthropogenic and natural aerosol loading on global and regional scales? What are the relative contributions of local emission and long-range transport to the surface radiation budget and how do these contributions change with time?

  5. The Role of Higher Education in Societies in Transition within the Globalized Environment: Solid Academic Credentials and the Challenges of Building up an Institutional Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozminski, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    Argues that higher education is essential for the facilitation of globalization, pointing out that in the Eastern and Central European transition countries, higher education has been a main engine of transition. Asserts that it too must adapt to change, such as the rigors of a market economy that require it to be accessible to all and financed…

  6. Knockdown of GnT-Va expression inhibits ligand-induced downregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and intracellular signaling by inhibiting receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Lee, Intaek; Pierce, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the expression of N-glycan branching glycosyltransferases can alter cell surface receptor functions, involving their levels of cell surface retention, rates of internalization into the endosomal compartment, and subsequent intracellular signaling. To study in detail the regulation of signaling of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by GlcNAcβ(1,6)Man branching, we utilized specific siRNA to selectively knockdown GnT-Va expression in the highly invasive human breast carcinoma line MDA-MB231, which resulted in the attenuation of its invasiveness-related phenotypes. Compared to control cells, ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR was significantly inhibited in GnT-Va-suppressed cells. This effect could be reversed by re-expression of GnT-Va, indicating that changes in ligand-induced receptor downregulation were dependent on GnT-Va activity. Knockdown of GnT-Va had no significant effect on c-Cbl mediated receptor ubiquitination and degradation, but did cause the inhibition of receptor internalization, showing that altered signaling and delayed ligand-induced downregulation of EGFR expression resulted from decreased EGFR endocytosis. Similar results were obtained with HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells treated with GnT-Va siRNA. Inhibited receptor internalization caused by the expression of GnT-Va siRNA appeared to be independent of galectin binding since decreased EGFR internalization in the knockdown cells was not affected by the treatment of the cells with lactose, a galectin inhibitor. Our results show that decreased GnT-Va activity due to siRNA expression in human carcinoma cells inhibits ligand-induced EGFR internalization, consequently resulting in delayed downstream signal transduction and inhibition of the EGF-induced, invasiveness-related phenotypes. PMID:19225046

  7. Finite-size-induced transitions to synchrony in oscillator ensembles with nonlinear global coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2015-08-01

    We report on finite-sized-induced transitions to synchrony in a population of phase oscillators coupled via a nonlinear mean field, which microscopically is equivalent to a hypernetwork organization of interactions. Using a self-consistent approach and direct numerical simulations, we argue that a transition to synchrony occurs only for finite-size ensembles and disappears in the thermodynamic limit. For all considered setups, which include purely deterministic oscillators with or without heterogeneity in natural oscillatory frequencies, and an ensemble of noise-driven identical oscillators, we establish scaling relations describing the order parameter as a function of the coupling constant and the system size.

  8. Running Out Of and Into Oil. Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L.; Hopson, Janet L.; Li, Jia

    2003-10-01

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value.

  9. State-and-transition model archetypes: a global taxonomy of rangeland change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    State and transition models (STMs) synthesize science-based and local knowledge to formally represent the dynamics of rangeland and other ecosystems. Mental models or concepts of ecosystem dynamics implicitly underlie all management decisions in rangelands and thus how people influence rangeland sus...

  10. The Application of Global Kinetic Models to HMX Beta-Delta Transition and Cookoff Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K; Nichols III, A L

    2006-12-07

    The reduction of the number of reactions in kinetic models for both the HMX beta-delta phase transition and thermal cookoff provides an attractive alternative to traditional multi-stage kinetic models due to reduced calibration effort requirements. In this study, we use the LLNL code ALE3D to provide calibrated kinetic parameters for a two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta HMX phase transition model based on Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) and Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) temperature history curves, and a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model based on One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) data. Results show that the two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta transition model presented here agrees as well with STEX and SITI temperature history curves as a reversible four-reaction Arrhenius model, yet requires an order of magnitude less computational effort. In addition, a single-reaction Prout-Tompkins model calibrated to ODTX data provides better agreement with ODTX data than a traditional multi-step Arrhenius model, and can contain up to 90% less chemistry-limited time steps for low-temperature ODTX simulations. Manual calibration methods for the Prout-Tompkins kinetics provide much better agreement with ODTX experimental data than parameters derived from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements at atmospheric pressure. The predicted surface temperature at explosion for STEX cookoff simulations is a weak function of the cookoff model used, and a reduction of up to 15% of chemistry-limited time steps can be achieved by neglecting the beta-delta transition for this type of simulation. Finally, the inclusion of the beta-delta transition model in the overall kinetics model can affect the predicted time to explosion by 1% for the traditional multi-step Arrhenius approach, while up to 11% using a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model.

  11. Particle-in-cell and global simulations of α to γ transition in atmospheric pressure Penning-dominated capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Chabert, P.; Lazzaroni, C.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) capacitive micro-discharges are of interest due to emerging applications, especially in the bio-medical field. A previous global model did not consider high-power phenomena such as sheath multiplication, thus limiting its applicability to the lower power range. To overcome this, we use one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of atmospheric He/0.1% N2 capacitive discharges over a wide range of currents and frequencies to guide the development of a more general global model which is also valid at higher powers. The new model includes sheath multiplication and two classes of electrons: the higher temperature ‘hot’ electrons associated with the sheaths, and the cooler ‘warm’ electrons associated with the bulk. The electric field and the electron power balance are solved analytically to determine the time-varying hot and warm temperatures and the effective rate coefficients. The particle balance equations are integrated numerically to determine the species densities. The model and PIC results are compared, showing reasonable agreement over the range of currents and frequencies studied. They indicate a transition from an α mode at low power characterized by relatively high electron temperature Te with a near uniform profile to a γ mode at high power with a Te profile strongly depressed in the bulk plasma. The transition is accompanied by an increase in density and a decrease in sheath widths. The current and frequency scalings of the model are confirmed by the PIC simulations.

  12. Strike-Slip Faulting Processes on Ganymede: Global Morphological Mapping and Structural Interpretation of Grooved and Transitional Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many large-scale, morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies (i.e., en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. We focus on complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulcus, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio, including Byblus Sulcus and Philus Sulcus). Detailed structural interpretations suggest strong evidence of strike-slip faulting in some regions (i.e., Nun and Dardanus Sulcus); however, further investigation of additional strike-slip structures is required of less convincing regions (i.e., Byblus Sulcus). Where applicable, these results are synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for many of Ganymede's fractures. Moreover, when combined with existing observations of extensional features, these results help to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain on Ganymede.

  13. Transition Brief: Policy Recommendations on Preparing Americans for the Global Skills Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The central economic competitiveness issue for the Obama administration is creating an aligned, 21st century public education system that prepares students,workers and citizens to triumph in the global skills race. On Jan. 20, 2009, the Obama administration will take command of the White House facing unprecedented challenges to the U.S. economy…

  14. From Cutlass to Agribusiness: Caribbean Food and Agriculture in Transition within a Global System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Michael J.

    This examination of the future role of food and agriculture in world peace and prosperity presents a regional cross-country view of the Caribbean countries with emphasis on the Caricom English speaking countries within a global food system environment. Following an introductory section, the second of six sections focuses on two broad agricultural…

  15. Comment on "Global resilience of tropical forest and savanna to critical transitions".

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Zak; Nippert, Jesse B

    2012-05-01

    Hirota et al. (Reports, 14 October 2011, p. 232) used spatial data to show that grasslands, savannas, and forests represent opposing stable states. Reanalyzing their data and drawing from temporal studies, we argue that spatial analyses underestimate the bistability of grasslands and savannas due to limitations of substituting space for time. We propose that temporal and spatial data are needed to predict critical transitions between grasslands and savannas. PMID:22556235

  16. Ion intercalation into two-dimensional transition-metal carbides: global screening for new high-capacity battery materials.

    PubMed

    Eames, Christopher; Islam, M Saiful

    2014-11-19

    Two-dimensional transition metal carbides (termed MXenes) are a new family of compounds generating considerable interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Intercalation of ions into MXenes has recently been demonstrated with good electrochemical performance, making them viable electrode materials for rechargeable batteries. Here we have performed global screening of the capacity and voltage for a variety of intercalation ions (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+)) into a large number of M2C-based compounds (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta) with F-, H-, O-, and OH-functionalized surfaces using density functional theory methods. In terms of gravimetric capacity a greater amount of Li(+) or Mg(2+) can be intercalated into an MXene than Na(+) or K(+), which is related to the size of the intercalating ion. Variation of the surface functional group and transition metal species can significantly affect the voltage and capacity of an MXene, with oxygen termination leading to the highest capacity. The most promising group of M2C materials in terms of anode voltage and gravimetric capacity (>400 mAh/g) are compounds containing light transition metals (e.g., Sc, Ti, V, and Cr) with nonfunctionalized or O-terminated surfaces. The results presented here provide valuable insights into exploring a rich variety of high-capacity MXenes for potential battery applications. PMID:25310601

  17. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  18. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging fkin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced proportional to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  19. Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a variety of textures observed on a dust-covered plain in the Marte Valles region of Mars. Textural variations across the scene include: areas that are littered with small impact craters, a channel-like feature that is dominated by mounds of a variety of sizes, small ripples and/or ridges, and relatively smooth, unremarkable terrain. The contact between the cratered plain and the area dominated by mounds marks one of the banks along the edge of one of the shallow valleys of the Marte Valles system.

    Location near: 17.7oN, 175.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  20. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  1. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C–C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  2. PPAR{gamma} ligands induce growth inhibition and apoptosis through p63 and p73 in human ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jae-Jung; Heo, Dae Seog

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands increased the rate of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands induced p63 and p73 expression, but not p53. {yields} p63 and p73 leads to an increase in p21 expression and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with treatment PPAR{gamma} ligands. {yields} These findings suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands suppressed growth of ovarian cancer cells through upregulation of p63 and p73. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists, including thiazolidinediones (TZDs), can induce anti-proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. This study investigated the mechanism of the anticancer effect of TZDs on human ovarian cancer. Six human ovarian cancer cell lines (NIH:OVCAR3, SKOV3, SNU-251, SNU-8, SNU-840, and 2774) were treated with the TZD, which induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Additionally, these cell lines exhibited various expression levels of PPAR{gamma} protein as revealed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry showed that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, as demonstrated by the appearance of a sub-G1 peak. This observation was corroborated by the finding of increased levels of Bax, p21, PARP, and cleaved caspase 3 in TGZ-treated cells. Interestingly, when we determined the effect of p53-induced growth inhibition in these three human ovarian cancer cells, we found that they either lacked p53 or contained a mutant form of p53. Furthermore, TGZ induced the expression of endogenous or exogenous p63 and p73 proteins and p63- or p73-directed short hairpin (si) RNAs inhibited the ability of TGZ to regulate expression of p21 in these cells. Thus, our results suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands can induce growth suppression of ovarian cancer cells and mediate p63 and p73 expression, leading to enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. The tumor suppressive effects of PPAR{gamma} ligands

  3. Global carbon cycle perturbation across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong McKay, David I.; Tyrrell, Toby; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-02-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), ~34 Ma, marks a tipping point in the long-term Cenozoic greenhouse to icehouse climate transition. Paleorecords reveal stepwise rapid cooling and ice growth across the EOT tightly coupled to a transient benthic δ13C excursion and a major and permanent deepening of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD). Based on biogeochemical box modeling, Merico et al. (2008) suggested that a combination of (1) glacioeustatic sea level fall-induced shelf-basin carbonate burial fractionation and (2) shelf carbonate weathering can account for the carbon cycle perturbation, but this finding has been questioned. Alternative proposed mechanisms include increased ocean ventilation, decreased carbonate burial, increased organic carbon burial, increased silicate weathering, and increased ocean calcium concentration. Here we use an improved version of the biogeochemical box model of Merico et al. (2008) to reevaluate these competing hypotheses and an additional mechanism, the expansion of "carbon capacitors" such as permafrost and peatlands. We find that changes in calcium concentration, silicate weathering, and carbonate or organic carbon burial each yield a response that is fundamentally at odds with the form and/or sign of the paleorecords. Shelf-basin carbonate burial fractionation (CCD change), plus shelf carbonate weathering, sequestration of 12C-enriched carbon into carbon capacitors, and possibly increased ocean ventilation (δ13C excursion), offers the best fit to the paleorecords. Further work is needed to understand why the EOT carbon cycle perturbation is so unique when the forcing mechanisms hypothesized to be responsible (cooling and ice growth) are not peculiar to this event.

  4. The Global HIV Archive: Facilitating the Transition from Science to Practice of Efficacious HIV Prevention Interventions*

    PubMed Central

    Card, Josefina J.; Newman, Emily N.; Golden, Rachel E.; Kuhn, Tamara; Lomonaco, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development, content, and capabilities of the online Global HIV Archive (GHA). With the goal of facilitating widespread adaptation and appropriate use of efficacious HIV prevention programs throughout the globe, GHA has: first, expanded and updated the search for HIV prevention programs originating in low-resource countries; second, identified those meritorious HIV prevention programs meeting established efficacy criteria of technical merit, replicability, and positive outcomes; third, prepared both implementation and evaluation materials from the efficacious programs for public use; fourth, developed interactive wizards or capacity-building tools to facilitate appropriate program selection, implementation, and adaptation; and, fifth, made the efficacious programs and accompanying wizards available to health practitioners throughout the globe in both printed and online formats. PMID:24563820

  5. Exploring Agricultural Livelihood Transitions with an Agent-Based Virtual Laboratory: Global Forces to Local Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Magliocca, Nicholas R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Ellis, Erle C.

    2013-01-01

    Rural populations are undergoing rapid changes in both their livelihoods and land uses, with associated impacts on ecosystems, global biogeochemistry, and climate change. A primary challenge is, thus, to explain these shifts in terms of the actors and processes operating within a variety of land systems in order to understand how land users might respond locally to future changes in broader-scale environmental and economic conditions. Using ‘induced intensification’ theory as a benchmark, we develop a generalized agent-based model to investigate mechanistic explanations of relationships between agricultural intensity and population density, environmental suitability, and market influence. Land-use and livelihood decisions modeled from basic micro-economic theories generated spatial and temporal patterns of agricultural intensification consistent with predictions of induced intensification theory. Further, agent actions in response to conditions beyond those described by induced intensification theory were explored, revealing that interactions among environmental constraints, population pressure, and market influence may produce transitions to multiple livelihood regimes of varying market integration. The result is new hypotheses that could modify and enrich understanding of the classic relationship between agricultural intensity and population density. The strength of this agent-based model and the experimental results is the generalized form of the decision-making processes underlying land-use and livelihood transitions, creating the prospect of a virtual laboratory for systematically generating hypotheses of how agent decisions and interactions relate to observed land-use and livelihood patterns across diverse land systems. PMID:24039892

  6. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun with the Transit of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David; Faherty, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the 2012 transit of Venus. In total, our group (stationed at Easter Island, Chile) recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu’u Global Network. Applying the methods of French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle, we used individual second and third Venus-Sun contact times to calculate the distance to the Sun. Ten of the sites in our network had amiable weather; 8 of which measured second contact and 5 of which measured third contact leading to consistent solar distance measurements of 152+/-30 million km and 163+/-30 million km respectively. The distance to the Sun at the time of the transit was 152.25 million km; therefore, our measurements are also consistent within 1-sigma of the known value. The goal of our international school group network was to inspire the next generation of scientists using the excitement and accessibility of such a rare astronomical event. In the process, we connected hundreds of participating students representing a diverse, multi-cultural group with differing political, economic, and racial backgrounds.

  7. Sensitivity to Flg22 Is Modulated by Ligand-Induced Degradation and de Novo Synthesis of the Endogenous Flagellin-Receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING2[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John M.; Salamango, Daniel J.; Leslie, Michelle E.; Collins, Carina A.; Heese, Antje

    2014-01-01

    FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) is the plant cell surface receptor that perceives bacterial flagellin or flg22 peptide, initiates flg22-signaling responses, and contributes to bacterial growth restriction. Flg22 elicitation also leads to ligand-induced endocytosis and degradation of FLS2 within 1 h. Why plant cells remove this receptor precisely at the time during which its function is required remains mainly unknown. Here, we assessed in planta flg22-signaling competency in the context of ligand-induced degradation of endogenous FLS2 and chemical interference known to impede flg22-dependent internalization of FLS2 into endocytic vesicles. Within 1 h after an initial flg22 treatment, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf tissue was unable to reelicit flg22 signaling in a ligand-, time-, and dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that flg22-induced degradation of endogenous FLS2 may serve to desensitize cells to the same stimulus (homologous desensitization), likely to prevent continuous signal output upon repetitive flg22 stimulation. In addition to impeding ligand-induced FLS2 degradation, pretreatment with the vesicular trafficking inhibitors Wortmannin or Tyrphostin A23 impaired flg22-elicited reactive oxygen species production that was partially independent of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1. Interestingly, these inhibitors did not affect flg22-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, indicating the ability to utilize vesicular trafficking inhibitors to target different flg22-signaling responses. For Tyrphostin A23, reduced flg22-induced reactive oxygen species could be separated from the defect in FLS2 degradation. At later times (>2 h) after the initial flg22 elicitation, recovery of FLS2 protein levels positively correlated with resensitization to flg22, indicating that flg22-induced new synthesis of FLS2 may prepare cells for a new round of monitoring the environment for flg22. PMID:24220680

  8. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Tomasto Cagigao, Elsa; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole. PMID:24979787

  9. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru.

    PubMed

    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Cagigao, Elsa Tomasto; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole. PMID:24979787

  10. NOW AND THEN: The Global Nutrition Transition: The Pandemic of Obesity in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; Adair, Linda S.; Ng, Shu Wen

    2011-01-01

    Decades ago discussion of an impending global pandemic of obesity was thought of as heresy. Diets in the 1970’s began to shift toward increased reliance upon processed foods, increased away from home intake and greater use of edible oils and sugar-sweetened beverages. Reduced physical activity and increased sedentary time was seen also. These changes began in the early 1990-‘s in the low and middle income world but did not become clearly recognized until diabetes, hypertension and obesity began to dominate the globe. Urban and rural areas from sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia’s poorest countries to the higher income ones are shown to have experienced rapid increases in overweight and obesity status. Concurrent rapid shifts in diet and activity are documented. An array of large-scale programmatic and policy shifts are being explored in a few countries; however despite the major health challenges faced, few countries are serious in addressing prevention of the dietary challenges faced. PMID:22221213

  11. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2006-01-01

    In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I) production and trade of agricultural goods; (II) foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III) global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis), but adaptation to products targeted at different

  12. Uneven dietary development: linking the policies and processes of globalization with the nutrition transition, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2006-01-01

    In a "nutrition transition", the consumption of foods high in fats and sweeteners is increasing throughout the developing world. The transition, implicated in the rapid rise of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide, is rooted in the processes of globalization. Globalization affects the nature of agri-food systems, thereby altering the quantity, type, cost and desirability of foods available for consumption. Understanding the links between globalization and the nutrition transition is therefore necessary to help policy makers develop policies, including food policies, for addressing the global burden of chronic disease. While the subject has been much discussed, tracing the specific pathways between globalization and dietary change remains a challenge. To help address this challenge, this paper explores how one of the central mechanisms of globalization, the integration of the global marketplace, is affecting the specific diet patterns. Focusing on middle-income countries, it highlights the importance of three major processes of market integration: (I) production and trade of agricultural goods; (II) foreign direct investment in food processing and retailing; and (III) global food advertising and promotion. The paper reveals how specific policies implemented to advance the globalization agenda account in part for some recent trends in the global diet. Agricultural production and trade policies have enabled more vegetable oil consumption; policies on foreign direct investment have facilitated higher consumption of highly-processed foods, as has global food marketing. These dietary outcomes also reflect the socioeconomic and cultural context in which these policies are operating. An important finding is that the dynamic, competitive forces unleashed as a result of global market integration facilitates not only convergence in consumption habits (as is commonly assumed in the "Coca-Colonization" hypothesis), but adaptation to products targeted at different

  13. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun Using the June 5th/6th Transit of Venus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rodriguez, David R.; Miller, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the rare June 5/6th transit of Venus. In total, we recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu'u Global Network. Applying the methods of French…

  14. Global transcriptional response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to growth transitions in glucose minimal medium

    PubMed Central

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Wick, Lukas M; Qi, Weihong; Riordan, James T; Ouellette, Lindsey M; Whittam, Thomas S

    2007-01-01

    Background: Global patterns of gene expression of Escherichia coli K-12 during growth transitions have been deeply investigated, however, comparable studies of E. coli O157:H7 have not been explored, particularly with respect to factors regulating virulence genes and genomic islands specific to this pathogen. To examine the impact of growth phase on the dynamics of the transcriptome, O157:H7 Sakai strain was cultured in MOPS minimal media (0.1% glucose), RNA harvested at 10 time points from early exponential to full stationary phase, and relative gene expression was measured by co-hybridization on high-density DNA microarrays. Expression levels of 14 genes, including those encoding Shiga toxins and other virulence factors associated with the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were confirmed by Q-PCR. Results: Analysis of variance (R/MAANOVA, Fs test) identified 442 (36%) of 1239 O157-specific ORFs and 2110 (59%) of 3647 backbone ORFs that changed in expression significantly over time. QT cluster analysis placed 2468 of the 2552 significant ORFs into 12 groups; each group representing a distinct expression pattern. ORFs from the largest cluster (n = 1078) decreased in expression from late exponential to early stationary phase: most of these ORFs are involved in functions associated with steady state growth. Also represented in this cluster are ORFs of the TAI island, encoding tellurite resistance and urease activity, which decreased ~4-fold. Most ORFs of the LEE pathogenicity island also decreased ~2-fold by early stationary phase. The ORFs encoding proteins secreted via the LEE encoded type III secretion system, such as tccP and espJ, also decreased in expression from exponential to stationary phase. Three of the clusters (n = 154) comprised genes that are transiently upregulated at the transition into stationary phase and included genes involved in nutrient scavenging. Upregulated genes with an increase in mRNA levels from late exponential to early stationary

  15. Exploring the global entanglement and quantum phase transition in the spin 1/2 XXZ model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Yang; Shi, Jia-Dong; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We study the global entanglement and quantum phase transition with the anisotropy parameter and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction by methodology of quantum renormalization group within a spin 1/2 XXZ model. It has been shown that the global entanglement can develop two different fixed values, which can exhibit quantum phase transition at the critical point, and DM interaction not only can control the occurrence of the critical point, but also can recover the spoiled three-block entanglement. The behavior of the three-block global entanglement of this large 1D spin 1/2 XXZ model with DM interaction can be revealed in this paper. It turns out that the critical exponent had a relation with the correlation length in the neighborhood of the critical point. Furthermore, the scaling behavior and nonanalytic phenomenon in the spin chains are disclosed.

  16. Transition from local to global phase synchrony in small world neural network and its possible implications for epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percha, Bethany; Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Żochowski, Michał; Parent, Jack

    2005-09-01

    Temporal correlations in the brain are thought to have very dichotomous roles. On one hand they are ubiquitously present in the healthy brain and are thought to underlie feature binding during information processing. On the other hand, large-scale synchronization is an underlying mechanism of epileptic seizures. In this paper we show a potential mechanism for the transition to pathological coherence underlying seizure generation. We show that properties of phase synchronization in a two-dimensional lattice of nonidentical coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons change radically depending on the connectivity structure of the network. We modify the connectivity using the small world network paradigm and measure properties of phase synchronization using a previously developed measure based on assessment of the distributions of relative interspike intervals. We show that the temporal ordering undergoes a dramatic change as a function of topology of the network from local coherence strongly dependent on the distance between two neurons, to global coherence exhibiting a larger degree of ordering and spanning the whole network.

  17. The transition zone chlorophyll front, a dynamic global feature defining migration and forage habitat for marine resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polovina, Jeffrey J.; Howell, Evan; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Seki, Michael P.

    Pelagic ecosystem dynamics on all temporal scales may be driven by the dynamics of very specialized oceanic habitats. One such habitat is the basin-wide chlorophyll front located at the boundary between the low chlorophyll subtropical gyres and the high chlorophyll subarctic gyres. Global satellite maps of surface chlorophyll clearly show this feature in all oceans. In the North Pacific, the front is over 8000 km long and seasonally migrates north and south about 1000 km. In the winter this front is located at about 30-35°N latitude and in the summer at about 40-45°N. It is a zone of surface convergence where cool, vertically mixed, high chlorophyll, surface water on the north side sinks beneath warm, stratified, low chlorophyll water on the south side. Satellite telemetry data on movements of loggerhead turtles and detailed fisheries data for albacore tuna show that both apex predators travel along this front as they migrate across the North Pacific. The front is easily monitored with ocean color satellite remote sensing. A change in the position of the TZCF between 1997 and 1998 appears to have altered the spatial distribution of loggerhead turtles. The position and dynamics of the front varied substantially between the 1998 El Niño and the 1999 La Niña. For example, from May to July 1999 the transition zone chlorophyll front (TZCF) remained between about 35°N and 40°N latitude showing very little meandering, whereas in 1998, during the same period, the TZCF exhibited considerable meandering and greater monthly latitudinal movement. Catch rates for albacore were considerably higher in 1998 than in 1999, and we hypothesize that a meandering TZCF creates regions of convergence, which enhances the foraging habitat for apex predators along the front.

  18. TGF-β induces global changes in DNA methylation during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Horacio; Vieth, Edyta; Lee, Jiyoon; Segar, Mathew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    A key step in the process of metastasis is the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We hypothesized that epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in EMT and to test this hypothesis we analyzed global and gene-specific changes in DNA methylation during TGF-β-induced EMT in ovarian cancer cells. Epigenetic profiling using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (HM450) revealed extensive (P < 0.01) methylation changes after TGF-β stimulation (468 and 390 CpG sites altered at 48 and 120 h post cytokine treatment, respectively). The majority of gene-specific TGF-β-induced methylation changes occurred in CpG islands located in or near promoters (193 and 494 genes hypermethylated at 48 and 120 h after TGF-β stimulation, respectively). Furthermore, methylation changes were sustained for the duration of TGF-β treatment and reversible after the cytokine removal. Pathway analysis of the hypermethylated loci identified functional networks strongly associated with EMT and cancer progression, including cellular movement, cell cycle, organ morphology, cellular development, and cell death and survival. Altered methylation and corresponding expression of specific genes during TGF-β-induced EMT included CDH1 (E-cadherin) and COL1A1 (collagen 1A1). Furthermore, TGF-β induced both expression and activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) -1, -3A, and -3B, and treatment with the DNMT inhibitor SGI-110 prevented TGF-β-induced EMT. These results demonstrate that dynamic changes in the DNA methylome are implicated in TGF-β-induced EMT and metastasis. We suggest that targeting DNMTs may inhibit this process by reversing the EMT genes silenced by DNA methylation in cancer. PMID:25470663

  19. Staggering Changes in Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Coincide with Global Climate and Evolution Transitions during the Late Miocene - Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanova, A.; Herbert, T.; Peterson, L.

    2012-12-01

    crisis and SST proxy data from the Rosello section shows a continuation of the late Miocene cooling trend into the earliest Pliocene as well as increase in the amplitude of variability. The onset of cooling in the Mediterranean coincides with the widespread C3/C4 plant transition suggesting a strong coherence between the terrestrial and marine realm during this time period. We hypothesize that in the Late Miocene a widespread cooling possibly driven by pCO2 changes coupled with orbital forcing set the stage for environmental and evolutionary changes on land. The changing landscape illustrated by expansion of grasslands and the emergence of the Sahara desert could have initiated an albedo-cooling feedback and set the stage for Northern Hemisphere Glaciation in the Pliocene. The Mediterranean records reconstruct climate changes currently observed in other paleoreconstructions but not captured by the global δ18O record. Our first, continuous SST record from the Mediterranean over this time period allows for the evaluation of marine-terrestrial connections on both long term and orbital time scale, continental climate change, plant, grazer and hominin evolution, thresholds for climate change and changes in climate forcing.

  20. Investigation of predictability during the Extratropical Transition of Tropical Cyclones using the THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. H.; Jones, S. C.; Anwender, D.

    2010-09-01

    Several times per year tropical cyclones pass through a recurvature after their typical tropical life-cycle. They start to interact with the mid-latitude flow and may be transformed into an extratropical system. Such an extratropical transition (ET) process of a tropical cyclone often leads to a reduction in the predictability for the synoptic development of the cyclone itself as well as for the downstream region. Recent studies investigated the predictability during ET events based on the variability among members of single operational medium-range ensemble forecasts. The new THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) provides an opportunity to extend these previous studies. TIGGE was established in the world weather research program THORPEX and combines the forecasts of 10 different EPS, operated at weather services all over the world. They are based on different assumptions, initial perturbation methods, resolutions and they also differ in the number of ensemble members, contained in the forecast. Thus TIGGE offers the possibility to compare predictability during ET events in a number of different ensemble prediction systems (EPS). Furthermore, TIGGE may show new possible development scenarios that could not be gained, using one single EPS. To extract the information, contained in the ensemble forecasts, we perform an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis on the variance-covariance-matrix of the forecast field in question. By calculating the principal components we get information, how each member, contained in the ensemble forecast contributes to the obtained EOF distribution. Using a fuzzy clustering, all members that show a related contribution, are grouped together. Thus, this analysis process allows us to extract possible development scenarios out of the ensemble forecast and at the same time we gain information about the possibility of these scenarios. For our investigations eight of the ten TIGGE EPS are used and interpolated to the same

  1. Switch of sensitivity dynamics revealed with DyGloSA toolbox for dynamical global sensitivity analysis as an early warning for system's critical transition.

    PubMed

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA - a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits. PMID:24367574

  2. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650–661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  3. The Q-rich/PST domain of the AHR regulates both ligand-induced nuclear transport and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Anna; Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Sowada, Juliane; Genkinger, Doris; Kern, Christian; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) shuttles continuously between cytoplasm and nucleus, unless ligand-binding triggers association with the AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and subsequent binding to cognate DNA motifs. We have now identified Val 647 as mandatory residue for export from the nucleus and AHR-function. This residue prevents inactivation of the receptor as a consequence of nuclear sequestration via constitutive import. Concomitantly mutants lacking this residue are exclusively localised in the nucleus. Although ligands accelerate nuclear import transiently, stable nuclear transition depends on a motif adjacent to Val 647 that comprises residues 650-661. Together, this defined region within the Q-rich domain regulates intracellular trafficking of the AHR in context of both nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and receptor activation. Nuclear export therefore depends on the previously characterised N-terminal NES and the newly identified motif that includes V647. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of full-length human AHR is further affected by a section of the PST domain that shows sequence similarities with nuclear export signals. In concert, these motifs maintain a predominant cytoplasmic compartmentalisation, receptive for ligand binding. PMID:27535013

  4. Ligand-induced formation of a transient tryptophan synthase complex with αββ subunit stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Alexander; Richter, Klaus; Busch, Florian; Reimann, Julia; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Sterner, Reinhard

    2010-12-28

    The prototypical tryptophan synthases form a stable heterotetrameric αββα complex in which the constituting TrpA and TrpB1 subunits activate each other in a bidirectional manner. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus does not contain a TrpB1 protein but instead two members of the phylogenetically distinct family of TrpB2 proteins, which are encoded within (sTrpB2i) and outside (sTrpB2a) the tryptophan operon. It has previously been shown that sTrpB2a does not functionally or structurally interact with sTrpA, whereas sTrpB2i substantially activates sTrpA in a unidirectional manner. However, in the absence of catalysis, no physical complex between sTrpB2i and sTrpA could be detected. In order to elucidate the structural requirements for complex formation, we have analyzed the interaction between sTrpA (α-monomer) and sTrpB2i (ββ-dimer) by means of spectroscopy, analytical gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation, as well as isothermal titration calorimetry. In the presence of the TrpA ligand glycerol 3-phosphate (GP) and the TrpB substrate l-serine, sTrpA and sTrpB2i formed a physical complex with a thermodynamic dissociation constant of about 1 μM, indicating that the affinity between the α- and ββ-subunits is weaker by at least 1 order of magnitude than the affinity between the corresponding subunits of prototypical tryptophan synthases. The observed stoichiometry of the complex was 1 subunit of sTrpA per 2 subunits of sTrpB2i, which corresponds to a αββ quaternary structure and testifies to a strong negative cooperativity for the binding of the α-monomers to the ββ-dimer. The analysis of the interaction between sTrpB2i and sTrpA in the presence of several substrate, transition state, and product analogues suggests that the αββ complex remains stable during the whole catalytic cycle and disintegrates into α- and ββ-subunits upon the release of the reaction product tryptophan. The formation of a transient tryptophan

  5. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E

    2014-11-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1°C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9°C with oligomers ⩾10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1μM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9°C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  6. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Hull, J J; Lee, J M; Matsumoto, S

    2011-12-01

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Using fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) chimeras to study PBANR regulation, we previously showed that BmPBANR undergoes rapid ligand-induced internalization, that the endocytotic motif resides between residues 358-367 of the BmPBANR C terminus, and that the internalization pathway is clathrin-dependent. Here, we sought to expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BmPBANR function and regulation by transiently expressing a series of fluorescent BmPBANR chimeric constructs in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and assaying for internalization of a fluorescently labelled ligand. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C significantly reduced internalization, suggesting that BmPBANR regulation proceeds via a conventional G-protein-dependent pathway. This was further supported by impaired internalization following site-directed mutagenesis of R263 and R264, two basic residues at the transmembrane 6 intracellular junction that are thought to stabilize G-protein coupling via electrostatic interactions. Ala substitution of S333 and S366, two consensus protein kinase C sites in the C terminus, likewise impaired internalization, as did RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Sf9 protein kinase C. N-terminal truncations of BmPBANR indicate that the first 27 residues are not necessary for cell surface trafficking or receptor functionality. PMID:21955122

  7. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  8. Global transition from drift wave dominated regimes to multi-instability plasma dynamics and simultaneous formation of a radial transport barrier in helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Cui, Lang; Gosselin, Jordan; Vaezi, Payam; Holland, Chris; Tynan, George

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies in CSDX reported a sharp global transition in the plasma dynamics during the route to turbulence. For B <140 mT, the plasma is dominated by density gradient driven drift waves [DW]. For B >140 mT, a new global equilibrium is achieved with simultaneous existence of three radially separated plasma instabilities: coherent Rayleigh Taylor [RT] modes at the center, DW at the density gradient and turbulent, shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz [KH] instabilities at the edge. Only the RT modes rotate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The radial particle flux is directed outward for small radii and inward for large radii, forming a radial particle transport barrier leading to stiff profiles and increased core density. Simultaneously the core Ar-II light emission increases (×10) forming a very bright blue core. The radial extent of the inner RT mode and the blue core coincides with the radial location of the particle transport barrier. This equilibrium with simultaneous RT-DW-KH instabilities shows very rich plasma dynamics including intermittency, blob formation and propagation, inward particle flux against density gradients etc. We report detailed studies of azimuthal momentum balance and time resolved dynamics leading to the transition using Langmuir probes, fast imaging, spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence etc.

  9. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era.

  10. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition.

    PubMed

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth's climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  11. Response of the Pacific inter-tropical convergence zone to global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene Oligocene Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, Kiseong; Kuroda, Junichiro; Seo, Inah; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 34 million years ago across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT), Earth’s climate tipped from a largely unglaciated state into one that sustained large ice sheets on Antarctica. Antarctic glaciation is attributed to a threshold response to slow decline in atmospheric CO2 but our understanding of the feedback processes triggered and of climate change on the other contents is limited. Here we present new geochemical records of terrigenous dust accumulating on the sea floor across the EOT from a site in the central equatorial Pacific. We report a change in dust chemistry from an Asian affinity to a Central-South American provenance that occurs geologically synchronously with the initiation of stepwise global cooling, glaciation of Antarctica and aridification on the northern continents. We infer that the inter-tropical convergence zone of intense precipitation extended to our site during late Eocene, at least four degrees latitude further south than today, but that it migrated northwards in step with global cooling and initiation of Antarctic glaciation. Our findings point to an atmospheric teleconnection between extratropical cooling and rainfall climate in the tropics and the mid-latitude belt of the westerlies operating across the most pivotal transition in climate state of the Cenozoic Era. PMID:27507793

  12. 3D Global PIC simulation of Alfvenic transition layers at the cusp outer boundary during IMF rotations from north to south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.; Esmaeili, A.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical experimental observations of the cusp boundaries from CLUSTER mission made by Lavraud et al. (2005) have clearly evidenced the presence of a transition layer inside the magnetosheath near the outer boundary of the cusp. This layer characterized by Log(MA)~ 1 allows a transition from super-Alfvenic to sub-Alfvenic bulk flow from the exterior to the interior side of the outer cusp and has been mainly observed experimentally under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The role of this layer is important in order to understand the flow variations (and later the entry and precipitation of particles) when penetrating the outer boundary of the cusp. In order to analyze this layer, a large 3D PIC simulation of the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere interaction have been performed, and the attention has been focused on the cusp region and its nearby surrounding during IMF rotation from north to south. Present results retrieve quite well the presence of this layer within the meridian plane for exactly northward IMF, but its location differs in the sense that it is located slightly below the X reconnection region associated to the nearby magnetopause (above the outer boundary of the cusp). In order to clarify this question, an extensive study has been performed as follows: (i) a 3D mapping of this transition layer in order to analyze more precisely the thickness, the location and the spatial extension of this layer on the magnetosphere flanks for a fixed Northward IMF configuration; (ii) a parametric study in order to analyze the impact of the IMF rotation from north to south on the persistence and the main features of this transition layer. The locations of this transition layer slightly radially expand and shrink during the IMF rotation and the thickness of the layer increases during the rotation. We show how these transition layers render the flow from super to sub Alfvenic and allow the particles enter into the magnetic cusp region. Alfven

  13. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands. PMID:7511663

  14. Coupling of β2-Adrenoceptors to XLαs and Gαs: A New Insight into Ligand-Induced G Protein ActivationS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, A. I.; Uǧur, Ö.; Öner, S. S.; Bastepe, M.; Onaran, H. O.

    2009-01-01

    Gαs and extra-large Gαs (XLαs) can both transduce receptor activation into intracellular cAMP generation. It is unknown, however, whether these two GNAS-locus products display distinct properties with respect to receptor coupling. Here, we show that XLαs couples to the β2-adrenoceptor more efficiently than Gαs. In transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts null for both Gαs and XLαs (2B2 cells), basal cAMP accumulation mediated by XLαs was higher than that mediated by Gαs. Inverse agonist treatment reduced Gαs-mediated basal activity, whereas its effect was markedly blunted on XLαs-mediated basal activity. Rank order of ligand efficacies regarding cAMP accumulation was the same when the receptor was coupled to XLαs or Gαs. However, ligand-induced and XLαs-mediated cAMP generation was higher than that mediated by Gαs. The relatively high efficiency of XLαs-mediated cAMP generation was conditional, disappearing with increased level of receptor expression or increased efficacy of ligand. Full-agonist responses in XLαs- and Gαs-expressing cells were comparable even at low receptor levels, whereas partial agonist responses became comparable only when the receptor expression was increased (>3 pmol/mg). Radioligand binding studies showed that the high-affinity component in agonist binding to β2-adrenoceptor was more pronounced in cells expressing XLαs than those expressing Gαs. We discuss these findings in the framework of current receptor-G protein activation models and offer an extended ternary complex model that can fully explain our observations. PMID:19144685

  15. Pan-HER-An antibody mixture targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER3 abrogates preformed and ligand-induced EGFR homo- and heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Ellebaek, Sofie; Brix, Susanne; Grandal, Michael; Lantto, Johan; Horak, Ivan D; Kragh, Michael; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2016-11-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-family is involved in development of many epithelial cancers. Therefore, HER-family members constitute important targets for anti-cancer therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A limitation to the success of single HER-targeting mAbs is development of acquired resistance through mechanisms such as alterted receptor dimerization patterns and dependencies. Pan-HER is a mixture of six mAbs simultaneously targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), HER2 and HER3 with two mAbs against each receptor. Pan-HER has previously demonstrated broader efficacy than targeting single or dual receptor combinations also in resistant settings. In light of this broad efficacy, we decided to investigate the effect of Pan-HER compared with single HER-targeting with single and dual mAbs on HER-family cross-talk and dimerization focusing on EGFR. The effect of Pan-HER on cell proliferation and HER-family receptor degradation was superior to treatment with single mAbs targeting either single receptor, and similar to targeting a single receptor with two non-overlapping antibodies. Furthermore, changes in EGFR-dimerization patterns after treatment with Pan-HER were investigated by in situ proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation, demonstrating that Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture efficiently down-regulate basal EGFR homo- and heterodimerization in two tested cell lines, whereas single mAbs had limited effects. Pan-HER and the EGFR-targeting mAb mixture also blocked EGF-binding and thereby ligand-induced changes in EGFR-dimerization levels. These results suggest that Pan-HER reduces the cellular capability to switch HER-dependency and dimerization pattern in response to treatment and thus hold promise for future clinical development of Pan-HER in resistant settings. PMID:27342948

  16. The role of global in-use material stocks in the course of the socio-metabolic transition, from 1900 -2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhofer, Dominik; Lauk, Christian; Fishman, Tomer; Tanikawa, Hiroki; Eisenmenger, Nina; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-05-01

    During the global socio-metabolic transition into the fossil fuelled age in the 20th century, annual material use increased nearly 10-fold (Krausmann et al. 2009). A substantial part of these materials were used to expand societal stocks such as infrastructure, buildings, factories or machinery. Long service-lifetimes lead to an ongoing accumulation of in-use stocks and determine the availability of materials for reuse and recycling. Systematic knowledge about material stock dynamics is crucial for understanding possible future resource use trends, the potential for increased recycling and thereby inform the development of strategies towards more sustainable resource use. In this presentation we explore the relationship between material use and stock accumulation, estimating global material stocks in infrastructures, buildings and durable goods from 1900 - 2009 based on a dynamic material stocks and flows model. We apply a top-down modelling approach, tracking annual cohorts of inflows of stock-building materials throughout the time period. We utilize a global material flow database and auxiliary data sources covering the time period 1850 - 2009 (Krausmann et al., 2009; Schaffartzik et al. 2013) to distinguish inputs of 11 major stock building materials: concrete, asphalt, bricks/stones/tiles, sand/gravel/crushed rocks, copper, steel, aluminum,other metals, solid-wood products, paper and plastics. Two types of functions are then used to model the lifetimes of the materials in use: A uniform distribution is applied for materials with short lifetimes, while a normal distribution is applied for materials with longer lifetimes. Furthermore, end-of-life waste is subject to recycling, thereby turning into additional input flows of non-virgin materials. Due to the inherent uncertainty in such an exercise, we perform Monte-Carlo simulations, applying uncertainty ranges for all model parameters and the material inflow data introduced above. This allows us to a) identify

  17. Global change across the Oligocene-Miocene transition: High-resolution stable isotope records from IODP Site U1334 (equatorial Pacific Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddow, Helen M.; Liebrand, Diederik; Sluijs, Appy; Wade, Bridget S.; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2016-01-01

    The Oligocene-Miocene transition (OMT) (~23 Ma) is interpreted as a transient global cooling event, associated with a large-scale Antarctic ice sheet expansion. Here we present a 2.23 Myr long high-resolution (~3 kyr) benthic foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope (δ18O and δ13C) record from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1334 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean), covering the interval from 21.91 to 24.14 Ma. To date, five other high-resolution benthic foraminiferal stable isotope stratigraphies across this time interval have been published, showing a ~1‰ increase in benthic foraminiferal δ18O across the OMT. However, these records are still few and spatially limited and no clear understanding exists of the global versus local imprints. We show that trends and the amplitudes of change are similar at Site U1334 as in other high-resolution stable isotope records, suggesting that these represent global deep water signals. We create a benthic foraminiferal stable isotope stack across the OMT by combining Site U1334 with records from ODP Sites 926, 929, 1090, 1264, and 1218 to best approximate the global signal. We find that isotopic gradients between sites indicate interbasinal and intrabasinal variabilities in deep water masses and, in particular, note an offset between the equatorial Atlantic and the equatorial Pacific, suggesting that a distinct temperature gradient was present during the OMT between these deep water masses at low latitudes. A convergence in the δ18O values between infaunal and epifaunal species occurs between 22.8 and 23.2 Ma, associated with the maximum δ18O excursion at the OMT, suggesting climatic changes associated with the OMT had an effect on interspecies offsets of benthic foraminifera. Our data indicate a maximum glacioeustatic sea level change of ~50 m across the OMT.

  18. Global analyses of brachiopod faunas through the Ordovician and Silurian transition: Reducing the role of the Lazarus effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rong, J.-Y.; Boucot, A.J.; Harper, D.A.T.; Zhan, R.-B.; Neuman, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Global analyses of 88 families and 284 genera of brachiopods from middle Ashgill, Late Ordovician, to early-middle Rhuddanian, Early Silurian, indicate that 18.6% and 12.5% of families and 51.0% and 41.3% of genera were eliminated in the first and second phases of the end-Ordovician mass extinction, respectively, with the total loss of 28.4% of families and 69.0% of genera in the crisis. New investigation demonstrates that brachiopods, at both generic and familial levels, suffered greater during the first phase than during the second phase. Four groups (victims, relicts, survivors, and new arrivals) are distinguished by their stratigraphical ranges. Generic survivors, occurring in the Kosov Province during the Hirnantian, can be split into three types with respect to their changing abundance: increasing, declining, and Lazarus taxa. Among the 88 genera that survived, numerous declining genera occurred in the Hirnantian: 16 Lazarus families and 18 Lazarus genera are provisionally known and may be regarded as end members of the declining type. Comparison of the abundance, population size, and distribution patterns of declining and Lazarus taxa shows important similarities between these two types which contribute to a better understanding of the nature of Lazarus taxa. In addition to these biological attributes, taphonomic failure and generally poor preservation, together with collecting bias and inadequate systematic data, are clearly involved. More collections will undoubtedly globally reduce the number of Lazarus taxa. A single, common refugium for end-Ordovician brachiopods probably did not exist; rather, these taxa used paleogeographically scattered locations in a range of environments for survival. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  19. The Global Cardiovascular Risk Transition: Associations of Four Metabolic Risk Factors with Macroeconomic Variables in 1980 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Goodarz; Singh, Gitanjali M; Paciorek, Christopher J; Lin, John K; Cowan, Melanie J; Finucane, Mariel M; Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A; Riley, Leanne M; Lu, Yuan; Rao, Mayuree; Ezzati, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that globally CVD risk factors are associated with affluence and Westernization. We investigated the associations of body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and serum total cholesterol (TC) with national income, Western diet, and (for BMI) urbanization in 1980 and 2008. Methods and Results Country-level risk factor estimates for 199 countries between 1980 and 2008 were from a previous systematic analysis of population-based data. We analyzed the associations between risk factors and natural logarithm of per-capita GDP [Ln(GDP)], a measure of Western diet, and (for BMI) percent population living in urban areas. In 1980, there was a positive association between national income and population mean BMI, SBP, and TC. By 2008, the slope of the association between Ln(GDP) and SBP became negative for women and zero for men. TC was associated with national income and Western diet throughout the period. In 1980, BMI rose with per-capita GDP and then flattened at about Int$7000; by 2008, the relationship resembled an inverted-U for women, peaking at middle income levels. BMI had a positive relationship with percent urban population in both 1980 and 2008. FPG had weaker associations with these country macro characteristics, but was positively associated with BMI. Conclusions The changing associations of metabolic risk factors with macroeconomic variables indicate that there will be a global pandemic of hyperglycemia and diabetes, together with high blood pressure in low income countries, unless effective lifestyle, and pharmacological interventions are implemented. PMID:23481623

  20. Global changes of the RNA-bound proteome during the maternal-to-zygotic transition in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sysoev, Vasiliy O.; Fischer, Bernd; Frese, Christian K.; Gupta, Ishaan; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hentze, Matthias W.; Castello, Alfredo; Ephrussi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) is a process that occurs in animal embryos at the earliest developmental stages, during which maternally deposited mRNAs and other molecules are degraded and replaced by products of the zygotic genome. The zygotic genome is not activated immediately upon fertilization, and in the pre-MZT embryo post-transcriptional control by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) orchestrates the first steps of development. To identify relevant Drosophila RBPs organism-wide, we refined the RNA interactome capture method for comparative analysis of the pre- and post-MZT embryos. We determine 523 proteins as high-confidence RBPs, half of which were not previously reported to bind RNA. Comparison of the RNA interactomes of pre- and post-MZT embryos reveals high dynamicity of the RNA-bound proteome during early development, and suggests active regulation of RNA binding of some RBPs. This resource provides unprecedented insight into the system of RBPs that govern the earliest steps of Drosophila development. PMID:27378189

  1. Transition in the waiting-time distribution of price-change events in a global socioeconomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guannan; McDonald, Mark; Fenn, Dan; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Nicholas; Johnson, Neil F.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of developing a firmer theoretical understanding of inhomogeneous temporal processes-in particular, the waiting times in some collective dynamical system-is attracting significant interest among physicists. Quantifying the deviations between the waiting-time distribution and the distribution generated by a random process may help unravel the feedback mechanisms that drive the underlying dynamics. We analyze the waiting-time distributions of high-frequency foreign exchange data for the best executable bid-ask prices across all major currencies. We find that the lognormal distribution yields a good overall fit for the waiting-time distribution between currency rate changes if both short and long waiting times are included. If we restrict our study to long waiting times, each currency pair’s distribution is consistent with a power-law tail with exponent near to 3.5. However, for short waiting times, the overall distribution resembles one generated by an archetypal complex systems model in which boundedly rational agents compete for limited resources. Our findings suggest that a gradual transition arises in trading behavior between a fast regime in which traders act in a boundedly rational way and a slower one in which traders’ decisions are driven by generic feedback mechanisms across multiple timescales and hence produce similar power-law tails irrespective of currency type.

  2. Global characterization of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in Caenorhabditis elegans uncovers a novel mRNA clearance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckius, Marlon; Grün, Dominic; Kirchner, Marieluise; Ayoub, Salah; Torti, Francesca; Piano, Fabio; Herzog, Margareta; Selbach, Matthias; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    The oocyte-to-embryo transition (OET) is thought to be mainly driven by post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, expression of both RNAs and proteins during the OET has not been comprehensively assayed. Furthermore, specific molecular mechanisms that regulate gene expression during OET are largely unknown. Here, we quantify and analyze transcriptome-wide, expression of mRNAs and thousands of proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes, 1-cell, and 2-cell embryos. This represents a first comprehensive gene expression atlas during the OET in animals. We discovered a first wave of degradation in which thousands of mRNAs are cleared shortly after fertilization. Sequence analysis revealed a statistically highly significant presence of a polyC motif in the 3′ untranslated regions of most of these degraded mRNAs. Transgenic reporter assays demonstrated that this polyC motif is required and sufficient for mRNA degradation after fertilization. We show that orthologs of human polyC-binding protein specifically bind this motif. Our data suggest a mechanism in which the polyC motif and binding partners direct degradation of maternal mRNAs. Our data also indicate that endogenous siRNAs but not miRNAs promote mRNA clearance during the OET. PMID:24957527

  3. Global changes of the RNA-bound proteome during the maternal-to-zygotic transition in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Vasiliy O; Fischer, Bernd; Frese, Christian K; Gupta, Ishaan; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo; Ephrussi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) is a process that occurs in animal embryos at the earliest developmental stages, during which maternally deposited mRNAs and other molecules are degraded and replaced by products of the zygotic genome. The zygotic genome is not activated immediately upon fertilization, and in the pre-MZT embryo post-transcriptional control by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) orchestrates the first steps of development. To identify relevant Drosophila RBPs organism-wide, we refined the RNA interactome capture method for comparative analysis of the pre- and post-MZT embryos. We determine 523 proteins as high-confidence RBPs, half of which were not previously reported to bind RNA. Comparison of the RNA interactomes of pre- and post-MZT embryos reveals high dynamicity of the RNA-bound proteome during early development, and suggests active regulation of RNA binding of some RBPs. This resource provides unprecedented insight into the system of RBPs that govern the earliest steps of Drosophila development. PMID:27378189

  4. High influx of carbon in walls of agglutinated foraminifers during the Permian-Triassic transition in global oceans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestell, Galina P.; Nestell, Merlynd K.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Basu, Asish R.; Ghosh, Nilotpal; Phuong Lan, Luu Thi; Rowe, Harry D.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Tomkin, Jonathan H.; Ratcliffe, Kenneth T.

    2015-01-01

    The Permian–Triassic mass extinction is postulated to be related to the rapid volcanism that produced the Siberian flood basalt (Traps). Unrelated volcanic eruptions producing several episodes of ash falls synchronous with the Siberian Traps are found in South China and Australia. Such regional eruptions could have caused wildfires, burning of coal deposits, and the dispersion of coal fly ash. These eruptions introduced a major influx of carbon into the atmosphere and oceans that can be recognized in the wallstructure of foraminiferal tests present in survival populations in the boundary interval strata. Analysis of free specimens of foraminifers recovered from residues of conodont samples taken at aPermian–Triassic boundary section at Lung Cam in northern Vietnam has revealed the presence of a significant amount of elemental carbon, along with oxygen and silica, in their test wall structure, but an absence of calcium carbonate. These foraminifers, identified as Rectocornuspira kalhori, Cornuspira mahajeri, and Earlandia spp. and whose tests previously were considered to be calcareous, are confirmed to be agglutinated, and are now referred to as Ammodiscus kalhori and Hyperammina deformis. Measurement of the 207Pb/204Pb ratios in pyrite clusters attached to the foraminiferal tests confirmed that these tests inherited the Pb in their outer layer from carbon-contaminated seawater. We conclude that the source of the carbon could have been either global coal fly ash or forest fire-dispersed carbon, or a combination of both, that was dispersed into the Palaeo-Tethys Ocean immediately after the end-Permian extinction event.

  5. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  6. Pion-photon transition form factor using light-cone sum rules: theoretical results, expectations, and a global-data fit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulev, A. P.; Mikhailov, S. V.; Pimikov, A. V.; Stefanis, N. G.

    2011-10-01

    A global fit to the data from different collaborations (CELLO, CLEO, BaBar) on the pion-photon transition form factor is carried out using light-cone sum rules. The analysis includes the next-to-leading QCD radiative corrections and the twist-four contributions, while the main next-to-next-to-leading term and the twist-six contribution are taken into account in the form of theoretical uncertainties. We use the information extracted from the data to investigate the pivotal characteristics of the pion distribution amplitude. This is done by dividing the data into two sets: one containing all data up to 9 GeV 2, whereas the other incorporates also the high- Q tail of the BaBar data. We find that it is not possible to accommodate into the fit these BaBar data points with the same accuracy and conclude that it is difficult to explain these data in the standard scheme of OCD.

  7. Millimeter wave and terahertz spectra and global fit of torsion-rotation transitions in the ground, first and second excited torsional states of 13CH3OH methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, R. M.; Hao, Yun; Müller, H. S. P.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.; Schlemmer, S.; Menten, K. M.

    2014-09-01

    Methanol is observed in a wide range of astrophysical sources throughout the universe, and comprehensive databases of the millimeter and THz spectra of CH3OH and its principal isotopologues represent important tools for the astronomical community. A previous combined analysis of microwave and millimeter wave spectra of 13CH3OH together with Fourier transform far-infrared spectra was limited to the first two torsional states, νt = 0 and 1, for J values up to 20. The limits on frequency and quantum number coverage have recently been extended by new millimeter and THz measurements on several different spectrometers in the Cologne laboratory in the frequency windows 34-70 GHz, 75-120 GHz, 240-340 GHz, 360-450 GHz and 1.12-1.50 THz. With the new data, the global treatment has now been expanded to include the first three torsional states for J values up to 30. The current 13CH3OH data set contains about 2300 microwave, millimeter-wave, sub-millimeter and THz lines and about 17,100 Fourier-transform far-infrared lines, representing the most recent available information in the quantum number ranges J ⩽ 30, K ⩽ 13 and νt ⩽ 2. The transitions have been successfully fitted to within the assigned measurement uncertainties of ±50 kHz for most of the frequency-measured (i.e. MW, MMW, Sub-MMW, THz) lines and ±6 MHz for the FIR lines. A convergent global fit was achieved using 103 adjustable parameters to reach an overall weighted standard deviation of 1.37. Our new C-13 methanol database is improved substantially compared to the existing one (Li-Hong et al., 1997), and will be available in the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS (http://www.astro.uni-koeln.de/cdms/), in support of astronomical studies associated with results from HIFI (Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared) on the Herschel Space Observatory and new observations from SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy) and ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array).

  8. A global view of the extratropical tropopause transition layer from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer O3, H2O, and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Boone, C. D.; Manney, G. L.; Walker, K. A.

    2009-04-01

    The global behavior of the extratropical tropopause transition layer (ExTL) is investigated using O3, H2O, and CO measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on Canada's SCISAT-1 satellite obtained between February 2004 and May 2007. The ExTL depth is derived using H2O-O3 and CO-O3 correlations. The ExTL top derived from H2O-O3 shows an increase from roughly 1-1.5 km above the thermal tropopause in the subtropics to 3-4 km (2.5-3.5 km) in the north (south) polar region, implying somewhat weaker troposphere-stratosphere-transport in the Southern Hemisphere. The ExTL bottom extends ˜1 km below the thermal tropopause, indicating a persistent stratospheric influence on the troposphere at all latitudes. The ExTL top derived from the CO-O3 correlation is lower, at 2 km or ˜345 K (1.5 km or ˜335 K) in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. Its annual mean coincides with the relative temperature maximum just above the thermal tropopause. The vertical CO gradient maximizes at the thermal tropopause, indicating a local minimum in mixing within the tropopause region. The seasonal changes in and the scales of the vertical H2O gradients show a similar pattern as the static stability structure of the tropopause inversion layer (TIL), which provides observational support for the hypothesis that H2O plays a radiative role in forcing and maintaining the structure of the TIL.

  9. In Bacillus subtilis LutR is part of the global complex regulatory network governing the adaptation to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Irigül-Sönmez, Öykü; Köroğlu, Türkan E; Öztürk, Büşra; Kovács, Ákos T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten

    2014-02-01

    The lutR gene, encoding a product resembling a GntR-family transcriptional regulator, has previously been identified as a gene required for the production of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis. To understand the broader regulatory roles of LutR in B. subtilis, we studied the genome-wide effects of a lutR null mutation by combining transcriptional profiling studies using DNA microarrays, reverse transcription quantitative PCR, lacZ fusion analyses and gel mobility shift assays. We report that 65 transcriptional units corresponding to 23 mono-cistronic units and 42 operons show altered expression levels in lutR mutant cells, as compared with lutR(+) wild-type cells in early stationary phase. Among these, 11 single genes and 25 operons are likely to be under direct control of LutR. The products of these genes are involved in a variety of physiological processes associated with the onset of stationary phase in B. subtilis, including degradative enzyme production, antibiotic production and resistance, carbohydrate utilization and transport, nitrogen metabolism, phosphate uptake, fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, protein synthesis and translocation, cell-wall metabolism, energy production, transfer of mobile genetic elements, induction of phage-related genes, sporulation, delay of sporulation and cannibalism, and biofilm formation. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay performed in the presence of both SinR and LutR revealed a close overlap between the LutR and SinR targets. Our data also revealed a significant overlap with the AbrB regulon. Together, these findings reveal that LutR is part of the global complex, interconnected regulatory systems governing adaptation of bacteria to the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase. PMID:24196425

  10. Reply to the Comment on "Wave climate, sediment supply and the depth of the sand-mud transition: A global survey" by D.A. George and P.S. Hill [Marine Geology 254 (2008) 121-128

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, D.A.; Hill, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of concepts presented by George and Hill [George, D.A., Hill, P.S., 2008. Wave climate, sediment supply and the depth of the sand-mud transition: A global survey. Marine Geology, 254, 121-128.] regarding the depth of the sand-mud transition (hSMT) was performed by Guill??n and Jim??nez [Jorge Guill??n and Jos?? A. Jim??nez, Comment on "Wave climate, sediment supply and the depth of the sand-mud transition: A global survey" by D.A. George and P.S. Hill [Marine Geology 254 (2008) 121-128], Marine Geology, in press]. We are pleased that our proposed definition of the hSMT was confirmed to be appropriate. We are encouraged that the authors agree that wave period and wave height should both be used to determine hSMT as we demonstrated in our Eq. (1), which calculates the bed shear stress at hSMT. More in-depth research should focus on characterizing the role of sediment supply in determining hSMT. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Emergent Self-Organized Criticality in Gene Expression Dynamics: Temporal Development of Global Phase Transition Revealed in a Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Giuliani, Alessandro; Hashimoto, Midori; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Background The underlying mechanism of dynamic control of the genome-wide expression is a fundamental issue in bioscience. We addressed it in terms of phase transition by a systemic approach based on both density analysis and characteristics of temporal fluctuation for the time-course mRNA expression in differentiating MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Methodology In a recent work, we suggested criticality as an essential aspect of dynamic control of genome-wide gene expression. Criticality was evident by a unimodal-bimodal transition through flattened unimodal expression profile. The flatness on the transition suggests the existence of a critical transition at which up- and down-regulated expression is balanced. Mean field (averaging) behavior of mRNAs based on the temporal expression changes reveals a sandpile type of transition in the flattened profile. Furthermore, around the transition, a self-similar unimodal-bimodal transition of the whole expression occurs in the density profile of an ensemble of mRNA expression. These singular and scaling behaviors identify the transition as the expression phase transition driven by self-organized criticality (SOC). Principal Findings Emergent properties of SOC through a mean field approach are revealed: i) SOC, as a form of genomic phase transition, consolidates distinct critical states of expression, ii) Coupling of coherent stochastic oscillations between critical states on different time-scales gives rise to SOC, and iii) Specific gene clusters (barcode genes) ranging in size from kbp to Mbp reveal similar SOC to genome-wide mRNA expression and ON-OFF synchronization to critical states. This suggests that the cooperative gene regulation of topological genome sub-units is mediated by the coherent phase transitions of megadomain-scaled conformations between compact and swollen chromatin states. Conclusion and Significance In summary, our study provides not only a systemic method to demonstrate SOC in whole-genome expression

  12. [Humanitarian transition].

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François; Troit, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    In two centuries, modern humanitarian action has experienced several fractures often linked to crises. Although its professionalism and intervention force remain indisputable, it faces, since the 2000s, a new context that limits its ability to act and confronts it with new dilemmas, even though it must deal with needs for aid of unprecedented scale. These difficulties reveal a humanitarian transition period that was not anticipated. This transition period reflects the change from a dominant paradigm of North-South solidarity of Western origin to a much more complex model. This article provides a summary of the current mutations that are dominated by the States' assertion of sovereignty. Among the possible solutions, it argues for an ethical approach and a better integration of the research carried out in the Global South, prerequisites for building a true partnership and placing the victims at the heart of the operations which involve them. PMID:26936180

  13. The global energy system.

    PubMed

    Häfele, W; Sassin, W

    1979-05-01

    A global energy system is conceptualized and analyzed, the energy distributor sub-system of the worldwide supranational system. Its many interconnections are examined and traced back to their source to determine the major elements of this global energy system. Long-term trends are emphasized. The analysis begins with a discussion of the local systems that resulted from the deployment of technology in the mid-nineteenth century, continues with a description of the global system based on oil that has existed for the past two decades, and ends with a scenario implying that an energy transition will occur in the future in which use of coal, nuclear, and solar energy will predominate. A major problem for the future will be the management of this energy transition. The optimal use of global resources and the efficient management of this transition will require a stable and persistent global order. PMID:464990

  14. Ligand-Induced Stabilization of a Duplex-like Architecture Is Crucial for the Switching Mechanism of the SAM-III Riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Gorle; Srinivasan, Harini; Nanda, Shivani; Priyakumar, U Deva

    2016-06-21

    Riboswitches are structured RNA motifs that control gene expression by sensing the concentrations of specific metabolites and make up a promising new class of antibiotic targets. S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-III riboswitch, mainly found in lactic acid bacteria, is involved in regulating methionine and SAM biosynthetic pathways. SAM-III riboswitch regulates the gene expression by switching the translation process on and off with respect to the absence and presence of the SAM ligand, respectively. In this study, an attempt is made to understand the key conformational transitions involved in ligand binding using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed in an explicit solvent environment. G26 is found to recognize the SAM ligand by forming hydrogen bonds, whereas the absence of the ligand leads to opening of the binding pocket. Consistent with experimental results, the absence of the SAM ligand weakens the base pairing interactions between the nucleobases that are part of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) and anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) sequences, which in turn facilitates recognition of the SD sequence by ribosomes. Detailed analysis reveals that a duplex-like structure formed by nucleotides from different parts of the RNA and the adenine base of the ligand is crucial for the stability of the completely folded state in the presence of the ligand. Previous experimental studies have shown that the SAM-III riboswitch exists in equilibrium between the unfolded and partially folded states in the absence of the ligand, which completely folds upon binding of the ligand. Comparison of the results presented here to the available experimental data indicates the structures obtained using the MD simulations resemble the partially folded state. Thus, this study provides a detailed understanding of the fully and partially folded structures of the SAM-III riboswitch in the presence and absence of the ligand, respectively. This study hypothesizes a dual role for the SAM ligand

  15. The Hetu'u Global Network: Using the rare June 5th/6th Transit of Venus to Bring Astronomy to the Remote Easter Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline; Rodriguez, D.

    2013-01-01

    There are rare times in astronomy when a celestial event, visible in broad daylight, can be used to measure a fundamental parameter and inspire a globe full of school age students. The June 5th/6th transit of Venus was one such event. In celebration, nine astronomy postdocs from the Chilean mainland traveled to Easter Island to lead a series of astronomy outreach activities over three days, culminating in a transit-viewing event. Our team dubbed "Equipo Hetu'u" or "Team Star" in the Rapa Nui (Easter Island native) language spent two days giving astronomy talks and doing hands-on demonstrations at the Museo Antropologico P. Sebastian Englert. In the final day-and-a-half leading up to the transit, we visited the science classes in the majority of the schools on the island, in order to spread the message about the once-in-a-lifetime transit event, highlighting how we planned on using it to measure the distance to the Sun. We estimate over 25% 1500 people) of this remote island participated in one or more of our organized activities. Our experience with this project is an excellent lesson on how to organize, lead, and fully execute a major outreach endeavor that inspires hundreds with minimal resources (save the spectacular event provided by the cosmos).

  16. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050–4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400–4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions. PMID:27283832

  17. The Properties of XO-5b and WASP-82b Redetermined Using New High-Precision Transit Photometry and Global Data Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents new transit photometry from the Isaac Newton Telescope of two transiting exoplanetary systems, XO-5 and WASP-82. In each case the new transit light curve is more precise than any other of that system previously published. The new data are analyzed alongside previously-published photometry and radial velocities, resulting in an improved orbital ephemeris and a refined set of system parameters in each case. The observational baseline of XO-5 is extended by very nearly four years, resulting in a determination of the orbital period of XO-5b to a precision of just 50 ms. The mass and radius of XO-5b are 1.19±0.03 and 1.14±0.03 times those of Jupiter, respectively. The light curve of WASP-82 is only the second published for this system. The planetary mass is 1.25±0.05 MJup, and the radius is 1.71±0.08 RJup.

  18. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050-4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400-4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions. PMID:27283832

  19. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-06-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050–4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400–4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions.

  20. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  1. NMR structures of apo L. casei dihydrofolate reductase and its complexes with trimethoprim and NADPH: contributions to positive cooperative binding from ligand-induced refolding, conformational changes, and interligand hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Feeney, James; Birdsall, Berry; Kovalevskaya, Nadezhda V; Smurnyy, Yegor D; Navarro Peran, Emna M; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2011-05-10

    In order to examine the origins of the large positive cooperativity (ΔG(0)(coop) = -2.9 kcal mol(-1)) of trimethoprim (TMP) binding to a bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the presence of NADPH, we have determined and compared NMR solution structures of L. casei apo DHFR and its binary and ternary complexes with TMP and NADPH and made complementary thermodynamic measurements. The DHFR structures are generally very similar except for the A-B loop region and part of helix B (residues 15-31) which could not be directly detected for L. casei apo DHFR because of line broadening from exchange between folded and unfolded forms. Thermodynamic and NMR measurements suggested that a significant contribution to the cooperativity comes from refolding of apo DHFR on binding the first ligand (up to -0.95 kcals mol(-1) if 80% of A-B loop requires refolding). Comparisons of Cα-Cα distance differences and domain rotation angles between apo DHFR and its complexes indicated that generally similar conformational changes involving domain movements accompany formation of the binary complexes with either TMP or NADPH and that the binary structures are approaching that of the ternary complex as would be expected for positive cooperativity. These favorable ligand-induced structural changes upon binding the first ligand will also contribute significantly to the cooperative binding. A further substantial contribution to cooperative binding results from the proximity of the bound ligands in the ternary complex: this reduces the solvent accessible area of the ligand and provides a favorable entropic hydrophobic contribution (up to -1.4 kcal mol(-1)). PMID:21410224

  2. NMR Structures of Apo L. casei Dihydrofolate Reductase and Its Complexes with Trimethoprim and NADPH: Contributions to Positive Cooperative Binding from Ligand-Induced Refolding, Conformational Changes, and Interligand Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine the origins of the large positive cooperativity (ΔG0coop = −2.9 kcal mol−1) of trimethoprim (TMP) binding to a bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the presence of NADPH, we have determined and compared NMR solution structures of L. casei apo DHFR and its binary and ternary complexes with TMP and NADPH and made complementary thermodynamic measurements. The DHFR structures are generally very similar except for the A−B loop region and part of helix B (residues 15−31) which could not be directly detected for L. casei apo DHFR because of line broadening from exchange between folded and unfolded forms. Thermodynamic and NMR measurements suggested that a significant contribution to the cooperativity comes from refolding of apo DHFR on binding the first ligand (up to −0.95 kcals mol−1 if 80% of A−B loop requires refolding). Comparisons of Cα−Cα distance differences and domain rotation angles between apo DHFR and its complexes indicated that generally similar conformational changes involving domain movements accompany formation of the binary complexes with either TMP or NADPH and that the binary structures are approaching that of the ternary complex as would be expected for positive cooperativity. These favorable ligand-induced structural changes upon binding the first ligand will also contribute significantly to the cooperative binding. A further substantial contribution to cooperative binding results from the proximity of the bound ligands in the ternary complex: this reduces the solvent accessible area of the ligand and provides a favorable entropic hydrophobic contribution (up to −1.4 kcal mol−1). PMID:21410224

  3. Global Transcriptome Profiling of Developing Leaf and Shoot Apices Reveals Distinct Genetic and Environmental Control of Floral Transition and Inflorescence Development in Barley[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Timing of the floral transition and inflorescence development strongly affect yield in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Therefore, we examined the effects of daylength and the photoperiod response gene PHOTOPERIOD1 (Ppd-H1) on barley development and analyzed gene expression changes in the developing leaves and main shoot apices (MSAs) of barley by RNA sequencing. The daylength sensitivity of MSA development had two phases, floret primordia initiated under long and short days, whereas successful inflorescence development occurred only under long days. The transcripts associated with floral transition were largely regulated independently of photoperiod and allelic variation at Ppd-H1. The photoperiod- and Ppd-H1-dependent differences in inflorescence development and flower fertility were associated with the induction of barley FLOWERING LOCUS T orthologs: FT1 in leaves and FT2 in MSAs. FT1 expression was coregulated with transcripts involved in nutrient transport, carbohydrate metabolism, and cell cycle regulation, suggesting that FT1 might alter source-sink relationships. Successful inflorescence development correlated with upregulation of FT2 and transcripts related to floral organ development, phytohormones, and cell cycle regulation. Identification of photoperiod and stage-specific transcripts gives insights into the regulation of reproductive development in barley and provides a resource for investigation of the complexities of development and yield in temperate grasses. PMID:26307377

  4. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  5. Northern versus southern gateways control on ocean overturning circulation at the Eocene-Oligocene transition and possible implications to global cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, M.; Erez, J.

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating reorganization in the ocean overturning circulation during the transition from the Eocene to the Oligocene, in particular, the initiation of the northern-sourced overturning circulation that comprises the northern component water (NCW) and northward flowing intermediate water. This evidence includes Nd isotopes from the Southern Hemisphere, δ13C from intermediate water in the subtropical North Atlantic, and increasing difference in the benthic δ18O between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We compare all these sets of proxies and show that the increasing trends have been conjugated throughout most of the Oligocene indicating enhancement of the northern-sourced overturning circulation that began around the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT). This reorganization was attributed mainly to the development of the wind-driven Antarctic circumpolar current (ACC). Based on variety of geological inferences, we suggest that the shift to interhemispheric bipolar overturning circulation was initiated by buoyancy fluxes formed by the development of anti-estuarine circulation between the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic around the EOT, which significantly intensified the NCW. The Nordic anti-estuarine circulation began at a critical threshold during rapid tectonic subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) triggered by the suppression of the Iceland mantle plume. We show that the development of northern-sourced circulation cell during the Oligocene correlates compellingly with the histories of the GSR subsidence and the activity of the Iceland mantle plume, and to a lesser degree with the ACC history. Accordingly, this circulation was enhanced as long as the GSR subsided rapidly. The onset of the northern-sourced overturning circulation, which is the biologically productive circulation domain, has probably triggered the marked increase in the ocean productivity during the EOT. The relationship between the EOT climatic

  6. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  7. A select set of opioid ligands induce up-regulation by promoting the maturation and stability of the rat kappa-opioid receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Yadav, Prem N; Howells, Richard D

    2007-11-01

    Ligand-induced regulation of the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing the FLAG-tagged rKOR. Incubation of rKOR cells with naltrexone for 24 h increased the B(max) >3-fold, with no change in the affinity of [(3)H]diprenorphine. Two immunoreactive receptor species were present in cell lysates: naltrexone treatment caused a >3-fold increase in the 52-kDa species while decreasing the level of the 42-kDa species. Dynorphin(1-13), U69,593 [(5alpha,7alpha,8beta)-(+)-N-methyl-N-(7-[1-pyrrolidinyl]-1-oxaspiro[4,5]dec-8-yl)benzeneacetamide], or salvinorin A [2S,4aR,6aR,7R,9S,10aS, 10bR)-9-(acetyloxy)-2-(3-furanyl)dodecahydro-6a,10b-dimethyl-4,10-dioxo-2H-naphtho[2,1c]pyran-7-carboxylic acid methyl ester] treatment did not alter the level of immunoreactive rKOR protein, whereas etorphine, cyclazocine, naloxone, and naloxone methiodide increased the 52-kDa and decreased the 42-kDa rKOR bands. Receptor up-regulation was associated with an increase in the number of cell surface receptors and a 2-fold increase in the E(max) for guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding. Glycosidase digestion indicated that the 52- and 42-kDa receptors contained complex and high-mannose N-glycans, respectively, Pulse-chase analysis and glycosidase digestion sensitivities suggested that the 42-kDa rKOR species was a precursor of the 52-kDa species. Naltrexone did not alter rKOR mRNA levels or translational efficiency, and rKOR up-regulation was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Brefeldin A caused accumulation of intracellular rKOR intermediates, and coincubation with naltrexone increased the levels of the brefeldin-induced species significantly. These results suggest that select opioid ligands up-regulate rKOR by enhancing the rate of receptor folding and maturation and by protecting the receptor from degradation, resulting in an increase in the number of rKOR binding sites, immunoreactive protein, and functional receptors

  8. High-yield functional expression of human sodium/d-glucose cotransporter1 in Pichia pastoris and characterization of ligand-induced conformational changes as studied by tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Navneet K; Goyal, Pankaj; Kumar, Azad; Pandey, Dharmendra; Siess, Wolfgang; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2005-11-29

    Studies on the structure-function relationship of transporters require the availability of sufficient amounts of the protein in a functional state. In this paper, we report the functional expression, purification, and reconstitution of the human sodium/d-glucose cotransporter1 (hSGLT1) in Pichia pastoris and ligand-induced conformational changes of hSGLT1 in solution as studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. hSGLT1 gene containing FLAG tag at position 574 was cloned into pPICZB plasmid, and the resulting expression vector pPICZB-hSGLT1 was introduced into P. pastoris strain GS115 by electroporation. Purification of recombinant hSGLT1 by nickel-affinity chromatography yields about 3 mg of purified recombinant hSGLT1 per 1-liter of cultured Pichia cells. Purified hSGLT1 migrates on SDS-PAGE with an apparent mass of 55 kDa. Kinetic analysis of hSGLT1 in proteoliposomes revealed sodium-dependent, secondary active, phlorizin-sensitive, and stereospecific alpha-methyl-d-glucopyranoside transport, demonstrating its full catalytic activity. The position of the maximum intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and titration with hydrophilic collisional quenchers KI, acrylamide, and trichloroethanol suggested that most of Trps in hSGLT1 in solution are in a hydrophobic environment. In the presence of sodium, sugars that have been identified earlier as substrate for the transporter increase intrinsic fluorescence in a saturable manner by a maximum of 15%. alpha-Methyl-d-glucopyranoside had the highest affinity (K(d) = 0.71 mM), followed by d-glucose, d-galactose, d-mannose, and d-allose which showed a much lower affinity. l-Glucose was without effect. d-Glucose also increased the accessibility of the Trps to hydrophilic collisional quenchers. On the contrary phlorizin, the well-established inhibitor of SGLT1, decreased intrinsic fluorescence by a maximum of 50%, and induced a blue shift of maximum (5 nm). Again, the effects were sodium-dependent and saturable and a high

  9. Transitions in sandflat biota since the 1930s: effects of sea-level rise, eutrophication and biological globalization in the tidal bay Königshafen, northern Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Juliane; Dolch, Tobias; Reise, Karsten

    2014-06-01

    Conspicuous macrozoobenthos and vegetation of intertidal sandflats in Königshafen (Island of Sylt, SE North Sea) were mapped in 1932, 1988 and 2008. Higher water levels since the 1930s with a concomitant increase in tidal dynamics are assumed to have weakened sediment stability. This dissolved the distinctly banded macrobenthic zonation of the 1930s. Near high water level, cyanobacterial mats with associated beetles, belts of the mudshrimp Corophium volutator and the seagrass Zostera noltii have vanished, while the range of the lugworm Arenicola marina has extended towards the shore. Near low water level, sandy elevations have become permanently submerged because a tidal creek has widened its bed. In 1988, extensive green algal mats and the almost complete absence of seagrass are attributed to peak eutrophication. This partially reversed until 2008. The mussel Mytilus edulis had strongly extended its beds along the creek in 1988. These were taken over by introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in 2008. Also in 2008, the cordgrass Spartina anglica, another introduced species, grew into large tussocks where cyanobacterial mats and a Corophium-belt had been mapped in the 1930s. Former benthic patterns may have little chance of resurrection by conventional nature protection because these small-scale shifts represent responses to regional and global change.

  10. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.

    1995-03-01

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Contemporary G2P[4] Human Rotaviruses Cocirculating in a Single U.S. Community: Footprints of a Globally Transitioning Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Allison F.; McDonald, Sarah M.; Payne, Daniel C.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Chappell, James D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses (RVs) remain a leading cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Although the G/P types of locally circulating RVs can vary from year to year and differ depending upon geographical location, those with G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], G9P[8], and G12P[8] specificities typically dominate. Little is known about the evolution and diversity of G2P[4] RVs and the possible role that widespread vaccine use has had on their increased frequency of detection. To address these issues, we analyzed the 12 G2P[4] RV isolates associated with a rise in RV gastroenteritis cases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) during the 2010-2011 winter season. Full-genome sequencing revealed that the isolates had genotype 2 constellations typical of DS-1-like viruses (G2P[4]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2). Phylogenetic analyses showed that the genome segments of the isolates were comprised of two or three different subgenotype alleles; this enabled recognition of three distinct clades of G2P[4] viruses that caused disease at VUMC in the 2010-2011 season. Although the three clades cocirculated in the same community, there was no evidence of interclade reassortment. Bayesian analysis of 328 VP7 genes of G2 viruses isolated in the last 39 years indicate that existing G2 VP7 gene lineages continue to evolve and that novel lineages, as represented by the VUMC isolates, are constantly being formed. Moreover, G2 lineages are characteristically shaped by lineage turnover events that introduce new globally dominant strains every 7 years, on average. The ongoing evolution of G2 VP7 lineages may give rise to antigenic changes that undermine vaccine effectiveness in the long term. IMPORTANCE Little is known about the diversity of cocirculating G2 rotaviruses and how their evolution may undermine the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines. To expand our understanding of the potential genetic range exhibited by rotaviruses circulating in postvaccine communities, we

  12. How severe is the modern biotic crisis?—A comparison of global change and biotic crisis between Permian-Triassic transition and modern times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hongfu; He, Weihong; Xie, Shucheng

    2011-03-01

    A comparison of the modern condition with the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) times was made to estimate how severe the modern biotic crisis is. About the global changes, the two periods are correlative in carbon dioxide concentration and carbon isotope negative excursion, UV strengthening, temperature increase, ocean acidification, and weathering enhancement. The following tendencies of biotic crises are also correlative: acceleration of extinction rates accompanied by parabolic curve of extinction with a turning interval representing the critical crisis; decline of the three main ecosystems: reefs, tropical rain forests and marine phytoplankton. It is also interesting to note that certain leading organism in both periods undergo accelerated evolution during the crisis. The comparison shows that the modern crisis is about at the turning point from decline to decimation. The extinction curve is now parabolic, and the extinction rate has been accelerated, but the decimation is not yet in real. This is also justified by the modern situation of the three main ecosystems. Modern biotic decline may worsen into decimation and mass extinction but may also get better and recover to ordinary evolution. Since human activities are the main cause of the deterioration of environments and organisms, mankind should be responsible and able to strive for the recovery of the crisis. For the future of mankind, Homo sapiens may become extinct, i.e., disappear without leaving descendants, or evolve into a new and more advanced species, i.e., disappear but leave descendants. For a better future, mankind should be conscious of the facing danger and act as a whole to save biodiversity and harmonize with the environments.

  13. Xbp1 Directs Global Repression of Budding Yeast Transcription during the Transition to Quiescence and Is Important for the Longevity and Reversibility of the Quiescent State

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Li, Lihong; Davison, Jerry; Breeden, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Pure populations of quiescent yeast can be obtained from stationary phase cultures that have ceased proliferation after exhausting glucose and other carbon sources from their environment. They are uniformly arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and display very high thermo-tolerance and longevity. We find that G1 arrest is initiated before all the glucose has been scavenged from the media. Maintaining G1 arrest requires transcriptional repression of the G1 cyclin, CLN3, by Xbp1. Xbp1 is induced as glucose is depleted and it is among the most abundant transcripts in quiescent cells. Xbp1 binds and represses CLN3 transcription and in the absence of Xbp1, or with extra copies of CLN3, cells undergo ectopic divisions and produce very small cells. The Rad53-mediated replication stress checkpoint reinforces the arrest and becomes essential when Cln3 is overproduced. The XBP1 transcript also undergoes metabolic oscillations under glucose limitation and we identified many additional transcripts that oscillate out of phase with XBP1 and have Xbp1 binding sites in their promoters. Further global analysis revealed that Xbp1 represses 15% of all yeast genes as they enter the quiescent state and over 500 of these transcripts contain Xbp1 binding sites in their promoters. Xbp1-repressed transcripts are highly enriched for genes involved in the regulation of cell growth, cell division and metabolism. Failure to repress some or all of these targets leads xbp1 cells to enter a permanent arrest or senescence with a shortened lifespan. PMID:24204289

  14. Focusing on the Interfaces, Estuaries and Redox Transition Zones, for Understanding the Microbial Processes and Biogeochemical Cycling of Carbon under the Looming Influence of Global Warming and Anthropogenic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2013-12-01

    the phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish communities in major world estuaries and coastal oceans. However, due to the rapid evolution rate and high adaptive nature of environmental microorganisms, global warming and anthropogenic perturbations may change the structure and function of the aquatic microbial communities. The estuarine redox transition zones may harbor diverse and novel microbial function groups and communities. How the different microbial processes may influence the ecological functionality and efficiency of estuarine ecosystems needs to be thoroughly investigated to be fully understood.

  15. Exploring Coordination Modes: Late Transition Metal Complexes with a Methylene-bridged Macrocyclic Tetra-NHC Ligand.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Philipp J; Weiss, Daniel T; Jandl, Christian; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-05-20

    A tetranuclear silver(I) N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex bearing a macrocyclic, exclusively methylene-bridged, tetracarbene ligand was synthesized and employed as transmetalation agent for the synthesis of nickel(II), palladium(II), platinum(II), and gold(I) derivatives. The transition metal complexes exhibit different coordination geometries, the coinage metals being bound in a linear fashion forming molecular box-type complexes, whereas the group 10 metals adapt an almost ideal square planar coordination geometry within the ligand's cavity, resulting in saddle-shaped complexes. Both the Ag(I) and the Au(I) complexes show ligand-induced metal-metal contacts, causing photoluminescence in the blue region for the gold complex. Distinct metal-dependent differences of the coordination behavior between the group 10 transition metals were elucidated by low-temperature NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. PMID:27017146

  16. Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 306 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 188 countries, 1990–2013: quantifying the epidemiological transition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) aims to bring together all available epidemiological data using a coherent measurement framework, standardised estimation methods, and transparent data sources to enable comparisons of health loss over time and across causes, age–sex groups, and countries. The GBD can be used to generate summary measures such as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE) that make possible comparative assessments of broad epidemiological patterns across countries and time. These summary measures can also be used to quantify the component of variation in epidemiology that is related to sociodemographic development. Methods We used the published GBD 2013 data for age-specific mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) to calculate DALYs and HALE for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2013 for 188 countries. We calculated HALE using the Sullivan method; 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) represent uncertainty in age-specific death rates and YLDs per person for each country, age, sex, and year. We estimated DALYs for 306 causes for each country as the sum of YLLs and YLDs; 95% UIs represent uncertainty in YLL and YLD rates. We quantified patterns of the epidemiological transition with a composite indicator of sociodemographic status, which we constructed from income per person, average years of schooling after age 15 years, and the total fertility rate and mean age of the population. We applied hierarchical regression to DALY rates by cause across countries to decompose variance related to the sociodemographic status variable, country, and time. Findings Worldwide, from 1990 to 2013, life expectancy at birth rose by 6·2 years (95% UI 5·6–6·6), from 65·3 years (65·0–65·6) in 1990 to 71·5 years (71·0–71·9) in 2013, HALE at birth rose by 5·4 years (4·9–5·8), from 56·9 years (54·5–59·1) to 62·3 years (59·7

  17. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2007-08-31

    The relativistic mean-field framework, extended to include correlations related to restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of the quadrupole deformation, is applied to a study of shape transitions in Nd isotopes. It is demonstrated that the microscopic self-consistent approach, based on global effective interactions, can describe not only general features of transitions between spherical and deformed nuclei, but also the singular properties of excitation spectra and transition rates at the critical point of quantum shape phase transition.

  18. Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreet, Wilma S., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue contains an introduction ("The Promise and Perplexity of Globalism," by W. Longstreet) and seven articles dedicated to exploring the meaning of global education for today's schools. "Global Education: An Overview" (J. Becker) develops possible definitions, identifies objectives and skills, and addresses questions and issues in this…

  19. Global Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Approaches taken by a school science department to implement a global science curriculum using a range of available resources are outlined. Problems with current curriculum approaches, alternatives to an ethnocentric curriculum, advantages of global science, and possible strategies for implementing a global science policy are discussed. (27…

  20. Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkley, June, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    The articles in this collection deal with various methods of global education--education to prepare students to function as understanding and informed citizens of the world. Topics discussed in the 26 articles include: (1) the necessity of global education; (2) global education in the elementary school language arts curriculum; (3) science fiction…

  1. Global HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on global human resource development (HRD). "Globalization of Human Resource Management (HRM) in Government: A Cross-Cultural Perspective" (Pan Suk Kim) relates HRM to national cultures and addresses its specific functional aspects with a unique dimension in a global organization. "An…

  2. Global Flexibility in a Sensory Receptor: A Site-Directed Cross-Linking Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falke, Joseph J.; Koshland, Daniel E.

    1987-09-01

    The aspartate receptor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium is a cell surface sensory transducer that binds extracellular aspartate and sends a transmembrane signal to the inside of the bacterium. The flexibility and allostery of this receptor was examined by placing sulfhydryl groups as potential cross-linking sites at targeted locations in the protein. Seven different mutant receptors were constructed, each containing a single cysteine residue at a different position in the primary structure. Intramolecular disulfide bond formation within oligomers of these mutant receptors is shown to trap structural fluctuations and to detect ligand-induced changes in structure. The results indicate that the receptor oligomer has a flexible, dynamic structure which undergoes a global change upon aspartate binding.

  3. Global monopoles can change Universe's topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-05-01

    If the Universe undergoes a phase transition, at which global monopoles are created or destroyed, topology of its spatial sections can change. More specifically, by making use of Myers' theorem, we show that, after a transition in which global monopoles form, spatial sections of a spatially flat, infinite Universe becomes finite and closed. This implies that global monopoles can change the topology of Universe's spatial sections (from infinite and open to finite and closed). Global monopoles cannot alter the topology of the space-time manifold.

  4. Multiple inhibitory ligands induce impaired T-cell immunologic synapse function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that can be blocked with lenalidomide: establishing a reversible immune evasion mechanism in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clear, Andrew J.; Fatah, Rewas; Gribben, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immune evasion is an emerging hallmark of disease progression. We have demonstrated previously that impaired actin polymerization at the T-cell immunologic synapse is a global immune dysfunction in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Direct contact with tumor cells induces defective actin polarization at the synapse in previously healthy T cells, but the molecules mediating this dysfunction were not known. In the present study, we show via functional screening assays that CD200, CD270, CD274, and CD276 are coopted by CLL cells to induce impaired actin synapse formation in both allogeneic and autologous T cells. We also show that inhibitory ligand–induced impairment of T-cell actin dynamics is a common immunosuppressive strategy used by both hematologic (including lymphoma) and solid carcinoma cells. This immunosuppressive signaling targets T-cell Rho-GTPase activation. Of clinical relevance, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide prevented the induction of these defects by down-regulating tumor cell–inhibitory molecule expression. These results using human CLL as a model cancer establish a novel evasion mechanism whereby malignant cells exploit multiple inhibitory ligand signaling to down-regulate small GTPases and lytic synapse function in global T-cell populations. These findings should contribute to the design of immunotherapeutic strategies to reverse T-cell tolerance in cancer. PMID:22547582

  5. Salutogenesis, globalization, and communication.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Theodor Dierk; Lehmann, Nadja

    2011-12-01

    Achieving successful communication in transcultural contexts means integrating emotional communication patterns into a global context. Professional, rational communication is characteristic of the cultural dimension, and emotions are characteristic of the direct, interpersonal dimension of human existence. Humans strive to achieve coherence in all dimensions of their lives; this goal is in the end the most essential aspect of psychophysical self-regulation. A major role in integrating emotional needs and cultural features in global coherence is played by the attractor 'global affinity'. The transitions from emotional coherence to cultural coherence, and likewise from cultural coherence to global coherence, can cause considerable insecurity as well as psychological problems, which previously went by the name 'adjustment disorders'. However, instead of pathologizing these processes, we should understand them in a salutogenic sense as challenges important for both individual and collective development. The development of more coherence is regulated by the neuropsychological approach and avoidance system. This system can be consciously fostered by directing our attention to the commonalities of all human beings. Such a global salutogenic orientation furthers both communication and creativity in teamwork. This article introduces a consequent salutogenic and evolutionary systemic view of transcultural communication and demonstrates its effectiveness in a number of case examples. PMID:22272595

  6. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  7. Global Composite

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  MISR Global Images See the Light of Day     View Larger Image ... than its nadir counterpart due to enhanced reflection of light by atmospheric particulates. MISR data are processed at the ...

  8. Transitions in viscous withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wendy W.

    2008-11-01

    A process analogous to flow-focusing occurs in extended and stably stratified layers of immiscible, viscous liquids. In viscous withdrawal, an axisymmetric converging flow is imposed in the upper layer. When the upper layer flow is weak, the interface forms a hump. No liquid from the lower layer is entrained. When the upper layer flow is strong, liquid from the lower layer is entrained and the interface becomes a spout. Here I summarize recent results on the fundamental mechanisms controlling these regimes. For selective withdrawal, a clear picture has emerged, with good agreement between theory, simulation and experiment. The regime ends when the viscous stress exerted by the upper layer flow overcomes surface tension, creating a saddle-node bifurcation in the hump solution. Less is understood about viscous entrainment. A long-wavelength model including only local information is degenerate, possessing many solutions for the same withdrawal condition. Including information about the global geometry removes this degeneracy but also makes the surprising prediction that global geometry can change the nature of the transition. First-order, weakly first-order or continuous transitions are all possible. How these results relate to the variety of experimental phenomena, such as stable, micron-sized spouts, intricate patterns of hysteresis and multiple stable spout states under the same condition, is at present unclear. (Includes material from joint works with Blanchette, Cohen, Kleine Berkenbusch, and Schmidt.)

  9. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  10. The L- to T-dwarf transition

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M. S.; Cushing, M. C.; Saumon, D.

    2004-01-01

    While the precise mechanism responsible for the L to T dwarf transition remains unclear, it is clearly caused by changing cloud characteristics. Here we briefly review data relevant to understanding the nature of the transition and argue that changing atmospheric dynamics produce the transition by opening holes through the global iron and silicate cloud decks. Other possibilities, such as a sudden vertical collapse in these cloud decks are also considered. Any acceptable model of the L to T transition must ultimately connect changing cloud properties to the underlying atmospheric dynamics.

  11. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  12. Global militarization

    SciTech Connect

    Wallensteen, P.; Galtung, J.; Portales, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Military Formations and Social Formations: A Structural Analysis; Global Conflict Formations: Present Developments and Future Directions; War and the Power of Warmakers in Western Europe and Elsewhere, 1600-1980; and The Urban Type of Society and International War.

  13. Global Warming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Julia Christensen; Brown, Jeff A.

    1994-01-01

    Presents information and data on an experiment designed to test whether different atmosphere compositions are affected by light and temperature during both cooling and heating. Although flawed, the experiment should help students appreciate the difficulties that researchers face when trying to find evidence of global warming. (PR)

  14. Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on topics related to global issues. (1) "Recycling for Art Projects" (Wendy Stephenson) gives an argument for recycling in the art classroom; (2) "Winds of Change: Tradition and Innovation in Circumpolar Art" (Bill Zuk and Robert Dalton) includes profiles of Alaskan Yupik artist, Larry Beck, who creates art from recycled…

  15. Campus Global.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sort, Josep

    2003-01-01

    Describes the development of the Campus Global portal at a public university in Spain. The project aimed to change the ways in which the university community worked, taught, and learned. Examines how the project was carried out, the transformations it instigated inside the organization, the improvements it has brought about, and the current state…

  16. Unstable supercritical discontinuous percolation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cheng, Xueqi; Zheng, Zhiming; Chung, Ning Ning; D'Souza, Raissa M.; Nagler, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The location and nature of the percolation transition in random networks is a subject of intense interest. Recently, a series of graph evolution processes have been introduced that lead to discontinuous percolation transitions where the addition of a single edge causes the size of the largest component to exhibit a significant macroscopic jump in the thermodynamic limit. These processes can have additional exotic behaviors, such as displaying a “Devil's staircase” of discrete jumps in the supercritical regime. Here we investigate whether the location of the largest jump coincides with the percolation threshold for a range of processes, such as Erdős-Rényipercolation, percolation via edge competition and via growth by overtaking. We find that the largest jump asymptotically occurs at the percolation transition for Erdős-Rényiand other processes exhibiting global continuity, including models exhibiting an “explosive” transition. However, for percolation processes exhibiting genuine discontinuities, the behavior is substantially richer. In percolation models where the order parameter exhibits a staircase, the largest discontinuity generically does not coincide with the percolation transition. For the generalized Bohman-Frieze-Wormald model, it depends on the model parameter. Distinct parameter regimes well in the supercritical regime feature unstable discontinuous transitions—a novel and unexpected phenomenon in percolation. We thus demonstrate that seemingly and genuinely discontinuous percolation transitions can involve a rich behavior in supercriticality, a regime that has been largely ignored in percolation.

  17. Panwapa: Global Kids, Global Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Ilene R.; Berson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Panwapa, created by the Sesame Street Workshop of PBS, is an example of an initiative on the Internet designed to enhance students' learning by exposing them to global communities. Panwapa means "Here on Earth" in Tshiluba, a Bantu language spoken in the Democratic Republic of Congo. At the Panwapa website, www.panwapa.org, children aged four to…

  18. Relation Between Higher Physical Activity and Public Transit Use

    PubMed Central

    Vernez Moudon, Anne; Kang, Bumjoon; Hurvitz, Philip M.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We isolated physical activity attributable to transit use to examine issues of substitution between types of physical activity and potential confounding of transit-related walking with other walking. Methods. Physical activity and transit use data were collected in 2008 to 2009 from 693 Travel Assessment and Community study participants from King County, Washington, equipped with an accelerometer, a portable Global Positioning System, and a 7-day travel log. Physical activity was classified into transit- and non–transit-related walking and nonwalking time. Analyses compared physical activity by type between transit users and nonusers, between less and more frequent transit users, and between transit and nontransit days for transit users. Results. Transit users had more daily overall physical activity and more total walking than did nontransit users but did not differ on either non–transit-related walking or nonwalking physical activity. Most frequent transit users had more walking time than least frequent transit users. Higher physical activity levels for transit users were observed only on transit days, with 14.6 minutes (12.4 minutes when adjusted for demographics) of daily physical activity directly linked with transit use. Conclusions. Because transit use was directly related to higher physical activity, future research should examine whether substantive increases in transit access and use lead to more physical activity and related health improvements. PMID:24625142

  19. Going Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulard, Garry

    2010-01-01

    In a move to increase its out-of-state and international student enrollment, officials at the University of Iowa are stepping up their global recruitment efforts--even in the face of criticism that the school may be losing sight of its mission. The goal is to increase enrollment across the board, with both in-state as well as out-of-state and…

  20. Global health diplomacy and peace.

    PubMed

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Buss, Paulo

    2011-09-01

    Diplomacy and health are in a period of rapid transition, so this article elaborates on the complex multilevel, multiactor negotiation processes that shape and manage the global policy environment for health. It explores the dynamic relationship between health and foreign policy and provides examples from the national, regional, and global levels. Reflecting on the deliberations in different international bodies, it discusses key questions and opportunities that could contribute to moving forward both health and peace agendas. The concluding remarks draw attention to the importance of bridging the capacity gap. PMID:21896361

  1. Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    2006-02-23

    The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit provides an efficient and portable “shared-memory” programming interface for distributed-memory computers. Each process in a MIMD parallel program can asynchronously access logical blocks of physically distributed dense multi-dimensional arrays, without need for explicit cooperation by other processes. Unlike other shared-memory environments, the GA model exposes to the programmer the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) characteristics of the high performance computers and acknowledges that access to a remote portion of the shared data is slower than to the local portion. The locality information for the shared data is available, and a direct access to the local portions of shared data is provided. Global Arrays have been designed to complement rather than substitute for the message-passing programming model. The programmer is free to use both the shared-memory and message-passing paradigms in the same program, and to take advantage of existing message-passing software libraries. Global Arrays are compatible with the Message Passing Interface (MPI).

  2. Global Arrays

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-02-23

    The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit provides an efficient and portable “shared-memory” programming interface for distributed-memory computers. Each process in a MIMD parallel program can asynchronously access logical blocks of physically distributed dense multi-dimensional arrays, without need for explicit cooperation by other processes. Unlike other shared-memory environments, the GA model exposes to the programmer the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) characteristics of the high performance computers and acknowledges that access to a remote portion of the sharedmore » data is slower than to the local portion. The locality information for the shared data is available, and a direct access to the local portions of shared data is provided. Global Arrays have been designed to complement rather than substitute for the message-passing programming model. The programmer is free to use both the shared-memory and message-passing paradigms in the same program, and to take advantage of existing message-passing software libraries. Global Arrays are compatible with the Message Passing Interface (MPI).« less

  3. Global topological k-defects

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.

    2006-10-15

    We consider global topological defects in symmetry-breaking models with a noncanonical kinetic term. Apart from a mass parameter entering the potential, one additional dimensional parameter arises in such models - a kinetic mass. The properties of defects in these models are quite different from standard global domain walls, vortices, and monopoles, if their kinetic mass scale is smaller than their symmetry-breaking scale. In particular, depending on the concrete form of the kinetic term, the typical size of such a defect can be either much larger or much smaller than the size of a standard defect with the same potential term. The characteristic mass of a nonstandard defect, which might have been formed during a phase transition in the early universe, depends on both the temperature of a phase transition and the kinetic mass.

  4. Monitoring Ligand-Induced Protein Ordering in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Grace, Christy R; Ban, David; Min, Jaeki; Mayasundari, Anand; Min, Lie; Finch, Kristin E; Griffiths, Lyra; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; Kiplin Guy, R; Dyer, Michael A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2016-03-27

    While the gene for p53 is mutated in many human cancers causing loss of function, many others maintain a wild-type gene but exhibit reduced p53 tumor suppressor activity through overexpression of the negative regulators, Mdm2 and/or MdmX. For the latter mechanism of loss of function, the activity of endogenous p53 can be restored through inhibition of Mdm2 or MdmX with small molecules. We previously reported a series of compounds based upon the Nutlin-3 chemical scaffold that bind to both MdmX and Mdm2 [Vara, B. A. et al. (2014) Organocatalytic, diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of nonsymmetric cis-stilbene diamines: A platform for the preparation of single-enantiomer cis-imidazolines for protein-protein inhibition. J. Org. Chem. 79, 6913-6938]. Here we present the first solution structures based on data from NMR spectroscopy for MdmX in complex with four of these compounds and compare them with the MdmX:p53 complex. A p53-derived peptide binds with high affinity (Kd value of 150nM) and causes the formation of an extensive network of hydrogen bonds within MdmX; this constitutes the induction of order within MdmX through ligand binding. In contrast, the compounds bind more weakly (Kd values from 600nM to 12μM) and induce an incomplete hydrogen bond network within MdmX. Despite relatively weak binding, the four compounds activated p53 and induced p21(Cip1) expression in retinoblastoma cell lines that overexpress MdmX, suggesting that they specifically target MdmX and/or Mdm2. Our results document structure-activity relationships for lead-like small molecules targeting MdmX and suggest a strategy for their further optimization in the future by using NMR spectroscopy to monitor small-molecule-induced protein order as manifested through hydrogen bond formation. PMID:26812210

  5. Oxytocin receptor ligands induce changes in cytoskeleton in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bakos, Jan; Strbak, Vladimir; Paulikova, Helena; Krajnakova, Lucia; Lestanova, Zuzana; Bacova, Zuzana

    2013-07-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate effects of ligands of oxytocin receptors on gene expression of neurofilament proteins (nestin and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)) associated with neuronal differentiation and growth factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) related to neuronal growth. Fluorescent staining of F-actin was used to observe morphology of cells. Co-treatment with oxytocin and oxytocin receptor antagonist--atosiban--resulted in significant increase of MAP2 gene expression in SK-N-SH cells. There was no effect of oxytocin on gene expression of growth factors BDNF and NGF. Surprisingly, oxytocin with atosiban significantly increased mRNA levels for both BDNF and NGF. Gene expression of vasopressin receptor (V1aR) significantly decreased in response to vasopressin. Atosiban decreased mRNA levels for oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and V1aR. Oxytocin significantly decreased OXTR and nestin mRNA levels and increased mRNA levels for BDNF and NGF in U-87 MG cells. The densest recruitment of F-actin filaments was observed in apical parts of filopodia in SK-N-SH cells incubated in oxytocin presence. Present data demonstrate complex role of ligands of oxytocin receptors in regulation of gene expression of intermediate filaments and thus, oxytocin might be considered as a growth factor in neuronal type of cells. PMID:23335033

  6. TLR2 ligand-induced protection against bacterial endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Christopher N; Glybina, Inna V; Mahmoud, Tamer H; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2009-01-01

    Background Activation of innate immunity plays a key role in determining the outcome of an infection. Here, we investigated whether Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in retinal innate response and explored the prophylactic use of TLR2 ligand in preventing bacterial endophthalmitis. Methods C57BL/6 (B6) mice were given intravitreal injections of Pam3Cys, a synthetic ligand of TLR2, or vehicle (PBS) 24 h prior to S. aureus (SA) inoculation. The severity of endophthalmitis was graded by slit lamp, electroretinography (ERG), histological examinations and determination of bacterial load in the retina. The expression of cytokines/chemokines and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) was assessed by ELISA and Western blot respectively. Results Intravitreal injections of Pam3Cys up-regulated TLR2 expression in the B6 retina and Pam3Cys pretreatment significantly improved the outcome of SA endophthalmitis, preserved retinal structural integrity and maintained visual function assessed with ERG in B6 mice. Furthermore, Pam3Cys pretreatment activated retinal microglia cells, induced the expression of CRAMP, and remarkably reduced the bacterial load. Conclusions This is the first report that highlights the existence and role of TLR2 in retinal innate immune response to SA infection and suggests that modulation of TLR activation provides a novel prophylactic approach to prevent bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:19995266

  7. TLR Ligands Induce Antiviral Responses in Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barjesteh, Neda; Behboudi, Shahriar; Brisbin, Jennifer T.; Villanueva, Alexander Ian; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Chicken macrophages express several receptors for recognition of pathogens, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs bind to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from bacterial or viral pathogens leading to the activation of macrophages. Macrophages play a critical role in immunity against viruses, including influenza viruses. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that treatment of chicken macrophages with TLR ligands reduces avian influenza replication. Furthermore, we sought to study the expression of some of the key mediators involved in the TLR-mediated antiviral responses of macrophages. Chicken macrophages were treated with the TLR2, 3, 4, 7 and 21 ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, R848 and CpG ODN, respectively, at different doses and time points pre- and post-H4N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) infection. The results revealed that pre-treatment of macrophages with Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN reduced the replication of AIV in chicken macrophages. In addition, the relative expression of genes involved in inflammatory and antiviral responses were quantified at 3, 8 and 18 hours post-treatment with the TLR2, 4 and 21 ligands. Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ, IFN-β and interferon regulatory factor (IFR) 7. The expression of these genes correlated with the reduction of viral replication in macrophages. These results shed light on the process of immunity to AIV in chickens. PMID:25165812

  8. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  9. LIGAND-INDUCED CHANGES IN T BOX ANTITERMINATOR RNA STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, S.; Acquaah-Harrison, G.; Jack, K.D.; Bergmeier, S.C.; Hines, J.V.

    2012-01-01

    The T box antiterminator RNA element is an important component of the T box riboswitch that controls the transcription of vital genes in many Gram-positive bacteria. A series of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles was screened in a fluorescence-monitored thermal denaturation assay to identify ligands that altered the stability of antiterminator model RNA. Several ligands were identified that significantly increased or decreased the melting temperature (Tm) of the RNA. The results indicate that this series of triazole ligands can alter the stability of antiterminator model RNA in a structure-dependent manner. PMID:22117759

  10. Ligand-induced ErbB receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Structural studies have provided important new insights into how ligand binding promotes homodimerization and activation of the EGF receptor and the other members of the ErbB family or receptor tyrosine kinases. These structures have also suggested possible explanations for the unique properties of ErbB2, which has no known ligand and can cause cell transformation (and tumorigenesis) by simple overexpression. In parallel with these advances, studies of the EGF receptor at the cell surface increasingly argue that the structural studies are missing key mechanistic components. This is particularly evident in the structural prediction that EGF binding linked to receptor dimerization should be positively cooperative, whereas cell-surface EGF-binding studies suggest negative cooperativity. In this review, I summarize studies of ErbB receptor extracellular regions in solution and of intact receptors at the cell surface, and attempt to reconcile the differences suggested by the two approaches. By combining results obtained with receptor ‘parts’, it is qualitatively possible to explain some models for the properties of the whole receptor. These considerations underline the need to consider the intact ErbB receptors as intact allosterically regulated enzymes, and to combine cellular and structural studies into a complete picture. PMID:19038249

  11. FES kinase participates in KIT-ligand induced chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Voisset, Edwige; Lopez, Sophie; Chaix, Amandine; Vita, Marina; George, Coralie; Dubreuil, Patrice; De Sepulveda, Paulo

    2010-02-26

    FES is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase activated by several membrane receptors, originally identified as a viral oncogene product. We have recently identified FES as a crucial effector of oncogenic KIT mutant receptor. However, FES implication in wild-type KIT receptor function was not addressed. We report here that FES interacts with KIT and is phosphorylated following activation by its ligand SCF. Unlike in the context of oncogenic KIT mutant, FES is not involved in wild-type KIT proliferation signal, or in cell adhesion. Instead, FES is required for SCF-induced chemotaxis. In conclusion, FES kinase is a mediator of wild-type KIT signalling implicated in cell migration.

  12. Global teaching of global seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, S.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Our recent textbook, Introduction to Seismology, Earthquakes, & Earth Structure (Blackwell, 2003) is used in many countries. Part of the reason for this may be our deliberate attempt to write the book for an international audience. This effort appears in several ways. We stress seismology's long tradition of global data interchange. Our brief discussions of the science's history illustrate the contributions of scientists around the world. Perhaps most importantly, our discussions of earthquakes, tectonics, and seismic hazards take a global view. Many examples are from North America, whereas others are from other areas. Our view is that non-North American students should be exposed to North American examples that are type examples, and that North American students should be similarly exposed to examples elsewhere. For example, we illustrate how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence using both the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska and the Eurasia-Africa boundary from the Azores to the Mediterranean. We illustrate diffuse plate boundary zones using western North America, the Andes, the Himalayas, the Mediterranean, and the East Africa Rift. The subduction zone discussions examine Japan, Tonga, and Chile. We discuss significant earthquakes both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and explore hazard mitigation issues in different contexts. Both comments from foreign colleagues and our experience lecturing overseas indicate that this approach works well. Beyond the specifics of our text, we believe that such a global approach is facilitated by the international traditions of the earth sciences and the world youth culture that gives students worldwide common culture. For example, a video of the scene in New Madrid, Missouri that arose from a nonsensical earthquake prediction in 1990 elicits similar responses from American and European students.

  13. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by keratinocyte growth conditions is overcome by E6 and E7 from HPV16, but not HPV8 and HPV38: Characterization of global transcription profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Borgogna, Cinzia; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Chiorino, Giovanna; Scatolini, Maria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2009-06-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth properties of primary human keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7 proteins, which are from either the beta- or alpha-genotypes, under different culture conditions. We demonstrated that keratinocytes expressing E6 and E7, from both HPV8 and 38, irreversibly underwent the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) when grown on plastic with FAD medium (F12/DMEM/5%FBS). Expression of E6/E7 from HPV16 was capable of fully overcoming the FAD-induced EMT. Immortalization was only observed in HPV16-transduced cell lines, while the more proliferating phenotype of both KerHPV8 and 38 was mainly related to FAD-induced EMT. Microarray analysis of exponentially growing cells identified 146 cellular genes that were differentially regulated in HPV16 compared to HPV8- and 38-transduced cells. A large accumulation of transcripts associated with epidermal development and differentiation was observed in HPV16-transduced cells, whereas transcripts of genes involved in the extracellular matrix, multicellular organismal processes, and inflammatory response were affected in HPV8 and 38-transduced cells.

  14. Global Geomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, I.

    1985-01-01

    Any global view of landforms must include an evaluation of the link between plate tectonics and geomorphology. To explain the broad features of the continents and ocean floors, a basic distinction between the tectogene and cratogene part of the Earth's surface must be made. The tectogene areas are those that are dominated by crustal movements, earthquakes and volcanicity at the present time and are essentially those of the great mountain belts and mid ocean ridges. Cratogene areas comprise the plate interiors, especially the old lands of Gondwanaland and Laurasia. Fundamental as this division between plate margin areas and plate interiors is, it cannot be said to be a simple case of a distinction between tectonically active and stable areas. Indeed, in terms of megageomorphology, former plate margins and tectonic activity up to 600 million years ago have to be considered.

  15. Global gamesmanship.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Ian C; van Putten, Alexander B; McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2003-05-01

    Competition among multinationals these days is likely to be a three-dimensional game of global chess: The moves an organization makes in one market are designed to achieve goals in another in ways that aren't immediately apparent to its rivals. The authors--all management professors-call this approach "competing under strategic interdependence," or CSI. And where this interdependence exists, the complexity of the situation can quickly overwhelm ordinary analysis. Indeed, most business strategists are terrible at anticipating the consequences of interdependent choices, and they're even worse at using interdependency to their advantage. In this article, the authors offer a process for mapping the competitive landscape and anticipating how your company's moves in one market can influence its competitive interactions in others. They outline the six types of CSI campaigns--onslaughts, contests, guerrilla campaigns, feints, gambits, and harvesting--available to any multiproduct or multimarket corporation that wants to compete skillfully. They cite real-world examples such as the U.S. pricing battle Philip Morris waged with R.J. Reynolds--not to gain market share in the domestic cigarette market but to divert R.J. Reynolds's resources and attention from the opportunities Philip Morris was pursuing in Eastern Europe. And, using data they collected from their studies of consumer-products companies Procter & Gamble and Unilever, the authors describe how to create CSI tables and bubble charts that present a graphical look at the competitive landscape and that may uncover previously hidden opportunities. The CSI mapping process isn't just for global corporations, the authors explain. Smaller organizations that compete with a portfolio of products in just one national or regional market may find it just as useful for planning their next business moves. PMID:12747163

  16. Global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, John

    2005-06-01

    'Global warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface and act as blankets over the surface keeping it warmer than it would otherwise be. Associated with this warming are changes of climate. The basic science of the 'greenhouse effect' that leads to the warming is well understood. More detailed understanding relies on numerical models of the climate that integrate the basic dynamical and physical equations describing the complete climate system. Many of the likely characteristics of the resulting changes in climate (such as more frequent heat waves, increases in rainfall, increase in frequency and intensity of many extreme climate events) can be identified. Substantial uncertainties remain in knowledge of some of the feedbacks within the climate system (that affect the overall magnitude of change) and in much of the detail of likely regional change. Because of its negative impacts on human communities (including for instance substantial sea-level rise) and on ecosystems, global warming is the most important environmental problem the world faces. Adaptation to the inevitable impacts and mitigation to reduce their magnitude are both necessary. International action is being taken by the world's scientific and political communities. Because of the need for urgent action, the greatest challenge is to move rapidly to much increased energy efficiency and to non-fossil-fuel energy sources.

  17. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  18. Global trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megie, G.; Chanin, M.-L.; Ehhalt, D.; Fraser, P.; Frederick, J. F.; Gille, J. C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Schoebert, M.; Bishop, L.; Bojkov, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    Measuring trends in ozone, and most other geophysical variables, requires that a small systematic change with time be determined from signals that have large periodic and aperiodic variations. Their time scales range from the day-to-day changes due to atmospheric motions through seasonal and annual variations to 11 year cycles resulting from changes in the sun UV output. Because of the magnitude of all of these variations is not well known and highly variable, it is necessary to measure over more than one period of the variations to remove their effects. This means that at least 2 or more times the 11 year sunspot cycle. Thus, the first requirement is for a long term data record. The second related requirement is that the record be consistent. A third requirement is for reasonable global sampling, to ensure that the effects are representative of the entire Earth. The various observational methods relevant to trend detection are reviewed to characterize their quality and time and space coverage. Available data are then examined for long term trends or recent changes in ozone total content and vertical distribution, as well as related parameters such as stratospheric temperature, source gases and aerosols.

  19. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  20. Long-term trends and a sustainability transition

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Robert W.; Parris, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    How do long-term global trends affect a transition to sustainability? We emphasize the “multitrend” nature of 10 classes of trends, which makes them complex, contradictory, and often poorly understood. Each class includes trends that make a sustainability transition more feasible as well as trends that make it more difficult. Taken in their entirety, they serve as a checklist for the consideration of global trends that impact place-based sustainability studies. PMID:12829798

  1. The Transition to a Highly Qualified Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosworth, Derek; Jones, Paul; Wilson, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is putting increasing pressure on jobs in the United Kingdom, particularly among less skilled activities. The European response through the Lisbon Strategy has been diffuse, while UK policy appears much more focused, concentrating on the need to raise education and skill levels. The present paper examines the transition towards a…

  2. Guidelines for Transitional Education Plan Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattanzio, Raphaëlle Martinez; Bethke, Lynne; Haas, Anna; Perrier, Janne Kjaersgaard; De Grauwe, Anton; Sigsgaard, Morten; Bird, Lyndsay; Coury, Diane; Gay, Dorian; MacEwan, Leonora; Seeger, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The "Guidelines for the Transitional Education Plan Preparation" are the result of an extensive consultation process and the product of fruitful guidance and contributions from key partners active in the field of education in emergencies and protracted crises. The new global education agenda 2030 places strong emphasis on countries…

  3. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  4. The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Thomas J.; Clayton, Susan

    2011-01-01

    An appreciation of the psychological impacts of global climate change entails recognizing the complexity and multiple meanings associated with climate change; situating impacts within other social, technological, and ecological transitions; and recognizing mediators and moderators of impacts. This article describes three classes of psychological…

  5. Navstar/Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ananda, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) was developed to provide highly precise position, velocity, and time information to users anywhere in the area of the Earth and at any time. The GPS, when fully operational, will consist of 18 satellites in six orbital planes. Any GPS user, by receiving and processing the radio signals from the satellite network can instantaneously determine navigation information to an accuracy of about 15 m in position and 0.1 m/s in velocity. The GPS is compared with other systems such as Loran-C, Omega, TACAN and Transit.

  6. Global oscillations and active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, C. J.

    The author presents further estimates of the amplitude of the modulation of the solar global velocity signal caused by the passage of active regions across the solar disc. Using measurements of the profile of the K I λ769.9 nm line in the quiet sun and in plages he finds a global velocity variation of ≡2 m s-1 during the transit of a typical active region of area 3300 millionths of the hemisphere. However, during the period in which a velocity amplitude of 6 m s-1 was reported by Claverie et al. (1982), the sunspot areas were exceptionally large and the author confirms Schröter's (1984) result that the combination of spot and plage contributions is sufficient to account for the observed signal. The velocity modulation is thus attributable to surface inhomogeneities, not to the structure of the solar core.

  7. Global F-theory GUTs

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Grimm, Thomas W.; Jurke, Benjamin; Weigand, Timo; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We construct global F-theory GUT models on del Pezzo surfaces in compact Calabi-Yau fourfolds realized as complete intersections of two hypersurface constraints. The intersections of the GUT brane and the flavour branes as well as the gauge flux are described by the spectral cover construction. We consider a split S[U(4) x U(1){sub X}] spectral cover, which allows for the phenomenologically relevant Yukawa couplings and GUT breaking to the MSSM via hypercharge flux while preventing dimension-4 proton decay. General expressions for the massless spectrum, consistency conditions and a new method for the computation of curvature-induced tadpoles are presented. We also provide a geometric toolkit for further model searches in the framework of toric geometry. Finally, an explicit global model with three chiral generations and all required Yukawa couplings is defined on a Calabi-Yau fourfold which is fibered over the del Pezzo transition of the Fano threefold P{sup 4}.

  8. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  9. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  10. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  11. The Managerial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneeland, Steven J.

    1980-01-01

    Having identified the problem of managerial transition in a previous article (CE 510 277), the author outlines a strategy for change which includes performance appraisal, definition of the management structure, and counselling for the individual in transition. (SK)

  12. Glass transition(s) of ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Ionomers are predominantly nonpolar polymers that contain a small amount of bonded salt groups. Microphase separation of ion-rich microdomains occurs as a consequence of the thermodynamic incompatibility of the salt groups and the polymer matrix and associative interactions between salt groups. Associations of the salt groups usually increase the glass transition of the continuous matrix phase, presumably as a consequence of the inhibition of chain mobility that accompanies physical crosslinking. The central question raised in this paper is whether the dispersed ion-rich microphase exhibits a glass transition. Although no glass transition for the microphase is detected by calorimetry, a dynamic mechanical relaxation is commonly observed above the T{sub g} of the matrix phase. This transition has some of the attributes of a glass transition, but it is not clear what is the actual relaxation process that is measured. This paper discusses the effect of the ionic groups on the matrix glass transition, the origin of the high-temperature dynamic mechanical transition, and the effects of the addition of plasticizers on the T{sub g} of the matrix and the higher temperature mechanical relaxation.

  13. Trust transitivity in social networks.

    PubMed

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected "fringe" nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its "fringe" peers. PMID:21483683

  14. Trust Transitivity in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Oliver; Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2011-01-01

    Non-centralized recommendation-based decision making is a central feature of several social and technological processes, such as market dynamics, peer-to-peer file-sharing and the web of trust of digital certification. We investigate the properties of trust propagation on networks, based on a simple metric of trust transitivity. We investigate analytically the percolation properties of trust transitivity in random networks with arbitrary in/out-degree distributions, and compare with numerical realizations. We find that the existence of a non-zero fraction of absolute trust (i.e. entirely confident trust) is a requirement for the viability of global trust propagation in large systems: The average pair-wise trust is marked by a discontinuous transition at a specific fraction of absolute trust, below which it vanishes. Furthermore, we perform an extensive analysis of the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) web of trust, in view of the concepts introduced. We compare different scenarios of trust distribution: community- and authority-centered. We find that these scenarios lead to sharply different patterns of trust propagation, due to the segregation of authority hubs and densely-connected communities. While the authority-centered scenario is more efficient, and leads to higher average trust values, it favours weakly-connected “fringe” nodes, which are directly trusted by authorities. The community-centered scheme, on the other hand, favours nodes with intermediate in/out-degrees, in detriment of the authorities and its “fringe” peers. PMID:21483683

  15. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  16. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  17. Transition: Terms and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ed

    This paper provides explanations and case examples of some terms and concepts related to transition of students with disabilities under 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Explanations and examples focus on the concepts of "statement of transition service needs" and "statement of needed transition services". The…

  18. Globalizing Knowledge: Connecting International & Intercultural Studies. The Academy in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Grant H.; Stoddard, Eve W.

    This is the fourth in a series of occasional papers that analyze the changes taking place in U.S. undergraduate education. This essay examines two streams of reform on the campus and in the curriculum--internationalization and diversification--and suggests that these separate movements must come together in a new paradigm of higher education in…

  19. Seoul Searching: Transitioning Basic Writers within the Global Frontiers Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Tabetha; Meyer, Connie

    2014-01-01

    The course described here was designed especially for students enrolled in a collaborative program between Texas A&M University-Commerce and Konkuk University in South Korea. This course was created specifically for students who did not earn a qualifying score on a standardized placement exam required of all first-year students for enrollment…

  20. An Attainable Global Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castaneda, Viann Pedersen

    Concordia College (Minnesota) has established a global studies curriculum that encourages the development of a global perspective in future business leaders. Global perspective is seen as having five dimensions: (1) perspective consciousness; (2) "state of the planet" awareness; (3) cross-cultural awareness; (4) knowledge of global dynamics; and…

  1. The Changing Disease-Scape in the Third Epidemiological Transition

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin; Armelagos, George

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiological transition model describes the changing relationship between humans and their diseases. The first transition occurred with the shift to agriculture about 10,000 YBP, resulting in a pattern of infectious and nutritional diseases still evident today. In the last two centuries, some populations have undergone a second transition, characterized by a decline in infectious disease and rise in degenerative disease. We are now in the throes of a third epidemiological transition, in which a resurgence of familiar infections is accompanied by an array of novel diseases, all of which have the potential to spread rapidly due to globalization. PMID:20616997

  2. On the theory of global population growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitza, Sergei P.

    2010-12-01

    Ours is an epoch of global demographic revolution, a time of a rapid transition from explosive population growth to a low reproduction level. This, possibly the most momentous change ever witnessed by humankind has, first and foremost, important implications for the dynamics of population. But it also affects billions of people in all aspects of their lives, and it is for this reason that demographic processes have grown into a vast problem, both globally and in Russia. Their fundamental understanding will to a large extent impact the present, the short-term future following the current critical epoch, the stable and uniform global development and its priorities, and indeed global security. Quantitative treatment of historical processes is reached using the phenomenological theory of mankind's population growth. This theory relies on the concepts and methods of physics and its conclusions should take into account the ideas of economics and genetics.

  3. Transforming Academic Globalization into Globalization for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramalhoto, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Driving innovation and continuous improvement with regard to ecological, environmental and human sustainability is essential for win-win globalization. That calls for research on strategic and monitoring planning to manage globalization and technological and scientific change. This paper describes a new basic function of the university institution…

  4. Transit of Venus Culture: A Celestial Phenomenon Intrigues the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueter, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    When Jeremiah Horrocks first observed it in 1639, the transit of Venus was a desirable telescopic target because of its scientific value. By the next transit of Venus in 1761, though, the enlightened public also embraced it as a popular celestial phenomenon. Its stature elevated over the centuries, the transit of Venus has been featured in music, poetry, stamps, plays, books, and art. The June 2004 transit emerged as a surprising global sensation, as suggested by the search queries it generated. Google's Zeitgeist deemed Venus Transit to be the #1 Most Popular Event in the world for that month. New priorities, technologies, and media have brought new audiences to the rare alignment. As the 2012 transit of Venus approaches, the trend continues with publicly accessible capabilities that did not exist only eight years prior. For example, sites from which historic observations have been made are plotted and readily available on Google Earth. A transit of Venus phone app in development will, if fully funded, facilitate a global effort to recreate historic expeditions by allowing smartphone users to submit their observed transit timings to a database for quantifying the Astronomical Unit. While maintaining relevance in modern scientific applications, the transit of Venus has emerged as a cultural attraction that briefly intrigues the mainstream public and inspires their active participation in the spectacle.

  5. Dynamical stability of global vortex strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Nguyen Vien; Ha, To Ba

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent field equations of the nonlinear field systems, whose static soliton solutions are (global) vortex strings, are studied by a numerical approach. They concern (i) the theory of a single complex scalar field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry, and (ii) the system of a complex scalar field doublet with an approximate U(2) symmetry. The obtained numerical solutions allow to clarify the dynamical behaviors of the systems under fluctuations. The systems are shown to have order-chaos phase transitions, but, despite phase transitions and deformations in field profiles by fluctuations, the shapes of the total field energy density distributions are rather stable.

  6. Veterans in Transition: Implications for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Dyar, Kelly L

    2016-07-01

    Recently the United States military has begun strategic reductions in force and as a result many veterans are utilizing education benefits to transition from combat to classroom. During this transitional period, veterans entering nursing programs may struggle to transition from the combat experience to the college campus. Barriers to transition can include stigma, difficulty with peer relationships, differences in military and nursing education structure, and personal and financial responsibilities. Regardless of these barriers, this population, which may include highly trained combat medics and corpsmen, may also bring assets gained through military training and experience that can enhance the nursing profession. These strengths include teamwork, perseverance, ability to focus on assignments, global awareness, and increased self-efficacy. Nursing education research is lacking in the area of combat veterans transitioning into nursing programs, prompting the concern that nursing education is not prepared to meet the needs of this unique population. Gaining better understanding of the barriers to transition and strengths gained through combat can aid the nurse educator in better meeting the needs of this unique population of students. Dyar. PMID:26094841

  7. Global quantum discord in multipartite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rulli, C. C.; Sarandy, M. S.

    2011-10-15

    We propose a global measure for quantum correlations in multipartite systems, which is obtained by suitably recasting the quantum discord in terms of relative entropy and local von Neumann measurements. The measure is symmetric with respect to subsystem exchange and is shown to be nonnegative for an arbitrary state. As an illustration, we consider tripartite correlations in the Werner-GHZ (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger) state and multipartite correlations at quantum criticality. In particular, in contrast with the pairwise quantum discord, we show that the global quantum discord is able to characterize the infinite-order quantum phase transition in the Ashkin-Teller spin chain.

  8. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  9. Moons over Jupiter: transits and shadow transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; et al.

    2003-06-01

    There is no more beautiful illustration of orbital motions than the movements of Jupiter's satellites. Every six years, their movements are most strikingly displayed, when the jovian system is presented edge-on to Earth. This means that there is a higher frequency of multiple transits over the face of the planet, as all the moons transit across the equatorial zone, whereas in other years Ganymede and Callisto transit near the poles or not at all. Also, for a few months, the satellites pass in front of each other, displaying mutual eclipses and occultations. In 2002/2003 we have been able to observe a fine series of these multiple and mutual events. On the cover, and on these pages, are some of the highest-resolution images received.

  10. Analyzing sustainability transitions as a shift between socio-metabolic regimes

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kowalski, Marina

    2011-01-01

    This essay seeks to specify the theoretical choices and assumptions involved in studying sociometabolic transitions, such as sustainability transitions, in a way that distinguishes them from mere “changes”. These generalizations draw on experiences with the empirical analysis of historical transitions on various scale levels. This perspective is illustrated by using material and energy flow data to demonstrate global sociometabolic regime transitions during the 20th century. PMID:27066392

  11. Dynamical Transition in polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen; Markelz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Two of the possible causes for the so called dynamical transition (the rapid increase in flexibility for biomolecules at ˜ 200 K) are: thermally activated side chain diffusive motions with hydration dependent activation energies; or a glass transition in the biological water directly adjacent to the biomolecule. If the transition is strictly due to side chain activation, it should not depend on protein structure. Previously we demonstrated that the dynamical transition remains after tertiary structure was removed using THz time domain dielectric spectroscopy (0.2 -2.0 THz, 0.5-5ps). Here measurements on polyalanine as a function of chain length show that the dynamical transition does not occur for peptide length shorter than 5. However, the transition is observed for 5 mer and higher. Structural and simulation studies indicate that the 5 mer transiently occupies structured forms [1,2]. These results suggest that A) the dynamical transition is not due to thermally activated side chain motion and B) secondary structure is necessary for the dynamical transition. Secondary structure possibly induces sufficient ordering in the adjacent water to result in a fragile to strong glass transition resulting in increased protein flexibility [3]. [1] KAH Wildman et al. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 24 (2003) 94-109. [2] Yuguang Mu,et al. Proteins 58, (2005) 45-52. [3] S.H. Chen et al. PNAS (2006) 9012--9016.

  12. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  13. Global Tuberculosis Report 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2015 This is the twentieth global report ...

  14. Global Health Observatory (GHO)

    MedlinePlus

    ... repository Reports Country statistics Map gallery Standards Global Health Observatory (GHO) data Monitoring health for the SDGs ... relevant web pages on the theme. Monitoring the health goal: indicators of overall progress Mortality and global ...

  15. IMERG Global Precipitation Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration betwee...

  16. Aerothermodynamics of the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, Russell W.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    The aerothermodynamics characteristics of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft are investigated and reported. These results have been used by the Mars Global Surveyor mission planners to design the aerobraking phase of the mission. Analytical and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computer codes were used with a detailed, three dimensional model of the spacecraft to evaluate spacecraft aerobraking characteristics for flight in free molecular and transitional flow regimes. The spacecraft is found to be aerodynamically stable in aerobraking and planned contingency configurations. Aerodynamic forces, moments, and heating are found to be highly dependent on atmospheric density. Accommodation coefficient. is seen to strongly influence drag coefficient. Transitional flow effects are found to reduce overall solar panel heating. Attitude control thruster plumes are shown to interact with the freestream, diminishing the effectiveness of the attitude control system and even leading to thrust reversal. These plume-freestream interaction effects are found to be highly dependent on freestream density.

  17. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  18. Modeling Global Change in Local Places: Capturing Global Change and Local Impacts in a Global Land System Change Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, P.; Eitelberg, D.; Ornetsmueller, C.; van Vliet, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global land use models are driven by demands for food and urban space. However, at the same time many transitions in land use and land cover are driven by societal changes and the demand for a wide range of landscape functions or ecosystem services, including the conservation of biodiversity, regulation of climate and floods, and recreation. Some of these demands lead to tele-connected land use change through the transport of good and services, others are place-based and shape the local realities of land system change. Most current land use change models focus on land cover changes alone and ignore the importance of changes in land management and landscape configuration that affect climate, biodiversity and the provisioning of ecosystem services. This talk will present an alternative approach to global land use modelling based on the simulation of changes in land systems in response to a wide set of ecosystem service demands. Simulations at global scale illustrate that accounting for demands for livestock products, carbon sequestration and biological conservation (following the Aichi targets) leads to different outcomes of land change models and allows the identification of synergies between carbon and biodiversity targets. An application in Laos indicates the complex transitions in land systems and landscapes that occur upon the transition from shifting cultivation to permanent agriculture and tree-crop plantations. We discuss the implications of such land system representations for Earth system modelling.

  19. The Psychology of Globalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnett, Jeffrey Jensen

    2002-01-01

    Examines the influence of globalization on psychological functioning, describing globalization worldwide and its psychological consequences. Notes that most people now develop bicultural identities that combine local identity with global culture-related identity. Identity confusion is increasing among young people in non-western cultures because…

  20. Developing Successful Global Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Everyone seems to agree the world desperately needs strong leaders who can manage a global workforce and all the inherent challenges that go with it. That's a big part of the raison d'etre for global leadership development programs. But are today's organizations fully utilizing these programs to develop global leaders, and, if so, are they…

  1. Mapping Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The demand to cultivate global citizenship is frequently invoked as central to colleges' and universities' internationalization efforts. However, the term "global citizenship" remains undertheorized in the context of U.S. higher education. This article maps and engages three common global citizenship positions--entrepreneurial, liberal…

  2. Globalization and American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, William; Nicoletti, Augustine

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is a potent force in today's world. The welfare of the United States is tied to the welfare of other countries by economics, the environment, politics, culture, information, and technology. This paper identifies the implications of globalization for education, presents applications of important aspects of globalization that teachers…

  3. Global temperatures and the global warming ``debate''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2009-04-01

    Many ordinary citizens listen to pronouncements on talk radio casting doubt on anthropogenic global warming. Some op-ed columnists likewise cast doubts, and are read by credulous citizens. For example, on 8 March 2009, the Boston Globe published a column by Jeff Jacoby, ``Where's global warming?'' According to Jacoby, ``But it isn't such hints of a planetary warming trend that have been piling up in profusion lately. Just the opposite.'' He goes on to write, ``the science of climate change is not nearly as important as the religion of climate change,'' and blamed Al Gore for getting his mistaken views accepted. George Will at the Washington Post also expressed denial. As a result, 44% of U.S. voters, according to the January 19 2009 Rasmussen Report, blame long-term planetary trends for global warming, not human beings. Is there global cooling, as skeptics claim? We examine the temperature record.

  4. Global sea level linked to global temperature

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Martin; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple relationship linking global sea-level variations on time scales of decades to centuries to global mean temperature. This relationship is tested on synthetic data from a global climate model for the past millennium and the next century. When applied to observed data of sea level and temperature for 1880–2000, and taking into account known anthropogenic hydrologic contributions to sea level, the correlation is >0.99, explaining 98% of the variance. For future global temperature scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report, the relationship projects a sea-level rise ranging from 75 to 190 cm for the period 1990–2100. PMID:19995972

  5. Global Health and the Global Economic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Stephen; Bakker, Isabella

    2011-01-01

    Although the resources and knowledge for achieving improved global health exist, a new, critical paradigm on health as an aspect of human development, human security, and human rights is needed. Such a shift is required to sufficiently modify and credibly reduce the present dominance of perverse market forces on global health. New scientific discoveries can make wide-ranging contributions to improved health; however, improved global health depends on achieving greater social justice, economic redistribution, and enhanced democratization of production, caring social institutions for essential health care, education, and other public goods. As with the quest for an HIV vaccine, the challenge of improved global health requires an ambitious multidisciplinary research program. PMID:21330597

  6. Global social identity and global cooperation.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Nancy R; Brewer, Marilynn B; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick K; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2011-06-01

    This research examined the question of whether the psychology of social identity can motivate cooperation in the context of a global collective. Our data came from a multinational study of choice behavior in a multilevel public-goods dilemma conducted among samples drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. Results demonstrate that an inclusive social identification with the world community is a meaningful psychological construct that plays a role in motivating cooperation that transcends parochial interests. Self-reported identification with the world as a whole predicts behavioral contributions to a global public good beyond what is predicted from expectations about what other people are likely to contribute. Furthermore, global social identification is conceptually distinct from general attitudes about global issues, and has unique effects on cooperative behavior. PMID:21586763

  7. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  8. Beyond global warming: Ecology and global change

    SciTech Connect

    Vitousek, P.M. )

    1994-10-01

    While ecologists involved in management or policy often are advised to learn to deal with uncertainty, some components of global environmental change are certainly occurring and are certainly human-caused. All have important ecological consequences. Well-documented global changes include: Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere; alterations in the biogeochemistry of the global nitrogen cycle; and ongoing land use/land cover change. Human activity - now primarily fossil fuel combustion - has increased carbon dioxide concentrations from [approximately] 280 to 355 [mu]L/L since 1800 and is likely to have climatic consequences and direct effects on biota in all terrestrial ecosystems. The global nitrogen cycle has been altered so that more nitrogen is fixed annually by humanity than by all natural pathways combined. Altering atmospheric chemistry and aquatic ecosystems, contributes to eutrophication of the biosphere, and has substantial regional effects on biological diversity. Finally, human land use/land cover change has transformed one-third to one-half of Earth's ice-free surface, representing the most important component of global change now. Any clear dichotomy between pristine ecosystems and human-altered areas that may have existed in the past has vanished, and ecological research should account for this reality. Certain components of global environmental change are the primary causes of anticipated changes in climate, and of ongoing losses of biological diversity. They are caused by the extraordinary growth in size and resource use of the human population. On a broad scale, there is little uncertainty about any of these components of change or their causes. However, much of the public believes the causes of global change to be uncertain and contentious. By speaking out effectively,the focus of public discussion towards what can and should be done about global environmental change can be shifted. 135 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Cooperativity in highly aggregated enzyme systems. A slow transition model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bisswanger, H

    1984-02-25

    Three models are compared describing cooperative phenomena in enzymatic reactions in order to explain sigmoidal saturation curves found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Escherichia coli: the concerted model, the sequential model, and the slow transition model. Both the concerted and the sequential model were considered especially with regard to the increasing number of identical interaction subunits (protomers) in order to get close to the situation found with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which consists of 24 protomers. Applying the sequential model to a great number of protomers results in a weak increase of the Hill coefficient, while, in addition to this effect, the concerted model drastically shifts the sigmoidal range of the saturation function to very low ligand concentrations. Such shift is seen with saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine disphosphate with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and a good fit with theoretical curves derived from the concerted model is obtained. However, subcomplexes with a reduced number of protomers exhibited no change in saturation behavior, thus providing evidence against concerted conformational changes of all subunits of the enzyme complex. A scheme for the initial reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex based on slow transitions is presented and a rate equation has been derived. Ordered binding of thiamine diphosphate and pyruvate and a ligand-induced slow transition between a less active and a fully active enzyme form has been assumed. The curves simulated with this model are in agreement with all essential kinetic data, which are observed with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the atypical shape of the saturation curves of pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate, the respective Hill coefficients and Michaelis constants, the hyperbolic binding behavior of thiamine diphosphate, and the inhibition pattern found for acetyl coenzyme A. PMID:6365912

  10. Global perspectives: A new global ethic, a new global partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Brundtland, G.H.

    1990-06-01

    In her keynote address at the opening plenary session of the Globe '90 Conference held in Vancouver in March, Mrs. Brundtland called for a new global partnership of government, industry, producers and consumers to meet present and future environmental challenges. This partnership would require help to developing countries to help free them from their handicaps of debt, overpopulation and poverty; that improvements made to the environment would not be offset by ecological damage in other areas. She was encouraged that the policy of sustainable development has been widely adapted as the only viable strategy for global change.

  11. Transitions in Spousal Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynda C.; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Jackson, Sharon; Hirsch, Calvin

    2003-01-01

    Describes transitions over 5 years among community-dwelling elderly spouses into and within caregiving roles and associated health outcomes. The trajectory of health outcomes associated with caregiving was generally downward. Those who transitioned to heavy caregiving had more symptoms of depression, and poorer self-reported health and health…

  12. Good Transitions = Great Starts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The smooth transition of outgoing and incoming board members and officers is of vital importance and can determine the PTA's success for years to come. The transition process is the responsibility of both incoming and outgoing officers and board members. It gives closure to those leaving their positions and allows those coming in to be properly…

  13. Children and Transition Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Daily transitions in early childhood centers and classrooms include periods when children are completing one activity, preparing to begin a new activity, and moving from place to place in a room or building. Transition activities involve teaching techniques that prepare learners to listen, relax, sit down, move between locations or activities, and…

  14. Matter in transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU( N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU( N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  15. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  16. Researching Student Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Richard A.; Smith, Gregory P.; Luan, Jing

    2006-01-01

    This article sketches a research agenda for the further study of community college student transitions. Specific techniques are depicted as are potential data sources that can be used to pursue that agenda. The role of student tracking systems in transition research is discussed as well as the applicability of national surveys to the study of…

  17. Transitions and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    If children are to benefit from a healthy, supportive early childhood experience, it is important to strengthen transitions between early childhood experiences in educational and care settings and the more formal educational system. This issue of Coordinator's Notebook focuses on strengthening linkages and transitions between home, preschool, and…

  18. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  19. Advanced IR System For Supersonic Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a preferred method investigating transition in flight: a) Global and non-intrusive; b) Can also be used to visualize and characterize other fluid mechanic phenomena such as shock impingement, separation etc. F-15 based system was updated with new camera and digital video recorder to support high Reynolds number transition tests. Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability and allows for accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements and greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena.

  20. Quantum tunneling with global charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. )

    1994-10-15

    We investigate quantum tunneling in the theory of a complex scalar field with a global U(1) symmetry when the charge density of the initial configuration does not vanish. We discuss the possible final configurations and set up the Euclidean path integral formalism to find the bubble nucleation and to study the bubble evolution. For the stationary path, or the bounce solution, in the Euclidean time, the phase variable becomes pure imaginary so that the charge density remains real. We apply this formalism to examples when the initial charge density is small. While the phase transition considered here occurs in zero temperature, the bubble dynamics is richly complicated, involving conserved charge, the sound wave, and the supersonic bubble wall.

  1. Global Health Governance at a Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Nora Y.; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2014-01-01

    This review takes stock of the global health governance (GHG) literature. We address the transition from international health governance (IHG) to global health governance, identify major actors, and explain some challenges and successes in GHG. We analyze the framing of health as national security, human security, human rights, and global public good, and the implications of these various frames. We also establish and examine from the literature GHG’s major themes and issues, which include: 1) persistent GHG problems; 2) different approaches to tackling health challenges (vertical, horizontal, and diagonal); 3) health’s multisectoral connections; 4) neoliberalism and the global economy; 5) the framing of health (e.g. as a security issue, as a foreign policy issue, as a human rights issue, and as a global public good); 6) global health inequalities; 7) local and country ownership and capacity; 8) international law in GHG; and 9) research gaps in GHG. We find that decades-old challenges in GHG persist and GHG needs a new way forward. A framework called shared health governance offers promise. PMID:24729828

  2. Future Earth - Research for Global Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Diana; Berkhout, Frans

    2014-05-01

    Future Earth is a 10-year international research programme that aims to provide the critical knowledge required for societies to understand and address challenges posed by global environmental change (GEC) and to seize opportunities for transitions to global sustainability. Future Earth research is organised around three broad and integrated research themes: Dynamic Planet; Global Development; and Transformations towards Sustainability. It builds upon and integrates the existing GEC Programmes: World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), DIVERSITAS (international programme of biodiversity science), the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP) and the Earth Systems Science Partnership (ESSP). This presentation will outline the key principles of Future Earth, such as the integration of natural and social science, and will describe how the programme intends to address the challenges of global environmental change. Some of the major research questions addressed by Future Earth could include: further understanding of the dynamics of the Earth system (including socio-ecology); risks relating to tipping points; how to ensure sustainable access to food, water and energy; and whether the present economic system provides the necessary framework for low carbon transition.

  3. A Posteriori Transit Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Given the radial velocity (RV) detection of an unseen companion, it is often of interest to estimate the probability that the companion also transits the primary star. Typically, one assumes a uniform distribution for the cosine of the inclination angle i of the companion's orbit. This yields the familiar estimate for the prior transit probability of ~Rlowast/a, given the primary radius Rlowast and orbital semimajor axis a, and assuming small companions and a circular orbit. However, the posterior transit probability depends not only on the prior probability distribution of i but also on the prior probability distribution of the companion mass Mc, given a measurement of the product of the two (the minimum mass Mc sin i) from an RV signal. In general, the posterior can be larger or smaller than the prior transit probability. We derive analytic expressions for the posterior transit probability assuming a power-law form for the distribution of true masses, dΓ/dMcvpropMcα, for integer values -3 <= α <= 3. We show that for low transit probabilities, these probabilities reduce to a constant multiplicative factor fα of the corresponding prior transit probability, where fα in general depends on α and an assumed upper limit on the true mass. The prior and posterior probabilities are equal for α = -1. The posterior transit probability is ~1.5 times larger than the prior for α = -3 and is ~4/π times larger for α = -2, but is less than the prior for α>=0, and can be arbitrarily small for α > 1. We also calculate the posterior transit probability in different mass regimes for two physically-motivated mass distributions of companions around Sun-like stars. We find that for Jupiter-mass planets, the posterior transit probability is roughly equal to the prior probability, whereas the posterior is likely higher for Super-Earths and Neptunes (10 M⊕ - 30 M⊕) and Super-Jupiters (3 MJup - 10 MJup), owing to the predicted steep rise in the mass function toward smaller

  4. The use of transition region characteristics to improve the numerical simulation of heat transfer in bypass transitional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for improving the numerical prediction of bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero or favorable pressure gradient. The method utilizes low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence models in combination with the characteristic parameters of the transition region. The parameters representing the characteristics of the transition region used are the intermittency, transition length and turbulent spot properties. An analysis is made of the transition length in terms of turbulent spot variables. The nondimensional spot formation rate, required for the prediction of the transition length, is shown by the analysis to be a function of the spot spreading angle, the dimensionless spot velocity ratio and the dimensionless spot area ratio. The intermittency form of the k-epsilon equations were derived from conditionally averaged equations which have been shown to be an improvement over global-time-averaged equations for the numerical calculation of the transition region. The numerical predictions are in general good agreement with the experimental data and indicate the potential use of the method in accelerating flows. Turbulence models of the k-epsilon type are known to underpredict the transition length. The present work demonstrates how incorporating transition region characteristics improves the ability of two-equation turbulence models to simulate bypass transition for flat plates with potential application to turbine vanes and blades.

  5. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  6. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K−1 decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  7. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  8. Predictability of critical transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance. PMID:26651760

  9. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  10. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  11. Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilman, David; Clark, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance.

  12. Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health.

    PubMed

    Tilman, David; Clark, Michael

    2014-11-27

    Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance. PMID:25383533

  13. The New Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Patricia M.; Davison, Veronica; Slutsker, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Global health reflects the realities of globalization, including worldwide dissemination of infectious and noninfectious public health risks. Global health architecture is complex and better coordination is needed between multiple organizations. Three overlapping themes determine global health action and prioritization: development, security, and public health. These themes play out against a background of demographic change, socioeconomic development, and urbanization. Infectious diseases remain critical factors, but are no longer the major cause of global illness and death. Traditional indicators of public health, such as maternal and infant mortality rates no longer describe the health status of whole societies; this change highlights the need for investment in vital registration and disease-specific reporting. Noncommunicable diseases, injuries, and mental health will require greater attention from the world in the future. The new global health requires broader engagement by health organizations and all countries for the objectives of health equity, access, and coverage as priorities beyond the Millennium Development Goals are set. PMID:23876365

  14. Globalization, culture and psychology.

    PubMed

    Melluish, Steve

    2014-10-01

    This article outlines the cultural and psychological effects of globalization. It looks at the impact of globalization on identity; ideas of privacy and intimacy; the way we understand and perceive psychological distress; and the development of the profession of psychology around the world. The article takes a critical perspective on globalization, seeing it as aligned with the spread of neoliberal capitalism, a tendency towards cultural homogenization, the imposition of dominant 'global north' ideas and the resultant growing inequalities in health and well-being. However, it also argues that the increased interconnectedness created by globalization allows for greater acknowledgement of our common humanity and for collective efforts to be developed to tackle what are increasingly global problems. This requires the development of more nuanced understandings of cultural differences and of indigenous psychologies. PMID:25343628

  15. The improved code TAC maker for modeling of planet transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Dimitrov, D.; Vladev, A.

    We present improvements of the code TAC-maker for modeling of planet transits. While the initial version of the code calculated synthetic transits for certain values of the input parameters, the new version TAC-maker 1.1.0 gives a possibility to obtain simultaneously numerous synthetic transits corresponding to chosen ranges of values for each fitted parameter. The most valuable property of the improved version of the code is the ability to obtain the global minimum of χ^{2} in the multidimensional parametric space and to estimate the errors of the searched parameters.

  16. Global health for a globally minded president.

    PubMed

    Daulaire, Nils

    2009-01-01

    President-elect Barack Obama can build on historic initiatives championed by his predecessor in global AIDS and malaria. These should serve as the platform for a more comprehensive and evidence-based set of activities aimed at addressing the major causes of ill health and instability in low-income countries. Obama should launch a new Global Family Health Action Plan aimed at saving the lives of six million children and women annually in impoverished nations. Existing policies driven by U.S. domestic ideological battles, particularly those relating to sexual and reproductive health, should be revised and brought into line with solid science and evidence from the field. PMID:19151008

  17. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  18. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin; Goodman, Steven J.; Christy, John R.; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.; Chou, Shi-Hung; Crosson, William; Wang, Shouping; Ramirez, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    This research is the MSFC component of a joint MSFC/Pennsylvania State University Eos Interdisciplinary Investigation on the global water cycle extension across the earth sciences. The primary long-term objective of this investigation is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates change on both global and regional scales. Significant accomplishments in the past year are presented and include the following: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) global modeling; and (4) optimal precipitation and stream flow analysis and hydrologic processes.

  19. NASA Global Hawk Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naftel, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Global Hawk Project is supporting Earth Science research customers. These customers include: US Government agencies, civilian organizations, and universities. The combination of the Global Hawks range, endurance, altitude, payload power, payload volume and payload weight capabilities separates the Global Hawk platform from all other platforms available to the science community. This presentation includes an overview of the concept of operations and an overview of the completed science campaigns. In addition, the future science plans, using the NASA Global Hawk System, will be presented.

  20. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  1. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  2. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  3. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  4. Magellan in transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Aerobraking Magellan would provide the possibility of obtaining gravity field data for Venus all the way to the poles. Attempts to accomplish aerobraking, which began on May 25, 1993 in the Magellan Transition Experiment, are discussed.

  5. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  6. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  7. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  8. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  9. Matter in transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, wheremore » a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.« less

  10. From Global Knowledge to Global Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzini, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I argue that student learning is enhanced when civic engagement is a component of international education initiatives. When only presented with knowledge about global challenges, students can become frustrated and overwhelmed unless they also understand how they might contribute to solutions. Political science programs are…

  11. "Global Competency" Is Imperative for Global Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimers, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    According to a recent report of scenarios prepared by the National Intelligence Council, the next 15 years will bring significant global changes, including the transformation of the international political system built after World War II, a transfer of wealth from the West to the East, pressure on natural resources resulting from continuing…

  12. Learning to Plunder: Global Education, Global Inequality and the Global City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannock, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Most research and policy discussions of education in the global city have focused on the ways in which globalization and the emergence of global or globalizing cities can create social, economic and educational inequality locally, within the global city itself. Global cities, however, are, by definition, powerful places, where the core…

  13. Preparing Global Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Welch, Lucas; Al-Khanji, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Global citizens are those who are aware of, demonstrate respect for, and are comfortable engaging across cultural boundaries. This article explores why preparing global citizens is important and how positive psychology can inform our understanding of those who engage comfortably in today's complicated world. Soliya's Connect program is described…

  14. Global Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the different definitions and conceptualizations of global education, stating that much of the traditional curriculum of international studies can be reinterpreted to prepare students to participate in an interdependent society. Gives nine objectives for global education, and delineates the issues surrounding current conceptions of…

  15. Poverty + Hunger = Global Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard H.

    1983-01-01

    Geography teachers can use mathematics to teach fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students about critical global issues. Five sample problems concerning population, poverty, waste, the arms race, and hunger are presented. The global issue related to each problem is discussed, and the solution and mathematical skill are provided. (RM)

  16. Defining Global Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Sarina; Lattimer, Heather

    2013-01-01

    As the world is becoming increasingly flat, it has become important for educators to prepare students to understand global perspectives and engage with people from countries and cultures around the world. Although there is no question as to the importance of global education to meet with the demands of a flat world, what internationalization and…

  17. Global Diversity and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Art

    2003-01-01

    Argues that global diversity has become a business imperative in today's business climate. Global diversity is of core importance even for companies that are considered domestic. Suggests community colleges need help in understanding their customer base and their shifting values in order to meet their needs and win customer loyalty. (NB)

  18. Globally Collaborative Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utsumi, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    The Global University System (GUS) [Utsumi, et al, 2003] is a worldwide initiative to create advanced telecommunications infrastructure for access to educational resources across national and cultural boundaries for global peace. GUS aims to create a worldwide consortium of universities to provide the underdeveloped world with access to 21st…

  19. Building Global Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Buchem, Ilona; Camacho, Mar; Cronin, Catherine; Gordon, Averill; Keegan, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Within the background where education is increasingly driven by the economies of scale and research funding, we propose an alternative online open and connected framework (OOC) for building global learning communities using mobile social media. We critique a three year action research case study involving building collaborative global learning…

  20. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and discusses the…

  1. Global Managers' Career Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappellen, Tineke; Janssens, Maddy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to empirically examine the career competencies of global managers having world-wide coordination responsibility: knowing-why, knowing-how and knowing-whom career competencies. Design/methodology/approach: Based on in-depth interviews with 45 global managers, the paper analyzes career stories from a content analysis…

  2. The Global Thinking Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassard, Jack; Weisburg, Julie

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Global Thinking Project, a collaborative effort between Georgia State University and the Russian Academy of Pedagogical Sciences to develop strategies, methods, and teaching materials to help students think globally. Students are connected through the AppleLink network. Student and teacher attitudes toward the project are reported.…

  3. Globalization, Interdependence and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Deane

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary globalization is marked by rapidly and dramatically increasing interdependence, which operates both within and among countries. Increasing global interdependence has profound influence on education at all levels, such as how to deal with a world with more permeable boundaries in which people are on the move more frequently (migration)…

  4. Global Interaction in Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Audrey Grace

    2010-01-01

    Based on a virtual conference, Glide'08 (Global Interaction in Design Education), that brought international design scholars together online, this special issue expands on the topics of cross-cultural communication and design and the technological affordances that support such interaction. The author discusses the need for global interaction in…

  5. Global 2000 Countdown Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Fourteen units for high school global education classes are based on "The Global 2000 Report to the President," which examines the relationships between worldwide population growth and resource and environmental consequences. Topics of the units are population; income; food; fisheries; forests; water; nonfuel minerals; energy; impacts on…

  6. Critically Theorizing the Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudelli, William

    2013-01-01

    Globalization has unleashed profound changes in education. These include positivistic international school comparisons, a singular focus on schools as drivers of economic development, and the adoption of neoliberal market principles in school. These changes, however, generally go unexamined within the field and literature of global education.…

  7. Globalization of Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Robert F.; Iannarelli, Juliane

    2011-01-01

    A new study, sponsored by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, presented a comprehensive new perspective on the globalization of management education, (AACSB International, 2011). Its findings are sobering: with regard to emerging global trends in higher education and cross-border business, the report reveals a sizable gap…

  8. Assessing Individuals' Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Kelly Carter; Braskamp, David C.; Braskamp, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Global Perspective Inventory (GPI), a survey instrument that measures participants' global perspective in terms of cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal domains--each in terms of both development and acquisition. A summary of the recent research on the GPI is provided along with a discussion of potential uses.

  9. Translation as (Global) Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  10. Teaching Global Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peet, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the course, "Global Society," for first-year International Studies students at a Massachusetts liberal arts college. The course, which takes a historical approach, informs students about the nature, history, and present characteristics of the global system, taking theoretical, historical, and critical approaches that stress the…

  11. Simulating Global Climate Summits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesperman, Dean P.; Haste, Turtle; Alrivy, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    One of the most persistent and controversial issues facing the global community is climate change. With the creation of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992 and the Kyoto Protocol (1997), the global community established some common ground on how to address this issue. However, the last several climate summits have failed…

  12. Global Wind Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes a new global wind-power map that has quantified global wind power and may help planners place turbines in locations that can maximize power from the winds and provide widely available low-cost energy. The researchers report that their study can assist in locating wind farms in regions known for strong and consistent…

  13. Global patterns in lake surface temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, C.; Sharma, S.; Gray, D.; Hampton, S. E.; Read, J. S.; Rowley, R.; McIntyre, P. B.; Lenters, J. D.; Schneider, P.; Hook, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature profoundly affects dynamics in the water bodieson which human societies depend worldwide. Even relatively small water temperature changes can alter lake thermal structure with implications for water level, nutrient cycling, ecosystem productivity, and food web dynamics. As air temperature increases with climate change and human land use transforms watersheds, rising water temperatures have been reported for individual lakes or regions, but a global synthesis is lacking; such a synthesis is foundational for understanding the state of freshwater resources. We investigated global patterns in lake surface water temperatures between 1985 and 2009 using in-situ and satellite data from 236 lakes. We demonstrate that lakes are warming significantly around the globe, at an average rate of 0.34 °C per decade. The breadth of lakes in this study allowed examination of the diversity of drivers across global lakes, and highlighted the importance of ice cover in determining the suite of morphological and climate drivers for lake temperature dynamics. These empirical results are consistent with modeled predictions of climate change, taking into account the extent to which water warming can be modulated by local environmental conditions and thus defy simple correlations with air temperature. The water temperature changes we report have fundamental importance for thermal structure and ecosystem functioning in global water resources; recognition of the extent to which lakes are currently in transition should have broad implications for regional and global models as well as for management.

  14. Phase transitions in fluids and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Maksim

    In this thesis, I consider systems from two seemingly different fields: fluid dynamics and microbial ecology. In these systems, the unifying features are the existences of global non-equilibrium steady states. I consider generic and statistical models for transitions between these global states, and I relate the model results with experimental data. A theme of this thesis is that these rather simple, minimal models are able to capture a lot of functional detail about complex dynamical systems. In Part I, I consider the transition between laminar and turbulent flow. I find that quantitative and qualitative features of pipe flow experiments, the superexponential lifetime and the splitting of turbulent puffs, and the growth rate of turbulent slugs, can all be explained by a coarse-grained, phenomenological model in the directed percolation universality class. To relate this critical phenomena approach closer to the fluid dynamics, I consider the transition to turbulence in the Burgers equation, a simplified model for Navier-Stokes equations. Via a transformation to a model of directed polymers in a random medium, I find that the transition to Burgers turbulence may also be in the directed percolation universality class. This evidence implies that the turbulent-to-laminar transition is statistical in nature and does not depend on details of the Navier-Stokes equations describing the fluid flow. In Part II, I consider the disparate subject of microbial ecology where the complex interactions within microbial ecosystems produce observable patterns in microbe abundance, diversity and genotype. In order to be able to study these patterns, I develop a bioinformatics pipeline to multiply align and quickly cluster large microbial metagenomics datasets. I also develop a novel metric that quantifies the degree of interactions underlying the assembly of a microbial ecosystem, particularly the transition between neutral (random) and niche (deterministic) assembly. I apply this

  15. Venus Transit 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Odenwald, S. F.

    2002-09-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the astronomical unit, calculation of longitudes on the earth, and detection of Venus' atmosphere. The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum in partnership with the Solar System Exploration Forum, DPS, and a number of NASA space missions is developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in the US and Europe will offer real time viewing of the transit and conduct educational programs through professional development seminars, public lectures, and planetarium shows. We are interested in soliciting advice from the research community to coordinate professional research interests with this program.

  16. Global value trees.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Puliga, Michelangelo; Cerina, Federica; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of production across countries has become an important feature of the globalization in recent decades and is often conceptualized by the term "global value chains" (GVCs). When empirically investigating the GVCs, previous studies are mainly interested in knowing how global the GVCs are rather than how the GVCs look like. From a complex networks perspective, we use the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) to study the evolution of the global production system. We find that the industry-level GVCs are indeed not chain-like but are better characterized by the tree topology. Hence, we compute the global value trees (GVTs) for all the industries available in the WIOD. Moreover, we compute an industry importance measure based on the GVTs and compare it with other network centrality measures. Finally, we discuss some future applications of the GVTs. PMID:25978067

  17. Global Value Trees

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Puliga, Michelangelo; Cerina, Federica; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of production across countries has become an important feature of the globalization in recent decades and is often conceptualized by the term “global value chains” (GVCs). When empirically investigating the GVCs, previous studies are mainly interested in knowing how global the GVCs are rather than how the GVCs look like. From a complex networks perspective, we use the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) to study the evolution of the global production system. We find that the industry-level GVCs are indeed not chain-like but are better characterized by the tree topology. Hence, we compute the global value trees (GVTs) for all the industries available in the WIOD. Moreover, we compute an industry importance measure based on the GVTs and compare it with other network centrality measures. Finally, we discuss some future applications of the GVTs. PMID:25978067

  18. "Becoming Somebody": Youth Transitions through Education and Migration in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crivello, Gina

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have witnessed international pressure to get more children in the world educated, for longer. The view that school education is core to definitions of good childhoods and successful youth transitions is increasingly widespread, globally and locally. However, structural inequalities persist and migration for education has…

  19. Learning about the Importance of Education for Labour Market Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Esther; Tellado, Itxaso; De Botton, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This article centres on the importance given by individuals to the process of education in labour market transitions and how they manage to overcome obstacles to achieve their goals. Many of the stories in the Spanish research were transformative and innovative despite the context of high levels of unemployment in Spain due to the global economic…

  20. Globalization and Health.

    PubMed

    Martin, Greg

    2005-04-22

    This debut editorial of Globalization and Health introduces the journal, briefly delineating its goals and objectives and outlines its scope of subject matter. 'Open Access' publishing is expected to become an increasingly important format for peer reviewed academic journals and that Globalization and Health is 'Open Access' is appropriate. The rationale behind starting a journal dedicated to globalization and health is three fold:Firstly: Globalization is reshaping the social geography within which we might strive to create health or prevent disease. The determinants of health - be they a SARS virus or a predilection for fatty foods - have joined us in our global mobility. Driven by economic liberalization and changing technologies, the phenomenon of 'access' is likely to dominate to an increasing extent the unfolding experience of human disease and wellbeing.Secondly: Understanding globalization as a subject matter itself needs certain benchmarks and barometers of its successes and failings. Health is one such barometer. It is a marker of social infrastructure and social welfare and as such can be used to either sound an alarm or give a victory cheer as our interconnectedness hurts and heals the populations we serve.And lastly: In as much as globalization can have an effect on health, it is also true that health and disease has an effect on globalization as exemplified by the existence of quarantine laws and the devastating economic effects of the AIDS pandemic.A balanced view would propose that the effects of globalization on health (and health systems) are neither universally good nor bad, but rather context specific. If the dialogue pertaining to globalization is to be directed or biased in any direction, then it must be this: that we consider the poor first. PMID:15847699

  1. Global Collaborations - Prospects and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2005-04-01

    International collaboration has long been a feature of science. Collaborative investments in joint facilities and projects have grown considerably over the past 20-40 years, and many projects have been multinational from the start. This has been particularly true in Europe, where intergovernmental organizations such as CERN, ESA, and ESO have enabled European countries to carry out forefront science with state-of-art facilites which would have been beyond the capabilities of any one country. A brief survey of these organizations, their structure, and the possible reasons behind their success is given. The transition from regional to global creates new problems. Global scale projects face a range of generic issues which must be addressed and overcome if the project is to be a success. Each project has its own specific boundary conditions and each adopts an approach best fitted to its own objectives and constraints. Experience with billion dollar projects such as the SSC, LHC, and ITER shows the key problem areas and demonstrates the importance of preparatory work in the early stages to settle issues such as schedule, funding, location, legal and managerial structure, and oversight. A range of current and proposed intercontinental or global projects - so- called ``Megascience Projects" - is reviewed. Such projects, originally a feature of space and particle physics, are now becoming more common, and very large projects in astronomy, for example ALMA and 50 - 100m telescopes, and other areas of physics now fall into the `global' category. These projects are on such a large scale, from any scientific, managerial, financial or political perspective, and have such global importance, that they have necessarily been conceived as international from the outset. Increasing financial pressures on governments and funding agencies in the developed countries place additional demands on the project planning. The contrasting approaches, problems faced, and progress made in various

  2. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition for X-33 Phase 2 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, Harris H., II; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A status review of the experimental and computational work performed to support the X-33 program in the area of hypersonic boundary-layer transition is presented. Global transition fronts are visualized using thermographic phosphor measurements. Results are used to derive transition correlations for "smooth body" and discrete roughness data and a computational tool is developed to predict transition onset for X-33 using these results. The X-33 thermal protection system appears to be conservatively designed for transition effects based on these studies. Additional study is needed to address concerns related to surface waviness. A discussion of future test plans is included.

  3. Phase transitions in least-effort communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Ay, Nihat; Obst, Oliver; Polani, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    We critically examine a model that attempts to explain the emergence of power laws (e.g., Zipf's law) in human language. The model is based on the principle of least effort in communications—specifically, the overall effort is balanced between the speaker effort and listener effort, with some trade-off. It has been shown that an information-theoretic interpretation of this principle is sufficiently rich to explain the emergence of Zipf's law in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems (one signal for all referable objects) and indexical reference systems (one signal per object). The phase transition is defined in the space of communication accuracy (information content) expressed in terms of the trade-off parameter. Our study explicitly solves the continuous optimization problem, subsuming a recent, more specific result obtained within a discrete space. The obtained results contrast Zipf's law found by heuristic search (that attained only local minima) in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems and indexical reference systems, with an inverse-factorial (sub-logarithmic) law found at the transition that corresponds to global minima. The inverse-factorial law is observed to be the most representative frequency distribution among optimal solutions.

  4. RTGs on Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassoulas, John; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Transit, the US Navy's Navigation Satellite System was conceived at the Applied Physics Laboratory in 1957 by observing the Doppler shift while tracking Sputnik I. As spacecraft development proceeded there was concern about the ability of batteries to maintain the hermetic seal over a 5-year operational life requirement; therefore, alternate energy sources were investigated. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) concept was pursued and resulted in the launch of SNAP 3s, providing partial power on both Transit 4A and 4B. SNAP 9s provided full power on three Transit 5BNs. All launches occurred in the early 1960s. When the U.S. conducted the high altitude nuclear test from Johnson Island, several spacecraft were lost due to artificial enhancement of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere resulting in rapid degradation of solar cell power production. This led to the decision to have both an RTG and Solar cell/battery design for Transit power systems; hence, a new RTG design, with a separable heat source and radiative coupling to the thermoelectric elements, was flown on TRIAD. This pioneering effort provided the impetus for future RTGs on interplanetary spacecraft. This paper describes the origin and purpose of the Transit program and provides details on the five satellites in that program that were powered by the first American RTGs used in space. The rationale and some of the challenges inherent in that use are also described.

  5. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  6. Trends in global earthquake loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnst, Isabel; Wenzel, Friedemann; Daniell, James

    2016-04-01

    Based on the CATDAT damage and loss database we analyse global trends of earthquake losses (in current values) and fatalities for the period between 1900 and 2015 from a statistical perspective. For this time period the data are complete for magnitudes above 6. First, we study the basic statistics of losses and find that losses below 10 bl. US satisfy approximately a power law with an exponent of 1.7 for the cumulative distribution. Higher loss values are modelled with the General Pareto Distribution (GPD). The 'transition' between power law and GPD is determined with the Mean Excess Function. We split the data set into a period of pre 1955 and post 1955 loss data as in those periods the exposure is significantly different due to population growth. The Annual Average Loss (AAL) for direct damage for events below 10 bl. US differs by a factor of 6, whereas the incorporation of the extreme loss events increases the AAL from 25 bl. US/yr to 30 bl. US/yr. Annual Average Deaths (AAD) show little (30%) difference for events below 6.000 fatalities and AAD values of 19.000 and 26.000 deaths per year if extreme values are incorporated. With data on the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) that reflects the annual expenditures (consumption, investment, government spending) and on capital stock we relate losses to the economic capacity of societies and find that GDP (in real terms) grows much faster than losses so that the latter one play a decreasing role given the growing prosperity of mankind. This reasoning does not necessarily apply on a regional scale. Main conclusions of the analysis are that (a) a correct projection of historic loss values to nowadays US values is critical; (b) extreme value analysis is mandatory; (c) growing exposure is reflected in the AAL and AAD results for the periods pre and post 1955 events; (d) scaling loss values with global GDP data indicates that the relative size - from a global perspective - of losses decreases rapidly over time.

  7. Governing the global commons with local institutions.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Todd; Salathé, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Most problems faced by modern human society have two characteristics in common--they are tragedy-of-the-commons type of problems, and they are global problems. Tragedy-of-the-commons type of problems are those where a commonly shared resource is overexploited by free riders at the expense of everyone sharing the resource. The exploitation of global resources such as clean air and water, political stability and peace, etc. underlies many of the most pressing human problems. Punishment of free riding behavior is one of the most frequently used strategies to combat the problem, but the spatial reach of sanctioning institutions is often more limited than the spatial effects of overexploitation. Here, we analyze a general game theoretical model to assess under what circumstances sanctioning institutions with limited reach can maintain the larger commons. We find that the effect of the spatial reach has a strong effect on whether and how the commons can be maintained, and that the transitions between those outcomes are characterized by phase transitions. The latter indicates that a small change in the reach of sanctioning systems can profoundly change the way the global commons can be managed. PMID:22509269

  8. Temperature-dependent phase transitions of a complex biological membrane in zeptoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Hohlbauch, Sophia; King, William P; Voitchovsky, K; Contera, S Antoranz; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions in purple membrane have been a topic of debate for the past two decades. In this work we present studies of a reversible transition of purple membrane in the 50 60 C range in zeptoliter volumes under different heating regimes (global heating and local heating). The temperature of the reversible phase transition is 52 5 C for both local and global heating, supporting the hypothesis that this transition is mainly due to a structural rearrangement of bR molecules and trimers. To achieve high resolution measurements of temperature-dependent phase transitions, a new scanning probe microscopy-based method was developed. We believe that our new technique can be extended to other biological systems and can contribute to the understanding of inhomogeneous phase transitions in complex systems.

  9. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  10. Biospheric primary production during an ENSO transition.

    PubMed

    Behrenfeld, M J; Randerson, J T; McClain, C R; Feldman, G C; Los, S O; Tucker, C J; Falkowski, P G; Field, C B; Frouin, R; Esaias, W E; Kolber, D D; Pollack, N H

    2001-03-30

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provides global monthly measurements of both oceanic phytoplankton chlorophyll biomass and light harvesting by land plants. These measurements allowed the comparison of simultaneous ocean and land net primary production (NPP) responses to a major El Niño to La Niña transition. Between September 1997 and August 2000, biospheric NPP varied by 6 petagrams of carbon per year (from 111 to 117 petagrams of carbon per year). Increases in ocean NPP were pronounced in tropical regions where El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) impacts on upwelling and nutrient availability were greatest. Globally, land NPP did not exhibit a clear ENSO response, although regional changes were substantial. PMID:11283369

  11. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  12. How global brands compete.

    PubMed

    Holt, Douglas B; Quelch, John A; Taylor, Earl L

    2004-09-01

    It's time to rethink global branding. More than two decades ago, Harvard Business School professor Theodore Levitt argued that corporations should grow by selling standardized products all over the world. But consumers in most countries had trouble relating to generic products, so executives instead strove for global scale on backstage activities such as production while customizing product features and selling techniques to local tastes. Such "glocal" strategies now rule marketing. Global branding has lost more luster recently because transnational companies have been under siege, with brands like Coca-Cola and Nike becoming lightning rods for antiglobalization protests. The instinctive reaction of most transnational companies has been to try to fly below the radar. But global brands can't escape notice. In fact, most transnational corporations don't realize that because of their power and pervasiveness, people view them differently than they do other firms. In a research project involving 3,300 consumers in 41 countries, the authors found that most people choose one global brand over another because of differences in the brands'global qualities. Ratherthan ignore the global characteristics of their brands, firms must learn to manage those characteristics. That's critical, because future growth for most companies will likely come from foreign markets. Consumers base preferences on three dimensions of global brands--quality (signaled by a company's global stature); the cultural myths that brands author; and firms' efforts to address social problems. The authors also found that it didn't matter to consumers whether the brands they bought were American--a remarkable finding considering that the study was conducted when anti-American sentiment in many nations was on the rise. PMID:15449856

  13. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  14. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  15. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  16. Identity, Family, and Faith: U.S. Third Culture Kids Transition to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortegast, Carrie; Yount, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent trends in globalization have increased the number of U.S. children and adolescents being raised outside the United States. Using the framework of adults in transition, the authors sought to understand the structure of Third Culture Kids' (TCKs), specifically Missionary Kids', transition to college. Findings indicate that participants must…

  17. Globalization and health.

    PubMed

    Walt, G

    2001-01-01

    Globalization means different things to different people; a general definition is the increasing movement of information, material and people across borders. It can be considered in terms of five conflicting but inter-relating themes, economic transformation; new patterns of trade; an increasing poverty gap associated with widening health inequalities; the revolution in electronic communication; and the growing role of non-state actors, such as non-governmental organizations and transnational corporations, in global governance. Globalization is both an opportunity and a threat, but it is not inexorable. Successful action against its undesirable aspects is possible. PMID:11339346

  18. Global atmospheric changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the processes that are responsible for the greenhouse effect, air pollution, acid deposition, and increased exposure to UV radiation. PMID:1820255

  19. Control of atomic transition rates via laser-light shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáuregui, R.

    2015-04-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, require waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be naturally described as modifications of the atomic angular momentum, this enhancement is maximal (within propagation invariant beams) for Bessel modes, Mathieu modes can be used to entangle the internal and center-of-mass involved states, and Weber beams suppress this kind of transition unless they have a significant component of odd modes. However, if a recoil effect of the transition with an adequate symmetry is allowed, the global transition rate (center of mass and internal motion) can also be enhanced using Weber modes. The global analysis presented reinforces the idea that a better control of the transitions between internal atomic states requires both a proper control of the available states of the atomic center of mass, and shaping of the background electromagnetic field.

  20. [Transition in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, M; Elowe-Gruau, E; Dwyer, A; Aquarone, M-P; Unal, S; Jornayvaz, F R; Perrenoud, L; Gastaldi, G; Castellsague, M; Dirlewanger, M; Schwitzgebel, V M

    2015-02-18

    For patients with type I diabetes, transition from pediatric to adult care is a challenge due to complex treatment requirements and the physical, psychological and social changes of adolescence. Members of the care team must recognize that while these emerging adults need to develop self-management skills, this may conflict at times with the developmentally appropriate desire for increasing autonomy. The role of nursing in coordinating a successful transition is critical for maintaining continuity of patient-centered care that responds to the specific needs of these young adults. PMID:25915986

  1. Network Observability Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E.

    2012-12-01

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network’s community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to “observability attacks.” Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  2. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  3. Global Timing With Low- and High-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.; Ondrasik, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report summarizes method for synchronizing clocks at intercontinental distances employing satellites of Global Positioning System (GPS) in high Earth orbit and transit satellite in orbit at relatively low altitude of about 1,300 km. When fully implemented, method expected to supply precise time measurements for world-wide communication and navigation.

  4. The Global Enery and Water Cycle Experiment Science Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of water in the atmosphere and at the surface of the Earth is the most influential factor regulating our environment, not only because water is essential for life but also because through phase transitions it is the main energy source that control clouds and radiation and drives the global circulation of the atmosphere.

  5. Global English and Local Language Policies: What Denmark Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes the mythology and imagery underpinning global English, the many labels used to describe English, and the transition from an imperialist language into one that meshes with ongoing processes of Europeanization and Americanization, largely through the influence of transnational corporations. Implications are drawn for Danish, in Denmark, a…

  6. The evolution of disease: anthropological perspectives on epidemiologic transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Molly Kathleen; Harper, Kristin Nicole; Barrett, Ronald; Armelagos, George John

    2014-01-01

    Background The model of epidemiologic transitions has served as a guiding framework for understanding relationships between patterns of human health and disease and economic development for the past several decades. However, epidemiologic transition theory is infrequently employed in epidemiology. Objective Moving beyond Omran's original formulation, we discuss critiques and modifications of the theory of epidemiologic transitions and highlight some of the ways in which incorporating epidemiologic transition theory can benefit theory and practice in epidemiology. Design We focus on two broad contemporary trends in human health that epidemiologic transition theory is useful for conceptualizing: the increased incidence of chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), such as allergic and autoimmune diseases, and the emergence and reemergence of infectious disease. Results Situating these trends within epidemiologic transition theory, we explain the rise in CIDs with the hygiene hypothesis and the rise in emerging and reemerging infections with the concept of a third epidemiologic transition. Conclusions Contextualizing these trends within epidemiologic transition theory reveals implications for clinical practice, global health policies, and future research within epidemiology. PMID:24848652

  7. Global space fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, L. A.; Semashko, N. N.

    The possibility of meeting future global energy demands by producing energy in space is addressed. Comparisons are made between the parameters of space plants producing solar electric power, nuclear electric power, and thermonuclear electric power.

  8. Commitment to Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Zita M.

    1983-01-01

    The need for a global education approach is emphasized in a teacher's account of a class that included 15 acoustically handicapped students. Topics focused on historical backgrounds and commonalities, food shortages, multinational corporations, and energy problems. (CL)

  9. The global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sedjo, R.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The author discusses the global carbon cycle and cites the results of several recently completed research projects, that seem to indicate that the temperate zone forests are a sink for carbon rather than a source, as was previously believed.

  10. Global Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... everyday functioning in countries at different stages of economic development and with varying resources. Global efforts are required ... cross-national assessment conducted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) estimated that dementia affected about 10 million ...

  11. Global health surveillance.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Michael

    2012-07-27

    Awareness of the importance of global health surveillance increased in the latter part of the 20th century with the global emergence of human immunodeficiency virus and novel strains of influenza. In the first decade of the 21st century, several events further highlighted global shared interests in and vulnerability to infectious diseases. Bioterrorist use of anthrax spores in 2001 raised awareness of the value of public health surveillance for national security. The epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, re-emergence of a panzootic of avian influenza A H5N1 in 2005, and the sudden emergence of pandemic H1N1 in North America in 2009 all highlighted the importance of shared global responsibility for surveillance and disease control. In particular, in 2003, SARS precipitated changes in awareness of the world's collective economic vulnerability to epidemic shocks. PMID:22832992

  12. Technology and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grübler, Arnulf

    2003-10-01

    Technology and Global Change describes how technology has shaped society and the environment over the last 200 years. Technology has led us from the farm to the factory to the internet, and its impacts are now global. Technology has eliminated many problems, but has added many others (ranging from urban smog to the ozone hole to global warming). This book is the first to give a comprehensive description of the causes and impacts of technological change and how they relate to global environmental change. Written for specialists and nonspecialists alike, it will be useful for researchers and professors, as a textbook for graduate students, for people engaged in long-term policy planning in industry (strategic planning departments) and government (R & D and technology ministries, environment ministries), for environmental activists (NGOs), and for the wider public interested in history, technology, or environmental issues.

  13. The Global Menace

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Summary The history of medicine has gone ‘global.’ Why? Can the proliferation of the ‘global’ in our writing be explained away as a product of staying true to our historical subjects’ categories? Or has this historiography in fact delivered a new ‘global’ problematic or performed serious ‘global’ analytic work? The situation is far from clear, and it is the tension between the global as descriptor and an analytics of the global that concerns me here. I have three main concerns: (1) that there is an epistemic collusion between the discourses of universality that inform medical science and global-talk; (2) that the embrace of the ‘global’ authorises a turning away from analyses of power in history-writing in that (3) this turning away from analyses of power in history-writing leads to scholarship that reproduces rather than critiques globalisation as a set of institutions, discourses and practices. PMID:26345469

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Nikesha; Deweese, Keith; Vess, Missie; Welter, Gary; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    During launch and early operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) analysis team encountered four main on orbit anomalies. These include: (1) unexpected shock from Solar Array deployment, (2) momentum buildup from the Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTBs) phasing errors, (3) transition into Safehold due to albedo-induced Course Sun Sensor (CSS) anomaly, and (4) a flight software error that could cause a Safehold transition due to a Star Tracker occultation. This paper will discuss ways GNC engineers identified and tracked down the root causes. Flight data and GNC on board models will be shown to illustrate how each of these anomalies were investigated and mitigated before causing any harm to the spacecraft. On May 29, 2014, GPM was handed over to the Mission Flight Operations Team after a successful commissioning period. Currently, GPM is operating nominally on orbit, collecting meaningful scientific data that will significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle.

  15. Monitoring global snow cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Richard; Hardman, Molly

    1991-01-01

    A snow model that supports the daily, operational analysis of global snow depth and age has been developed. It provides improved spatial interpolation of surface reports by incorporating digital elevation data, and by the application of regionalized variables (kriging) through the use of a global snow depth climatology. Where surface observations are inadequate, the model applies satellite remote sensing. Techniques for extrapolation into data-void mountain areas and a procedure to compute snow melt are also contained in the model.

  16. Update on global immunization.

    PubMed

    Weber, Carol J

    2007-10-01

    The international community recognizes that investing in the health development of poor and disadvantaged countries is central to reducing poverty. Immunization is one strategy in the global effort to reduce infant mortality, improve maternal health, and combat infectious disease. In this day of global interdependence, all countries are vulnerable to uncontrolled spread of disease through epidemics. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals will not only help developing countries, but it will also contribute to improving health and security for all. PMID:17990623

  17. Promoting Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Winker, Margaret A.; Ferris, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA) is a member of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). The Editorial Board of IJMA believes it is important that the statement on promoting global health and this accompanying editorial is brought to the attention of our readers. Medical journal editors have a social responsibility to promote global health by publishing, whenever possible, research that furthers health worldwide.

  18. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  19. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect

    Low, N.C.; Shen, S.

    1996-09-01

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  20. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) states that transition planning should begin at the earliest age appropriate and no later than age 16. IDEA requires schools to make collaborative efforts to provide students access to an array of postschool activities including integrated employment, postsecondary…

  1. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  2. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  3. Youth Policy in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A study team was commissioned to critically review three independent reports on youth and schooling: "Youth: Transition to Adulthood"; "The Education of Adolescents"; and "The Reform of Secondary Education." The study team examined the reports in light of the most recent available social science evidence. The three reports, presenting similar…

  4. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  5. A Survey Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, William; McAllister, Alex M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful outcomes for a "Transition Course in Mathematics" have resulted from two unique design features. The first is to run the course as a "survey course" in mathematics, introducing sophomore-level students to a broad set of mathematical fields. In this single mathematics course, undergraduates benefit from an introduction of proof…

  6. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  7. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  8. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  9. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  10. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  11. Learning for Life Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmecky, Jane Hyde

    2012-01-01

    Many adults return to formal learning situations to pursue lifelong learning goals because their lives are in transition from dealing with real-life problems such as divorce and re-marriage. The purpose of this study was to describe what couples learned that contributed to the success of their subsequent marriages and how they learned it. The…

  12. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  13. Globalization and Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, J. Lawrence; Carter, Lyn; Chiu, Mei-Hung; Duit, Reinders; Martin, Sonya; Siry, Christina; Krajcik, Joseph; Shin, Namsoo; Choi, Kyunghee; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-06-01

    Processes of globalization have played a major role in economic and cultural change worldwide. More recently, there is a growing literature on rethinking science education research and development from the perspective of globalization. This paper provides a critical overview of the state and future development of science education research from the perspective of globalization. Two facets are given major attention. First, the further development of science education as an international research domain is critically analyzed. It seems that there is a predominance of researchers stemming from countries in which English is the native language or at least a major working language. Second, the significance of rethinking the currently dominant variants of science instruction from the perspectives of economic and cultural globalization is given major attention. On the one hand, it is argued that processes concerning globalization of science education as a research domain need to take into account the richness of the different cultures of science education around the world. At the same time, it is essential to develop ways of science instruction that make students aware of the various advantages, challenges and problems of international economic and cultural globalization.

  14. Globalization and Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, J. Lawrence; Carter, Lyn; Chiu, Mei-Hung; Duit, Reinders; Martin, Sonya; Siry, Christina; Krajcik, Joseph; Shin, Namsoo; Choi, Kyunghee; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Sung-Won

    2012-12-01

    Processes of globalization have played a major role in economic and cultural change worldwide. More recently, there is a growing literature on rethinking science education research and development from the perspective of globalization. This paper provides a critical overview of the state and future development of science education research from the perspective of globalization. Two facets are given major attention. First, the further development of science education as an international research domain is critically analyzed. It seems that there is a predominance of researchers stemming from countries in which English is the native language or at least a major working language. Second, the significance of rethinking the currently dominant variants of science instruction from the perspectives of economic and cultural globalization is given major attention. On the one hand, it is argued that processes concerning globalization of science education as a research domain need to take into account the richness of the different cultures of science education around the world. At the same time, it is essential to develop ways of science instruction that make students aware of the various advantages, challenges and problems of international economic and cultural globalization.

  15. Global challenges and globalization of bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Nezhmetdinova, Farida

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes problems and implications for man and nature connected with the formation of a new architecture of science, based on the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science (NBIC). It also describes evolution and genesis of bioethics, a scientific discipline and social practice with a special role of ethical management of potential risks of scientific research. The aim was to demonstrate the necessity of bioethical social control in the development of a global bioeconomy driven by NBIC technologies. PMID:23447421

  16. Global challenges and globalization of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Nezhmetdinova, Farida

    2013-02-01

    This article analyzes problems and implications for man and nature connected with the formation of a new architecture of science, based on the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science (NBIC). It also describes evolution and genesis of bioethics, a scientific discipline and social practice with a special role of ethical management of potential risks of scientific research. The aim was to demonstrate the necessity of bioethical social control in the development of a global bioeconomy driven by NBIC technologies. PMID:23447421

  17. Transit of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Laurance R.

    1998-01-01

    During the past five years we have pursued the detection of extrasolar planets by the photometric transit method, i.e. the detection of a planet by watching for a drop in the brightness of the light as it crosses in front of a star. The planetary orbit must cross the line-of-sight and so most systems will not be lined up for such a transit to ever occur. However, we have looked at eclipsing binary systems which are already edge-on. Such systems must be very small in size as this makes the differential light change due to a transit much greater for a given planet size (the brightness difference will be proportional to the area of the transiting planet to the disc area of the star). Also, the planet forming region should be closer to the star as small stars are generally less luminous (that is, if the same thermal regime for planet formation applies as in the solar system). This led to studies of the habitable zone around other stars, as well. Finally, we discovered that our data could be used to detect giant planets without transits as we had been carefully timing the eclipses of the stars (using a GPS antenna for time) and this will drift by being offset by any giant planets orbiting around the system, as well. The best summary of our work may be to just summarize the 21 refereed papers produced during the time of this grant. This will be done is chronological order and in each section separately.

  18. Buckley Prize Talk: The Suprerconductor-(Metal)-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2015-03-01

    While the classical theory of phase transitions has been extraordinarily successful, there are several reasons to exercise caution when applying this approach to the zero temperature superconducting transition. First, experimental identification of the relevant phases requires extrapolation to zero temperature, which becomes complicated, especially when one needs to identify sources of dissipation. In addition, since superconductivity may be highly inhomogeneous as appreciable superconducting order parameter may be concentrated in ``superconducting puddles'' due to disorder and/or spontaneous phase separation, the nature of the quantum phase transition to a superconducting state may be highly anomalous, where the system attempts to optimizes the formation of puddles with the Josephson coupling among them to obtain global superconductivity. In this talk we will review some of the consequences of these considerations, emphasizing the possible emergence of anomalous metallic phases close to the superconductor-insulator transition.

  19. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Mendez, Victor Manuel; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Ramasco, Jose J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Transitions in complex dynamical systems are ubiquitous in nature. Finding leading indicators in such systems is a fundamental task in many areas of science, such as financial markets, the extinction of species or climate change studies. Here we propose a new framework to study systems close to a bifurcation point by analyzing topological properties, based on clusters and percolation, of functional networks defined from the time series. The use of networks allows us for a global parametrization of the system going far beyond simple two-point relations (classical correlations). The generality and versatility of the cluster-based method to forecast transitions is shown in two different kinds of data. In one hand, three theoretical dynamical systems displaying very different transitions and crossovers were used as a test bed. On the other hand, we have used the field of surface air temperature in the NINO 3.4 zone. In this new approach, critical transitions are identified before they occur.

  20. Global mental health and neuroscience: potential synergies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; He, Yanling; Phillips, Anthony; Sahakian, Barbara J; Williams, John; Patel, Vikram

    2015-02-01

    Global mental health has emerged as an important specialty. It has drawn attention to the burden of mental illness and to the relative gap in mental health research and services around the world. Global mental health has raised the question of whether this gap is a developmental issue, a health issue, a human rights issue, or a combination of these issues-and it has raised awareness of the need to develop new approaches for building capacity, mobilising resources, and closing the research and treatment gap. Translational neuroscience has also advanced. It comprises an important conceptual approach to understanding the neurocircuitry and molecular basis of mental disorders, to rethinking how best to undertake research on the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of these disorders, with the ultimate aim to develop entirely new approaches to prevention and intervention. Some apparent contrasts exist between these fields; global mental health emphasises knowledge translation, moving away from the bedside to a focus on health systems, whereas translational neuroscience emphasises molecular neuroscience, focusing on transitions between the bench and bedside. Meanwhile, important opportunities exist for synergy between the two paradigms, to ensure that present opportunities in mental health research and services are maximised. Here, we review the approaches of global mental health and clinical neuroscience to diagnosis, pathogenesis, and intervention, and make recommendations for facilitating an integration of these two perspectives. PMID:26359754

  1. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    PubMed

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape. PMID:21175379

  2. Global Self-Esteem, Appearance Satisfaction, and Self-Reported Dieting in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Erin T.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    Global self-esteem, appearance satisfaction, and self-reported dieting are interrelated. This study examines the temporal ordering of global self-esteem and appearance satisfaction across the early adolescence transition, from age 10 to age 14, as well as the independent associations of self-esteem and appearance satisfaction on self-reported…

  3. The Mongolia experience: transitioning within transition.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Richard G

    2009-12-01

    Although Mongolia has a long and distinguished history, as a new and emerging democracy it is experiencing the pains of transition-one that is moving the country from its pastoral and nomadic past into the 21st century. Confounded by its previous dependence on socialist Soviet Russia, the concept of a market economy seems opportunistic for some, while for those living within the traditional lifestyle of the herdsman in the countryside it is confusing and threatening to family structure and values. Adolescents and young adults are caught at the interface-not only of their own development, but by the disparities between tradition and Western values, new technology, and freedoms granted by the emerging democracy, and by the civic practice of democracy itself. Conceptually the new belongs to the young, and yet limited health and educational resources are available to modulate and focus both threats and opportunities. Using the analogy of the spirit banner of the warrior, it is the young as the warriors of the 21st century who have the energy and investment in the future that will be needed to shepherd this change. Both personal and public health, within the context of development, the psychobiological model, and the political and social ecology will be strong determinants of success. It is a parallel investment in both youth and the ideals they represent that will ensure success for the new Mongolia. PMID:20653216

  4. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  5. MEASURING GLOBAL OBSERVABLES WITH PHENIX.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT,M.J. FOR THE PHENIX COLLABORATION

    1998-06-12

    When the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) begins operations, it will be capable of colliding nuclei of various sizes, from protons up to Au, at center-of-mass energies of 200 to 500 GeV per nucleon pair. Some of these collisions are expected to produce a new state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), in which quarks are no longer confined to individual hadrons and in which chiral symmetry has been restored. Numerous predictions have been made as to how a phase transition to a QGP would affect the particle spectra produced in these collisions (see, for example, a recent review by Harris and Mueller). The PHENIX physics philosophy is to detect and systematically study the QGP via a simultaneous measurement of many different probes/signatures of the plasma, as a function of the energy density achieved in the nucleus-nucleus collision. To achieve this goal, the PHENIX detector has been designed as a multi-purpose spectrometer, capable of concurrently measuring hadrons, leptons and photons, as well as global properties of the collision, e.g. energy density, as will be detailed below.

  6. Global computing for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Loewe, Laurence

    2002-12-01

    Global computing, the collaboration of idle PCs via the Internet in a SETI@home style, emerges as a new way of massive parallel multiprocessing with potentially enormous CPU power. Its relations to the broader, fast-moving field of Grid computing are discussed without attempting a review of the latter. This review (i) includes a short table of milestones in global computing history, (ii) lists opportunities global computing offers for bioinformatics, (iii) describes the structure of problems well suited for such an approach, (iv) analyses the anatomy of successful projects and (v) points to existing software frameworks. Finally, an evaluation of the various costs shows that global computing indeed has merit, if the problem to be solved is already coded appropriately and a suitable global computing framework can be found. Then, either significant amounts of computing power can be recruited from the general public, or--if employed in an enterprise-wide Intranet for security reasons--idle desktop PCs can substitute for an expensive dedicated cluster. PMID:12511066

  7. Global crop forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.; Hall, F. G.

    1980-01-01

    The needs for and remote sensing means of global crop forecasting are discussed, and key results of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) are presented. Current crop production estimates provided by foreign countries are shown often to be inadequate, and the basic elements of crop production forecasts are reviewed. The LACIE project is introduced as a proof-of-concept experiment designed to assimilate remote sensing technology, monitor global wheat production, evaluate key technical problems, modify the technique accordingly and demonstrate the feasibility of a global agricultural monitoring system. The global meteorological data, sampling and aggregation techniques, Landsat data analysis procedures and yield forecast procedures used in the experiment are outlined. Accuracy assessment procedures employed to evaluate LACIE technology performance are presented, and improvements in system efficiency and capacity during the three years of operation are pointed out. Results of LACIE estimates of Soviet, U.S. and Canadian wheat production are presented which demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the remote-sensing approach for global food and fiber monitoring.

  8. Transition Planning: A Team Effort. NICHCY Transition Summary, TS10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Mary Kate

    This summary on transition planning provides ideas and information on how students, families, school personnel, service providers, and others can work together to help students with a disability make a smooth transition after leaving high school. It focuses on creative transition planning and services that use all the resources that exist in…

  9. Models for transition clinics.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa, Jaime; An, Isabelle; Appleton, Richard; Camfield, Peter; Von Moers, Arpad

    2014-08-01

    Transition is a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic medical conditions, as they advance from a pediatric and family-centered to an adult, individual focused health care provider. This article describes some of the models for transition clinics or services for epilepsy in five countries (Canada, France, Colombia, Germany, and the United Kingdom). These models include joint adult and pediatric clinics, algorithm-driven service, and a check list system in the context of pediatric care. Evaluation of these models is limited, and it is not possible to choose an optimal program. The attitude and motivation of health care providers may be the most important elements. PMID:25209087

  10. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  11. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, maintain and exercise state-of-the-art methods for transition prediction in supersonic flow fields. Basic state and stability codes, acquired during the last work period, were exercised and applied to calculate the properties of various flowfields. The development of a code for the prediction of transition location using a currently novel method (the PSE or Parabolized Stability Equation method), initiated during the last work period and continued during the present work period, was cancelled at mid-year for budgetary reasons. Other activities during this period included the presentation of a paper at the APS meeting in Tallahassee, Florida entitled 'Stability of Two-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers', as well as the initiation of a paper co-authored with H. Reed of the Arizona State University entitled 'Stability of Boundary Layers'.

  12. Transitions: exploring the frontier.

    PubMed

    Corless, Inge B

    End-of-life experiences go by various terms, including near-death experiences (NDEs), death bed visions, death bed phenomena, death bed coincidences, and nearing death awareness. Death bed escorts is the term applied to the vision of deceased family members or friends who inform the dying person that they will be accompanied in the transition from life. In this article, I examine the subject of NDEs and death bed escorts, starting with the rich body of work provided by Robert and Beatrice Kastenbaum. A subject of some interest to Robert Kastenbaum, he explored this frontier in his many writings on dying, death, and bereavement. Ever the pioneer and having made the ultimate transition, he may yet be exploring new frontiers. PMID:25351590

  13. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  14. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  15. Transition Region Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Ultraviolet emission lines emitted from the SOLAR TRANSITION REGION are often shifted from their expected rest wavelengths. Shifts of spectral lines are due to the so-called DOPPLER EFFECT, where the source of emission is moving either away from or towards the observer, causing a change in the apparent wavelength. The shifted emission lines are most often interpreted as a flow of plasma along ...

  16. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  17. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  18. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  19. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  20. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  1. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  2. Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. Amelia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter considers how transitions to adulthood have been historically represented and presents alternative ways of thinking about transitions to adulthood through the context of adult basic education programs.

  3. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  4. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  5. Sleep locally, act globally.

    PubMed

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Lima, Steven L; Lesku, John A

    2012-10-01

    In most animals, sleep is considered a global brain and behavioral state. However, recent intracortical recordings have shown that aspects of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and wakefulness can occur simultaneously in different parts of the cortex in mammals, including humans. Paradoxically, however, NREM sleep still manifests as a global behavioral shutdown. In this review, the authors examine this paradox from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of strategic modeling, they suggest that in animals with brains composed of heavily interconnected and functionally interdependent units, a global regulator of sleep maintains the behavioral shutdown that defines sleep and thereby ensures that local use-dependent functions are performed in a safe and efficient manner. This novel perspective has implications for understanding deficits in human cognitive performance resulting from sleep deprivation, sleep disorders such as sleepwalking, changes in consciousness that occur during sleep, and the function of sleep itself. PMID:22572533

  6. Global ethics and principlism.

    PubMed

    Gordon, John-Stewart

    2011-09-01

    This article examines the special relation between common morality and particular moralities in the four-principles approach and its use for global ethics. It is argued that the special dialectical relation between common morality and particular moralities is the key to bridging the gap between ethical universalism and relativism. The four-principles approach is a good model for a global bioethics by virtue of its ability to mediate successfully between universal demands and cultural diversity. The principle of autonomy (i.e., the idea of individual informed consent), however, does need to be revised so as to make it compatible with alternatives such as family- or community-informed consent. The upshot is that the contribution of the four-principles approach to global ethics lies in the so-called dialectical process and its power to deal with cross-cultural issues against the background of universal demands by joining them together. PMID:22073817

  7. Network-complement transitions, symmetries, and cluster synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2016-09-01

    Synchronization in networks of coupled oscillators is known to be largely determined by the spectral and symmetry properties of the interaction network. Here, we leverage this relation to study a class of networks for which the threshold coupling strength for global synchronization is the lowest among all networks with the same number of nodes and links. These networks, defined as being uniform, complete, and multi-partite (UCM), appear at each of an infinite sequence of network-complement transitions in a larger class of networks characterized by having near-optimal thresholds for global synchronization. We show that the distinct symmetry structure of the UCM networks, which by design are optimized for global synchronizability, often leads to formation of clusters of synchronous oscillators, and that such states can coexist with the state of global synchronization.

  8. Global mortality, disability, and the contribution of risk factors: Global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, C J; Lopez, A D

    1997-05-17

    The Global Burden of Disease Study used the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) to compare death and disability from various disorders in developing and developed countries. In 1990, developing countries carried almost 90% of the global disease burden yet were recipients of only 10% of global health care funding. The highest disease burdens were in sub-Saharan Africa (21.4% of global total) and India (20.9%). Communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional disorders (group 1 causes) predominated in sub-Saharan Africa (65.9% of burden), while noncommunicable diseases (group 2 causes) accounted for 80% of the burden in established market economies; injuries (group 3) did not differ substantially across regions. The ratio of group 2 to group 1 disorders can be used as a measure of the epidemiologic transition. Group 2 disorders already surpass group 1 disorders in China, Latin America, and the Caribbean. On a global level, group 1, 2, and 3 causes accounted for 43.9%, 40.9%, and 15.1%, respectively, of DALYs. Overall, the top 3 causes of DALYs in 1990 were lower respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and perinatal disorders (low birth weight and birth asphyxia or birth trauma). In developed countries, these causes were ischemic heart disease, unipolar major depression, and cerebrovascular diseases. Malnutrition was the risk factor responsible for the greatest loss of DALYs (15.9%), followed by poor water supply, sanitation, and personal hygiene (6.8%). PMID:9164317

  9. The Global Schoolgirl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chickering, Lawrence; Tyagi, Anjula

    2012-01-01

    The challenges of poverty and development have long been regarded in terms of transitive relationships, in which the rich help the poor because the poor are not seen as able to help themselves. This view of the poor assumes they have mainly needs and no assets. With so many people believing this view it isn't surprising that the poor themselves…

  10. Quantum Phase Transitions in Antiferromagnets and Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2000-03-01

    A general introduction to the non-zero temperature dynamic and transport properties of low-dimensional systems near a quantum phase transition shall be presented. Basic results will be reviewed in the context of experiments on the spin-ladder compounds. Recent large N computations (M. Vojta and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83), 3916 (1999) on an extended t-J model motivate a global scenario of the quantum phases and transitions in the high temperature superconductors, and connections will be made to numerous experiments. A universal theory (S. Sachdev, C. Buragohain, and M. Vojta, Science, in press M. Vojta, C. Buragohain, and S. Sachdev, cond- mat/9912020) of quantum impurities in spin-gap antiferromagnets near a magnetic ordering transition will be compared quantitatively to experiments on Zn doped Y Ba2 Cu3 O7 (Fong et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1939 (1999)

  11. Transition of GAIM from Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.; Thonnard, S. E.; Budzien, S. A.; Dandenault, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    In July 2004, Utah State University delivered the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) for transition to operations at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) by 2006. This system was designed to assimilated measurements from a variety of sources and provide ionospheric specification and forecasting satisfying DoD needs. Coordinated by AFWA, the transition of GAIM to operations at AFWA is a multi-organizational effort and includes data source evaluation, environment porting, validation and integration. The Naval Research Laboratory is responsible for the configuration management of GAIM between the USU and AFWA during this transition process. As such, NRL has installed GAIM to provide daily ionospheric specification and 24 hour forecast on a routine basis. Additionally, NRL has begun new research effort to investigate the assimilation of ultraviolet airglow observations into GAIM. This poster describes the configuration of GAIM at NRL and ionospheric specification capabilities that are currently available. The information will include a background of the assimilation process and data inputs used at NRL. An overview of ongoing GAIM research including plans at NRL to assimilate ultraviolet airglow emission observations will be provided. Additionally, a brief description of the graphical tools to operate the GAIM model and visualize the output will be provided.

  12. Phase Transitions of Single Semistiff Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastolla, Ugo; Grassberger, Peter

    1997-12-01

    We study numerically a lattice model of semiflexible homopolymers with nearest neighbor (nn) attraction and energetic preference for straight joints between bonded monomers. For this we use a new Monte Carlo algorithm, the “prunedenriched Rosenbluth Method” (PERM). It is very efficient both for relatively open configurations at high temperatures and for compact and frozen-in low- T states. This allows us to study in detail the phase diagram as a function of nn attraction ɛ and stiffness x. It shows a θ-collapse line with a transition from open coils (small ɛ) to molten compact globules (large ɛ) and a freezing transition toward a state with orientational global order (large stiffness x). Qualitatively this is similar to a recently studied mean-field theory [S. Doniach, T. Garel, and H. Orland (1996), J. Chem. Phys. 105(4), 1601], but there are important differences in details. In contrast to the mean-field theory and to naive expectations, the θ-temperature increases with stiffness x. The freezing temperature increases even faster, and reaches the θ-line at a finite value of x. For even stiffer chains, the freezing transition takes place directly, without the formation of an intermediate globular state. Although being in conflict with mean-field theory, the latter had been conjectured already by Doniach et al. on the basis of heuristic arguments and of low-statistics Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the present model as a very crude model for protein folding.

  13. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  14. The transition to agricultural sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    1999-01-01

    The transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production during the 21st century will take place within the context of a transition to a stable population and a possible transition to a stable level of material consumption. If the world fails to successfully navigate a transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production, the failure will be due more to a failure in the area of institutional innovation than to resource and environmental constraints. PMID:10339524

  15. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  16. Global Transport Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Howard

    The aim of the NATO Science Committee's Global Transport Mechanisms in the Geosciences program is to stimulate and facilitate international collaboration among scientists of the member countries in the study of selected global transport mechanisms. The program organizers intend to sponsor advanced research workshops, advanced study institutes, conferences, collaborative research, research study, and lecture visits. NATO grants are available, but they are intended to cover only part of the expenses involved in the international aspects of the sponsored activities. Citizens or permanent residents of one of the member countries of NATO who possess qualifications appropriate to the proposed activity are eligible to apply.

  17. Global environmental politics

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.; Brown, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors explore past international environmental negotiations and the broader political landscape in which they take place to discern some elements of success. The overridding message is that it may take a long time, but in the end some combination of new scientific evidence, domestic political pressures, and international persuasion will likely turn the tide in favor of cooperative action. The authors feel that an incremental change approach, based on current international environmental governance, is the one most likely to be followed, although global governance, with a greatly strengthened UN and environmental law, or global partnership, developmental assistance from richer countries to poorer countries, are the better choices.

  18. Global water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Christy, John R.; Goodman, Steven J.; Miller, Tim L.; Fitzjarrald, Dan; Lapenta, Bill; Wang, Shouping

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective is to determine the scope and interactions of the global water cycle with all components of the Earth system and to understand how it stimulates and regulates changes on both global and regional scales. The following subject areas are covered: (1) water vapor variability; (2) multi-phase water analysis; (3) diabatic heating; (4) MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) temperature analysis; (5) Optimal precipitation and streamflow analysis; (6) CCM (Community Climate Model) hydrological cycle; (7) CCM1 climate sensitivity to lower boundary forcing; and (8) mesoscale modeling of atmosphere/surface interaction.

  19. Global environmental report card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Worldwatch Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, issued a gloomy yet hopeful annual “State of the World” report on global environmental trends on 10 January.The report notes some recent successful efforts to protect the environment, including the phasing out of the production of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and the 2001 signing of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). Nonetheless, the report calls for a global war on environmental degradation “that is as aggressive and well-funded as the war on terrorism” following the 11 September terrorist attacks in the United States.

  20. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are free-floating algae that grow in the euphotic zone of the upper ocean, converting carbon dioxide, sunlight, and available nutrients into organic carbon through photosynthesis. Despite their microscopic size, these photoautotrophs are responsible for roughly half the net primary production on Earth (NPP; gross primary production minus respiration), fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels our global ocean ecosystems. Phytoplankton thus play a critical role in the global carbon cycle, and their growth patterns are highly sensitive to environmental changes such as increased ocean temperatures that stratify the water column and prohibit the transfer of cold, nutrient richwaters to the upper ocean euphotic zone.

  1. Global Biogeochemistry: an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B., III

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic biogeochemical equilibria among the major pools of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus represented by terrestrial biomes, the world's oceans, and the troposphere are disturbed. Since even the most rapid processes of adjustments among the reservoirs take decades, new equilibria are far from established. These human-induced perturbations and the system's subsequent responses constitute an on-going biogeochemical experiment at the global level. Current and new information must be combined in a way that allows testing of various hypotheses about the workings of global biogeochemical systems. This enables assessment of current knowledge and evaluation of the gaps.

  2. Global carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken

    2015-03-01

    Human emissions of CO2 now outpace natural sources by two orders of magnitude. The current concentration of CO2 has not been substantially exceeded in the past 30 million years. Multiple model exercises indicate that consuming all fossil fuels would result in concentrations more than double present levels, even after 10,000 years. The global warming effect of carbon emissions appears within 5-7 years. However, since the effect of present infrastructure over its expected life would only modestly increase CO2 concentrations and global temperature, human choices over its replacement will decisively influence ultimate carbon impacts, both short-term and long-term.

  3. The global event system

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-02

    The support for the global event system has been designed to allow an application developer to control the APS event generator and receiver boards. This is done by the use of four new record types. These records are customized and are only supported by the device support modules for the APS event generator and receiver boards. The use of the global event system and its associated records should not be confused with the vanilla EPICS events and the associated event records. They are very different.

  4. Globalization and Higher Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Paige; Vidovich, Lesley

    2000-01-01

    Discusses political and cultural forms of globalization, suggesting that the economic dimension of globalization has dominated the policy agenda of western governments as they have attempted to position themselves favorably in competitive global markets. This analysis seeks to determine how globalization might produce dynamic new opportunities…

  5. Reconstructing Transition Knowledge in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chen-chen

    2012-01-01

    Taking a post-colonial stand and using school to work transition as an example, the author re-examines the special education discourses in Taiwan and attempts to construct alternate understandings of transition from sociological and cultural perspectives. A review of past transition literature and a survey of the educational background of the…

  6. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  7. Ontario's hospital transitional funding initiative: an overview and assessment.

    PubMed

    Lave, J R; Jacobs, P; Markel, F

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, the hospital transitional funding initiative, which incorporates case mix measurement into the hospital funding process, was started in Ontario. This initiative is the beginning of a new, more objective basis for determining hospital funding. In its initial stages, incremental growth and interhospital equity adjustments are made to the global budgets. In this paper, we describe the launching of this initiative and the funding formulas that emerged from its first phase. The issue of incentive effects is then discussed and, as this is an evolving or "transitional" undertaking, we comment on several economic issues arising as a result of this new venture. PMID:10115423

  8. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  9. Amazonia and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Michael; Bustamante, Mercedes; Gash, John; Silva Dias, Pedro

    Amazonia and Global Change synthesizes results of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) for scientists and students of Earth system science and global environmental change. LBA, led by Brazil, asks how Amazonia currently functions in the global climate and biogeochemical systems and how the functioning of Amazonia will respond to the combined pressures of climate and land use change, such as • Wet season and dry season aerosol concentrations and their effects on diffuse radiation and photosynthesis • Increasing greenhouse gas concentration, deforestation, widespread biomass burning and changes in the Amazonian water cycle • Drought effects and simulated drought through rainfall exclusion experiments • The net flux of carbon between Amazonia and the atmosphere • Floodplains as an important regulator of the basin carbon balance including serving as a major source of methane to the troposphere • The impact of the likely increased profitability of cattle ranching. The book will serve a broad community of scientists and policy makers interested in global change and environmental issues with high-quality scientific syntheses accessible to nonspecialists in a wide community of social scientists, ecologists, atmospheric chemists, climatologists, and hydrologists.

  10. Tending the Global Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the global trends associated with the increasing levels of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFS) in the earth's atmosphere. Presents several ecological effects associated with these increases, along with some of the possible social and economic implications for the quality of life. Argues for more…

  11. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  12. The Global Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tow, Kristen

    2001-01-01

    States that there is increased demand from employers for graduates to have greater international knowledge. Reports that the California Community College's Chancellor's Office is currently underwriting the Global Education Network (GEN), a group of initiatives to include intercultural perspectives into the community college curricula. Lists…

  13. Making a global impact.

    PubMed

    2015-12-12

    How can vets, individually and collectively, make an impact on the global stage? Addressing this question at the BVA Congress at the London Vet Show, René Carlson, president of the World Veterinary Association, encouraged the profession to play its part locally, nationally and internationally, in tackling current challenges. Kristy Ebanks reports. PMID:26667429

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  15. Global Learning Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Learning, education, and training becomes more and more internationalized. As examples, study programs are exported across borders, curricula are harmonized across Europe, learners work in globally distributed groups. However, the quality of educational offers differs dramatically. In this paper, an approach to manage quality for globally…

  16. Another "Mishegas": Global Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to focus on assertions that have accumulated around the work of international education professionals and practitioners: the idea of the global citizen. The propagation of this notion derives from, essentially, two sources: (1) it is a recurrent claim made by study abroad programs; and (2) it is used also as a means of…

  17. The Global Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Henry

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of and research related to a theory explaining the earth's electric budget. The theory suggests a global electric circuit completed by a positive current flowing up into thunderstorm clouds, from clouds to ionosphere, distributed around the globe, and down to earth through the lower atmosphere in fair-weather regions. (JN)

  18. Software for global optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mockus, L.

    1994-12-31

    The interactive graphical software that implements numeric methods and other techniques to solve global optimization problems is presented. The Bayesian approach to the optimization is the underlying idea of numeric methods used. Software is designed to solve deterministic and stochastic problems of different complexity and with many variables. It includes global and local optimization methods for differentiable and nondifferentiable functions. Implemented numerical techniques for global optimization vary from simple Monte-Carlo simulation to Bayesian methods by J. Mockus and extrapolation theory based methods by Zilinskas. Local optimization techniques includes simplex method of Nelder and Mead method of nonlinear programming by Shitkowski, and method of stochastic approximation with Bayesian step size control by J. Mockus. Software is interactive, it allows user to start and stop chosen method of global or local optimization, define and change its parameters and examine the solution process. Out-put from solution process is both numerical and graphical. Currently available graphical features are the projection of the objective function on a chosen plane and convergence plot. Both these features let the user easily observe solution process and interactively modify it. More features can be added in a standard way. It is up to the user how many graphical and numerical output features activate or deactivate at any given time. Software is implemented in C++ using X Windows as graphical platform.

  19. Subnational Opposition to Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Using a unique dataset on the geographic distribution of reported protest events from local sources, the study explains the variation in community-level mobilization in response to neoliberal reforms in two countries in the global periphery. Building on insights from macro, cross-national studies of protests related to market reforms, this article…

  20. Global Atmospheric Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallen, Carl C.

    1975-01-01

    The global atmospheric monitoring plans of the World Meteorological Organization are detailed. Single and multipurpose basic monitoring systems and the monitoring of chemical properties are discussed. The relationship of the World Meteorological Organization with the United Nations environment program is discussed. A map of the World…

  1. Global Hawk Science Flights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Global Hawk is a robotic plane that can fly altitudes above 60,000 feet (18.3 kilometers) -- roughly twice as high as a commercial airliner -- and as far as 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 kilome...

  2. Global Lessons from Siberia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jan L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a visit by two U.S. social studies educators to schools in Krasnoyarsk, a city in Siberia, Russia. Discusses economic and social changes brought about by the end of the Cold War. Recommends more international and global education for both Russia and the United States. (CFR)

  3. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  4. Encouraging Global Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Forest Woody, Jr.; Keiser, Barbie E.

    2008-01-01

    While much has been done to address the digital divide, awareness concerning the importance of information literacy (IL) has taken a back seat to a world that focuses on technology. This article traces the genesis of a global effort to address information literacy education and training beyond discussions taking place within the library and…

  5. Globalism and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of twenty-four-hour news media, local, state, and national agencies' warnings and with the explosive role of the Internet, people are more aware of global health concerns that may have significant consequences for the world's population. As international travel continues to increase, health care professionals around the world are…

  6. The Global Energy Budget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jax, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan about greenhouse effect and global warming. Includes diagrams and graphs from which students are asked to make inferences. Provides background information about how energy enters and leaves the earth system, the energy budget, consequences of obstructing the energy balance, and the greenhouse effect. (three references) (MCO)

  7. Mathematics and Global Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard H.

    This resource was written to provide students with an awareness of critical issues facing the world today. In courses for college students, it can motivate their study of mathematics, teach them how to solve mathematical problems related to current global issues, provide coherence to mathematical studies through a focus on issues of human…

  8. Global Education Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourne, Doug; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Learning in a Global Society" (Bourne); "Latin American Bureau" (Moriarty); "Council for Education in World Citizenship" (Rogers); "Development Education Centres"; "REFLECT (Regenerated Freirean Literacy through Empowering Community Techniques" (Archer); "Adapting REFLECT in Oxford" (Norris); "World Music: Education as Festival"…

  9. Global Education Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Sandra, Comp.

    Over 700 annotated resources, most of which were produced between 1970 and 1980, are presented in this resource guide which addresses global issues and interdependence from a world order perspective. Arranged into 3 parts, the resources listed in part I primarily provide background material organized under the following subtitles: world order;…

  10. The Globalization of Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedo, Donaldo; Gounari, Panayota

    2005-01-01

    Addressing ethnic cleansing, culture wars, human sufferings, terrorism, immigration, and intensified xenophobia, "Globalization of Racism" explains why it is vital that we gain a nuanced understanding of how ideology underlies all social, cultural, and political discourse and racist actions. The book looks at recent developments in France,…

  11. Geography and global health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tim; Moon, Graham

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the report of the World Health Organisation's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, Closing the gap in a generation (Marmot 2008), this invited commentary considers the scope for geographical research on global health. We reflect on current work and note future possibilities, particularly those that take a critical perspective on the interplay of globalisation, security and health. PMID:22413171

  12. Accelerating global forest mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest mortality is apparently accelerating globally. The evidence supporting this contention is now substantial, as is the evidence suggesting the acceleration has just begun and will become progressively worse in upcoming decades. I will review the data and models used to make these contentions.

  13. The Global Internet Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Deborah Joy

    2009-01-01

    The global rise of Internet-based education is discussed in relation to models drawn from social studies and epidemiology. Experiential and data density models are highlighted, also the capacity for technological change, and phenomena observed in the spread of disease. The lesson of these illustrations is that even apparently permanent phenomena…

  14. Global Timber Model (GTM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    GTM is an economic model capable of examining global forestry land-use, management, and trade responses to policies. In responding to a policy, the model captures afforestation, forest management, and avoided deforestation behavior. The model estimates harvests in industrial fore...

  15. NASA Global Hawk Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    NASA Global Hawk is operational and supporting Earth science research. 29 Flights were conducted during the first year of operations, with a total of 253 flight hours. Three major science campaigns have been conducted with all objectives met. Two new science campaigns are in the planning stage

  16. Missing: Students' Global Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemu, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    While schools are focusing excessively on meeting accountability standards and improving test scores, important facets of schooling--such as preparing students for the global marketplace--are being inadvertently overlooked. Without deliberate informal observation by teachers and school administrators, detecting and addressing students'…

  17. GAR Global Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskrey, Andrew; Safaie, Sahar

    2015-04-01

    Disaster risk management strategies, policies and actions need to be based on evidence of current disaster loss and risk patterns, past trends and future projections, and underlying risk factors. Faced with competing demands for resources, at any level it is only possible to priorities a range of disaster risk management strategies and investments with adequate understanding of realised losses, current and future risk levels and impacts on economic growth and social wellbeing as well as cost and impact of the strategy. The mapping and understanding of the global risk landscape has been greatly enhanced by the latest iteration of the GAR Global Risk Assessment and the objective of this submission is to present the GAR global risk assessment which contributed to Global Assessment Report (GAR) 2015. This initiative which has been led by UNISDR, was conducted by a consortium of technical institutions from around the world and has covered earthquake, cyclone, riverine flood, and tsunami probabilistic risk for all countries of the world. In addition, the risks associated with volcanic ash in the Asia-Pacific region, drought in various countries in sub-Saharan Africa and climate change in a number of countries have been calculated. The presentation will share thee results as well as the experience including the challenges faced in technical elements as well as the process and recommendations for the future of such endeavour.

  18. Global patterns in litter decomposition: a synthesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auch, W. E.; Ross, D. S.

    2007-12-01

    Leaf and coarse woody debris (LCWD) decay catalyzes the biochemical mechanisms of the soil-aboveground interface, and should be an important component of climate change models that address carbon and nitrogen. There is a clear need for the identification of determinant climate or litter chemistry parameters at the global scale. Local and global decay is commonly attributed to litter chemistry and climate, respectively. The objective of this synthesis was to illustrate LCWD decay across a global climate-chemistry continuum and contrast results with a previous assessment via both standard first-order (|k|) decay kinetics and gradient exponent values arranged in order of influence from initial to latter decay stages. Results suggest greater initial LCWD cation concentrations yielded the fastest initial rates of decomposition and most climatic indices appeared relevant at intermediate stages of decay. Elevation and refractory LCWD carbon (i.e. carbon, lignin, and tannins) were inversely correlated with decay, prolonging the process and possibly acting in concert as "end-point" determinants. Furthermore, the initial influence of nitrogen and phosphorus is universal across LCWD-type as well as ecoregion. Climate acts in a transitional role between easily solubilized and late or aromatic substrate decay. Global and continental carbon cycling assumptions and models must acknowledge: i) the influence of LCWD cation and N concentration during initial fragmentation, leaching, and transformation; ii) climate, specifically seasonal temperature averages > evapotranspiration > precipitation, during the interim; and iii) the ever-present influence of seasonality and litter aromatic components. Key Words: Leaf and Coarse Woody Debris (LCWD) decomposition, |k|, first-order kinetics, Carbon Cycle, Global Climate Change (GCC), Actual Evapotranspiration (AET).

  19. Global Data Toolset (GDT)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cress, Jill J.; Riegle, Jodi L.

    2007-01-01

    According to the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) approximately 60 percent of the data contained in the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) has missing or incomplete boundary information. As a result, global analyses based on the WDPA can be inaccurate, and professionals responsible for natural resource planning and priority setting must rely on incomplete geospatial data sets. To begin to address this problem the World Data Center for Biodiversity and Ecology, in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII), the Global Earth Observation System, and the Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network (IABIN) sponsored a Protected Area (PA) workshop in Asuncion, Paraguay, in November 2007. The primary goal of this workshop was to train representatives from eight South American countries on the use of the Global Data Toolset (GDT) for reviewing and editing PA data. Use of the GDT will allow PA experts to compare their national data to other data sets, including non-governmental organization (NGO) and WCMC data, in order to highlight inaccuracies or gaps in the data, and then to apply any needed edits, especially in the delineation of the PA boundaries. In addition, familiarizing the participants with the web-enabled GDT will allow them to maintain and improve their data after the workshop. Once data edits have been completed the GDT will also allow the country authorities to perform any required review and validation processing. Once validated, the data can be used to update the global WDPA and IABIN databases, which will enhance analysis on global and regional levels.

  20. Volcanoes and global catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1988-01-01

    The search for a single explanation for global mass extinctions has let to polarization and the controversies that are often fueled by widespread media attention. The historic record shows a roughly linear log-log relation between the frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions and the volume of their products. Eruptions such as Mt. St. Helens 1980 produce on the order of 1 cu km of tephra, destroying life over areas in the 10 to 100 sq km range, and take place, on the average, once or twice a decade. Eruptions producing 10 cu km take place several times a century and, like Krakatau 1883, destroy life over 100 to 1000 sq km areas while producing clear global atmospheric effects. Eruptions producting 10,000 cu km are known from the Quaternary record, and extrapolation from the historic record suggests that they occur perhaps once in 20,000 years, but none has occurred in historic time and little is known of their biologic effects. Even larger eruptions must also exist in the geologic record, but documentation of their volume becomes increasingly difficult as their age increases. The conclusion is inescapable that prehistoric eruptions have produced catastrophes on a global scale: only the magnitude of the associated mortality is in question. Differentiation of large magma chambers is on a time scale of thousands to millions of years, and explosive volcanoes are clearly concentrated in narrow belts near converging plate margins. Volcanism cannot be dismissed as a producer of global catastrophes. Its role in major extinctions is likely to be at least contributory and may well be large. More attention should be paid to global effects of the many huge eruptions in the geologic record that dwarf those known in historic time.

  1. Dimensional reduction transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.

    1984-11-01

    In this conference on phase transitions in the early Universe the author discusses the transition from more than four space-time dimensions to four effective space-time dimensions; the dimensional reduction transition. The basic assumption is that the true dimensionality of space-time is more than four, and that at present the extra dimensions are compact and too small to be observable. The origin of the observed gauge symmetries from symmetries of a compact space has been proposed as a possible approach for the unification of particle physics and gravity. The common assumption in all models with extra dimensions is that the unseen dimensions are compactified to a very small size, usually taken to be of the order of the Planck length. To probe the structure of the extra dimensions would require energies of the Planck mass E = m/sub pl/ = 1.2 x 10/sup 19/GeV, and the early Universe may be the only source of such energies. The author will assume for initial conditions that all spatial dimensions are small, and that initially the Universe had N = 3 + D spatial dimensions. When the temperature fell below T = R/sub D//sup -1/, where R/sub D/ is the physical size of the compact extra dimensions, the space-time dimensionality of the Universe underwent a reduction to effectively a 4 space-time dimensional Universe, and dynamical effects of the extra dimensions became unimportant. In this paper I will discuss three possible consequences of this cosmological dimensional reduction; entropy production (inflation), magnetic monopole production, and stable, massive particle production. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Transits of Venus and Colonial India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochhar, Rajesh

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical expeditions during the colonial period had a political and national significance also. Measuring the earth and mapping the sky were activities worthy of powerful and power- seeking nations. Such was the sanctity of global astronomical activity that many other agendas could be hidden under it. An early astronomy-related expedition turned out to be extremely beneficial, to botany. The expedition sent by the French Government in 1735 to South America under the leadership of Charles Marie de la Condamine (1701--1774) ostensibly for the measurement of an arc of the meridian at Quito in Ecuador surreptitiously collected data that enabled Linnaeus to describe the genus cinchona in 1742. When the pair of transits of Venus occurred in 1761 and 1769, France and England were engaged in a bitter rivalry for control of India. The observation of the transits became a part of the rivalry. A telescope presented by the British to a South Indian King as a decorative toy was borrowed back for actual use. Scientifically the transit observations were a wash out, but the exercise introduced Europe to details of living Indian tradition of eclipse calculations. More significantly, it led to the institutionalization of modern astronomy in India under the auspices of the English East India Company (1787). The transits of Venus of 1874 and 1882 were important not so much for the study of the events as for initiating systematic photography of the Sun. By this, Britain owned most of the world's sunshine, and was expected to help European solar physicists get data from its vast Empire on a regular basis. This and the then genuinely held belief that a study of the sun would help predict failure of monsoons led to the institutionalization of solar physics studies in India (1899). Of course, when the solar physicists learnt that solar activity did not quite determine rainfall in India, they forgot to inform the Government.

  3. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  4. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  5. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  6. Electromagnetic transitions in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this review is to survey observations of electromagnetic transitions in hypernuclei and to point out contributions of these observations to an understanding of the effective two-body hyperon-nucleon forces in the nucleus. The discussion concentrates on lambda-hyperon nucleon potentials. Future plans for high resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy using Ge diode detectors is discussed, especially regarding the window of utility of such devices. Expected improvements in beam facilities are also reviewed. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (DWL)

  7. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  8. A translational evaluation of transitions.

    PubMed

    Jessel, Joshua; Hanley, Gregory P; Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid

    2016-06-01

    Transitions with nonhuman animals are typically framed as inescapable changes in signaled reinforcement schedules that result in a pause in responding unique to switches from rich to lean schedules. Pausing is considered to be a function of the aversive qualities of the contrasting reinforcement schedules. Transitions are typically framed in applied research as physical changes in location that evoke problem behavior maintained by the escape of an aversive event or resumption of a preferred event. We attempted to extend the basic framing of transitions to behaviors and contexts of social significance and evaluate a novel treatment for the problem of dawdling by 3 boys who had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder during rich-to-lean transitions. Dawdling during physical transitions was most readily observed when transitioning to lean contexts in Experiment 1. We then shortened transition duration in Experiment 2 by programming unsignaled and probabilistic rich reinforcement in the upcoming context. PMID:26916573

  9. Global veterinary leadership.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G Gale; Brown, Corrie C

    2002-11-01

    The public needs no reminder that deadly infectious diseases such as FMD could emerge in any country at any moment, or that national food security could be compromised by Salmonella or Listeria infections. Protections against these risks include the knowledge that appropriate and equivalent veterinary education will enable detection and characterization of emerging disease agents, as well as an appropriate response, wherever they occur. Global veterinary leadership is needed to reduce the global threat of infectious diseases of major food animal and public health importance. We believe that the co-curriculum is an excellent way to prepare and train veterinarians and future leaders who understand and can deal with global issues. The key to the success of the program is the veterinarian's understanding that there is a cultural basis to the practice of veterinary medicine in any country. The result will be a cadre of veterinarians, faculty, and other professionals who are better able (language and culture) to understand the effects of change brought about by free trade and the importance of interdisciplinary and institutional relationships to deal effectively with national and regional issues of food safety and security. New global veterinary leadership programs will build on interests, experience, ideas, and ambitions. A college that wishes to take advantage of this diversity must offer opportunities that interest veterinarians throughout their careers and that preferably connect academic study with intensive experiential training in another country. At its best, the global veterinary leadership program would include a partnership between veterinarians and several international learning centers, a responsiveness to the identified international outreach needs of the profession, and attention to critical thinking and reflection. The global veterinary leadership program we have described is intended to be a set of ideas meant to promote collaboration, coalitions, and

  10. Parallel Transitions in IT Outsourcing: Making It Happen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beulen, Erik; Tiwari, Vinay

    Global sourcing of IT services is growing consistently over the last decades. Along with this rapid growth, instances of failures, sore relationships or unsatisfactory performances during IT outsourcing engagements are prevalent and require management attention. Over two-thirds of the problems in these unsuccessful engagements arise due to failed or poor transition. Transition is immediately followed by contract signing and precedes service delivery phase. It sets the tone for the entire relationship and involves handover of outsourced services from either the client's internal IT department or the incumbent service provider. Recently second and third generation outsourcing engagements are coming into existence, with offshoring and multi-sourcing as an integral component of these engagements. Multi-sourcing deals, involving several service providers are emerging and require transition to be implemented in parallel. These developments exacerbate the complexity of transitions due to the presence of multiple service providers and several distributed or offshore locations, thereby further enhancing its bearing on the success of an engagement. What are the Critical Success Factors for parallel transitions? We conducted an initial Delphi study to explore success factors for parallel transitions. The findings highlight the importance of understanding the contractual agreement including transition exit criteria. Also the implementation of a joint steering committee contributes to transition success. All the stakeholders, including representatives of the incumbent service provider(s), should be represented in the steering committee to act responsive. Finally, the findings emphasis the need to manage dependencies between the transitions not limited to time lines and availability of critical resources for knowledge transfer and balancing between business continuity and timely and effective knowledge transfer.

  11. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  12. Planet Demographics from Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    From the demographics of planets detected by the Kepler mission, we have learned that there exists approximately one planet per star for planets larger than Earth orbiting inside of 1 AU. We have also learned the relative occurrence of these planets as a function of their orbital periods, sizes, and host star masses and metallicities. In this talk I will review the key statistical findings that the planet size distribution peaks in the range 1-3 times Earth-size, the orbital period distribution is characterized by a power-law cut off at short periods, small planets are more prevalent around small stars, and that approximately 20% of Sun-like stars hosts a planet 1-2 times Earth-size in a habitable zone. Looking forward, I will describe analysis of photometry from the K2 mission that is yielding initial planet discoveries and offering the opportunity to measure planet occurrence in widely separated regions of the galaxy. Finally, I will also discuss recent techniques to discover transiting planets in space-based photometry and to infer planet population properties from the ensemble of detected and non-detected transit signals.

  13. 309 Building transition plan

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-08-31

    The preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (transition) of the 309 Building is projected to be completed by the end of the fiscal year (FY) 1998. The major stabilization and decontamination efforts include the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), fuel storage and transfer pits, Transfer Waste (TW) tanks and the Ion Exchange Vaults. In addition to stabilizing contaminated areas, equipment, components, records, waste products, etc., will be dispositioned. All nonessential systems, i.e., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical, monitoring, fluids, etc., will be shut down and drained/de-energized. This will allow securing of the process, laboratory, and office areas of the facility. After that, the facility will be operated at a level commensurate with its surveillance needs while awaiting D&D. The implementation costs for FY 1995 through FY 1998 for the transition activities are estimated to be $1,070K, $2,115K, $2,939K, and $4,762K, respectively. Costs include an assumed company overhead of 20% and a 30% out year contingency.

  14. Global Patterns of Drought Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, C.; Anderegg, W.; Biondi, F.; Koch, G. W.; Litvak, M. E.; Shaw, J.; Wolf, A.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Schaefer, K. M.; Fisher, J. B.; Cook, R. B.; Wei, Y.; Fang, Y.; Hayes, D. J.; Huang, M.; Jain, A. K.; Tian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the impacts of drought on carbon metabolism is crucial to elucidate how global environmental change will alter the climate regulation ecosystem service provided by terrestrial vegetation. Notwithstanding past and anticipated future changes in drought regime the interplay between hydrologic (amelioration of precipitation deficit) and functional (return to pre-drought levels of carbon metabolism) post-drought recovery is not well understood. Recovery time is however a prime determinant of whether ecosystems revert to their initial state or transition to a new equilibrium. Here we quantify post-drought recovery time of gross primary productivity (GPP) at grid cell (0.5° spatial resolution) to global scales using three reconstructions: MODIS, upscaled FLUXNET, and an ensemble of state-of-the-art standardized land surface model runs taken from MsTMIP (Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project). Drought is tracked using the multiscalar Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index drought metric where the integration period (the retrospective window used to calculate the metric) is varied from 1 to 24-months. We define recovery time as a function of both hydrologic and GPP recovery, i.e., both must attain pre-drought levels for recovery to occur. Despite the diverse provenance of the reconstructions, different reconstruction periods, and variable integration lengths several consistent patterns emerge across the c. 4 000 000 drought events and subsequent recovery times cataloged. Recovery time scales with drought severity and drought length. Biological productivity and biodiversity exhibit response surfaces with large amplitudes and clear thresholds whereas soil fertility is a weak constraint. In general, GPP-based descriptors of drought events serve as key boundary conditions for drought recovery. The longest recovery times occur on marginal lands--non-forested, mixed tree-grass, and boreal systems--with a slight uptick for

  15. Statistical detection of the mid-Pleistocene transition

    SciTech Connect

    Maasch, K.A. )

    1988-01-01

    Statistical methods have been used to show quantitatively that the transition in mean and variance observed in delta O-18 records during the middle of the Pleistocene was abrupt. By applying these methods to all of the available records spanning the entire Pleistocene, it appears that this jump was global and primarily represents an increase in ice mass. At roughly the same time an abrupt decrease in sea surface temperature also occurred, indicative of sudden global cooling. This kind of evidence suggests a possible bifurcation of the climate system that must be accounted for in a complete explanation of the ice ages. Theoretical models including internal dynamics are capable of exhibiting this kind of rapid transition. 50 refs.

  16. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone. PMID:25974581

  17. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone.

  18. PEPFAR Transitions to Country Ownership: Review of Past Donor Transitions and Application of Lessons Learned to the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Vogus, Abigail; Graff, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has shifted from an emergency response to a sustainable, country-owned response. The process of transition to country ownership is already underway in the Eastern Caribbean; the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) has advised the region that PEPFAR funding is being redirected away from the Eastern Caribbean toward Caribbean countries with high disease burden to strengthen services for key populations. This article seeks to highlight and apply lessons learned from other donor transitions to support a successful transition of HIV programs in the Eastern Caribbean. Based on a rapid review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature on donor transitions to country ownership in family planning, HIV, and other areas, we identified 48 resources that addressed key steps in the transition process and determinants of readiness for transition. Analysis of the existing literature revealed 6 steps that could help ensure successful transition, including developing a clear roadmap articulated through high-level diplomacy; investing in extensive stakeholder engagement; and supporting monitoring and evaluation during and after the transition to adjust course as needed. Nine specific areas to assess a country's readiness for transition include: leadership and management capacity, political and economic factors, the policy environment, identification of alternative funding sources, integration of HIV programs into the wider health system, the institutionalization of processes, the strength of procurement and supply chain management, identification of staffing and training needs, and engagement of civil society and the private sector. In the Caribbean, key areas requiring strengthening to ensure countries in the region can maintain the gains made under PEPFAR include further engaging civil society and the private sector, building the capacity of NGOs to take on essential program functions, and maintaining donor

  19. PEPFAR Transitions to Country Ownership: Review of Past Donor Transitions and Application of Lessons Learned to the Eastern Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Vogus, Abigail; Graff, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    The US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has shifted from an emergency response to a sustainable, country-owned response. The process of transition to country ownership is already underway in the Eastern Caribbean; the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) has advised the region that PEPFAR funding is being redirected away from the Eastern Caribbean toward Caribbean countries with high disease burden to strengthen services for key populations. This article seeks to highlight and apply lessons learned from other donor transitions to support a successful transition of HIV programs in the Eastern Caribbean. Based on a rapid review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature on donor transitions to country ownership in family planning, HIV, and other areas, we identified 48 resources that addressed key steps in the transition process and determinants of readiness for transition. Analysis of the existing literature revealed 6 steps that could help ensure successful transition, including developing a clear roadmap articulated through high-level diplomacy; investing in extensive stakeholder engagement; and supporting monitoring and evaluation during and after the transition to adjust course as needed. Nine specific areas to assess a country’s readiness for transition include: leadership and management capacity, political and economic factors, the policy environment, identification of alternative funding sources, integration of HIV programs into the wider health system, the institutionalization of processes, the strength of procurement and supply chain management, identification of staffing and training needs, and engagement of civil society and the private sector. In the Caribbean, key areas requiring strengthening to ensure countries in the region can maintain the gains made under PEPFAR include further engaging civil society and the private sector, building the capacity of NGOs to take on essential program functions, and maintaining donor

  20. Global carbon budget 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quéré, C.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Andrew, R. M.; Boden, T.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Moriarty, R.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Bopp, L.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Doney, S. C.; Harper, A.; Harris, I.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Jones, S. D.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Körtzinger, A.; Koven, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Omar, A.; Ono, T.; Park, G.-H.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schwinger, J.; Segschneider, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Tilbrook, B.; van Heuven, S.; Viovy, N.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Yue, C.

    2013-11-01

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe datasets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics, while emissions from Land-Use Change (ELUC), including deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover change data, fire activity in regions undergoing deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated for the first time in this budget with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of Dynamic Global Vegetation Models. All uncertainties are reported as ± 1 sigma, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2003-2012), EFF was 8.6 ± 0.4 GtC yr-1, ELUC 0.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr-1, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr-1, and SLAND 2.6 ± 0.8 GtC yr-1. For year 2012 alone, EFF grew to 9.7