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Sample records for light decuplet baryons

  1. Strong coupling constants of decuplet baryons with vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K.

    2010-11-01

    We provide a comprehensive study of strong coupling constants of decuplet baryons with light nonet vector mesons in the framework of light cone QCD sum rules. Using the symmetry arguments, we argue that all coupling constants entering the calculations can be expressed in terms of only one invariant function even if the SU(3){sub f} symmetry breaking effects are taken into account. We estimate the order of SU(3){sub f} symmetry violations, which are automatically considered by the employed approach.

  2. Electromagnetic structure of decuplet baryons towards the chiral regime

    SciTech Connect

    Boinepalli, S.; Leinweber, D. B.; Moran, P. J.; Williams, A. G.; Zanotti, J. M.; Zhang, J. B.

    2009-09-01

    The electromagnetic properties of the baryon decuplet are calculated in quenched QCD on a 20{sup 3}x40 lattice with a lattice spacing of 0.128 fm using the fat-link irrelevant clover fermion action with quark masses providing a pion mass as low as 300 MeV. Magnetic moments and charge radii are extracted from the electric and magnetic form factors for each individual quark sector. From these, the corresponding baryon properties are constructed. We present results for the higher-order moments of the spin-3/2 baryons, including the electric-quadrupole moment E2 and the magnetic-octupole moment M3. The world's first determination of a nonzero M3 form factor for the {delta} baryon is presented. With these results we provide a conclusive analysis which shows that decuplet baryons are deformed. We compare the decuplet-baryon results from a similar lattice calculation of the octet baryons. We establish that the environment sensitivity is far less pronounced for the decuplet baryons compared to the octet baryons. A surprising result is that the charge radii of the decuplet baryons are generally smaller than those of the octet baryons. The magnetic moment of the {delta}{sup +} reveals a turnover in the low quark-mass region, making it smaller than the proton magnetic moment. These results are consistent with the expectations of quenched chiral perturbation theory. A similar turnover is also noticed in the magnetic moment of the {sigma}*{sup 0}, but not for {xi}* where only kaon loops can appear in quenched QCD. The electric-quadrupole moment of the {omega}{sup -} baryon is positive when the negative charge factor is included, and is equal to 0.86{+-}0.12x10{sup -2} fm{sup 2}, indicating an oblate shape.

  3. Study of decuplet baryon resonances from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Negele, J. W.; Petschlies, M.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    A lattice QCD study of the strong decay width and coupling constant of decuplet baryons to an octet baryon-pion state is presented. The transfer matrix method is used to obtain the overlap of lattice states with decuplet baryon quantum numbers on the one hand and octet baryon-pion quantum numbers on the other as an approximation of the matrix element of the corresponding transition. By making use of leading-order effective field theory, the coupling constants as well as the widths for the various decay channels are determined. The transitions studied are Δ →π N , Σ*→Λ π , Σ*→Σ π and Ξ*→Ξ π . We obtain results for two ensembles of Nf=2 +1 dynamical fermion configurations: one using domain wall valence quarks on a staggered sea at a pion mass of 350 MeV and a box size of 3.4 fm and a second one using domain wall sea and valence quarks at pion mass 180 MeV and box size 4.5 fm.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Decuplet Baryon Masses from Thermal QCD Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Liu, Yong-Lu; Huang, Ming-Qiu

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the masses of the decuplet baryons at finite temperature are investigated using thermal QCD sum rules. Making use of the quark propagator at finite temperature, we calculate the spectral functions to T8 order, and find that there are no contributions to the spectral functions at T8 order and the temperature corrections mainly come from that containing T4 ones. The calculations show very little temperature dependence of the masses below T = 0.11 GeV. While above that value, the masses decrease with increasing temperature. The results indicate that the hadron-quark phase transition temperature may be Tc >= 0.11 GeV for the decuplet bayons.

  5. Magnetic moments of JP = {{3}/{2}} + decuplet baryons using the statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Upadhyay, Alka

    2016-04-01

    A suitable wave function for the baryon decuplet is framed with the inclusion of the sea containing quark-gluon Fock states. Relevant operator formalism is applied to calculate the magnetic moments of J P = {{3}/{2}} + baryon decuplet. The statistical model assumes the decomposition of the baryonic state in various quark-gluon Fock states and is used in combination with the detailed balance principle to find the relative probabilities of these Fock states in flavor, spin and color space. The upper limit to the gluon is restricted to three with the possibility of emission of quark-antiquark pairs. We study the importance of strangeness in the sea (scalar, vector and tensor) and its contribution to the magnetic moments. Our approach has confirmed the scalar-tensor sea dominancy over the vector sea. Various modifications in the model are used to check the validity of the statistical approach. The results are matched with the available theoretical data. A good consistency with the experimental data has been achieved for Δ^{{++}}_{} , Δ^{{+}}_{} and Ω^{{-}}_{}.

  6. Color octet contribution in exclusive P-wave charmonium decay into octet and decuplet baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. M. H.

    2000-06-01

    In the last years, the need for the color octet state in inclusive P-wave charmonium decay has been firmly established. However, the implications of this in the corresponding exclusive reactions have not been fully recognized. We argue for the necessity of the color octet in P- and higher-wave quarkonium decay. Using a set of phenomenologically constructed baryon wave functions, we consider the χ_J decay into an octet and decuplet baryon antibaryon pair. By doing so, we subject the wave functions to a test of applicability. We show that the color singlet component alone is insufficient to account for the experimental measurements, and only by including the color octet contribution can the partial theoretical decay widths be brought into the range of the data. By the present and earlier applications of the set of wave functions, these show themselves to be reasonable model wave functions at around the scale Q^2 ˜ 10 20 GeV^2.

  7. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons using effective quark masses in a chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Aarti; Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model (χ CQM ) with explicit results for the contribution coming from the valence quark polarizations, sea quark polarizations, and their orbital angular momentum. Since the JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have short lifetimes, the experimental information about them is limited. The χ CQM has important implications for chiral symmetry breaking as well as SU(3) symmetry breaking since it works in the region between the QCD confinement scale and the chiral symmetry breaking scale. The predictions in the model not only give a satisfactory fit when compared with the experimental data but also show improvement over the other models. The effect of the confinement on quark masses has also been discussed in detail and the results of χ CQM are found to improve further with the inclusion of effective quark masses.

  8. Baryon-Baryon-Meson Coupling Constants in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Ozpineci, A.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K.; Zamiralov, V.

    2010-12-22

    The strong coupling constant of decuplet and octet baryons to vector and pseudoscalar mesons are calculated in light cone QCD sum rules in general case and when the SU(3){sub f} symmetry is taken into account. A comparison of the obtained results with the existing experimental data and predictions of the other nonperturbative approaches is also made.

  9. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X. |; Huang, T. |; Li, Z.

    1996-05-01

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  11. Baryons as Fock states of 3,5,... Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov; Victor Petrov

    2004-09-01

    We present a generating functional producing quark wave functions of all Fock states in the octet, decuplet and antidecuplet baryons in the mean field approximation, both in the rest and infinite momentum frames. In particular, for the usual octet and decuplet baryons we get the SU(6)-symmetric wave functions for their 3-quark component but with specific corrections from relativism and from additional quark-antiquark pairs. For the exotic antidecuplet baryons we obtain the 5-quark wave function.

  12. Light-cone distribution amplitudes of the baryon octet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Braun, Vladimir M.; Göckeler, Meinulf; Gruber, Michael; Hutzler, Fabian; Schäfer, Andreas; Schiel, Rainer W.; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang; Sternbeck, Andre; Wein, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    We present results of the first ab initio lattice QCD calculation of the normalization constants and first moments of the leading twist distribution amplitudes of the full baryon octet, corresponding to the small transverse distance limit of the associated S-wave light-cone wave functions. The P-wave (higher twist) normalization constants are evaluated as well. The calculation is done using N f = 2 + 1 flavors of dynamical (clover) fermions on lattices of different volumes and pion masses down to 222 MeV. Significant SU(3) flavor symmetry violation effects in the shape of the distribution amplitudes are observed.

  13. Measuring the speed of light with baryon acoustic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Salzano, Vincenzo; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-03-13

    In this Letter, we describe a new method to use baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) to derive a constraint on the possible variation of the speed of light. The method relies on the fact that there is a simple relation between the angular diameter distance (D(A)) maximum and the Hubble function (H) evaluated at the same maximum-condition redshift, which includes speed of light c. We note the close analogy of the BAO probe with a laboratory experiment: here we have D(A) which plays the role of a standard (cosmological) ruler, and H^{-1}, with the dimension of time, as a (cosmological) clock. We evaluate if current or future missions such as Euclid can be sensitive enough to detect any variation of c. PMID:25815922

  14. Light Baryon Spectroscopy using the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2011-12-01

    Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. The systematics of the baryon excitation spectrum is important to our understanding of the effective degrees of freedom underlying nucleon matter. High-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining the nucleon and the strong nuclear force. Current experimental efforts with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory utilize highly-polarized frozen-spin targets in combination with polarized photon beams. The status of the recent double-polarization experiments and some preliminary results are discussed in this contribution.

  15. Baryon spectrum from superconformal quantum mechanics and its light-front holographic embedding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-27

    We describe the observed light-baryon spectrum by extending superconformal quantum mechanics to the light front and its embedding in AdS space. This procedure uniquely determines the confinement potential for arbitrary half-integer spin. To this end, we show that fermionic wave equations in AdS space are dual to light-front supersymmetric quantum-mechanical bound-state equations in physical space-time. The specific breaking of conformal invariance explains hadronic properties common to light mesons and baryons, such as the observed mass pattern in the radial and orbital excitations, from the spectrum generating algebra. Lastly, the holographic embedding in AdS also explains distinctive and systematic features, suchmore » as the spin-J degeneracy for states with the same orbital angular momentum, observed in the light-baryon spectrum.« less

  16. Baryon spectrum from superconformal quantum mechanics and its light-front holographic embedding

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-27

    We describe the observed light-baryon spectrum by extending superconformal quantum mechanics to the light front and its embedding in AdS space. This procedure uniquely determines the confinement potential for arbitrary half-integer spin. To this end, we show that fermionic wave equations in AdS space are dual to light-front supersymmetric quantum-mechanical bound-state equations in physical space-time. The specific breaking of conformal invariance explains hadronic properties common to light mesons and baryons, such as the observed mass pattern in the radial and orbital excitations, from the spectrum generating algebra. Lastly, the holographic embedding in AdS also explains distinctive and systematic features, such as the spin-J degeneracy for states with the same orbital angular momentum, observed in the light-baryon spectrum.

  17. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(mπ3), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a2). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  18. Light-Front Holography and Gauge/Gravity Duality: The Light Meson and Baryon Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    Starting from the bound state Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we derive relativistic light-front wave equations in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. These equations of motion in physical space-time are equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. Its eigenvalues give the hadronic spectrum, and its eigenmodes represent the probability amplitudes of the hadronic constituents at a given scale. An effective classical gravity description in a positive-sign dilaton background exp(+{kappa}{sup 2}z{sup 2}) is given for the phenomenologically successful soft-wall model which naturally encodes the internal structure of hadrons and their orbital angular momentum. Applications to the light meson and baryon spectrum are presented.

  19. Applications of AdS/QCD and Light-Front Holography to Baryon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2011-10-21

    The correspondence between theories in anti--de Sitter space and field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. These equations, for both mesons and baryons, give a very good representation of the observed hadronic spectrum, including a zero mass pion. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. The meson and baryon wave-functions derived from light-front holography and AdS/QCD also have remarkable phenomenological features, including predictions for the electromagnetic form factors and decay constants. The approach can be systematically improved using light-front Hamiltonian methods. Some novel features of QCD for baryon physics are also discussed.

  20. Applications of AdS/QCD and Light-Front Holography to Baryon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2011-08-22

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. These equations, for both mesons and baryons, give a very good representation of the observed hadronic spectrum, including a zero mass pion. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. The meson and baryon wavefunctions derived from light-front holography and AdS/QCD also have remarkable phenomenological features, including predictions for the electromagnetic form factors and decay constants. The approach can be systematically improved using light-front Hamiltonian methods. Some novel features of QCD for baryon physics are also discussed.

  1. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  2. Radiative decays of the heavy flavored baryons in light cone QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Azizi, K.; Ozpineci, A.

    2009-03-01

    The transition magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of the radiative decays of the sextet heavy flavored spin 3/2 to the heavy spin 1/2 baryons are calculated within the light cone QCD sum rules approach. Using the obtained results, the decay rate for these transitions are also computed and compared with the existing predictions of the other approaches.

  3. Electroweak properties of octet baryons in a light-cone quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    We study the electroweak properties of ground state octet baryons in a relativistic quark-spectator-diquark model, with a light-front formalism applied to take relativistic effects into account. Our model provides a consistent picture of the electroweak properties of the ground state octet baryons in the low momentum transfer region. The Melosh-Wigner rotation is applied as the transformation relation between spinors in the instant form and front form. Numerical results are presented for the magnetic moments, weak transition charges, and Sachs form factors. Our results are in good agreement with experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  4. Strong coupling constants of heavy baryons with light mesons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Azizi, K.; Savci, M.

    2012-10-23

    The strong coupling constants of the heavy spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 baryons with light pseudoscalar and vector mesons are calculated in the framework of the light cone QCD sum rules. Using the symmetry arguments, some structure independent relations among different correlation functions are obtained. It is shown that all possible transitions are described by only one invariant function, whose explicit expression is structure dependent.

  5. Analysis of heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon-light vector meson vertices in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2011-05-01

    The heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon vertices with light vector mesons are studied within the light cone QCD sum rules method. These vertices are parametrized in terms of three coupling constants. These couplings are calculated for all possible transitions. It is shown that correlation functions for these transitions are described by only one invariant function for every Lorenz structure. The obtained relations between the correlation functions of the different transitions are structure independent while explicit expressions of invariant functions depend on the Lorenz structure.

  6. Modified Baryonic Dynamics: two-component cosmological simulations with light sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, G.W.; Gentile, G.; Diaferio, A.; Famaey, B.; Heyden, K.J. van der E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: gianfranco.gentile@ugent.be

    2014-10-01

    In this article we continue to test cosmological models centred on Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with light sterile neutrinos, which could in principle be a way to solve the fine-tuning problems of the standard model on galaxy scales while preserving successful predictions on larger scales. Due to previous failures of the simple MOND cosmological model, here we test a speculative model where the modified gravitational field is produced only by the baryons and the sterile neutrinos produce a purely Newtonian field (hence Modified Baryonic Dynamics). We use two-component cosmological simulations to separate the baryonic N-body particles from the sterile neutrino ones. The premise is to attenuate the over-production of massive galaxy cluster halos which were prevalent in the original MOND plus light sterile neutrinos scenario. Theoretical issues with such a formulation notwithstanding, the Modified Baryonic Dynamics model fails to produce the correct amplitude for the galaxy cluster mass function for any reasonable value of the primordial power spectrum normalisation.

  7. Superconformal Baryon-Meson Symmetry and Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, Hans Guenter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-04-10

    We construct an effective QCD light-front Hamiltonian for both mesons and baryons in the chiral limit based on the generalized supercharges of a superconformal graded algebra. The superconformal construction is shown to be equivalent to a semi-classical approximation to light-front QCD and its embedding in AdS space. The specific breaking of conformal invariance inside the graded algebra uniquely determines the effective confinement potential. The generalized supercharges connect the baryon and meson spectra to each other in a remarkable manner. In particular, the π/b1 Regge trajectory is identified as the superpartner of the nucleon trajectory. However, the lowest-lying state on this trajectory, the π-meson is massless in the chiral limit and has no supersymmetric partner.

  8. Superconformal Baryon-Meson Symmetry and Light-Front Holographic QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dosch, Hans Guenter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-04-10

    We construct an effective QCD light-front Hamiltonian for both mesons and baryons in the chiral limit based on the generalized supercharges of a superconformal graded algebra. The superconformal construction is shown to be equivalent to a semi-classical approximation to light-front QCD and its embedding in AdS space. The specific breaking of conformal invariance inside the graded algebra uniquely determines the effective confinement potential. The generalized supercharges connect the baryon and meson spectra to each other in a remarkable manner. In particular, the π/b1 Regge trajectory is identified as the superpartner of the nucleon trajectory. However, the lowest-lying state on thismore » trajectory, the π-meson is massless in the chiral limit and has no supersymmetric partner.« less

  9. Baryon-baryon interactions in the SU6 quark model and their applications to light nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamoto, C.

    2007-04-01

    channel is relatively weak, since this coupling is caused by the strangeness exchange. The B8B8 interactions are then applied to some of the few-baryon systems and light Λ-hypernuclei in a three-cluster Faddeev formalism using two-cluster RGM kernels. An application to the three-nucleon system shows that the quark-model NN interaction can give a sufficient triton binding energy with little room for the three-nucleon force. The hypertriton Faddeev calculation indicates that the attraction of the ΛN interaction in the S01 state is only slightly more attractive than that in the S13 state. In the application to the ααΛ system, the energy spectrum of BeΛ9 is well reproduced using the αα RGM kernel. The very small spin-orbit splitting of the BeΛ9 excited states is also discussed. In the ΛΛα Faddeev calculation, the NAGARA event for HeΛΛ6 is found to be consistent with the quark-model ΛΛ interaction.

  10. Massive black holes and light-element nucleosynthesis in a baryonic universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Rees, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine the model proposed by Gnedin & Ostriker (1992) in which Jeans mass black holes (M(sub BH) approximately = 10(exp 6) solar mass) form shortly after decoupling. There is no nonbaryonic dark matter in this model, but we examine the possibility that Omega(sub b) is considerably larger than given by normal nucleosynthesis. Here we allow for the fact that much of the high baryon-to-photon ratio material will collapse leaving the universe of remaining material with light-element abundances more in accord with the residual baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -2)) than with Omega(sub 0) and the initial baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -1)). We find that no reasonable model can be made with random-phase density fluctuations, if the power on scales smaller than 10(exp 6) solar mass is as large as expected. However, phase-correlated models of the type that might occur in connection with topological singularities can be made with Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.013 +/- 0.001, 0.15 approximately less than Omega(sub 0) approximately less than 0.4, which are either flat (Omega(sub lambda) = 1 - Omega(sub 0)) or open (Omega(sub lambda) = 0) and which satisfy all the observational constraints which we apply, including the large baryon-to-total mass ratio found in the X-ray clusters. The remnant baryon density is thus close to that obtained in the standard picture (Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.0125 +/- 0.0025; Walker et al. 1991). The spectral index implied for fluctuations in the baryonic isocurvature scenario, -1 less than m less than 0, is in the range expected by other arguments based on large-scale structure and microwave fluctuation constraints. The dark matter in this picture is in the form of massive black holes. Accretion onto them at early epochs releases high-energy photons which significantly heat and reionize the universe. But photodissociation does not materially change light-element abundances. A typical model gives bar-y approximately = 1 x 10(exp -5

  11. Meson/baryon/tetraquark supersymmetry from superconformal algebra and light-front holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Superconformal algebra leads to remarkable connections between the masses of mesons and baryons of the same parity — supersymmetric relations between the bosonic and fermionic bound states of QCD. Supercharges connect the mesonic eigenstates to their baryonic superpartners, where the mesons have internal angular momentum one unit higher than the baryons: LM = LB + 1. The dynamics of the superpartner hadrons also match; for example, the power-law fall-off of the form factors are the same for the mesonic and baryonic superpartners, in agreement with twist counting rules. An effective supersymmetric light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks can be constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. This procedure also generates a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique quark-confining light-front potential for light hadrons in agreement with the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach and light-front holography. Only one mass parameter λ appears; it sets the confinement mass scale, a universal value for the slope of all Regge trajectories, the nonzero mass of the proton and other hadrons in the chiral limit, as well as the length scale which underlies their structure. The mass for the pion eigenstate vanishes in the chiral limit. When one includes the constituent quark masses using the Feynman-Hellman theorem, the predictions are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadronic spectra. Our analysis can be consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K∗ and ϕ meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ∗, Ξ and Ξ∗ baryons. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass-squared of the light hadrons can be expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition of contributions from the constituent

  12. Electromagnetic corrections to baryon masses

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc

    2005-04-01

    We analyze the electromagnetic contributions to the octet and decuplet baryon masses using the heavy-baryon approximation in chiral effective field theory and methods we developed in earlier analyses of the baryon masses and magnetic moments. Our methods connect simply to Morpurgo's general parametrization of the electromagnetic contributions and to semirelativistic quark models. Our calculations are carried out including the one-loop mesonic corrections to the basic electromagnetic interactions, so to two loops overall. We find that to this order in the chiral loop expansion there are no three-body contributions. The Coleman-Glashow relation and other sum rules derived in quark models with only two-body terms therefore continue to hold, and violations involve at least three-loop processes and can be expected to be quite small. We present the complete formal results and some estimates of the matrix elements here. Numerical calculations will be presented separately.

  13. Staggered baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon Andrew

    The strong force binds protons and neutrons within nuclei and quarks within mesons and baryons. Calculations of the masses of the light-quark baryons from the theory of the strong force, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), require numerical methods in which continuous Minkowski spacetime is replaced by a discrete Euclidean spacetime lattice. Finite computational resources and theoretical constraints impose significant limitations on lattice calculations. The price of perhaps the fastest formulation of lattice QCD, rooted staggered QCD, includes quark degrees of freedom called tastes, associated discretization effects called taste violations, and the rooting conjecture for eliminating the tastes in the continuum limit. Empirically successful rooted staggered QCD calculations of the baryon spectrum would constitute numerical evidence for the rooting conjecture and further vindication of QCD as the theory of the strong force. With such calculations as the goal, I discuss expected features of the staggered baryon spectrum, examine the spectra of interpolating operators transforming irreducibly under the staggered lattice symmetry group, construct such a set of baryon operators, and show how they could allow for particularly clean calculations of the masses of the nucleon, Delta, Sigma*, Ξ*, and O-. To quantify taste violations in baryonic quantities, I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory for light-quark baryons by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, calculate the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory, and discuss in detail the pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting baryon degeneracies and mixings. The resulting chiral forms could be used with interpolating operators already in use to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  14. Highlights in light-baryon spectroscopy and searches for gluonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons - mesons and baryons - serves as an excellent probe of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The strong coupling however makes QCD challenging. It confines quarks and breaks chiral symmetry, thus providing us with the world of light hadrons. Highly-excited hadronic states are sensitive to the details of quark confinement, which is only poorly understood within QCD. This is the regime of non-perturbative QCD and it is one of the key issues in hadronic physics to identify the corresponding internal degrees of freedom and how they relate to strong coupling QCD. The quark model suggests mesons are made of a constituent quark and an antiquark and baryons consist of three such quarks. QCD predicts other forms of matter. What is the role of glue? Resonances with large gluonic components are predicted as bound states by QCD. The lightest hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers are estimated to have masses in the range from 1 to 2 GeV/c2 and are well in reach of current experimental programs. At Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and other facilities worldwide, the high-energy electron and photon beams present a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing an excellent microscope for examining atomic nuclei and the strong nuclear force.

  15. Baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, Eberhard; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2010-04-15

    About 120 baryons and baryon resonances are known, from the abundant nucleon with u and d light-quark constituents up to the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -}=(bsd), which contains one quark of each generation and to the recently discovered {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}=(bss). In spite of this impressively large number of states, the underlying mechanisms leading to the excitation spectrum are not yet understood. Heavy-quark baryons suffer from a lack of known spin parities. In the light-quark sector, quark-model calculations have met with considerable success in explaining the low-mass excitations spectrum but some important aspects such as the mass degeneracy of positive-parity and negative-parity baryon excitations remain unclear. At high masses, above 1.8 GeV, quark models predict a very high density of resonances per mass interval which is not yet observed. In this review, issues are identified discriminating between different views of the resonance spectrum; prospects are discussed on how open questions in baryon spectroscopy may find answers from photoproduction and electroproduction experiments which are presently carried out in various laboratories.

  16. Eightfold-way Assignments for Y{sub 1}* (1660) and Other Baryons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Rosenfeld, A. H.

    1962-12-04

    It was shown that the partial widths for the various two-body decay modes of the gamma octet and of the delta decuplet were compatible with unitary symmetry of strong interactions. The experimental partial widths for decay into meson plus baryon were summarized. Two of these were used as input variables determining the eightfold-way D and F decay-coupling constants for the gamma octet; the remaining five partial widths were calculated after adjustment of a radius of interaction. The calculation was repeated for the delta decuplet. Agreement with experiment was found. (C.E.S.)

  17. Dirac form factors and electric charge radii of baryons in the combined chiral and 1 /Nc expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mendieta, Rubén; Rivera-Ruiz, Mayra Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    The baryon Dirac form factor is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of color charges. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. As a byproduct, the mean-square charge radius is also computed through a detailed numerical analysis. The predictions of large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1 /Nc expansion and with the experimental data.

  18. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  19. Baryon Regge Trajectories in the Light of the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jose L. Goity; Nicolas Matagne

    2007-11-01

    We analyze Regge trajectories in term the $1/N_c$ expansion of QCD. Neglecting spin-orbit contributions to the large $N_c$ baryon mass operator, we consider the evolution of the spin-flavor singlet component of the masses with respect $\\ell$. We find two distinct and remarkably linear Regge trajectories for symmetric and for mixed symmetric spin-flavor multiplets.

  20. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael; Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-03-01

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  1. Isospin splittings in the light-baryon octet from lattice QCD and QED.

    PubMed

    Borsanyi, Sz; Dürr, S; Fodor, Z; Frison, J; Hoelbling, C; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, Th; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Ramos, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K

    2013-12-20

    While electromagnetic and up-down quark mass difference effects on octet baryon masses are very small, they have important consequences. The stability of the hydrogen atom against beta decay is a prominent example. Here, we include these effects by adding them to valence quarks in a lattice QCD calculation based on Nf=2+1 simulations with five lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. This allows us to gain control over all systematic errors, except for the one associated with neglecting electromagnetism in the sea. We compute the octet baryon isomultiplet mass splittings, as well as the individual contributions from electromagnetism and the up-down quark mass difference. Our results for the total splittings are in good agreement with experiment. PMID:24483739

  2. Baryon spectroscopy at ELPH and LEPS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takatsugu

    2014-09-01

    Baryon spectroscopy is an important testing ground for understanding low energy QCD. Meson photoproduction is complementary to π induced reactions for studying excited baryons. Among the meson photo-produced reactions, the neutron target, kaon photo-produced, and multi-meson photo-produced reactions are important to reveal the properties of baryon resonances. The photoproduction experiments at ELPH and the planned experiments at LEPS2 will be discussed. The nucleon and Δ resonances are studied with an electromagnetic calorimeter FOREST at ELPH, Tohoku University by using various photoproduction reactions. A narrow resonance observed at W-75 MeV in η photoproduction on the neutron is of great interest. It would be attributed to a member of anti-decuplet pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness since no signature corresponding to this bump has been observed so far in the proton channel. Multi-meson/kaon photoproduction is a good tool to study highly excited baryons. The results obtained at ELPH and planned experiments at LEPS2 will be presented.

  3. Multi-baryon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kostas Orginos, Will Detmold

    2012-12-01

    In this talk I review the challenges related to calculations of properties of interacting baryons on the lattice. I present the progress made addressing the problem of calculating the large number of Wick contractions necessary to compute states with the quantum numbers of many baryons in lattice QCD. Examples of correlation functions computed using these techniques are shown for the quantum numbers of the light nuclei, He-4, Be-8, C-12, O-16 and Si-28.

  4. The baryon vector current in the combined chiral and 1/Nc expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Goity, Jose L

    2014-12-01

    The baryon vector current is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of colors. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference and SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. The results are compared against the available experimental data through several fits in order to extract information about the unknown parameters. The large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory predictions are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1/Nc expansion and with the experimental data. The effect of SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking for the |Delta S|=1 vector current form factors f1(0) results in a reduction by a few percent with respect to the corresponding SU(3) symmetric values.

  5. On the consistency of recent QCD lattice data of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Semke, A.

    2012-11-01

    In our recent analysis of lattice data of the BMW, LHPC and PACS-CS groups we determined a parameter set of the chiral Lagrangian that allows a simultaneous description of the baryon octet and decuplet masses as measured by those lattice groups. The results on the baryon spectrum of the HSC group were recovered accurately without their inclusion into our six parameter fit. We show that the same parameter set provides an accurate reproduction of the recent results of the QCDSF-UKQCD group probing the baryon masses at quite different quark masses. This shows a remarkable consistency amongst the different lattice simulations. With even more accurate lattice data in the near future it will become feasible to determine all low-energy parameters relevant at N3LO.

  6. Quark-mass dependence of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-02-01

    We perform a chiral extrapolation of the baryon octet and decuplet masses in a relativistic formulation of chiral perturbation theory. A partial summation is assumed as implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop diagrams. Upon a chiral expansion, our results are consistent with strict chiral perturbation theory at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. All counter terms are correlated by a large-Nc operator analysis. Our results are confronted with recent results of unquenched three-flavor lattice simulations. We adjust the parameter set to the pion-mass dependence of the nucleon and omega masses as computed by the BMW Collaboration and predict the pion-mass dependence of the remaining baryon octet and decuplet states. The current lattice simulations can be described accurately and smoothly up to pion masses of about 600 MeV. In particular, we recover the recent results of the HSC without any further adjustments.

  7. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  8. U-spin predictions of the transition magnetic moments of the electromagnetic decay of the {Sigma}{sup ∗}(1385) baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin M.; Hicks, Kenneth H.

    2013-05-01

    The transition magnetic moments for decuplet-to-octet baryon electromagnetic decays are calculated from the CLAS experimental results and are compared with calculations to first order in the 1/N{sub c} expansion of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and new U-spin predictions. Using the U-spin predictions for the {Sigma} *{sup 0} --> {Sigma}{sup 0} {gamma} and {Sigma} *{sup +} → {Sigma}{sup +} {gamma} decays, the SU(3)-forbidden transition {Sigma} *{sup -} → {Sigma}{sup -} {gamma} is obtained. In addition, the doubly strange baryon radiative decay {Xi} *{sup 0} → {Xi} {gamma} is predicted using U-spin.

  9. Progress towards understanding baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker; Roberts, Winston

    2013-07-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1?2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have been performed in the heavy-baryon sector, which has seen a fruitful period in recent years, in particular at the B factories and the Tevatron. First results from the large hadron collider indicate rapid progress in the field of bottom baryons. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental progress and give an overview of theoretical approaches.

  10. Baryonic popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    In the large N c limit cold dense nuclear matter must be in a lattice phase. This applies also to holographic models of hadron physics. In a class of such models, like the generalized Sakai-Sugimoto model, baryons take the form of instantons of the effective flavor gauge theory that resides on probe flavor branes. In this paper we study the phase structure of baryonic crystals by analyzing discrete periodic configurations of such instantons. We find that instanton configurations exhibit a series of "popcorn" transitions upon increasing the density. Through these transitions normal (3D) lattices expand into the transverse dimension, eventually becoming a higher dimensional (4D) multi-layer lattice at large densities. We consider 3D lattices of zero size instantons as well as 1D periodic chains of finite size instantons, which serve as toy models of the full holographic systems. In particular, for the finite-size case we determine solutions of the corresponding ADHM equations for both a straight chain and for a 2D zigzag configuration where instantons pop up into the holographic dimension. At low density the system takes the form of an "abelian anti- ferromagnetic" straight periodic chain. Above a critical density there is a second order phase transition into a zigzag structure. An even higher density yields a rich phase space characterized by the formation of multi-layer zigzag structures. The finite size of the lattices in the transverse dimension is a signal of an emerging Fermi sea of quarks. We thus propose that the popcorn transitions indicate the onset of the "quarkyonic" phase of the cold dense nuclear matter.

  11. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  12. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  13. Baryon-baryon mixing in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1998-12-31

    Implications of few-body hypernuclei for the understanding of the baryon-baryon interaction are examined. Octet-octet coupling effects not present in conventional, non strange nuclei are the focus. The need to identify strangeness {minus}2 hypernuclei to test model predictions is emphasized.

  14. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, C. Q.; Hsiao, Y. K.; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. No such type of decay has ever been observed. In particular, we concentrate on the decay Λb0→p p ¯n , which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1 /2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be B (Λb0→p p ¯ n )=(2. 0-0.2+0.3)×10-6 , which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Our study can be extended to other purely baryonic decays such as Λb0→p p ¯ Λ , Λb0→Λ p ¯ Λ , and Λb0→Λ Λ ¯Λ , as well as to similar decays of antitriplet b baryons such as Ξb0 ,-.

  15. Axial-vector transitions and strong decays of the baryon antidecuplet in the self-consistent SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, Tim; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Goeke, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the axial-vector transition constants of the baryon antidecuplet to the octet and decuplet within the framework of the self-consistent SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. Taking into account rotational 1/N{sub c} and linear m{sub s} corrections and using the symmetry-conserving quantization, we calculate the axial-vector transition constants. It is found that the leading-order contributions are generally almost canceled by the rotational 1/N{sub c} corrections. Thus, the m{sub s} corrections turn out to be essential contributions to the axial-vector constants. The decay width of the {theta}{sup +}{yields}NK transition is determined to be {gamma}({theta}{yields}NK)=0.71 MeV, based on the result of the axial-vector transition constant g{sub A}*({theta}{yields}NK)=0.05. In addition, other strong decays of the baryon antidecuplet are investigated. The forbidden decays from the baryon antidecuplet to the decuplet are also studied.

  16. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  17. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  18. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  19. The status of pentaquark baryons

    SciTech Connect

    V.D. Burkert

    2006-06-01

    The status of the search for peritaquark baryon states is reviewed in light of new results from the first two dedicated experiments from CLAS at Jefferson Lab and of new analyses from several labs on the Theta^+(1540). Evidence for and against the heavier pentaquark states, the Xi(1862) and the Theta^0_c(3100) observed at CERN and at HERA, respectively, are also discussed. I conclude that the evidence against the latter two heavier pentaquark baryons is rapidly increasing making their existence highly questionable. I also conclude that the evidence for the Theta^+ state has significantly eroded with the recent CLAS results, and just leaves room for a possible state with an intrinsic width of Gamma < 0.5 MeV. Preliminary new evidence from various experiments will be discussed as well.

  20. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.

  1. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  2. Study of a possible S = + 1 dynamically generated baryonic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Oset, E.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    Starting from the lowest-order chiral Lagrangian for the interaction of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons we find an attractive interaction in the ΔK channel with L = 0 and I = 1, while the interaction is repulsive for I = 2. The attractive interaction leads to a pole in the second Riemann sheet of the complex plane and manifests itself in a large strength of the ΔK scattering amplitude close to the ΔK threshold, which is not the case for I = 2. However, we also make a study of uncertainties in the model and conclude that the existence of this pole depends sensitively upon the input used and can disappear within reasonable variations of the input parameters. We take advantage to study the stability of the other poles obtained for the {{3}/{2}}- dynamically generated resonances of the model and conclude that they are stable and not contingent to reasonable changes in the input of the theory.

  3. Precision Holographic Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Piljin

    2011-10-21

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for {rho} mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  4. Precision Holographic Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Piljin

    2011-10-01

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for ρ mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  5. Charm Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    B-factories Belle and BaBar during its operation made not only measurements connected with B-meson decays but also numerous observation and measurements in charm physics. In particular, their results on charm baryon decays and spectroscopy have enlarged and enriched the current picture of heavy flavour hadrons. In this talk we overview current status of charm baryons and their excited states.

  6. Hybrid baryons [alpha].

    SciTech Connect

    Page, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    The authors review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modeled by both the bag and flux tube models. The low lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2{sup +} with a mass of 1.5 - 1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue rich processes of diffractive {gamma}N and {pi}N production, {Psi} decays and p{bar p} annihilation. We review the current status of research on three quarks with a gluonic excitation, called a hybrid baryon. The excitation is not an orbital or radial excitation between the quarks. Hybrid baryons have also been reviewed elsewhere. The Mercedes-Benz logl in Figure 1 indicates two possible views of the confining interaction of three quarks, an essential issue in the study of hybrid baryons. In the logo the three points where the Y shape meets the boundary circle should be identified with the three quarks. There are two possibilities fo rthe interaction of the quarks: (1) a pairwise interaction of the quarks represented by the circle, or (2) a Y shaped interaction between the quarks, represented by the Y-shape in the logo.

  7. Numerical calculation of radiative corrections to the. beta. energy spectrum of semileptonic decays of light- and charm-quark charged baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez V., A.; Juarez W., S.R. ); Garcia, A. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we calculate, for the {beta} energy spectrum of several semileptonic decays of interest, the numerical values of the radiative correction coefficients of an analytic expression previously obtained. The results can be readily used in a Monte Carlo simulation in an experimental analysis of those decays. We estimate the theoretical uncertainty involved in the analytic expression and show that it remains small even in high-{ital q} decays. Therefore, that expression is valid for charm-baryon semileptonic decays, to a high degree of precision.

  8. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  9. Evidence for an Exotic Baryon State, Theta{sup +}(1540), in Photoproduction Reactions from Protons and Deuterons with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Stepan Stepanyan

    2003-05-01

    CLAS photoproduction data on deuterium and hydrogen targets have been analyzed in a search for an exotic baryon state with strangeness S = +1, the {Theta}{sup +} (originally named the Z{sup +}). This resonance was predicted recently in theoretical work based on the chiral soliton model as a lowest mass member of an anti-decuplet of 5-quark states. The reaction {gamma}d {yields} pK{sup -}K{sup +}n, which requires a final state interaction inside the deuteron, was used in the analysis of deuteron data. In the analysis of proton data, the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}n was studied. Evidence for the {Theta}{sup +} state is found in both analyzes in the invariant mass distribution of the nK{sup +}. Our results are consistent with previously reported results by LEPS/Spring-8 collaboration (Japan), and by the ITEP (Moscow) group.

  10. Baryonic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden-Bell, D. ); Gilmore, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Dark matter, first definitely found in the large clusters of galaxies, is now known to be dominant mass in the outer parts of galaxies. All the mass definitely deduced could be made up of baryons, and this would fit well with the requirements of nucleosynthesis in a big bang of small {Omega}{sub B}. However, if inflation is the explanation of the expansion and large scale homogeneity of the universe and of baryon synthesis, and if the universe did not have an infinite extent at the big bang, then {Omega} should be minutely greater than unity. It is commonly hypothesized that most mass is composed of some unknown, non-baryonic form. This book first discusses the known forms, comets, planets, brown dwarfs, stars, gas, galaxies and Lyman {alpha} clouds in which baryons are known to exist. Limits on the amount of dark matter in baryonic form are discussed in the context of the big bang. Inhomogeneities of the right type alleviate the difficulties associated with {Omega}{sub B} = 1 cosmological nucleosynthesis.

  11. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.« less

  12. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  13. Baryon production at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.; Weiss, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    Measurements of inclusive ..lambda.. + anti ..lambda.. production for 1.0 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 10.0 GeV/c and p + anti p production for 0.4 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 2.0 GeV/c show significant baryon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at E/sub cm/ = 29 GeV. ..lambda.. + anti ..lambda.. production represents 0.2 ..lambda..'s or anti ..lambda..'s per PEP event while the observed p + anti p production implies all baryon-antibaryon pair production is occurring at least as often as 0.6 per event, depending on the yet to be measured p + anti p production at high momentum. Comparisons are made with the first theoretical attempts to account for baryon production at these energies.

  14. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  15. Baryons and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-03-01

    The author presents an idiosyncratic view of baryons which calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD. He advocates a treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of q pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections.

  16. Baryons as Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Sarada Gangadharan

    In this dissertation we study the soliton models of baryons originally proposed by Skyrme. Baryons are interpreted in the naive quark model as bound states of three quarks. Here, we interpret them as solitonic bound states of mesons. This is natural in Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions. The low energy properties of chromodynamics are well accounted for by the chiral model. The Wess-Zumino anomaly plays a crucial role in this model. A derivation within the canonical formulation of the Wess-Zumino is given. It is shown that the anomaly leads to a modification of the current algebra. An operator that creates solitonic states out of the vacuum is constructed. It is shown that this operator is fermionic if the number of colors is odd. The Wess -Zumino anomaly is shown to be responsible for this fact. The anomaly is studied in detail in the simpler context of a two dimensional theory. The operator creating solitons is constructed and its equations of motion are found. This model has an infinite number of conserved charges satisfying a Kac-Moody algebra. A derivation of the Wess-Zumino anomaly starting from Quantum Chromodynamics is given. Further the Skyrme constant is calculated, within certain approximations. This enables us to calculate the mass of the soliton and it agrees with the baryon mass to 20%. The constants D and F that couple the baryons to mesons are also computed. They also agree to about 20%. Thus the identification of baryons as solitons of the chiral model is established.

  17. Baryons in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-15

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8 holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and {rho} mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large N{sub c}, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and {rho}-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the {rho}-meson profile G-tilde(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without {rho} mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and {rho} mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant {rho}-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  18. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  19. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez, F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2006-02-11

    We study the mass spectrum of baryons with two and three charmed quarks. For double charm baryons the spin splitting is found to be smaller than standard quark-model potential predictions. This splitting is not influenced either by the particular form of the confining potential or by the regularization taken for the contact term of the spin-spin potential. We consistently predict the spectra for triply charmed baryons.

  20. Exciting Baryons with MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrick, Michael

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in baryon spectroscopy. In modern experiments all spin degrees of freedom can be exploited in order to determine partial wave amplitudes and resonance parameters. With the Crystal Ball/TAPS detector setup at the energy-tagged photon facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI photoproduction can be studied up to the center-of-mass energy W = 1.9 GeV. Selected results for differential cross sections and transverse target asymmetries in π0, η, and η' production are presented.

  1. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  2. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  3. Decay and spectra of baryons especially beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, C. S.

    1996-06-01

    Masses and decays of the baryons are considered. The entire spectroscopy of baryons containing u,d,s,c and b quarks is calculated using the five quark masses and only four additional parameters describing the potential between the baryons. This potential is taken to be a short-range Coulomb potential together with a long-range linear potential modified by a harmonic-oscillator potential. Decays are studied using the quark pair creation model of Le Yaouanc et. al. The pair strength γ is replaced by kγ . This and the meson radius are the only parameters used in the calculation of the decays. Overall, we have a useful model, employing a small number of parameters, yet capable of yielding a description of the baryons in good accord with experimental data.

  4. Baryon asymmetry and split SUSY

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta

    2005-12-02

    It is one of the greatest mysteries that the baryon asymmetry in our universe is so small. It is argued that it may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum. LHC may prove or falsify our scenario.

  5. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-10-14

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. As a result, energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  6. THE BARYON CONTENT OF COSMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Zagursky, Matthew J. E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu E-mail: mzagursk@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2010-01-01

    We make an inventory of the baryonic and gravitating mass in structures ranging from the smallest galaxies to rich clusters of galaxies. We find that the fraction of baryons converted to stars reaches a maximum between M {sub 500} = 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M {sub sun}, suggesting that star formation is most efficient in bright galaxies in groups. The fraction of baryons detected in all forms deviates monotonically from the cosmic baryon fraction as a function of mass. On the largest scales of clusters, most of the expected baryons are detected, while in the smallest dwarf galaxies, fewer than 1% are detected. Where these missing baryons reside is unclear.

  7. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  8. Holographic baryons from oblate instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozali, Moshe; Stang, Jared B.; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-02-01

    We investigate properties of baryons in a family of holographic field theories related to the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. Starting with the N f = 2 Sakai-Sugimoto model, we truncate to a 5D Yang-Mills action for the gauge fields associated with the noncompact directions of the flavor D8-branes. We define a free parameter γ that controls the strength of this Yang-Mills term relative to the Chern-Simons term that couples the Abelian gauge field to the SU(2) instanton density. Moving away from γ = 0 should incorporate some of the effects of taking the Sakai-Sugimoto model away from large 't Hooft coupling λ. In this case, the baryon ground state corresponds to an oblate SU(2) instanton on the bulk flavor branes: the usual SO(4) symmetric instanton is deformed to spread more along the field theory directions than the radial direction. We numerically construct these anisotropic instanton solutions for various values of γ and calculate the mass and baryon charge profile of the corresponding baryons. Using the value γ = 2.55 that has been found to best fit the mesonic spectrum of QCD, we find a value for the baryon mass of 1.19 GeV, significantly more realistic than the value 1.60 GeV computed previously using an SO(4) symmetric ansatz for the instanton.

  9. Prelude to compressed baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Why study compressed baryonic matter, or more generally strongly interacting matter at high densities and temperatures? Most obviously, because it's an important piece of Nature. The whole universe, in the early moments of the big bang, was filled with the stuff. Today, highly compressed baryonic matter occurs in neutron stars and during crucial moments in the development of supernovae. Also, working to understand compressed baryonic matter gives us new perspectives on ordinary baryonic matter, i.e. the matter in atomic nuclei. But perhaps the best answer is a variation on the one George Mallory gave, when asked why he sought to scale Mount Everest: Because, as a prominent feature in the landscape of physics, it's there. Compressed baryonic matter is a material we can produce in novel, challenging experiments that probe new extremes of temperature and density. On the theoretical side, it is a mathematically well-defined domain with a wealth of novel, challenging problems, as well as wide-ranging connections. Its challenges have already inspired a lot of very clever work, and revealed some wonderful surprises, as documented in this volume.

  10. Supersymmetry across the light and heavy-light hadronic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, Hans Gunter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-10-07

    Relativistic light-front bound-state equations for mesons and baryons can be constructed in the chiral limit from the supercharges of a superconformal algebra which connect baryon and meson spectra. Quark masses break the conformal invariance, but the basic underlying supersymmetric mechanism, which transforms meson and baryon wave functions into each other, still holds and gives remarkable connections across the entire spectrum of light and heavy-light hadrons. As a result, we also briefly examine the consequences of extending the supersymmetric relations to double-heavy mesons and baryons.

  11. 1/Nc Countings in Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity

    2004-05-01

    The 1/N{sub c} power countings for baryon decays and configuration mixings are determined by means of a non-relativistic quark picture. Such countings are expected to be robust as the quark masses are decreased towards the chiral limit. It is shown that excited baryons have natural widths of {Omicron}(N{sub c}{sup 0}). These dominant widths are due to the decays that proceed directly to the ground state baryons, with cascade decays being suppressed to {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}). Configuration mixings, defined as mixings between states belonging to different O(3) x SU(2N{sub f}) multiplets, are shown to be sub-leading in an expansion in 1/{radical}N{sub c}, except for certain mixings between excited multiplets belonging to the mixed-symmetric spin-flavor representation and different O(3) representations, where the mixings are of zeroth order in 1/N{sub c}.

  12. B baryons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, S.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the most recent results concerning B Baryons at CDF, including the study of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup {+-}(*)} observation and properties, and a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime and the observation of new {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay modes. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} bayron is observed through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{Psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{Psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the lifetime 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup _0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. For the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} the mass is measured 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and the lifetime 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. The four new states {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}, and {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} have been observed in 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data, and the masses have been determined, m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}) = 5807.8{sub -2.2}{sup +2.0}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}) = 5815.2 {+-} 1.0(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}) = 5829.0{sub -1.8-1.8}{sup +1.6+1.7}, and m{Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} = 5836.4 {+-} 2.0(stat.){sub -1.7}{sup +1.8}(syst.). CDF has performed a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the displaced vertex trigger 1.401 {+-} 0.046(stat.) {+-} 0.035(syst.), where the main systematic error is due to the uncertainty on the trigger model.

  13. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  14. Deforming baryons into confining strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Portugues, Rubén

    2004-09-01

    We find explicit probe D3-brane solutions in the infrared of the Maldacena-Nuñez background. The solutions describe deformed baryon vertices: q external quarks are separated in spacetime from the remaining N-q. As the separation is taken to infinity we recover known solutions describing infinite confining strings in N=1 gauge theory. We present results for the mass of finite confining strings as a function of length. We also find probe D2-brane solutions in a confining type IIA geometry, the reduction of a G2 holonomy M theory background. The relation between these deformed baryons and confining strings is not as straightforward.

  15. Charmed baryon spectroscopy from CLEO at CESR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Sajjad

    1999-02-17

    Charmed baryon spectroscopy has been unfolding since the discovery of the first charmed baryon in 1975. The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has now established itself as a charmed particle factory. In this report, we present results on charmed baryon production at CESR using the CLEO detector.

  16. Cosmological baryon diffusion and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, James H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-02-01

    The diffusion rate of baryons through the big-bang plasma is calculated. Fluctuations in baryon density in the early Universe lead to inhomogeneities in the neutron-proton ratio, due to the differential diffusion of these particles through the radiation plasma. For certain types of nonlinear fluctuations, some nucleosynthesis would occur in very neutron-rich regions. Nuclear products of homogeneous neutron-enriched regions are evaluated numerically using a standard reaction network and these results are used to estimate final abundances in an inhomogeneous universe. Net deuterium and lithium abundances tend to increase and the net helium abundance tends to decrease compared to an unperturbed standard model. It is suggested that pronounced nonlinear baryon-density fluctuations produced in QCD- or electroweak-epoch phase transitions could alter abundances sufficiently to make a closed baryonic universe consistent with current observations of these elements. In such a model the abundance of heavier elements (C,N,O, etc.) increases significantly and approaches observable levels. Abundances can be used to place constraints on extreme scenarios for phase transitions at these epochs.

  17. Symétries et nomenclature des baryons: Proposition d'une nouvelle nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Gaëtan

    Baryons, such as protons and neutrons, are matter particles made of three quarks. Their current nomenclature is based on the concept of isospin, introduced by Werner Heisenberg in 1932 to explain the similarity between the masses of protons and neutrons, as well as the similarity of their behaviour under the strong interaction. It is a refinement of a nomenclature designed in 1964, before the acceptance of the quark model, for light baryons. A historical review of baryon physics before the advent of the quark model is given to understand the motivations behind the light baryon nomenclature. Then, an overview of the quark model is given to understand the extensions done to this nomenclature in 1986, as well as to understand the physics of baryons and of properties such as isospin and flavour quantum numbers. Since baryon properties are in general explained by the quark model, a nomenclature based on isospin leads to several issues of physics and of clarity. To resolve these issues, the concepts of isospin and mass groups are generalized to all flavours of quarks, the Gell-Mann--Okubo formalism is extended to generalized mass groups, and a baryon nomenclature based on the quark model, reflecting modern knowledge, is proposed.

  18. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This "missing baryon" puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above ∼5 x 10(13)h(-1)(72)M. This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  19. RESOLVING THE BARYON-FRACTION PROFILE IN LENSING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-10-20

    The study of the distribution of baryonic matter within dark halos enriches our understanding of galaxy formation. We show the radial dependence of stellar baryon-fraction curves derived for 21 lensing galaxies from the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey (CASTLES) by means of stellar population synthesis and pixel-based mass reconstruction. The sample covers a stellar mass range of M{sub s} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (solar masses) which corresponds to a total enclosed mass range of M{sub L} {approx_equal} 7 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} on radial scales from 0.25R{sub e} to 5R{sub e} (effective radii). By examining the M{sub s} and M{sub L} dependence on radial distance to the center of each galaxy, we find that there are pairs of lenses on small to intermediate mass scales which approach at large radii the same values for their enclosed total mass but exhibit very different stellar masses and stellar baryon fractions. This peculiar behavior subsides for the most massive lensing galaxies. All the baryon-fraction profiles show that the dark matter halo overtakes the stellar content between 1.5 and 2.5R{sub e}. At 3R{sub e} most of the stellar component is enclosed. We find evidence for a stellar baryon fraction steadily declining over the full mass range. Furthermore, we shed light on the Fundamental Plane puzzle by showing that the slope of the M{sub L} (< R)-to-M{sub s} (< R) relation approaches the mass-to-light relation of recent Fundamental Plane studies at large radii. We also introduce novel concentration indices c = R90/R50 for stellar and total mass profiles (i.e., the ratio of radii enclosing 90% and 50% of the stellar or total mass). We show that the value c = 2.6 originally determined by light profiles which separates early-type galaxies from late-type galaxies also holds for stellar mass. In particular, less massive dark matter halos turn out to be influenced by the distribution of stellar matter on resolved

  20. A NEW WAY OF DETECTING INTERGALACTIC BARYONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lieu, Richard; Duan Lingze

    2013-02-01

    For each photon wave packet of extragalactic light, the dispersion by line-of-sight intergalactic plasma causes an increase in the envelope width and a chirp (drift) in the carrier frequency. It is shown that for continuous emission of many temporally overlapping wave packets with random epoch phases such as quasars in the radio band, this in turn leads to quasi-periodic variations in the intensity of the arriving light on timescales between the coherence time (defined as the reciprocal of the bandwidth of frequency selection, taken here as of order 0.01 GHz for radio observations) and the stretched envelope, with most of the fluctuation power on the latter scale which is typically in the millisecond range for intergalactic dispersion. Thus, by monitoring quasar light curves on such short scales, it should be possible to determine the line-of-sight plasma column along the many directions and distances to the various quasars, affording one a three-dimensional picture of the ionized baryons in the near universe.

  1. On the peculiar momentum of baryons after reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Ho, Shirley

    2009-09-01

    The peculiar motion of ionized baryons is known to introduce temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by means of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. In this work, we present an all-sky computation of angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropies introduced by kSZ momentum of all baryons in the Universe during and after reionization. In an attempt to study the bulk flows of the missing baryons not yet detected, we separately address the contribution from all baryons in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and those baryons located in collapsed structures like groups and clusters of galaxies. In the first case, our approach provides a complete all-sky computation of the kSZ effect in the second order of cosmological perturbation theory [also known as the Ostriker-Vishniac (OV) effect]. Most of the power of the OV effect is generated during reionization, although it has a non-negligible tail at low redshifts, when the bulk of the kSZ peculiar momentum of the halo (cluster + group) population arises. If gas outside haloes is comoving with clusters as the theory predicts, then the signature of the bulk flows of the missing baryons should be recovered by a cross-correlation analysis of future CMB data sets with kSZ estimates in clusters of galaxies. For an Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) or South Pole Telescope (SPT) type of CMB experiment, all-sky kSZ estimates of all clusters above 2 × 1014h-1Msolar should provide a detection of dark flows with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ~23 (S/N ~ 5-11 for 2000-10000 deg2). Improving kSZ estimates with data from Large Scale Structure surveys should enable a deeper confrontation of the theoretical predictions for bulk flows with observations. The combination of future CMB and optical data should shed light on the dark flows of the nearby, so far undetected, diffuse baryons.

  2. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  3. Radiative decays of dynamically generated charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamermann, D.; Jimenez-Tejero, C. E.; Ramos, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the radiative decay of dynamically generated J{sup P}=(1{sup -}/2) charm baryons into the ground state J{sup P}=(1{sup +}/2) baryons. Since different theoretical interpretations of these baryonic resonances and, in particular, of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), give different predictions, a precise experimental measurement of these decays would be an important step for understanding their nature.

  4. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  5. Smallness of baryon asymmetry from split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2005-06-15

    The smallness of the baryon asymmetry in our universe is one of the greatest mysteries and may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum.

  6. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  7. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  8. Energy loss, equilibration, and thermodynamics of a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Ficnar, Andrej; Finazzo, Stefano I.; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Lattice data for the QCD equation of state and the baryon susceptibility near the crossover phase transition (at zero baryon density) are used to determine the input parameters of a 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model that provides a consistent holographic framework to study both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium properties of a hot and baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We compare our holographic equation of state computed at nonzero baryon chemical potential, μ B , with recent lattice calculations and find quantitative agreement for the pressure and the speed of sound for μ B ≤ 400 MeV. This holographic model is used to obtain holographic predictions for the temperature and μ B dependence of the drag force and the Langevin diffusion coefficients associated with heavy quark jet propagation as well as the jet quenching parameter q and the shooting string energy loss of light quarks in the baryon dense plasma. We find that the energy loss of heavy and light quarks generally displays a nontrivial, fast-varying behavior as a function of the temperature near the crossover. Moreover, energy loss is also found to generally increase due to nonzero baryon density effects even though this strongly coupled liquid cannot be described in terms of well defined quasiparticle excitations. Furthermore, to get a glimpse of how thermalization occurs in a hot and baryon dense QGP, we study how the lowest quasinormal mode of an external massless scalar disturbance in the bulk is affected by a nonzero baryon charge. We find that the equilibration time associated with the lowest quasinormal mode decreases in a dense medium.

  9. Cascade ({xi}) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-17

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and {delta}+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two ''massive'' strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and {delta}* resonances to make a conclusive search for the 'Unseen Resonances' of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?.

  10. Cascade (Ξ) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-01

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and Δ+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two "massive" strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and Δ* resonances to make a conclusive search for the "Unseen Resonances" of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?

  11. BRYNTRN: A baryon transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Chun, Sang Y.; Hong, B. S.; Buck, Warren W.; Lamkin, S. L.; Ganapol, Barry D.; Khan, Ferdous; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an interaction data base and a numerical solution to the transport of baryons through an arbitrary shield material based on a straight ahead approximation of the Boltzmann equation are described. The code is most accurate for continuous energy boundary values, but gives reasonable results for discrete spectra at the boundary using even a relatively coarse energy grid (30 points) and large spatial increments (1 cm in H2O). The resulting computer code is self-contained, efficient and ready to use. The code requires only a very small fraction of the computer resources required for Monte Carlo codes.

  12. Exploring Baryons for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    There is on-going research for the detection of WIMP's based on a speculative idea of supersymmetry, which attempts to unify the fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. The detection of WIMP's is expected to find a solution to the issue of dark matter. We continue to hold and support our view of the millennium that gravity is not a fundamental force of Nature. We are therefore exploring baryons as the particles to address the issue of dark matter. We poster present our analyses to support our proposal.

  13. Baryon-Meson Mass Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, S.

    1983-12-01

    It is suggested that the inequality mB>32mM is a rigorous result in quantum chromodynamics. The analog for a (q1...qN) baryon in SU(N) is mB>(12N)mM. The inequality is proved for weak coupling and a version of the strong-coupling expansion where a separation Hq1q2q3=H12+H23+H31 of the problem can be achieved. Implications for quantum chromodynamics and composite models are briefly discussed.

  14. The baryons in the Milky Way satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, O. H.; Eke, V. R.; Frenk, C. S.; Okamoto, T.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of satellite galaxies using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of a Milky Way (MW) like system, focusing on the best resolved examples, analogous to the classical MW satellites. Comparing with a pure dark matter simulation, we find that the condensation of baryons has had a relatively minor effect on the structure of the satellites' dark matter haloes. The stellar mass that forms in each satellite agrees relatively well over three levels of resolution (a factor of ˜64 in particle mass) and scales with (sub)halo mass in a similar way in an independent semi-analytical model. Our model provides a relatively good match to the average luminosity function of the MW and M31. To establish whether the potential wells of our satellites are realistic, we measure their masses within observationally determined half-light radii, finding that they have somewhat higher mass-to-light ratios than those derived for the MW dSphs from stellar kinematic data; the most massive examples are most discrepant. A statistical test yields an ˜6 per cent probability that the simulated and observationally derived distributions of masses are consistent. If the satellite population of the MW is typical, our results could imply that feedback processes not properly captured by our simulations have reduced the central densities of subhaloes, or that they initially formed with lower concentrations, as would be the case, for example, if the dark matter were made of warm, rather than cold particles.

  15. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  16. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  17. Marriage between the baryonic and dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Zurab

    2006-11-01

    The baryonic and dark matter fractions in the universe can be both generated simultaneously and with comparable amounts, if dark matter is constituted by the baryons of the mirror world, a parallel hidden sector with the same microphysics as that of the observable world.

  18. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  19. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  20. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique

    2011-10-24

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  1. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Both the quantum theory and Einsteins theory of special relativity lead to the supposition that matter and antimatter were produced in equal quantities during the big bang. It is noted that local matter/antimatter asymmetries may be reconciled with universal symmetry by assuming (1) a slight imbalance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, annihilation, and a subsequent remainder of matter; (2) localized regions of excess for one or the other type of matter as an initial condition; and (3) an extremely dense, high temperature state with zero net baryon number; i.e., matter/antimatter symmetry. Attention is given to the third assumption, which is the simplest and the most in keeping with current knowledge of the cosmos, especially as pertains the universality of 3 K background radiation. Mechanisms of galaxy formation are discussed, whereby matter and antimatter might have collided and annihilated each other, or have coexisted (and continue to coexist) at vast distances. It is pointed out that baryon symmetric big bang cosmology could probably be proved if an antinucleus could be detected in cosmic radiation.

  2. Measurements of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cassel, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Gambino, D.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, L. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using about 1.5 million hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector, the lifetime of the b baryons has been measured using two independent data samples. From a maximum likelihood fit to the impact parameter distribution of leptons in 519 Λℓ - combinations containing a b baryon sample of 290 decays, the measured b baryon lifetime is τb-baryon = 1.05 -0.11+0.12(stat)±0.09(syst) ps. The lifetime of the Λb0 baryon from a maximum likelihood fit to the proper time distribution of 58 Λc+ℓ - candidates containing a Λb0 sample of 44 decays, is τΛb0 = 1.02 -0.18+0.23(stat) ± 0.06(syst) ps.

  3. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl H.; Morrissey, D.; Sigurdson, K.; Tulin, S.

    2011-11-10

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  4. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-11-01

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  5. Soft RPV through the baryon portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krnjaic, Gordan; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2014-03-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) models with R-parity generically predict sparticle decays with invisible neutralinos, which yield distinctive missing energy events at colliders. Since most LHC searches are designed with this expectation, the putative bounds on sparticle masses become considerably weaker if R-parity is violated so that squarks and gluinos decay to jets with large QCD backgrounds. Here we introduce a scenario in which baryonic R-parity violation (RPV) arises effectively from soft SUSY breaking interactions, but leptonic RPV remains accidentally forbidden to evade constraints from proton decay and FCNCs. The model features a global R-symmetry that initially forbids RPV interactions, a hidden R-breaking sector, and a heavy mediator that communicates this breaking to the visible sector. After R-symmetry breaking, the mediator is integrated out and an effective RPV A-term arises at tree level; RPV couplings between quarks and squarks arise only at loop level and receive additional suppression. Although this mediator must be heavy compared to soft masses, the model introduces no new hierarchy since viable RPV can arise when the mediator mass is near the SUSY breaking scale. In generic regions of parameter space, a light thermally-produced gravitino is stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate.

  6. A Census of Baryons in Galaxy Clusters and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2007-09-01

    We determine the contribution of stars in galaxies, intracluster stars, and the intracluster medium to the total baryon budget in nearby galaxy clusters and groups. We find that the baryon mass fraction (fb≡Ωb/Ωm) within r500 is constant for systems with M500 between 6×1013 and 1×1015 Msolar. Although fb is lower than the WMAP value, the shortfall is on the order of both the observational systematic uncertainties and the depletion of baryons within r500 that is predicted by simulations. The data therefore provide no compelling evidence for undetected baryonic components, particularly any that would be expected to vary in importance with cluster mass. A unique feature of the current analysis is direct inclusion of the contribution of intracluster light (ICL) in the baryon budget. With the addition of the ICL to the stellar mass in galaxies, the increase in X-ray gas mass fraction with increasing total mass is entirely accounted for by a decrease in the total stellar mass fraction, supporting the argument that the behavior of both the stellar and X-ray gas components is dominated by a decrease in star formation efficiency in more massive environments. Within just the stellar component, the fraction of the total stellar luminosity in the central, giant brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and ICL (hereafter the BCG+ICL component) decreases as velocity dispersion (σ) increases for systems with 145 km s-1<=σ<=1026 km s-1, suggesting that the BCG+ICL component, and in particular the dominant ICL component, grows less efficiently in higher mass environments. The degree to which this behavior arises from our sample selection, which favored systems with central, giant elliptical galaxies, remains unclear. A more robust result is the identification of low-mass groups with large BCG+ICL components, demonstrating that the creation of ``intracluster'' stars does not require a massive cluster environment. Within r500 and r200, the BCG+ICL contributes on average 40% and 33% of

  7. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  8. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  9. Beauty Baryons at CDF and DO

    SciTech Connect

    Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2006-11-17

    The results from Tevatron in the baryonic sector are presented. The lifetime of {lambda}b {yields} J/{psi}{lambda}, the observation of hadronic decay of {lambda}b {yields} {lambda}c{pi}, the semileptonic decays of {lambda}b {yields} {lambda}c{mu}{nu}, the hadronization of the b-baryons, and the {lambda}b decays to {lambda}b {yields} p{pi} and {lambda}b {yields} pK are discussed. These measurements paint a nice picture of our understanding of the beauty baryons.

  10. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Preface; Conference prelims; The HI that barked in the night M. J. Disney; The detection of dark galaxies in blind HI surveys J. I. Davies; Red haloes of galaxies - reservoirs of baryonic dark matter? E. Zackrisson, N. Bergvall, C. Flynn, G. Ostlin, G. Micheva and B. Baldwell; Constraints on dark and visible mass in galaxies from strong gravitational lensing S. Dye and S. Warren; Lost baryons at low redshift S. Mathur, F. Nicastro and R. Williams; Observed properties of dark matter on small spatial scales R. Wyse and G. Gilmore; The mass distribution in spiral galaxies P. Salucci; Connecting lost baryons and dark galaxies via QSO absorption lines T. Tripp; ALFALFA: HI cosmology in the local universe R. Giovanelli; The ALFALFA search for (almost) dark galaxies across the HI mass function M. Haynes; HI clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey B. Kent; Cosmic variance in the HI mass function S. Schneider; The Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey - potential for finding dark galaxies and results so far R. Minchin et al.; Free-floating HI clouds in the M81 group E. Brinks, F. Walter and E. Skillman; Where are the stars in dark galaxies J. Rosenberg, J. Salzer and J. Cannon; The halo by halo missing baryon problem S. McGaugh; The local void is really empty R. Tully; Voids in the local volume: a limit on appearance of a galaxy in a dark matter halo A. Tikhonov and A. Klypin; Dim baryons in the cosmic web C. Impey; A census of baryons in galaxy clusters and groups A. Gonzalez, D. Zaritsky and A. Zabludo; Statistical properties of the intercluster light from SDSS image stacking S. Zibetti; QSO strong gravitational lensing and the detection of dark halos A. Maccio; Strong gravitational lensing: bright galaxies and lost dark-matter L. Koopmans; Mapping the distribution of luminous and dark matter in strong lensing galaxies I. Ferreras, P. Saha, L. Williams and S. Burles; Tidal debris posing as dark galaxies P. Duc, F. Bournaud and E. Brinks

  11. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-01

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2 +1 ) -flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130 MeV ≤T ≤300 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0 ≤μB≤400 MeV . Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  12. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan. PMID:26613433

  13. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  14. Meson and Baryon Spectroscopy on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, D. G.

    2010-12-28

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  15. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  16. Doubly charmful baryonic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Tsai, S.-Y.

    2006-04-01

    There are two apparent puzzles connected with the two-body and three-body doubly charmed baryonic B decays. First, earlier calculations based on QCD sum rules or the diquark model predict B(B{sup 0}{yields}{xi}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}){approx_equal}B(B{sup 0}{yields}B{sub c}N), while experimentally the former has a rate 2 orders of magnitude larger than the latter. Second, a naive estimate of the branching ratio O(10{sup -9}) for the color-suppressed three-body decay B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K, which is highly suppressed by phase space, is too small by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the experiment. We show that the great suppression for the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K production can be alleviated provided that there exists a narrow hidden charm bound state with a mass near the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} threshold. This new state that couples strongly to the charmed baryon pair can be searched for in B decays and in pp collisions by studying the mass spectrum of D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)} or {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}. The doubly charmful decay B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} has a configuration more favorable than the singly charmful one such as B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}p since no hard gluon is needed to produce the energetic {xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} pair in the former decay, while two hard gluons are needed for the latter process. Assuming that a soft qq quark pair is produced through the {sigma} and {pi} meson exchanges in the configuration for B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}, it is found that its branching ratio is of order 10{sup -3}, in agreement with the experiment.

  17. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  18. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  19. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  20. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  1. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Calle Cordon, Alvaro C.; DeGrand, Thomas A.; Goity, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc=3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc=3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc=3 LQCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  2. Relativistic Quark-Model Results for Baryon Ground and Resonant States

    SciTech Connect

    Plessas, W.; Melde, T.

    2008-10-13

    Latest results from a study of baryon ground and resonant states within relativistic constituent quark models are reported. After recalling some typical spectral properties, the description of ground states, especially with regard to the nucleon and hyperon electromagnetic structures, is addressed. In the following, recent covariant predictions for pion, eta, and kaon partial decay widths of light and strange baryon resonances below 2 GeV are summarized. These results exhibit a characteristic pattern that is distinct from nonrelativistic or relativized decay studies performed so far. Together with a detailed analysis of the spin, flavor, and spatial structures of the wave functions, it supports a new and extended classification scheme of baryon ground and resonant states into SU(3) flavor multiplets.

  3. Continuum-mediated dark matter-baryon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Andrey; Reece, Matthew; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-06-01

    Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator Oμν that mixes with the hypercharge field strength and couples to dark matter tensor currents, which has an interesting viable parameter space. We describe the effect of such mediators on the cross sections and recoil energy spectra that could be observed in direct detection.

  4. Radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays with the emission of a polarized baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, R.

    2010-07-29

    We present an overview of the calculation of radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. We discuss both charged and neutral decaying baryons, restricted to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Our analysis is specialized to cover two possible scenarios: The center-of-mass frames of the emitted and the decaying baryons. We have accounted for terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum-transfer and M{sup 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  5. Detecting the Baryons in Matter Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Xuelei

    2002-11-01

    We examine power spectra from the Abell/ACO rich cluster survey and the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) for observational evidence of features produced by the baryons. A nonnegligible baryon fraction produces relatively sharp oscillatory features at specific wavenumbers in the matter power spectrum. However, the mere existence of baryons will also produce a global suppression of the power spectrum. We look for both of these features using the false discovery rate statistic. We show that the window effects on the Abell/ACO power spectrum are minimal, which has allowed for the discovery of discrete oscillatory features in the power spectrum. On the other hand, there are no statistically significant oscillatory features in the 2dFGRS power spectrum, which is expected from the survey's broad window function. After accounting for window effects we apply a scale-independent bias to the 2dFGRS power spectrum, PAbell(k)=b2P2dF(k) and b=3.2. We find that the overall shapes of the Abell/ACO and the biased 2dFGRS power spectra are entirely consistent over the range 0.02<=k<=0.15h Mpc-1. We examine the range of Ωmatter and baryon fraction, for which these surveys could detect significant suppression in power. The reported baryon fractions for both the Abell/ACO and 2dFGRS surveys are high enough to cause a detectable suppression in power (after accounting for errors, windows, and k-space sampling). Using the same technique, we also examine, given the best-fit baryon density obtained from big bang nucleosynthesis, whether it is possible to detect additional suppression due to dark matter-baryon interaction. We find that the limit on dark matter cross section/mass derived from these surveys is the same as those ruled out in a recent study by Chen, Hannestad, & Scherrer.

  6. Heavy Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin

    2007-11-14

    A quark model is applied to the spectrum of baryons containing heavy quarks. The model gives masses for the known heavy baryons that are in agreement with experiment, but for the doubly-charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$, the model prediction is too heavy. Mixing between the $\\Xi_Q$ and $\\Xi_Q^\\prime$ states is examined and is found to be small for the lowest lying states. In contrast with this, mixing between the $\\Xi_{bc}$ and $\\Xi_{bc}^\\prime$ states is found to be large, and the implication of this mixing for properties of these states is briefly discussed. We also examine heavy-quark spin-symmetry multiplets, and find that many states in the model can be placed in such multiplets.

  7. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  8. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, J. L.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2007-02-12

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  9. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  10. A measurement of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    In 451 000 hadronic Z 0 decays, recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP, the yields of Λℓ - and Λℓ + combinations are measured. Semileptonic decays of b baryons result in a signal of 122± 18 (stat.) -23+22 (syst.) Λℓ - combinations. From a fit to the impact parameter distributions of the leptons in the Λℓ - sample, the lifetime of b baryons is measured to be 1.12 -0.29+0.32 (stat.) ±0.16 (syst.) ps.

  11. Observational tests of Baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of pi(0)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the amma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed.

  12. Baryon Spectroscopy Results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.

    2010-08-05

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state Lb, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and DOe Collaborations will be presented.

  13. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  14. Meson Production and Baryon Resonances at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Burkert

    2011-02-01

    I give a brief overview of the exploration of baryon properties in meson photo- and electroproduction. These processes provide ample information for the study of electromagnetic couplings of baryon resonances and to search for states, yet to be discovered. The CLAS detector, combined with the use of energy-tagged polarized photons and polarized electrons, as well as polarized targets and the measurement of recoil polarization, provide the tools for a comprehensive nucleon resonance program. I briefly present the status of this program, prospects for the next few years, and plans for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade.

  15. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Konstantinos Orginos, Aaron Torok, Silas R Beane, Thomas C Luu, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-04-01

    The $\\pi^+\\Sigma^+$, $\\pi^+\\Xi^0$ , $K^+p$, $K^+n$, and $K^0 \\Xi^0$ scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find $a_{\\pi^+\\Sigma^+} = ?0.197 ± 0.017$ fm, and $a_{\\pi^+\\Xi^0} = ?0.098 0.017$ fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  16. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  17. Baryons in the relativistic jets of the stellar-mass black-hole candidate 4U 1630-47.

    PubMed

    Trigo, María Díaz; Miller-Jones, James C A; Migliari, Simone; Broderick, Jess W; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2013-12-12

    Accreting black holes are known to power relativistic jets, both in stellar-mass binary systems and at the centres of galaxies. The power carried away by the jets, and, hence, the feedback they provide to their surroundings, depends strongly on their composition. Jets containing a baryonic component should carry significantly more energy than electron-positron jets. Energetic considerations and circular-polarization measurements have provided conflicting circumstantial evidence for the presence or absence of baryons in jets, and the only system in which they have been unequivocally detected is the peculiar X-ray binary SS 433 (refs 4, 5). Here we report the detection of Doppler-shifted X-ray emission lines from a more typical black-hole candidate X-ray binary, 4U 1630-47, coincident with the reappearance of radio emission from the jets of the source. We argue that these lines arise from baryonic matter in a jet travelling at approximately two-thirds the speed of light, thereby establishing the presence of baryons in the jet. Such baryonic jets are more likely to be powered by the accretion disk than by the spin of the black hole, and if the baryons can be accelerated to relativistic speeds, the jets should be strong sources of γ-rays and neutrino emission. PMID:24226774

  18. Negative-parity {Lambda}{sub Q} baryons in the baryon-meson continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto; Shimizu, Kiyotaka

    2011-10-21

    The negative-parity charmed baryons are investigated by employing the quark model as well as the effective baryon meson model with a bound state embedded in the continuum. Especially the mass difference between the J{sup P} 1/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons is discussed. The observed value of this mass splitting is almost the same as that of {Xi}{sub c}, about 30 MeV. It is found that most of this splitting can be reproduced by assuming a simple qqQ configuration. The coupling to the baryon-meson scattering state may enlarge the splitting as it does for the {Lambda}(1405)(1/2{sup -}) and {Lambda}(1520)(3/2{sup -}) case. We investigate this coupling effect and find that with an appropriately modified coupling or the pole energy, the peak can be reproduced.

  19. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  20. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  1. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  2. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  3. Baryons, neutrinos, feedback and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OverWhelmingly Large hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for z < 1.5, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than 2 per cent for scales k < 10 h Mpc-1 and better than 5 per cent for 10 < k < 100 h Mpc-1. Equipped with this precise tool, this paper presents the first constraint on baryonic feedback models using gravitational lensing data, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In this analysis, we show that the effect of neutrino mass on the mass power spectrum is degenerate with the baryonic feedback at small angular scales and cannot be ignored. Assuming a cosmology precision fixed by WMAP9, we find that a universe with massless neutrinos is rejected by the CFHTLenS lensing data with 85-98 per cent confidence, depending on the baryon feedback model. Some combinations of feedback and non-zero neutrino masses are also disfavoured by the data, although it is not yet possible to isolate a unique neutrino mass and feedback model. Our study shows that ongoing weak gravitational lensing surveys (KiDS, HSC and DES) will offer a unique opportunity to probe the physics of baryons at galactic scales, in

  4. Strange Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Satoshi N.

    2014-04-01

    "Strange" means 1) unusual or surprising, especially in a way that is difficult to explain or understand or 2) having strangeness degree of freedom. Light nuclear systems with strangeness, light hypernuclei, are perfect playground to study baryon force which would be a bridge between well established nuclear force in low energy region and QCD, the first principle of the strong interaction. Overview of study of light hypernuclei is given and recent experimental findings are reviewed.

  5. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  6. The XXL Survey. XIII. Baryon content of the bright cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Coupon, J.; Gastaldello, F.; Pierre, M.; Melin, J.-B.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; McCarthy, I. G.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Faccioli, L.; Giles, P.; Lavoie, S.; Lefèvre, J. P.; Lieu, M.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B.; McGee, S.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Sadibekova, T.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction Ωb/ Ωm. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. Since it spans a wide range of mass (1013-1015 M⊙) and redshift (0.05-1.1) and benefits from a large set of multiwavelength data, the XXL-100-GC sample is ideal for measuring the global baryon budget of massive halos. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass-temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads fgas,500 = 0.055-0.006+0.007(M500/1014 M⊙)0.21-0.10+0.11. The baryon budget of galaxy clusters therefore falls short of the Universal baryon fraction by about a factor of two at r500,MT. Our measurements require a hydrostatic bias 1-b = MX/MWL = 0.72-0.07+0.08 to match the gas fraction obtained using lensing and hydrostatic equilibrium, which holds independently of the instrument considered. Comparing our gas fraction measurements with the expectations from numerical simulations, we find that our results favour an extreme feedback scheme in which a significant fraction of the baryons are expelled from the cores of halos. This model is, however, in contrast with the thermodynamical properties of observed halos, which might suggest that weak-lensing masses are overestimated. In light of these results, we note that a mass bias 1-b = 0.58 as required to reconcile Planck

  7. Multiquark baryons and color screening at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoroku, Kazuo; Ishihara, Masafumi; Nakamura, Akihiro; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    2009-03-15

    We study baryons in SU(N) gauge theories at finite temperature according to the gauge/string correspondence based on IIB string theory. The baryon is constructed out of the D5-brane and N fundamental strings to form a color singlet N-quark bound state. At finite temperature and in the deconfining phase, we could find k(baryons. Thermal properties of such k-quark baryons and also of the N-quark baryon are examined. We study the temperature dependence of color screening distance and the Debye length of the baryon of the k quark and the N quark. We also estimate the melting temperature, where the baryons decay into quarks and gluons completely.

  8. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called “dark energy.” To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 109 individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

  9. Baryon acoustic oscillation intensity mapping of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The expansion of the Universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious antigravity agent of this acceleration has been called "dark energy." To measure the dynamics of dark energy, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as 10(9) individual galaxies, by observing the 21 cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three-dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy. PMID:18352692

  10. Baryon Spectroscopy and Operator Construction in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; I. Sato; S. Wallace; R. Edwards; D. Richards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U. Heller; C. Morningstar

    2004-07-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances. I will describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons, and enable comparison both with experiment, and with QCD-inspired pictures of hadron structure, such as calculations in the limit of large N{sub c}.

  11. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  12. New Exotic Meson and Baryon Resonances from Doubly Heavy Hadronic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L

    2015-09-18

    We predict several new exotic doubly heavy hadronic resonances, inferring from the observed exotic bottomoniumlike and charmoniumlike narrow states X(3872), Z_{b}(10610), Z_{b}(10650), Z_{c}(3900), and Z_{c}(4020/4025). We interpret the binding mechanism as mostly molecularlike isospin-exchange attraction between two heavy-light mesons in a relative S-wave state. We then generalize it to other systems containing two heavy hadrons which can couple through isospin exchange. The new predicted states include resonances in meson-meson, meson-baryon, baryon-baryon, and baryon-antibaryon channels. These include those giving rise to final states involving a heavy quark Q=c,b and antiquark Q[over ¯]^{'}=c[over ¯],b[over ¯], namely, DD[over ¯]^{*}, D^{*}D[over ¯]^{*}, D^{*}B^{*}, B[over ¯]B^{*}, B[over ¯]^{*}B^{*}, Σ_{c}D[over ¯]^{*}, Σ_{c}B^{*}, Σ_{b}D[over ¯]^{*}, Σ_{b}B^{*}, Σ_{c}Σ[over ¯]_{c}, Σ_{c}Λ[over ¯]_{c}, Σ_{c}Λ[over ¯]_{b}, Σ_{b}Σ[over ¯]_{b}, Σ_{b}Λ[over ¯]_{b}, and Σ_{b}Λ[over ¯]_{c}, as well as corresponding S-wave states giving rise to QQ^{'} or Q[over ¯]Q[over ¯]^{'}. PMID:26430989

  13. Cosmological baryon and lepton number in the presence of electroweak fermion-number violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    In the presence of rapid fermion-number violation due to nonperturbative electroweak effects certain relations between the baryon number of the Universe and the lepton numbers of the Universe are predicted. In some cases the electron-neutrino asymmetry is exactly specified in terms of the baryon asymmetry. Without introducing new particles, beyond the usual quarks and leptons, it is necessary that the Universe possess a nonzero value of B - L prior to the epoch of fermion-number violation if baryon and lepton asymmetries are to survive. Contrary to intuition, even though electroweak processes violate B + L, a nonzero value of B + L persists after the epoch of rapid fermion-number violation. If the standard model is extended to include lepton-number violation, for example through Majorana neutrino masses, then electroweak processes will reduce the baryon number to zero even in the presence of an initial B - L unless 20 M(sub L) approximately greater than the square root of (T(sub B - L) m(sub P1)) where M(sub L) sets the scale of lepton number violation and T(sub B - L) is the temperature at which a B - L asymmetry is produced. In many models this implies that neutrinos must be so light that they cannot contribute appreciably to the mass density of the Universe.

  14. Neutrino physics with dark matter experiments and the signature of new baryonic neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Pospelov, Maxim

    2011-10-15

    New neutrino states {nu}{sub b}, sterile under the standard model interactions, can be coupled to baryons via the isoscalar vector currents that are much stronger than the standard model weak interactions. If some fraction of solar neutrinos oscillate into {nu}{sub b} on their way to Earth, the coherently enhanced elastic {nu}{sub b}-nucleus scattering can generate a strong signal in the dark matter detectors. For the interaction strength a few hundred times stronger than the weak force, the elastic {nu}{sub b}-nucleus scattering via new baryonic currents may account for the existing anomalies in the direct detection dark matter experiments at low recoil. We point out that for solar-neutrino energies, the baryon-current-induced inelastic scattering is suppressed, so that the possible enhancement of a new force is not in conflict with signals at dedicated neutrino detectors. We check this explicitly by calculating the {nu}{sub b}-induced deuteron breakup, and the excitation of a 4.4 MeV {gamma} line in {sup 12}C. A stronger-than-weak force coupled to the baryonic current implies the existence of a new Abelian gauge group U(1){sub B} with a relatively light gauge boson.

  15. Neutrino physics with dark matter experiments and the signature of new baryonic neutral currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelov, Maxim

    2011-10-01

    New neutrino states νb, sterile under the standard model interactions, can be coupled to baryons via the isoscalar vector currents that are much stronger than the standard model weak interactions. If some fraction of solar neutrinos oscillate into νb on their way to Earth, the coherently enhanced elastic νb-nucleus scattering can generate a strong signal in the dark matter detectors. For the interaction strength a few hundred times stronger than the weak force, the elastic νb-nucleus scattering via new baryonic currents may account for the existing anomalies in the direct detection dark matter experiments at low recoil. We point out that for solar-neutrino energies, the baryon-current-induced inelastic scattering is suppressed, so that the possible enhancement of a new force is not in conflict with signals at dedicated neutrino detectors. We check this explicitly by calculating the νb-induced deuteron breakup, and the excitation of a 4.4 MeV γ line in C12. A stronger-than-weak force coupled to the baryonic current implies the existence of a new Abelian gauge group U(1)B with a relatively light gauge boson.

  16. Numerical precision radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of light and heavy quark unpolarized baryon semileptonic decays: The cases {xi}{sup 0}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}e{nu} and {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{yields}{lambda}e{sup +}{nu}

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Torres, J.J.; Neri, M.; Martinez, A.; Garcia, A.

    2005-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical use for our previous precision results for the radiative corrections to unpolarized spin one-half baryon semileptonic decays, which is not compromised to fixing the form factors at prescribed values. We present various cross-checks and comparisons with other results available in the literature of such analytical radiative corrections. Our analysis, however, is general and applies to all charge assignments to the baryons allowed by heavy quarks. The procedure is exemplified with the processes {xi}{sup 0}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}e{nu} and {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{yields}{lambda}e{sup +}{nu}.

  17. THE BARYON CENSUS IN A MULTIPHASE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: 30% OF THE BARYONS MAY STILL BE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton D. E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain {approx}10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Ly{alpha} forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 10{sup 5-6} K traced by O VI {lambda}1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun }) and ionization fractions (f {sub HI}, f {sub OVI}). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z {sub Sun })f {sub OVI} Almost-Equal-To (0.015)(N {sub OVI}/10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.70}, with an N {sub OVI}-weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Ly{alpha} forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z){sup 3} increase in absorber density, the (1 + z){sup 4.4} rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Ly{alpha} forest (28% {+-} 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Ly{alpha} absorbers (25% {+-} 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% {+-} 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% {+-} 13%. Our simulations suggest that {approx}15% reside in hotter WHIM (T {>=} 10{sup 6} K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Ly{alpha} and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N {sub HI} {>=} 10{sup 12.0} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVI} {>=} 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVII} {>=} 10{sup 14.5} cm{sup -2}, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  18. Baryon resonances in large Nc QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2015-01-01

    The current status and open challenges of large Nc QCD baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. After introducing the 1 /Nc expansion method, the latest achievements for the ground state properties are revisited. Next the applicability of this method to excited states is presented using two different approaches with their advantages and disadvantages. Selected results for the spectrum and strong and electromagnetic decays are described. Also further developments for the applicability of the method to excited states are presented, based on the qualitative compatibility between the quark excitation picture and the meson-nucleon scattering picture. A quantitative comparison between results obtained from the mass formula of the 1 /Nc expansion method and quark models brings convincing support to quark models and the implications of different large Nc limits are discussed. The SU(6) spin-flavor structure of the large Nc baryon allows a convenient classification of highly excited resonances into SU(3) multiplets and predicts mass ranges for the missing partners.

  19. An Unquenched Quark Model of Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2007-10-26

    We present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The present approach is an extension of the fiux-tube breaking model of Geiger and Isgur in which now the contribution of quark-antiquark pairs can be studied for any inital baryon, for any fiavor of the qq-bar pair (not only ss-bar but also uu-bar and dd-bar) and for arbitrary hadron wave functions. The method is illustrated with an application to the spin of the proton and the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea.

  20. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  1. The Missing Baryons Around Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2013-10-01

    Dwarf galaxies are missing nearly all of their baryons, which have presumably flowed away as a wind. This mass loss accounts for a significant fraction of all baryons lost from galaxies, so there is great interest in determining the size and scope of the gas lost. This gas is not visible in emission but is detectable through absorption features toward background AGNs. Here we propose to observe the absorbing material around three isolated dwarfs on the periphery of the Local Group: Sextans A, Sextans B, and NGC 3109. Unlike more distant dwarfs, the star formation history and cold gaseous content of these galaxies are well-studied. The isolation of these dwarfs, far from large galaxies, means that they have not yet interacted with other systems so their mass loss history is well-preserved, making them ideal targets for study.

  2. Chiral dynamics of S -wave baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Bingwei

    2016-07-01

    As the pion mass approaches a critical value mπ⋆ from below, an S -wave resonance crosses the pion-baryon threshold and becomes a bound state with arbitrarily small binding energy, thus driving the scattering length to diverge. I explore the consequences of chiral symmetry for the values of mπ close to mπ⋆. It turns out that chiral symmetry is crucial for an S -wave resonance to be able to stand very near the threshold and in the meantime to remain narrow, provided that the mass splitting is reasonably small. The effective range of pion-baryon scattering is unexpectedly large, proportional to 4 π fπ2/mπ3 when mπ is around mπ⋆. As a result, this unexpected large length scale causes universality relations to break down much sooner than naively expected.

  3. Compressed baryonic matter at FAIR: JINR participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Malakhov, A.; Senger, P.

    2015-11-01

    The scientific mission of the Compressed Baryonic Matter(CBM) experiment is the study of the nuclear matter properties at the high baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. We present the results on JINR participation in the CBM experiment. JINR teams are responsible on the design, the coordination of superconducting(SC) magnet manufacture, its testing and installation in CBM cave. Together with Silicon Tracker System it will provide the momentum resolution better 1% for different configuration of CBM setup. The characteristics and technical aspects of the magnet are discussed. JINR plays also a significant role in the manufacture of two straw tracker station for the muon detection system. JINR team takes part in the development of new method for simulation, processing and analysis experimental data for different basic detectors of CBM.

  4. Observational tests of baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of Pi(O)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the gamma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10996

  5. New Results on Baryon Spectroscopy from MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Sven

    2010-08-05

    An overview of the MAMI-C electron accelerator facility (E{sub 0} = 1.6 GeV) and the experimental setups of the A1 and A2 collaborations for electro- and photoproduction reactions is given. Several experimental results and their interpretations for baryon spectroscopy are discussed. The topics presented here are the beam-helicity asymmetry I{center_dot} for {pi}{pi} photoproduction in the second resonance region, the photoproduction of {pi}{sup 0{eta}} up to beam energies of {omega} = 1.4 GeV as a way to study the {Delta}(1700)D{sub 33} baryon, and polarisation observables in h electro- and photoproduction in order to investigate an unexpected s-d-wave phase shift and its possible implications for the nature of the S{sub 11}(1535) resonance.

  6. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  7. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  8. Relativistic spin effects in the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Garcilazo, Humberto

    2005-04-01

    We study the nonstrange baryon spectrum within a three-body theory that treats relativistically both the space and the spin variables. The relativistic effects of the spin are about one order of magnitude smaller than those due to the use of relativistic momentum variables. The relativistic treatment of the spin breaks the degenerancy that is present in the nonrelativistic model and in the model with only relativistic momentum variables.

  9. Recent results on baryon production at PETRA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the recent excitements at PETRA is the observation of the copious production of baryons. About a year ago, TASSO observed the inclusive production of protons and antiprotons. More recently JADE confirmed the inclusive antiproton spectrum to about 1 GeV/c and also observed the inclusive anti ..lambda.. spectrum to about 1.4 GeV/c, while TASSO obtained the ..lambda.. and anti-..lambda.. spectrum all the way up 10 GeV/c in momentum.

  10. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  11. Baryon currents in QCD with compact dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.

    2007-06-15

    On a compact space with nontrivial cycles, for sufficiently small values of the radii of the compact dimensions, SU(N) gauge theories coupled with fermions in the fundamental representation spontaneously break charge conjugation, time reversal, and parity. We show at one loop in perturbation theory that a physical signature for this phenomenon is a nonzero baryonic current wrapping around the compact directions. The persistence of this current beyond the perturbative regime is checked by lattice simulations.

  12. Kinematics of Baryons Cycling Through Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2015-01-01

    In a modern view of galaxy evolution, the baryon cycle is key to understanding the observed global properties of galaxies. Red galaxies passively evolve due to quenching of their star formation, whereas blue galaxies actively evolve, presumably due to a replenishing gas supply. Signatures of the baryon cycle such as IGM accretion, minor mergers, and stellar-driven outflows and fountains are best probed in gaseous halos, i.e., the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We study the spatial and kinematic distribution of the low-ionization metal-enriched CGM with QSO absorption lines for a population of 182 galaxies in the MgII Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT). We present our findings detailing how the extent and patchiness of the CGM depends on MgII absorption strength, and galaxy luminosity and color. For the first time, we placed the kinematics of 39 MgII absorbers with high-resolution spectra in the context of their host galaxy color, redshift, and orientation. By examining the velocity dispersions of absorbers, we find possible effects of quenching on red galaxies where the velocity dispersions decrease over 2 Gyrs time and are smaller at larger radii. The velocity dispersions for blue galaxies remain constant over time and radius and possibly indicate a sustained flow of baryons feeding star formation. Blue, face-on galaxies probed along the minor axis show the largest velocity dispersions to very high significance. This result provides the strongest direct evidence to date for galactic-scale outflows which, for this orientation, are pointing nearly towards the observer. We discuss how our results place observational constraints on simulations which are just now beginning to accurately model the baryon cycle and its role in galaxy evolution.

  13. Where Are the ``Missing'' Galactic Baryons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer-Larsen, Jesper

    2006-06-01

    Based on 19 high-resolution N-body/gasdynamical galaxy formation simulations in the ΛCDM cosmology, it is shown that for a galaxy like the Milky Way, in addition to the baryonic mass of the galaxy itself, about 70% extra baryonic mass should reside around the galaxy (inside of the virial radius), chiefly in the form of hot gas. Averaging over the entire field galaxy population, this ``external'' component amounts to 64%-85% of the baryonic mass of the population itself. These results are supported by the recent detection of very extended, soft X-ray emission from the halo of the quiescent, massive disk galaxy NGC 5746. Some of the hot gas may, by thermal instability, have condensed into mainly pressure-supported, warm clouds, similar to the Galactic high-velocity clouds (HVCs). Based on an ultra-high-resolution cosmological test simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy (with a gas particle mass and gravity softening length of only 7.6×103 h-1 Msolar and 83 h-1 pc, respectively), it is argued that the hot gas phase dominates over the warm gas phase, in the halo. Finally, an origin of HVCs as ``leftovers'' from filamentary, ``cold'' accretion events, mainly occurring early in the history of galaxies, is proposed.

  14. Charming Mesons with Baryons and Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura

    2013-11-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in nuclear matter and nuclei are reviewed. Different frameworks are discussed paying a special attention to unitarized coupled-channel approaches which incorporate heavy-quark spin symmetry. Several charmed baryon states with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. These states are compared to experimental data. Moreover, the properties of open-charm mesons in matter are analyzed. The in-medium solution accounts for Pauli blocking effects, and for the meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. The behavior in the nuclear medium of the rich spectrum of dynamically-generated baryon states is studied as well as their influence in the self-energy and, hence, the spectral function of open charm. The possible experimental signatures of the in-medium properties of open charm are finally addressed, such as the formation of charmed nuclei, in connection with the future FAIR facility.

  15. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  16. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  17. Decay widths of ground-state and excited {Xi}{sub b} baryons in a nonrelativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Limphirat, Ayut; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Suebka, Prasart; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-11-15

    Decay processes of ground and excited bottom baryons are studied in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} nonrelativistic quark model with all model parameters fixed in the sector of light quarks. Using as an input the recent mass of {Xi}{sub b} and the theoretical masses of {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}, narrow decay widths are predicted for the ground-state bottom baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}. The work predicts large decay widths, about 100 MeV for the {rho}-type orbital excitation states of {Xi}{sub b}.

  18. Marriage à-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-05-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology—a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies—a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the X-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gas dynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is not so abundant, and is not expected in galaxies; it is thus not subject to constraints on baryonic DM in galaxies. The mass in CBDM required in a whole cluster is, typically, similar to that in hot gas, but is rather more centrally concentrated, totally dominating the core. The CBDM contribution to the baryon budget in the universe is thus small. Its properties, deduced for isolated clusters, are consistent with the observations of the "bullet cluster". Its kinetic energy reservoir is much larger than that of the hot gas in the core, and would suffice to keep the gas hot for many cooling times. Heating can be effected in various ways depending on the exact nature of the CBDM, from very massive black holes to cool, compact gas clouds.

  19. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  20. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc‑1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc‑1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  1. STOPPING AND BARYON TRANSPORT IN HEAVY ION REACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK, F.

    2005-02-05

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  2. Baryon stability on the Higgs dissolution edge: threshold corrections and suppression of baryon violation in the NMSGUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulakh, Charanjit S.; Garg, Ila; Khosa, Charanjit K.

    2014-05-01

    Superheavy threshold corrections to the matching condition between matter Yukawa couplings of the effective Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the New Minimal Supersymmetric (SO(10)) GUT (NMSGUT) provide a novel and generic mechanism for reducing the long standing and generically problematic operator dimension 5 baryon decay rates. In suitable regions of the parameter space strong wave function renormalization of the effective MSSM Higgs doublets due to the large number of heavy fields can take the wave function renormalization of the MSSM Higgs field close to the dissolution value (ZH,Hbar=0). Rescaling to canonical kinetic terms lowers the SO(10) Yukawas required to match the MSSM fermion data. Since the same Yukawas determine the dimension 5 B violation operator coefficients, the associated rates can be suppressed to levels compatible with current limits. Including these threshold effects also relaxes the constraint yb-yτ≃ys-yμ operative between 10-120-plet generated tree level MSSM matter fermion Yukawas yf. We exhibit accurate fits of the MSSM fermion mass-mixing data in terms of NMSGUT superpotential couplings and 5 independent soft Susy breaking parameters specified at 1016.25 GeV with the claimed suppression of baryon decay rates. As before, our s-spectra are of the mini split supersymmetry type with large |A0|,μ,mH,Hbar>100 TeV, light gauginos and normal s-hierarchy. Large A0,μ and soft masses allow significant deviation from the canonical GUT gaugino mass ratios and ensure vacuum safety. Even without optimization, prominent candidates for BSM discovery such as the muon magnetic anomaly, b→sγ and leptogenesis CP violation emerge in the preferred ball park.

  3. Freeze-out parameters from electric charge and baryon number fluctuations: is there consistency?

    PubMed

    Borsanyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Ratti, C; Szabo, K K

    2014-08-01

    Recent results for moments of multiplicity distributions of net protons and net-electric charge from the STAR Collaboration are compared to lattice QCD results for higher order fluctuations of baryon number and electric charge by the Wuppertal-Budapest Collaboration, with the purpose of extracting the freeze-out temperature and chemical potential. All lattice simulations are performed for a system of 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, at the physical mass for light and strange quarks; all results are continuum extrapolated. We show that it is possible to extract an upper value for the freeze-out temperature, as well as precise baryochemical potential values corresponding to the four highest collision energies of the experimental beam energy scan. Consistency between the freeze-out parameters obtained from baryon number and electric charge fluctuations is found. The freeze-out chemical potentials are now in agreement with the statistical hadronization model. PMID:25126910

  4. B baryons at D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Ratoff, Peter Neil; /Lancaster U.

    2009-01-01

    The observation of the b baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} in high energy proton-antiproton collisions in the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider are presented, along with measurements of the masses and production rates of these states. Within the standard model a total of 15 b baryons are predicted (counting quark content only). Taking into consideration intrinsic angular momentum, there are 10 charmless b baryons in J=1/2 and J=3/2 muliplets. These states are unique to hadron colliders since the B factories operate at insufficient energy to produce them, and they are expected to be produced copiously at the Tevatron. There are interesting mass predictions for these states from various theoretical models but the experimental challenge to observe them is very substantial. At the start of Tevatron Run II ({approx}2003) only the {Lambda}{sub b} had been observed (first by the UA1 collaboration in 1991). However, in the past three years at the Tevatron, another four of the predicted J=1/2 states containing just one b quark have been observed. The {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +} (uub) and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -} (ddb) were recorded by the CDF collaboration in the {Sigma}{sub b} {yields} {pi}{Lambda}{sub c} {pi} ({Lambda}{sub c} {pi}) channel while at D-Zero the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} (bds) and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} (bss) states were observed. The measurements leading to the identification of the latter two states are the subject of the remainder of this presentation.

  5. Non-baryonic dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is based on lectures given at the IX Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures (as the paper) were a broad-band review of the current status of non-baryonic dark matter research. I start with a historical overview of the evidences of dark matter existence, then I discuss how dark matter is distributed from small scale to large scale, and I then verge the attention to dark matter nature: dark matter candidates and their detection. I finally discuss some of the limits of the ΛCDM model, with particular emphasis on the small scale problems of the paradigm.

  6. Time delay plots of unflavoured baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.; Khemchandani, K. P.; Jain, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    We explore the usefulness of the existing relations between the S-matrix and time delay in characterizing baryon resonances in pion-nucleon scattering. We draw attention to the fact that the existence of a positive maximum in time delay is a necessary criterion for the existence of a resonance and should be used as a constraint in conventional analyses which locate resonances from poles of the S-matrix and Argand diagrams. The usefulness of the time delay plots of resonances is demonstrated through a detailed analysis of the time delay in several partial waves of πN elastic scattering.

  7. Baryon number violation via Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We propose and investigate a novel, minimal, and experimentally testable framework for baryo- genesis, dubbed dexiogenesis, using baryon number violating effective interactions of right-handed Majorana neutrinos responsible for the seesaw mechanism. The distinct LHC signature of our framework is same-sign top quark final states, possibly originating from displaced vertices. The region of parameters relevant for LHC phenomenology can also yield concomitant signals in nucleon decay experiments. We provide a simple ultraviolet origin for our effective operators, by adding a color-triplet scalar, which could ultimately arise from a grand unified theory.

  8. Synthesis of baryons from unconfined quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Pati, J.C.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1980-02-15

    We calculate, for a number of cases, the cosmic temperature at which primordial quarks condense into baryons, within a field theory of partially confined quarks that enjoys temporary asymptotic freedom. We assume that the mass of a quark in a dense quark-antiquark medium is a monotonic function of the medium: that is, we assume the validity of the so-called ''Archimedes effect.'' We show that, within such models, unbound-quark lifetimes are larger than the age of the universe at the time of the transition.

  9. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Peter

    Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At top RHIC and LHC energies, the QCD phase diagram is studied at very high temperatures and very low net-baryon densities. These conditions presumably existed in the early universe about a microsecond after the big bang. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure such as a critical point, a first order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter, or new phases like quarkyonic matter. The experimental discovery of these prominent landmarks of the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific pillars of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at neutron star core densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure rare diagnostic probes such as multi-strange hyperons, charmed particles and vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs with unprecedented precision and statistics. Most of these particles will be studied for the first time in the FAIR energy range. In order to achieve the required precision, the measurements will be performed at very high reaction rates of 100 kHz to 10 MHz. This requires very fast and radiation-hard detectors, and a novel data read-out and analysis concept based on free streaming front-end electronics and a high-performance computing cluster for online event selection. The layout, the physics performance, and the status of the proposed CBM experimental

  10. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  11. Universal fitting formulae for baryon oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Parkinson, David; Bassett, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Kunz, Martin; Nichol, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of galaxy surveys will attempt to measure the baryon oscillations in the clustering power spectrum with high accuracy. These oscillations encode a preferred scale which may be used as a standard ruler to constrain cosmological parameters and dark energy models. In this paper we present simple analytical fitting formulae for the accuracy with which the preferred scale may be determined in the tangential and radial directions by future spectroscopic and photometric galaxy redshift surveys. We express these accuracies as a function of survey parameters such as the central redshift, volume, galaxy number density and (where applicable) photometric redshift error. These fitting formulae should greatly increase the efficiency of optimizing future surveys, which requires analysis of a potentially vast number of survey configurations and cosmological models. The formulae are calibrated using a grid of Monte Carlo simulations, which are analysed by dividing out the overall shape of the power spectrum before fitting a simple decaying sinusoid to the oscillations. The fitting formulae reproduce the simulation results with a fractional scatter of 7 per cent (10 per cent) in the tangential (radial) directions over a wide range of input parameters. We also indicate how sparse-sampling strategies may enhance the effective survey area if the sampling scale is much smaller than the projected baryon oscillation scale.

  12. Baryogenesis from baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, J. P.; Volkas, R. R.

    1997-03-01

    In the following work we consider the possibility of explaining the observed baryon-number asymmetry in the universe from simple baryon-number-violating modifications, involving massive scalar bosons, to the standard model. In these cases baryon-number violation is mediated through a combination of Yukawa and scalar self-coupling interactions. Starting with a previously compiled catalogue of baryon-number-violating extensions of the standard model, we identify the minimal subsets which can induce a B-L asymmetry and thus be immune to sphaleron washout. For each of these models, we identify the region of parameter space that leads to the production of a baryon number asymmetry of the correct order of magnitude.

  13. Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-09-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  14. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-05-05

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = 3877.9 {+-} 6.9 {+-} 9.2 {+-} 3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of {delta}E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} - 2M{sub {Xi}{sup 0}} - M{sub n} = 4.6 {+-} 5.0 {+-} 7.9 {+-} 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  15. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Walker-Loud, Will Detmold, William Detmold, Aaron Torok, Konstantinos Orginos, Silas Beane, Tom Luu, Martin Savage, Assumpta Parreno

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the $\\Xi^0\\Xi^0 n$ system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}= 3877.9\\pm 6.9\\pm 9.2\\pm3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of \\delta E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}=E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}-2M_{\\Xi^0} -M_n=4.6\\pm 5.0\\pm 7.9\\pm 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  16. Limits to the primordial helium abundance in the baryon-inhomogeneous big bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Schramm, D. N.; Meyer, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The parameter space for baryon inhomogeneous big bang models is explored with the goal of determining the minimum helium abundance obtainable in such models while still satisfying the other light-element constraints. We find that the constraint of (D + He-3)/H less than 10 exp -4 restricts the primordial helium mass fraction from baryon-inhomogeneous big bang models to be greater than 0.231 even for a scenario which optimizes the effects of the inhomogeneities and destroys the excess lithium production. Thus, this modification to the standard big bang as well as the standard homogeneous big bang model itself would be falsifiable by observation if the primordial He-4 abundance were observed to be less than 0.231. Furthermore, a present upper limit to the observed helium mass fraction of Y(obs)(p) less than 0.24 implies that the maximum baryon-to-photon ratio allowable in the inhomogeneous models corresponds to eta less than 2.3 x 10 exp -9 (omega(b) h-squared less than 0.088) even if all conditions are optimized.

  17. Light Front Wave Function for Hadrons with Arbitrary Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological light-front wave function for hadrons with arbitrary twist dimension (mesons, baryons and multiquark states), which gives the correct scaling behavior of structure functions and form factors. Some examples of his uses are presented.

  18. Light Front Wave Function for Hadrons with Arbitrary Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a phenomenological light-front wave function for hadrons with arbitrary twist dimension (mesons, baryons and multiquark states), which gives the correct scaling behavior of structure functions and form factors. Some examples of his uses are presented.

  19. Light-cone quantized QCD in 1 + 1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbostel, K.; Brodsky, S.J.; Pauli, H.C.

    1988-10-01

    The QCD light-cone Hamiltonian is diagonalized in a discrete momentum-space basis. The spectra and wavefunctions for various coupling constants, numbers of color, and baryon number are computed. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  1. First Observation of a Baryonic Bc+ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A baryonic decay of the Bc+ meson, Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+, is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.3 standard deviations, in pp collision data collected with the LHCb detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 taken at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. With the Bc+→J/ψπ+ decay as the normalization channel, the ratio of branching fractions is measured to be B(Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+)/B(Bc+→J/ψπ+)=0.143-0.034+0.039(stat)±0.013(syst). The mass of the Bc+ meson is determined as M(Bc+)=6274.0±1.8(stat)±0.4(syst) MeV/c2, using the Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+ channel.

  2. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam

    2006-09-07

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  3. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  4. Baryonic strangeness and related susceptibilities in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, A.; Müller, B.

    2006-11-01

    The ratios of off-diagonal to diagonal conserved charge susceptibilities, e.g., χBS/χS,χQS/χS, related to the quark flavor susceptibilities, have proven to be discerning probes of the flavor carrying degrees of freedom in hot strongly interacting matter. Various constraining relations between the different susceptibilities are derived based on the Gell-Mann-Nishijima formula and the assumption of isospin symmetry. Using generic models of deconfined matter and results from lattice quantum chromodynamics, it is demonstrated that the flavor-carrying degrees of freedom at a temperature above 1.5Tc are quarklike quasiparticles. A new observable related by isospin symmetry to CBS=-3χBS/χS and equal to it in the baryon free regime is identified. This new observable, which is blind to neutral and nonstrange particles, carries the potential of being measured in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Cluster outskirts and the missing baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters are located at the crossroads of intergalactic filaments and are still forming through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures from the surrounding cosmic web. Deep, wide-field X-ray studies of the outskirts of the most massive clusters bring us valuable insight into the processes leading to the growth of cosmic structures. In addition, cluster outskirts are privileged sites to search for the missing baryons, which are thought to reside within the filaments of the cosmic web. I will present the XMM cluster outskirts project, a VLP that aims at mapping the outskirts of 13 nearby clusters. Based on the results obtained with this program, I will then explore ideas to exploit the capabilities of XMM during the next decade.

  6. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excessmore » of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.« less

  7. Baryon and dark matter genesis from strongly coupled strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2011-06-01

    D3-brane probes of E-type Yukawa points lead to strongly coupled nearly conformal sectors nearby the Standard Model (visible sector) which are motivated by F-theory GUTs. Realistic visible sector brane configurations induce a seesaw mass hierarchy in the hidden sector with light GUT singlets charged under a strongly coupled hidden sector U(1). Interpreting these GUT singlets as dark matter, this leads to a matter genesis scenario where the freeze out and subsequent decay of heavy mediators between the two sectors simultaneously populates comparable amounts of baryon and dark matter asymmetry. Generating a net matter asymmetry requires a generational structure in the probe sector which is absent at weak string coupling, but is automatically realized at strong string coupling via towers of dyonic bound states corresponding to multi-prong string junctions. The hidden U(1) couples to the visible sector through both electric and magnetic kinetic mixing terms, providing an efficient means to deplete the symmetric component of dark matter. The mass of the dark matter is of order ˜ 10 GeV. The dark matter mass and the matter asymmetry are both controlled by the scale of conformal symmetry breaking ˜ 109 - 1013 GeV, with the precise relation between the two set by details of the visible sector brane configuration.

  8. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excess of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.

  9. Properties of the baryon number distribution in QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Keitaro; Kashiwa, Kouji; Mochizuki-Nishigaki, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2014-09-01

    We study properties of the baryon number distribution in QGP phase. We first point out that a Gaussian type of the canonical partition function with regard to the baryon number means the Roberge-Weiss phase transition. The canonical partition function of QCD at high temperatures is studied both analytically and numerically. We find that the canonical partition function obtained in lattice QCD simulation agrees with that obtained for Stefan-Boltzmann limit for T higher than Tc, and is the Gaussian function of the baryon number.

  10. Baryon asymmetry from hypermagnetic helicity in dilaton hypercharge electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2006-12-15

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe from the hypermagnetic helicity, the physical interpretation of which is given in terms of hypermagnetic knots, is studied in inflationary cosmology, taking into account the breaking of the conformal invariance of hypercharge electromagnetic fields through both a coupling with the dilaton and with a pseudoscalar field. It is shown that, if the electroweak phase transition is strongly first order and the present amplitude of the generated magnetic fields on the horizon scale is sufficiently large, a baryon asymmetry with a sufficient magnitude to account for the observed baryon-to-entropy ratio can be generated.

  11. DO HOT HALOS AROUND GALAXIES CONTAIN THE MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N. E-mail: jbregman@umich.ed

    2010-05-01

    Galaxies are missing most of their baryons, and many models predict these baryons lie in a hot halo around galaxies. We establish observationally motivated constraints on the mass and radii of these halos using a variety of independent arguments. First, the observed dispersion measure of pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud allows us to constrain the hot halo around the Milky Way: if it obeys the standard Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) profile, it must contain less than 4%-5% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy. This is similar to other upper limits on the Galactic hot halo, such as the soft X-ray background and the pressure around high-velocity clouds. Second, we note that the X-ray surface brightness of hot halos with NFW profiles around large isolated galaxies is high enough that such emission should be observed, unless their halos contain less than 10%-25% of their missing baryons. Third, we place constraints on the column density of hot halos using nondetections of O VII absorption along active galactic nucleus (AGN) sightlines: in general they must contain less than 70% of the missing baryons or extend to no more than 40 kpc. Flattening the density profile of galactic hot halos weakens the surface brightness constraint so that a typical L{sub *} galaxy may hold half its missing baryons in its halo, but the O VII constraint remains unchanged, and around the Milky Way a flattened profile may only hold 6%-13% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy ((2-4) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). We also show that AGN and supernovae at low to moderate redshift-the theoretical sources of winds responsible for driving out the missing baryons-do not produce the expected correlations with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship and, therefore, are insufficient to explain the missing baryons from galaxies. We conclude that most of missing baryons from galaxies do not lie in hot halos around the galaxies, and that the missing baryons never fell into the potential wells of

  12. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  13. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-30

    The {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}p, K{sup +}n, {bar K}{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}, and {bar K}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0} scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}} = -0.197 {+-} 0.017 fm, and a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}} = -0.098 {+-} 0.017 fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  14. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  15. Baryon spectroscopy in a three-quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a three-body quark model for investigating the internal structure of baryons as well as baryon spectroscopy. In order to describe the SU(6) -invariant part of the spectrum, we assumed the spin-independent part of the interaction hypercentral, and treated using the hyperspherical formalism. For SU(6) -invariant potential, we used a generalized version of the popular "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential which contains "linear-plus-logarithmic" terms as confinement part and some inverse power terms. To obtain an analytical solution, we applied some approximations for dealing with problematic linear and logarithmic terms, leading to a qualitative reproducing of the spectrum. Then, to describe the hyperfine structure of the baryon and the splittings within the SU(6) -multiplets, we used the generalized Gürsey-Radicati Mass Formula as a SU(6) breaking interaction. Our calculations lead to a generally fair description of the baryon spectrum.

  16. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  17. Studying time-like baryonic transitions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results of the HADES collaboration are presented with emphasis on the e+e- production in elementary reactions. Via the Dalitz decay of baryonic resonances (R →Ne+e-), access is given to the time-like electromagnetic structure of baryonic transitions. This process could be measured for the first time for Δ(1232) in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV. At higher energies, the sensitivity of e+e- emission to transition form factors of the Vector Dominance type has been demonstrated. Very recently, experiments with the GSI pion beam started, allowing for more direct studies of baryonic resonances Dalitz decays. In addition, the measurement of hadronic channels provides a new data base for baryon spectroscopy issues, in particular in the 2πN channel.

  18. The electroweak axion, dark energy, inflation and baryonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2015-03-15

    In a previous paper [1], the standard model was generalized to include an electroweak axion which carries baryon plus lepton number, B + L. It was shown that such a model naturally gives the observed value of the dark energy, if the scale of explicit baryon number violation A was chosen to be of the order of the Planck mass. In this paper, we consider the effect of the modulus of the axion field. Such a field must condense in order to generate the standard Goldstone boson associated with the phase of the axion field. This condensation breaks baryon number. We argue that this modulus might be associated with inflation. If an additional B − L violating scalar is introduced with a mass similar to that of the modulus of the axion field, we argue that decays of particles associated with this field might generate an acceptable baryon asymmetry.

  19. Color fluxes in the production of doubly heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, S. P.

    2007-04-15

    The production of doubly heavy baryons in hadron-hadron collisions is considered. A method is proposed for decomposing the respective differential cross section into parts associated with contributions of various color-flux configurations.

  20. CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations in a sneutrino curvaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Taku; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: taku1215@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: shuichiro@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    Matter isocurvature perturbations are strictly constrained from cosmic microwave background observations. We study a sneutrino curvaton model where both cold dark matter (CDM)/baryon isocurvature perturbations are generated. In our model, total matter isocurvature perturbations are reduced since the CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations compensate for each other. We show that this model can not only avoid the stringent observational constraints but also suppress temperature anisotropies on large scales, which leads to improved agreement with observations.

  1. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  2. Study of ψ(3770) decaying to baryon anti-baryon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Li-Gang

    2016-05-01

    To study the decays of ψ (3770) going to baryon anti-baryon pairs (B B bar), all available experiments of measuring the cross sections of e+e- → B B bar at center-of-mass energy ranging from 3.0 GeV to 3.9 GeV are combined. To relate the baryon octets, a model based on the SU(3) flavor symmetry is used and the SU(3) breaking effects are also considered. Assuming the electric and magnetic form factors are equal (|GE | = |GM |), a global fit including the interference between the QED process and the resonant process is performed. The branching fraction of ψ (3770) → B B bar is determined to be (2.4 ± 0.8 ± 0.3) ×10-5, (1.7 ± 0.6 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5, and (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5 for B = p , Λ ,Σ+ ,Σ0 ,Ξ- and Ξ0, respectively, where the first uncertainty is from the global fit and the second uncertainty is the systematic uncertainty due to the assumption |GE | = |GM |. They are at least one order of magnitude larger than a simple scaling of the branching fraction of J / ψ / ψ (3686) → B B bar .

  3. K{sup +} production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.Q.; Ko, C.M.; Chung, W.S.

    1998-01-01

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-{Delta}, and {Delta}-{Delta} interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell; only contributions due to a virtual pion are included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite {Delta} width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the relativistic transport model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2009-04-15

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratios in midrapidity (|y|{<=}0.5) from central Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV are about a factor of five and ten, respectively, larger than those given by the thermal model, and about a factor of ten and twelve, respectively, larger than corresponding ratios in the PYTHIA model for pp collisions. These ratios are reduced by a factor of about 1.6 if there are no diquarks in the quark-gluon plasma. The transverse momentum dependence of the heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratio being much flatter than the {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum p{sub T}{approx_equal}0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to p{sub T}{approx_equal}2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

  5. BASE - The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δg/g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.

  6. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  7. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  8. Results on Charm Baryon Spectroscopy from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-05-01

    Due to an excellent mass resolution and a large amount of available data, the CDF experiment, located at the Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator, allows the precise measurement of spectroscopic properties, like mass and decay width, of a variety of states. This was exploited to examine the first orbital excitations of the {Lambda}{sub c} baryon, the resonances {Lambda}{sub c}(2595) and {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), in the decay channel {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as the {Lambda}{sub c} spin excitations {Sigma}{sub c}(2455) and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) in its decays to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final states in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. We present measurements of the mass differences with respect to the {Lambda}{sub c} and the decay widths of these states, using significantly higher statistics than previous experiments.

  9. Is the cygnet the quintessential baryon?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1991-01-01

    The apparently new hadron-like particle ("cygnet") indicated by cosmic ray observations on certain neutron stars is predicted to be a spin 1/2 fermion of magnetic moment and charge 0 and lifetime infinity. This derives from the natural identification of the cygnet with the one hitherto unobserved fundamental fermion of chronometric particle theory, the x or "exon", which plays the role of a quintessential baryon. The "partons" are represented by the other fundamental fermions, consisting of e, nue, and numu; e.g., n = x + e+ + e-, p = x + e+ + nue. With further empirical assignments, chronometric theory has a potential for explaining diverse phenomena, such as mixing in the neutral kaon complex and the nature of the higher electrons. Its fundamental fermion and boson fields transform indecomposably under its symmetry group, the conformal group G. Theoretical elementary particles transforming irreducibly under G derive as successive quotients in a maximal chain of invariant subspaces. Mass fixing by Mach's principle breaks the symmetry down to microscopically observed covariance with respect to the Poincare group P0. The resulting representation is normally irreducible, but splits in the case of the K0 into two P0-irreducible components that are mixed by the excess of the chronometric over the relativistic energy ("gravity"), which provides a "superweak" force that may be explanatory of CP violation. PMID:11607152

  10. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  11. Baryon-Derived Scaling Relations from CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakon, Nicole G.; Donahue, M.; Medezinski, E.; CLASH; Bolocam

    2014-01-01

    The CLASH observing program has produced a unique data set which allows the accurate calibration of a large set of galaxy cluster masses. The cosmological and astrophysical implications of these measurements extend far beyond HST-only science. To capitalize on the astronomy community’s interest in the CLASH data products, our collaboration has assembled a team of experts across many different observational cluster probes, including: strong lensing, weak lensing, X-ray, and the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Effect (SZE). By combining weak- and strong-lensing measurements, full cluster profiles can be constrained from the inner tens of kpc out to several Mpc. This has important implications in cross-probe analyses as different observational probes are sensitive to different regions of a cluster’s mass profile. Another goal of the CLASH program is to characterize the level of hydrostatic mass bias in X-ray measurements. This is important as hydrostatic mass estimates are commonly used to calibrate X-ray and SZE cluster studies. In my talk, I will report on the status of several cross-probe scaling relations comparing the CLASH lensing masses and various baryonic cluster mass probes, including: optical richness, X-ray, and SZE observations of the full CLASH cluster catalog. The results of these investigations will be interesting for both large-scale surveys and individual cluster studies, when high quality lensing data is unavailable.

  12. Quark Interchange Model of Baryon Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslow, Joel Neal

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point -like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and we assume that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (qq) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of Yn scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  13. First observation of a baryonic Bc+ decay.

    PubMed

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Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; 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McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-10

    A baryonic decay of the B(c)(+) meson, B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+), is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.3 standard deviations, in pp collision data collected with the LHCb detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) taken at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. With the B(c)(+) → J/ψπ(+) decay as the normalization channel, the ratio of branching fractions is measured to be B(B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+))/B(B(c)(+) → J/ψπ(+)) = 0.143(-0.034)(+0.039)(stat) ± 0.013(syst). The mass of the B(c)(+) meson is determined as M(B(c)(+) = 6274.0 ± 1.8(stat) ± 0.4(syst) MeV/c(2), using the B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+) channel. PMID:25375705

  14. Analyses of Transverse Momentum Spectra of Baryon Resonances in C+C Collisions at 4.2 A GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Picuric, Ivana

    2010-01-21

    The production of Delta baryon resonances in heavy ion C+C collisions, using a 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed to beams of light relativistic nuclei from the Dubna synchrophasotron, has been investigated. The transverse momentum spectra of Delta baryon resonances have been measured and analyzed within a simple thermodynamical collective flow model and a boundary model. The goal was to find a simple, but realistic parameterization of the freeze-out stage in these collisions. As typical freeze-out parameters temperature T and beta have been obtained from the collective flow and temperature T from the boundary model.

  15. Self Interacting Dark Matter and Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Alexander B.; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Self Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a cosmologically consistent alternative theory to Cold Dark Matter (CDM). SIDM is motivated as a solution to solve problems of the CDM model on small scales including the core/cusp problem, the missing satellites, and halo triaxiality. Each of these problems has secular astrophysical solutions, however taken together and along with suggestions from dark matter (DM) particle physics it is interesting to place constraints on how strong a self interaction would have to be for us to observe it and conversely the null hypothesis of whether we can rule out SIDM. We use high resolution cosmological simulations to compare evolution of stellar populations and (DM) components of dwarf galaxies. Our advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics N-body simulations combine SIDM with baryon physics including star formation, feedback recipes, metal line cooling, UV background, and thermal diffusion that eliminates artificial surface gas tension. We find for a constant SIDM cross section of 2 cm2 g-1 that DM interactions alone are not significant enough to create cores in dwarf galaxies and for low mass (Vpeak= 25 km s-1) galaxies the introduction of SIDM fails to decrease the DM central density. Our simulations with star formation feedback are in good agreement with observational estimates of Local Group dwarfs. The lower mass (below 108 M⊙) halos have inefficient SF, late formation time, and less DM interactions thus small field halos in CDM and SIDM remain cuspy. We conclude that constant cross section SIDM of 2 cm2 g-1 would be close to unobservable in dwarf galaxies and yet at the same time this cross section is already larger than some observational constraints found in larger (higher velocity) systems. We conclude that to differentiate between SIDM and CDM in an observationally detectable and astrophysically consistent manner a velocity dependent cross section that peaks for halos with small peak velocities will be necessary.

  16. Spin (1/2){sup +}, spin (3/2){sup +}, and transition magnetic moments of low lying and charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neetika; Dahiya, Harleen; Chatley, P. K.; Gupta, Manmohan

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the low lying and charmed spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} baryons have been calculated in the SU(4) chiral constituent quark model ({chi}CQM) by including the contribution from cc fluctuations. Explicit calculations have been carried out for the contribution coming from the valence quarks, ''quark sea'' polarizations and their orbital angular momentum. The implications of such a model have also been studied for magnetic moments of the low lying spin (3/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} and (1/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} transitions as well as the transitions involving charmed baryons. The predictions of {chi}CQM not only give a satisfactory fit for the baryons where experimental data is available but also show improvement over the other models. In particular, for the case of {mu}(p), {mu}({Sigma}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}), Coleman-Glashow sum rule for the low lying spin (1/2){sup +} baryons and {mu}({Delta}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}) for the low lying spin (3/2){sup +} baryons, we are able to achieve an excellent agreement with data. For the spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} charmed baryon magnetic moments, our results are consistent with the predictions of the QCD sum rules, light cone sum rules and spectral sum rules. For the cases where light quarks dominate in the valence structure, the sea and orbital contributions are found to be fairly significant however, they cancel in the right direction to give the correct magnitude of the total magnetic moment. On the other hand, when there is an excess of heavy quarks, the contribution of the quark sea is almost negligible, for example, {mu}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}), {mu}({Omega}{sub c}*{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}*{sup +}), and {mu}({Omega}{sub ccc}*{sup ++}). The effects of configuration mixing and quark masses have also been

  17. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-05-06

    This study presents the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 16³ × 128, with inverse spacing in temporal direction at⁻¹=5.67(4) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU(6)×O(3) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  18. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  19. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 1 63×128 , with inverse spacing in temporal direction at-1=5.67 (4 ) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3 ) F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7 /2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU (6 )×O (3 ) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  20. Electric charge quantization from gauge invariance of a Lagrangian: A catalogue of baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, J. P.; Foot, R.; Volkas, R. R.

    1996-12-01

    In gauge theories such as the standard model, the electric charges of the fermions can be heavily constrained from the classical structure of the theory and from the cancellation of anomalies. There is, however, mounting evidence suggesting that these anomaly constraints are not as well motivated as the classical constraints. In light of this we discuss possible modifications of the minimal standard model that will give us complete electric charge quantization from classical constraints alone. Because these modifications to the standard model involve the consideration of baryon-number-violating scalar interactions, we present a complete catalogue of the simplest ways to modify the standard model so as to introduce explicit baryon number violation. This has implications for proton decay searches and baryogenesis.

  1. Electric charge quantization from gauge invariance of a Lagrangian: A catalogue of baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, J.P.; Foot, R.; Volkas, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    In gauge theories such as the standard model, the electric charges of the fermions can be heavily constrained from the classical structure of the theory and from the cancellation of anomalies. There is, however, mounting evidence suggesting that these anomaly constraints are not as well motivated as the classical constraints. In light of this we discuss possible modifications of the minimal standard model that will give us complete electric charge quantization from classical constraints alone. Because these modifications to the standard model involve the consideration of baryon-number-violating scalar interactions, we present a complete catalogue of the simplest ways to modify the standard model so as to introduce explicit baryon number violation. This has implications for proton decay searches and baryogenesis. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Axial charges of hyperons and charmed baryons using Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted mass fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.

    2016-08-01

    The axial couplings of the low lying baryons are evaluated using a total of five ensembles of dynamical twisted mass fermion gauge configurations. The simulations are performed using the Iwasaki gauge action and two degenerate flavors of light quarks, and a strange and a charm quark fixed to approximately their physical values at two values of the coupling constant. The lattice spacings, determined using the nucleon mass, are a =0.082 fm and a =0.065 fm , and the simulations cover a pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV. We study the dependence of the axial couplings on the pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV as well as the SU(3) breaking effects as we decrease the light quark mass toward its physical value.

  3. Magnetic moments of octet baryons and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2005-01-01

    Using generalized Sehgal equations for magnetic moments of baryon octet and taking into account {sigma}{sup 0}-{lambda} mixing and two particle corrections to independent quark contributions we obtain very good fit using experimental values for errors of such moments. We present sum rules for quark magnetic moments ratios and for integrated spin densities ratios. Because of the SU(3) structure of our equations the results for magnetic moments of quarks and their densities depend on two additional parameters. Using information from deep inelastic scattering and baryon {beta}-decays we discuss the dependence of antiquark polarizations on introduced parameters. For some plausible values of these parameters we show that these polarizations are small if we neglect angular momenta of quarks. Our very good fit to magnetic moments of baryon octet can still be improved by using specific model for angular momentum of quarks.

  4. Measurement of b-Baryons with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Joachim; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    We report the observation of new bottom baryon states. The most recent result is the observation of the baryon {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Xi}{sup -}. The significance of the signal corresponds to 7.7{sigma} and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 5792.9{+-}2.5(stat.){+-}1.7(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition we observe four resonances in the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} spectra, consistent with the bottom baryons {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}}. All observations are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  5. Observation of the sigma_b baryons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pursley, Jennifer M.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-03-01

    We present a measurement of four new bottom baryons in proton-antiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b}{pi}{+-} resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The probability for the background to produce a similar or larger signal is less than 8.3 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of greater than 5.2 {sigma}. We interpret these baryons as the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}} baryons.

  6. Instability of string models of baryons: Character and manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, G. S.

    2010-12-15

    The character of the instability of a rotational state (rotation of the system at a constant speed) against small perturbations is studied in detail for the Y string model of the baryon. It is shown that the existing instability is due to the presence of repeated real-valued frequencies in the spectrum of small perturbations and that there are no complex-valued frequencies in this spectrum. This leads to a linear growth of small-perturbation amplitudes. A comparison of the Y configuration with the q-q-q linear string model of the baryon reveals a difference in the character of the instability of rotational states of these systems and in the manifestations of this instability. In particular, there are exponentially growing modes in the excitation spectrum of the linear model, which lead to an additional contribution to the baryon-state width.

  7. High Spin Baryons in Quantum Mechanical Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2009-04-20

    A framework of quantum mechanical chromodynamics (QMCD) is developed with the aim to place the description of the nucleon on a comparable footing with Schroedinger's quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom. Such indeed turns out to be possible upon replacing the (e{sup -}-p) by a (q-qq) system, on the one hand, and the Coulomb potential by the recently reported by us exactly solvable trigonometric extension of the Cornell (TEC) potential, on the other. The TEC potential translates the inverse distance potential in ordinary flat space to a space of constant positive curvature, the 3D hypersphere, a reason for which both potentials have the SO(4) and SO(2, 1) symmetries in common. In effect, the nucleon spectrum, inclusive its {delta} branch, acquire the degeneracy patterns of the electron excitations with spin in {sup 1}H without copying them, however. There are two essential differences between the N({delta}) and H atom spectra. The first concerns the parity of the states which can be unnatural for the N and {delta} excitations due to compositeness of the diquark, the second refers to the level splittings in the baryon spectra which contain besides the Balmer term also its inverse of opposite sign. Our scheme reproduces the complete number of states (except the hybrid {delta}(1600)), predicts a total of 33 new resonances, and explains the splittings of the N and {delta} levels containing high-spin resonances. It also describes accurately the proton electric charge form factor. We here calculate the potential in momentum space (instantaneous effective gluon propagator) as a Fourier transform of the TEC potential and show that the concept of curvature allows to avoid the integral divergences suffered by schemes based on power potentials. We find a propagator that is finite at origin, likely to produce confinement. The advocated new potential picture allows for deconfinement too as effect of space flattening in the limit of infinite radius of the 3D

  8. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  9. Baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology. [matter-antimatter symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    The framework of baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology offers the greatest potential for deducing the evolution of the universe as a consequence of physical laws and processes with the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions as to initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed, and also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic gamma ray background radiation.

  10. CP violation and the development of cosmological baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, G.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the origin of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe is presented in the context of the standard cosmological model. Except in the case of the minimal SU(5) theory, it is possible that grand unified theories predict the right order of magnitude for the ratio of baryon to photon number. The question of CP violation is addressed in detail and it is shown that, tied up with symmetry nonrestoration at high temperature, the soft CP violation does remain at T approx. = 10/sup 15/ GeV as to lead to the creation of baryon asymmetry in the very early universe.

  11. Baryon as impurity for phase transition in string landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Aya; Nakai, Yuichiro; Ookouchi, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    We consider a decay of a false vacuum in flux compactifications of type IIB string theory and study a catalytic effect for a phase transition induced by a new type of impurities. We concentrate on the large N dual of a D5-brane/anti-D5-brane system which has a rich vacuum structure. We show that D3-branes wrapping the 3-cycles can form a baryon bound state with a monopole. We find that these baryon-like objects can make the lifetime of the metastable vacuum shorter.

  12. Indication of divergent baryon-number susceptibility in QCD matter

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniou, N. G.; Diakonos, F. K.; Kapoyannis, A. S.

    2010-01-15

    The baryon-number density formed in relativistic nuclear collisions versus the chemical potential of the freeze-out states is systematically studied on the basis of existing measurements. A remarkable power-law behavior of the baryon-number susceptibility is found at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron, consistent with the existence of a QCD critical point at mu{sub B,c}approx =222 MeV, T{sub c}approx =155 MeV. The equation of state in different asymptotic regimes of the critical region is also examined and confronted with freeze-out states in these experiments.

  13. Exact baryon, strangeness, and charge conservation in hadronic gas models

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Marais, M.; Suhonen, E.

    1997-11-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied assuming that particles can be described by a hadron gas in thermal and chemical equilibrium. The exact conservation of baryon number, strangeness, and charge is explicitly taken into account. For heavy ions the effect arising from the neutron surplus becomes important and leads to a substantial increase in, e.g., the {pi}{sup {minus}}/{pi}{sup +} ratio. A method is developed which is suited to the study of small systems up to baryon number 20, which, unfortunately excludes cases like S-S. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the 3P0 quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the 3P0 model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the Λp and Λn channels, which is an SU(2) isospin breaking, is included in the

  15. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, Th.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-15

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the {sup 3}P{sub 0} model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the {lambda}p and {lambda}n channels, which is an SU(2

  16. Implication of magnetic moments for the spin structure of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, R.P.; Choudhary, J.K.

    1980-11-01

    It is shown that the magnetic moments of baryon multiplet suggest that SU(3) is a correct symmetry scheme but that its extension to SU(6) is not justified. The new spin distribution among the different valence quarks, satisfying the SU(3) constraint, and consistent with the models of deep-inelastic scattering is obtained.

  17. Coupling vector and pseudoscalar mesons to study baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Khemchandani, K. P.; Kaneko, H.; Hosaka, A.; Martinez Torres, A.; Nagahiro, H.

    2011-11-01

    A study of meson-baryon systems with total strangeness -1 is made within a framework based on the chiral and hidden local symmetries. These systems consist of octet baryons, pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The pseudoscalar meson-baryon (PB) dynamics has been earlier found determinant for the existence of some strangeness -1 resonances, for example, {Lambda}(1405), {Lambda}(1670), etc. The motivation of the present work is to study the effect of coupling the closed vector meson-baryon (VB) channels to these resonances. To do this, we obtain the PB{yields}PB and VB{yields}VB amplitudes from the t-channel diagrams and the PB{r_reversible}VB amplitudes are calculated using the Kroll-Ruddermann term where, considering the vector meson dominance phenomena, the photon is replaced by a vector meson. The calculations done within this formalism reveal a very strong coupling of the VB channels to the {Lambda}(1405) and {Lambda}(1670). In the isospin 1 case, we find evidence for a double pole structure of the {Sigma}(1480) which, like the isospin 0 resonances, is also found to couple strongly to the VB channels. The strong coupling of these low-lying resonances to the VB channels can have important implications on certain reactions producing them.

  18. Relevance of matter and glue dynamics for baryon number fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the impact of the matter and glue dynamics on baryon number fluctuations and the kurtosis of baryon number distribution. This is done within the framework of QCD-improved low-energy effective models. In particular, we include the momentum scale dependence of the quark-meson scattering and the nontrivial dispersions of both quarks and mesons. On the gluonic side, we take into account the backreaction of the matter sector on the glue dynamics. It is shown that the above fluctuations lead to a more rapid change of the baryon number fluctuations as well as the kurtosis of with the chiral crossover. We also study the signatures of quark confinement in low-energy QCD. It is shown that, contrary to the common picture, the effective thermal distribution in the presence of confining glue backgrounds does not tend towards the colorless baryonic one. Instead, the dominance of colorless hadronic states is obtained in a subtle interplay of quark and glue contributions to the canonical potential.

  19. Layers of deformed instantons in holographic baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We discuss homogeneous baryonic matter in the decompactified limit of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, improving existing approximations based on flat-space instantons. We allow for an anisotropic deformation of the instantons in the holographic and spatial directions and for a density-dependent distribution of arbitrarily many instanton layers in the bulk. Within our approximation, the baryon onset turns out to be a second-order phase transition, at odds with nature, and there is no transition to quark matter at high densities, at odds with expectations from QCD. This changes when we impose certain constraints on the shape of single instantons, motivated by known features of holographic baryons in the vacuum. Then, a first-order baryon onset and chiral restoration at high density are possible, and at sufficiently large densities two instanton layers are formed dynamically. Our results are a further step towards describing realistic, strongly interacting matter over a large density regime within a single model, desirable for studies of compact stars.

  20. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Zolotov, Adi E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  1. The status of the Excited Baryon Analysis Center

    SciTech Connect

    B. Julia-Diaz

    2010-08-01

    The Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), which is associated with the Theory Group at Jefferson Laboratory, was initiated in 2006. Its main goal is to extract and interpret properties of nucleon resonances (N*) from the world data of meson production reactions induced by pions, photons and electrons. We review the main accomplishments of the center since then and sketch its near future perspectives.

  2. Excited state mass spectra of Λc+ baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Zalak; Thakkar, Kaushal; Rai, Ajay Kumar; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    The radial and orbital excited state masses of singly charmed Λc+ baryon is calculated using the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM). The first order correction is applied to the confinement coulomb plus power potential. The ground and excited state masses for JP=3/2+ are calculated. Our results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical predictions.

  3. Moduli induced cogenesis of baryon asymmetry and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Hati, Chandan; Sarkar, Utpal

    2016-05-01

    We study a cogenesis mechanism in which the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe and the dark matter abundance can be produced simultaneously at low reheating temperature without violating baryon number in the fundamental interactions. In particular, we consider a model which can be realized in the context of type IIB large volume string compactifications. The matter superfields in this model include additional pairs of color triplet and singlet superfields in addition to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) superfields. Assuming that the mass of the additional singlet fermions is O (GeV) and of the color triplet fermions is O (TeV), we show that the modulus dominantly decays into the additional color triplet superfields. After soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield further decays into fermionic component of singlet superfield and quarks without violating baryon number. Imposing discrete Z2 symmetry, it follows that the singlet fermion will not further decay into the SM particles and therefore it can be considered as a stable asymmetric dark matter (ADM) component. We find that the decay of the lightest eigenstate of scalar component of color triplet superfield gives the observed baryon asymmetry in the visible sector, an asymmetric dark matter component with the right abundance and naturally explains cosmic coincidence.

  4. Group-theoretical construction of extended baryon operators

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; R. Edwards; R. Fiebig; G. T. Fleming; U. M. Heller; C. Morningstar; D. Richards; I. Sato; S. Wallace

    2004-06-01

    The design and implementation of large sets of spatially extended baryon operators for use in lattice simulations are described. The operators are constructed to maximize overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, while minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark propagators.

  5. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (2/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  6. Baryons:the Promise, the Problems, and the Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, Nathan

    1995-10-01

    An idiosyncratic view of Baryons '95 that calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD is presented.A treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of qq{bar} pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections is advocated.

  7. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (1/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  8. Thermodynamics of Hot Hadronic Gases at Finite Baryon Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Michael Glenn

    In this thesis we investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) matter at finite baryon densities. We begin by constructing crossover models for the thermodynamic equation of state. These use switching functions to smoothly interpolate between a hadronic gas model at low energy densities to a perturbative QCD equation of state at high energy densities. We carefully design the switching function to avoid introducing first-, second-, or higher-order phase transitions which lattice QCD indicates are not present at small baryon chemical potentials. We employ three kinds of hadronic models in the crossover constructions, two of which include repulsive interactions via an excluded volume approximation while one model does not. We find that the three crossover models are in excellent agreement with accurate lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state over a wide range of temperatures and baryon chemical potentials. Hence, the crossover models should be very useful for parameterizing the equation of state at finite baryon densities, which is needed to build next-generation hydrodynamic simulations of heavy-ion collisions. We next calculate the speed of sound and baryon number fluctuations predicted by the crossover models. We find that crossover models with hadronic repulsion are most successful at reproducing the lattice results, while the model without repulsion is less successful, and hadron (only) models show poor agreement. We then compare the crossover models to net-proton fluctuation measurements from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comparisons suggest baryon number fluctuations freeze-out well below the chemical freeze-out temperature. We also search for signs of critical fluctuations in the STAR data, but we find no evidence for them at this time. Finally, we derive kinetic theory formulas for the shear and bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity of hot hadronic

  9. Simultaneous Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John

    2012-09-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Production of unstable scalars carrying baryon number at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  10. Searches for the θ5(1540)+ Strange-Pentaquark Candidate in e+e- Annihilation, Hadroproduction and Electroproduction with the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Jonathan P

    2009-05-01

    Since early in 2003, several experiments have presented evidence for the existence of a positive strangeness baryon state of mass around 1540 MeV/c2 and width <8 MeV, the θ(1540), which decays to K+n and K0p. Such a state has minimum quark content udud$\\bar{s}$ and consequently has been interpreted as the S = +1 member of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states proposed by Diakonov et al. Subsequently, the NA49 experiment presented evidence for the S = -2 member of the anti-decuplet, the Ξ5 (1860) --, but this has yet to be observed in any other experiment. Results from the search for the production of the θ(1540) memember of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states using data from e+e - collisions obtained with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II Collider are presented. No signal is observed, and cross section limits for the θ(1540) are given; these prove to be well below the cross section values for ordinary baryons of similar mass. In addition, a search has been carried out for the electroproduction of the θ(1540) in the material of the BABAR detector. Event selection procedures are discussed in detail, the results of this search are presented, and are discussed in the light of several other experiments.

  11. Small-scale anisotropies in the microwave background in a baryon-dominated open universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gouda, N.; Sasaki, M.; Suto, Y.

    1987-10-01

    The anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in a baryon-dominated universe (BDU) are calculated using a gauge-invariant method. The theoretical predictions on a 4.5-arcmin angular scale are compared with the observational data of Uson and Wilkinson (1984). Both adiabatic and isocurvature scenarios predict roughly the same amplitudes of the anisotropies on this scale, in spite of the difference of the physical mechanism of the anisotropy generation. As a result, CMB isotropy requires that the density parameter of a BDU must be larger than 0.8 even in an isocurvature scenario. This conclusion is compatible with the observation of light elements only if the universe were fairly inhomogeneous at the epoch of primordial nucleosynthesis. In turn, to the extent that standard primordial nucleosynthesis predictions are assumed, the idea of a BDU based on either adiabatic or isocurvature models can be ruled out. 22 references.

  12. Baryon census in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planelles, S.; Borgani, S.; Dolag, K.; Ettori, S.; Fabjan, D.; Murante, G.; Tornatore, L.

    2013-05-01

    We carry out an analysis of a set of cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters and groups aimed at studying the total baryon budget in clusters, and how this budget is shared between the hot diffuse component and the stellar component. Using the TreePM+SPH GADGET-3 code, we carried out one set of non-radiative simulations, and two sets of simulations including radiative cooling, star formation and feedback from supernovae (SNe), one of which also accounting for the effect of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The analysis is carried out with the twofold aim of studying the implication of stellar and hot gas content on the relative role played by SNe and AGN feedback, and to calibrate the cluster baryon fraction and its evolution as a cosmological tool. With respect to previous similar analysis, the simulations used in this study provide us with a sufficient statistics of massive objects and including an efficient AGN feedback. We find that both radiative simulation sets predict a trend of stellar mass fraction with cluster mass that tends to be weaker than the observed one. However this tension depends on the particular set of observational data considered. Including the effect of AGN feedback alleviates this tension on the stellar mass and predicts values of the hot gas mass fraction and total baryon fraction to be in closer agreement with observational results. We further compute the ratio between the cluster baryon content and the cosmic baryon fraction, Yb, as a function of clustercentric radius and redshift. At R500 we find for massive clusters with M500 > 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ that Yb is nearly independent of the physical processes included and characterized by a negligible redshift evolution: Yb, 500 = 0.85 ± 0.03 with the error accounting for the intrinsic rms scatter within the set of simulated clusters. At smaller radii, R2500, the typical value of Yb slightly decreases, by an amount that

  13. Precision electromagnetic structure of octet baryons in the chiral regime

    SciTech Connect

    Boinepalli, S.; Leinweber, D. B.; Williams, A. G.; Zanotti, J. M.; Zhang, J. B.

    2006-11-01

    The electromagnetic properties of the baryon octet are calculated in quenched QCD on a 20{sup 3}x40 lattice with a lattice spacing of 0.128 fm using the fat-link irrelevant clover (FLIC) fermion action. FLIC fermions enable simulations to be performed efficiently at pion masses as low as 300 MeV. By combining FLIC fermions with an improved-conserved vector current, we ensure that discretization errors occur only at O(a{sup 2}) while maintaining current conservation. Magnetic moments and electric and magnetic radii are extracted from the electric and magnetic form factors for each individual quark sector. From these, the corresponding baryon properties are constructed. Our results are compared with the predictions of quenched chiral perturbation theory. We detect substantial curvature and environment sensitivity of the quark contributions to electric charge radii and magnetic moments in the low quark-mass region.

  14. Flavor violation in Higgs-boson couplings to baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B. ); Niyogi, S. )

    1992-06-01

    The 1/2{sup +} baryon mass spectrum is studied to determine the {ital {bar u}u}, {ital {bar d}d}, and {ital {bar s}s} contents in the nucleon. We find that higher-order symmetry-breaking terms in the mass operator are necessary to estimate {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar u}u}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle}, {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar d}d}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle}, and {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar s}s}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle} in a self-consistent way. We also assess the scalar (pseudoscalar) Higgs-boson couplings to baryons.

  15. Tensor Charges, Quark Anomalous Magnetic Moments And Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhfi, M.

    2007-06-13

    We propose an 'ultimate' upgrade of the Karl- Sehgal (KS) formula which relates baryon magnetic moments to the spin structure of constituent quarks, by adding anomalous magnetic moments of quarks. We first argue that relativistic nature of quarks inside baryons requires introduction of two kinds of magnetisms, one axial and the other tensoriel. The first one is associated with integrated quark helicity distributions {delta}i - {delta}i-bar (standard ) and the second with integrated transversity distributions {delta}i - {delta}i-bar. The weight of each contribution is controlled by the combination of two parameters, xi the ratio of the quark mass to the average kinetic energy and ai the quark anomalous magnetic moment. The quark anomalous magnetic moment is thus shown to be correlated to transversity. The proposed formula confirms, with reasonable inputs that anomalous magnetic moments of quarks are unavoidable intrinsic properties.

  16. DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor): the Dark Baryon Exploring Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Ohashi, Takaya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2015-08-01

    More than half of the baryons are unidentified in the local Universe, and majority of them are thought to reside along the large-scale structure in the form of Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The 3-dimensional structure of WHIM will be probed by observing redshifted oxygen emission lines with high resolution X-ray spectrometers. DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor) has been developed aiming for a launch by JAXA’s Epsilon Launch Vehicle around 2020. The payload consists of a 4-reflection X-ray telescope and a TES calorimeter array cooled by mechanical coolers. With a large grasp (area times f.o.v.) over 100 cm2 deg2, DIOS will identify 30-40% of dark baryons and will show us gas dynamics of cosmic plasmas from Earth’s megnetosphere to cluster outskirts. We describe the design and outstanding issues of DIOS.

  17. The technological concept of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveaux, M.; Cbm-Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is to explore the properties of strongly interacting matter in the regime of highest net baryon densities. It aims to find experimental evidence for numerous predicted effects like a first order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter, the existence of a critical endpoint of this phase transition and the expected onset of chiral symmetry restoration. The 8-45 AGeV heavy ion beam needed to create the hot and dense matter in the fixed target experiment will be provided by the SIS100 and the SIS300 synchrotron of the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. The paper provides an introduction into the measurement challenges and the technological concept of CBM-experiment from an instrumentalist's point of view.

  18. Securing a Detection of the Bulk of the Missing Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio

    2010-09-01

    We propose to optimize the use of X-ray and FUV observatories to settle unambiguously one of the most controversial and open problems of modern astrophysics: the existence of the Missing Baryons in a Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). We will do this by targeting a 500 ks Chandra-LETG observation on the best available tracers of the bulk (~80%) of the Missing Baryons in the Universe: two intergalactic absorption systems recently detected through Broad HI Lya and triple-OVI absorption, respectively, in a moderate S/N HST-COS spectrum of the bright and relatively high-redshift (z>0.4) blazar 1ES 1553+113. The proposed observation is carefully designed to finally secure a detection of the WHIM and to obtain a first robust estimate of its metal content.

  19. Observation of the Heavy Baryons Sigma b and Sigma b*.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-16

    We report an observation of new bottom baryons produced in pp collisions at the Tevatron. Using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four Lambda b 0 pi+/- resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode Lambda b 0-->Lambda c + pi-, where Lambda c+-->pK* pi+. We interpret these states as the Sigma b(*)+/- baryons and measure the following masses: m Sigma b+=5807.8 -2.2 +2.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, m Sigma b- =5815.2+/-1.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, and m(Sigma b*)-m(Sigma b)=21.2-1.9 +2.0(stat.)-0.3+0.4(syst.) MeV/c2. PMID:18233134

  20. Search for exotic baryon states with the SPHINX detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    A number of diffractive processes involving the production of baryon states are studied in a series of experiments using the SPHINX detector and the E{sub p} = 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator. These include p + N {yields} [pK{sup +}K{sup {minus}}] + N, p + N {yields} [p{phi}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Lambda}(1520)K{sup +}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] + N + (neutrals), p + N {yields} [{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +}] + N, and a number of other transitions. Searches for narrow heavy baryons, which are candidates for cryptoexotic hadron states with hidden strangeness, are reported. The first results on meson production in the deep fragmentation region are presented. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Dark matter from dark energy-baryonic matter couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Alejandro; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scenario in which a scalar field dark energy is coupled to the trace of the energy momentum tensor of the baryonic matter fields. In the slow-roll regime, this interaction could give rise to the cosmological features of dark matter. We work out the cosmological background solutions and fit the parameters of the model using the Union 2 supernovae data set. Then, we develop cosmological perturbations up to linear order, and we find that the perturbed variables have an acceptable behavior, in particular, the density contrast of baryonic matter grows similar to that in the ΛCDM model for a suitable choice of the strength parameter of the coupling.

  2. Lattice QCD determination of patterns of excited baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; Keisuke Juge; Adam Lichtl; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2007-10-01

    Energies for excited isospin I = 1/2 and I = 3/2 states that include the nucleon and Delta families of baryons are computed using quenched, anisotropic lattices. Baryon interpolating field operators that are used include nonlocal operators that provide G2 irreducible representations of the octahedral group. The decomposition of spin 5/2 or higher spin states is realized for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation. We observe patterns of degenerate energies in the irreducible representations of the octahedral group that correspond to the subduction of the continuum spin 5/2 or higher. The overall pattern of low-lying excited states corresponds well to the pattern of physical states subduced to the irreducible representations of the octahedral group.

  3. Determination of the quark coupling strength |Vub| using baryonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Mohr, R. Casanova; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; de Bruyn, K.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Silva, W.; de Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; di Canto, A.; di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Pardiñas, J. García; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the strength of the couplings of the b quark to the u and c quarks, |Vub| and |Vcb|, are governed by the coupling of the quarks to the Higgs boson. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, the probability for the Λb0 baryon to decay into the p final state relative to the final state is measured. Combined with theoretical calculations of the strong interaction and a previously measured value of |Vcb|, the first |Vub| measurement to use a baryonic decay is performed. This measurement is consistent with previous determinations of |Vub| using B meson decays to specific final states and confirms the existing incompatibility with those using an inclusive sample of final states.

  4. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E. ); Raby, S. . Dept. of Physics); Starkman, G. . Dept. of Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, {gamma} is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E{center dot}B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, {Gamma}: {gamma} {preceq} n{sub f}{Gamma}/T{sup 3}. Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Two potential quark models for double heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, A. M.; Kozhedub, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Baryons containing two heavy quarks (QQ' q) are treated in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Two non-relativistic potential models are proposed, in which the Schrödinger equation admits a separation of variables in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates, respectively. In the first model, the potential is equal to the sum of Coulomb potentials of the two heavy quarks, separated from each other by a distance - R and linear potential of confinement. In the second model the center distance parameter R is assumed to be purely imaginary. In this case, the potential is defined by the two-sheeted mapping with singularities being concentrated on a circle rather than at separate points. Thus, in the first model diquark appears as a segment, and in the second - as a circle. In this paper we calculate the mass spectrum of double heavy baryons in both models, and compare it with previous results.

  6. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship for S{sup 4}G galaxies and the 'condensed' baryon fraction of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene; Sorce, Jenny; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Hinz, J. L.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Regan, M. W.; Seibert, M.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We combine data from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies, a recently calibrated empirical stellar mass estimator from Eskew et al., and an extensive database of H I spectral line profiles to examine the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation. We find (1) that the BTF has lower scatter than the classic Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and is better described as a linear relationship, confirming similar previous results, (2) that the inclusion of a radial scale in the BTF decreases the scatter but only modestly, as seen previously for the TF relation, and (3) that the slope of the BTF, which we find to be 3.5 ± 0.2 (Δlog M {sub baryon}/Δlog v{sub c} ), implies that on average a nearly constant fraction (∼0.4) of all baryons expected to be in a halo are 'condensed' onto the central region of rotationally supported galaxies. The condensed baryon fraction, M {sub baryon}/M {sub total}, is, to our measurement precision, nearly independent of galaxy circular velocity (our sample spans circular velocities, v {sub c} , between 60 and 250 km s{sup –1}, but is extended to v{sub c} ∼ 10 km s{sup –1} using data from the literature). The observed galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in this fraction is generally ≤ a factor of 2 despite fairly liberal selection criteria. These results imply that cooling and heating processes, such as cold versus hot accretion, mass loss due to stellar winds, and active galactic nucleus driven feedback, to the degree that they affect the global galactic properties involved in the BTF, are independent of halo mass for galaxies with 10 < v{sub c} < 250 km s{sup –1} and typically introduce no more than a factor of two range in the resulting M {sub baryon}/M {sub total}. Recent simulations by Aumer et al. of a small sample of disk galaxies are in excellent agreement with our data, suggesting that current simulations are capable of reproducing the global properties of individual disk galaxies. More detailed comparison to models using the

  7. The Baryonic Tully-Fisher Relationship for S4G Galaxies and the "Condensed" Baryon Fraction of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Sorce, Jenny; Erroz-Ferrer, S.; Comerón, S.; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Hinz, J. L.; Laurikainen, E.; Kim, T.; Laine, J.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Mizusawa, T.; Regan, M. W.; Salo, H.; Seibert, M.; Sheth, K.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Cisternas, M.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, B.

    2014-06-01

    We combine data from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies, a recently calibrated empirical stellar mass estimator from Eskew et al., and an extensive database of H I spectral line profiles to examine the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation. We find (1) that the BTF has lower scatter than the classic Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and is better described as a linear relationship, confirming similar previous results, (2) that the inclusion of a radial scale in the BTF decreases the scatter but only modestly, as seen previously for the TF relation, and (3) that the slope of the BTF, which we find to be 3.5 ± 0.2 (Δlog M baryon/Δlog vc ), implies that on average a nearly constant fraction (~0.4) of all baryons expected to be in a halo are "condensed" onto the central region of rotationally supported galaxies. The condensed baryon fraction, M baryon/M total, is, to our measurement precision, nearly independent of galaxy circular velocity (our sample spans circular velocities, v c , between 60 and 250 km s-1, but is extended to vc ~ 10 km s-1 using data from the literature). The observed galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in this fraction is generally <= a factor of 2 despite fairly liberal selection criteria. These results imply that cooling and heating processes, such as cold versus hot accretion, mass loss due to stellar winds, and active galactic nucleus driven feedback, to the degree that they affect the global galactic properties involved in the BTF, are independent of halo mass for galaxies with 10 < vc < 250 km s-1 and typically introduce no more than a factor of two range in the resulting M baryon/M total. Recent simulations by Aumer et al. of a small sample of disk galaxies are in excellent agreement with our data, suggesting that current simulations are capable of reproducing the global properties of individual disk galaxies. More detailed comparison to models using the BTF holds great promise, but awaits improved determinations of the stellar masses.

  8. Radial flow afterburner for event generators and the baryon puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, E.; Paic, G.

    2008-07-01

    A simple afterburner to add radial flow to the randomized transverse momentum obtained from event generators, PYTHIA and HIJING, has been implemented to calculate the p/π ratios and compare them with available data. A coherent trend of qualitative agreement has been obtained in pp and Au+Au collisions for various centralities. These results indicate that the radial flow does play an important role in the so-called baryon puzzle anomaly.

  9. Nuclear matter at high temperature and low net baryonic density

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-11-12

    We study the effect of the {sigma}-{omega} mesons interaction on nucleon-antinucleon matter properties. This interaction is employed in the context of the linear Walecka model to discuss the behavior of this system at high temperature and low net baryonic density regime. The field equations are solved in the relativistic mean-field approximation and our results show that the phase transition pointed out in the literature for this regime is eliminated when the meson interaction are considered.

  10. Physical processes effecting the baryonic matter content of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotova, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed physical processes effecting the generation of the matter content of the Universe. First we have studied the processes effecting Big Bang Nucleosynthesis during which the chemical content of the baryonic component of the Universe was produced. We have provided detail numerical analysis of the BBN production of ^4He, Y_p, in the presence of ν_e ← ν_s neutrino oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling. We have accounted for all known effects of neutrino oscillations on cosmological nucleosyntesis. We have obtained cosmological bounds corresponding to δ Y_p/Y_p= 5.2 % in correspondance with the recently found higher uncertainty in ^4He. Iso-helium contours for δ Y_p/Y_p > 5% and population of the ν_s state δ N_s = 0; 0.5; 0.7; 0.9, both for resonant and non-resonant oscillations have been calculated. Next we have studied the processes effecting the formation of the baryon content of the Universe. We have investigated a baryogenesis model based on Affleck and Dine baryogenesis scenario, Scalar Field Condensate (SFC) baryogenesis model. We have provided precise numerical analysis of the SFC baryogenesis model numerically accounting for the particle creation processes by the time varying scalar field. We have numerically obtained the dependence of the field and baryon charge evolution and their final values on the model's parameters, namely: the gauge coupling constant α, the Hubble constant during inflation H_I, the mass of the field m and the self coupling constants λ_i. We have found the range of the model parameters for which a baryon asymmetry value close to the observed one can be generated.

  11. BARYONS MATTER: WHY LUMINOUS SATELLITE GALAXIES HAVE REDUCED CENTRAL MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Dekel, Avishai; Brooks, Alyson M.; Willman, Beth; Governato, Fabio; Quinn, Tom; Pontzen, Andrew; Christensen, Charlotte; Wadsley, James

    2012-12-10

    Using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-massed disk galaxies, we demonstrate that supernovae feedback and tidal stripping lower the central masses of bright (-15 < M{sub V} < -8) satellite galaxies. These simulations resolve high-density regions, comparable to giant molecular clouds, where stars form. This resolution allows us to adopt a prescription for H{sub 2} formation and destruction that ties star formation to the presence of shielded, molecular gas. Before infall, supernova feedback from the clumpy, bursty star formation captured by this physically motivated model leads to reduced dark matter (DM) densities and shallower inner density profiles in the massive satellite progenitors (M{sub vir} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) compared with DM-only simulations. The progenitors of the lower mass satellites are unable to maintain bursty star formation histories, due to both heating at reionization and gas loss from initial star-forming events, preserving the steep inner density profile predicted by DM-only simulations. After infall, gas stripping from satellites reduces the total central masses of satellites simulated with DM+baryons relative to DM-only satellites. Additionally, enhanced tidal stripping after infall due to the baryonic disk acts to further reduce the central DM densities of the luminous satellites. Satellites that enter with cored DM halos are particularly vulnerable to the tidal effects of the disk, exacerbating the discrepancy in the central masses predicted by baryon+DM and DM-only simulations. We show that DM-only simulations, which neglect the highly non-adiabatic evolution of baryons described in this work, produce denser satellites with larger central velocities. We provide a simple correction to the central DM mass predicted for satellites by DM-only simulations. We conclude that DM-only simulations should be used with great caution when interpreting kinematic observations

  12. Meson-baryon interaction in the meson exchange picture

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, M.

    2011-10-24

    Elastic {pi}N scattering and the reaction {pi}{sup +}p{yields}K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +} are described simultaneously in a unitary coupled-channels approach which respects analyticity. SU(3) flavor symmetry is used to relate the t- and u- channel exchanges that drive the meson-baryon interaction in the different channels. Angular distributions, polarizations, and spin-rotation parameters are compared with available experimental data. The pole structure of the amplitudes is extracted from the analytic continuation.

  13. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  14. Prospects for baryon instability search with long-lived isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yu.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Parker, G.; Plasil, F.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we consider the possibility of observation of baryon instability processes occurring inside nuclei by searching for the remnants of such processes that could have been accumulated in nature as mm long-lived isotopes. As an example, we discuss here the possible detection of traces of {sup 97}Tc, {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 99}Tc in deep-mined nonradioactive tin ores.

  15. Bosonic and Baryonic String Theory in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuti, Julius

    2007-02-27

    Bosonic string formation in gauge theories is reviewed with particular attention to the confining flux in lattice QCD and its effective string theory description. Recent results on the Casimir energy of the ground state and the string excitation spectrum are analyzed in the Dirichlet string limit of large separation between static sources. The closed string-soliton (torelon) with electric flux winding around a compact dimension is discussed and a new bound state tower spectrum at baryon string junctions is presented.

  16. The riddle of high-energy baryon number violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattis, M.P.

    1991-09-01

    The exciting possibility that anomalous baryon and lepton number violation might be observable at the next generation of supercolliders is suggested by an instanton calculation due to Ringwald and Espinosa. In these Lectures, the current controversial status of these claims is discussed, and several new technologies designed to analyze this question are reviewed. These technologies should contribute more generally to our understanding of weakly- coupled field theories in the nonperturbative regime where both energies and multiplicities are very large. 61 refs., 35 figs.

  17. The Baryon Number Two System in the Chiral Soliton Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani-Sarti, Valentina; Drago, Alessandro; Vento, Vicente; Park, Byung-Yoon

    2013-03-01

    We study the interaction between two B = 1 states in a chiral soliton model where baryons are described as non-topological solitons. By using the hedgehog solution for the B = 1 states we construct three possible B = 2 configurations to analyze the role of the relative orientation of the hedgehog quills in the dynamics. The strong dependence of the intersoliton interaction on these relative orientations reveals that studies of dense hadronic matter using this model should take into account their implications.

  18. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  19. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, M.; Martinez, A.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2008-09-01

    We have calculated the radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers both charged and neutral decaying baryons and is restricted to the so-called three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the center-of-mass frame of the emitted baryon. We have considered terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  20. Heavy-flavor-conserving hadronic weak decays of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Cheung, Chi-Yee; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Yeu-Chung; Yan, Tung-Mow; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2016-03-01

    More than two decades ago, we studied heavy-flavor-conserving weak decays of heavy baryons within the framework that incorporates both heavy-quark and chiral symmetries. In view of the first observation of Ξ b - → Λ b 0 π - by LHCb recently, we have reexamined these decays and presented updated predictions. The predicted rates for Ξ b - → Λ b 0 π - in the MIT bag and diquark models are consistent with experiment. The major theoretical uncertainty stems from the evaluation of baryon matrix elements. The branching fraction of Ξ c → Λ c π is predicted to be of order 10-4. It is suppressed relative to {B}({Ξ}_bto {Λ}_bπ ) owing to the shorter lifetime of Ξ c relative to Ξ b and the destructive nonspectator W-exchange contribution. The kinematically accessible weak decays of the sextet heavy baryon Ω Q are Ω Q → Ξ Q π. Due to the absence of the {{B}}_6-{{B}}{_3-} transition in the heavy quark limit and the {{B}}_6-{{B}}_6 transition in the model calculations, Ω Q → Ξ Q π vanish in the heavy quark limit.

  1. LOCATING THE ''MISSING'' BARYONS WITH EXTRAGALACTIC DISPERSION MEASURE ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Matthew

    2014-01-10

    Recently, Thornton and coworkers confirmed a class of millisecond radio bursts likely of extragalactic origin that is well-suited for estimating dispersion measures (DMs). We calculate the probability distribution of DM(z) in different models for how the cosmic baryons are distributed (both analytically and with cosmological simulations). We show that the distribution of DM is quite sensitive to whether the ''missing'' baryons lie around the virial radius of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} M{sub ☉} halos or further out, which is not easily constrained with other observational techniques. The intrinsic contribution to DM from each source could complicate studies of the extragalactic contribution. This difficulty is avoided by stacking based on the impact parameter to foreground galaxies. We show that a stacking analysis using a sample of ∼100 DM measurements from arcminute-localized, z ≳ 0.5 sources would place interesting constraints at 0.2-2 halo virial radii on the baryonic mass profile surrounding different galaxy types. Conveniently for intergalactic studies, sightlines that intersect intervening galactic disks should be easily identified owing to scattering. A detectable level of scattering may also result from turbulence in the circumgalactic medium.

  2. Probing the Missing Baryons via kSZ Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Han; Lin, Wei-Peng; Zhang, Peng-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) stacking has great potential to become a powerful probe of missing baryons, due to advances in CMB experiments and galaxy surveys. In this paper, we study kSZ stacking in hydrodynamic simulations with different gastrophysics. We quantify the kSZ stacking signal as a function of halo mass, redshift and projection depth. We compare between different simulations to estimate the impact of gastrophysics such as cooling and supernova feedback. Furthermore, we measure the contribution from warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), which is believed to be the reservoir for most, if not all, missing baryons. We find that the WHIM contribution is significant, at the level of ∼ 10%–70%, depending on the angular separation from the stacked halos and other factors. However, contribution from the intracluster medium along the line of sight is in general non-negligible. This complexity requires more detailed and comprehensive analysis on probing the missing baryons with kSZ stacking.

  3. A BARYONIC SOLUTION TO THE MISSING SATELLITES PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan E-mail: mqk@astro.berkeley.edu E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem.

  4. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  5. A low-dimensional analogue of holographic baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Baryons in holographic QCD correspond to topological solitons in the bulk. The most prominent example is the Sakai-Sugimoto model, where the bulk soliton in the five-dimensional spacetime of AdS-type can be approximated by the flat space self-dual Yang-Mills instanton with a small size. Recently, the validity of this approximation has been verified by comparison with the numerical field theory solution. However, multi-solitons and solitons with finite density are currently beyond numerical field theory computations. Various approximations have been applied to investigate these important issues and have led to proposals for finite density configurations that include dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn. Here we introduce and investigate a low-dimensional analogue of the Sakai-Sugimoto model, in which the bulk soliton can be approximated by a flat space sigma model instanton. The bulk theory is a baby Skyrme model in a three-dimensional spacetime with negative curvature. The advantage of the lower-dimensional theory is that numerical simulations of multi-solitons and finite density solutions can be performed and compared with flat space instanton approximations. In particular, analogues of dyonic salt and baryonic popcorn configurations are found and analysed.

  6. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  7. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  8. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet II: Implications of a non-zero baryon chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    We present an extended version of the dynamical model for a multi-quark droplet evolution described in our proceeding paper. The model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension, and now a non-zero baryon number. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We consider evolutions of droplets with different initial temperatures and net baryon number. It is found that the introduction of a non-zero net baryon number does not change the lifetime of the droplets significantly. Only when we consider an initially very baryon-rich, low-temperature droplets is the lifetime is decreased significantly. We have, furthermore, found a convergence of both baryon chemical potential and temperature toward the values μB≈450 MeV and T≈150 MeV. This convergence is linked to the competing emission of baryons versus mesons.

  9. Cosmological baryon-number domain structure from symmetry breaking in grand unified field theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big bang can lead more naturally to a baryon-symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon-asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  10. Cosmological baryon number domain structure from symmetry-breaking in grand unified field theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big-bang can lead more naturally to a baryon symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  11. What can we learn from unpolarized and polarized electroproduction of fast baryons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Mekhfi, M.

    1991-09-01

    Two applications of semi-inclusive electroproduction of fast baryons are presented: (i) The steepness of the baryon spectrum at medium rapidity can give information about the general mechanisms of baryon production in soft and hard processes. (ii) With a polarized target and a detector which analyses the polarization of final Λ's, the aptitude of quarks to carry transverse polarization can be tested for the first time.

  12. Semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the semileptonic decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit, which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  13. Semileptonic decay properties of Λb baryon in potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-08-01

    Considering the hyperradial Schrödinger equation in the presence of a potential combination containing harmonic and Deng-Fan-type terms and choosing the harmonic term as parent, we obtain baryonic hyperradial wave function and masses of Lambda baryons. Then, we apply the differential decay width with the Isgur-Wise function to find rates for the semileptonic baryon decay Λb → Λc ℓ bar{ν}. Comparison with other published models is also included.

  14. Mass formulas for {Xi}{sub c} and {Xi}{sub b} baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Zamiralov, V. S.; Ozpineci, A.

    2010-10-15

    The importance of taking into account the mixing of the heavy cascade baryons {Xi} and {Xi}' that have new quantum numbers in analyzing their properties is shown. The Ono quark model is considered by way of example. The masses of the new baryons and the {Xi}-{Xi}' mixing angles are obtained. The same approach is applied to the interpolating currents of these baryons within QCD sum rules.

  15. Optimizing baryon acoustic oscillation surveys - II. Curvature, redshifts and external data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, David; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Bassett, Bruce A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Vardanyan, Mihran

    2010-02-01

    We extend our study of the optimization of large baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys to return the best constraints on the dark energy, building on Paper I of this series by Parkinson et al. The survey galaxies are assumed to be pre-selected active, star-forming galaxies observed by their line emission with a constant number density across the redshift bin. Star-forming galaxies have a redshift desert in the region 1.6 < z < 2, and so this redshift range was excluded from the analysis. We use the Seo & Eisenstein fitting formula for the accuracies of the BAO measurements, using only the information for the oscillatory part of the power spectrum as distance and expansion rate rulers. We go beyond our earlier analysis by examining the effect of including curvature on the optimal survey configuration and updating the expected `prior' constraints from Planck and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We once again find that the optimal survey strategy involves minimizing the exposure time and maximizing the survey area (within the instrumental constraints), and that all time should be spent observing in the low-redshift range (z < 1.6) rather than beyond the redshift desert, z > 2. We find that, when assuming a flat universe, the optimal survey makes measurements in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.7, but that including curvature as a nuisance parameter requires us to push the maximum redshift to 1.35, to remove the degeneracy between curvature and evolving dark energy. The inclusion of expected other data sets (such as WiggleZ, the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and a stage III Type Ia supernova survey) removes the necessity of measurements below redshift 0.9, and pushes the maximum redshift up to 1.5. We discuss considerations in determining the best survey strategy in light of uncertainty in the true underlying cosmological model.

  16. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  17. Ground state heavy baryon production in a relativistic quark-diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomshi Nobary, M. A.; Sepahvand, R.

    2007-12-01

    We use current-current interaction to calculate the fragmentation functions to describe the production of spin-1/2, spin-1/2{sup '}, and spin-3/2 baryons with massive constituents in a relativistic quark-diquark model. Our results are in their analytic forms and are applicable for singly, doubly, and triply heavy baryons. We discuss the production of {omega}{sub bbc}, {omega}{sub bcc}, and {omega}{sub ccc} baryons in some detail. The results are satisfactorily compared with those obtained for triply heavy baryons calculated in a perturbative regime within reasonable values of the parameters involved.

  18. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons: The initial-baryon rest frame case

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2009-03-01

    We complement the results for the radiative corrections to the s-circumflex{sub 2}{center_dot}l-circumflex angular correlation of baryon semileptonic decays of Neri et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 054018 (2008)] with the final results in the rest frame of the decaying baryon. In addition, we present an analytical result which was not possible to obtain in Neri et al.'s work.

  19. Lambda Baryon a Production in 91 GEV Positron - Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routenburg, Paul

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of Lambda + | Lambda production in the data collected with the OPAL detector during 1990 is presented. A total inclusive rate is determined and checked through detailed systematic studies. This rate is found to be 0.356 +/- 0.011 (stat.) +/- 0.028 (syst.) per multihadron event. The inclusive cross sections as a function of the fractional Lambda energy (x _{E}) and xi (xi = ln(1/x_{p }), where x_{p} is the fractional Lambda momentum) are determined and compared to the predictions of the HERWIG 5.0 and JETSET 7.2 Monte Carlos as tuned to agree with global event shapes at an average centre-of-mass energy of 91 GeV. The overall Lambda rate is in agreement with the JETSET prediction but less than that predicted by HERWIG. The fragmentation function observed is softer than predicted by either Monte Carlo. Scaling violations are observed in the x_{E } distribution compared to the observations between 29 and 35 GeV. This is attributed to increased gluon radiation. A study is then made of the Lambda decay length distribution, and of the production and decay angles. Reasonable agreement is found between the data and the expectations. There is some indication that the Lambda rate increases faster with event sphericity than does the charged multiplicity. This effect is thought to be due to increased baryon production in gluon fragmentation. Finally, an investigation into Lambda - | Lambda, Lambda - Lambda and | Lambda - | Lambda production in the same event is presented. The results support local baryon number conservation and agree with the JETSET prediction. It is also shown that an additional meson is produced between the baryon and the antibaryon a significant fraction of the time.

  20. Search for popcorn mesons in events with two charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartfiel, Brandon

    The physics of this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part measures the Λc → pi kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c, which is just below the Υ(4s) resonance. The data sample consists of 15,400 Λc baryons from 9.46 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the Λc → K0p mode, and look for events with a Λc+ and a Λ c- in order to look for "popcorn" mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb-1. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06+/-.09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to Λc + npi, we are left with 2.63+/-.21 additional charged pious in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per bayon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  1. The quest for missing baryon states in electromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, Volker

    2016-03-01

    The excitation spectrum of nucleons reveals properties of the quark and gluon interactions in a confined system. Knowledge of the nucleon excitations is central to our understanding of the basic interactions underlying the spectrum, and is a fundamental goal of experimental nuclear and hadronic physics. Accounting for the complete baryon spectrum has recently been shown as critical for modeling the transition from the quark-gluon plasma phase to the confinement phase of stable nucleons in the early universe. Microscopic approaches such as constituent quark models and more recently Lattice QCD make predictions regarding masses and quantum numbers of the excited states and their internal structure according to radial, spin, and orbital transitions of the quark-gluon system. Pion induced transitions have revealed many nucleon states consistent with these predictions, but most of the predicted states have not been observed, especially those in the higher mass range. The quest for a more complete understanding of the systematic and the internal structure of baryons has led to a worldwide experimental effort to measure electromagnetically induced meson production including many polarization observables. The CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab is playing a key role in measuring many of the key observables with unprecedented precision, and some of these data have been employed in coupled-channel resonance analyses that led to strong evidence for a number of excited states that were previously unobserved or lacked sufficient evidence. In this talk I will discuss the current status of and future directions in the search for new baryon states using electromagnetic probes.

  2. Matrix model and holographic baryons in the D0-D4 background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-wen; Jia, Tuo

    2015-08-01

    We study the spectrum and short-distance two-body force of holographic baryons by the matrix model, which is derived from the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the D0-D4 background (D0-D4/D8 system). The matrix model is derived by using the standard technique in string theory, and it can describe multibaryon systems. We rederive the action of the matrix model from open string theory on the baryon vertex, which is embedded in the D0-D4/D8 system. The matrix model offers a more systematic approach to the dynamics of the baryons at short distances. In our system, we find that the matrix model describes stable baryonic states only if ζ =UQ0 3/UKK 3<2 , where UQ0 3 is related to the number density of smeared D0-branes. This result in our paper is exactly the same as some previous results studied in this system, presented in [W. Cai, C. Wu, and Z. Xiao, Phys. Rev. D 90, 106001 (2014)]. We also compute the baryon spectrum (k =1 case) and short-distance two-body force of baryons (k =2 case). The baryon spectrum is modified and could be able to fit the experimental data if we choose a suitable value for ζ . And the short-distance two-body force of baryons is also modified by the appearance of smeared D0-branes from the original Sakai-Sugimoto model. If ζ >2 , we find that the baryon spectrum will be totally complex and an attractive force will appear in the short-distance interaction of baryons, which may consistently correspond to the existence of unstable baryonic states.

  3. Brane-induced Skyrmion on S{sup 3}: Baryonic matter in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2009-01-15

    We study baryonic matter in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D brane system in type IIA superstring theory. The baryon is described as the 'brane-induced Skyrmion', which is a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in the four-dimensional meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. We employ the ''truncated-resonance model'' approach for the baryon analysis, including pion and {rho} meson fields below the ultraviolet cutoff scale M{sub KK}{approx}1 GeV, to keep the holographic duality with QCD. We describe the baryonic matter in large N{sub c} as single brane-induced Skyrmion on the three-dimensional closed manifold S{sup 3} with finite radius R. The interactions between baryons are simulated by the curvature of the closed manifold S{sup 3}, and the decrease of the size of S{sup 3} represents the increase of the total baryon-number density in the medium in this modeling. We investigate the energy density, the field configuration, the mass and the root-mean-square radius of single baryon on S{sup 3} as the function of its radius R. We find a new picture of 'pion dominance' near the critical density in the baryonic matter, where all the (axial) vector meson fields disappear and only the pion fields survive. We also find the swelling phenomena of the baryons as the precursor of the deconfinement, and propose the mechanism of the swelling in the general context of QCD. The properties of the deconfinement and the chiral symmetry restoration in the baryonic matter are examined by taking the proper order parameters. We also compare our truncated-resonance model with another instanton description of the baryon in holographic QCD, considering the role of cutoff scale M{sub KK}.

  4. Baryon Resonances from a Novel Fat-Link Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; F. X. Lee; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

    2001-07-01

    We present first results for masses of positive and negative parity excited baryons in lattice QCD using an O(a{sup 2}) improved gluon action and a Fat Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed with fat links. The results are in agreement with earlier calculations of N* resonances using improved actions and exhibit a clear mass splitting between the nucleon and its chiral partner, even for the Wilson fermion action. The results also indicate a splitting between the lowest J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} states for the standard nucleon interpolating fields.

  5. Unconventional baryon and meson spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Battaglieri

    2007-11-01

    Understanding quark and gluon confinement in Quantum Chromodynamics is one of the main issue in hadronic physics. Electromagnetic probes, real and virtual photons, are a powerful tool to investigate how the QCD-partons manifest themselves in strong interaction at the energy scale of the nucleon mass (GeV). The CLAS Collaboration in Hall B at Jefferson Lab (USA) has a broad scientific program ranging from the static and dynamic properties of constituent quarks to the investigation of possible exotic baryon configurations. After a brief description of the CLAS detector, some selected results will be outlined showing the richness of this non-perturbative physics.

  6. Measurement of the mass of the Λb baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Wildish, T.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    In a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP, four Λb baryon candidates are exclusively reconstructed in the Λb → Λc+π- channel, with the Λc+ decaying into pK-π+, p overlineK0, or Λπ+π+π-. The probability of the observed signal to be due to a background fluctuation is estimated to be 4.2 × 10 -4. The mass of the Λb is measured to be 5614±21 (stat.) ± 4 (syst.) MeV/ c2.

  7. Evidence for a narrow anti-charmed baryon state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kückens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakyt≐, R.; Pöschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    A narrow resonance in D∗ -p and D∗ +p¯ invariant mass combinations is observed in inelastic electron-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 300 GeV and 320 GeV at HERA. The resonance has a mass of 3099±3(stat.)±5(syst.) MeV and a measured Gaussian width of 12±3(stat.) MeV, compatible with the experimental resolution. The resonance is interpreted as an anti-charmed baryon with a minimal constituent quark composition of uuddc¯, together with the charge conjugate.

  8. Baryon octet electromagnetic form factors in a confining NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Serrano, Manuel E.; Bentz, Wolfgang; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet are studied using a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model which utilizes the proper-time regularization scheme to simulate aspects of colour confinement. In addition, the model also incorporates corrections to the dressed quarks from vector meson correlations in the t-channel and the pion cloud. Comparison with recent chiral extrapolations of lattice QCD results shows a remarkable level of consistency. For the charge radii we find the surprising result that rEp < rEΣ+ and | rEn | < | rEΞ0 |, whereas the magnetic radii have a pattern largely consistent with a naive expectation based on the dressed quark masses.

  9. On the baryonic contents of low mass galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2012-07-16

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is an important observational constraint on cosmological and galactic models. However, it is critical to keep in mind that in observations only stars, molecular, and atomic gas are counted, while the contribution of the ionized gas is almost universally missed. The ionized gas is, however, expected to be present in the gaseous disks of dwarf galaxies simply because they are exposed to the cosmic ionizing background and to the stellar radiation that manages to escape from the central regions of the galactic disks into their outer layers. Such an expectation is, indeed, born out both by cosmological numerical simulations and by simple analytical models.

  10. Sterile neutrinos as the origin of dark and baryonic matter.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, evading thus the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. We identify the range of sterile neutrino properties that is consistent with all known constraints. We find a domain of parameters where the new particles can be found with present day experimental techniques, using upgrades to existing experimental facilities. PMID:23432234

  11. Including the {delta}(1232) resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.; Wies, N.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-11-01

    Baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit {delta}(1232) degrees of freedom is considered. The most general interactions of pions, nucleons, and {delta} consistent with all underlying symmetries as well as with the constraint structure of higher-spin fields are constructed. By use of the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme, a manifestly Lorentz-invariant effective-field theory with a systematic power counting is obtained. As applications, we discuss the mass of the nucleon, the pion-nucleon {sigma} term, and the pole of the {delta} propagator.

  12. Improving the ultraviolet behavior in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, D.; Schindler, M.R.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a new formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory which improves the ultraviolet behavior of propagators and can be interpreted as a smooth cutoff regularization scheme. It is equivalent to the standard approach, preserves all symmetries, and therefore satisfies the Ward identities. Our formulation is equally well defined in the vacuum, one-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors of the theory. The equations (Bethe-Salpeter, Lippmann-Schwinger, etc.) for the scattering amplitudes of the few-nucleon sector are free of divergences in the new approach. Unlike the usual cutoff regularization, our 'cutoffs' are parameters of the Lagrangian and do not have to be removed.

  13. Baryon resonances without quarks: A chiral soliton perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karliner, M.

    1987-03-01

    In many processes involving low momentum transfer it is fruitful to regard the nucleon as a soliton or ''monopole-like'' configuration of the pion field. In particular, within this framework it is possible to obtain detailed predictions for pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes and for properties of baryon resonances. One can also derive model-independent linear relations between scattering amplitudes, such as ..pi..N and anti KN. A short survey of some recent results is given, including comparison with experimental data.

  14. Lattice Calculation of Baryon Masses using Clover Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Richards; M. Gockeler; P.E.L. Rakow; D. Pleiter; G. Schierholz; R. Horsley; C.M. Maynard

    2002-03-01

    We present a calculation of the lowest-lying baryon masses in the quenched approximation to QCD. The calculations are performed using a non-perturbatively improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon and its parity partner. An analysis of the mass of the first radial excitation of the nucleon finds a value considerably larger than that of the parity partner of the nucleon, and thus little evidence for the Roper resonance as a simple three-quark state.

  15. Correlating the skewness and kurtosis of baryon number distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2016-05-01

    The skewness and the kurtosis of the baryon number distributions are computed within QCD-improved low energy effective models including quantum thermal and density fluctuations. The results are compared with the Beam Energy Scan experiment at RHIC. The theoretical results agree with the experimental measurements up to errors, for the collision energy √{s }≥19.6 GeV . For smaller collision energies a discrepancy between theoretical and experimental results develops. This discrepancy partially relates to the lack of precision of the current setup for small collision energies. It is outlined how this deficiency can be overcome.

  16. The cosmological density of baryons from observations of 3He+ in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Bania, T M; Rood, Robert T; Balser, Dana S

    2002-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis after the Big Bang can be constrained by the abundances of the light elements and isotopes 2H, 3He, 4He and 7Li (ref. 1). The standard theory of stellar evolution predicts that 3He is also produced by solar-type stars, so its abundance is of interest not only for cosmology, but also for understanding stellar evolution and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The 3He abundance in star-forming (H II) regions agrees with the present value for the local interstellar medium, but seems to be incompatible with the stellar production rates inferred from observations of planetary nebulae, which provide a direct test of stellar evolution theory. Here we develop our earlier observations, which, when combined with recent theoretical developments in our understanding of light-element synthesis and destruction in stars, allow us to determine an upper limit for the primordial abundance of 3He relative to hydrogen: 3He/H = (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-5). The primordial density of all baryons determined from the 3He data is in excellent agreement with the densities calculated from other cosmological probes. The previous conflict is resolved because most solar-mass stars do not produce enough 3He to enrich the interstellar medium significantly. PMID:11780112

  17. Production of Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron from Baryon inhomogeneous primordial nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David; Schramm, David N.; Olive, Keith A.; Mathews, Grant J.; Meyer, Bradley S.; Fields, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis may eventually be used to explain the abundances of Li-6, Be-9, and B in Population II stars. The present work differs from previous studies in that we have used a more extensive reaction network. It is demonstrated that in the simplest scenario the abundances of the light elements with A less than or = 7 constrain the separation of inhomogeneities to sufficently small scales that the model is indistinguishable from homogeneous nucleosynthesis and that the abundnace of Li-6, Be-9, and B are then below observations by several orders of magnitude. This conclusion does not depend on the Li-7 constraint. We also examine alternative scenarios which involve a post-nucleosynthesis reprocessing of the light elements to reproduce the observed abundances of Li and B, while allowing for a somewhat higher baryon density (still well below the cosmological critical density). Future B/H measurements may be able to exclude even this exotic scenario and further restrict primirdial nucleosynthesis to approach the homogeneous model conclusions.

  18. Baryons with open beauty dynamically generated from meson-baryon interaction in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Xiao, C. W.; Oset, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we review the results about the interaction of B ¯N , B ¯Δ, B ¯*N and B ¯*Δ states with beauty B = 1, together with their coupled channels, using the extended local hidden gauge approach. The Λb(5912) and Λb(5920) observed in the experiment are dynamically generated from the meson-baryon interaction, and they couple mostly to B ¯*N , which are degenerate with the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction. In addition, three more states with I = 0 and eight more states with I = 1 are predicted.

  19. Relativistic quark-diquark model of baryons with a spin-isospin transition interaction: Non-strange baryon spectrum and nucleon magnetic moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, M.; Ferretti, J.; Santopinto, E.; Vassallo, A.

    2016-05-01

    The relativistic interacting quark-diquark model of baryons, recently developed, is here extended introducing in the mass operator a spin-isospin transition interaction. This refined version of the model is used to calculate the non-strange baryon spectrum. The results are compared to the present experimental data. A preliminary calculation of the magnetic moments of the proton and neutron is also presented.

  20. Stealth dark matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present a new model of stealth dark matter: a composite baryonic scalar of an S U (ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND≥4 . All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to S U (4 ), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB≳300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  1. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-01

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. PMID:25166658

  2. The Experimental Discovery of Double-Charm Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelfried, Jürgen; Selex Collaboration

    2005-04-01

    In 2002, the SELEX [The SELEX (Fermilab E781) Collaboration: Ball State University, Bogazici University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Fermilab, Institute For High Energy Physics (Protvino), Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing), Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow), Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Tel Aviv University, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, University of Iowa, University of Michigan-Flint, University of Rochester, University of Rome La Sapienza and INFN, University of São Paulo, University of Trieste and INFN. http://www-selex.fnal.gov] Experiment (Fermilab E781) reported the first observation of a member of the family of doubly charmed baryons [SELEX Collaboration, M. Mattson et al.: First observation of the doubly charmed baryonΞcc+. Phys. Rev. Letters 89 (2002) 112001, [ arXiv:hep-ex/0208014

  3. Mission and instrumentation concept for the baryonic structure probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbets, Dennis; DeCino, James; Turner-Valle, Jennifer; Sembach, Kenneth

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing consensus that a substantial fraction of the matter in the universe, especially what we think of as normal baryonic matter, exists in a tenuous, hot filamentary intergalactic medium often referred to as the Cosmic Web. Improving our understanding of the web has been a high priority scientific goal in NASA's planning and roadmapping activities. NASA recently supported an Origins Probe study that explored the observable phenomenology of the web in detail and developed concepts for the instrumentation and mission. The Baryonic Structure Probe operates in the ultraviolet spectral region, using primarily O VI (λλ 1032, 1038 angstrom) and HI Ly α (λ 1216 angstrom) as tracers of the web. A productive investigation requires both moderate resolution (R = λ/Δλ ~ 30000) absorption line spectroscopy using faint background quasars as continuum sources, and imaging of the diffuse filaments in emission lines of the same ions. Spectroscopic sensitivity to quasars as faint as V ~ 19 will probe a large number of sight lines to derive physical diagnostics over the redshift range 0 < z < 1. Spectral imaging with a wide field of view and sensitivity to a redshift range 0 < z < 0.3 will map the filaments in a large volume of the universe after the web had evolved to near its modern structure. This paper summarizes the scientific goals, identifies the measurement requirements derived from them, and describes the instrument concepts and overall mission architecture developed by the BSP study team.

  4. Dense baryonic matter: Constraints from recent neutron star observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Thomas; Weise, Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Updated constraints from neutron star masses and radii impose stronger restrictions on the equation of state for baryonic matter at high densities and low temperatures. The existence of 2M⊙ neutron stars rules out many soft equations of state with prominent "exotic" compositions. The present work reviews the conditions required for the pressure as a function of baryon density to satisfy these constraints. Several scenarios for sufficiently stiff equations of state are evaluated. The common starting point is a realistic description of both nuclear and neutron matter based on a chiral effective field theory approach to the nuclear many-body problem. Possible forms of hybrid matter featuring a quark core in the center of the star are discussed using a three-flavor Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. It is found that a conventional equation of state based on nuclear chiral dynamics meets the astrophysical constraints. Hybrid matter generally turns out to be too soft unless additional strongly repulsive correlations, e.g., through vector current interactions between quarks, are introduced. The extent to which strangeness can accumulate in the equation of state is also discussed.

  5. Strange b baryon production and lifetime in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    In a data sample of approximately four million hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector from 1990 to 1995, a search for the strange b baryon Ξb is performed with a study of Ξ-lepton correlations. Forty-four events with same sign Ξ-ℓ - combinations are found whereas 8.4 are expected based on the rate of opposite sign Ξ-ℓ + combinations. This significant excess is interpreted as evidence for Ξb semileptonic decays. The measured product branching ratio is Br(b → Ξ b) × Br(Ξ b → X cXℓ -overlineν ℓ) × Br(X c → Ξ -X‧) = (5.4±1.1(stat) ± 0.8(syst)) × 10 -4 per lepton species, averaged over electrons and muons, with X c a charmed baryon. The Ξb lifetime is measured to be τΞb = 1.35 -0.28+0.37(stat) -0.17+0.15(syst) ps.

  6. Baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.

    2016-06-01

    We are carrying out a panchromatic observing program to study the baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters. In this talk, I will present results primarily from XMM-Newton observations of optically-selected clusters in the redshift range of 0.1-0.4. These clusters are selected because of their fortuitous alignment with background far-UV-bright QSOs, which thus allows for Ly-alpha and O VI absorption line spectroscopy with HST/COS, probing physical processes of the evolving intracluster medium, freshly accreted from the intergalactic medium and/or stripped out of individual galaxies, as well as the gaseous halos of individual cluster galaxies. Interestingly, such clusters tend to be dynamically young and often consist of merging subcluster pairs at similar redshifts. These subclusters themselves typically show substantial substructures, including strongly distorted radio lobes, as well as large position offsets between the diffuse X-ray centroids and the brightest galaxies. A comparison of the hot gas and stellar masses of each cluster with the expected cosmological baryonic mass fraction indicates a significant room for other gas components. I will also briefly examine the limitations of both optically and X-ray selected clusters, as well as how they may be used in a complementary fashion.

  7. Tying dark matter to baryons with self-interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2014-07-11

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) models have been proposed to solve the small-scale issues with the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. We derive equilibrium solutions in these SIDM models for the dark matter halo density profile including the gravitational potential of both baryons and dark matter. Self-interactions drive dark matter to be isothermal and this ties the core sizes and shapes of dark matter halos to the spatial distribution of the stars, a radical departure from previous expectations and from cold dark matter predictions. Compared to predictions of SIDM-only simulations, the core sizes are smaller and the core densities are higher, with the largest effects in baryon-dominated galaxies. As an example, we find a core size around 0.3 kpc for dark matter in the Milky Way, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the core size from SIDM-only simulations, which has important implications for indirect searches of SIDM candidates. PMID:25062162

  8. QCD at zero baryon density and the Polyakov loop paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvila, Slavo; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2006-06-01

    We compare the grand-canonical partition function at fixed chemical potential {mu} with the canonical partition function at fixed baryon number B, formally and by numerical simulations at {mu}=0 and B=0 with four flavors of staggered quarks. We verify that the free energy densities are equal in the thermodynamic limit, and show that they can be well described by the hadron resonance gas at TT{sub c}. Small differences between the two ensembles, for thermodynamic observables characterizing the deconfinement phase transition, vanish with increasing lattice size. These differences are solely caused by contributions of nonzero baryon density sectors, which are exponentially suppressed with increasing volume. The Polyakov loop shows a different behavior: for all temperatures and volumes, its expectation value is exactly zero in the canonical formulation, whereas it is always nonzero in the commonly used grand-canonical formulation. We clarify this paradoxical difference, and show that the nonvanishing Polyakov loop expectation value is due to contributions of nonzero triality states, which are not physical, because they give zero contribution to the partition function.

  9. Electroproduction of baryon-meson states and strangeness suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santopinto, E.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the electroproduction ratios of baryon-meson states from nucleon, inferring from the sea quarks in the nucleon using an extension of the quark model that takes into account the sea. As a result we provide, with no adjustable parameters, the predictions of ratios of exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, Σ* K, ΣK, pπ0, and nπ+. These predictions are in agreement with the new JLab experimental data showing that sea quarks play an important role in the electroproduction. We also predicted further ratios of exclusive reactions that can be measured and tested in future experiments. In particular, we suggested new experiments on deuterium and tritium. Such measurements can provide crucial tests of different predictions concerning the structure of nucleon and its sea quarks helping to solve an outstanding problem. Finally, we compute the so called strangeness suppression factor, λs, that is the suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, and we found that our finding with this simple extension of the quark model is in good agreement with the results of JLab and CERN experiments.

  10. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  11. Charmed baryon strong decays in a chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Xianhui; Zhao Qiang

    2008-04-01

    Charmed baryon strong decays are studied in a chiral quark model. The data for the decays of {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2593), {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2625), {sigma}{sub c}{sup ++,+,0}, and {sigma}{sub c}{sup +,0}(2520) are accounted for successfully, which allows one to fix the pseudoscalar-meson-quark couplings in an effective chiral Lagrangian. Extending this framework to analyze the strong decays of the newly observed charmed baryons, we classify that {lambda}{sub c}(2880) and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) as D-wave states in the N=2 shell; {lambda}{sub c}(2880) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(3/2){sup +}> and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup +}>. Our calculation also suggests that {lambda}{sub c}(2765) is very likely a {rho}-mode P-wave excited state in the N=1 shell, and favors a |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 4}P{sub {rho}}(1/2){sup -}> configuration. The {sigma}{sub c}(2800) favors being a |{sigma}{sub c}{sup 2}P{sub {lambda}}(1/2){sup -}> state. But its being |{sigma}{sub c}{sup ++4}P{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup -}> cannot be ruled out.

  12. Dark and baryonic matter in the MareNostrum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Khalatyan, A.; Sevilla, R.; Turchaninov, V.

    2006-11-01

    We report some results from one of the largest hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of large scale structures that has been done up to date. The MareNostrum Universe SPH simulation consists of 2 billion particles (2 × 10243) in a cubic box of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side. This simulation has been done in the MareNostrum parallel supercomputer at the Barcelona SuperComputer Center. Due to the large simulated volume and good mass resolution, our simulated catalog of dark matter halos comprises more than half a million objects with masses larger than a typical Milky Way galaxy halo. From this dataset we have studied several statistical properties such as the halo mass function, the distribution of shapes of dark and gas components within halos, the baryon fraction, cumulative void volume etc. This simulation is particularly useful to study the large scale distribution of baryons in the universe as a function of temperature and density. In this paper we also show the time evolution of the gas fractions at large scales.

  13. Observation of a new Ξb baryon.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; De Jesus Damiao, D; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W

    2012-06-22

    The observation of a new b baryon via its strong decay into Ξ(b)(-) π(+) (plus charge conjugates) is reported. The measurement uses a data sample of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb(-1). The known Ξ(b)(-) baryon is reconstructed via the decay chain Ξ(b)(-) → J/ψΞ(-) → μ(+) μ(-) Λ(0) π(-), with Λ(0) → pπ(-). A peak is observed in the distribution of the difference between the mass of the Ξ(b)(-) π(+) system and the sum of the masses of the Ξ(b)(-) and π(+), with a significance exceeding 5 standard deviations. The mass difference of the peak is 14.84 ± 0.74(stat) ± 0.28(syst) MeV. The new state most likely corresponds to the J(P) = 3/2(+) companion of the Ξ(b). PMID:23004588

  14. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  15. Fragmentation fractions of two-body b-baryon decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Y. K.; Lin, P. Y.; Luo, L. W.; Geng, C. Q.

    2015-12-01

    We study the fragmentation fractions (fBb) of the b-quark to b-baryons (Bb). By the assumption of fΛb / (fu +fd) = 0.25 ± 0.15 in accordance with the measurements by LEP, CDF and LHCb Collaborations, we estimate that fΛb = 0.175 ± 0.106 and fΞb-,0 = 0.019 ± 0.013. From these fragmentation fractions, we derive B (Λb → J / ψΛ) = (3.3 ± 2.1) ×10-4, B (Ξb- → J / ψΞ-) = (5.3 ± 3.9) ×10-4 and B (Ωb- → J / ψΩ-) > 1.9 ×10-5. The predictions of B (Λb → J / ψΛ) and B (Ξb- → J / ψΞ-) clearly enable us to test the theoretical models, such as the QCD factorization approach in the b-baryon decays.

  16. Accuracy of cosmological parameters using the baryon acoustic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Thepsuriya, Kiattisak; Lewis, Antony E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2015-01-01

    Percent-level measurements of the comoving baryon acoustic scale standard ruler can be used to break degeneracies in parameter constraints from the CMB alone. The sound horizon at the epoch of baryon drag is often used as a proxy for the scale of the peak in the matter density correlation function, and can conveniently be calculated quickly for different cosmological models. However, the measurements are not directly constraining this scale, but rather a measurement of the full correlation function, which depends on the detailed evolution through decoupling. We assess the level of reliability of parameter constraints based on a simple approximation of the acoustic scale compared to a more direct determination from the full numerical two-point correlation function. Using a five-parameter fitting technique similar to recent BAO data analyses, we find that for standard ΛCDM models and extensions with massive neutrinos and additional relativistic degrees of freedom, the approximation is at better than 0.15% for most parameter combinations varying over reasonable ranges.

  17. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Jose; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering the Lyman-a forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Survey (BOSS). show that the flat LCDM model, that best describes the CMB data alone, is discrepant at 95% with the LyaF measurements. Hence, in order to reconcile them we consider models with more unusual histories of the dark energy, matter, or radiation components. In part we want to know what our combined data can place on interesting physical, such as neutrino masses, extra relativistic species, or dark energy that is dynamically significant at early times. But we also want to see whether any of these alternative models can resolve the discrepancy with the LyaF measurements at z = 2.34.

  18. A Study of Double-Charm and Charm-Strange Baryons inElectron-Positron Annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Adam J.; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    In this dissertation I describe a study of double-charm and charm-strange baryons based on data collected with the BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In this study I search for new baryons and make precise measurements of their properties and decay modes. I seek to verify and expand upon double-charm and charm-strange baryon observations made by other experiments. The BABAR Detector is used to measure subatomic particles that are produced at the PEP-II storage rings. I analyze approximately 300 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events in a search for the production of double-charm baryons. I search for the double-charm baryons {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} (containing the quarks ccd) and {Xi}{sup ++}{sub cc} (ccu) in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, respectively. No statistically significant signals for their production are found, and upper limits on their production are determined. Statistically significant signals for excited charm-strange baryons are observed with my analysis of approximately 500 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events. The charged charm-strange baryons {Xi}{sub c}(2970){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +} are found in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the same decay mode used in the {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} search. The neutral charm-strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup 0} is observed in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}. I also search for excited charm-strange baryon decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. No significant charm-strange baryon signals a f h these decay modes. For each excited charm-strange baryon state that I observe, I measure its mass, natural width (lifetime), and production rate. The properties of these excited charm-strange baryons and their

  19. Pion- and strangeness-baryon σ terms in the extended chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, C. S.; Saghai, B.

    2015-07-01

    Within an extended chiral constituent quark formalism, we investigate contributions from all possible five-quark components in the octet baryons to the pion-baryon (σπ B) and strangeness-baryon (σs B) sigma terms: B ≡N ,Λ ,Σ ,Ξ . The probabilities of the quark-antiquark components in the ground-state baryon octet wave functions are calculated by taking the baryons to be admixtures of three- and five-quark components, with the relevant transitions handled via the 3P0 mechanism. Predictions for σπ B and σs B obtained by using input parameters taken from the literature are reported. Our results turn out to be, in general, consistent with the findings via lattice QCD and chiral perturbation theory.

  20. Properties of hadron matter. II - Dense baryon matter and neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Y. C.; Wang, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    In this article we have provided certain details of a nuclear-matter computation, based on the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory of nuclear reaction, which leads to an equation of state for matter in the density region of 10 to 500 trillion g/cu cm. We also explore the possibilities that at very high baryon densities or for very short baryon separations, the net baryon-baryon interaction may be negligible so that the results of dynamical models, like the statistical bootstrap model and the dual-resonance model, may be applicable to the study of dense baryon matter. Several plausible equations of state are constructed, and their effect on the limiting mass of the neutron star is examined.

  1. Feynman scaling violation on baryon spectra in pp collisions at LHC and cosmic ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Arakelyan, G. H.; Merino, C. Pajares, C.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    2013-03-15

    A significant asymmetry in baryon/antibaryon yields in the central region of high energy collisions is observed when the initial state has nonzero baryon charge. This asymmetry is connected with the possibility of baryon charge diffusion in rapidity space. Such a diffusion should decrease the baryon charge in the fragmentation region and translate into the corresponding decrease of the multiplicity of leading baryons. As a result, a new mechanism for Feynman scaling violation in the fragmentation region is obtained. Another numerically more significant reason for the Feynman scaling violation comes from the fact that the average number of cut Pomerons increases with initial energy. We present the quantitative predictions of the Quark-Gluon String Model for the Feynman scaling violation at LHC energies and at even higher energies that can be important for cosmic ray physics.

  2. Masses of doubly charmed baryons in the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Feng; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the mass corrections of the doubly charmed baryons up to N2L O in the extended-on-mass-shell (EOMS) renormalization scheme, comparing with the results of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. We find that the terms from the heavy baryon approach are a subset of those obtained in the EOMS scheme. By fitting the lattice data, we can determine the parameters m ˜, α , c1 and c7 from the Lagrangian, while in the heavy baryon approach no information on c1 can be obtained from the baryons mass. Correspondingly, the masses of mΞcc and mΩcc are predicted, in the EOMS scheme, extrapolating the results from different values of the charm quark and the pion masses of the lattice QCD calculations.

  3. A Study in Blue: The Baryon Content of Isolated Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Jeremy D.; Geha, Marla C.; Blanton, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    We study the baryon content of low-mass galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR8), focusing on galaxies in isolated environments where the complicating physics of galaxy–galaxy interactions are minimized. We measure neutral hydrogen (HI) gas masses and line widths for 148 isolated galaxies with stellar mass between 107 and {10}9.5{M}ȯ . We compare isolated low-mass galaxies to more massive galaxies and galaxies in denser environments by remeasuring HI emission lines from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey 40% data release. All isolated low-mass galaxies either have large atomic gas fractions or large atomic gas fractions cannot be ruled out via their upper limits. We measure a median atomic gas fraction of {f}{gas}=0.81+/- 0.13 for our isolated low-mass sample with no systems below 0.30. At all stellar masses, the correlations between galaxy radius, baryonic mass, and velocity width are not significantly affected by environment. Finally, we estimate a median baryon to total dynamical mass fraction of {f}{baryon,{disk}}=0.15+/- 0.17. We also estimate two different median baryon to halo mass fractions using the results of semi-analytic models ({f}{baryon,{halo}}=0.04+/- 0.06) and abundance matching ({f}{baryon,{halo}}=0.04+/- 0.02). Baryon fractions estimated directly using HI observations appear independent of environment and maximum circular velocity, while baryon fractions estimated using abundance matching show a significant depletion of baryons at low maximum circular velocities.

  4. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and galactic outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.

    2012-08-01

    Most of the baryons in the Universe are not in the form of stars and cold gas in galaxies. Galactic outflows driven by supernovae/stellar winds are the leading mechanisms for explaining this fact. The scaling relation between galaxy mass and outer rotation velocity (also known as the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, BTF) has recently been used as evidence against this viewpoint. We use a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM)-based semi-analytic disc galaxy formation model to investigate these claims. In our model, galaxies with less efficient star formation and higher gas fractions are more efficient at ejecting gas from galaxies. This somewhat counter intuitive result is due to the (observational) fact that galaxies with less efficient star formation and higher gas fractions tend to live in dark matter haloes with lower circular velocities, from which less energy is required to escape the potential well. In our model the intrinsic scatter in the BTF is ≃0.15 dex, and mostly reflects scatter in dark halo concentration. The scatter is largely independent of galaxy structure because of the large radius within which galaxy rotation velocities are measured. The observed scatter, equal to ≃0.24 dex, is dominated by measurement errors. The best estimate for the intrinsic scatter is that it is less than 0.15 dex, and thus our ΛCDM-based model (which does not include all possible sources of scatter) is only just consistent with this. Future observations of the BTF scatter could be made with a more stringent measurement of the intrinsic scatter, and thus provide a strong constraint to galaxy formation models. In our model, gas-rich galaxies, at fixed virial velocity (Vvir), with lower stellar masses have lower baryonic masses. This is consistent with the expectation that galaxies with lower stellar masses have had less energy available to drive an outflow. However, when the outer rotation velocity (Vflat) is used the correlation has the opposite sign, with a slope in agreement

  5. Kaon condensation in baryonic Fermi liquid at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Won-Gi; Rho, Mannque

    2015-01-01

    We formulate kaon condensation in dense baryonic matter with antikaons fluctuating from the Fermi-liquid fixed point. This entails that in the Wilsonian renormalization group (RG) approach, the decimation is effectuated in the baryonic sector to the Fermi surface while in the meson sector to the origin. In writing the kaon-baryon (KN) coupling, we take a generalized hidden local symmetry Lagrangian for the meson sector endowed with a "mended symmetry" that has the unbroken symmetry limit at high density in which the Goldstone π , scalar s , and vectors ρ (and ω ) and a1 become massless. The vector mesons ρ (and ω ) and a1 can be identified as emergent (hidden) local gauge fields and the scalar s as the dilaton field of the spontaneously broken scale invariance at chiral restoration. In matter-free space, when the vector mesons and the scalar meson—whose masses are much greater than that of the pion—are integrated out, then the resulting KN coupling Lagrangian consists of the leading chiral order [O (p1) ] Weinberg-Tomozawa term and the next chiral order [O (p2) ] ΣKN term. In addressing kaon condensation in dense nuclear matter in chiral perturbation theory, one makes an expansion in the "small" Fermi momentum kF. We argue that in the Wilsonian RG formalism with the Fermi-liquid fixed point, the expansion is on the contrary in 1 /kF with the "large" Fermi momentum kF. The kaon-quasinucleon interaction resulting from integrating out the massive mesons consists of a "relevant" term from the scalar exchange (analog to the ΣKN term) and an "irrelevant" term from the vector-meson exchange (analog to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term). It is found that the critical density predicted by the latter approach, controlled by the relevant term with the irrelevant term suppressed, is three times less than that predicted by chiral perturbation theory. This would make kaon condensation take place at a much lower density than previously estimated in chiral perturbation theory.

  6. Quark confinement potential examined by excitation energy of the Λc and Λb baryons in a quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jido, Daisuke; Sakashita, Minori

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of having a diquark configuration in heavy baryons, such as Λ and Λ, is examined by a nonrelativistic potential model with a heavy quark and a light scalar diquark. Assuming that the Λ and Λ baryons are composed of the heavy quark and the point-like scalar-isoscalar ud diquark, we solve the two-body Schrödinger equation with the Coulomb plus linear potential and obtain the energy spectra for the heavy baryons. Contrary to our expectation, it is found that the potential determined by the quarkonium spectra fails to reproduce the excitation spectra of the Λ and Λ in the quark-diquark picture, while the Λ and Λ spectra are reproduced with half the strength of the confinement string tension than for the quarkonium. The finite size effect of the diquark is also examined and it is found that the introduction of a finite size diquark would resolve the failure of the spectrum reproduction. The Ξ excitation energy is also calculated and is found to be smaller than Λ in the quark-diquark model. This is not consistent with experimental observations.

  7. Dark matter from unification of color and baryon number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornal, Bartosz; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a recently proposed extension of the Standard Model based on the S U (4 )×S U (2 )L×U (1 )X gauge group, in which baryon number is interpreted as the fourth color and dark matter emerges as a neutral partner of the ordinary quarks under S U (4 ). We show that under well-motivated minimal flavor-violating assumptions the particle spectrum contains a heavy dark matter candidate which is dominantly the partner of the right-handed top quark. Assuming a standard cosmology, the correct thermal relic density through freeze-out is obtained for dark matter masses around 2-3 TeV. We examine the constraints and future prospects for direct and indirect searches for dark matter. We also briefly discuss the LHC phenomenology, which is rich in top quark signatures, and investigate the prospects for discovery at a 100 TeV hadron collider.

  8. Do baryons trace dark matter in the early universe?

    PubMed

    Grin, Daniel; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-23

    Baryon-density perturbations of large amplitude may exist if they are compensated by dark-matter perturbations such that the total density is unchanged. Primordial abundances and galaxy clusters allow these compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) to have amplitudes as large as ~10%. CIPs will modulate the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations--those due to the usual adiabatic perturbations--as a function of position on the sky. This leads to correlations between different spherical-harmonic coefficients of the temperature and/or polarization maps, and induces polarization B modes. Here, the magnitude of these effects is calculated and techniques to measure them are introduced. While a CIP of this amplitude can be probed on large scales with existing data, forthcoming CMB experiments should improve the sensitivity to CIPs by at least an order of magnitude. PMID:22243148

  9. Hypermagnetic gyrotropy, inflation, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the production of the hypermagnetic gyrotropy when the electric and magnetic gauge couplings evolve at different rates, as it happens in the relativistic theory of the van der Waals forces. If a pseudoscalar interaction breaks the duality symmetry of the corresponding equations, the gyrotropic configurations of the hypermagnetic fields can be amplified from the vacuum during an inflationary stage of expansion. After charting the parameter space of the model in terms of the rates of evolution of the magnetic and electric gauge couplings, we identify the regions where the gyrotropy is sufficiently intense to seed the baryon asymmetry of the Universe at the electroweak epoch while the backreaction constraints, the strong coupling bounds and the other astrophysical limits are concurrently satisfied.

  10. The Missing Baryons Around Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    Based on their stellar and cool gas content, galaxies are missing most of their baryons, yet additional gas may lie in a hot multi-million degree halo stretching to the virial radius. Our ROSAT stacking analysis shows that the average galaxy possesses only a modest extended gas halo, but studies of two individual isolated elliptical galaxies indicate that such massive halos exist. To investigate this difference, we propose observations of two ellipticals with specially designed observations that minimize systematic uncertainties. The derived halo masses will show if the gas mass to dark matter ratio is nearly constant of if it varies greatly between galaxies. These gas masses and radial distributions are fundamental quantities, critical in constraining galaxy formation models.

  11. Low energy scattering phase shifts for meson-baryon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, William; Nicholson, Amy N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we calculate meson-baryon scattering phase shifts in four channels using lattice QCD methods. From a set of calculations at four volumes, corresponding to spatial sizes of 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 fm, and a pion mass of mπ˜390 MeV , we determine the scattering lengths and effective ranges for these systems at the corresponding quark masses. We also perform the calculation at a lighter quark mass, mπ˜230 MeV , on the largest volume. Using these determinations, along with those in previous work, we perform a chiral extrapolation of the scattering lengths to the physical point after correcting for the effective range contributions using the multivolume calculations performed at mπ˜390 MeV .

  12. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with future SKA surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, P.; Camera, S.; Raccanelli, A.; Blake, C.; Ferreira, P.; Santos, M.; Schwarz, D. J.

    2015-04-01

    The imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in large-scale structure can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history, and hence for testing cosmological models. In this article we briefly describe the scientific background to the BAO technique, and forecast the potential of the Phase 1 and 2 SKA telescopes to perform BAO surveys using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys. We find that a 25,000 sq. deg. intensity mapping survey on a Phase 1 array will preferentially constrain the radial BAO, providing a highly competitive 2% constraint on the expansion rate at z ~ 2. A 30,000 sq. deg. galaxy redshift survey on SKA2 will outperform all other planned experiments for z < 1.4.

  13. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon production mechanism. The following reactions were looked at, γp -->pp p , γp -->ppπ- n , and γp -->p p π+ n. For these reactions the photon energies that were selected were from 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with a luminosity of 68 pb-1. Features of the data such as invariant mass spectra, missing mass spectra, and angular distributions necessary for the analysis will be shown. In addition, a first observation of antineutrons in photoproduction in the missing mass spectra of γp -->ppπ- n will also be shown.

  14. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon photoproduction mechanism. Three reactions, γ p --> pp p , γp --> pp π- n , and γp --> p p π+ n have been investigated for the photon energy range of 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with an integrated luminosity of 68 pb-1. General features of the data for these three reactions will be shown. In particular, the angular and energy dependence of the antibaryons as well as the preliminary normalized yields will be presented. Also, preliminary partial wave analysis results for the p p system will be discussed.

  15. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William

    2015-04-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon photoproduction mechanism. Three reactions, γp --> pp p , γp --> ppπ- n , and γp --> p p π+ n have been investigated for the photon energy range of 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with an integrated luminosity of 68 pb-1. General features of the data for these three reactions will be shown. In particular, the angular and energy dependence of the antibaryons as well as the preliminary normalized yields will be presented. Also, preliminary partial wave analysis results for the p p system will be discussed.

  16. Observation of excited Λ(b)(0) baryons.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-26

    Using pp collision data corresponding to 1.0 fb(-1) integrated luminosity collected by the LHCb detector, two narrow states are observed in the Λ(b)(0)π(+)π(-) spectrum with masses 5911.97±0.12(stat)±0.02(syst)±0.66(Λ(b)(0) mass) MeV/c(2) and 5919.77±0.08(stat)±0.02(syst)±0.66(Λ(b)(0) mass) MeV/c(2). The significances of the observations are 5.2 and 10.2 standard deviations, respectively. These states are interpreted as the orbitally excited Λ(b)(0) baryons, Λ(b)(*0)(5912) and Λ(b)(*0)(5920). PMID:23215180

  17. QCD Phase Diagram at Finite Baryon and Isospin Chemical Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, T.; Sakai, Y.; Yahiro, M.; Kouno, H.

    2011-10-21

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for finite temperature T and finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub I}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data in the {mu}{sub I}-T plane at {mu}{sub B} = 0. In the {mu}{sub I}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub I} = 0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub I}-T plane at {mu}{sub B} = 0 as {mu}{sub I} increases.

  18. Spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Zanotti; S. Choe; D.B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A.G. Williams; J.B. Zhang

    2002-06-01

    We present first results for masses of spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD, using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed using fat links. In the isospin-1/2 sector, we observe, after appropriate spin and parity projection, a strong signal for the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} state, and find good agreement between the 1/2{sup +} mass and earlier nucleon mass simulations with a spin-1/2 interpolating field. For the isospin-3/2 Delta states, clear mass splittings are observed between the various 1/2{sup +/-} and the 3/2{sup +/-} channels, with the calculated level orderings in good agreement with those observed empirically.

  19. Development of clustering algorithms for Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, G. E.; Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Vassiliev, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    A clustering problem for the coordinate detectors in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is discussed. Because of the high interaction rate and huge datasets to be dealt with, clustering algorithms are required to be fast and efficient and capable of processing events with high track multiplicity. At present there are two different approaches to the problem. In the first one each fired pad bears information about its charge, while in the second one a pad can or cannot be fired, thus rendering the separation of overlapping clusters a difficult task. To deal with the latter, two different clustering algorithms were developed, integrated into the CBMROOT software environment, and tested with various types of simulated events. Both of them are found to be highly efficient and accurate.

  20. Simultaneous generation of WIMP miracle-like densities of baryons and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John

    2011-11-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Dark matter is due to O(100) GeV gauge singlet scalars produced in the annihilation of the O(TeV) colored scalars which are responsible for the final thermal WIMP-like baryon asymmetry. The requirement of no baryon washout implies that there are two gauge singlet scalars. The low-temperature transfer of the asymmetry to conventional baryons can be understood if the long-lived O(TeV) colored scalars have large hypercharge, |Y|>4/3. Production of such scalars at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  1. Yukawa Meson, Sakata Model and Baryon-Lepton Symmetry Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, R. E.

    It is difficult for me to grasp that this symposium is celebrating the jubilee of meson theory since I was a junior at Columbia College in 1935. I recall hearing a colloquium by Paul Dirac that year telling an enraptured audience about the infinite sea of negative energy states but I do not recall any special note being taken of the birth of an equally revolutionary concept, the Yukawa meson. Perhaps the reason was the publication of Hideki Yukawa's paper in an inaccessible Japanese journal, perhaps Dirac's electron theory was dealing with the well-known electromagnetic force whereas Yukawa' meson theory was put forth to understand the nature of two new forces - the nuclear and the weak. Whatever the reason, the situation changed drastically when I migrated to Cornell (to do my thesis under Hans Bethe during the years 1937sim39) and found a deep interest in meson theory. Thus, my own scientific career has almost spanned the period since the birth of meson theory but, what is more to the point, it has been strongly influenced by the work of Yukawa and his collaborators. It therefore gives me great pleasure to be able to talk at this MESON 50 symposium. As one of the oldest speakers, I shall respond in a loose way to Professor Maki's invitation to cover ``topics concerning the historical developments of hadron physics''. I shall select several major themes from the Japanese work that have had special interest for me. My remarks will fall under the four headings: (A) Yukawa Meson; (B) Sakata Model; (C) Baryon-Lepton Symmetry; and (D) Extensions of Baryon-Lepton Symmetry.

  2. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; et al

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements,more » basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.« less

  3. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-03-24

    The semileptonic decays of {Omega}{sub c} and {Omega}{sub b} are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy {Lambda} baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For {Omega}{sub b} to {Omega}{sub c} the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}e{sup +}{nu} rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of {Omega}{sub b} to pairs of ground and excited {Omega}{sub c} states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of {Omega}{sub Q} vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 {+-} 2%) for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup (*)} decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Omega}{sup (*)} decays to the ground state {Omega}. The elastic fraction of {Omega}{sub b} {yields} {Omega}{sub c} ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models.

  4. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: a cosmological forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Ross, Ashley J.; Shandera, Sarah; Percival, Will J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Myers, Adam D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Comparat, Johan; Delubac, Timothée; Gao, Pengyuan; Hojjati, Alireza; Koyama, Kazuya; McBride, Cameron K.; Meza, Andrés; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pogosian, Levon; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tao, Charling; Wang, Dandan; Yèche, Christophe; Zhang, Hanyu; Zhang, Yuecheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    We present a science forecast for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) survey. Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the fNL parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Lyman α forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS luminous red galaxies, emission line galaxies and clustering quasars can achieve a precision of 1, 2.2 and 1.6 per cent, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on fσ8 is expected to be 2.5, 3.3 and 2.8 per cent, respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of σ(fNL) ˜ 10-15. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy figure of merit by a factor of 3 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter. eBOSS can also significantly improve constraints on modified gravity parameters by providing the RSD information, which is highly complementary to constraints obtained from weak lensing measurements. A principal component analysis shows that eBOSS can measure the eigenmodes of the effective Newton's constant to 2 per cent precision; this is a factor of 10 improvement over that achievable without eBOSS. Finally, we derive the eBOSS constraint (combined with Planck, Dark Energy Survey and BOSS) on the total neutrino mass, σ(Σmν) = 0.03 eV (68 per cent CL), which in principle makes it possible to distinguish between the two scenarios of neutrino mass hierarchies.

  5. The different baryonic Tully-Fisher relations at low masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.; Santos-Santos, Isabel; Stinson, Greg

    2016-06-01

    We compare the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) of simulations and observations of galaxies ranging from dwarfs to spirals, using various measures of rotational velocity Vrot. We explore the BTFR when measuring Vrot at the flat part of the rotation curve, Vflat, at the extent of H I gas, Vlast, and using 20 per cent (W20) and 50 per cent (W50) of the width of H I line profiles. We also compare with the maximum circular velocity of the parent halo, V_max^DM, within dark matter only simulations. The different BTFRs increasingly diverge as galaxy mass decreases. Using Vlast one obtains a power law over four orders of magnitude in baryonic mass, with slope similar to the observed BTFR. Measuring Vflat gives similar results as Vlast when galaxies with rising rotation curves are excluded. However, higher rotation velocities would be found for low-mass galaxies if the cold gas extended far enough for Vrot to reach a maximum. W20 gives a similar slope as Vlast but with slightly lower values of Vrot for low-mass galaxies, although this may depend on the extent of the gas in your galaxy sample. W50 bends away from these other relations towards low velocities at low masses. By contrast, V_max^DM bends towards high velocities for low-mass galaxies, as cold gas does not extend out to the radius at which haloes reach V_max^DM. Our study highlights the need for careful comparisons between observations and models: one needs to be consistent about the particular method of measuring Vrot, and precise about the radius at which velocities are measured.

  6. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  7. THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Bolton, Adam S.; Schlegel, David J.; Bailey, Stephen; Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian E.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Borde, Arnaud; Brandt, W. N.; and others

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large-scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i = 19.9 over 10,000 deg{sup 2} to measure BAO to redshifts z < 0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Ly{alpha} forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g < 22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15 < z < 3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Ly{alpha} forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A} to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z = 0.3 and z = 0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Ly{alpha} forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D{sub A} (z) and H {sup -1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z {approx} 2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.

  8. Baryonic distributions in galaxy dark matter haloes - I. New observations of neutral and ionized gas kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (H I) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for 16 galaxies in the statistically representative Extended Disk Galaxy Explore Science kinematic sample. H I rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The H I rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in 12 galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  9. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2009-12-15

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter - radiation and baryon -radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space m{sub {sigma}} (modulus mass) - {sigma}{sub inf} (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential, and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale m{sub {sigma}} > or approx. 100 TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 10{sup 13} GeV.

  10. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Haloes I: New Observations of Neutral and Ionized Gas Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.; van Zee, L.; Barnes, K. L.; Staudaher, S.; Dale, D. A.; Braun, T. T.; Wavle, D. C.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bullock, J. S.; Chandar, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a combination of new and archival neutral hydrogen (HI) observations and new ionized gas spectroscopic observations for sixteen galaxies in the statistically representative EDGES kinematic sample. HI rotation curves are derived from new and archival radio synthesis observations from the Very Large Array (VLA) as well as processed data products from the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope (WSRT). The HI rotation curves are supplemented with optical spectroscopic integral field unit (IFU) observations using SparsePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to constrain the central ionized gas kinematics in twelve galaxies. The full rotation curves of each galaxy are decomposed into baryonic and dark matter halo components using 3.6μm images from the Spitzer Space Telescope for the stellar content, the neutral hydrogen data for the atomic gas component, and, when available, CO data from the literature for the molecular gas component. Differences in the inferred distribution of mass are illustrated under fixed stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and maximum disc/bulge assumptions in the rotation curve decomposition.

  11. Relativistic baryonic jets from an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Feng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Song; Justham, Stephen; Lu, You-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Álvarez, Pedro; Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shri

    2015-12-01

    The formation of relativistic jets by an accreting compact object is one of the fundamental mysteries of astrophysics. Although the theory is poorly understood, observations of relativistic jets from systems known as microquasars (compact binary stars) have led to a well established phenomenology. Relativistic jets are not expected to be produced by sources with soft or supersoft X-ray spectra, although two such systems are known to produce relatively low-velocity bipolar outflows. Here we report the optical spectra of an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source (ULS) in the nearby galaxy M81 (M81 ULS-1; refs 9, 10). Unexpectedly, the spectra show blueshifted, broad Hα emission lines, characteristic of baryonic jets with relativistic speeds. These time-variable emission lines have projected velocities of about 17 per cent of the speed of light, and seem to be similar to those from the prototype microquasar SS 433 (refs 11, 12). Such relativistic jets are not expected to be launched from white dwarfs, and an origin from a black hole or a neutron star is hard to reconcile with the persistence of M81 ULS-1's soft X-rays. Thus the unexpected presence of relativistic jets in a ULS challenges canonical theories of jet formation, but might be explained by a long-speculated, supercritically accreting black hole with optically thick outflows. PMID:26605521

  12. Excited-state spectroscopy of triply-bottom baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of baryons containing three b quarks is calculated in nonperturbative QCD, using the lattice regularization. The energies of ten excited bbb states with J{sup P} = 1/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +}, 5/2{sup +}, 7/2{sup +}, 1/2{sup -}, and 3/2{sup -} are determined with high precision. A domain-wall action is used for the up-, down- and strange quarks, and the bottom quarks are implemented with NRQCD. The computations are done at lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.11 fm and a {approx} 0.08 fm, and the results demonstrate the improvement of rotational symmetry as a is reduced. A large lattice volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3} is used, and extrapolations of the bbb spectrum to realistic values of the light sea-quark masses are performed. All spin-dependent energy splittings are resolved with total uncertainties of order 1 MeV, and the dependence of these splittings on the couplings in the NRQCD action is analyzed.

  13. Singly and Doubly Charmed $J=1/2$ Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu; Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-05-01

    We compute the masses of the singly and doubly charmed baryons in full QCD using the relativistic Fermilab action for the charm quark. For the light quarks we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We use the low-lying charmonium spectrum to tune our heavy-quark action and as a guide to understanding the discretization errors associated with the heavy quark. Our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematicss, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we predict the isospin averaged mass to be $M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 3665 \\pm17 \\pm14\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV} (here the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third an estimate of lattice discretization errors). In addition, we predict the splitting of the (isospin averaged) spin-1/2 $\\O_{cc}$ with the $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $M_{\\O_{cc}} - M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 98 \\pm9 \\pm22$~{MeV} (in this mass splitting, the leading discretization errors cancel). This corresponds to a prediction of $M_{\\O_{cc}} = 3763\\pm9\\pm44\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV}.

  14. Doubly heavy baryons and quark-diquark symmetry in quenched and partially quenched chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Brian C. Tiburzi

    2006-07-17

    We extend the chiral Lagrangian with heavy quark-diquark symmetry to quenched and partially quenched theories. These theories are used to derive formulae for the chiral extrapolation of masses and hyperfine splittings of doubly heavy baryons in lattice QCD simulations. A quark-diquark symmetry prediction for the hyperfine splittings of heavy mesons and doubly heavy baryons is rather insensitive to chiral corrections in both quenched and partially quenched QCD. Extrapolation formulae for the doubly heavy baryon electromagnetic transition moments are also determined for the partially quenched theory.

  15. Dark matter, lepton and baryon number, and left-right symmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sudhanwa

    2016-05-01

    A lepto-baryonic left-right symmetric theory is considered along with pointing out stable dark matter candidates whose stability is ensured automatically where leptons and baryons are defined as local gauge symmetries. These theories are generally anomalous, and the possible gauge anomaly free solutions for these theories are presented. It is found that the neutral component of fermion triplets can be a viable dark matter candidate originally introduced for gauge anomaly cancellation. The other dark matter possibilities within this lepto-baryonic left-right symmetric theory are also presented.

  16. Electromagnetic baryon form factors in the Poincaré-covariant Faddeev approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkofer, Reinhard; Eichmann, Gernot; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Williams, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Baryons are treated as three-quark systems using QCD degrees of freedom in Poincaré-covariant bound-state equations. The quark self-energy as well as the interaction between quarks are approximated by a vector-vector interaction via a single dressed-gluon exchange (rainbow-ladder truncation), thereby allowing a unified study of quark, meson and baryon properties. Here we will focus on the calculation of electromagnetic properties of spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 ground state baryons.

  17. The Entire Virial Radius of the Fossil Cluster RXJ 1159 + 5531. II. Dark Matter and Baryon Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buote, David A.; Su, Yuanyuan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this second paper on the entire virial region of the relaxed fossil cluster RXJ 1159+5531, we present a hydrostatic analysis of the azimuthally averaged hot intracluster medium (ICM) using the results of Su et al. For a model consisting of ICM, stellar mass from the central galaxy (BCG), and an NFW dark matter (DM) halo, we obtain a good description of the projected radial profiles of ICM emissivity and temperature that yield precise constraints on the total mass profile. The BCG stellar mass component is clearly detected with a K-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, {M}\\star /{L}K=0.61+/- 0.11 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , consistent with stellar population synthesis models for a Milky Way initial mass function. We obtain a halo concentration, {c}200=8.4+/- 1.0, and virial mass, {M}200=(7.9+/- 0.6)× {10}13 {M}ȯ . For its mass, the inferred concentration is larger than most relaxed halos produced in cosmological simulations with Planck parameters, consistent with RXJ 1159+5531 forming earlier than the general halo population. The baryon fraction at r 200, {f}{{b,200}}=0.134+/- 0.007, is slightly below the Planck value (0.155) for the universe. However, when we take into account the additional stellar baryons associated with non-central galaxies and the uncertain intracluster light (ICL), {f}{{b,200}} increases by ≈ 0.015, consistent with the cosmic value and therefore no significant baryon loss from the system. The total mass profile is nearly a power law over a large radial range (˜0.2–10 R e ), where the corresponding density slope α obeys the α -{R}e scaling relation for massive early-type galaxies. Performing our analysis in the context of MOND still requires a large DM fraction (85.0 % +/- 2.5 % at r = 100 kpc) similar to that obtained using the standard Newtonian approach. The detection of a plausible stellar BCG mass component distinct from the NFW DM halo in the total gravitational potential suggests that ˜ {10}14 {M}ȯ represents the mass scale above which

  18. The Entire Virial Radius of the Fossil Cluster RXJ 1159 + 5531. II. Dark Matter and Baryon Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buote, David A.; Su, Yuanyuan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this second paper on the entire virial region of the relaxed fossil cluster RXJ 1159+5531, we present a hydrostatic analysis of the azimuthally averaged hot intracluster medium (ICM) using the results of Su et al. For a model consisting of ICM, stellar mass from the central galaxy (BCG), and an NFW dark matter (DM) halo, we obtain a good description of the projected radial profiles of ICM emissivity and temperature that yield precise constraints on the total mass profile. The BCG stellar mass component is clearly detected with a K-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, {M}\\star /{L}K=0.61+/- 0.11 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ , consistent with stellar population synthesis models for a Milky Way initial mass function. We obtain a halo concentration, {c}200=8.4+/- 1.0, and virial mass, {M}200=(7.9+/- 0.6)× {10}13 {M}ȯ . For its mass, the inferred concentration is larger than most relaxed halos produced in cosmological simulations with Planck parameters, consistent with RXJ 1159+5531 forming earlier than the general halo population. The baryon fraction at r 200, {f}{{b,200}}=0.134+/- 0.007, is slightly below the Planck value (0.155) for the universe. However, when we take into account the additional stellar baryons associated with non-central galaxies and the uncertain intracluster light (ICL), {f}{{b,200}} increases by ≈ 0.015, consistent with the cosmic value and therefore no significant baryon loss from the system. The total mass profile is nearly a power law over a large radial range (∼0.2–10 R e ), where the corresponding density slope α obeys the α -{R}e scaling relation for massive early-type galaxies. Performing our analysis in the context of MOND still requires a large DM fraction (85.0 % +/- 2.5 % at r = 100 kpc) similar to that obtained using the standard Newtonian approach. The detection of a plausible stellar BCG mass component distinct from the NFW DM halo in the total gravitational potential suggests that ∼ {10}14 {M}ȯ represents the mass scale above which

  19. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  20. Mixing of pseudoscalar-baryon and vector-baryon in the JP=1 /2- sector and the N* (1535) and N* (1650) resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, E. J.; Oset, E.

    2015-02-01

    We study the meson-baryon interaction with JP=1 /2- using the hidden-gauge Lagrangians and mixing pseudoscalar meson-baryon with the vector meson-baryon states in a coupled channels scheme with π N ,η N ,K Λ ,K Σ ,ρ N , and π Δ (d wave). We fit the subtraction constants of each channel to the S11 partial wave amplitude of the π N scattering data extracted from the partial wave analysis of the George Washington group. We find two poles that we associate to the N*(1535 ) and the N*(1650 ) resonances, with negative subtraction constants of natural size, and compare the results with empirical determinations of these pole positions. We calculate the branching ratios for the different channels of each resonance and we find a good agreement with the experimental data. The cross section for the π-p →η n scattering is also evaluated and compared with experiment.

  1. Evidence of the Missing Baryons from the Kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Planck Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Wang, Wenting; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Macías-Pérez, Juan; Herranz, Diego

    2015-11-01

    We estimate the amount of the missing baryons detected by the Planck measurements of the cosmic microwave background in the direction of central galaxies (CGs) identified in the Sloan galaxy survey. The peculiar motion of the gas inside and around the CGs unveils values of the Thomson optical depth τT in the range 0.2 - 2 ×1 0-4 , indicating that the regions probed around CGs contain roughly half of the total amount of baryons in the Universe at the epoch where the CGs are found. If baryons follow dark matter, the measured τT's are compatible with the detection of all of the baryons existing inside and around the CGs.

  2. Large-scale magnetic fields can explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kamada, Kohei

    2016-04-01

    Helical hypermagnetic fields in the primordial Universe can produce the observed amount of baryon asymmetry through the chiral anomaly without any ingredients beyond the standard model of particle physics. While they generate no B -L asymmetry, the generated baryon asymmetry survives the spharelon washout effect, because the generating process remains active until the electroweak phase transition. Solving the Boltzmann equation numerically and finding an attractor solution, we show that the baryon asymmetry of our Universe can be explained, if the present large-scale magnetic fields indicated by the blazar observations have a negative helicity and existed in the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition. We also derive the upper bound on the strength of the helical magnetic field, which is tighter than the cosmic microwave background constraint, to avoid the overproduction of baryon asymmetry.

  3. Σ--antihyperon correlations in Z0 decay and investigation of the baryon production mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Åkesson, P. F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R. J.; Batley, R. J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bell, P. J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J. W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwé, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G. G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Horváth, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Krämer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G. D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A. J.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H. A.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pásztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycień, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J. M.; Rossi, A. M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Ströhmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M. A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trócsányi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvári, B.; Vollmer, C. F.; Vannerem, P.; Vértesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2009-12-01

    Data collected around sqrt{s}=91 GeV by the OPAL experiment at the LEP e+e- collider are used to study the mechanism of baryon formation. As the signature, the fraction of Σ- hyperons whose baryon number is compensated by the production of a overline{Σ-},overline{Λ} or overline{Ξ-} antihyperon is determined. The method relies entirely on quantum number correlations of the baryons, and not rapidity correlations, making it more model independent than previous studies. Within the context of the JETSET implementation of the string hadronization model, the diquark baryon production model without the popcorn mechanism is strongly disfavored with a significance of 3.8 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. It is shown that previous studies of the popcorn mechanism with Λ overline{Λ} and p\\uppi overline{p} correlations are not conclusive, if parameter uncertainties are considered.

  4. Evidence of the Missing Baryons from the Kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect in Planck Data.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Kitaura, Francisco S; Wang, Wenting; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Macías-Pérez, Juan; Herranz, Diego

    2015-11-01

    We estimate the amount of the missing baryons detected by the Planck measurements of the cosmic microwave background in the direction of central galaxies (CGs) identified in the Sloan galaxy survey. The peculiar motion of the gas inside and around the CGs unveils values of the Thomson optical depth τ(T) in the range 0.2-2×10(-4), indicating that the regions probed around CGs contain roughly half of the total amount of baryons in the Universe at the epoch where the CGs are found. If baryons follow dark matter, the measured τ(T)'s are compatible with the detection of all of the baryons existing inside and around the CGs. PMID:26588370

  5. Gamma-rays and the case for baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    The baryon symmetric big-bang cosmologies offer an explanation of the present photon-baryon ratio in the universe, the best present explanation of the diffuse gamma-ray background spectrum in the 1-200 MeV range, and a mechanism for galaxy formation. In regard to He production, evidence is discussed that nucleosynthesis of He may have taken place after the galaxies were formed.

  6. Baryon isocurvature scenario in inflationary cosmology - A particle physics model and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Suto, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    A phenomenological model to produce isocurvature baryon-number fluctuations is proposed in the framework of inflationary cosmology. The resulting spectrum of density fluctuation is very different from the conventional Harrison-Zel'dovich shape. The model, with the parameters satisfying several requirements from particle physics and cosmology, provides an appropriate initial condition for the minimal baryon isocurvature scenario of galaxy formation discussed by Peebles.

  7. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  8. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  9. Baryonic dark clusters in galactic halos and their observable consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, Ira; Salpeter, Edwin E.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the possibility that approximately 10% of the mass of a typical galaxy halo is in the form of massive (approximately 10(exp 7) solar masses), compact (escape speeds approximately 100 km/s) baryonic clusters made of neutron stars (approximately 10% by mass), black holes (less than or approximately equal to 1%) and brown dwarfs, asteroids, and other low-mass debris (approximately 90%). These general properties are consistent with several different observational and phenomenological constraints on cluster properties subject to the condition that neutron stars comprise approximately 1% of the total halo mass. Such compact, dark clusters could be the sites of a variety of collisional phenomena involving neutron stars. We find that integrated out to the Hubble distance approximately one neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole collision occurs daily. Of order 0.1-1 asteroid-neutron star collisions may also happen daily in the halo of the Milky Way if there is roughly equal cluster mass per logarithmic particle mass interval between asteroids and brown dwarfs. These event rates are comparable to the frequency of gamma-ray burst detections by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Observatory, implying that if dark halo clusters are the sites of most gamma-ray bursts, perhaps approximately 90% of all bursts are extragalactic, but approximately 10% are galactic. It is possible that dark clusters of the kind discussed here could be detected directly by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) or Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). If the clusters considered in this paper exist, they should produce spatially correlated gravitational microlensing of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). If 10% of the halo is in the form of dark baryonic clusters, and the remaining 90% is in brown dwarfs and other dark objects which are either unclustered or collected into low-mass clusters, then we expect that two events within

  10. The different baryonic Tully–Fisher relations at low masses

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Chris B.; Santos-Santos, Isabel; Stinson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    We compare the Baryonic Tully–Fisher relation (BTFR) of simulations and observations of galaxies ranging from dwarfs to spirals, using various measures of rotational velocity Vrot. We explore the BTFR when measuring Vrot at the flat part of the rotation curve, Vflat, at the extent of H i gas, Vlast, and using 20 per cent (W20) and 50 per cent (W50) of the width of H i line profiles. We also compare with the maximum circular velocity of the parent halo, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$V_{\\rm max}^{\\rm DM}$\\end{document}, within dark matter only simulations. The different BTFRs increasingly diverge as galaxy mass decreases. Using Vlast one obtains a power law over four orders of magnitude in baryonic mass, with slope similar to the observed BTFR. Measuring Vflat gives similar results as Vlast when galaxies with rising rotation curves are excluded. However, higher rotation velocities would be found for low-mass galaxies if the cold gas extended far enough for Vrot to reach a maximum. W20 gives a similar slope as Vlast but with slightly lower values of Vrot for low-mass galaxies, although this may depend on the extent of the gas in your galaxy sample. W50 bends away from these other relations towards low velocities at low masses. By contrast, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$V_{\\rm max}^{\\rm DM}$\\end{document} bends towards high velocities for low-mass galaxies, as cold gas does not extend out to the radius at which haloes reach \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage

  11. A Massive Warm Baryonic Halo in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Joy, Marshall K.; Lieu, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma Cluster reveal a very large scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well-known radiation from the hot intracluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central region of the cluster using lower sensitivity Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.6 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The X-ray spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled nonthermally but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission from warm gas at approx. 10(exp 6) K. The mass of the warm gas is on par with that of the hot X-ray-emitting plasma and significantly more massive if the warm gas resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus, the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict that at low redshift approx. 30%-40% of the baryons reside in warm filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  12. A Giant Warm Baryonic Halo for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Max; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma cluster unveil a very large-scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well know radiation from the hot intra-cluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central cluster regions through lower-sensitivity EUVE and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.5 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled non-thermally, but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission at warm temperatures. The mass of this plasma is at least on par with that of the hot X-ray emitting plasma, and significantly more massive if the plasma resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict greater than 50 percent by mass of today's baryons reside in warm-hot filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  13. Observation of Two New Ξb- Baryon Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. 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C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, JVVB; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξb0π- mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 , recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content b d s are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity JP=(1/2 ) + and JP=(3/2 ) + states, denoted Ξb'- and Ξb*-. Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m (Ξb'-)-m (Ξb0)-m (π-)=3.653 ±0.018 ±0.006 MeV /c2 , m (Ξb*-)-m (Ξb0)-m (π-)=23.96 ±0.12 ±0.06 MeV /c2 , Γ (Ξb*-)=1.65 ±0.31 ±0.10 MeV , where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ (Ξb'-)<0.08 MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported.

  14. Helioseismology with long-range dark matter-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Panci, Paolo; Silk, Joseph E-mail: panci@iap.fr

    2014-11-10

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how long-range dark matter (DM)-baryon interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new U(1) gauge boson and a photon, affect the evolution of the Sun and, in turn, the sound speed the profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that DM particles with a mass of ∼10 GeV, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of 10{sup –9}, and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the LUX detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best-fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

  15. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

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Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-01

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst). PMID:17930744

  16. Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-01

    The observation of the bottom, strange baryon {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} through the decay chain {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} {yields} {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} {pi}{sup -}, where {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, is reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 ft{sup -1} from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}{ovr s} = 1.96 TeV recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal of 25.3{sup +5.6}{sub -5.4} candidates is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 3.6 x 10{sup -12}, corresponding to 6.8 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Xi}{sup 0}{sub b} mass is measured to be 5787.8 {+-} 5.0(stat) {+-} 1.3(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition, the {Xi}{sup -}{sub b} is observed through the process {Xi}{sup -}{sub b} {yields} {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} {pi}{sup -}, where {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda} {pi}{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}.

  17. QCD phase diagram at finite baryon and isospin chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2010-12-01

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for thermal systems with finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub iso}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data at not only {mu}{sub iso}={mu}{sub B}=0, but also {mu}{sub iso}>0 and {mu}{sub B}=0. In the {mu}{sub iso}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, where T is temperature, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub iso}=0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub iso}-T plane at {mu}{sub B}=0 as {mu}{sub iso} increases. The thermodynamics at small T is controlled by {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{pi}{sup 2}) defined by the chiral and pion condensates, {sigma} and {pi}.

  18. Helioseismology with Long-range Dark Matter-Baryon Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Panci, Paolo; Silk, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how long-range dark matter (DM)-baryon interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new U(1) gauge boson and a photon, affect the evolution of the Sun and, in turn, the sound speed the profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that DM particles with a mass of ~10 GeV, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of 10-9, and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the LUX detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best-fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

  19. Strategies for detecting the missing hot baryons in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Alves, Guilherme Camargo; Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2015-10-01

    About 30% to 50% of the baryons in the local universe are unaccounted for and are likely in a hot phase, 105.5 to 108 K. A hot halo (106.3 K) is detected around the Milky Way through the O VII and O VIII resonance absorption and emission lines in the soft x-ray band. Current instruments are not sensitive enough to detect this gas in absorption around other galaxies and galaxy groups, the two most likely sites. We show that resonant line absorption by this hot gas can be detected with current technology, with a collecting area exceeding ˜300 cm2 and a spectral resolution R>2000. For a few notional x-ray telescope configurations that could be constructed as Explorer or Probe missions, we calculate the differential number of O VII and O VIII absorbers as a function of equivalent width through redshift space, dN/dz. The hot halos of individual external galaxies produce absorption that should be detectable out to about their virial radii. For the Milky Way, one can determine the radial distribution of density, temperature, and metallicity after making optical depth corrections. Spectroscopic observations can determine the rotation of a hot gaseous halo.

  20. SCABS: A Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Taylor, Matthew Alan

    2015-08-01

    First results of the "SCABS: A Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures" project will be presented. SCABS utilizes the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4m Victor Blanco telescope to image NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) in the optical u'g'r'i'z' bands to depths of u'=24.50, g'=23.72, r'=23.12, i'=22.95 and z'=22.75 AB mags out to the ~300 kpc virial radius for the first time at these depths. These observations identify >99% of globular clusters (GCs), ultra-compact dwarfs, and low-surface brightness features (e.g. dwarf galaxies and tidal streams) associated with NGC 5128 down to ~25 mag/sq. arcsec in the g-band. These data will place strong constraints on the assembly/merger history of NGC 5128 by identifying GC spatial over-densities, low-surface brightness tidal features and unique GC age/metallicity distribution functions. SCABS will also present new near-field cosmological applications via the 10-100 new dwarf galaxies expected to be in the region. Additionally, new high redshift background targets will be identified for future follow-up studies, making SCABS applicable to many areas of research. This talk will summarize the data, present preliminary results from colour-colour diagrams and propose the myriad applications of SCABS for various astrophysical fields of study.

  1. Observation of two new Ξ(b)(-) baryon resonances.

    PubMed

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McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V V B; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-02-13

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξ(b)(0)π(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb(-1), recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity J(P)=(1/2)(+) and J(P)=(3/2)(+) states, denoted Ξ(b)('-) and Ξ(b)(*-). Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m(Ξ(b)('-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=3.653±0.018±0.006  MeV/c(2), m(Ξ(b)(*-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=23.96±0.12±0.06  MeV/c(2), Γ(Ξ(b)(*-))=1.65±0.31±0.10  MeV, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ(Ξ(b)('-))<0.08  MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported. PMID:25723210

  2. RELIABILITY OF THE DETECTION OF THE BARYON ACOUSTIC PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez, Vicent J.; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; De la Cruz, Pablo; Saar, Enn; Tempel, Elmo; Pons-BorderIa, MarIa Jesus

    2009-05-01

    The correlation function of the distribution of matter in the universe shows, at large scales, baryon acoustic oscillations, which were imprinted prior to recombination. This feature was first detected in the correlation function of the luminous red galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Recently, the final release (DR7) of the SDSS has been made available, and the useful volume is about two times bigger than in the old sample. We present here, for the first time, the redshift-space correlation function of this sample at large scales together with that for one shallower, but denser volume-limited subsample drawn from the Two-Degree Field Redshift Survey. We test the reliability of the detection of the acoustic peak at about 100 h {sup -1} Mpc and the behavior of the correlation function at larger scales by means of careful estimation of errors. We confirm the presence of the peak in the latest data although broader than in previous detections.

  3. 3+1 dimensional viscous hydrodynamics at high baryon densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu; Bleicher, M.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2015-05-01

    A 3+1 dimensional event-by-event viscous hydrodynamic + cascade model is applied for the simulation of heavy ion collision reactions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 6.3... 200 GeV. UrQMD cascade is used for the pre-thermal (pre-hydro) and final (post-hydro) stages of the reaction. The baryon, as well as electric charge densities are consistently taken into account in the model. For this aim the equation of state based on a Chiral model coupled to the Polyakov loop is used in hydrodynamic phase of evolution. As a result of the model adjustment to the experimental data, the effective values of the shear viscosity over entropy density η/s are obtained for different collision energies in the BES region. A decrease of the effective values of η/s from 0.2 to 0.08 is observed as collision energy increases from \\sqrt{s} ≈ 7 to 39 GeV.

  4. Gluonic profile of the static baryon at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2015-05-01

    The gluon flux distribution of a static three quark system has been revealed at finite temperature in the pure SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. An action density operator is correlated with three Polyakov loops representing the baryonic state at temperatures near the end of the QCD plateau, T /Tc≈0.8 , and another just before the deconfinement point, T /Tc≈0.9 . The flux distributions at short distance separations between the quarks display an action-density profile consistent with a rounded filled Δ shape iso surface. However the Δ shape action iso-surface distributions are found to persist even at large interquark separations. The action density distribution in the quark plane exhibits a nonuniform pattern for all quark separations considered. This result contrasts with the Y-shaped uniform action density gluonic-flux profile obtained using the Wilson loop as a quark source operator at zero temperature. We systematically measure and compare the main aspects of the profile of the flux distribution at the two considered temperature scales for three sets of isosceles triangle quark configurations. In this paper, we present major characteristics of the gluonic profile including radii, amplitudes, and rate of change of the width of the flux distribution. These aspects show significant changes as the temperature changes from the end of the QCD plateau towards the deconfinement point. In particular, we found the flux tube is exhibiting a linear divergence at some planes of the gluonic pattern for the temperature close to the deconfinement point.

  5. Baryonic Z' explanation for the CDF Wjj excess.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kingman; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2011-05-27

    The latest CDF anomaly, the excess of dijet events in the invariant-mass window 120-160 GeV in associated production with a W boson, can be explained by a baryonic Z' model in which the Z' boson has negligible couplings to leptons. Although this Z' model is hardly subject to the Drell-Yan constraint from Tevatron, it is constrained by the dijet data from UA2 (√s=630 GeV), and the precision measurements at LEP through the mixing with the SM Z boson. We show that under these constraints this model can still explain the excess in the M(jj)∼120-160  GeV window, as well as the claimed cross section σ(WZ')∼4  pb. Implications at the Tevatron would be the associated production of γZ', ZZ', and Z'Z' with the Z'→jj. We show that with tightened jet cuts and improved systematic uncertainties both γZ'→γjj and ZZ'→ℓ(+)ℓ(-) jj channels could be useful to probe this model at the Tevatron. PMID:21699289

  6. Double type-II seesaw scenario, baryon asymmetry, and dark matter for cosmic e{sup {+-}} excesses

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; He Hongjian; Sarkar, Utpal; Zhang Xinmin

    2009-09-01

    We construct a new realization of type-II seesaw for neutrino masses and baryon asymmetry by extending the standard model with one light and two heavy singlet scalars besides one Higgs triplet. The heavy singlets pick up small vacuum expectation values to give a suppressed trilinear coupling between the triplet and doublet Higgs bosons after the light singlet drives the spontaneous breaking of lepton number. The Higgs triplet can thus remain light and be accessible at the LHC. The lepton-number conserving decays of the heavy singlets can generate a lepton asymmetry stored in the Higgs triplet to account for the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. We further introduce stable gauge bosons from a hidden sector, which obtain masses and annihilate into the Higgs triplet after spontaneous breaking of the associated non-Abelian gauge symmetry. With Breit-Wigner enhancement, the stable gauge bosons can simultaneously explain the relic density of dark matter and the cosmic positron/electron excesses.

  7. Dynamical signatures of a ΛCDM-halo and the distribution of the baryons in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbelli, Edvige; Thilker, David; Zibetti, Stefano; Giovanardi, Carlo; Salucci, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We determine the mass distribution of stars, gas, and dark matter in M 33 to test cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We map the neutral atomic gas content of M 33 using high resolution Very Large Array and Green Bank Telescope observations of the 21 cm HI line emission. A tilted ring model is fitted to the HI datacube to determine the varying spatial orientation of the extended gaseous disk and the rotation curve. We derive the stellar mass surface density map of M 33's optical disk via pixel-SED fitting methods based on population synthesis models that allow for positional changes in star formation history. Stellar and gas maps are used in the dynamical analysis of the rotation curve to constrain the dark halo properties. Results: The disk of M 33 warps from 8 kpc outward without substantial change of its inclination with respect to the line of sight; the line of nodes rotates clockwise toward the direction of M 31. Rotational velocities rise steeply with radius in the inner disk, reaching 100 km s-1 in 4 kpc, then the rotation curve becomes more perturbed and flatter with velocities as high as 120-130 km s-1 out to 2.7 R25. The stellar surface density map highlights a star-forming disk with a varying mass-to-light ratio. At larger radii, a dynamically relevant fraction of the baryons are in gaseous form. A dark matter halo with a Navarro-Frenk-White density profile, as predicted by hierarchical clustering and structure formation in a ΛCDM cosmology, provides the best fits to the rotation curve. Dark matter is relevant at all radii in shaping the rotation curve and the most likely dark halo has a concentration C ≃ 9.5 and a total mass of 4.3(±1.0) × 1011 M⊙. This imples a baryonic fraction of order 0.02 and the evolutionary history of this galaxy should therefore account for loss of a large fraction of its original baryonic content. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetries in the production of Ξ and Ω baryons in p p ¯ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the forward-backward asymmetries AFB of charged Ξ and Ω baryons produced in p p ¯ collisions recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at √{s }=1.96 TeV as a function of the baryon rapidity y . We find that the asymmetries AFB for charged Ξ and Ω baryons are consistent with zero within statistical uncertainties.

  9. Lighting: Green Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  10. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe’s total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 105-107 kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 107 kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster’s gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  11. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web. PMID:26632589

  12. Model-independent Evidence for Dark Energy Evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s-1 Mpc-1 at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh 2 from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh 2 ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω0m h 2 for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω0m h 2 = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  13. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, V.; Shafieloo, A.; Starobinsky, A. A. E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  14. B baryon production and decays and B hadron lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, S.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the most recent results concerning B Baryons at CDF and D0, including the observation and the study of the properties of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup {+-}(*)}, the observation of new {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay modes, and a new measurement of the lifetime of the b hadrons in decays with a J/{Psi}. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is observed through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{Psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{Psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the lifetime 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. For the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} the mass is measured 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and the lifetime 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. A new accurate measurement of the properties of the resonances {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}, and {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} has been performed in 6 fb{sup -1} of data, and the masses have been determined, m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}) = 5811.2{sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}) = 5815.5{sub -0.5}{sup +0.6}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}) = 5832.0 {+-} 0.7(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.), and m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -}) = 5835.0 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma

  15. MASS-DEPENDENT BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION SIGNAL AND HALO BIAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiao; Zhan Hu

    2013-05-10

    We characterize the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) feature in halo two-point statistics using N-body simulations. We find that nonlinear damping of the BAO signal is less severe for halos in the mass range we investigate than for dark matter. The amount of damping depends weakly on the halo mass. The correlation functions show a mass-dependent drop of the halo clustering bias below roughly 90 h {sup -1} Mpc, which coincides with the scale of the BAO trough. The drop of bias is 4% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} and reduces to roughly 2% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }. In contrast, halo biases in simulations without BAO change more smoothly around 90 h {sup -1} Mpc. In Fourier space, the bias of M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases smoothly by 11% from wavenumber k = 0.012 h Mpc{sup -1} to 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}, whereas that of M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases by less than 4% over the same range. By comparing the halo biases in pairs of otherwise identical simulations, one with and the other without BAO, we also observe a modulation of the halo bias. These results suggest that precise calibrations of the mass-dependent BAO signal and scale-dependent bias on large scales would be needed for interpreting precise measurements of the two-point statistics of clusters or massive galaxies in the future.

  16. A NEW STATISTIC FOR ANALYZING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Eckel, J.; Mehta, K.; Metchnik, M.; Pinto, P.; White, M.; Padmanabhan, N.; Seo, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a new statistic {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) for measuring and analyzing large-scale structure and particularly the baryon acoustic oscillations. {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) is a band-filtered, configuration space statistic that is easily implemented and has advantages over the traditional power spectrum and correlation function estimators. Unlike these estimators, {omega}{sub l}(r{sub s}) can localize most of the acoustic information into a single dip at the acoustic scale while avoiding sensitivity to the poorly constrained large-scale power (i.e., the integral constraint) through the use of a localized and compensated filter. It is also sensitive to anisotropic clustering through pair counting and does not require any binning of data. We measure the shift in the acoustic peak due to nonlinear effects using the monopole {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) derived from subsampled dark matter (DM) catalogs as well as from mock galaxy catalogs created via halo occupation distribution modeling. All of these are drawn from 44 realizations of 1024{sup 3} particle DM simulations in a 1 h {sup -1} Gpc box at z = 1. We compare these shifts with those obtained from the power spectrum and conclude that the results agree. We therefore expect that distance measurements obtained from {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) and P(k) will be consistent with each other. We also show that it is possible to extract the same amount of acoustic information by fitting over a finite range using either {omega}{sub 0}(r{sub s}) or P(k) derived from equal volume surveys.

  17. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1,000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  18. Baryons as solitons in effective chiral field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, G.

    This lecture comprises some recent developments concerning the description of baryons as topological solitons in effective chiral meson theories. In the first part one-loop corrections to the classical tree approximation are discussed. This involves renormalization of low-energy coupling constants and evaluation of the finite next-to-leading-order terms in the {1}/{N c} expansion. In contrast to the corresponding procedure in the meson sector the magnitude of the chiral gradients involved in the soliton profile requires that counter terms and finite loop contributions be calculated to all chiral orders. Recent results for various nucleon observables are presented. They show that the {1}/{N c} expansion essentially works as expected. In the second part electro-magnetic nucleon form factors (FFs) with relativistic corrections are evaluated in a chiral soliton model including vector mesons. The magnetic FF GMp is shown to agree well with new SLAC data for spacelike Q2 up to 30 (GeV/c) 2 if superconvergence is enforced. The electric FF GEp is dominated by a zero in the few (GeV/c) 2 region due to a low-lying zero in the non-relativistic electric FF in tree approximation. The third part describes how to extract the strong πNN form factor from chiral soliton models, taking due care of the local metric created by the presence of the soliton. When used in a one-boson-exchange model for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, deuteron properties and phase parameters of NN scattering are reproduced as well as in conventional NN models that apply a hard monopole form factor at the πNN vertex.

  19. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2014-09-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection.

  20. Equilibrium model constraints on baryon cycling across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sourav; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    Galaxies strongly self-regulate their growth via energetic feedback from stars, supernovae, and black holes, but these processes are among the least understood aspects of galaxy formation theory. We present an analytic galaxy evolution model that directly constrains such feedback processes from observed galaxy scaling relations. The equilibrium model, which is broadly valid for star-forming central galaxies that dominate cosmic star formation, is based on the ansatz that galaxies live in a slowly evolving equilibrium between inflows, outflows, and star formation. Using a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain approach, we constrain our model to match observed galaxy scaling relations between stellar mass and halo mass, star formation rate, and metallicity from 0 < z < 2. A good fit (χ2 ≈ 1.6) is achieved with eight free parameters. We further show that constraining our model to any two of the three data sets also produces a fit to the third that is within reasonable systematic uncertainties. The resulting best-fitting parameters that describe baryon cycling suggest galactic outflow scalings intermediate between energy and momentum-driven winds, a weak dependence of wind recycling time on mass, and a quenching mass scale that evolves modestly upwards with redshift. This model further predicts a stellar mass-star formation rate relation that is in good agreement with observations to z ˜ 6. Our results suggest that this simple analytic framework captures the basic physical processes required to model the mean evolution of stars and metals in galaxies, despite not incorporating many canonical ingredients of galaxy formation models such as merging or disc formation.

  1. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations from the clustering of voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependence of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale-dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  2. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stephanie A.

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  3. SIMULATIONS OF EARLY BARYONIC STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH STREAM VELOCITY. II. THE GAS FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Yoshida, Naoki; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-20

    Understanding the gas content of high-redshift halos is crucial for studying the formation of the first generation of galaxies and reionization. Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that the relative 'stream' velocity between the dark matter and baryons at the time of recombination-formally a second-order effect, but an unusually large one-can influence the later structure formation history of the universe. We quantify the effect of the stream velocity on the so-called characteristic mass-the minimum mass of a dark matter halo capable of retaining most of its baryons throughout its formation epoch-using three different high-resolution sets of cosmological simulations (with separate transfer functions for baryons and dark matter) that vary in box size, particle number, and the value of the relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons. In order to understand this effect theoretically, we generalize the linear theory filtering mass to properly account for the difference between the dark matter and baryonic density fluctuation evolution induced by the stream velocity. We show that the new filtering mass provides an accurate estimate for the characteristic mass, while other theoretical ansatzes for the characteristic mass are substantially less precise.

  4. Measurement of the average polarization of b baryons in hadronic Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OPAL Collaboration; Abbiendi, G.; Ackerstaff, K.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S. F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S. D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Böhme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Bürgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R. L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Davis, R.; de Jong, S.; del Pozo, L. A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M. S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A. A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fürtjes, A.; Futyan, D. I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwé, M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hobson, P. R.; Hocker, A.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Horváth, D.; Hossain, K. R.; Howard, R.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F. R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C. R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P. I.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R. V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S. R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J. G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A. M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A. W.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Liu, D.; Macchiolo, A.; MacPherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; McDonald, W. J.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H. A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pálinkás, J.; Pásztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Patrick, G. N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycień , M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A. M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W. M.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W. G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, D.; Ströhmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S. D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M. A.; von Törne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trócsányi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; van Kooten, R.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wäckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; White, J. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-12-01

    In the Standard Model, b quarks produced in e+e- annihilation at the Z0 peak have a large average longitudinal polarization of -0.94. Some fraction of this polarization is expected to be transferred to b-flavored baryons during hadronization. The average longitudinal polarization of weakly decaying b baryons, , is measured in approximately 4.3 million hadronic Z0 decays collected with the OPAL detector between 1990 and 1995 at LEP. Those b baryons that decay semileptonically and produce a Λ baryon are identified through the correlation of the baryon number of the Λ and the electric charge of the lepton. In this semileptonic decay, the ratio of the neutrino energy to the lepton energy is a sensitive polarization observable. The neutrino energy is estimated using missing energy measurements. From a fit to the distribution of this ratio, the value =- 0.56+0.20-0.13+/-0.09 is obtained, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  5. Counts of galaxy clusters as cosmological probes: the impact of baryonic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguera-Antolínez, Andrés; Porciani, Cristiano E-mail: porciani@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-04-01

    The halo mass function from N-body simulations of collisionless matter is generally used to retrieve cosmological parameters from observed counts of galaxy clusters. This neglects the observational fact that the baryonic mass fraction in clusters is a random variable that, on average, increases with the total mass (within an overdensity of 500). Considering a mock catalog that includes tens of thousands of galaxy clusters, as expected from the forthcoming generation of surveys, we show that the effect of a varying baryonic mass fraction will be observable with high statistical significance. The net effect is a change in the overall normalization of the cluster mass function and a milder modification of its shape. Our results indicate the necessity of taking into account baryonic corrections to the mass function if one wants to obtain unbiased estimates of the cosmological parameters from data of this quality. We introduce the formalism necessary to accomplish this goal. Our discussion is based on the conditional probability of finding a given value of the baryonic mass fraction for clusters of fixed total mass. Finally, we show that combining information from the cluster counts with measurements of the baryonic mass fraction in a small subsample of clusters (including only a few tens of objects) will nearly optimally constrain the cosmological parameters.

  6. Relative velocity of dark matter and baryonic fluids and the formation of the first structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher

    2010-10-01

    At the time of recombination, baryons and photons decoupled and the sound speed in the baryonic fluid dropped from relativistic, ˜c/3, to the thermal velocities of the hydrogen atoms, ˜2×10-5c. This is less than the relative velocities of baryons and dark matter computed via linear perturbation theory, so we infer that there are supersonic coherent flows of the baryons relative to the underlying potential wells created by the dark matter. As a result, the advection of small-scale perturbations (near the baryonic Jeans scale) by large-scale velocity flows is important for the formation of the first structures. This effect involves a quadratic term in the cosmological perturbation theory equations and hence has not been included in studies based on linear perturbation theory. We show that the relative motion suppresses the abundance of the first bound objects, even if one only investigates dark matter haloes, and leads to qualitative changes in their spatial distribution, such as introducing scale-dependent bias and stochasticity. We further discuss the possible observable implications of this effect for high-redshift galaxy clustering and reionization.

  7. Heating of baryons due to scattering with dark matter during the dark ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2015-10-01

    We explore the effects of elastic scattering between dark matter and baryons on the 21-cm signal during the dark ages. In particular, we consider a dark-matter-baryon interaction with a cross section of the form σ =σ0v-4 , in which case the effect of the drag force between the dark matter and baryon fluids grows with time. We show that, as opposed to what was previously thought, this effect heats up the baryons due to the relative velocity between dark matter and baryons. This creates an additional source of fluctuations, which can potentially make interactions easier to detect by 21-cm measurements than by using the cosmic microwave background and the Lyman-α forest. Our forecasts show that the magnitude of the cross section can be probed to σ0˜3 ×1 0-42 cm2 for mχ≪1 GeV and σ0˜2 ×1 0-41(mχ/10 GeV ) cm2 for mχ≫1 GeV with next generation experiments, and improved to σ0˜4 ×1 0-44 cm2 for mχ≪1 GeV and σ0˜4 ×1 0-43(mχ/10 GeV ) cm2 for mχ≫1 GeV with futuristic experiments.

  8. C P -violating polarization asymmetry in charmless two-body decays of beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Guan-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Several baryons containing a heavy b-quark, the b-baryons, have been discovered. The charmless two-body decays of b-baryons can provide a new platform for C P violating studies in a similar way provided by charmless two-body decays of B-meson. There are new C P violating observables related to baryon polarization in b-baryon decays. We show that in the flavor S U (3 ) limit, there exists relations involving different combinations of the decay amplitudes compared with those in C P violating rate asymmetry. These new relations therefore provide interesting tests for the mechanism of C P violations in the standard model (SM) and flavor S U (3 ) symmetry. Such tests could complement the b-meson decay studies which hint at a better flavor S U (3 ) conservation in b-hadron decays than in kaon and hyperon decays. Future data from LHCb can provide new information about C P violation in the SM.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 9, including the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

  10. The baryon-dark matter ratio via moduli decay after Affleck-Dine baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Gordon; Yu, Hai-Bo; Shao, Jing; Watson, Scott E-mail: jishao@syr.edu E-mail: haiboyu@gmail.com

    2011-11-01

    Low-scale supersymmetry breaking in string motivated theories implies the presence of O(100 TeV) scale moduli, which generically lead to a significant modification of the history of the universe prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Such an approach implies a non-thermal origin for dark matter resulting from scalar decay, where the lightest supersymmetric particle can account for the observed dark matter relic density. We study the further effect of the decay on the baryon asymmetry of the universe, and find that this can satisfactorily address the problem of the over-production of the baryon asymmetry by the Affleck-Dine mechanism in the MSSM. Remarkably, there is a natural connection between the baryon and dark matter abundances today, which leads to a solution of the 'Cosmic Coincidence Problem'.

  11. Matrix theory for baryons: an overview of holographic QCD for nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sinya; Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-10-01

    We provide, for non-experts, a brief overview of holographic QCD (quantum chromodynamics) and a review of the recent proposal (Hashimoto et al 2010 (arXiv:1003.4988[hep-th])) of a matrix-like description of multi-baryon systems in holographic QCD. Based on the matrix model, we derive the baryon interaction at short distances in multi-flavor holographic QCD. We show that there is a very universal repulsive core of inter-baryon forces for a generic number of flavors. This is consistent with a recent lattice QCD analysis for Nf = 2, 3 where the repulsive core looks universal. We also provide a comparison of our results with the lattice QCD and the operator product expansion analysis.

  12. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Ωc* Decaying to Ωc0γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Hart, A. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Bard, D. J.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Ωc* (css) in the radiative decay Ωc0γ, where the Ωc0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Ω-π+, Ω-π+π0, Ω-π+π-π+, and Ξ-K-π+π+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Ωc* and the Ωc0 baryons is measured to be 70.8±1.0(stat)±1.1(syst)MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Ωc* and Ωc0 in e+e- annihilation.

  13. Matrix theory for baryons: an overview of holographic QCD for nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sinya; Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-10-01

    We provide, for non-experts, a brief overview of holographic QCD (quantum chromodynamics) and a review of the recent proposal (Hashimoto et al 2010 (arXiv:1003.4988[hep-th])) of a matrix-like description of multi-baryon systems in holographic QCD. Based on the matrix model, we derive the baryon interaction at short distances in multi-flavor holographic QCD. We show that there is a very universal repulsive core of inter-baryon forces for a generic number of flavors. This is consistent with a recent lattice QCD analysis for Nf = 2, 3 where the repulsive core looks universal. We also provide a comparison of our results with the lattice QCD and the operator product expansion analysis. PMID:24088334

  14. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  15. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2007-10-01

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  16. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)ⓍO(3) symmetry.

  17. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation. PMID:17280195

  18. Anomalous kinematics of the 3.52-GeV/c{sup 2} baryonic enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V.M.; Moroz, V.I.; Coca, C.

    1995-05-01

    In the effective-mass spectrum of the K{sup O}{sub S}K{sup +}p{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}} system produced in {pi}-p interactions at 16 GeV/c, an enhancement is observed that suggests the existence of a narrow baryon state with M = 3521 {plus_minus} 3 MeV/c{sup 2} and {gamma} = 6{sup +21}{sub {minus}6} MeV/c{sup 2}. Events in the peak region show special kinematic features at a probability level of 6.4 x 10 {sup {minus}9}, which is comparable with that of the background. These features serve as additional evidence for the existence of a hypothetical baryon and are probably related to the properties of this baryon. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. The Thermal Delocalization of the Flux Tubes in Mesons and Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2011-05-24

    The gluon action density in a static mesonic system is analyzed at finite temperature using lattice QCD techniques in quenched QCD. The obtained results are compared to predictions of bosonic string models for the flux-tube profiles to understand the changes of the flux-tube profiles with temperature. The mesonic flux tube curved-width profile is found to compare well with that of the bosonic string at large distances. In the intermediate distance region, a free bosonic string behaviour is observed for analysis performed on highly UV-filtered gauge configurations. Extending the analysis to the static baryon reveals a delocalization of the baryonic node in the Y-shape gluonic configuration observed at zero temperature. At finite temperature, a filled delta-shaped configuration is observed, even at large distances. We study a baryonic string model at finite temperature.

  20. Anomalous dimensions of baryon multiplets in SU(N) (N>=3) flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong; Pang, Chiu-Yan

    1991-09-01

    The QCD evolution equation for the antisymmetric flavor multiplet is solved in SU(N) (N>=3) flavor symmetry. This work presents the leading anomalous dimensions of all possible baryon multiplets in SU(N) flavor symmetry. Expanding the quark distribution amplitudes of all baryon states in terms of Appel polynomials Ai(x), we observe that only the antisymmetric polynomials (e.g., A1 and A4 when i<=5) have nonzero coefficients for the antisymmetric flavor [N(N-1)(N-2)/6] multiplet. For N=3, this observation provides a constraint for building the model quark distribution of the Λ1 baryon. The asymptotic high-Q2 behavior of the Λ1 form factor is also presented.

  1. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: QUASAR TARGET SELECTION FOR DATA RELEASE NINE

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Nicholas P.; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Carithers, William C.; Ho, Shirley; Myers, Adam D.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Yeche, Christophe; Aubourg, Eric; Strauss, Michael A.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Bovy, Jo; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Richards, Gordon T.; Brandt, W. N.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Da Silva, Robert; Dawson, Kyle; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; and others

    2012-03-01

    The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), a five-year spectroscopic survey of 10,000 deg{sup 2}, achieved first light in late 2009. One of the key goals of BOSS is to measure the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption from the spectra of a sample of {approx}150,000 z > 2.2 quasars. Along with measuring the angular diameter distance at z Almost-Equal-To 2.5, BOSS will provide the first direct measurement of the expansion rate of the universe at z > 2. One of the biggest challenges in achieving this goal is an efficient target selection algorithm for quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3.5, where their colors tend to overlap those of the far more numerous stars. During the first year of the BOSS survey, quasar target selection (QTS) methods were developed and tested to meet the requirement of delivering at least 15 quasars deg{sup -2} in this redshift range, with a goal of 20 out of 40 targets deg{sup -2} allocated to the quasar survey. To achieve these surface densities, the magnitude limit of the quasar targets was set at g {<=} 22.0 or r {<=} 21.85. While detection of the BAO signature in the distribution of Ly{alpha} absorption in quasar spectra does not require a uniform target selection algorithm, many other astrophysical studies do. We have therefore defined a uniformly selected subsample of 20 targets deg{sup -2}, for which the selection efficiency is just over 50% ({approx}10 z > 2.20 quasars deg{sup -2}). This 'CORE' subsample will be fixed for Years Two through Five of the survey. For the remaining 20 targets deg{sup -2}, we will continue to develop improved selection techniques, including the use of additional data sets beyond the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. In this paper, we describe the evolution and implementation of the BOSS QTS algorithms during the first two years of BOSS operations (through 2011 July), in support of the science investigations based on

  2. Halo mass function: baryon impact, fitting formulae, and implications for cluster cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Sebastian; Saro, Alex; Dolag, Klaus; Mohr, Joseph J.

    2016-03-01

    We use a set of hydrodynamical and dark matter-only (DMonly) simulations to calibrate the halo mass function (HMF). We explore the impact of baryons, propose an improved parametrization for spherical overdensity masses, and identify differences between our DMonly HMF and previously published HMFs. We use the Magneticum simulations, which are well suited because of their accurate treatment of baryons, high resolution, and large cosmological volumes of up to (3818 Mpc)3. Baryonic effects globally decrease the masses of galaxy clusters, which, at a given mass, results in a decrease of their number density. This effect vanishes at high redshift z ˜ 2 and for high masses M200 m ≳ 1014 M⊙. We perform cosmological analyses of three idealized approximations to the cluster surveys by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Planck, and eROSITA. We pursue two main questions. (1) What is the impact of baryons? - for the SPT-like and the Planck-like samples, the impact of baryons on cosmological results is negligible. In the eROSITA-like case, however, neglecting the baryonic impact leads to an underestimate of Ωm by about 0.01, which is comparable to the expected uncertainty from eROSITA. (2) How does our DMonly HMF compare with previous work? - for the Planck-like sample, results obtained using our DMonly HMF are shifted by Δ(σ8) ≃ Δ(σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.3) ≃ 0.02 with respect to results obtained using the Tinker et al. fit. This suggests that using our HMF would shift results from Planck clusters towards better agreement with cosmic-microwave-background anisotropy measurements. Finally, we discuss biases that can be introduced through inadequate HMF parametrizations that introduce false cosmological sensitivity.

  3. Gamma rays and the case for baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    The baryon symmetric big-bang cosmologies offer an explanation of the present photon-baryon ratio in the universe, the best present explanation of the diffuse gamma-ray background spectrum in the 1 to 200 MeV range, and a mechanism for galaxy formation. In the context of an open universe model, the value of omega which best fits the present gamma-ray data is omega equals approx. 0.1 which does not conflict with upper limits on Comptonization distortion of the 3K background radiation. In regard to He production, evidence is discussed that nucleosynthesis of He may have taken place after the galaxies were formed.

  4. High-pT azimuthal correlations of neutral strange baryons and mesons in STAR at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bielcikova, Jana

    2006-07-11

    We present results on two-particle azimuthal correlations of high-pT neutral strange baryons ({lambda},{lambda}-bar) and mesons (K{sub S}{sup 0}) associated with non-identified charged particles in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. In particular, we discuss properties of the near-side yield of associated charged particles as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and zT, as well as possible baryon/meson and particle/antiparticle differences. The results are compared to the proton and pion triggered correlations and to fragmentation and recombination models.

  5. A proposal to construct SELEX - segmented large-x baryon spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, J.,; Edelstein, R.; Gibaut, D.; Lipton, R.; Potter, D.; Lach, J.; Stutte, L.; Li, Yun-Shan; Tang, Fu-Kun; Lang, Feng-Fei; Li, Cheng-Ze; Denisov, A.S.; Golovtsov, V.; Grachev, V.; Krivshich, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; Vorobyov, A.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Iowa U. /Sao Paulo U. /Yale U.

    1987-11-01

    Heavy flavor experiments currently in progress at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders or in the fixed target programs at CERN and Fermilab are aimed at collecting large samples (> 10,000 reconstructed events) of charmed events. These experiments will provide a great deal of information about charmed meson systems, but the expected yield of charmed baryons is not large--10% or less of the sample size. The most detailed study of the charm strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} comes not from a large-statistics central production experiment at high energy but rather from a 20-day run at modest beam flux in the CERN hyperon beam. This proposal exploits the advantages in triggering and particle identification of large-x production to make a systematic study of charm baryon production and decay systematics. For the dominant ({approx} 10% branching ratio) modes of these baryons, they expect to collect 10{sup 6} triggered events in each mode per running period. This will give adequate statistics to study even highly suppressed modes. The study of meson systematics by the Mark III spectrometer at SPEAR led to a revolution in the understanding of charmed meson decay mechanisms. No present experiment will supply a similar data set for the charmed baryons. A fixed target experiment cannot supply the absolute branching ratios that e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation on the {Upsilon}(3770) resonance provides for the Mark III data. They can supply relative branching ratios for the non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes of charmed baryons and establish the importance of two-body resonance modes in the decay mechanism. This information, along with lifetime measurements for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup ++}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup 0}, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons, will permit evaluation in the baryon sector of the role of color suppression, Pauli suppression, sextet enhancement and other varied mechanisms which influence decay rates of charmed

  6. Globally baryon symmetric cosmology, GUT spontaneous symmetry breaking, and the structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Brown, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Grand unified theories (GUT) such as SU(5), with spontaneous symmetry breaking, can lead more naturally to a globally baryon symmetric big bang cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken at random in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Because of the additional freedom in the high-energy physics allowed by such GUT gauge theories, new observational tests may be possible. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and various observational tests are discussed.

  7. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-02-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}, and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}.

  8. Baryon-number conservation in Bose-Einstein condensate black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnel, Florian; Sandstad, Marit

    2015-12-01

    Primordial black holes are studied in the Bose-Einstein condensate description of space-time. The question of baryon-number conservation is investigated with emphasis on the possible formation of bound states of the system's remaining captured baryons. This leads to distinct predictions both for the formation time, which for the naively natural assumptions is shown to lie between 10-12 s and 1012 s after the big bang, and for the remnant's mass, yielding approximately 3 ×1023 kg in the same scheme. The consequences for astrophysically formed black holes are also considered.

  9. A simple analytic treatment of linear growth of structure with baryon acoustic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepian, Zachary; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    In linear perturbation theory, all information about the growth of structure is contained in the Green's function, or equivalently, transfer function. These functions are generally computed using numerical codes or by phenomenological fitting formula anchored in accurate analytic results in the limits of large and small scale. Here, we present a framework for analytically solving all scales, in particular the intermediate scales relevant for the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We solve for the Green's function and transfer function using spherically averaged overdensities and the approximation that the density of the coupled baryon-photon fluid is constant interior to the sound horizon.

  10. Supersymmetric Froggatt-Nielsen Models with Baryon- and Lepton-Number Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-16

    We systematically investigate the embedding of U(1)_X Froggatt-Nielsen models in (four-dimensional) local supersymmetry. We restrict ourselves to models with a single flavon field. We do not impose a discrete symmetry by hand, e.g., R-parity, baryon-parity or lepton-parity. Thus we determine the order of magnitude of the baryon- and/or lepton violating coupling constants through the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We then scrutinize whether the predicted coupling constants are in accord with weak or GUT scale constraints. Many models turn out to be incompatible.

  11. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  12. GAS-RICH MERGERS IN LCDM: DISK SURVIVABILITY AND THE BARYONIC ASSEMBLY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.

    2009-09-01

    We use N-body simulations and observationally normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M>0.3) experienced by the Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshifts. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed early-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} M{sub sun}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high-baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Second, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas-poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is significant. Approximately {approx}20%-30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas or stars via major mergers since z = 2, with most of this accretion in the form of cold gas. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (M {sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub sun}), the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers since z = 2 is even higher, {approx}40%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass

  13. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  14. Observation of an exotic S = +1 baryon in exclusive photoproduction from the deuteron.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, S; Hicks, K; Carman, D S; Pasyuk, E; Schumacher, R A; Smith, E S; Tedeschi, D J; Todor, L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S P; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Vita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Lima, A; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Murphy, L Y; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J; Sapunenko, V; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Strakovsky, I I; Stavinsky, A; Stoler, P; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2003-12-19

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction gammad-->K(+)K(-)pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S=+1 is seen in the K(+)n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542+/-0.005 GeV/c(2) with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c(2) FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2+/-0.6)sigma. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow S=+1 baryon by other experimental groups. PMID:14754107

  15. Baryon magnetic moments in alternate 1/N{sub c} expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebed, Richard F.; TerBeek, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work shows not only the necessity of a 1/N{sub c} expansion to explain the observed mass spectrum of the lightest baryons, but also that at least two distinct large N{sub c} expansions, in which quarks transform under either the color-fundamental or the two-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N{sub c}), work comparably well. Here we show that the baryon magnetic moments do not support this ambivalence; they strongly prefer the color-fundamental 1/N{sub c} expansion, providing experimental evidence that nature decisively distinguishes among 1/N{sub c} expansions for this observable.

  16. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-06-08

    A panel of Lab scientists ? including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering ? along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  17. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-04-25

    A panel of Lab scientists — including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering — along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  18. A Study of Excited Charm-Strange Baryons withEvidence for new Baryons Xi_c(3055)+ and Xi_c(3123)+

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-30

    We present a study of excited charm-strange baryon states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, in a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study strong decays of charm-strange baryons to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This study confirms the existence of the states {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +}, and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup -}, with a more accurate determination of the {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} mass and width. We also present evidence for two new states, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +}, decaying through the intermediate resonant modes {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}K{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup ++}K{sup -}, respectively. For each of these baryons, we measure the yield in each final state, determine the statistical significance, and calculate the product of the production cross-section and branching fractions. We also measure the masses and widths of these excited charm-strange baryons.

  19. Observation of the Omega(b)- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Xi(b)- and Omega(b)- Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: mock galaxy catalogues for the BOSS Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Guo, Hong; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Tinker, Jeremy; McBride, Cameron; Reid, Beth; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Neyrinck, Mark; Beutler, Florian; Comparat, Johan; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    We reproduce the galaxy clustering catalogue from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Final Data Release (BOSS DR11&DR12) with high fidelity on all relevant scales in order to allow a robust analysis of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions. We have generated (6000) 12 288 MultiDark PATCHY BOSS (DR11) DR12 light cones corresponding to an effective volume of ˜192 000 [h-1 Gpc]3 (the largest ever simulated volume), including cosmic evolution in the redshift range from 0.15 to 0.75. The mocks have been calibrated using a reference galaxy catalogue based on the halo abundance matching modelling of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy clustering data and on the data themselves. The production follows three steps. First, we apply the PATCHY code to generate a dark matter field and an object distribution including non-linear stochastic galaxy bias. Secondly, we run the halo/stellar distribution reconstruction HADRON code to assign masses to the various objects. This step uses the mass distribution as a function of local density and non-local indicators (i.e. tidal field tensor eigenvalues and relative halo exclusion separation for massive objects) from the reference simulation applied to the corresponding patchy dark matter and galaxy distribution. Finally, we apply the SUGAR code to build the light cones. The resulting MultiDarkPATCHY mock light cones reproduce the number density, selection function, survey geometry, and in general within 1σ, for arbitrary stellar mass bins, the power spectrum up to k = 0.3 h Mpc-1, the two-point correlation functions down to a few Mpc scales, and the three-point statistics of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy samples.