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Sample records for light chemical effects

  1. Chemical and size effects of hygroscopic aerosols on light scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ignatius N.

    1996-08-01

    The extensive thermodynamic and optical properties recently reported [Tang and Munkelwitz, 1994a] for sulfate and nitrate solution droplets are incorporated into a visibility model for computing light scattering by hygroscopic aerosols. The following aerosol systems are considered: NH4HSO4, (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)3H(SO4), NaHSO4, Na2SO4, NH4NO3, and NaNO3. In addition, H2SO4 and NaCl are included to represent freshly formed sulfate and background sea-salt aerosols, respectively. Scattering coefficients, based on 1 μg dry salt per cubic meter of air, are calculated as a function of relative humidity for aerosols of various chemical compositions and lognormal size distributions. For a given size distribution the light scattered by aerosol particles per unit dry-salt mass concentration is only weakly dependent on chemical constituents of the hygroscopic sulfate and nitrate aerosols. Sulfuric acid and sodium chloride aerosols, however, are exceptions and scatter light more efficiently than all other inorganic salt aerosols considered in this study. Both internal and external mixtures exhibit similar light-scattering properties. Thus for common sulfate and nitrate aerosols, since the chemical effect is outweighed by the size effect, it follows that observed light scattering by the ambient aerosol can be approximated, within practical measurement uncertainties, by assuming the aerosol being an external mixture. This has a definite advantage for either visibility degradation or climatic impact modeling calculations, because relevant data are now available for external mixtures but only very scarce for internal mixtures.

  2. Chemical and sensory effects of storing sauvignon Blanc wine in colored bottles under artificial light.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Flores-Valdivia, Daniela; Laurie, V Felipe; López-Solís, Remigio; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2014-07-23

    The chemical and sensory effects of storing Sauvignon Blanc in colored bottles and exposing them to artificial light were examined. The colors of the bottles chosen were Dead Leaf Green, Antique Green, Amber, and Flint. The light was provided by fluorescent tubes with a regime of 16 h of exposure during 8 months of storage. The results indicated that the wine's chemical composition was affected by the type of bottle used. The Flint bottle presented the lowest concentration of total phenols. Yellow coloration was not dependent on the bottle color, as the wine in darker bottles (Amber, Antique Green, and Dead Leaf Green) had considerably more yellow color development than the wine in clear bottles. With regard to the sensory analyses performed, a trend showing an increase in color intensity and a decrease in overall aromas depending on the bottle color was observed. The wine's aromatic description changed significantly during its storage under artificial light conditions, demonstrating a decrease in vegetal aromas and an increase in citrus and tropical flavors that was dependent on the bottle color. PMID:24983902

  3. Tetracene films for light-emitting transistors: chemical and physical effects of the organic dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santato, Clara; Cicoira, Fabio; Bertolazzi, Simone

    2010-03-01

    Tetracene vacuum-sublimed films have been used to demonstrate the first Organic Light Emitting Field Effect Transistor (OLEFET), in 2003. Because of their planar configuration, OLEFET are excellent systems to study fundamental processes such as charge injection, transport, and light emission in organic semiconductor films. OLEFET are intensively investigated for applications in active matrix full-color displays and, ultimately, lasers. Since the first Tetracene-OLEFET, a number of excellent studies have been reported on vacuum-sublimed as well as solution-processed films of organic semiconductors incorporated into OLEFET. Investigating the role played by the surface substrate chemistry and establishing sound structure-property relationships in organic semiconductor films incorporated into OLEFET structures are the keys to understand and improve the optoelectronic characteristics of OLEFET. Here we present our results on the morphological, structural, light-emission, and charge transport properties in field-effect transistor configuration of vacuum-sublimed tetracene films deposited on chemically and physically different organic dielectric substrates (HMDS- and OTS-treated SiO2, polystyrene, parylene, PMMA).

  4. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  5. Infrared light actuated shape memory effects in crystalline polyurethane/graphene chemical hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, B. K.

    2014-02-01

    A series of crystalline shape memory polyurethanes (SMPUs) were synthesized from polycaprolactone diols and 4,4‧-methylenedicyclohexyl diisocyanate (H12MDI) with chemical incorporation of allyl isocyanate modified graphene oxide (iGO) into the PU. Actuation of hybrid SMPUs by infrared (IR) absorption of iGO as well as the direct heat actuated SMPUs has been studied in terms of the isothermal crystallization rate, near-IR absorption, and thermal, mechanical, and shape memory properties. It was found that iGO functions as a multifunctional cross-linker at low contents and a nucleating agent at high contents, and as a reinforcing filler, while light absorption by the iGO induced melting of the PU soft segment, giving rise to a shape recovery of over 90% at 1% iGO (G10).

  6. Relativistic environmental effects in (29)Si NMR chemical shifts of halosilanes: light nucleus, heavy environment.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic calculations of (29)Si NMR shielding constants (chemical shifts) in the series of halosilanes SiX(n)H(4-n) (X = F, Cl, Br and I) are performed within a full four-component relativistic Dirac's scheme using relativistic Dyall's basis sets. Three different theoretical levels are tested in the computation of (29)Si NMR chemical shifts in comparison with experiment: namely, four-component relativistic GIAO-DFT, four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA, and a hybrid scheme of a nonrelativistic GIAO-MP2 with taking into account relativistic corrections using the four-component relativistic GIAO-RPA. The DFT results give larger relativistic effects as compared to the RPA data which might be rationalized in terms of the manifestation of correlation effects taken into account at the DFT level and not accounted for at the uncorrelated RPA level. Taking into account solvent effects slightly improves agreement with experiment, however, being not a matter of principle. Generally, relativistic pure nonempirical wave function methods perform much better as compared to relativistic DFT methods when benchmarked to experiment. PMID:25946056

  7. Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

    2012-11-02

    We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

  8. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation and sandblasting treatment on bond strengths between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation and sandblasting treatment on the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin. Three types of commercial polyamides were treated using UV irradiation, sandblasting treatment, and a combining sandblasting and UV irradiation. The shear bond strength was measured and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Comparing shear bond strengths without surface treatment, from 4.1 to 5.7 MPa, the UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths except for Valplast, whose shear bond strengths ranged from 5.2 to 9.3 MPa. The sandblasting treatment also significantly increased the shear bond strengths (8.0 to 11.4 MPa). The combining sandblasting and UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths (15.2 to 18.3 MPa) comparing without surface treatment. This combined treatment was considered the most effective at improving the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin. PMID:25087663

  9. Effect of smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens on survival of ultraviolet light-inactivated herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dokko, H.; Min, P.S.; Cherrick, H.M.; Park, N.H. )

    1991-04-01

    Low doses of ultraviolet (UV) light, x-rays, photodynamic treatment, or aflatoxins increase the survival of UV-irradiated virus in cells. This effect is postulated to occur by enhancement of the error-prone cellular repair function, which could also be associated with oncogenic cell transformation. The present study was designed to investigate whether treatment of green monkey kidney cells with water extract of snuff (snuff extract), benzo(a)pyrene, nicotine, or tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines would result in enhanced survival of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Exposure of the cells with snuff extract, benzo(a)pyrene, N'-nitrosonornicotine, or 4-(N-methyl-N'-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone resulted in an enhancement of survival of UV-irradiated HSV type 1 compared with the control whereas exposure of the cells with nicotine did not. These data indicate that the water-extractable component of snuff and tobacco-related chemical carcinogens increase the cellular repair mechanism and provides for increased survival of UV-irradiated HSV.

  10. Effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on muscular growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of breast muscle in male broilers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H J; Qiao, X; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Yao, J H; Qi, G H

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on breast muscle growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of male broilers. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres; n = 1,320) were preweighed and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups in 3 modified incubators: 1) control group (in dark condition), 2) monochromatic green light group (560 nm), and 3) monochromatic blue light group (480 nm). The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps and were equalized at the intensity of 15 lx at eggshell level. After hatch, 120 male chicks from each group were placed in 6 replicates with 20 birds each. All of the birds were housed under white light (30 lx at bird-head level) with a light schedule of 23L:1D. At 21, 35, and 42 d of age, BW and breast muscle weight in the green light group were significantly increased compared with birds in the blue or dark groups (P < 0.05). The breast muscle weight and breast muscle percentages in birds incubated under green light were significantly elevated by 50.39 g (0.76%) and 54.07 g (1.20%) than those in the dark condition or blue group at 42 d of market age (P < 0.05), respectively. In the green light group, feed intake during 0~42 d was higher than that in the other 2 treatment groups (P < 0.05); feed conversion ratio during 0~35 and 0~42 d were lower than that in the dark condition (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the contents of breast moisture, CP, crude fat, and crude ash among all groups were observed (P > 0.05). Green light stimuli tended to increase cooking loss (P = 0.08) and L* value of 24-h meat color (P = 0.09). These results suggest that green light stimuli during embryogenesis enhanced the posthatch BW of male broilers, increased breast muscle growth, and improved the feed conversion ratio, but it did not cause any noticeable changes in breast chemical composition or overall meat quality characteristics. PMID:22399743

  11. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides

  12. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  13. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL PROCESSING AND OXIDE ETHYLENE STERILIZATION ON CORTICAL AND CANCELLOUS RAT BONE: A LIGHT AND ELECTRON SCANNING MICROSCOPY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; da Silva, Juliano Voltarelli F.; Frezarim Thomazini, José Armendir; Volpon, José Batista

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, under microscopic examination, the structural changes displayed by the trabecular and cortical bones after being processed chemically and sterilized by ethylene oxide. Methods: Samples of cancellous and cortical bones obtained from young female albinus rats (Wistar) were assigned to four groups according to the type of treatment: Group I- drying; Group II- drying and ethylene oxide sterilization; III- chemical treatment; IV- chemical treatment and ethylene oxide sterilization. Half of this material was analyzed under ordinary light microscope and the other half using scanning electron microscopy. Results: In all the samples, regardless the group, there was good preservation of the general morphology. For samples submitted to the chemical processing there was better preservation of the cellular content, whereas there was amalgamation of the fibres when ethylene oxide was used. Conclusion: Treatment with ethylene oxide caused amalgamation of the fibers, possibly because of heating and the chemical treatment contributed to a better cellular preservation of the osseous structure. PMID:26998450

  14. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Chemically enhanced bacteriorhodopsin thin-film spatial-light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qi Wang; Zhang, Chunping; Blumer, Robert V.; Gross, Richard B.; Chen, Zhongping; Birge, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    An optically addressed spatial light modulator that is based on the chemically enhanced bacteriorhodopsin thin film is demonstrated. The underlying principle is the light-induced shift of absorption band of the protein. The device can be chemically or genetically modified for different applications. In our preliminary experiment, a resolution of about 100 line pairs per millimeter with a linear dynamic range of above 100:1 is obtained.

  16. Chemically enhanced bacteriorhodopsin thin-film spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Q. W.; Zhang, Chungping; Blumer, Robert; Gross, Richard B.; Chen, Zhongping; Birge, Robert R.

    1993-08-01

    An optically addressed spatial light modulator based on a thin film of chemically enhanced bacteriorhodopsin is demonstrated. Incoherent-to-coherent light conversion is achieved by exploitation of both the large shift in absorption maxima accompanying the bR - M phototransformation and the extended M-intermediate lifetime resulting from the chemical enhancement of the protein at high pH. The device exhibits a linear dynamic range of 120:1 at 514 nm and a resolution of about 100 line pairs/mm.

  17. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  18. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  19. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical strength of mirrors on fluorite substrates subjected to cw radiation from a chemical CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, V. A.; Rukhin, V. B.

    1994-02-01

    Optimisation of the energy characteristics of a chemical CO laser revealed damage to the optical resonator mirrors. Estimates indicated that when the power density of the incident cw laser radiation was 2-2.5 kW cm-2 the induced thermoelastic stresses could reach the damage threshold of mirrors on fluorite substrates.

  20. Detection of UV light based on chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, D. V.; Grankin, V. P.; Martysh, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency accommodation of heterogeneous-reaction energy via an electronic channel and the possibility of using this effect to design an ionizing (UV) radiation detector based on chemically stimulated luminescence have been investigated. Preliminary irradiation of a ZnS sample by UV light is found to cause a luminescence flash under subsequent exposure of the sample surface to a flux of hydrogen atoms. The flash intensity depends on the UV excitation level and increases by several orders of magnitude in comparison with an unirradiated sample. It is shown that a new method for detecting UV light using chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors accumulating light yield can be developed based on this effect.

  1. Health effects of chemical products.

    PubMed

    Steensberg, J

    1982-01-01

    An outline is given of the data on human health effects that are needed as a foundation for the administration of legislation on chemical substances and products. Danish data on mortality and morbidity from acute poisoning and some published clinical studies are presented. Serious problems may persist in subgroups of the population and the prevention of acute poisoning is still a basic aim of this legislation. Allergic reactions to chemicals are discussed. Not all sensitized individuals can be protected but steps should be taken to prevent contact with the sensitizing agents that are of the greatest public health importance. Chronic health effects following exposure to chemicals have influenced the recent strengthening of regulations but carcinogenic risks especially are extremely difficult for administrative and political systems to handle in an approximately rational way. While we are reducing the use of suspected carcinogenic chemicals our populations must, however, be given a greater appreciation of the cancer risk problem, particularly the fact that we cannot eliminate all cancer risks. Biological monitoring of human populations is a necessary supplement to the traditional registration of diseases as part of our health surveillance systems. Fortunately our societies have been able to pay increasing attention to the long-term public health consequences of exposures to chemical factors in our environment. PMID:6236969

  2. Chemical Imaging of Biological Tissue with Synchrotron Infrared Light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,L.; Dumas, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) and imaging (FTIRI) have become valuable techniques for examining the chemical makeup of biological materials by probing their vibrational motions on a microscopic scale. Synchrotron infrared (S-IR) light is an ideal source for FTIRM and FTIRI due to the combination of its high brightness (i.e., flux density), also called brilliance, and broadband nature. Through a 10-{mu}m pinhole, the brightness of a synchrotron source is 100-1000 times higher than a conventional thermal (globar) source. Accordingly, the improvement in spatial resolution and in spectral quality to the diffraction limit has led to a plethora of applications that is just being realized. In this review, we describe the development of synchrotron-based FTIRM, illustrate its advantages in many applications to biological systems, and propose some potential future directions for the technique.

  3. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  4. Ship diesel emission aerosols: A comprehensive study on the chemical composition, the physical properties and the molecular biological and toxicological effects on human lung cells of aerosols from a ship diesel engine operated with heavy or light diesel fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Dietmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Paur, H.; Dilger, M.; Mülhopt, S.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Hirvonen, M.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Berube, K.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Arteaga Salas, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Reda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Gröger, T.; Weiss, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties, transformation processes and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. This is performed by thorough comprehensive chemical and physical characterization of combustion aerosols (including application of advantageous on-line methods) and studying of biological effects on human lung cell-cultures. A new ALI air-liquid-interface (ALI) exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for the HICE-measurements. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized (e.g. proteomics). By using stable isotope labeling technologies (13C-Glucose/metabolomics; 2H-Lysine/SILAC-proteomics), high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of molecular-biological effects is achievable even at sub-toxic effect dose levels. Aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine (heavy/light fuel oil) have been investigated. The effect of wood combustion and ship diesel PM e.g. on the protein expression of ALI-exposed A549 cells was compared. Filtered aerosol is used as gas-reference for the isotope labeling based method (SILAC). Therefore the effects of wood combustion- and shipping diesel-PM can be directly compared. Ship diesel aerosol causes a broader distribution in the observed fold changes (log2), i.e. more proteins are significantly up-/down-regulated in case of shipping diesel PM-exposure. This corresponds to a stronger biological reaction if compared to wood combustion-PM exposure. The chemical analysis results on wood combustion- and ship diesel-PM depict more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)/oxidized-PAH but less of some transition metals (V, Fe) in the wood combustion case. Interestingly, alkylated PAH are considerably more abundant in shipping PM, suggesting that PAH/Oxy-PAH may be less relevant for

  5. Effect of chemical peeling on photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed; Funasaka, Yoko; Kamo, Tsuneyoshi; Ooe, Masahiko; Matsunaka, Hiroshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Itoh, Tomoo; Nishigori, Chikako

    2010-10-01

    Chemical peeling is one of the dermatological treatments available for certain cutaneous diseases and conditions or improvement of cosmetic appearance of photo-aged skin. We assessed the photo-chemopreventive effect of several clinically used chemical peeling agents on the ultraviolet-irradiated skin of hairless mice. Chemical peeling was done using 35% glycolic acid dissolved in distilled water, 30% salicylic acid in ethanol, and 10% or 35% trichloroacetic acid in distilled water at the right back of ultraviolet-irradiated hairless mice every 2 weeks for glycolic acid, salicylic acid and 10% trichloroacetic acid, and every 4 weeks for 35% trichloroacetic acid for a total of 18 weeks after the establishment of photo-aged mice by irradiation with ultraviolet B range light three times a week for 14 weeks at a total dose of 6.66 J/cm(2) . Tumor formation was assessed every week. Skin specimens were taken from treated and non-treated area for evaluation under microscopy, evaluation of p53 expression and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Serum level of prostaglandin E(2) was also evaluated. All types of chemical peeling reduced tumor formation in treated mice, mostly in the treated area but also in the non-treated area. Peeling suppressed retention of p53-positive abnormal cells and reduced mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in treated skin. Further, serum prostaglandin E(2) level was decreased in chemical peeling treated mice. These results indicate that chemical peeling with glycolic acid, salicylic acid and trichloroacetic acid could serve tumor prevention by removing photo-damaged cells. PMID:20860736

  6. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  7. Color and Light Effects on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grangaard, Ellen Mannel

    This study examined the effects of color and light on the learning of eleven 6-year-old elementary school students. The students were videotaped to identify off-task behaviors and had their blood pressure measured while in a standard classroom with white walls and cool-white fluorescent lights, as well as in a classroom with light blue walls and…

  8. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  9. Effects of light on brain and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, George C.

    1994-01-01

    It is obvious that light entering the eye permits the sensory capacity of vision. The human species is highly dependent on visual perception of the environment and consequently, the scientific study of vision and visual mechanisms is a centuries old endeavor. Relatively new discoveries are now leading to an expanded understanding of the role of light entering the eye in addition to supporting vision, light has various nonvisual biological effects. Over the past thirty years, animal studies have shown that environmental light is the primary stimulus for regulating circadian rhythms, seasonal cycles, and neuroendocrine responses. As with all photobiological phenomena, the wavelength, intensity, timing and duration of a light stimulus is important in determining its regulatory influence on the circadian and neuroendocrine systems. Initially, the effects of light on rhythms and hormones were observed only in sub-human species. Research over the past decade, however, has confirmed that light entering the eyes of humans is a potent stimulus for controlling physiological rhythms. The aim of this paper is to examine three specific nonvisual responses in humans which are mediated by light entering the eye: light-induced melatonin suppression, light therapy for winter depression, and enhancement of nighttime performance. This will serve as a brief introduction to the growing database which demonstrates how light stimuli can influence physiology, mood and behavior in humans. Such information greatly expands our understanding of the human eye and will ultimately change our use of light in the human environment.

  10. Nanofabrication and applications of subwavelength optical probes: Chemical and biological sensors, light sources and exciton probes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.

    1993-01-01

    The author has developed a new and controllable nanofabrication technique, photo-nanofabrication, based on near-field photo-chemical synthesis and nanometer optical sources. Photo-nanofabrication can produce subwavelength light and exciton probes with or without specific chemical or biological sensitivity. By applying near-field optics, the author has successfully demonstrated a new concept of near-field photochemical synthesis, in which the dimension of a product is solely determined by the size of the light source. The most successful application to date is the development of the smallest fiberoptic chemical sensors. Specifically, a thousandfold miniaturization of an immobilized fiberoptic pH sensor has been achieved, leading to at least a millionfold decrease in necessary sample volume and to at least a hundredfold shorter response time. The sensors have high fluorescence intensity and excellent detection limit. New internal calibration methods have also been developed for accurate pH quantification. The newly developed optical sensors have been used in real time measurements of pH on individual, viable, intact rat conceptuses during the period of organogenesis. The sensors can discriminate pH changes of less than 0.1 pH unit in the physiologic pH range. Static determinations of pH in rat conceptuses of varying gestational ages show decreasing pH with conceptal age. Chemical dynamic alterations in pH of intact rat conceptuses, in response to several variations in their environmental conditions, have been measured. Passive and active subwavelength light sources have been constructed with both micropipettes and fiberoptic tips. They have been used as exciton and light sources and in preliminary probe-to-sample distance regulated, Foerster energy transfer studies as well as in studies of the probe-to-sample interfacial Kasha effect. They were also used in supertip development for near-field scanning optical microscopy and for molecular exciton microscopy.

  11. [Mutagenic effects of ionized plasma light flux].

    PubMed

    Stupin, I V; Dombrovskiĭ, A M; Novokshonov, A I; Belova, L L; Belous, G G

    1990-10-01

    The effect of ion plasma light flux on the genomes of auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain and Drosophilla melanogaster has been examined. Essentially no mutagenic effect was found in doses close to therapeutic ones. PMID:2126213

  12. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  13. Visible light Cr(VI) reduction and organic chemical oxidation by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Reddy, Ettireddy P; Smirniotis, Panagiotis G

    2005-08-15

    Here we report the simultaneous Cr(VI) reduction and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) oxidation in water under visible light (wavelength > 400 nm) using commercial Degussa P25 TiO2. This remarkable observation was attributed to a synergistic effect among TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP. It is well known that TiO2 alone cannot remove either 4-CP or Cr(VI) efficiently under visible light. Moreover, the interaction between Cr(VI) and 4-CP is minimal if not negligible. However, we found that the combination of TiO2, Cr(VI), and 4-CP together can enable efficient Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation under visible light. The specific roles of the three ingredients in the synergistic system were studied parametrically. It was found that optimal concentrations of Cr(VI) and TiO2 exist for the Cr(VI) reduction and 4-CP oxidation. Cr(VI) was compared experimentally with other metals such as Cu(ll), Fe(lll), Mn(IV), Ce(IV), and V(V). Among all these metal ions, only Cr(VI) promotes the photocatalytic oxidation of 4-CP. The amount of 4-CP removed was directly related to the initial concentration of Cr(VI). The system was also tested with four other chemicals (aniline, salicylic acid, formic acid, and diethyl phosphoramidate). We found that the same phenomenon occurred for organics containing acid and/or phenolic groups. Cr(VI) was reduced at the same time as the organic chemicals being oxidized during photoreaction under visible light. The synergistic effect was also found with pure anatase TiO2 and rutile TiO2. This study demonstrates a possible economical way for environmental cleanup under visible light. PMID:16173589

  14. Damaging effects of visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. P.; Baker, B. N.

    1982-02-01

    The right eyes of anesthetized, ten week old albino rats are exposed to constant photon fluxes at 6 wavelengths for 6 hours. The left eye of each animal is patched during the exposure and is used as control. Histologic examination of retinal sections disclosed a region in the superior retina which is more damaged than are other areas. Attempting to ascertain an action spectrum by measuring outer nuclear layer (ONL) lost in this sensitive region fails. However, it is shown that when ONL thickness is integrated over the entire retinal sections, a rhodopsin action-spectrum emerges. It is concluded that retinal light damage in the albina rat under these conditions is rhodopsin mediated; and assessment of the extent of damage is best made by some method which integrates over the entire retinal section. The latter methodology is not routinely incorporated into studies of retinal light-damage but probably should be.

  15. Radial spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Weixing; Ke, Yougang; Liu, Yachao; Ling, Xiaohui; Luo, Hailu; Yin, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    We propose and realize a radial spin Hall effect (SHE) of light by using a dielectric metasurface. The metasurface with radially varying optical axes introduces a Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) geometrical phase to the incident light. The spatial gradient of PB phase accounts for a shift in the momentum space and thus leads the light to split radially into two concentric rays with opposite spin in the position space, which is called a radial SHE. Further experiments verify that the magnitude of the splitting increases with the rotation rate of the optical-axis orientation and the propagation distance, thereby allowing for macroscopic observation of the SHE. We also find that the phase of the incident light influences the profiles of the two split rays, while the polarization determines their intensities. The results provide methods to tune the SHE of light by engineering metasurfaces and modulating the incident light, and this radial SHE may be extrapolated to other physical systems.

  16. Permeability-increasing effects of low-power light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtsev, Igor Z.; Koudryavtsev, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    The actions of physico-chemical mechanisms of low power light, applied in medicine are discussed. The investigations were prepared both in experiment on laboratory animals and in emergency-care clinics, where I worked with physicians as the theory-investigator. In this message I propose the theory of permeability increasing effects of low power light. Proton- permeability increasing effects on membranes go to the bioenergetic mechanism of low power light action. Sodium-permeability increasing effects on excitable membranes go to the reflex mechanism of low power light action. We suppose the medical mechanism of laser irradiation effects on the blood to be connected with water-permeability increasing effects because of blood cell membrane depolarization and shaking. We measured the dependence of red blood cell membrane water-permeability coefficient upon the low power light irradiation wavelength in the range 625 - 645 nm. So it was proved that He-Ne laser irradiation with 633 nm wavelength excites dissolved molecular oxygen from the ground triplet state to the singlet state. Fast relaxation of singlet oxygen to triplet state in water medium near membrane with the time 10-6 sec go to the membrane purification mechanism of low power light action.

  17. Light history modulates antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to both natural (light) and chemical (herbicides) stressors.

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Sague, Irene Gallardo; Urrea, Gemma; Guasch, Helena

    2012-05-01

    In multiple stress situations, the co-occurrence of environmental and chemical factors can influence organisms' ability to cope with toxicity. In this context, the influence of light adaptation on the response of freshwater biofilms to sudden light changes or to herbicides exposure was investigated by determining various parameters: diatom community composition, photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll a content, antioxidant enzyme activities. Biofilms were grown in microcosms under sub-optimal, saturating, and high light intensities and showed already described characteristics of shade/light adaptation (community structure, photosynthetic adaptation, etc.). Light history modulated antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to the stress caused by short-term exposure to sudden light changes or to herbicides. First biofilms adapted to sub-optimal light intensity (shade-adapted) were found to be more sensitive to an increase in light intensity than high-light adapted ones to a reduction in light intensity. Second, while light history influenced biofilms' response to glyphosate, it had little influence on biofilms' response to copper and none on its response to oxyfluorfen. Indeed glyphosate exposure led to a stronger decrease in photosynthetic efficiency of shade-adapted biofilms (EC(50) = 11.7 mg L(-1)) than of high-light adapted communities (EC(50) = 35.6 mg L(-1)). Copper exposure led to an activation of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in biofilms adapted to sub-optimal and saturating light intensity while the protein content decreased in all biofilms exposed to copper. Oxyfluorfen toxicity was independent of light history provoking an increase in APX activity. In conclusion this study showed that both previous exposure to contaminants and physical habitat characteristics might influence community tolerance to disturbances strongly. PMID:22407402

  18. Shedding Light on Synergistic Chemical Genetic Connections with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage

    2015-12-23

    Machine learning can be used to predict compounds acting synergistically, and this could greatly expand the universe of available potential treatments for diseases that are currently hidden in the dark chemical matter. PMID:27136350

  19. Catalytic effect of light illumination on bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Gan, Min; Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jie, Shiqi; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of visible light exposure on chalcopyrite bioleaching was investigated using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The results indicated, in both shake-flasks and aerated reactors with 8500-lux light, the dissolved Cu was 91.80% and 23.71% higher, respectively, than that in the controls without light. The catalytic effect was found to increase bioleaching to a certain limit, then plateaued as the initial chalcopyrite concentration increased from 2% to 4.5%. Thus a balanced mineral concentration is highly amenable to bioleaching via offering increased available active sites for light adsorption while eschewing mineral aggregation and screening effects. Using semiconducting chalcopyrite, the light facilitated the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) as metabolic substrates for A.ferrooxidans, leading to better biomass, lower pH and redox potential, which are conducive to chalcopyrite leaching. The light exposure on iron redox cycling was further confirmed by chemical leaching tests using Fe(3+), which exhibited higher Fe(2+) levels in the light-induced system. PMID:25722073

  20. Chemically driven tunable light emission of charged and neutral excitons in monolayer WS₂.

    PubMed

    Peimyoo, Namphung; Yang, Weihuang; Shang, Jingzhi; Shen, Xiaonan; Wang, Yanlong; Yu, Ting

    2014-11-25

    Monolayer (1L) semiconducting transition metal dichacogenides (TMDs) possess remarkable physical and optical properties, promising for a wide range of applications from nanoelectronics to optoelectronics such as light-emitting and sensing devices. Here we report how the molecular adsorption can modulate the light emission and electrical properties of 1L WS2. The dependences of trion and exciton emission on chemical doping are investigated in 1L WS2 by microphotoluminescence (μPL) measurements, where different responses are observed and simulated theoretically. The total PL is strongly enhanced when electron-withdrawing molecules adsorb on 1L WS2, which is attributed to the increase of the exciton formation due to charge transfer. The electrical transport measurements of a 1L WS2 field effect transistor elucidate the effect of the adsorbates on the conductivity, which give evidence for charge transfer between molecules and 1L WS2. These findings open up many opportunities to manipulate the electrical and optical properties of two-dimensional TMDs, which are particularly important for developing optoelectronic devices for chemical and biochemical sensing applications. PMID:25317839

  1. Chemical communication: a jewel sheds light on signal evolution.

    PubMed

    Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-05-01

    When others show sexy tails or sing elaborate songs, many animals use the language of chemistry to attract potential mates. A study provides insights into the evolutionary conundrum of how new chemical signals can evolve in an established communication system. PMID:23660353

  2. Controllable light-induced conic structures in silicon nanowire arrays by metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenli; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Hong; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have long been considered a promising material due to their extraordinary electrical and optical properties. As a simple, highly efficient fabrication method for SiNWs, metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) has been intensively studied over recent years. However, effective control by modulation of simple parameters is still a challenging topic and some key questions still remain in the mechanistic processes. In this work, a novel method to manipulate SiNWs with a light-modulated MACE process has been systematically investigated. Conic structures consisting of inclined and clustered SiNWs can be generated and effectively modified by the incident light while new patterns such as ‘bamboo shoot’ arrays can also be formed under certain conditions. More importantly, detailed study has revealed a new top-down ‘diverting etching’ model of the conic structures in this process, different from the previously proposed ‘bending’ model. As a consequence of this mechanism, preferential lateral mass transport of silver particles occurs. Evidence suggests a relationship of this phenomenon to the inhomogeneous distribution of the light-induced electron-hole pairs beneath the etching front. Study on the morphological change and related mechanism will hopefully open new routes to understand and modulate the formation of SiNWs and other nanostructures.

  3. Retinal Effects Of Blue Light Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, William T.; Mueller, Harold A.; Ruffolo, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Recent research has shown that blue light exposure is an important factor in certain types of retinal injury. The mammalian ocular media transmits the spectral band 400-1400 nm to the retina. The short wavelengths (400-550 nm) produce a photochemical or actinic type of damage, while the longer wavelengths (550-1400 nm) produce thermal damage. Distinction between the two types of retinal damage are discussed briefly and the importance of the blue light effect for solar retinitis and eclipse blindness is emphasized. The significance of blue light retinal injury is summarized for various environmental and occupational exposures.

  4. Effect of Light on Human Circadian Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The circadian system in animals and humans, being near but not exactly 24-hours in cycle length, must be reset on a daily basis in order to remain in synchrony with external environmental time. This process of entrainment is achieved in most mammals through regular exposure to light and darkness. In this chapter, we review the results of studies conducted in our laboratory and others over the past 25 years in which the effects of light on the human circadian timing system were investigated. These studies have revealed, how the timing, intensity, duration, and wavelength of light affect the human biological clock. Our most recent studies also demonstrate that there is much yet to learn about the effects of light on the human circadian timing system. PMID:20161220

  5. Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of poor lighting and glare on public safety are well-known, as are the harmful environmental effects on various species and the environment in general. What is less well-known is the potential harmful medical effects of excessive poor nighttime lighting. A significant body of research has been developed over the last few years regarding this problem. One of the most significant effects is the startling increased risk for breast cancer by excessive exposure to nighttime lighting. The mechanism is felt to be by disruption of the circadian rhythm and suppression of melatonin production from the pineal gland. Melatonin has an anticancer effect that is lost when its production is disrupted. I am in the process of developing a monograph that will summarize this important body of research, to be presented and endorsed by the American Medical Association, and its Council of Science and Public health. This paper is a brief overall summary of this little known potential harmful effect of poor and excessive nighttime lighting.

  6. Effects of supplementary lighting by natural light for growth of Brassica chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shih-Chuan; Lee, Hui-Ping; Kao, Shih-Tse; Lu, Ju-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This paper present a model of cultivated chamber with supplementary natural colour light. We investigate the effects of supplementary natural red light and natural blue light on growth of Brassica chinensis under natural white light illumination. After 4 weeks of supplementary colour light treatment, the experiment results shown that the weight of fresh leaf were not affected by supplementary natural blue light. However, those Brassica chinensis were cultivated in the chambers with supplementary natural red light obtained a significant increasing of fresh weight of leaf under both white light illuminate models. The combination of natural white light with supplementary natural red light illumination will be benefits in growth for cultivation and energy saving.

  7. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  8. Vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets: chemical vapor synthesis, ultraviolet light emission, and superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qin, Li; Hao, Yufeng; Kuang, Shengyong; Bai, Xuedong; Chong, Yat-Ming; Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Enge

    2010-01-26

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor with a wide band gap ( approximately 6 eV). Here, we report the synthesis of vertically aligned BN nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-N(2)-H(2). The size, shape, thickness, density, and alignment of the BNNSs were well-controlled by appropriately changing the growth conditions. With changing the gas flow rates of BF(3) and H(2) as well as their ratio, the BNNSs evolve from three-dimensional with branches to two-dimensional with smooth surface and their thickness changes from 20 to below 5 nm. The growth of the BNNSs rather than uniform granular films is attributed to the particular chemical properties of the gas system, mainly the strong etching effect of fluorine. The alignment of the BNNSs is possibly induced by the electrical field generated in plasma sheath. Strong UV light emission with a broad band ranging from 200 to 400 nm and superhydrophobicity with contact angles over 150 degrees were obtained for the vertically aligned BNNSs. The present BNNSs possess the properties complementary to carbon nanosheets such as intrinsically semiconducting, high temperature stability, and high chemical inertness and may find applications in ultraviolet nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, electron field emission, and self-cleaning coatings, etc., especially those working at high temperature and in harsh environments. PMID:20047271

  9. Aerosol chemical composition and light scattering during a winter season in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Gao, Jian; Wang, Han; Chai, Faihe; Wang, Shulan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate PM2.5 contributions to light scattering under different air pollution levels, PM2.5 and its major chemical components, PM10, size-segregated water-soluble ions, and aerosol scattering coefficient (bsp) under dry conditions were measured at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013 when heavy pollution events frequently occurred. Measurements were categorized into three pollution levels including heavy-polluted (Air Quality Index (AQI) ≥ 200), light-polluted (200 > AQI ≥ 100) and clean periods (AQI < 100). The average PM2.5 mass concentration was 248 μg m-3 during the heavy-polluted period, which was 2.4 and 5.6 times of those during the light-polluted (104 μg m-3) and clean (44 μg m-3) periods, respectively. The concentrations of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ increased much more than those of OC and EC during the heavy-polluted period compared with those during the light-polluted and clean periods. Good correlations between PM2.5 and bsp were found (R2 > 0.95) during the different pollution levels. The mass scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM2.5 was 4.9 m2 g-1 during the heavy-polluted period, which was higher than those during the light-polluted (4.3 m2 g-1) and clean periods (3.6 m2 g-1). To further evaluate the impact of individual chemical components of PM2.5 on light scattering, a multiple linear regression equation of measured bsp against the mass concentration of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, Organic Matter (OM), EC, Fine Soil (FS), Coarse Matter (CM) and Other chemical compounds were performed. (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and OM were the dominant species contributing to bsp under both dry and ambient conditions. OM contributed more to bsp than the sum of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 did under the dry condition during all the pollution periods and this was also the case under the ambient condition during the light-polluted and clean periods. However, the total contributions of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 to bsp under the ambient condition was 55%, much more than

  10. Effect of light conditions on the resistance of current-year Fagus Crenata seedlings against fungal pathogens causing damping-off in a natural beech forest: fungus isolation and histological and chemical resistance.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Yu; Yamaji, Keiko

    2009-09-01

    Forest gap dynamics affects light intensity on the forest floor, which in turn may influence defense and survival of tree seedlings. Current-year Fagus crenata seedlings show high mortality under the canopy caused by damping-off. In contrast, they survive pathogen attacks in gaps. However, defense mechanisms against damping-off have not been fully understood. In order to determine the resistance factors that affect mortality in current-year seedlings, we compared seedling survival and chemical and histological characteristics of the hypocotyls of seedlings from closed-stand and forest-edge plots. Damping-off occurred in the current-year seedlings mainly from the end of June to July; survival rate of the seedlings was higher in the forest-edge plot than in the closed-stand plot. By performing an inoculation test on the seedling hypocotyls, we identified Colletotrichum dematium and Cylindrocarpon sp. as the causative pathogens under low illumination only. In the beginning of July, only seedling hypocotyls from the forest-edge plot exhibited periderm formation. From mid-June to July, seedling hypocotyls from the forest-edge plot accumulated approximately twice the amount of total phenols as those accumulated by seedling hypocotyls from the closed-stand plot. The ethyl acetate phase of methanol extracts of hypocotyls showed antifungal activity. We conclude that seedlings from the forest-edge plot may resist pathogenic attack via periderm formation and increased phenol synthesis. Plant defense mechanisms that are controlled by light intensity may be important for promoting seedling regeneration in forest gap dynamics. PMID:19774414

  11. Chemically Induced Changes to Membrane Permeability in Living Cells Probed with Nonlinear Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Michael J; Sharifian Gh, Mohammad; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2015-07-28

    Second-harmonic light scattering (SHS) permits characterization of membrane-specific molecular transport in living cells. Herein, we demonstrate the use of time-resolved SHS for quantifying chemically induced enhancements in membrane permeability. As proof of concept, we examine the enhanced permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane in living Escherichia coli following addition of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATPe). The transport rate of the hydrophobic cation, malachite green, increases nearly an order of magnitude following addition of 0.1 mM ATPe. The absence of an ATPe-enhanced permeability in liposomes strongly suggests the induced effect is protein-mediated. The utility of SHS for elucidating the mechanism of action of antimicrobials is discussed. PMID:26122620

  12. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  13. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, S.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Freeland, E.; Foley, J.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Laiho, J.; Levkova, L.; Li, R.; Osborn, J.; Sugar, R. L.; Torok, A.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.; Collaboration MILC

    2015-09-01

    For some time, the MILC Collaboration has been studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons. These calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in χPT. That is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. For the photons we use the non-compact formalism. We have new results with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. We consider how well chiral perturbation theory describes these results and the implications for light quark masses.

  14. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Basak, S.; Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Freeland, E.; Foley, J.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Komijani, J.; Laiho, J.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Calculations studying electromagnetic effects on light mesons are reported. The calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffices to NLO in χPT; that is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. The non-compact formalism is used for photons. New results are obtained with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. The success of chiral perturbation theory in describing these results and the implications for light quark masses are considered.

  15. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities. PMID:25192094

  16. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-05-22

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert thyroid effects through a variety of mechanisms of action, and some animal experiments and in vitro studies have focused on elucidating the mode of action of specific chemical compounds. Long-term human studies on effects of environmental chemicals on thyroid related outcomes such as growth and development are still lacking. The human exposure scenario with life long exposure to a vast mixture of chemicals in low doses and the large physiological variation in thyroid hormone levels between individuals render human studies very difficult. However, there is now reasonably firm evidence that PCBs have thyroid-disrupting effects, and there is emerging evidence that also phthalates, bisphenol A, brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals may have thyroid disrupting properties. PMID:21939731

  17. Building Twilight "Light Sensors" to Study the Effects of Light Pollution on Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thancharoen, Anchana; Branham, Marc A.; Lloyd, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Light pollution negatively affects many nocturnal organisms. We outline two experiments that can be conducted by students to examine the effects of light pollution on firefly behavior. Inexpensive electronic light sensors, which are easy to construct and calibrate, are used to sample light levels along transects in spaces where fireflies are…

  18. Studying the Effect of Light Quality on the Size of the Photosystem II Light Harvesting Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhoz, Romualdo; Quiles, Maria J.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the effect of light quality on the size of the photosystem II (PSII) light harvesting complex (LHCII) is studied by measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by leaf sections of oat ("Avena sativa," var. Prevision) plants previously treated with either white light or with light filtered through blue, green, red or farred…

  19. Light-triggered chemical amplification to accelerate degradation and release from polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Jason; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Lux, Jacques; Grossman, Madeleine; He, Sha; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-12-11

    We describe a means of chemical amplification to accelerate triggered degradation of a polymer and particles composed thereof. We designed a light-degradable copolymer containing carboxylic acids masked by photolabile groups and ketals. Photolysis allows the unmasked acidic groups in the polymer backbone to accelerate ketal hydrolysis even at neutral pH. PMID:26445896

  20. Light-emitting channelrhodopsins for combined optogenetic and chemical-genetic control of neurons.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Ken; Birkner, Elisabeth; Augustine, George J; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Manipulation of neuronal activity through genetically targeted actuator molecules is a powerful approach for studying information flow in the brain. In these approaches the genetically targeted component, a receptor or a channel, is activated either by a small molecule (chemical genetics) or by light from a physical source (optogenetics). We developed a hybrid technology that allows control of the same neurons by both optogenetic and chemical genetic means. The approach is based on engineered chimeric fusions of a light-generating protein (luciferase) to a light-activated ion channel (channelrhodopsin). Ionic currents then can be activated by bioluminescence upon activation of luciferase by its substrate, coelenterazine (CTZ), as well as by external light. In cell lines, expression of the fusion of Gaussia luciferase to Channelrhodopsin-2 yielded photocurrents in response to CTZ. Larger photocurrents were produced by fusing the luciferase to Volvox Channelrhodopsin-1. This version allowed chemical modulation of neuronal activity when expressed in cultured neurons: CTZ treatment shifted neuronal responses to injected currents and sensitized neurons to fire action potentials in response to subthreshold synaptic inputs. These luminescent channelrhodopsins--or luminopsins--preserve the advantages of light-activated ion channels, while extending their capabilities. Our proof-of-principle results suggest that this novel class of tools can be improved and extended in numerous ways. PMID:23544095

  1. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  2. All-in-one light-tunable borated phosphors with chemical and luminescence dynamical control resolution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun Che; Liu, Yun-Ping; Xiao, Zhi Ren; Wang, Yin-Kuo; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2014-06-25

    Single-composition white-emitting phosphors with superior intrinsic properties upon excitation by ultraviolet light-emitting diodes are important constituents of next-generation light sources. Borate-based phosphors, such as NaSrBO3:Ce(3+) and NaCaBO3:Ce(3+), have stronger absorptions in the near-ultraviolet region as well as better chemical/physical stability than oxides. Energy transfer effects from sensitizer to activator caused by rare-earth ions are mainly found in the obtained photoluminescence spectra and lifetime. The interactive mechanisms of multiple dopants are ambiguous in most cases. We adjust the doping concentration in NaSrBO3:RE (RE = Ce(3+), Tb(3+), Mn(2+)) to study the energy transfer effects of Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Mn(2+) by comparing the experimental data and theoretical calculation. The vacuum-ultraviolet experimental determination of the electronic energy levels for Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) in the borate host regarding the 4f-5d and 4f-4f configurations are described. Evaluation of the Ce(3+)/Mn(2+) intensity ratios as a function of Mn(2+) concentration is based on the analysis of the luminescence dynamical process and fluorescence lifetime measurements. The results closely agree with those directly obtained from the emission spectra. Density functional calculations are performed using the generalized gradient approximation plus an on-site Coulombic interaction correction scheme to investigate the forbidden mechanism of interatomic energy transfer between the NaSrBO3:Ce(3+) and NaSrBO3:Eu(2+) systems. Results indicate that the NaSrBO3:Ce(3+), Tb(3+), and Mn(2+) phosphors can be used as a novel white-emitting component of UV radiation-excited devices. PMID:24844411

  3. Preparation and Effect of Lighting on Structures and Properties of GSH Capped ZnSe QDs.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Peng, Zeze; Zhou, Peijiang; Cheng, Gary J; Nian, Qiong; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Jinhui; Liang, Yuhe

    2015-11-01

    L-glutathione (GSH) capped ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by microwave-assisted aqueous synthesis. Then, the resulting QDs were illuminated under dark, ultraviolet light and incandescent light, respectively. Thereby effect of lighting on the structures and properties of QDs were studied systematically. It was revealed that particle size and element content of QDs took a sharp change after irradiation, while the crystal structure maintains nearly unaffected. Comparing to the ZnSe QDs under dark condition, counterparts irradiated by UV light possessed outstanding sphericity, size distribution and dispersion. And the content of sulfur (S) in ZnSe QDs irradiated by UV light was much higher relatively. The effect of lighting on vibration peaks of O-H was considerable. However, this effect was observed to be weak on other chemical bonds. The possible explanation ascribes to photo-chemical interactions can occur between S-H and O-H bonds on the surface of GSH ligand. The lighting induced GSH to occur photocatalytic oxidation on the surface of ZnSe QDs, which improved the optical properties of QDs. The effects of lighting rely on irradiation types, the sequence is UV light, incandescent light and dark from high to low. PMID:26377128

  4. Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes NIPER's research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

  5. Effect of wettability on light oil steamflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes NIPER`s research on four interrelated topics for Light Oil Steamflooding. Four interrelated topics are described: The methodology for measuring capillary pressure and wettability at elevated temperature, the use of silylating agents to convert water-wet Berea sandstones or unconsolidated quartz sands to oil-wetted surfaces, the evaluation of the thermal hydrolytic stability of these oil-wet surfaces for possible use in laboratory studies using steam and hot water to recover oil, and the effect of porous media of different wettabilities on oil recovery where the porous media is first waterflooded and then steamflooded.

  6. Detailed chemical abundances of extragalactic globular clusters using high resolution, integrated light spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.

    Globular clusters (GCs) are luminous, observationally accessible objects that are good tracers of the total star formation and evolutionary history of galaxies. We present the first detailed chemical abundances for GCs in M31 using a new abundance analysis technique designed for high resolution, integrated light (IL) spectra of GCs. This technique has recently been developed using a training set of old GCS in the Milky Way (MW), and makes possible detailed chemical evolution studies of distant galaxies, where high resolution abundance analysis of individual stars are not obtainable. For the 5 M31 GCs presented here, we measure abundances of 14 elements: Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba. We find the M31 GCs have ages (>10 Gyr) and chemical properties similar to MW GCs, including an enhancement in the alpha-elements Ca, Ti and Si of [alpha/Fe]˜ +0.4. In this thesis, we also further develop this IL abundance analysis method to include GCs of ages 10 Myr--12 Gyrs using GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which contains the necessary sample of clusters over this wide age range. This work demonstrates for the first time that this IL abundance analysis method can be used on clusters of all ages, and that ages can be constrained to within 1--2 Gyr for clusters with ages of ˜2 Gyr and within a few 100 Myr for clusters with ages <1 Gyr. We find that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with ages <12 Gyrs with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1--0.25 dex) than those obtained for old GCs; the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. Using the LMC clusters, we also investigate the effects of statistical fluctuations in the theoretical cluster stellar populations used in our analysis. We also develop strategies to allow for statistical variations in these stellar populations, and find that the stability of the Fe line abundance solution can provide tight constraints on the

  7. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  8. Effective Chemical Inactivation of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Reliable inactivation of specimens before removal from high-level biocontainment is crucial for safe operation. To evaluate efficacy of methods of chemical inactivation, we compared in vitro and in vivo approaches using Ebola virus as a surrogate pathogen. Consequently, we have established parameters and protocols leading to reliable and effective inactivation. PMID:27070504

  9. Changes in the chemical components of light crude oil during simulated short term weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qimin; Luo, Xia; Yu, Zhigang

    2007-07-01

    To unambiguously identify spilled oils and to link them to the known sources are extremely important in settling questions of environmental impact and legal liability. The fate and behavior of spilled oils in the environment depend on a number of physicochemical and biological factors. This paper presents the results regarding changes in chemical composition of light crude oil during simulated short-term weathering based on natural environmental conditions. The results show that the saturated hydrocarbons of the light crude oil mainly distribute between n-C8 and n-C23 and the most abundant n-alkanes are found in the n-C10 to n-C16. The main chemical components of the light crude oil are n-alkanes and isoprenoids. The aromatic compounds are subordinate chemical components. Under the conditions of the weathering simulation experiment, n-alkanes less than n-C12, toluene and 1,3-dimethyl benzene are lost after 1 d weathering, the n-C13, n-C14, naphthalene and 2-methyl-naphthalene are lost on the fifth day of weathering, and n-C15 alkane components show certain weatherproof capability. The ratios n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane are unaltered and can be used to identify the source of the light crude oil during the first 8 d of weathering. After 21 d, the ratio pristine/phytane can not provide much information on the source of the spilled light crude oil. Triterpanes (m/z 191) as biomarker compounds of light crude oil are more valuable.

  10. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  11. Damaging effects of visible light. Comprehensive progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on studies of retinal light damage. A myriad of variables effect the production of light damage. These include age, prior light history, body temperature, vitamin A status, intensity, wavelength and duration of light. The intensity-duration function and the age function have been studied in detail in rats. Studies have been begun on the wavelength variable. (ACR)

  12. The difference of the PDT's effects between interstitial lighting and continuous lighting in low oxygen density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiumin; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Tiegen; Xu, Tao

    2008-02-01

    Tumor oxygen depletion plays an important role in the process of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). The paper focuses on the improvement of the lighting mode to carry out this cancer therapy more effectively in low oxygen content. The effect of interstitial lighting was compared with that of continuous lighting in different oxygen density measured with a homemade device in PDT. 90 mice were divided into 3 groups: the contrast group, the continuous lighting group and the interstitial lighting group. The initial oxygen content was measured with a homemade device before the treatment. To examine the different effects, both the interstitial lighting and the continuous lighting have the same fluent rates (30mW/cm2, 32.4J/ cm2). The continuous lighting lasted 18 minutes while the interstitial lighting lasted 36 minutes with 1 second's idle time and 1 second's effective time of each pulse. The result shows that the volume of tumor doubling duration in interstitial lighting group is longer in the condition of low initial oxygen content. Thus with low initial oxygen content, the interstitial lighting is more effective than the continuous lighting during PDT.

  13. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  14. Chemical Pressure Effects in Layered Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Yousuke; Nakamura, Arao

    1998-03-01

    Lattice effects on the magnetic and transport properties have been investigated for layered-type doped mangaites. The insulator-to-metal transition temperature for La_1.2Sr_1.8Mn_2O7 (T_C=130 K) is significantly suppressed with chemical substitution of the trivalent La^3+ ions to smaller Nd^3+ (or Sm^3+) ions(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56(1997)R7057. Similarly, the charge-ordering temperature for La_0.5Sr_1.5MnO4 (T_CO=230 K) is suppresses with chemical substitution(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56, in press. Systematic x-ray as well as neutron diffraction measurements have revealed that above chemical pressure enhances the static Jahn-Teller distortion of the MnO6 octahedra in both the system. We will explain the suppressions of TC and T_CO in terms of the increasing d_3z^2-r^2 character in the occupied eg state. Our observation indicates that the chemical pressure effects are qualitatively different between the cubic and layered manganites systems. The authors are grateful to K. Ohoyama and M. Ohashi for their help in neutron diffraction measurements, and to S. Mori for his help in electron diffraction measurements. This work was supported by a Grant-In-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sport and Culture and from PRESTO, Japan Scienece and Technology Corporation (JST), Japan.

  15. Chemically unassisted phototherapy: dose effects via real-time optical monitoring of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Sylvie; Keeler, Werden

    2010-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light and short wavelength visible (VIS) light have been used to kill pathogens for many years. Although the adverse effects of UV radiation on living cells have been extensively studied using biochemical and biomolecular techniques, most of the light therapies used for medical treatment are chemically assisted (i.e., photodynamic therapy). However, the use of light alone could prove both cost and therapeutically effective as an alternative treatment modality for localized diseases. In this study, real-time oblique incidence reflection (OIR) microscopy and image analysis were used to visualize and quantify the effects of chemically unassisted light therapy on untagged live cancer cells in vitro. The incident radiation fluence (in mJ/cm^2) required to induce cell death was determined for selected quasi-monochromatic UV to VIS wavelengths ranging from 275nm to 460nm. A predictive mathematical equation quantifying the lethal fluence as a function of wavelength will be discussed.

  16. Spectral and temperature characteristics of light transmission in solutions of chemical indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichev, V. D.; Dmitriev, A. L.; Karacharov, G.; Nagibin, Yu. T.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral and temperature characteristics of light transmission in water solutions of chemical indicators— bromophenol blue, bromothymol blue, and cresol red—were measured in the wavelength range of 500-750 nm and the temperature range from 20 to 90°C. It was demonstrated that these solutions can be applied in optical fiber thermometers with continuous reading which are not affected by strong external electromagnetic fields.

  17. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  18. Spatial resolution effect of light coupling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Li, Kezheng; Schuster, Christian; Su, Rongbin; Wang, Xuehua; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Martins, Emiliano R.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of light between free space and thin film semiconductors is an essential requirement of modern optoelectronic technology. For monochromatic and single mode devices, high performance grating couplers have been developed that are well understood. For broadband and multimode devices, however, more complex structures, here referred to as “coupling surfaces”, are required, which are often difficult to realise technologically. We identify general design rules based on the Fourier properties of the coupling surface and show how they can be used to determine the spatial resolution required for the coupler’s fabrication. To our knowledge, this question has not been previously addressed, but it is important for the understanding of diffractive nanostructures and their technological realisation. We exemplify our insights with solar cells and UV photodetectors, where high-performance nanostructures that can be realised cost-effectively are essential.

  19. Effects of light on scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Manho; Margulies, Seymour

    1993-10-01

    Tracking detectors based on scintillating-fiber technology are being developed for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider and for the D0 collaboration at Fermilab. An important part of the work is to insure that the fibers will not be damaged by environmental conditions in the course of detector construction. This paper presents preliminary results of the effects of ambient fluorescent light on scintillating fibers containing 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) waveshifter. Six fiber types having 3HF concentrations between 100 ppm and 6000 ppm were studied; both single-clad fibers from Bicron and Kuraray and a new Kuraray multiclad fiber were included. A blue fiber containing no 3HF was used to provide a comparison.

  20. Spatial resolution effect of light coupling structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juntao; Li, Kezheng; Schuster, Christian; Su, Rongbin; Wang, Xuehua; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Martins, Emiliano R.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of light between free space and thin film semiconductors is an essential requirement of modern optoelectronic technology. For monochromatic and single mode devices, high performance grating couplers have been developed that are well understood. For broadband and multimode devices, however, more complex structures, here referred to as “coupling surfaces”, are required, which are often difficult to realise technologically. We identify general design rules based on the Fourier properties of the coupling surface and show how they can be used to determine the spatial resolution required for the coupler’s fabrication. To our knowledge, this question has not been previously addressed, but it is important for the understanding of diffractive nanostructures and their technological realisation. We exemplify our insights with solar cells and UV photodetectors, where high-performance nanostructures that can be realised cost-effectively are essential. PMID:26678574

  1. Chemical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction in light water reactor fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive literature on the mechanical aspects of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical features of this phenomenon are so poorly understood that there is still disagreement concerning the chemical agent responsible. Since the earliest work by Rosenbaum, Davies and Pon, laboratory and in-reactor experiments designed to elucidate the mechanism of PCI fuel rod failures have concentrated almost exclusively on iodine. The assumption that this is the reponsible chemical agent is contained in models of PCI which have been constructed for incorporation into fuel performance codes. The evidence implicating iodine is circumstantial, being based primarily upon the volatility and significant fission yield of this element and on the microstructural similarity of the failed Zircaloy specimens exposed to iodine in laboratory stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests to cladding failures by PCI.

  2. Kinetic Effects of Laser Light on Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan

    1995-01-01

    In part one of this dissertation, a derivation of the semi-classical kinetic theory of laser-atom interaction for a general multilevel atom is presented, followed by a complete algorithm for the calculation of the force and diffusion as functions of atomic velocity. In contrast to previous numerical methods, the excited states of the atom are not eliminated in this algorithm. Velocity dependent Raman resonances (Ramanons) in a three level Lambda-system are calculated using the general algorithm and physical origin of these resonances is discussed. In part two of the thesis, two novel experiments on the kinetic effects of laser light on rubidium atoms are reported. Transient effects in laser cooling are reported and studied in detail. A semiclassical simulation based on the physical interpretation of these effects agrees well with both the experimental data and results from the quantum calculations, indicating a good understanding of the phenomena. Results of systematic study of a new cooling scheme using a standing wave laser field of two frequencies are presented. In this scheme, sub-Doppler cooling is achieved without either a polarization gradient or a B-field. In addition to cooling and heating, deflection of atoms by a rectified dipole force is observed for certain laser parameters.

  3. Chemical nature of the light emitter of the Aequorea green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Haruki; Inouye, Satoshi; Hirano, Takashi; Matsuno, Tatsuki; Kojima, Satoshi; Kubota, Masayuki; Ohashi, Mamoru; Tsuji, Frederick I.

    1996-01-01

    The jellyfish Aequorea victoria possesses in the margin of its umbrella a green fluorescent protein (GFP, 27 kDa) that serves as the ultimate light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the animal. The protein is made up of 238 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain and produces a greenish fluorescence (λmax = 508 nm) when irradiated with long ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of a chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67-. GFP has been used extensively as a reporter protein for monitoring gene expression in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, but relatively little is known about the chemical mechanism by which fluorescence is produced. To obtain a better understanding of this problem, we studied a peptide fragment of GFP bearing the chromophore and a synthetic model compound of the chromophore. The results indicate that the GFP chromophore consists of an imidazolone ring structure and that the light emitter is the singlet excited state of the phenolate anion of the chromophore. Further, the light emission is highly dependent on the microenvironment around the chromophore and that inhibition of isomerization of the exo-methylene double bond of the chromophore accounts for its efficient light emission. PMID:8942983

  4. Chemical and thermodynamic control of the surface of semiconductor nanocrystals for designer white light emitters.

    PubMed

    Krause, Michael M; Mooney, Jonathan; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2013-07-23

    Small CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals with diameters below 2 nm are thought to emit white light due to random surface defects which result in a broad distribution of midgap emitting states, thereby preventing rational design of small nanocrystal white light emitters. We perform temperature dependent photoluminescence experiments before and after ligand exchange and electron transfer simulations to reveal a very simple microscopic picture of the origin of the white light. These experiments and simulations reveal that these small nanocrystals can be physically modeled in precisely the same way as normal-sized semiconductor nanocrystals; differences in their emission spectra arise from their surface thermodynamics. The white light emission is thus a consequence of the thermodynamic relationship between a core excitonic state and an optically bright surface state with good quantum yield. By virtue of this understanding of the surface and the manner in which it is coupled to the core excitonic states of these nanocrystals, we show both chemical and thermodynamic control of the photoluminescence spectra. We find that using both temperature and appropriate choice in ligands, one can rationally control the spectra so as to engineer the surface to target color rendering coordinates for displays and white light emitters. PMID:23802709

  5. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  6. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys.

    PubMed

    Denbow, D M; Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M

    1990-09-01

    1. The effect of different light sources (incandescent, sodium vapour, daylight fluorescent and warm fluorescent) and light intensities (10.8 and 86.1 lux) on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys was investigated in two experiments conducted at different times of the year. 2. Although light source influenced body weight and efficiency of food utilisation, there was no consistent effect between experiments in favour of any particular source. 3. Light intensity had no effect on body weight, efficiency of food utilisation or behaviour. PMID:2245342

  7. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  8. Geometric spin Hall effect of light in tightly focused polarization-tailored light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Martin; Banzer, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Orlov, Sergej; Lindlein, Norbert; Aiello, Andrea; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that a nonzero transverse angular momentum manifests itself in a polarization-dependent intensity shift of the barycenter of a paraxial light beam [Aiello et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 100401 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.100401]. The underlying effect is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall effect of light but does not depend on the specific light-matter interaction and can be interpreted as a purely geometric effect. Thus, it was named the geometric spin Hall effect of light. Here, we experimentally investigate the appearance of this effect in tightly focused vector beams. We use an experimental nanoprobing technique in combination with a reconstruction algorithm to verify the relative shifts of the components of the electric energy density and the shift of the intensity in the focal plane. By that, we experimentally demonstrate the geometric spin Hall effect of light in a highly nonparaxial beam.

  9. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic color-magnitude diagram of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed database of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photo-chemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colors than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.

  10. A fibre-optic mode-filtered light sensor for general and fast chemical assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Choi, Martin M. F.; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui; Tan, Weihong

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast-response fibre-optic chemical sensor based on mode-filtered light detection (MFLD) has been successfully developed. The sensor was constructed by inserting an unmodified fibre core into a silica capillary tubing; a charge-coupled device which acted as a multi-channel detector was positioned alongside the capillary to detect the emanated mode-filtered light. An interesting finding was observed: there was an increase in the signal upon the decrease in the sample refractive index when an unclad optical fibre was employed, which was different from the results of a polymer-clad fibre reported previously. This phenomenon of opposite signal trend can clearly be interpreted by applying a mathematical derivation based on light propagation in the optical fibre. The derived mathematical model correlates well with the experimental results. It also provides a good theoretical foundation for the future development of MFLD-based analyser in conjunction with liquid chromatographic separation and assay. The proposed MFLD sensor was successfully applied to determine acetic acid with a linear response in the range 0-90 v/v % and a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. The sensor has the advantages of high S/N ratio and very fast response time. It offers the potential for use as a general sensor in food and chemical industries.

  11. Brooding light intensity effects on broiler performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light intensity is an environmental factor which is used with a high degree of variation throughout the US Broiler Industry. Light intensity influences bird activity, immune response, growth rate and has been used to alleviate mortality issues related to metabolic disease (spiking mortality). The ...

  12. Pharmacological and Chemical Effects of Cigarette Additives

    PubMed Central

    Rabinoff, Michael; Caskey, Nicholas; Rissling, Anthony; Park, Candice

    2007-01-01

    We investigated tobacco industry documents and other sources for evidence of possible pharmacological and chemical effects of tobacco additives. Our findings indicated that more than 100 of 599 documented cigarette additives have pharmacological actions that camouflage the odor of environmental tobacco smoke emitted from cigarettes, enhance or maintain nicotine delivery, could increase the addictiveness of cigarettes, and mask symptoms and illnesses associated with smoking behaviors. Whether such uses were specifically intended for these agents is unknown. Our results provide a clear rationale for regulatory control of tobacco additives. PMID:17666709

  13. Colour and Light Effects on Students' Achievement, Behavior and Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlfarth, H.

    A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design was used to investigate the effects of full-spectrum light, prescribed color and light/color combinations, ultra-violet light, and electromagnetic radiation in an elementary school environment. Four schools in the Wetaskiwin School District, Alberta, were involved in the study; three served…

  14. Real-time detection of concealed chemical hazards under ambient light conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa; Izake, Emad L

    2013-07-01

    Current concerns regarding terrorism and international crime highlight the need for new techniques for detecting unknown and hazardous substances. A novel Raman spectroscopy-based technique, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), was recently devised for noninvasively probing the contents of diffusely scattering and opaque containers. Here, we demonstrate a modified portable SORS sensor for detecting concealed substances in-field under different background lighting conditions. Samples including explosive precursors, drugs, and an organophosphate insecticide (chemical warfare agent surrogate) were concealed inside diffusely scattering packaging including plastic, paper, and cloth. Measurements were carried out under incandescent and fluorescent light as well as under daylight to assess the suitability of the probe for different real-life conditions. In each case, it was possible to identify the substances against their reference Raman spectra in less than 1 min. The developed sensor has potential for rapid detection of concealed hazardous substances in airports, mail distribution centers, and customs checkpoints. PMID:23692353

  15. Melanopsin Is Highly Resistant to Light and Chemical Bleaching in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Timothy J.; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin is the photopigment of mammalian intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, where it contributes to light entrainment of circadian rhythms, and to the pupillary light response. Previous work has shown that the melanopsin photocycle is independent of that used by rhodopsin (Tu, D. C., Owens, L. A., Anderson, L., Golczak, M., Doyle, S. E., McCall, M., Menaker, M., Palczewski, K., and Van Gelder, R. N. (2006) Inner retinal photoreception independent of the visual retinoid cycle. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 10426–10431). Here we determined the ability of apo-melanopsin, formed by ex vivo UV light bleaching, to use selected chromophores. We found that 9-cis-retinal, but not all-trans-retinal or 9-cis-retinol, is able to restore light-dependent ipRGC activity after bleaching. Melanopsin was highly resistant to both visible-spectrum photic bleaching and chemical bleaching with hydroxylamine under conditions that fully bleach rod and cone photoreceptor cells. These results suggest that the melanopsin photocycle can function independently of both rod and cone photocycles, and that apo-melanopsin has a strong preference for binding cis-retinal to generate functional pigment. The data support a model in which retinal is continuously covalently bound to melanopsin and may function through a reversible, bistable mechanism. PMID:22547062

  16. Equine cutaneous amyloidosis derived from an immunoglobulin lambda-light chain. Immunohistochemical, immunochemical and chemical results.

    PubMed

    Linke, R P; Geisel, O; Mann, K

    1991-09-01

    Amyloid deposits from equine cutaneous nodular amyloidosis associated with extramedullary plasmacytoma were classified immunohistochemically as equine immunoglobulin lambda-light chain-derived and designated eA lambda (HIP). For chemical identification, the amyloid fibril proteins were separated on Sephadex G-100 in 6M guanidine.HCl. Polypeptides of predominantly 24 kDa and 50 kDa were found by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. They have preponderance of immunoglobulin lambda-antigenic determinants as detected by immunodiffusion and immunoblotting. Since the N-terminus of the major proteins was blocked, peptides were generated with trypsin and endoproteinase Asp-N and then isolated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Automatic amino-acid sequence determination of seven peptides showed novel sequences. Data bank comparison indicated that these peptides were derived from a monoclonal immunoglobulin lambda-light and a gamma-heavy chain. The light chain was considered to be the leading amyloidogenic polypeptide, since it was the predominant component in a virtually pure amyloid fibril preparation. Thus, immunoglobulin lambda-light chain-derived amyloidosis, so far established only in man and cat, has now also been identified in the horse. PMID:1772596

  17. Role of chemical reactions of arylamine hole transport materials in operational degradation of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondakov, Denis Y.

    2008-10-15

    We report that the representative arylamine hole transport materials undergo chemical transformations in operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. Although the underlying chemical mechanisms are too complex to be completely elucidated, structures of several identified degradation products point at dissociations of relatively weak carbon-nitrogen and carbon-carbon bonds in arylamine molecules as the initiating step. Considering the photochemical reactivities, the bond dissociation reactions of arylamines occur by the homolysis of the lowest singlet excited states formed by recombining charge carriers in the operating OLED device. The subsequent chemical reactions are likely to yield long-lived, stabilized free radicals capable of acting as deep traps--nonradiative recombination centers and fluorescence quenchers. Their presence in the hole transport layer results in irreversible hole trapping and manifests as a positive fixed charge. The extent and localization of chemical transformations in several exemplary devices suggest that the free radical reactions of hole transporting materials, arylamines, can be sufficient to account for the observed luminance efficiency loss and voltage rise in operating OLEDs. The relative bond strengths and excited state energies of OLED materials appear to have a determining effect on the operational stability of OLED devices.

  18. Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

    1993-02-01

    Light hydrocarbon gases could be reacted with low cost alkaline earth metal oxide (CaO, MgO) in high-temperature plasma reactor to achieve very high ([le]100%) gas conversion to H[sub 2], CO, and the corresponding metal carbides. These carbides could be stored, transported, and hydrolyzed to acetylene or methyl acetylene, which in turn could be upgraded to a wide range of chemicals and premium liquid hydrocarbon fuels. An electric arc discharge reactor was built for converting methane. Literature reviews were made.

  19. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescent Chemical and Biological Sensors: An Organic Light-Emitting Diode-Based Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, J.; Shinar, R.

    The chapter describes the development, advantages, challenges, and potential of an emerging, compact photoluminescence-based sensing platform for chemical and biological analytes, including multiple analytes. In this platform, the excitation source is an array of organic light-emitting device (OLED) pixels that is structurally integrated with the sensing component. Steps towards advanced integration with additionally a thin-film-based photodetector are also described. The performance of the OLED-based sensing platform is examined for gas-phase and dissolved oxygen, glucose, lactate, ethanol, hydrazine, and anthrax lethal factor.

  20. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  1. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed data base of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photochemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colours than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.

  2. The effect of sterilization methods on the light transmission characteristics and structure of light-curing tips.

    PubMed

    Kakaboura, A; Tzoutzas, J; Pitsinigos, D; Vougiouklakis, G

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various sterilization methods on the light transmission and the structural characteristics of two light-curing tips. Twenty tips from two light-curing devices [Elipar II (EL) and Heliolux II (HL)] were classified into four groups. The tips in groups A to C were subjected to sterilization with 0.2% sodium dichloroisacyanurate solution (Presept), 2% glutaraldehyde solution (Cidex) (2 h cycle(-1)) and water-steam autoclave (120 degrees C, 1 bar, 12 min cycle(-1)), respectively. A total of 2100 sterilization cycles was performed for all methods tested. The transmitted light intensity (TLI) was measured at specific sterilization time intervals by a curing radiometer (Model 100, Demetron). The final % TLI reduction of the sterilized tips was calculated relative to the corresponding control ones. The topography and composition of the front curing tip surfaces were determined using scanning electron microscopy combined with electron probe microanalyser. Autoclaving caused the lowest final TLI decrease (EL: 15%, HL: 19%) compared with Presept (EL: 60%, HL: 42%) and with Cidex (EL: 68%, HL: 52%). Cidex yielded higher TLI drop than Presept for both types of tips examined. Elipar tips were found to be more sensitive than Heliolux tips to both chemical sterilization techniques. Total or partial coating of the tip surfaces with insoluble salts after sterilization with Presept and Cidex was detected, mainly composed of Ca, Cl, Al, Pd and Mg traces. No changes were noted on the surfaces after autoclave. Water-steam autoclave is safer than the 0.2% sodium dicloroisocyanorate and 2% glutaraldehyde chemical sterilization agents regarding the light transmission characteristics and the structure of the light-curing tips. PMID:15369476

  3. Optical and chemical characterization of aerosols emitted from coal, heavy and light fuel oil, and small-scale wood combustion.

    PubMed

    Frey, Anna K; Saarnio, Karri; Lamberg, Heikki; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Teinilä, Kimmo; Carbone, Samara; Tissari, Jarkko; Niemelä, Ville; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Kytömäki, Jorma; Artaxo, Paulo; Virkkula, Aki; Pirjola, Liisa; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Particle emissions affect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to know the physical and chemical characteristics of them. This work studied the chemical, physical, and optical characteristics of particle emissions from small-scale wood combustion, coal combustion of a heating and power plant, as well as heavy and light fuel oil combustion at a district heating station. Fine particle (PM1) emissions were the highest in wood combustion with a high fraction of absorbing material. The emissions were lowest from coal combustion mostly because of efficient cleaning techniques used at the power plant. The chemical composition of aerosols from coal and oil combustion included mostly ions and trace elements with a rather low fraction of absorbing material. The single scattering albedo and aerosol forcing efficiency showed that primary particles emitted from wood combustion and some cases of oil combustion would have a clear climate warming effect even over dark earth surfaces. Instead, coal combustion particle emissions had a cooling effect. Secondary processes in the atmosphere will further change the radiative properties of these emissions but are not considered in this study. PMID:24328080

  4. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behavior of male turkeys.

    PubMed

    Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M; Denbow, D M

    1989-09-01

    This study consisted of two experiments: the first was conducted with Large White turkey males during the spring and summer (experiment 1) and the second during the autumn and winter (experiment 2). When 56 d of age, the birds were assigned to light-controlled pens and exposed to continuous illumination. Light sources used were incandescent, daylight fluorescent, warm fluorescent or high pressure sodium vapour lamps at light intensities of 10.8 or 86.1 lux. Results obtained showed that the light sources used had no significant effects on growth performance, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or live bird quality of Large White turkeys. Social encounters were higher in birds reared under fluorescent and sodium vapour lights and mortality was higher in birds under fluorescent lights in experiment 1. Behaviour, feather scores, live bird grade and mortality were unaffected by light source treatments in experiment 2. Light intensity had no significant effect on growth, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or bird market quality. Social encounters and mortality were higher in males exposed to 86.1 lux of light intensity. PMID:2819500

  5. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  6. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, S.; et al.

    2015-10-16

    Calculations studying electromagnetic eff ects on light mesons are reported. The calculations use fully dynamical QCD, but only quenched photons, which suffi ces to NLO in χ PT; that is, the sea quarks are electrically neutral, while the valence quarks carry charge. The non-compact formalism is used for photons. New results are obtained with lattice spacing as small as 0.045 fm and a large range of volumes. The success of chiral perturbation theory in describing these results and the implications for light quark masses are considered.

  7. Effects of School Lighting on Physical Development and School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1995-01-01

    This study collected data on the physical development, attendance, and school performance effects of four types of school lighting on elementary students over a two-year period. Results indicated that regular exposure to the lights had important nonvisual effects on students. Full-spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet supplements were found…

  8. Effect of ultraviolet light on toxicity of the PAH fluoranthene to freshwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Cox, D.; Kahl, M.; Spehar, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Certain polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be activated by irradiation with ultraviolet light in the near UV waveband to increase their biocidal qualities. Fluoranthene is one of the PAHs that has this capacity. Ten species of freshwater animals and one species of freshwater plant were acutely exposed to several concentrations of fluoranthene in the presence of additional UV light and to standard light conditions. Tests were conducted using flow-through static or renewal techniques. Fluoranthene concentrations were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. UV light was produced by UV-emitting fluorescent lamps. UV-C was removed from the spectrum by cellulose triacetate filters. Separate measurements were made of spectral ranges 310 to 390, 265 to 328 and < 320 nm. All species tested except for a dragonfly, Ophiogomphus sp. were more sensitive to fluoranthene in the presence of UV light ranging from 449 to 926 {mu}W/CM{sup 2} than the same species exposed to this chemical in tests using standard light conditions. Sensitivity increased by factors of {<=}32 times in these tests. Two species were tested for effects of UV light during chronic exposure. The cladoceran, Daphnia magna, showed a 17.1 fold increase in sensitivity to fluoranthene due to UV light and the fathead minnow showed a 5.77 fold increase. Results show that water quality criteria for fluoranthene should be adjusted for UV light effects.

  9. Conquering the Pumpkin Effect: A Lighting Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Gary B.

    1993-01-01

    Turning off all the interior and exterior lighting when school buildings are closed saves money. In a small Illinois school district, nearly $14,000 were saved in electrical expenditures for six buildings. Another Illinois district currently has 19 of its 32 buildings blacked out at night and saves over $150,000 annually. Vandalism and loitering…

  10. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  11. Acute effects of bright light exposure on cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Christopher M; Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Scheer, Frank A J L; Cajochen, Christian; Lockley, Steven W; Czeisler, Charles A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Multisynaptic neural and endocrine pathways from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus have been hypothesized to communicate circadian and photic information to the adrenal glands. In humans, light exposure has been reported to have no effect, increase, or decrease cortisol levels. These inconsistent findings in humans may be related to differences among studies including the intensity (approximately 500 to 5500 lux), duration (15 min to 4 h), and circadian phase of light exposure. The authors assessed the influence of exposure to bright light on cortisol levels in humans during the rising and descending phases of the circadian rhythm of cortisol, that is, when cortisol levels are high. Twenty healthy men and women were studied using a within-subject research design. Subjects were studied in an environment free of time cues for 9 to 10 days. Subjects received a 6.7-h exposure of bright light (approximately 10,000 lux; equivalent to ambient light intensity just after sunrise or just before sunset) or dim light (approximately 3 lux; equivalent to candle light) during the biological night and morning. Bright light exposure significantly reduced plasma cortisol levels at both circadian phases studied, whereas dim light exposure had little effect on cortisol levels. The finding of an acute suppressive effect of bright light exposure on cortisol levels supports the existence of a mechanism by which photic information can acutely influence the human adrenal glands. PMID:20484692

  12. Competition between the tensor light shift and nonlinear Zeeman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chalupczak, W.; Wojciechowski, A.; Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.

    2010-08-15

    Many precision measurements (e.g., in spectroscopy, atomic clocks, quantum-information processing, etc.) suffer from systematic errors introduced by the light shift. In our experimental configuration, however, the tensor light shift plays a positive role enabling the observation of spectral features otherwise masked by the cancellation of the transition amplitudes and creating resonances at a frequency unperturbed either by laser power or beam inhomogeneity. These phenomena occur thanks to the special relation between the nonlinear Zeeman and light shift effects. The interplay between these two perturbations is systematically studied and the cancellation of the nonlinear Zeeman effect by the tensor light shift is demonstrated.

  13. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise.

    PubMed

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark R; Devlin, Tina M; Moore, Teresa A

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210-2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210-2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210-2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410-0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect. PMID:27103935

  14. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.; Zielinski, Mark R.; Devlin, Tina M.; Moore, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210–2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210–2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210–2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410–0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect. PMID:27103935

  15. The effect of light color on muscular strength and power.

    PubMed

    Crane, Daniel K; Hensarling, Robert W; Jung, Alan P; Sands, Charles D; Petrella, John K

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the color of light in a room on muscular strength and power. A convenience sample of 18 men (M age = 20.4 yr., SD = 1.2) performed a modified Wingate Anaerobic Cycle Test for muscular power and a hand grip strength test in each of the following conditions: red, blue, and white (neutral) ambient light. A repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance indicated that average muscular power was significantly higher when performing the test in the room with red light compared to rooms lit with blue light or white light. The results also indicated that grip strength was significantly higher in the room lit with white light as compared to the room lit with blue light. PMID:18712217

  16. Quantum spin Hall effect of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Smirnova, Daria; Nori, Franco

    2015-06-01

    Maxwell’s equations, formulated 150 years ago, ultimately describe properties of light, from classical electromagnetism to quantum and relativistic aspects. The latter ones result in remarkable geometric and topological phenomena related to the spin-1 massless nature of photons. By analyzing fundamental spin properties of Maxwell waves, we show that free-space light exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall effect—surface modes with strong spin-momentum locking. These modes are evanescent waves that form, for example, surface plasmon-polaritons at vacuum-metal interfaces. Our findings illuminate the unusual transverse spin in evanescent waves and explain recent experiments that have demonstrated the transverse spin-direction locking in the excitation of surface optical modes. This deepens our understanding of Maxwell’s theory, reveals analogies with topological insulators for electrons, and offers applications for robust spin-directional optical interfaces.

  17. OPTICS. Quantum spin Hall effect of light.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Smirnova, Daria; Nori, Franco

    2015-06-26

    Maxwell's equations, formulated 150 years ago, ultimately describe properties of light, from classical electromagnetism to quantum and relativistic aspects. The latter ones result in remarkable geometric and topological phenomena related to the spin-1 massless nature of photons. By analyzing fundamental spin properties of Maxwell waves, we show that free-space light exhibits an intrinsic quantum spin Hall effect—surface modes with strong spin-momentum locking. These modes are evanescent waves that form, for example, surface plasmon-polaritons at vacuum-metal interfaces. Our findings illuminate the unusual transverse spin in evanescent waves and explain recent experiments that have demonstrated the transverse spin-direction locking in the excitation of surface optical modes. This deepens our understanding of Maxwell's theory, reveals analogies with topological insulators for electrons, and offers applications for robust spin-directional optical interfaces. PMID:26113717

  18. Light Quality Effects on Corn Chloroplast Development

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray; Dybas, Linda; McCarthy, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Corn was grown under greenhouse and controlled light quality conditions incluing full spectrum, red (R), and far-red (FR) sources. Young leaf samples were analyzed for pigments, pigment-proteins, membrane polypeptides, and ultrastructure. Chloroplast development in full spectrum white light was similar to that found in R but different from that found in FR plus low R. Compared to greenhouse and R, FR plus low R (670-760) repressed the formation of photosystem I reaction center protein (CP1 + CP1a) and enhanced those of photosystem II (CPa) in both bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Photosystem II polypeptides were present in both cell types, with the 46 and 34 kilodalton proteins predominant in mesophyll cells. Bundle sheath cells contained relatively more of the 51 kilodalton and less of the 46 kilodalton proteins. However, they also contained measurable amounts of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase which may interfere with estimates of the 51 kilodalton protein. Images Fig. 4 PMID:16664023

  19. Effect of 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode Light On Neuronal Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Whelan, Harry T.

    2002-01-01

    Light close to and within the near infrared range has documented benefits for promoting wound healing in human and animal studies. Our preliminary results using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in this range have also demonstrated two-to five-fold increases in growth-phase-specific DNA synthesis in normal fibroblasts, muscle cells, osteoblasts, and mucosal epithelial cells in tissue cultures. However, the mechanisms of action of such light on cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the therapeutic effects of such light result from the stimulation of cellular events associated with increases in cytochrome oxidase activity. As a first step in testing our hypothesis, we subjected primary neuronal cultures to impulse blockade by tetrodotoxin (TTX), a voltage-dependent sodium channel blocker, and applied LED light at 670 nm to determine if it could partially or fully reverse the reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity by TTX. The wavelength and parameters were previously tested to be beneficial for wound healing.

  20. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  1. Wet Chemical Controllable Synthesis of Hematite Ellipsoids with Structurally Enhanced Visible Light Property

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengliang; Han, Jie; Li, Qiankun; Xie, Jingsong

    2013-01-01

    A facile and economic route has been presented for mass production of micro/nanostructured hematite microcrystals based on the wet chemical controllable method. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the product was mesoporous α-Fe2O3 and nearly elliptical in shape. Each hematite ellipsoid was packed by many α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The values of vapor pressure in reaction systems played vital roles in the formation of porous hematite ellipsoids. Optical tests demonstrated that the micro/nanostructured elliptical hematite exhibited enhanced visible light property at room temperature. The formation of these porous hematite ellipsoids could be attributed to the vapor pressure induced oriented assembling of lots of α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:24222735

  2. The Detailed Chemical Properties of M31 Star Clusters. I. Fe, Alpha and Light Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-01

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R M31 < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ~ - 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. THE DETAILED CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF M31 STAR CLUSTERS. I. Fe, ALPHA AND LIGHT ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-20

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the α elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R {sub M31} < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ∼ – 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The α-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope.

  4. Effects of laryngoscope handle light source on the light intensity from disposable laryngoscope blades.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Brousseau, P A; Brousseau, C A

    2014-12-01

    A bench-top study was performed to assess the effects of different laryngoscope handles on the light intensity delivered from disposable metal or plastic laryngoscope blades. The light intensity from both the handle light sources themselves and the combined handle and laryngoscope blade sets was measured using a custom-designed testing system and light meter. Five samples of each disposable blade type were tested and compared with a standard re-usable stainless steel blade using three different handle/light sources (Vital Signs LED, Heine 2.5 V Xenon and 3.5 V Xenon). The light intensity delivered by the disposable blades ranged from 790 to 3846 lux for the different handle types. Overall, the 3.5 V Heine handle delivered the highest light output (p < 0.007) in comparison with the other handles. For the disposable blades, the overall light output was significantly higher from the plastic than the metal blades (p < 0.001). PMID:25040627

  5. Chromophore-immobilized luminescent metal-organic frameworks as potential lighting phosphors and chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangming; Liu, Wei; Teat, Simon J; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinlong; An, Litao; Li, Jing

    2016-08-11

    An organic chromophore H4tcbpe-F was synthesized and immobilized into metal-organic frameworks along with two bipyridine derivatives as co-ligands to generate two strongly luminescent materials [Zn2(tcbpe-F)(4,4'-bpy)·xDMA] (1) and [Zn2(tcbpe-F)(bpee)·xDMA] (2) [4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine, bpee = 4,4'-bipyridyl-ethylene, tcbpe-F = 4',4''',4''''',4'''''''-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetrakis(3-fluoro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid), DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide]. Compounds 1 and 2 are isoreticular and feature a 2-fold interpenetrated three-dimensional porous structure. Both compounds give green-yellow emission under blue light excitation. Compound 1 has a high internal quantum yield of ∼51% when excited at 455 nm and shows selective luminescence signal change (e.g. emission energy and/or intensity) towards different solvents, including both aromatic and nonaromatic volatile organic species. These properties make it potentially useful as a lighting phosphor and a chemical sensor. PMID:27465685

  6. Light-sensitized decontamination of ground-water hazardous chemicals. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; Schlauch, M.B.; Ellis, D.D.; Marley, K.A.; Ju, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of sunlight, oxygen, and dissolved organic compounds active as 'photosensitizers' (substances capable of absorbing sunlight and transforming it into chemically useful forms) is a promising treatment for contaminated waters. Light is absorbed by the sensitizing substance, raising it to a higher energy excited state. Reaction with the excited state substance converts molecular oxygen to a form much more reactive with dissolved compounds. Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), a naturally occurring compound and a known photosensitizer, was investigated for use in this process. A series of kinetic experiments explored its ability to photodegrade several aromatic compounds, phenols and anilines, that are related to some herbicides (such as carbaryl, 2, 4-D, alachlor, atrazine, and trifluralin) commonly found in polluted waters. It was found that riboflavin when added to solutions of phenols or anilines greatly accelerated the rate of their loss in the presence of light. The sensitized photolysis rates increased in the absence of oxygen, suggesting a mechanism involving direct energy or electron transfer between flavin excited states and acceptor molecules. In addition, it was found that some iron salts were very significant promoters of photodestruction of the triazine herbicide, atrazine.

  7. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light

    PubMed Central

    Wätzel, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that can be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter confinement potentials, can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters. PMID:26900105

  8. Centrifugal photovoltaic and photogalvanic effects driven by structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wätzel, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-02-01

    Much efforts are devoted to material structuring in a quest to enhance the photovoltaic effect. We show that structuring light in a way it transfers orbital angular momentum to semiconductor-based rings results in a steady charge accumulation at the outer boundaries that can be utilized for the generation of an open circuit voltage or a photogalvanic (bulk photovoltaic) type current. This effect which stems both from structuring light and matter confinement potentials, can be magnified even at fixed moderate intensities, by increasing the orbital angular momentum of light which strengthens the effective centrifugal potential that repels the charge outwards. Based on a full numerical time propagation of the carriers wave functions in the presence of light pulses we demonstrate how the charge buildup leads to a useable voltage or directed photocurrent whose amplitudes and directions are controllable by the light pulse parameters.

  9. Effects of light on gravitaxis and velocity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sineshchekov, O; Lebert, M; Hader, D P

    2000-09-01

    The effects of light on gravitaxis and velocity in the bi-flagellated green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were investigated using a real time automatic tracking system. Three distinct light effects on gravitaxis and velocity with parallel kinetics were found. Photosynthetically active continuous red light reversibly enhances the swimming velocity and increases or decreases the precision of gravitaxis, depending on its initial level. Blue light flashes induce fast transient increases in velocity immediately after the photophobic response, and transiently decrease or even reverse negative gravitaxis. The calcium dependence of this response, its fluence-response curve and its spectral characteristics strongly suggest the participation of chlamy-rhodopsin in this effect. The third response, a prolonged activation of velocity and gravitaxis, is also induced by blue light flashes, which can be observed even in calcium-free medium. PMID:12090268

  10. The Effects of Blue Light on Ocular Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchel, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    This review of the literature examines the effects of blue light (or near UV - ultraviolet), especially that given off by black-light tubes, often used with children with visual impairments. It finds a long-term danger of retinal and lens damage and offers six practical suggestions which emphasize using proper filters and limiting exposure to…

  11. Non-Visual Effects of Classroom Lighting on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1993-01-01

    A two-year study in Alberta on the effects of classroom lighting found that elementary school students exposed to full-spectrum lighting with measurable ultraviolet output had fewer dental caries, larger gains in height and weight, larger gains in achievement, and better attendance. Students exposed to high-pressure sodium vapor lamps had the…

  12. Non-Visual Effects of Classroom Lighting on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Warren E.

    1994-01-01

    Results from a pilot study of four different lighting systems indicate that over a two-year period, light had measurable and significant effects on students. Under full-spectrum fluorescent lamps with ultraviolet enhancement, students developed fewer dental cavities and had better attendance, achievement, and growth and development than students…

  13. Origins of light trans-Fe and r-process elements deduced from Galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Yuhri; Arao, Sachie; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Compact binary mergers are suggested to be the major site of the r-process elements by recent hydrodynamical and nucleosynthesis studies. It has been pointed out, however, that estimated long lifetimes of compact binaries are in conflict with the presence of large scatters in r-process elements of very metal-poor stars (MPS). To resolve this problem, we examine the role of compact binary mergers in the early Galactic chemical evolution on the assumption that our Galactic halo was formed from clusterings of sub-halos. We find that star-to-star scatters of [r/Fe] in MPS can be well explained with this scenario. Observations of MPS also show large enhancement of Sr relative to Ba, suggesting a distinct site of light trans-Fe elements. Recent nucleosynthesis studies show that electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe) can produce heavy elements up to Zr (Wanajo et al. 2011). Using our inhomogeneous chemical evolution model, we discuss that ECSNe can explain observed enhancement of Zn in MPS as well as of Sr, Y, and Zr.

  14. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor. PMID:27001735

  15. Quantifying phosphorus and light effects in stream algae

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Walter; Fanta, S.E.; Roberts, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous gradients of phosphorus and light were applied in experimental streams to develop quantitative relationships between these two important abiotic variables and the growth and composition of benthic microalgae. Algal biovolume and whole-stream metabolism responded hyperbolically to phosphorus enrichment, increasing approximately two-fold over the 5-300 g L-1 range of experimental phosphorus concentrations. The saturation threshold for phosphorus effects occurred at 25 g L-1 of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP). Light effects were much stronger than those of phosphorus, resulting in a nearly ten-fold increase in algal biovolume over the 10-400 mol photons m-2 s-1 range of experimental irradiances. Biovolume accrual was light-saturated at 100 mol photons m-2 s-1 (5 mol photons m-2 d-1). Light effects were diminished by low phosphorus concentrations, and phosphorus effects were diminished by low irradiances, but evidence of simultaneous limitation by both phosphorus and light at subsaturating irradiances was weak. Contrary to the light:nutrient hypothesis, algal phosphorus content was not significantly affected by light, even in the lowest SRP treatments. However, algal nitrogen content increased substantially at lower irradiances, and it was very highly correlated with algal chlorophyll a content. Phosphorus enrichment in streams is likely to have its largest effect at concentrations <25 g L-1 SRP, but the effect of enrichment is probably minimized when streambed irradiances are kept below 2 mol photons m-2 d-1 by riparian shading or turbidity

  16. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  17. Tumorigenesis in athymic nude mouse skin by chemical carcinogens and ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.M.; Rice, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of established skin tumorigenesis protocols were tested for efficacy on athymic nu/nu mice (BALB/c background) and compared on euthymic nu/+ counterparts. Chemical carcinogens and UV light were applied to the ears of 10 mice of each sex and genotype for each group. Treatments were: 0.5 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene ((DMBA) CAS: 57-97-6) to each ear; 0.125 mg DMBA to each ear, followed by 0.1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate ((TPA) CAS: 16561-29-8) twice weekly for 56 weeks; 0.2 mg N-nitroso-N-methylurea ((NMU) CAS: 684-93-5; 1% in acetone, 20 microliter) to each ear; 0.1 mg NMU to each ear weekly for 30 weeks; 0.2 mg NMU to each ear, followed by TPA twice weekly for 56 weeks; two ip doses of N-nitroso-N-ethylurea ((NEU) CAS: 759-73-9; 25 mg/kg each), followed by TPA twice weekly topically for 56 weeks; and exposure to sunlamps (250- to 400-nm emission) two or three times per week for 20 weeks, for a total dose of 3.7 X 10(5) J/m2. The chemical treatments caused mainly squamous papillomas and carcinomas, sebaceous adenomas and adenocarcinomas, and basal cell tumors, which appeared both on the skin of the ears and elsewhere. UV light caused squamous tumors, basal cell tumors, and sarcomas. Ear skin of the nu/nu mice developed significantly more squamous tumors than those of nu/+ mice after DMBA-TPA, NMU-TPA, NEU-TPA, repeated NMU, or UV light. Similar results were obtained for the skin of the heads and bodies. Even a single dose of NMU caused a few tumors on the nude, but not the euthymic, mice. A single dose of DMBA caused primarily sebaceous adenomas, distributed at random over the entire bodies. These results show that, contrary to previous reports, nude mice are sensitive to skin tumorigenesis, more so than euthymic nu/+ mice similarly exposed to diverse types of carcinogen and treatment protocols.

  18. Daily variation and effects of ambient light and circadian factors on the human light reflex.

    PubMed

    Fosnaugh, J S; Bunker, E B; Pickworth, W B

    1992-09-01

    Measures of pupillary size and the dynamic light reflex are safe and noninvasive methods to quantify and characterize the mechanism and site of drug action. The effects of variations in ambient light and time of day on pupillary measures were determined. In dark adapted volunteers (n = 13), ambient light was incrementally increased at < 0.1, 4, 40, 100 and 200 foot-candle (ftcd). Subjects adjusted to each light level for 1 min before the light reflex was elicited. Replicate measures were collected with the contralateral eye open and covered with an opaque patch. Data were collected every 3 h between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. The prestimulus diameter of the dark adapted pupil averaged 6.4 mm at < 0.1 ftcd and 2.3 mm at 200 ftcd. Constriction amplitude decreased with increases in ambient light from 2.1 mm (< 0.1 ftcd) to 0.2 mm (200 ftcd) while constriction and dilatation velocities decreased from 7.7 to 2.8 mm/sec and 4.3 to 2.8 mm/sec, respectively. Time of day effects were small but statistically significant and the interaction of ambient light and time of recording suggests the pupil is differentially sensitive to ambient and phasic light stimuli over the course of the day. A patch over the contralateral eye increased pupil size and velocities of the light reflex. In a second study, 10 volunteers were tested twice a day at 4 and 80 ftcd for four days. While there was wide between subject variability, the within subject differences were small. Such baseline data may be useful in describing the normal variations in these increasingly popular indices of drug action. PMID:1287379

  19. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth. PMID:24367902

  20. Potential Biological and Ecological Effects of Flickering Artificial Light

    PubMed Central

    Inger, Richard; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered. PMID:24874801

  1. [Effect of Light Color Temperature on Human Concentration and Creativity].

    PubMed

    Weitbrecht, W U; Bärwolff, H; Lischke, A; Jünger, S

    2015-06-01

    Light has different biological effects depending on the color temperature and intensity. This may be the reason for its differing effects. We investigated the influence of color temperature (3000 K, 4500 K, 6000 K) under constant high intensity (1000 Lux) on concentration and creativity of 50 students and employees of the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Campus Gummersbach (age: 30.9 +/- 10.8y.). As test method we used d2-bq-test, creativity test (mean of the number of ideas on 5 themes), word test and logic test. In addition, test subjects were asked to evaluate their impression of light by means of a questionnaire. To exclude the circadian influence and learning effects on the result, we performed tests at the same time of the day using a random order of color temperature. We found that creativity was better under warm light (3000 K) than under colder light (4500 K, 6000 K). Concentration was best under cold light (6000 K). Under the same light intensity conditions, subjects judged blue light (6000 K) to be brighter than red light (3000 K). PMID:26098084

  2. Effect of various visible light photoinitiators on the polymerization and color of light-activated resins.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideo; Kanie, Takahito; Ban, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of various visible light photoinitiators on the polymerization efficiency and color of the light-activated resins. Four photoinitiators, including camphorquinone, phenylpropanedione, monoacrylphosphine oxide (TPO), and bisacrylphosphine oxide (Ir819), were used. Each photoinitiator was dissolved in a Bis-GMA and TEGDMA monomer mixture. Materials were polymerized using dental quartz-tungsten halogen lamp (QTH), plasma-ark lamp and blue LED light-curing units, and a custom-made violet LED light unit. The degree of monomer conversion and CIE L*a*b* color values of the resins were measured using a FTIR and spectral transmittance meter. The degree of monomer conversions of TPO- and Ir819-containing resins polymerized with the violet-LED unit were higher than camphorquinone-containing resin polymerized with the QTH light-curing unit. The lowest color values were observed for the TPO-containing resin. Our results indicate that the TPO photoinitiator and the violet-LED light unit may provide a useful and improved photopolymerization system for dental light-activated resins. PMID:19721283

  3. Chemical Effects during Storage of Frozen Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powrie, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses (1) characteristics, interrelationships, and distribution of food constituents (including water) in unfrozen food systems; (2) the freezing process; and (3) chemical changes in food during frozen storage. Protein alterations and lipid oxidation are emphasized. (JN)

  4. Compression effects on electrons for chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Zhang, Fan

    2014-03-01

    How electrons move under compression as chemical bonds between atoms are broken and formed is central to a number of challenges on the performance of materials in extreme conditions. This is not only associated with the fundamental knowledge of material response to compressive loading but also would advance many aspects of material science towards future energy technologies. First-principles simulations of enthalpy minimization, in various target pressures on chemical transformation bonding pathways, reveal that high pressure can push electrons away from their denser regimes where the kinetic energy rises steeply on compression, causing a destabilization of intramolecular bonds. The high-pressure pushing of electrons from one regime to another thus leads to chemical bond destruction and formation with a cell volume collapse accompanied by a drop in stress components. Determination of such electron pathways following bonding conformations of molecular precursors would then result in a number of chemical transformations for novel materials, including high energy density materials.

  5. Effects of weather conditions, light conditions, and road lighting on vehicle speed.

    PubMed

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Sjöbergh, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Light conditions are known to affect the number of vehicle accidents and fatalities but the relationship between light conditions and vehicle speed is not fully understood. This study examined whether vehicle speed on roads is higher in daylight and under road lighting than in darkness, and determined the combined effects of light conditions, posted speed limit and weather conditions on driving speed. The vehicle speed of passenger cars in different light conditions (daylight, twilight, darkness, artificial light) and different weather conditions (clear weather, rain, snow) was determined using traffic and weather data collected on an hourly basis for approximately 2 years (1 September 2012-31 May 2014) at 25 locations in Sweden (17 with road lighting and eight without). In total, the data included almost 60 million vehicle passes. The data were cleaned by removing June, July, and August, which have different traffic patterns than the rest of the year. Only data from the periods 10:00 A.M.-04:00 P.M. and 06:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. were used, to remove traffic during rush hour and at night. Multivariate adaptive regression splines was used to evaluate the overall influence of independent variables on vehicle speed and nonparametric statistical testing was applied to test for speed differences between dark-daylight, dark-twilight, and twilight-daylight, on roads with and without road lighting. The results show that vehicle speed in general depends on several independent variables. Analyses of vehicle speed and speed differences between daylight, twilight and darkness, with and without road lighting, did not reveal any differences attributable to light conditions. However, vehicle speed decreased due to rain or snow and the decrease was higher on roads without road lighting than on roads with lighting. These results suggest that the strong association between traffic accidents and darkness or low light conditions could be explained by drivers failing to adjust their

  6. Demonstrating the Effects of Light Quality on Plant Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitesell, J. H.; Garcia, Maria

    1977-01-01

    Describes a lab demonstration that illustrates the effect of different colors or wavelengths of visible light on plant growth and development. This demonstration is appropriate for use in college biology, botany, or plant physiology courses. (HM)

  7. Visible Light Photocatalysis with Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buzby,S.; Barakat, M.; Lin, H.; Ni, C.; Rykov, S.; Chen, J.; Shah, S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized via plasma assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Nitrogen dopant concentration was varied from 0 to 1.61 at. %. The effect of nitrogen ion doping on visible light photocatalysis has been investigated. Samples were analyzed by various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure. Titanium tetraisopropoxide was used as the titanium precursor, while rf-plasma-decomposed ammonia was used as the source for nitrogen doping. The N-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were deposited on stainless steel mesh under a flow of Ar and O2 gases at 600 {sup o}C in a tube reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples was tested by the degradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an aqueous solution using a visible lamp equipped with an UV filter. The efficiency of photocatalytic oxidation of 2-CP was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results obtained revealed the formation of N-doped TiO{sub 2} samples as TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, and a corresponding increase in the visible light photocatalytic activity.

  8. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  9. Nondipole Effects in Chiral Systems Measured with Linearly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. P.; Hemmers, O.; Guillemin, R.; Stolte, W. C.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Lindle, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of third-generation synchrotron light sources, it has been demonstrated that higher-order corrections to the dipole approximation are necessary for the description of light-matter interactions in the soft x-ray range. These effects, known as 'nondipole effects', present themselves as asymmetries in the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Chiral molecules, known to have asymmetries in photoelectron angular distributions when exposed to circularly polarized light, have been proposed to demonstrate a chiral-specific nondipole effect when exposed to linearly polarized light. We present the first-ever measurement of nondipole chiral angular distributions for the case of each enantiomer of camphor in the photon energy range 296-343eV.

  10. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of thetetoperator andGal4operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26673714

  11. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of the tet operator and Gal4 operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26673714

  12. Chemical leasing business models: a contribution to the effective risk management of chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Cornelia; Moser, Frank

    2007-08-01

    Chemicals indisputably contribute greatly to the well-being of modern societies. Apart from such benefits, however, chemicals often pose serious threats to human health and the environment when improperly handled. Therefore, the European Commission has proposed a regulatory framework for the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) that requires companies using chemicals to gather pertinent information on the properties of these substances. In this article, we argue that the crucial aspect of this information management may be the honesty and accuracy of the transfer of relevant knowledge from the producer of a chemical to its user. This may be particularly true if the application of potentially hazardous chemicals is not part of the user's core competency. Against this background, we maintain that the traditional sales concept provides no incentives for transferring this knowledge. The reason is that increased user knowledge of a chemical's properties may raise the efficiency of its application. That is, excessive and unnecessary usage will be eliminated. This, in turn, would lower the amount of chemicals sold and in competitive markets directly decrease profits of the producer. Through the introduction of chemical leasing business models, we attempt to present a strategy to overcome the incentive structure of classical sales models, which is counterproductive for the transfer of knowledge. By introducing two models (a Model A that differs least and a Model B that differs most from traditional sales concepts), we demonstrate that chemical leasing business models are capable of accomplishing the goal of Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals: to effectively manage the risk of chemicals by reducing the total quantity of chemicals used, either by a transfer of applicable knowledge from the lessor to the lessee (Model A) or by efficient application of the chemical by the lessor him/herself (Model B). PMID:17958507

  13. Advanced Strategies for Outdoor LED Lighting Applications and Technologies to Curtail Regional Light Pollution Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrad, Christian Karl; Benya, James R.

    2015-08-01

    LED lighting systems for outdoor lighting applications continue to evolve as do strategies to mitigate related effects upon regional astronomical and ecological assets. The improving availability and relative lumen-per-watt efficiencies of blue-suppressed low correlated color temperature emitters, narrow band amber, phosphor converted amber, and various combinations of broadband emitters and sub-550NM and sub-500NM filters allow for a wide palette of choices to be assessed to suit site-specific and task-specific lighting needs. In addition to static spectral content options, readily available luminaire designs also include precise geometric beam shape selections and adaptive controls to include dimming, dynamic spectral shifting, motion detection, and dynamic beam shaping to minimize total environmental lumen emissions throughout the course of the nighttime hours.Regional and international light pollution mitigation regulations will also be briefly addressed in the context of luminaire shielding and spectral content control efforts to better protect human quality of life issues as well as astronomical and ecological interests.The presentation will include numerous spectral content graphs for various luminaire options as well as project-specific case studies to document comparisons of legacy lighting systems versus high-performance LED systems with regard to total lumen emissions, skyglow contributions, energy efficiency, and end-user satisfaction with the installed LED lighting systems. Physical samples of various luminaires will also be available for hands-on assessments.

  14. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  15. Pathogenic effects of the human chemical biofield.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, S N; Grzeszczuk, J

    1995-07-01

    Organisms release their antigens into the environment. Some antigens are volatile and may pass into the blood of other organisms during respiration. Fetal antigens enter the mother's bloodstream through the placenta. Foreign antigens in the blood can cause various chemical changes and may initiate an immune reaction. PMID:8524190

  16. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  17. Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on adipocyte development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obesity is a growing concern in the US population. Current interest is high in the role played by environmental factors called obesogens that may contribute to obesity through developmental exposure. One class of potential obesogens is the family of perfluorinated chemicals used ...

  18. Chemical methods for degradation of target proteins using designed light-activatable organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Shuho; Takahashi, Daisuke; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-11

    Molecular design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of several designed organic molecules, which target-selectively degrade proteins upon photo-irradiation, are introduced. The designed molecules for protein photo-degradation include 2-phenylquinoline-steroid hormone hybrids and porphyrin derivatives, both of which selectively photo-degrade estrogen receptor-α, and fullerene-sugar and -sulfonic acid hybrids, which selectively photo-degrade HIV-1 protease and amyloid β, respectively. The information will provide a novel and effective way to control specific functions of proteins, and contribute to the molecular design of novel protein photo-degrading agents, which should find wide application in chemistry, biology, and medicine. PMID:22739361

  19. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring. PMID:24874944

  20. Rayleigh light scattering measurements of transient gas temperature in a rapid chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.F.; Peterson, J.E.

    2000-02-01

    A laser-induced Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) system was used to measure transient gas temperatures in a simulated rapid chemical vapor deposition (RCVD) reactor. The test section geometry was an axisymmetric jet of carrier gas directed down, impinging on a heated water surface. RLS was used to measure instantaneous gas temperature at several locations above the wafer as it was heated from room temperature to 475 K. Gas flow rate and wafer temperature correspond to jet Reynolds number Re{sub i} = 60, wafer maximum Grashof number Gr{sub H} = 4.4 x 10{sup 6}, and a maximum mixed convection parameter Gr{sub H}/Re{sub i}{sup 2} = 1200; all conditions typical of impinging jet reactors common in the numerical literature. Uncertainty of RLS transient temperature from a propagated error analysis was {+-}2--4 K. Peak gas temperature fluctuations were large (in the order of 25 to 75 C). Both flow visualization and RLS measurements showed that the flow field was momentum dominated prior to heating initiation, but became unstable by Gr{sub H}/Re{sub i}{sup 2} = 5. It then consisted of buoyancy-induced plumes and recirculations. Up to the peak wafer temperature, the flow field continued to be highly three-dimensional, unsteady, and dominated by buoyancy. RLS measurements are shown to provide information on carrier gas instantaneous temperature and flow field stability, both critical issues in RCVD processing.

  1. Effect of Pulsing in Low-Level Light Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Javad T.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kurup, Divya Balachandran; De Taboada, Luis; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Low level light (or laser) therapy (LLLT) is a rapidly growing modality used in physical therapy, chiropractic, sports medicine and increasingly in mainstream medicine. LLLT is used to increase wound healing and tissue regeneration, to relieve pain and inflammation, to prevent tissue death, to mitigate degeneration in many neurological indications. While some agreement has emerged on the best wavelengths of light and a range of acceptable dosages to be used (irradiance and fluence), there is no agreement on whether continuous wave or pulsed light is best and on what factors govern the pulse parameters to be chosen. Study Design/Materials and Methods The published peer-reviewed literature was reviewed between 1970 and 2010. Results The basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of LLLT are discussed. The type of pulsed light sources available and the parameters that govern their pulse structure are outlined. Studies that have compared continuous wave and pulsed light in both animals and patients are reviewed. Frequencies used in other pulsed modalities used in physical therapy and biomedicine are compared to those used in LLLT. Conclusion There is some evidence that pulsed light does have effects that are different from those of continuous wave light. However further work is needed to define these effects for different disease conditions and pulse structures. PMID:20662021

  2. Display conditions and lesion detectability: effect of background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mahmood; Hall, Theodore R.; Aberle, Denise R.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Loloyan, Mansur; Eldredge, Sandra L.

    1990-08-01

    We assessed the effect of high background light on observer performance for the detection of a variety of chest radiographic abnormalities. Five observers reviewed 66 digital hard copy chest images formatted to 1 1 x 14 inch size under two display conditions: 1) on a specially prepared 1 1 x 14 inch illuminated panel with no peripheral light and 2) on a standard viewing panel designed for 14 x 17 inch radiographs. The images contained one - or more of the following conditions: pneumothorax, interstitial disease, nodules, alveolar process, or no abnormality. The results of receiver operator characteristic analysis show that extraneous light does reduce observer performance and the detectability of nodules, interstitial disease.

  3. The effects of light on man and other mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The present article describes the best-studied extravisual effects of visible and ultraviolet light on humans and other mammals. It also considers the possible biological consequences to man of living in artificially lighted environments that differ significantly from the milieu in which he evolved. Cumulative evidence favors the beneficial influences of sunlight: vitamin D activation, plasma bilirubin elimination, inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis, etc.

  4. Chemically Compatible Sacrificial Layer-Assisted Lift-Off Patterning Method for Fabrication of Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Kim, Min-Hoi; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2011-08-01

    We developed a generic platform to pattern combinatorial functional layers composed of different classes of organic materials using a repetitive lift-off method based on a chemically compatible sacrificial layer (SL) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The essential features come from the chemically compatible SL of a fluorous-polymer that can be generated by laser-inscription or transfer-printing. The precise registration of lateral patterns of different materials was achieved on a single substrate through a series of SL-assisted lift-off processes. The chemical compatibility of the SL and the stability of the light-emitting characteristics were shown in a fluorous-solvent treated monochrome OLEDs.

  5. Shining light on memory: Effects of bright light on working memory performance.

    PubMed

    Huiberts, L M; Smolders, K C H J; de Kort, Y A W

    2015-11-01

    This study examined whether diurnal non-image forming (NIF) effects of illuminance level on cognitive task performance depend on task difficulty and time of day. We employed a balanced crossover design with two 60-min sessions of 200 vs. 1000 lux at eye level. Digit-span task difficulty was manipulated within subjects (forward (FDST) vs. backward (BDST) digit-span task), n-back task difficulty was manipulated between subjects (n=1, 2, or 3). Bright light exposure improved FDST performance during the final measurement block, especially in the afternoon. In contrast, BDST performance deteriorated slightly under bright light in the afternoon. Two-back performance was significantly worse under bright light in the afternoon, while no effect of illuminance level was found on 3-back performance. Thus, the more difficult BDST was affected differently by light intensity as compared to the easier FDST. N-back accuracy, however, did not confirm this role of task difficulty. Future studies should investigate whether similar results hold for other types of tasks and how other variables (e.g., time of day, physiological arousal, or other task characteristics) may influence the direction and magnitude of NIF effects on performance. PMID:26215575

  6. The phantom light effects in modern car taillight combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Norbert; Klinger, Karsten; Manz, Karl; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-04-01

    There are some interfering elements, which are able to influence the signal functions of a car's rear light. One of these elements is the sensitivity to external light sources, which is able to affect the intensity of the rear lamps by the impact of direct sunrays in a flat angle. Recognition of the signals could be made more difficult or impossible. This effect is called phantom light effect. Today the regulations of the ECE do not contain these influences. To investigate the meaning of the effects to the traffic safety, there has been a test with a sun simulator. The task of this test is to measure the luminance of signals from different actual taillights with and without sunlight. Another part of the investigations are some psychophysical tests involving about 20 persons. The dimension of phantom light effects at taillights will be quantified by the analysis of the luminance pictures. With these cognitions some possibilities to reduce the phantom light effect with little changes in the optical design of taillights will be performed. One example will be shown.

  7. Diurnal Spectral Sensitivity of the Acute Alerting Effects of Light

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shadab A.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Brainard, George C.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated short-wavelength sensitivity for the acute alerting response to nocturnal light exposure. We assessed daytime spectral sensitivity in alertness, performance, and waking electroencephalogram (EEG). Design: Between-subjects (n = 8 per group). Setting: Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit. Participants: Sixteen healthy young adults (mean age ± standard deviation = 23.8 ± 2.7 y). Interventions: Equal photon density exposure (2.8 × 1013 photons/cm2/s) to monochromatic 460 nm (blue) or 555 nm (green) light for 6.5 h centered in the middle of the 16-h episode of wakefulness during the biological day. Results were compared retrospectively to 16 individuals who were administered the same light exposure during the night. Measurements and Results: Daytime and nighttime 460-nm light exposure significantly improved auditory reaction time (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and reduced attentional lapses (P < 0.05), and improved EEG correlates of alertness compared to 555-nm exposure. Whereas subjective sleepiness ratings did not differ between the two spectral conditions during the daytime (P > 0.05), 460-nm light exposure at night significantly reduced subjective sleepiness compared to 555-nm light exposure at night (P < 0.05). Moreover, nighttime 460-nm exposure improved alertness to near-daytime levels. Conclusions: The alerting effects of short-wavelength 460-nm light are mediated by counteracting both the circadian drive for sleepiness and homeostatic sleep pressure at night, but only via reducing the effects of homeostatic sleep pressure during the day. Citation: Rahman SA; Flynn-Evans EE; Aeschbach D; Brainard GC; Czeisler CA; Lockley SW. Diurnal spectral sensitivity of the acute alerting effects of light. SLEEP 2014;37(2):271-281. PMID:24501435

  8. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-12-18

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  9. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2009-04-20

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  10. Thermal effects of cold light sources used in otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Fadlullah; Dogan, Remzi; Ozturan, Orhan; Eren, Sabri Baki; Veyseller, Bayram; Gedik, Ozge

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the thermal effects of cold light sources and endoscopes on the inner ear. 25 male guinea pigs were assigned equally to five groups (1: Halogen-1 min, 2: Halogen-5 min, 3: Xenon-1 min, 4: Xenon-5 min, 5: Controls). After both bullae of the guinea pigs were opened, light sources and endoscopes were positioned in the middle ears of the first four groups for specific time periods. DPOAE and ABR tests were conducted on all animals at the beginning of the study, at the end of surgery, and 2 h after surgery. The temperatures of cold light sources were measured by a thermocouple thermometer, and the surface temperatures of the endoscopes were measured by an infrared thermometer. DPOAE and ABR measurements performed right after and 2 h after surgery in group 1, 2, 3, and 5 did not reveal any significant difference. In group 4, DPOAE values were significantly lower and ABR threshold values were significantly higher than those in the other groups, right after and 2 h after surgery. Thermocouple thermometer readings showed that, after the first minute, the Xenon light source generated significantly more temperature rise than the Halogen light source. The surface temperatures of all endoscopes returned to normal approximately 1 min after light sources were turned off. Our study demonstrated that when an endoscope using a Xenon light source was applied to the middle ear for a specific time periods, inner ear functions deteriorated, as reflected by audiologic tests. PMID:25118982

  11. Effects of light on the gravitropic response in plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Suzuki, G.; Ohgishi, M.; Saji, K.; Okada, K.

    Plants show changing of growth pattern responding to the environmental stimuli to adapt themselves to the environment. Our research purpose is to elucidate the function of genes participating in light-induced change of growth and movement in plants. By isolation and analyses of mutants showing defects in light-induced responses in model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana, genes involved in the response are identified. Previous studies reported that the negative gravitropic response in hypocotyl of Arabidopsis is suppressed by red light irradiation. We isolated a red-light hypersensitive mutant, flabby, which shows a random-hypocotyl bending by red light irradiation. The FLABBY gene encodes a protein, which is involved in the auxin transport in hypocotyls. On the other hand, our recent analysis showed that cryptochromes also induce a blue-light dependent, random-hypocotyl bending in the phototropins-defective mutants. Now we are studying on the genetic interactions between FLABBY and photoreceptors (phytochromes, cryptochromes, and phototropins). We discuss the effects of light on the gravitropic response in plants.

  12. Development of InAsSb-based light emitting diodes for chemical sensing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Burkhatt, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    Mid-infrared (3--6 {micro}m) LED`s are being developed for use in chemical sensor systems. As rich, InAsSb heterostructures are particularly suited for optical emitters in the mid-infrared region. The authors are investigating both InAsSb-InAs multiple quantum well (MQW) and InAsSb-InAsP strained layer superlattice (SLS) structures for use as the active region for light emitting diodes (LED`s). The addition of phosphorus to the InAs barriers increases the light and heavy hole splitting and hence reduces non-radiative Auger recombination and provides for better electron and hole confinement in the InAsSb quantum well. Low temperature (< 20 K) photoluminescence (PL) emission from MQW structures is observed between 3.2 to 6.0 {micro}m for InAsSb wells between 70 to 100 {angstrom} and antimony mole fractions between 0.04 to 0.18. Room temperature PL has been observed to 6.4 {micro}m in MQW structures. The additional confinement by InAsP barriers results in low temperature PL being observed over a narrower range (3.2 to 5.0 {micro}m) for the similar well thicknesses with antimony mole fractions between 0.10 to 0.24. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed to 5.8 {micro}m in SLS structures. The addition of a p-AlAsSb layer between the n-type active region (MQW or SLS) and a p-GaAsSb contact layer improves electron confinement of the active region and increases output power by a factor of 4. Simple LED emitters have been fabricated which exhibit an average power at room temperature of > 100 {micro}W at 4.0 {micro}m for SLS active regions. These LED`s have been used to detect CO{sub 2} concentrations down to 24 ppm in a first generation, non-cryogenic sensor system. They will report on the development of novel LED device designs that are expected to lead to further improvements in output power.

  13. The investigation of chemical structure of coal macerals via transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuguang, Sun

    2005-11-01

    The Late Permian coals from South China are characterized by high content of the unique maceral "barkinite" and elemental hydrogen, typically produce high yields of tar, and exhibit significant oil-producing potential. "Barkinite" has been identified as suberinite for a long time, but now many Chinese workers have concluded that "barkinite" is not suberinite, rather it is a distinct maceral. The term "barkinite" was formally certified and named by the State Bureau of Technical Supervision of PR China in 1991, 1995, and 1999, however, it has not been recognized as a scientific term by international coal geologists and the ICCP. Transmitted-light FT-IR microspectroscopy and curve-fitting analysis were used to investigate the chemical structure of "barkinite"; at the same time, parallel studies were also carried out on vitrinite, fusinite, and sporinite. In comparison with other maceral types, the micro-FT-IR spectra of "barkinite" are characterized by very strong intensities of aliphatic CH x stretching vibrations at 3000-2800 cm -1 and deformations at 1460-1450 cm -1, less intense bands from aromatic C dbnd C ring stretching at 1610-1600 cm -1 and aromatic CH out-of-plane deformations at 900-700 cm -1. The aliphatic side-chains in the molecular structure of "barkinite" are longer and less branched. In addition, there also appear intense aliphatic ether C sbnd O sbnd C and alcohol C sbnd O stretching bands at 1100-1000 cm -1, notable aromatic CH stretching vibrations at 3050-3030 cm -1, weak OH stretching bands of water in the 3600-3200 cm -1 range, and rare acid C dbnd O group absorption at 1740-1700 cm -1. Collectively the IR spectral characteristics indicate that "barkinite" is composed of great numbers of long chain aliphatics, a fewer of aromatics and rare of oxygenate components. The chemical structure of "barkinite" show that the high tar yields and the relatively high oil-producing potential of the Late Permian coals from South China are attributable to the

  14. Effect of melatonin on hyperlipidemic nephropathy under constant light exposure.

    PubMed

    Túnez, L; Muñoz, M C; Feijoo-López, A L; Valdvira, E; Bujalance-Arenas, L; Montilla, P

    2002-06-01

    Studies have shown anti-hyperlipidemic actions of melatonin, with pharmacological doses inducing changes in cholesterol levels. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of melatonin on adriamycin-induced (25mg/kg b.w., i.p.) hyperlipidemia under constant light exposure. Melatonin was injected i.p. (1,000 microg/kg b.w./day). Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, light-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-proteic nitrogen compounds (urea and creatinine levels), total protein in serum, proteins eliminated in the urine and melatonin levels in serum and kidney were determined. Results show a decrease in melatonin levels induced by both adriamycin and constant light. Likewise, adriamycin induced significant increases in triglycerides, total cholesterol and light-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lowered high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Constant light exposure also prompted an increase in LDL-c levels and a decrease in HDL-c values, and intensified the effects of adriamycin on these two lipoproteins. All changes induced by adriamycin and constant light were reverted toward normality by melatonin administration. PMID:12435086

  15. Algorithm to illustrate context using dynamic lighting effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Roshy M.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2007-09-01

    With the invention of Ultra-Bright LED, solid state lighting has come to something which is much more efficient and energy saving when compared to conventional incandescent or fluorescent lighting. With the use of proper driver electronics now a days it is possible to install solid state lighting systems with the cost same as that of any other lighting technology. This paper is a part of the research project we are doing in our lab, which deals with using ultra bright LEDs of different colors for lighting applications. The driver electronics are made in such a way that, the color and brightness of the lights will change according to context. For instance, if one of the users is reading a story or listening to music in a Personal Computer or in a hand held device such as a PDA, the lighting systems and the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air-conditioning) systems will change dramatically according to the content of the story or the music. The vulnerability of solid-state lighting helps to accomplish such an effect. Such a type of system will help the reader to feel the story mentally and physically as well. We developed complete driver electronics for the system using multiple microcomputers and a full software suite which uses complex algorithms to decode the context from text or music and synchronize it to lighting and HVAC information. The paper also presents some case-study statistics which shows the advantage of using the system to teach kindergarten children, deaf and dumb children and for language learning classes.

  16. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  17. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  18. A rule-based expert system for chemical prioritization using effects-based chemical categories.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, P K; Kolanczyk, R C; Hornung, M W; Tapper, M A; Denny, J S; Sheedy, B R; Aladjov, H

    2014-01-01

    A rule-based expert system (ES) was developed to predict chemical binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) patterned on the research approaches championed by Gilman Veith to whom this article and journal issue are dedicated. The ERES was built to be mechanistically transparent and meet the needs of a specific application, i.e. predict for all chemicals within two well-defined inventories (industrial chemicals used as pesticide inerts and antimicrobial pesticides). These chemicals all lack structural features associated with high affinity binders and thus any binding should be low affinity. Similar to the high-quality fathead minnow database upon which Veith QSARs were built, the ERES was derived from what has been termed gold standard data, systematically collected in assays optimized to detect even low affinity binding and maximizing confidence in the negatives determinations. The resultant logic-based decision tree ERES, determined to be a robust model, contains seven major nodes with multiple effects-based chemicals categories within each. Predicted results are presented in the context of empirical data within local chemical structural groups facilitating informed decision-making. Even using optimized detection assays, the ERES applied to two inventories of >600 chemicals resulted in only ~5% of the chemicals predicted to bind ER. PMID:24779615

  19. "EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT."

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL/IO BOOK NRMRL-CIN-1363 Enfield*, C.G., Lien*, B.K., and Wood*, A.L. "Effect of Non-Target Organics on Organic Chemical Transport." Published in: Humic Substances and Chemical Contaminants, Chapter 23, C.E. Clapp, M.H.B. Hayes, et al (Ed.), Madison, WI: So...

  20. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  1. Enhancing extraction of light from metal composite structures for plasmonic emitters using light-coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Yang, Cheng-Du; Kao, Yi-Lun; Lu, Kuan-Lin

    2015-04-20

    This work demonstrates the efficiency and directionality of a method of extracting light from thin-film emissive devices by near-field evanescent waves in plasmonic emitters used in metal composite grating structures. A near-field evanescent wave can induce a surface plasmon wave on the surface of a metal under resonant conditions. Enhancing the near-field evanescent wave generates strong far-field nonlinear optical effects. This effect is highly efficient in some plasmonic emitter structures. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that such a metal composite grating structure exhibits good performance, a high coupling ratio, a small coupling angle, enhanced light extraction and a small FWHM. It also improves luminous efficiency, emitter angle, and directivity. PMID:25968996

  2. GaN nanorod light emitting diodes with suspended graphene transparent electrodes grown by rapid chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kun; Xu, Chen Deng, Jun; Zhu, Yanxu; Guo, Weiling; Mao, Mingming; Xun, Meng; Chen, Maoxing; Zheng, Lei; Xie, Yiyang; Sun, Jie; Mikroteknologi och Nanovetenskap, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola AB, Göteborg 41296

    2013-11-25

    Ordered and dense GaN light emitting nanorods are studied with polycrystalline graphene grown by rapid chemical vapor deposition as suspended transparent electrodes. As the substitute of indium tin oxide, the graphene avoids complex processing to fill up the gaps between nanorods and subsequent surface flattening and offers high conductivity to improve the carrier injection. The as-fabricated devices have 32% improvement in light output power compared to conventional planar GaN-graphene diodes. The suspended graphene remains electrically stable up to 300 °C in air. The graphene can be obtained at low cost and high efficiency, indicating its high potential in future applications.

  3. Blue light dose–responses of leaf photosynthesis, morphology, and chemical composition of Cucumis sativus grown under different combinations of red and blue light

    PubMed Central

    Hogewoning, Sander W.; Trouwborst, Govert; Maljaars, Hans; Poorter, Hendrik; van Ieperen, Wim; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The blue part of the light spectrum has been associated with leaf characteristics which also develop under high irradiances. In this study blue light dose–response curves were made for the photosynthetic properties and related developmental characteristics of cucumber leaves that were grown at an equal irradiance under seven different combinations of red and blue light provided by light-emitting diodes. Only the leaves developed under red light alone (0% blue) displayed dysfunctional photosynthetic operation, characterized by a suboptimal and heterogeneously distributed dark-adapted Fv/Fm, a stomatal conductance unresponsive to irradiance, and a relatively low light-limited quantum yield for CO2 fixation. Only 7% blue light was sufficient to prevent any overt dysfunctional photosynthesis, which can be considered a qualitatively blue light effect. The photosynthetic capacity (Amax) was twice as high for leaves grown at 7% blue compared with 0% blue, and continued to increase with increasing blue percentage during growth measured up to 50% blue. At 100% blue, Amax was lower but photosynthetic functioning was normal. The increase in Amax with blue percentage (0–50%) was associated with an increase in leaf mass per unit leaf area (LMA), nitrogen (N) content per area, chlorophyll (Chl) content per area, and stomatal conductance. Above 15% blue, the parameters Amax, LMA, Chl content, photosynthetic N use efficiency, and the Chl:N ratio had a comparable relationship as reported for leaf responses to irradiance intensity. It is concluded that blue light during growth is qualitatively required for normal photosynthetic functioning and quantitatively mediates leaf responses resembling those to irradiance intensity. PMID:20504875

  4. Effects on the Liver of Chemicals Encountered in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Susan M.

    1982-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in toxicology. It is the primary organ of detoxification and elimination by metabolism of many chemicals. Many workplace chemicals can affect the liver in animals; fewer have been proved to do so in humans. The diverse hepatic effects observed in humans from occupational exposure to chemicals range from fatty infiltration, acute hepatitis and cholestasis to cirrhosis and angiosarcoma. Three important workplace chemicals, prototypes for the toxicities of many others, are carbon tetrachloride, vinyl chloride and the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's). These three are described in some detail to highlight principles of occupational toxicology. Most of the hepatic effects produced by chemicals in the workplace have clinical, laboratory and morphological features common to many other forms of liver disease. Therefore, only an astute physician who takes an occupational history will recognize the association between a patient's workplace and liver disease. PMID:6819718

  5. In Vitro Profiling of Chemical Effects on Steroidogenesis (ASCCT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroidogenesis, including both steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism, is critical for proper endocrine function. Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals results in altered hormone levels that may cause adverse reproductive and developmental effects. This s...

  6. Is part-night lighting an effective measure to limit the impacts of artificial lighting on bats?

    PubMed

    Azam, Clémentine; Kerbiriou, Christian; Vernet, Arthur; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Plichard, Laura; Maratrat, Julie; Le Viol, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    As light pollution is currently considered to be a major threat to biodiversity, different lighting management options are being explored to mitigate the impact of artificial lighting on wildlife. Although part-night lighting schemes have been adopted by many local authorities across Europe to reduce the carbon footprint and save energy, their effects on biodiversity are unknown. Through a paired, in situ experiment, we compared the activity levels of 8 bat species under unlit, part-night, and full-night lighting treatments in a rural area located 60 km south of Paris, France. We selected 36 study locations composed of 1 lit site and a paired unlit control site; 24 of these sites were located in areas subject to part-night lighting schemes, and 12 sites were in areas under standard, full-night lighting. There was significantly more activity on part-night lighting sites compared to full-night lighting sites for the late-emerging, light-sensitive Plecotus spp., and a similar pattern was observable for Myotis spp., although not significant. In contrast, part-night lighting did not influence the activity of early emerging bat species around streetlights, except for Pipistrellus pipistrellus for which there was significantly less activity on part-night lighting sites than on full-night lighting sites. Overall, no significant difference in activity between part- and full-night lighting sites were observed in 5 of the 8 species studied, suggesting that current part-night lighting schemes fail to encompass the range of activity of most bat species. We recommend that such schemes start earlier at night to effectively mitigate the adverse effects of artificial lighting on light-sensitive species, particularly along ecological corridors that are especially important to the persistence of biodiversity in urban landscapes. PMID:26179558

  7. BIOELECTRIC POTENTIALS IN HALICYSTIS : VIII. THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT.

    PubMed

    Blinks, L R

    1940-03-20

    The effects of light upon the potential difference across the protoplasm of impaled Halicystis cells are described. These effects are very slight upon the normal P.D., increasing it 3 or 4 per cent, or at most 10 per cent, with a characteristic cusped time course, and a corresponding decrease on darkening. Light effects become much greater when the P.D. has been decreased by low O(2) content of the sea water; light restores the P.D. in much the same time course as aeration, and doubtless acts by the photosynthetic production of O(2). There are in both cases anomalous cusps which decrease the P.D. before it rises. Short light exposures may give only this anomaly. Over part of the potential range the light effects are dependent upon intensity. Increased CO(2) content of the sea water likewise depresses the P.D. in the dark, and light overcomes this depression if it is not carried too far. Recovery is probably due to photosynthetic consumption of CO(2), unless there is too much present. Again there are anomalous cusps during the first moments of illumination, and these may be the only effect if the P.D. is too low. The presence of ammonium salts in the sea water markedly sensitizes the cells to light. Subthreshold NH(4) concentrations in the dark become effective in the light, and the P.D. reverses to a negative sign on illumination, recovering again in the dark. This is due to increase of pH outside the cell as CO(2) is photosynthetically reduced, with increase of undissociated NH(3) which penetrates the cell. Anomalous cusps which first carry the P.D. in the opposite direction to the later drift are very marked in the presence of ammonia, and may represent an increased acidity which precedes the alkaline drift of photosynthesis. This acid gush seems to be primarily within the protoplasm, persisting when the sea water is buffered. Glass electrode measurements also indicate anomalies in the pH drift. There are contrary cusps on darkening which suggest temporarily

  8. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  9. The Effects of Lighting and Interpersonal Distance on Counseling Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumont, Florent; Lecomte, Conrad

    1975-01-01

    Results showed a significant interactive effect of lighting and distance on the communication of empathy. Requests for reprints should be sent to F. Dumont, McGill University, 3700 McTavish Street, Montreal, P.Q., H3A 1Y2. (Author)

  10. Engineering a Chemical Switch into the Light-driven Proton Pump Proteorhodopsin by Cysteine Mutagenesis and Thiol Modification.

    PubMed

    Harder, Daniel; Hirschi, Stephan; Ucurum, Zöhre; Goers, Roland; Meier, Wolfgang; Müller, Daniel J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-25

    For applications in synthetic biology, for example, the bottom-up assembly of biomolecular nanofactories, modules of specific and controllable functionalities are essential. Of fundamental importance in such systems are energizing modules, which are able to establish an electrochemical gradient across a vesicular membrane as an energy source for powering other modules. Light-driven proton pumps like proteorhodopsin (PR) are excellent candidates for efficient energy conversion. We have extended the versatility of PR by implementing an on/off switch based on reversible chemical modification of a site-specifically introduced cysteine residue. The position of this cysteine residue in PR was identified by structure-based cysteine mutagenesis combined with a proton-pumping assay using E. coli cells overexpressing PR and PR proteoliposomes. The identified PR mutant represents the first light-driven proton pump that can be chemically switched on/off depending on the requirements of the molecular system. PMID:27294681

  11. Prediction of Harmful Human Health Effects of Chemicals from Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Mark T. D.

    There is a great need to assess the harmful effects of chemicals to which man is exposed. Various in silico techniques including chemical grouping and category formation, as well as the use of (Q)SARs can be applied to predict the toxicity of chemicals for a number of toxicological effects. This chapter provides an overview of the state of the art of the prediction of the harmful effects of chemicals to human health. A variety of existing data can be used to obtain information; many such data are formalized into freely available and commercial databases. (Q)SARs can be developed (as illustrated with reference to skin sensitization) for local and global data sets. In addition, chemical grouping techniques can be applied on "similar" chemicals to allow for read-across predictions. Many "expert systems" are now available that incorporate these approaches. With these in silico approaches available, the techniques to apply them successfully have become essential. Integration of different in silico approaches with each other, as well as with other alternative approaches, e.g., in vitro and -omics through the development of integrated testing strategies, will assist in the more efficient prediction of the harmful health effects of chemicals

  12. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  13. Reflective liquid crystal light valve with hybrid field effect mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Donald D. (Inventor); Grinberg, Jan (Inventor); Jacobson, Alexander D. (Inventor); Myer, Gary D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is disclosed a high performance reflective mode liquid crystal light valve suitable for general image processing and projection and particularly suited for application to real-time coherent optical data processing. A preferred example of the device uses a CdS photoconductor, a CdTe light absorbing layer, a dielectric mirror, and a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes deposited on optical quality glass flats. The non-coherent light image is directed onto the photoconductor; this reduces the impedance of the photoconductor, thereby switching the AC voltage that is impressed across the electrodes onto the liquid crystal to activate the device. The liquid crystal is operated in a hybrid field effect mode. It utilizes the twisted nematic effect to create a dark off-state (voltage off the liquid crystal) and the optical birefringence effect to create the bright on-state. The liquid crystal thus modulates the polarization of the coherent read-out or projection light responsively to the non-coherent image. An analyzer is used to create an intensity modulated output beam.

  14. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Peddada, Shyamal D; Sills, Robert C; Pandiri, Arun R

    2016-08-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light-induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization whereas chemical-induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify and characterize treatment-related retinal degeneration in National Toxicology Program rodent bioassays. A total of 3 chronic bioassays in F344/N rats (but not in B6C3F1/N mice) were identified that had treatment-related increases in retinal degeneration (kava kava extract, acrylamide, and leucomalachite green). A retrospective light microscopic evaluation of the retinas from rats in these 3 studies showed a dose-related increase in the frequencies of retinal degeneration, beginning with the loss of photoreceptor cells, followed by the inner nuclear layer cells. These dose-related increased frequencies of degenerative retinal lesions localized within the central/hemispherical region are suggestive of exacerbation of light-induced retinal degeneration. PMID:27230502

  15. The effects of clouds on the light produced by lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Krider, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of finite clouds on the light impulses was produced by point and finite lightning sources within cubical, cylindrical, and spherical clouds. It is shown that absorption is essentially negligible in the visible and near infrared. The fractions of photons which escape various cloud surfaces are a function of position and geometry of the source. The light emission is high for intracloud discharges and the incloud portion of cloud to ground discharges. It is concluded that the characteristic dimensions of the light escaping from a cloud surface are typically 60 to 70% of the cloud dimensions while the time broadening of an impulse by multiple scattering can be tens of microseconds or more.

  16. NOTE: Fluorescent light effects on FWT-60 radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2005-08-01

    FWT-60 radiochromic film has been tested for colouration effects from fluorescent light sources and shown to produce a marked colouration when exposed to office fluorescent light sources showing an approximate 1 OD unit per 0.5 J m-2 exposure to a broad ultraviolet (UV) UVA + UVB spectrum at the peak absorption wavelength. This produces a measurable and quantifiable response to UV exposure. By choosing an appropriate wavelength of readout or band pass, the level of sensitivity can be changed to match the application or exposure level measurement required. These levels of UV response are significantly higher in sensitivity than other radiochromic films such as Gafchromic MD-55 by an order of magnitude. This feature may be of use for measurement of integrated UV exposure from fluorescent lights when required and produces a quantifiable history of total exposure.

  17. Effects of blue light on pigment biosynthesis of Monascus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xue, Chunmao; Chen, Mianhua; Wu, Shufen; Li, Zhenjing; Wang, Changlu

    2016-04-01

    The influence of different illumination levels of blue light on the growth and intracellular pigment yields of Monascus strain M9 was investigated. Compared with darkness, constant exposure to blue light of 100 lux reduced the yields of six pigments, namely, rubropunctatamine (RUM), monascorubramine (MOM), rubropunctatin (RUN), monascorubrin (MON), monascin (MS), and ankaflavin (AK). However, exposure to varying levels of blue light had different effects on pigment production. Exposure to 100 lux of blue light once for 30 min/day and to 100 lux of blue light once and twice for 15 min/day could enhance RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production and reduce RUN and MON compared with non-exposure. Exposure to 100 lux twice for 30 min/day and to 200 lux once for 45 min/day decreased the RUM, MOM, MS, and AK yields and increased the RUN and MON. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pigment biosynthetic genes were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results indicated that gene MpPKS5, mppR1, mppA, mppB, mmpC, mppD, MpFasA, MpFasB, and mppF were positively correlated with the yields of RUN and MON, whereas mppE and mppR2 were associated with RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production. PMID:27033206

  18. The Red Light District and Its Effects on Zebrafish Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Adatto, Isaac; Krug, Lauren; Zon, Leonard Ira

    2016-06-01

    Light-dark cycles mimicking natural settings in a zebrafish facility are crucial for maintaining fish with an entrained circadian clock making them an ideal vertebrate model to study such rhythms. However, failure to provide optimal conditions to include complete darkness can lead to a disturbed circadian pacemaker affecting physiology and behavior in zebrafish. To meet building code requirements, the aquatics facility in use was outfitted with EXIT signs emitting a constant light. To determine if light radiating from the EXIT sign has an effect on zebrafish embryo production, 100 fish (1:1 m/f ratio) were split and housed at 10 fish/L. Half were housed directly in front of the EXIT sign, whereas the other half (control) were housed under a true 14-h light-10-h dark cycle. Reproductive success was evaluated by recording fecundity and viability from 10 weekly matings under two light colors: red (640 nm) and green (560 nm). On average the control group spawned twice as many embryos compared to those housed in front of a red EXIT sign, whereas green EXIT sign showed no difference. This suggests the importance of providing a complete dark environment within the night cycle and a recommendation toward dim green EXIT signs to avoid a decline in reproductive performance. PMID:26978703

  19. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    A. Daniel

    2009-12-01

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  20. Chemiluminescent Oscillating Demonstrations: The Chemical Buoy, the Lighting Wave, and the Ghostly Cylinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prypsztejn, Hernan E.; Mulford, Douglas R.; Stratton, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Oscillating reactions have been extensively used in chemical demonstrations. They involve several chemical concepts about kinetics, catalysts, and thermodynamics. The spontaneous cyclic color change of a solution is an attraction in any educational-level course. Chemiluminescent reactions are also among the most fascinating demonstrations and have…

  1. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  2. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  3. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  4. Automatic instrument for chemical processing to detect microorganism in biological samples by measuring light reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated apparatus is reported for sequentially assaying urine samples for the presence of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that comprises a rotary table which carries a plurality of sample containing vials and automatically dispenses fluid reagents into the vials preparatory to injecting a light producing luciferase-luciferin mixture into the samples. The device automatically measures the light produced in each urine sample by a bioluminescence reaction of the free bacterial adenosine triphosphate with the luciferase-luciferin mixture. The light measured is proportional to the concentration of bacterial adenosine triphosphate which, in turn, is proportional to the number of bacteria present in the respective urine sample.

  5. Ambipolar Light-Emitting Transistors on Chemical Vapor Deposited Monolayer MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Gutiérrez-Lezama, Ignacio; Ubrig, Nicolas; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2015-12-01

    We realize and investigate ionic liquid gated field-effect transistors (FETs) on large-area MoS2 monolayers grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Under electron accumulation, the performance of these devices is comparable to that of FETs based on exfoliated flakes. FETs on CVD-grown material, however, exhibit clear ambipolar transport, which for MoS2 monolayers had not been reported previously. We exploit this property to estimate the bandgap Δ of monolayer MoS2 directly from the device transfer curves and find Δ ≈ 2.4-2.7 eV. In the ambipolar injection regime, we observe electroluminescence due to exciton recombination in MoS2, originating from the region close to the hole-injecting contact. Both the observed transport properties and the behavior of the electroluminescence can be consistently understood as due to the presence of defect states at an energy of 250-300 meV above the top of the valence band, acting as deep traps for holes. Our results are of technological relevance, as they show that devices with useful optoelectronic functionality can be realized on large-area MoS2 monolayers produced by controllable and scalable techniques. PMID:26594892

  6. Ultraviolet-light-driven doping modulation in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M Z; Iqbal, M W; Khan, M F; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-08-28

    The tuning of charge carrier density of graphene is an essential factor to achieve the integration of high-efficiency electronic and optoelectronic devices. We demonstrate the reversible doping in graphene using deep ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and treatment with O2 and N2 gases. The Dirac point shift towards a positive gate voltage of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene field-effect transistors confirms the p-type doping, which is observed under UV irradiation and treatment with O2 gas, while it restores its pristine state after treatment with N2 gas under UV irradiation. The emergence of an additional peak in the X-ray photoelectron spectra during UV irradiation and treatment with O2 gas represents the oxidation of graphene, and the elimination of this peak during UV irradiation and treatment with N2 gas reveals the restoration of graphene in its pristine state. The shift in the G and 2D bands in Raman spectra towards higher and then lower wavenumber also suggests p-type doping and then reversible doping in graphene. The controlled doping and its reversibility in large area grown graphene offer a new vision for electronic applications. PMID:26198203

  7. Understanding the human health effects of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David O; Arcaro, Kathleen; Spink, David C

    2002-01-01

    Most research on the effects of chemicals on biologic systems is conducted on one chemical at a time. However, in the real world people are exposed to mixtures, not single chemicals. Although various substances may have totally independent actions, in many cases two substances may act at the same site in ways that can be either additive or nonadditive. Many even more complex interactions may occur if two chemicals act at different but related targets. In the extreme case there may be synergistic effects, in which case the effects of two substances together are greater than the sum of either effect alone. In reality, most persons are exposed to many chemicals, not just one or two, and therefore the effects of a chemical mixture are extremely complex and may differ for each mixture depending on the chemical composition. This complexity is a major reason why mixtures have not been well studied. In this review we attempt to illustrate some of the principles and approaches that can be used to study effects of mixtures. By the nature of the state of the science, this discussion is more a presentation of what we do not know than of what we do know about mixtures. We approach the study of mixtures at three levels, using specific examples. First, we discuss several human diseases in relation to a variety of environmental agents believed to influence the development and progression of the disease. We present results of selected cellular and animal studies in which simple mixtures have been investigated. Finally, we discuss some of the effects of mixtures at a molecular level. PMID:11834461

  8. Circadian-effect engineering of solid-state lighting spectra for beneficial and tunable lighting.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Shan, Qifeng; Lam, Hien; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-09-01

    Optimization of solid-state lighting spectra is performed to achieve beneficial and tunable circadian effects. First, the minimum spectral circadian action factor (CAF) of 2700 K white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is studied for applications where biologically active illumination is undesirable. It is found that white-LEDs based on (i) RGB chips, (ii) blue & red chips plus green phosphor, and (iii) blue chip plus green & red phosphors are the corresponding minimum-CAF solutions at color-rendering index (CRI) requirements of 80, 90, and 95, respectively. Second, maximum CAF tunability of LED clusters is studied for dynamic daylighting applications. A dichromatic phosphor-converted blue-centered LED, a dichromatic phosphor-converted green-centered LED, and a monochromatic red LED are grouped to obtain white spectra between 2700 K and 6500 K. A maximum CAF tunability of 3.25 times is achieved with CRI above 90 and luminous efficacy of radiation of 313 - 373 lm/W. We show that our approaches have advantages over previously reported solutions on system simplicity, minimum achievable CAF value, CAF tunability range, and light source efficacy. PMID:27607613

  9. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  10. Integrated chemical treatment of municipal wastewater using waste hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmed; Mahmood, Qaisar; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Malik, Amir Haider; Rashid, Naim; Wu, Donglei

    Dilemmas like water shortage, rapid industrialization, growing human population and related issues have seriously affected human health and environmental sustainability. For conservation and sustainable use of our water resources, innovative methods for wastewater treatment are continuously being explored. Advance Oxidation Processes (AOPs) show a promising approach to meet specific objectives of municipal wastewater treatment (MWW). The MWW samples were pretreated with Al 2(SO 4) 4·8H 2O (Alum) at different doses 4, 8, 12-50 mg/L to enhance the sedimentation. The maximum COD removal was observed at alum treatments in range of 28-32 mg/L without increasing total dissolved solids (TDS). TDS were found to increase when the alum dose was increased from 32-40 mg/L. In the present study, the optimum alum dose of 30 mg/L for 3 h of sedimentation and subsequent integrated H 2O 2/UV treatment was applied (using 2.5 mL/L of 40% waste H 2O 2 and 35% fresh H 2O 2 separately). Organic and inorganic pollutants, contributing towards chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity and total dissolved solids were degraded by H 2O 2/UV. About 93% COD, 90% BOD and 83% turbidity reduction occurred when 40% waste H 2O 2 was used. When using fresh H 2O 2, 63% COD, 68% BOD and 86% turbidity reduction was detected. Complete disinfection of coliform bacteria occurred by using 40% H 2O 2/UV. The most interesting part of this research was to compare the effectiveness of waste H 2O 2 with fresh H 2O 2. Waste H 2O 2 generated from an industrial process of disinfection was found more effective in the treatment of MWW than fresh 35% H 2O 2.

  11. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UV LAMP TO DECOMPOSE OXALATES

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Huff, T.; Sudduth, C.

    2010-01-19

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning is a new process scheduled to begin cleaning Savannah River Site High Level Waste Tanks in 2012. It is an improvement over the current chemical cleaning method, in that it minimizes downstream impacts on the High Level Waste System. It is based on a state of the art scale removal process used on the secondary side of nuclear power plants, with modifications to accommodate the unique constraints created by the tanks. Both Enhanced Chemical Cleaning and the scale removal process are founded on dissolving metal oxides/hydroxides using oxalic acid, with subsequent oxalate decomposition via hydroxylation using ozone or peroxide, and UV light as a catalyst. A divergence Enhanced Chemical Cleaning has from nuclear power scale removal is the significantly increased solids concentration during oxalate decomposition. These solids can limit the ability of the UV light to create hydroxyl radicals, either by limiting the ability of the light to penetrate through the solution, or by increasing the fouling rate on the UV light. Both will decrease the overall catalytic effectiveness, thereby decreasing the concentration of formed hydroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are the driving force behind the oxalate decomposition. To understand the impact of increased solids, testing was performed using a medium pressure UV light inside an ozone supplied Oxalate Decomposition Reactor. Using a dissolved metal sludge simulant with an initial oxalate concentration greater than 12,000 ppm, and an initial pH of about 2.0, the spent acid solution was recirculated through the reactor, while the UV light was allowed to foul. For the first few hours, the oxalate decomposition rate was about 1,300 ppm/hour. After about 3 hours, enough time for the UV lamp to foul, the oxalate decomposition rate decreased to about 500 ppm/hour. The decomposition rate then remained roughly constant for the next 16 hours. Overall, testing showed that the oxalate destruction rate decreased

  12. Local and systemic effects of mechanico-chemical retraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Goodchild, Jason H

    2013-09-01

    The process of recording an acceptable fixed prosthodontic impression must include appropriate tissue management. This article reviews the effects of mechanical and chemical tissue retraction for fixed prosthodontics, specifically discussing the use of retraction cord with or without chemicals to control sulcular hemorrhage and moisture. Common astringents, hemostatics, and vasoconstrictors used in dentistry as gingival retraction agents are discussed, and recommendations for modification of patient and treatment management are provided. PMID:24350912

  13. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  14. [Negotiating light therapy. Kellogg versus Finsen, and the controversy about the health effects of light rays around 1900].

    PubMed

    Ingold, Niklaus

    2015-07-01

    Western medicine has produced different rationales for the application of light rays to cure diseases in the 201h century. Since the 1980s, physicians have used bright light for treating mental disorders. In the interwar period, however, physicians regarded ultraviolet rays rather than bright light as medically relevant. This view goes back to the 1890s, when the physician (and later Nobel Price laureate) Niels R. Finsen started treating skin tuberculosis with light rays. However, Finsen was not the only physician who utilized the new electric light to develop effective therapies. Famous American inventor of the breakfast cereal and eugenicists, John Harvey Kellogg used incandescent lamps to heat a sweatbox. Consequently, two different therapeutic schools emerged from these therapeutic experiments. This article shows how these two schools negotiated the use of light therapy and how a specific idea of medically interesting light rays emerged thereby. PMID:26111841

  15. Slow-light effect via Rayleigh anomaly and the effect of finite gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm; Chong, Xinyuan; Ren, Fanghui; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the slow-light effect of sub-wavelength diffraction gratings via the Rayleigh anomaly using a fully analytical approach without needing to consider specific grating structures. Our results show that the local group velocity of the transmitted light can be significantly reduced due to the optical vortex, which can inspire a new mechanism to enhance light–matter interactions for optical sensing and photodetection. However, the slow-light effect will diminish as the transmitted light propagates farther from the grating surface, and the slowdown factor decreases as the grating size shrinks. PMID:26565869

  16. Effect of fixation positions on perception of lightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, Matteo; Valsecchi, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.

    2015-03-01

    Visual acuity, luminance sensitivity, contrast sensitivity, and color sensitivity are maximal in the fovea and decrease with retinal eccentricity. Therefore every scene is perceived by integrating the small, high resolution samples collected by moving the eyes around. Moreover, when viewing ambiguous figures the fixated position influences the dominance of the possible percepts. Therefore fixations could serve as a selection mechanism whose function is not confined to finely resolve the selected detail of the scene. Here this hypothesis is tested in the lightness perception domain. In a first series of experiments we demonstrated that when observers matched the color of natural objects they based their lightness judgments on objects' brightest parts. During this task the observers tended to fixate points with above average luminance, suggesting a relationship between perception and fixations that we causally proved using a gaze contingent display in a subsequent experiment. Simulations with rendered physical lighting show that higher values in an object's luminance distribution are particularly informative about reflectance. In a second series of experiments we considered a high level strategy that the visual system uses to segment the visual scene in a layered representation. We demonstrated that eye movement sampling mediates between the layer segregation and its effects on lightness perception. Together these studies show that eye fixations are partially responsible for the selection of information from a scene that allows the visual system to estimate the reflectance of a surface.

  17. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids. PMID:26349036

  18. Silicon-Based Chemical Motors: An Efficient Pump for Triggering and Guiding Fluid Motion Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Esplandiu, Maria J; Farniya, Ali Afshar; Bachtold, Adrian

    2015-11-24

    We report a simple yet highly efficient chemical motor that can be controlled with visible light. The motor made from a noble metal and doped silicon acts as a pump, which is driven through a light-activated catalytic reaction process. We show that the actuation is based on electro-osmosis with the electric field generated by chemical reactions at the metal and silicon surfaces, whereas the contribution of diffusio-osmosis to the actuation is negligible. Surprisingly, the pump can be operated using water as fuel. This is possible because of the large ζ-potential of silicon, which makes the electro-osmotic fluid motion sizable even though the electric field generated by the reaction is weak. The electro-hydrodynamic process is greatly amplified with the addition of reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which generates higher electric fields. Another remarkable finding is the tunability of silicon-based pumps. That is, it is possible to control the speed of the fluid with light. We take advantage of this property to manipulate the spatial distribution of colloidal microparticles in the liquid and to pattern colloidal microparticle structures at specific locations on a wafer surface. Silicon-based pumps hold great promise for controlled mass transport in fluids. PMID:26349036

  19. Health and environmental effects of complex chemical mixtures: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Department of Energy supports a broad long-term research program on human health and environmental effects from potential exposure to energy-related complex chemical mixtures. The program seeks basic mechanistic data on the effects of complex mixtures at the cellular, molecular, and whole animal levels to aid in predicting human health effects and seeks ecological data on biological and physical transformations in the mixtures, concentrations of the mixtures in various compartments of the environment, and potential routes for human exposure to these mixtures (e.g., food chain). On June 17-18, 1985, OHER held its First Annual Technical Meeting on the Complex Chemical Mixtures Program in Chicago, IL. The primary purpose of the meeting was to enable principal investigators to report the research status and accomplishments of ongoing complex chemical mixture studies supported by OHER. To help focus future research directions round table discussions were conducted.

  20. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  1. Light-Induced Changes of the Circadian Clock of Humans: Increasing Duration is More Effective than Increasing Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of increasing the intensity and/or duration of exposure on light-induced changes in the timing of the circadian clock of humans. Design: Multifactorial randomized controlled trial, between and within subject design Setting: General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) of an academic medical center Participants: 56 healthy young subjects (20-40 years of age) Interventions: Research subjects were admitted for 2 independent stays of 4 nights/3 days for treatment with bright or dim-light (randomized order) at a time known to induce phase delays in circadian timing. The intensity and duration of the bright light were determined by random assignment to one of 9 treatment conditions (duration of 1, 2, or 3 hours at 2000, 4000, or 8000 lux). Measurements and Results: Treatment-induced changes in the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and dim light melatonin offset (DLMOff) were measured from blood samples collected every 20-30 min throughout baseline and post-treatment nights. Comparison by multi-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) of light-induced changes in the time of the circadian melatonin rhythm for the 9 conditions revealed that changing the duration of the light exposure from 1 to 3 h increased the magnitude of light-induced delays. In contrast, increasing from moderate (2,000 lux) to high (8,000 lux) intensity light did not alter the magnitude of phase delays of the circadian melatonin rhythm. Conclusions: Results from the present study suggest that for phototherapy of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in humans, a longer period of moderate intensity light may be more effective than a shorter exposure period of high intensity light. Citation: Dewan K; Benloucif S; Reid K; Wolfe LF; Zee PC. Light-induced changes of the circadian clock of humans: increasing duration is more effective than increasing light intensity. SLEEP 2011;34(5):593-599. PMID:21532952

  2. Radiation chemical effects of X-rays on liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Holroyd, R.A.; Preses, J.M.

    1998-11-01

    This review describes some of the chemical changes induced by photoelectrons which are released in liquids when X-rays are absorbed. Both experimental studies and theory are discussed. In part 1, the basic processes occurring upon absorption of X-rays are described. Parts 2 and 3 deal with hydrocarbon liquids; in part 2 the ion yields, including effects at K-edges, and in part 3, the yields of excited states. Part 4 discusses chemical effects of X-rays in aqueous solutions. The authors end with a summary of future needs and directions.

  3. Effects of extracellular calcium and of light adaptation on the response to dim light in honey bee drone photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raggenbass, M

    1983-01-01

    Light responses in honey bee drone photoreceptors were recorded with intracellular micro-electrodes in superfused slices of retina. The effects of changes in extracellular calcium on the size and the shape of the response to dim light were studied and compared with the effects of light adaptation. Dim light stimuli were used so that the amplitude of the response was linearly related to the number of the photons absorbed, the effects of voltage-dependent mechanisms were negligible and no detectable light adaptation was produced by the stimulus. Lowering the extracellular calcium concentration increased the amplitude and the duration of the response. Raising the extracellular calcium concentration produced the opposite effects. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration modified the response without altering either the linearity of the intensity--response relation or the resting membrane potential in the dark. Light adaptation decreased the amplitude and the duration of the response in a manner that could be quantitatively simulated, in the same photoreceptors, by an increase in the extracellular calcium concentration. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration, or light-adapting the preparation, modified the response without altering its early depolarizing phase. Lowering external calcium either did not affect, or slightly increased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization; raising external calcium, or light-adapting the preparation, either did not affect, or slightly decreased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization. The experimental data can be quantitatively described by a mathematical model with the basic assumption that calcium acts in the process of light adaptation by decreasing the mean open time of the light-activated channels. PMID:6655592

  4. Chemical characteristics and light-absorbing property of water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing: Biomass burning contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Caiqing; Zheng, Mei; Sullivan, Amy P.; Bosch, Carme; Desyaterik, Yury; Andersson, August; Li, Xiaoying; Guo, Xiaoshuang; Zhou, Tian; Gustafsson, Örjan; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    Emissions from biomass burning contribute significantly to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon). Ambient atmospheric samples were collected at an urban site in Beijing during winter and summer, along with source samples from residential crop straw burning. Carbonaceous aerosol species, including organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), WSOC and multiple saccharides as well as water-soluble potassium (K+) in PM2.5 (fine particulate matter with size less than 2.5 μm) were measured. Chemical signatures of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing during winter and summer days with significant biomass burning influence were identified. Meanwhile, light absorption by WSOC was measured and quantitatively compared to EC at ground level. The results from this study indicated that levoglucosan exhibited consistently high concentrations (209 ± 145 ng m-3) in winter. Ratios of levoglucosan/mannosan (L/M) and levoglucosan/galacosan (L/G) indicated that residential biofuel use is an important source of biomass burning aerosol in winter in Beijing. Light absorption coefficient per unit ambient WSOC mass calculated at 365 nm is approximately 1.54 ± 0.16 m2 g-1 in winter and 0.73 ± 0.15 m2 g-1 in summer. Biomass burning derived WSOC accounted for 23 ± 7% and 16 ± 7% of total WSOC mass, and contributed to 17 ± 4% and 19 ± 5% of total WSOC light absorption in winter and summer, respectively. It is noteworthy that, up to 30% of total WSOC light absorption was attributed to biomass burning in significant biomass-burning-impacted summer day. Near-surface light absorption (over the range 300-400 nm) by WSOC was about ∼40% of that by EC in winter and ∼25% in summer.

  5. Photo-oxidation effects of light-emitting porous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Sadao

    2009-06-01

    The effects of light illumination on porous silicon (PSi) properties have been studied using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The PL spectrum evolution in PSi sample under light illumination at various wavelengths indicates that the photo-oxidation occurs and causes a decrease in its intensity with increasing illumination time t. The decrease in the PL intensity IPL can be written as logarithmic expression, namely, the Elovich equation IPL∝-α ln t, where α is the quenching rate of the PL intensity associated with the native oxide growth. The α value is dependent on the illuminated photon energy Epo in a manner α =0.050Epo. Each PL spectrum can be deconvoluted into four Gaussian peaks. The higher the PL peak energy, the larger its photo-oxidation-induced blueshift. This fact and XPS results support that the light emission in a porous sample is due to the quantum-size effect, i.e., relaxation of the momentum conservation at and above the indirect absorption edge (supra-indirect-gap emission). The PLE spectra suggest that the surface hydrogen termination should influence the highly excited carrier dynamics in nanocrystalline PSi materials.

  6. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J J

    2001-01-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, a number of researchers have speculated that the changes in cognitive function are mediated by the endocrine-like actions of these chemicals. In this paper we review the evidence that cognitive effects of chemicals classified as environmental endocrine disruptors are mediated by changes in hormonal function. We begin by briefly reviewing the role of gonadal steroids, thyroid hormones, and glucocorticoids in brain development and brain function. We then review the endocrine changes and cognitive effects that have been reported for selected endocrine-disrupting chemicals, discuss the evidence for causal relationships between endocrine disruption and cognitive effects, and suggest directions for future research. PMID:11748026

  7. Synthesis of Graphene Films by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Transparent Conducting Electrodes of GaN Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Gunho; Choe, Minhyeok; Cho, Chu-Young; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Woojin; Lee, Sangchul; Park, Seong-Ju; Hong, Byung Hee; Kahng, Yung Ho; Lee, Takhee

    2011-12-01

    This work demonstrales large-scale simultaneous fabrication of patterned graphene-based GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Graphene sheets were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on nickel films and showed typical CVD-synthesized film properties, possessing a sheet resistance of ˜605 Ω/⃞ with a transparency of more than 85% in the 400-800 nm wavelength range, and was applied as transparent condueting electrodes of GaN-based blue LHDs, The light output performance of GaN LEDs with graphene electrodes was comparable to that of conventional ITO-electrode LEDs over the range of input current up to 150 mA.

  8. The Enhanced Light Absorptance and Device Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon Fabricated by Metal-assisted Chemical Etching.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hao; Guo, Anran; Guo, Guohui; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-12-01

    We use metal-assisted chemical etching (MCE) method to fabricate nanostructured black silicon on the surface of C-Si. The Si-PIN photoelectronic detector based on this type of black silicon shows excellent device performance with a responsivity of 0.57 A/W at 1060 nm. Silicon nanocone arrays can be created using MCE treatment. These modified surfaces show higher light absorptance in the near-infrared range (800 to 2500 nm) compared to that of C-Si with polished surfaces, and the variations in the absorption spectra of the nanostructured black silicon with different etching processes are obtained. The maximum light absorptance increases significantly up to 95 % in the wavelength range of 400 to 2500 nm. Our recent novel results clearly indicate that nanostructured black silicon made by MCE has potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic detectors. PMID:27368764

  9. The Enhanced Light Absorptance and Device Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon Fabricated by Metal-assisted Chemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hao; Guo, Anran; Guo, Guohui; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    We use metal-assisted chemical etching (MCE) method to fabricate nanostructured black silicon on the surface of C-Si. The Si-PIN photoelectronic detector based on this type of black silicon shows excellent device performance with a responsivity of 0.57 A/W at 1060 nm. Silicon nanocone arrays can be created using MCE treatment. These modified surfaces show higher light absorptance in the near-infrared range (800 to 2500 nm) compared to that of C-Si with polished surfaces, and the variations in the absorption spectra of the nanostructured black silicon with different etching processes are obtained. The maximum light absorptance increases significantly up to 95 % in the wavelength range of 400 to 2500 nm. Our recent novel results clearly indicate that nanostructured black silicon made by MCE has potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic detectors.

  10. Exhaust emissions from gasoline-fuelled light duty vehicles operated in different driving conditions: A chemical and biological characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerholm, Roger; Almén, Jacob; Li, Hang; Rannug, Ulf; Rosén, Åke

    Chemical analysis and mutagenicity tests on Salmonella typtimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 (Ames test) of exhaust emissions from five passengers vehicles, with or without a three-way catalyst, have been carried out to obtain emission factors and to characterize exhaust emissions. Both constant cruising speeds and transient driving conditions were investigated, regulated CO, HC, NO x and particulates, as well as unregulated pollutants, were analysed. The following unregulated pollutants were measured: particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), 1-nitropyrene, light aromatics and light oxygenates. In total, 39 individual compounds were assayed. Emissions from catalyst-equipped vehicles showed a dramatic decrease compared with those from the vehicle without a catalyst. An emission dependency of both regulated and unregulated pollutants and biological activity on driving conditions were determined. An increased emission of PAH, 1-nitropyrene, particulates and mutagenic activity was found with a higher cruising speed.

  11. Light-enhanced chemical whitening of teeth: new in vitro investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovska, R.; Dimitrov, S.; Pavlova, P.; Todorov, G.

    2007-03-01

    We report new results on the light enhanced teeth whitening obtained in a research collaboration financed by the Medical Science Council of the Medical University of Sofia. The project is an extension of previous research and its basic goal is to develop new teeth bleaching substances and procedures, in which the activators are diode lamps (LED).

  12. Effect of recycled light in two-beam interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnero, Giovanni; Mana, Giovanni; Massa, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    We developed a laser interferometer allowing parts per million resolution to be achieved in fringe division for the measurement of the Si (220) lattice spacing by combined x-ray and optical interferometry. With the aim of obtaining 10{sup -9} measurement uncertainty, we pursued the study of a troublesome noise in interferometer operation and eventually identified its origin in a minute interferometer optical feedback. We investigated mathematically the feedback effect and verified predictions experimentally. Imperfect isolation and light recycling having been identified and subsequently experimentally proved, we took remedial steps in order to improve measurement capabilities. This investigation has brought into light and has made it possible to quantify an interferometer noise up to now overlooked.

  13. Slow-light enhanced absorption for bio-chemical sensing applications: potential of low-contrast lossy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, J.; Xiao, S.; Mortensen, N. A.

    2008-02-01

    Slow-light enhanced absorption in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals has recently been proposed as a route to compensate for the reduced optical path in typical lab-on-a-chip systems for bio-chemical sensing applications. A simple perturbative expression has been applied to ideal structures composed of lossless dielectrics. In this work we study the enhancement in structures composed of lossy dielectrics such as a polymer. For this particular sensing application we find that the material loss has an unexpected limited drawback and surprisingly, it may even add to increase the bandwidth for low-index contrast systems such as polymer devices.

  14. Chemical Hair Relaxers Have Adverse Effects a Myth or Reality

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vinma H; Shetty, Narendra J; Nair, Dhanya Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Context: Hair plays an important role in one's personality and builds confidence. Now-a-days, chemical hair relaxers are used very commonly in the society. We document the adverse effects reported by the sample that have used any one of the professional chemical hair relaxers. Aim: To study the adverse effects reported by the sample who underwent repeated chemical hair relaxing. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire based study done on a sample taken from a medical college and hospital campus in Mangalore. Materials and Methods: The sample was restricted to females and to those who underwent it more than once. A questionnaire was given to a sample of 90, which matched our criteria. Statistical Analysis: SPSS software 17. Results: Adverse effects reported by the sample after undergoing the procedure were found to be a high 95.56%, out of which the following are the common adverse effects reported; frizzy hair in 67%, dandruff in 61%, hair loss in 47%, thinning and weakening of hair in 40%, greying of hair 22%, and split ends in only 17%. Conclusions: Very few studies have been conducted on the adverse effects of hair straightening products in India. From our study, it can be stated that most of the samples had adverse effects, which was as high as 95.56%. Hence from the details elicited from this study, we can conclude that, usage of chemical hair relaxers does cause adverse effects and is “not a myth.” Thus, it is necessary to make available a less harmful chemical hair relaxer to the society. PMID:23960393

  15. Spectral effects of light-emitting diodes on plant growth and development: The importance of green and blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, K. R.; Bugbee, B.

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an emerging technology for plant growth lighting. Due to their narrow spectral output, colored LEDs provide many options for studying the spectral effects of light on plants. Early on, efficient red LEDs were the primary focus of photobiological research; however, subsequent studies have shown that normal plant growth and development cannot be achieved under red light without blue light supplementation. More recent studies have shown that red and blue (RB) LEDs supplemented with green light increase plant dry mass. This is because green light transmits more effectively through the leaf canopy than red and blue light, thus illuminating lower plant leaves and increasing whole-plant photosynthesis. Red, green and blue (RGB) light can be provided by either a conventional white light source (such as fluorescent lights), a combination of RGB LEDs, or from recently developed white LEDs. White LEDs exceed the efficiency of fluorescent lights and have a comparable broad spectrum. As such, they have the potential to replace fluorescent lighting for growth-chamber-based crop production both on Earth and in space. Here we report the results of studies on the effects of three white LED types (warm, neutral and cool) on plant growth and development compared to combinations of RB and RGB LEDs. Plants were grown under two constant light intensities (200 and 500 μmol m-2 s-1). Temperature, environmental conditions and root-zone environment were uniformly maintained across treatments. Phytochrome photoequilbria and red/far-red ratios were similar among treatments and were comparable to conventional fluorescent lights. Blue light had a significant effect on both plant growth (dry mass gain) and development (dry mass partitioning). An increase in the absolute amount (μmol m-2 s-1) of blue light from 0-80 μmol m-2 s-1 resulted in a decrease in stem elongation, independent of the light intensity. However, an increase in the relative amount (%) of blue

  16. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A‑1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color.

  17. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A−1 and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color. PMID:27048887

  18. High Color-Purity Green, Orange, and Red Light-Emitting Didoes Based on Chemically Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woosung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Taehyung; Do, Sungan; Park, Yoonsang; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Tae-Woo; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Chemically derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to date have showed very broad emission linewidth due to many kinds of chemical bondings with different energy levels, which significantly degrades the color purity and color tunability. Here, we show that use of aniline derivatives to chemically functionalize GQDs generates new extrinsic energy levels that lead to photoluminescence of very narrow linewidths. We use transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies to study the electronic structures and related electronic transitions of our GQDs, which reveals that their underlying carrier dynamics is strongly related to the chemical properties of aniline derivatives. Using these functionalized GQDs as lumophores, we fabricate light-emitting didoes (LEDs) that exhibit green, orange, and red electroluminescence that has high color purity. The maximum current efficiency of 3.47 cd A(-1) and external quantum efficiency of 1.28% are recorded with our LEDs; these are the highest values ever reported for LEDs based on carbon-nanoparticle phosphors. This functionalization of GQDs with aniline derivatives represents a new method to fabricate LEDs that produce natural color. PMID:27048887

  19. Chemical contaminants in feedlot wastes: concentrations, effects and attenuation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S J; Roser, D J; Davies, C M; Peters, G M; Stuetz, R M; Tucker, R; Ashbolt, N J

    2008-08-01

    Commercial feedlots for beef cattle finishing are potential sources of a range of trace chemicals which have human health or environmental significance. To ensure adequate protection of human and environmental health from exposure to these chemicals, the application of effective manure and effluent management practices is warranted. The Australian meat and livestock industry has adopted a proactive approach to the identification of best management practices. Accordingly, this review was undertaken to identify key chemical species that may require consideration in the development of guidelines for feedlot manure and effluent management practices in Australia. Important classes of trace chemicals identified include steroidal hormones, antibiotics, ectoparasiticides, mycotoxins, heavy metals and dioxins. These are described in terms of their likely sources, expected concentrations and public health or environmental significance based on international data and research. Androgenic hormones such as testosterone and trenbolone are significantly active in feedlot wastes, but they are poorly understood in terms of fate and environmental implications. The careful management of residues of antibiotics including virginiamycin, tylosin and oxytetracycline appears prudent in terms of minimising the risk of potential public health impacts from resistant strains of bacteria. Good management of ectoparasiticides including synthetic pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones, fluazuron, and amitraz is important for the prevention of potential ecological implications, particularly towards dung beetles. Very few of these individual chemical contaminants have been thoroughly investigated in terms of concentrations, effects and attenuation in Australian feedlot wastes. PMID:18055014

  20. Effects of selenium and light wavelengths on liquid culture of Cordyceps militaris Link.

    PubMed

    Dong, J Z; Liu, M R; Lei, C; Zheng, X J; Wang, Y

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the effects of selenium and light wavelengths on the growth of liquid-cultured Cordyceps militaris and the main active components' accumulation, culture conditions as selenium selenite concentrations and light of different wavelengths were studied. The results are: adenosine accumulation proved to be significantly selenium dependent (R(2) = 0.9403) and cordycepin contents were determined to be not significantly selenium dependent (R(2) = 0.3845) but significantly enhanced by selenium except for 20 ppm; there were significant differences in cordycepin contents, adenosine contents, and mycelium growth caused by light wavelengths: cordycepin, blue light > pink light > daylight, darkness, red light; adenosine, red light > pink light, darkness, daylight, blue light; and mycelium growth, red light > pink light, darkness, daylight > blue light. In conclusion, light wavelength had a significant influence on production of mycelia, adenosine, and cordycepin, so lightening wavelength should be changed according to target products in the liquid culture of C. militaris. PMID:22434354

  1. CHEMICAL MIXTURES AND HEALTH EFFECTS AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 1991 and 1993, EPA's Office of Research and Development conducted a small health effects research program dedicated to the problem of chemical mixtures at Superfund sites. This paper summarizes key findings from the program. The studies covered a wide range of endpoints, ...

  2. Chemical release and radiation effects experiment advanced planning and coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, William W.; Alzmann, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    The efforts conducted to provide assessments and planning support for the Chemical Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) Experiments are summarized. Included are activities regarding scientific working group and workshop development including the preparation of descriptive information on the CRRES Project.

  3. Environmental chemical mixtures: Assessing ecological exposure and effects in streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a USGS fact sheet that describes a collaborative effort between USGS and US EPA to characterize exposures to chemical mixtures and associated biological effects for a diverse range of US streams representing varying watershed size, land-use patterns, and ecotypes.

  4. EFFECTIVE RISK MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WORKSHOP NEWMEDIA CD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a CD-ROM version of the workshop, Effective Risk Management of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, held in January 2002, in Cincinnati, Ohio. The goal of this workshop was to introduce the science and engineering behind managing the potential risk of suspected endocri...

  5. Effect of light polarization on holographic recording in glassy azocompounds and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozols, Andris; Kokars, Valdis; Augustovs, Peteris; Uiska, Ilze; Traskovskis, Kaspars; Saharov, Dmitry

    2011-04-01

    Light polarization effects on a holographic grating recording in a glassy chalcogenide a-As40S15Se45 film has been experimentally studied and compared with previously studied glassy molecular azobenzene film 8a at 633, using s - s,p - p, CE-1 and CE-2 circular-elliptic recording-beam polarizations (differing by light electric field rotation directions). The azocompound exhibited much higher self-diffraction efficiency (SDE) and diffraction efficiency whereas chalcogenide was more sensitive. Their recording efficiency polarization dependences also were different. SDE up to 45% was achieved in 8a with p - p and up to 2.6% in a-As40S15Se45 with CE-2 polarized recording beams. The polarization changes in the diffraction process were studied as well in these and other materials ( 11, 16, 19 and a-As2S3 film, LiTaO3:Fe crystal). It was found that light polarization changes in the process of diffraction from gratings recorded vectorially by s- p polarizations depended on chemical composition, wavelength, and exposure time. Vector gratings with SDE up to 25% were recorded in 8a, rotating a linear polarization by 90°. No light polarization changes were found in azobenzene 19 and chalcogenide films and in LiTaO3:Fe crystal, thus showing a vector recording of scalar holograms. The recording mechanisms in azocompounds and chalcogenides are discussed and compared.

  6. Effect of light polarization on holographic recording in glassy azocompounds and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozols, Andris; Kokars, Valdis; Augustovs, Peteris; Uiska, Ilze; Traskovskis, Kaspars; Saharov, Dmitry

    2011-04-01

    Light polarization effects on a holographic grating recording in a glassy chalcogenide a-As40S15Se45 film has been experimentally studied and compared with previously studied glassy molecular azobenzene film 8a at 633, using s - s,p - p, CE-1 and CE-2 circular-elliptic recording-beam polarizations (differing by light electric field rotation directions). The azocompound exhibited much higher self-diffraction efficiency (SDE) and diffraction efficiency whereas chalcogenide was more sensitive. Their recording efficiency polarization dependences also were different. SDE up to 45% was achieved in 8a with p - p and up to 2.6% in a-As40S15Se45 with CE-2 polarized recording beams. The polarization changes in the diffraction process were studied as well in these and other materials (11, 16, 19 and a-As2S3 film, LiTaO3:Fe crystal). It was found that light polarization changes in the process of diffraction from gratings recorded vectorially by s-p polarizations depended on chemical composition, wavelength, and exposure time. Vector gratings with SDE up to 25% were recorded in 8a, rotating a linear polarization by 90°. No light polarization changes were found in azobenzene 19 and chalcogenide films and in LiTaO3:Fe crystal, thus showing a vector recording of scalar holograms. The recording mechanisms in azocompounds and chalcogenides are discussed and compared.

  7. Effect of light and sweeteners on color in an amaretto-type liqueur.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Olivares, F; Pless, R C; González-Jasso, E

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the color loss in an amaretto-type liqueur under controlled light conditions showed a clear dependence of the decoloration rate on the light intensity, and complete color stability in the absence of light. The principal sweetener used in the preparation of the liqueur strongly affected the rate of color loss under irradiation, color stability being much greater for the formulations containing sucrose or no added sweetener instead of fructose 42. These differences were more pronounced in experiments conducted with chemically well-defined mixtures that contained either of the 2 azo dyes used in the coloration of the amaretto, tartrazine, and Allura Red, and various alternative sweeteners, in 28% (v/v) ethanol solution: D-fructose and, to a lesser extent, D-glucose, at concentrations of 14% (w/v), were effective in bringing about photodecoloration, while no color loss was detected in the presence of sucrose, or in the absence of any added sugar. The results are interpreted in terms of a redox reaction of reducing sugars with the diarylazo compounds, the function of the light being the conversion of the azo compound from the predominant trans configuration to the cis configuration, which on geometric grounds lends itself better to a concerted, cyclical redox reaction with the reducing sugar. PMID:21535589

  8. Seeing Chemistry through Sound: A Submersible Audible Light Sensor for Observing Chemical Reactions for Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supalo, Cary A.; Kreuter, Rodney A.; Musser, Aaron; Han, Josh; Briody, Erika; McArtor, Chip; Gregory, Kyle; Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    In order to enable students who are blind and visually impaired to observe chemical changes in solutions, a hand-held device was designed to output light intensity as an audible tone. The submersible audible light sensor (SALS) creates an audio signal by which one can observe reactions in a solution in real time, using standard laboratory…

  9. Modeling the Role of Selected Light Nonmethane Hydrocarbons on the Chemical Composition of Natural and Perturbed Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mohan Lal

    The original Oslo 2-dimensional global tropospheric photochemical model is modified by extending its vertical domain to 24.5 km with new transport coefficients to deduce the annual global source strengths of parent hydrocarbons (C-1 to C-3, or LHCs) and to study the role of photochemistry of these hydrocarbons and isoprene (rm C _5H_8) on the chemical composition of natural and perturbed troposphere. Model transport features are studied by comparing simulated atmospheric distributions and trends of CFC-11, CFC-12 and ^{85}Kr with corresponding long term observations. Four different photochemical schemes PC-1, PC -2, PC-3, and PC-5, that include C-1, C-2, C-3 hydrocarbons and rm C_5H_8 respectively, are developed. OH radical distributions calculated using these schemes and averaged surface observation data of LHCs as their respective lower boundary conditions are validated by comparing simulated atmospheric distribution and trends of rm CH_3CCl_3 with ALE/GAGE observations. Annual steady state source strengths of LHCs and rm C_2Cl _4 are calculated from their surface observations and above stated OH distributions. Comparison of modeled concentrations of C-2 and C-3 hydrocarbons in the lowest model layer with their corresponding observations shows that the sources of these species are seasonal in nature. The effects of photochemistry of light nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) on distributions of selected tropospheric species and ratio distributions of key species and on the budgets of O_3, CO, NOx and HNO _3 are also evaluated. Simulations of multiple changes in individual source strengths of NOx, CH_4, CO, NMHCs suggest that per molecule injected, NOx from aircraft emissions is the most efficient, the magnitude of which decreases with increase in emissions, in changing the global averaged O_3 concentration. Among NMHCs, changes in propane and ethane emissions are the most effective in changing the global average O _3 concentration and steady state lifetime of CH_4

  10. Techniques for Accurate Sizing of Gold Nanoparticles Using Dynamic Light Scattering with Particular Application to Chemical and Biological Sensing Based on Aggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianyu; Bott, Steven; Huo, Qun

    2016-08-24

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have found broad applications in chemical and biological sensing, catalysis, biomolecular imaging, in vitro diagnostics, cancer therapy, and many other areas. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is an analytical tool used routinely for nanoparticle size measurement and analysis. Due to its relatively low cost and ease of operation in comparison to other more sophisticated techniques, DLS is the primary choice of instrumentation for analyzing the size and size distribution of nanoparticle suspensions. However, many DLS users are unfamiliar with the principles behind the DLS measurement and are unware of some of the intrinsic limitations as well as the unique capabilities of this technique. The lack of sufficient understanding of DLS often leads to inappropriate experimental design and misinterpretation of the data. In this study, we performed DLS analyses on a series of citrate-stabilized AuNPs with diameters ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Our study shows that the measured hydrodynamic diameters of the AuNPs can vary significantly with concentration and incident laser power. The scattered light intensity of the AuNPs has a nearly sixth order power law increase with diameter, and the enormous scattered light intensity of AuNPs with diameters around or exceeding 80 nm causes a substantial multiple scattering effect in conventional DLS instruments. The effect leads to significant errors in the reported average hydrodynamic diameter of the AuNPs when the measurements are analyzed in the conventional way, without accounting for the multiple scattering. We present here some useful methods to obtain the accurate hydrodynamic size of the AuNPs using DLS. We also demonstrate and explain an extremely powerful aspect of DLS-its exceptional sensitivity in detecting gold nanoparticle aggregate formation, and the use of this unique capability for chemical and biological sensing applications. PMID:27472008