Science.gov

Sample records for light diffraction ellipsometry

  1. Ellipsometry of diffractive insect reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; Lee, M. E.

    1996-04-01

    Scales on the wings of certain insects, such as Trichoplusia orichalcea, exhibit a surface microstructure resembling a fine diffraction grating. Diffraction of incident light by this structure is responsible for many of the optical properties of the wings of this moth, such as the metallic yellow color and the almost-specular reflection and polarization properties of the scattered radiation. It is shown that by the use of null ellipsometry the polarization characteristics can be used to obtain the optical constants of the scale material. Theoretical considerations and suitable experimental conditions are discussed and evaluated.

  2. Ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Podraza, N J; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle

    2014-01-01

    Ellipsometry is a technique often used to measure the thickness and properties of a thin film. This article covers the instrumental, theoretical, and practical aspects of this technique. Notably, different types of instruments including nulling ellipsometer, rotating compensator ellipsometer, and photoelastic modulator ellipsometer designs are presented. Elements of proper data analysis are also included, such as the use of an error-based figure of merit.

  3. Spectral Ellipsometry and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analyses of Silicon Surfaces Implanted with Silver Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, V. V.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Vorobev, V. V.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) produced on surfaces of single-crystal substrates (c-Si) by low-energy low-dose implantation of silver ions is studied by spectral ellipsometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Implantation was done with an ion energy of 30 keV at a constant ion beam current density of 2 μA/cm2 and doses of 6.24·1012-1.25·1016 ions/cm2 on room temperature substrate targets. Irradiation was carried out with a current density of 0.1-5 μA/cm2 for implantation doses of 6.24·1013 and 1.87·1014 ions/cm2. It was found that spectral ellipsometry is an accurate andreliable method for monitoring low-dose ion implantation processes.

  4. Quantum ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Kimani Christopher, Jr.

    Ellipsometry is a technique in which the polarization of light is used to determine the optical properties of a material (sample) and infer information such as the thickness of a thin film. Traditional ellipsometric measurements are limited in their accuracy because of the use of an external reference sample for calibration, and because of the quantum noise inherent in the source that becomes important at low light levels. A new technique called quantum ellipsometry is investigated, and is shown to circumvent these limitations by using a non-classical source of light, namely, twin photons generated by the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), in conjunction with a novel polarization interferometer and coincidence-counting detection scheme. Quantum ellipsometry comes in two forms: correlated-photon and entangled-photon ellipsometry. Both ellipsometric techniques yield estimated of the sample reflectance/transmittance with accuracy greater than conventional ellipsometry. Specifically, when the quantum efficiencies of the detectors used are above a certain threshold the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured ellipsometric parameters is larger for quantum ellipsometry than for conventional ellipsometry. This is because the photon pairs generated by SPDC have a fully correlated joint photon counting distribution. Furthermore, both correlated-photon and entangled-photon ellipsometry have the added advantage that they do not require calibration by an external reference sample, which is another limitation on the accuracy for most conventional ellipsometry. Quantum ellipsometry exploits the property of photon number correlation and polarization entanglement. The entanglement property, inherent in entangled-photon ellipsometry, is shown to allow for the movement of the optical elements that precede the sample to the sample-free optical channel in the setup. A theoretical and experimental investigation of quantum ellipsometry was conducted. Both correlated

  5. Light polarization states of a cholesteric liquid crystal probed with optical ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therézio, Eralci M.; da Silva, Silésia F. C.; Dalkiranis, Gustavo G.; Alliprandini Filho, Paulo; Santos, George C.; Ely, Fernando; Bechtold, Ivan H.; Marletta, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    Herein a useful methodology to study optical properties of cholesteric liquid crystals (Ch-LC) is proposed by using the Fourier decomposition ellipsometry technique to calculate the Stokes parameters of transmitted and reflected light in the UV-Vis spectral range. Combining Bragg reflection and optical activity we were able to obtain ∼100% of linear or circular light polarization from the Ch-LC sample using achromatic and non-polarized light source. The photonic bandgap and the polarization components can be controlled with the temperature as a result of alterations in the helix pitch of the cholesteric phase. Finally, it is demonstrated the correlation between the dissymmetry factor (g) calculated via the Stokes parameter S3 and the reflection spectrum. The data revealed that the maximum value of S3 is not coincident with the peak of maximum reflection. The reflected or transmitted light analysis via Stokes parameters obtained by ellipsometry showed an alternative and low cost method for optical characterization in Ch-LC.

  6. Diffraction gratings for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; de Boer, Dick K. G.; Tukker, Teus

    2013-09-01

    Sub-micron diffraction gratings have been used for two LED illumination applications. One is to create a transparent see through luminaire which can be used to illuminate and read a paper document or e-book. A second is a light sensor that can be used in a feedback loop to control a multicolor LED lamp. Optical design and experimental proof-of-principle are presented.

  7. Light by light diffraction in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Daniele; Michinel, Humberto

    2010-07-15

    We show that a laser beam can be diffracted by a more concentrated light pulse due to quantum vacuum effects. We compute analytically the intensity pattern in a realistic experimental configuration, and discuss how it can be used to measure the parameters describing photon-photon scattering in vacuum. In particular, we show that the quantum electrodynamics prediction can be detected in a single-shot experiment at future 100-PW lasers such as ELI or HIPER. On the other hand, if carried out at one of the present high-power facilities, such as OMEGA EP, this proposal can lead either to the discovery of nonstandard physics or to substantial improvement in the current limits by PVLAS collaboration on the photon-photon cross section at optical wavelengths. This example of manipulation of light by light is simpler to realize and more sensitive than existing, alternative proposals, and can also be used to test Born-Infeld theory or to search for axionlike or minicharged particles.

  8. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  9. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory. PMID:20208939

  10. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza-Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light-matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt's number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  11. Atomic oxygen effects on thin film space coatings studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Woollam, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently evaluating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) simulation techniques as well as a variety of thin film protective coatings to withstand atomic oxygen (AO) degradation. Both oxygen plasma ashers and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source are being used for LEO simulation. Thin film coatings are characterized by optical techniques including Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Optical spectrophotometry, and laser light scatterometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is also used to characterize surface morphology. Results on diamondlike carbon (DLC) films show that DLC degrades with simulated AO exposure at a rate comparable to Kapton polyimide. Since DLC is not as susceptible to environmental factors such as moisture absorption, it could potentially provide more accurate measurements of AO fluence on short space flights.

  12. Study on the reversibility of the diffraction light path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Wan, Lingyu; Liu, Yun; Dong, Jianjie; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-08-01

    of grating. First, we studied the reversibility of optical path of grating illuminated by monochromatic light, and then illuminated by polychromatic light. We found that the optical path of diffraction of grating has partial reversibility. Using the partial reversibility of optical path of diffraction of grating, we analyzed the spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect.

  13. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  14. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  15. Hair treatment device for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, Bruce E.; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2016-01-26

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  16. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  17. Atomic diffraction by light gratings with very short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Lasers with wavelengths of the order of the atomic size are becoming available. We explore the behavior of light-matter interactions in this emergent field by considering the atomic Kapitza-Dirac effect. We derive the diffraction patterns, which are in principle experimentally testable. From a fundamental point of view, our proposal provides an example of system where the periodicity of the diffraction grating is comparable to the size of the diffracted object.

  18. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  19. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  20. Degree of polarization of light diffracted from resting striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1987-04-01

    A laser light diffractometer has been developed to measure directly the total degree of polarization of (alpha t) of light diffracted and randomly scattered from striated muscle fibers. From alpha t the degree of polarization (alpha d) of light diffracted from the periodically arranged contractile filaments is determined. Measurements on single muscle fibers and small fiber bundles indicate that both alpha t and alpha d of the first-order diffraction decrease monotonically with sarcomere length. For the second-order diffraction, alpha t and alpha d exhibit a peak at sarcomere length of about 3.0 micron. A proposed theory based on the anisotropic light scattering efficiencies of the thick and thin filaments can account for the measurements. The comparison between the theory and measurements indicates that the A-band, as well as the I-band, are optically anisotropic. PMID:2443248

  1. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained. PMID:26835636

  2. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E. ); Weaver, H.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. Key words: Spherical diffraction, isomorphic propagation theory, Lommel functions.

  3. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  4. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Sommargren, G E; Weaver, H J

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. PMID:20577447

  5. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  6. Computation of Diffractive Beam Propagation of Monochromatic Light

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-20

    Computation of diffractive beam propagation of monochromatic light through a l-dimensional (slab) structure defined by a piecewise continuous complex index of refraction. Finite difference equations are fourth-order-accurate in the lateral grid size and include discontinuities of higher-order field derivatives at dielectric interfaces. Variable grid spacing is allowed, and all dielectric interfaces are assumed to coincide with grid points.

  7. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  8. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  9. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  10. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  11. Spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseler, A.

    1992-03-01

    The spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry (SIRE) by means of the combination of a photometric ellipsometer with a Fourier transform spectrometer is used to measure optical properties in the infrared. From the observed four Stokes parameters, the spectrum of the degree of polarization after the reflection at the sample is calculated and discussed.

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  13. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  14. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  15. Generalized Ellipsometry in Unusual Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Holcomb, David Eugene; Hunn, John D; Rouleau, Christopher M; Wright, Gomez W

    2006-01-01

    Most ellipsometry experiments are performed by shining polarized light onto a sample at a large angle of incidence, and the results are interpreted in terms of thin film thicknesses and isotropic optical functions of the film or substrate. However, it is possible to alter the geometrical arrangement, either by observing the sample in transmission or at normal-incidence reflection. In both cases, the experiment is fundamentally the same, but the interpretation of the results is considerably different. Both configurations can be used in conjunction with microscope optics, allowing for images to be made of the sample. The results of three examples of these different configurations using the two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) are reported: (1) spectroscopic birefringence measurements of ZnO, (2) electric field-induced birefringence (Pockels effect) in GaAs, and (3) normal-incidence reflection anisotropy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG).

  16. Ellipsometry: a sophisticated tool for optical metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Rasheed M. A.

    2000-11-01

    Ellipsometry is a sensitive optical technique for non- invasive in-situ (in any optically transparent environment) and ex-situ (in air) characterization of surfaces, interfaces, and thin films which is based on measurement of the polarization of light before and after reflection from a given sample at different angles of incidence and as a function of wavelength. The spectral range of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) -typically 1-6eV of photon energy- has been extended to the mid and far IR on one side and to the VUV, EUV, and X-ray region on the other. Significant advances and sophistication of available instrumentation and supportive software have resulted in extensive use of ellipsometry in biology, chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering, and industrial applications over the past two decades. Fast ellipsometers are used for real- time on-line monitoring and feedback process control of various thin films and for the fabrication of pre-engineered multilayer and graded-composition structures. As a metrology tool, ellipsometry yields information on dielectric functions of layered optically isotropic or anisotropic materials, film thicknesses, interface roughnesses, and compositions (void and alloy fractions) and depth profiles of inhomogeneous thin films.

  17. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  18. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  19. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  20. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOEpatents

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  1. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, G.V.

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  3. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Huelsen, G.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Broennimann, Ch.; Horisberger, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Borchert, G. L.

    2004-05-12

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157x366 pixels of 217x217 {mu}m2, leading to an active area of 34x80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120x157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 deg./s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  4. Chromatic compensation of broadband light diffraction: ABCD-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jésus; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Climent, Vicent; Andrés, Pedro; Caraquitena, José

    2004-10-01

    Compensation of chromatic dispersion for the optical implementation of mathematical transformations has proved to be an important tool in the design of new optical methods for full-color signal processing. A novel approach for designing dispersion-compensated, broadband optical transformers, both Fourier and Fresnel, based on the collimated Fresnel number is introduced. In a second stage, the above framework is fully exploited to achieve the optical implementation of the fractional Fourier transform (FRT) of any diffracting screen with broadband illumination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the amount of shift variance of the dispersion-compensated FRT can be tuned continuously from the spatial domain, which is totally space variant, to the spectral domain, which is totally space invariant, with the chromatic correction remaining unaltered. PMID:15497415

  5. Light coupling into an optical microcantilever by an embedded diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, K; Dominguez, C; Plaza, J A; Cadarso, V; Lechuga, L M

    2006-01-10

    By measuring the excitation efficiency of an optical waveguide on a diffraction grating one can accurately register the changes in the incidence angle of the exciting light beam. This phenomenon was applied to detect ultrasmall deflections of silicon dioxide cantilevers of submicrometer thickness that were fabricated with corrugation on top to act as diffraction grating couplers. The power of light coupled into the cantilevers was monitored with a conventional photodetector and modulated using mechanical vibration of the cantilever, thus changing the spatial orientation of the coupler with respect to the incident light beam. The technique can be considered as an alternative to the methods known for detection of cantilever deflection. PMID:16422154

  6. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  7. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  8. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  9. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes. PMID:14570106

  10. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes. PMID:26393758

  11. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  12. Minimization of diffraction peaks of spatial light modulators using Voronoi diagrams.

    PubMed

    Benoît-Pasanau, Céline; Goudail, Francois; Chavel, Pierre; Cano, Jean-Paul; Ballet, Jérôme

    2010-07-01

    It is possible to reduce the diffraction peaks of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) by breaking the periodicity of the pixels shape. We propose a theoretical investigation of a SLM that would be based on a Voronoi diagram, obtained by deforming a regular grid, and show that for a specific deformation parameter the diffraction peaks disappear and are replaced with a speckle-like diffraction halo. We also develop a simple model to determine the shape and the level of this halo. PMID:20640008

  13. Small modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharme, Stephen P. (Inventor); El Hajj, Hassanayn M. (Inventor); Johs, Blaine D. (Inventor); Woollam, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In an ellipsometer, a phase-modulated, polarized light beam is applied to a sample, electrical signals are obtained representing the orthogonal planes of polarization of the light after it has interacted with the sample and the constants of the sample are calculated from the two resulting electrical signals. The phase modulation is sufficiently small so that the calibration errors are negligible. For this purpose, the phase modulator phase modulates the light within a range of no more than ten degrees modulations peak to peak. The two electrical signals are expanded by Fourier analysis and the coefficients thereof utilized to calculate psi and delta.

  14. Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo

    2009-03-10

    Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

  15. Polarization-independent light-dispersing device based on diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report a light-dispersing device comprised of two transmission gratings and a wave plate. The gratings split the light incident at the Bragg angle into two orthogonally polarized components. The wave plate, which is placed between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique illumination. Appropriate assembly of these optical parts results in efficient diffraction of the unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device with a grating period of 400 nm for the spectral range of 680 ± 50 nm. We verified the proposed polarization-independent light-dispersing concept from the evaluation of this device.

  16. Observation of light diffraction by time-resolved femtosecond correlation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zeylikovich, I; Bai, G; Alfano, R R

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrate time development of the diffraction of light waves from objects for what is to our knowledge the f irst time by using a new femtosecond correlation interferometry. This new dynamical optics method allows for the conversion of temporal information to space information with femtosecond resolution and has the potential to produce a time-resolved femtosecond movie for the visualization of light-wave propagation in space for scientific, biological, and medical applications. PMID:19862089

  17. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  18. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  19. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-shan Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-06-15

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive.

  20. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  1. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  2. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  3. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  4. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  5. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  6. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  7. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  8. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept. PMID:24921129

  9. Automatic null ellipsometry with an interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2009-11-10

    A new approach to automatic null ellipsometry is described in which the analyzer of a traditional polarizer compensator sample analyzer (PCSA) null ellipsometer is replaced with a heterodyne Michelson interferometer. One arm of this interferometer is modified such that it produces a fixed, linearly polarized reference beam, irrespective of the input polarization state. This beam is recombined interferometrically with the measurement beam and spatially separated into its p and s polarizations. The relative phase of the resulting temporal fringes is a linear function of the polarizer azimuthal angle P, and thus this component can be driven to its null position without iteration. Once at null, the azimuthal angle of the reflected, linearly polarized light is trivially determined from the relative amplitude of the fringes. Measurements made with this instrument on a native oxide film on a silicon wafer were in excellent agreement with those made with a traditional PCSA null ellipsometer.

  10. Scattering of white light from levitated oblate water drops near rainbows and other diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H J; Marston, P L

    1991-08-20

    Oblate drops of water illuminated perpendicular to their symmetry axis generate a hyperbolic-umbilic diffraction catastrophe near the primary rainbow [P. L. Marston and E. H. Trinh, Nature London 312, 529-531 (1984)]. Observations were made of this diffraction catastrophe generated by white-light illumination of acoustically levitated drops of water in air. The observations suggest what generalized rainbows would look like if they were produced in nature when sunlight illuminates large raindrops. Unlike the usual rainbow arc, the transverse cusp of the unfolded catastrophe is not distinctly colored. The hyperbolic-umbilic focal section is distinctly colored as is another diffraction catastrophe generated in the rainbow region when the drop is highly oblate. PMID:20706412

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis: Measured vs. calculated quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a very powerful technique for optical characterization of thin-film and bulk materials, but the technique measures functions of complex reflection coefficients, which are usually not of interest per se. The interesting characteristics such as film thickness, surface roughness thickness, and optical functions can be determined only by modeling the near-surface region of the sample. However, the measured quantities are not equivalent to those determined from the modeling. Ellipsometry measurements determine elements of the sample Mueller matrix, but the usual result of modeling calculations are elements of the sample. Often this difference is academic, but if the sample depolarizes the light, it is not. Ellipsometry calculations also include methods for determining the optical functions of materials. Data for bulk materials are usually accurate for substrates, but are not appropriate for most thin films. Therefore, reasonable parameterizations are quite useful in performing spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis. Recently, there has been an increased interest in anisotropic materials, both in thin-film and bulk form. A generalized procedure will be presented for calculating the elements of the Jones matrix for any number of layers, any one of which may or may not be uniaxial.

  12. Analysis of beam steering by diffraction and the scattering of light by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Jing M.

    This thesis addresses two problems. The first is the performance of non-mechanical beam steering devices based on diffractive optics, and the second is the problem of the scattering of light by turbulence. Two beam steering devices namely holographic optical elements and optical phased arrays are analyzed. Of particular interest are the wavelength selectivity of the uniform volume holographic grating and the impact of dispersion on the spatial and temporal fidelity of an optically transmitted communication signal through both beamsteering devices. Longitudinal refractive index modulation (apodization) in photosensitive glass is used to improve sidelobe. Theoretical methods are developed to model both devices. For uniform grating, it is shown that the temporal dispersion due to the diffraction increase with beam diameter yielding a higher power penalty for large diffraction angles and aperture sizes. For an optical phased array, it is shown the power penalty increase as the diffraction angles and diameters increase. In addition, the scattering of light in turbulent medium is investigated. Of particular interest is to determine region of validity of the Born approximation which is used to compute the scattering field. Pade approximants are used to analyze the propagation through a media having strong turbulent intensity. It is shown that the region of convergence of Born approximation increases as the outer scale of the turbulence decreases. In the case of the strong turbulence, the Born approximation does not capture the correct angular distribution of the scattering intensity.

  13. Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Katsev, I L; Prikhach, A S; Kazak, N S; Kroening, M

    2006-04-30

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable. (light beams)

  14. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400-800 nm) and bottom (800-1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  15. LIGHT BEAMS: Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, I. L.; Prikhach, A. S.; Kazak, N. S.; Kroening, M.

    2006-04-01

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable.

  16. Birefringence characterization using transmission ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nee, Soe-Mie F.

    1992-12-01

    Birefringence can be obtained from the phase difference (Delta) between the ordinary and the extraordinary rays for normal transmission through a birefringent slab. Rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) and null ellipsometry (NE) were used to measure (Delta) . NE gives accurate phase spectrum which shows linear dependence of phase on wave-number. The phase spectrum by RAE looks like a damped oscillatory curve. The calibration of RAE against NE shows that the extrema of RAE phase spectrum correspond to (Delta) equals m(pi) of NE spectrum, where m equals integer; the phases near m (pi) + (pi) /2 are about the same from both methods. Error caused by partially coherent interference of the multiple reflected waves within the slab consists basically of the sinusoidal functions of (Delta) and its harmonics, and is zero at (Delta) equals m(pi) . These errors can be suppressed by the least-square fit of m to a quadratic function of 1/(lambda) . The birefringence spectrum measured for a sapphire sample in the 0.4 to 0.9 micrometers wavelength region agrees with the handbook values.

  17. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  18. Improvement of the diffraction efficiency and kinetics of holographic gratings in photochromic media by auxiliary light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert; Juchem, Thorsten

    2004-12-01

    Holographic gratings recorded in photochromic media often do not obtain the maximally achievable diffraction efficiency because of diminishing the fringe contrast caused, e.g., by a photochemically active readout beam or unequal intensities of object and reference waves. For nonreversible materials this problem causes a decrease in diffraction efficiency that is proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, in nonlinear materials such as photochromic media, for which saturation effects need to be considered, an out-of-proportion decrease in the SNR results. It is shown that an overshooting peak during hologram growth, which then decays to a lower permanent level of diffraction, is an indicator for such a situation. Even a weak readout beam may cause such effects, which significantly affect the hologram kinetics. The observed overshooting diffraction efficiency may even be misinterpreted to be dependent on material properties. Experimental and theoretical proof that with low levels of auxiliary light this type of problem can be eliminated completely is presented. Throughout this research bacteriorhodopsin films were used, but the results are valid for photochromic media in general.

  19. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  20. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  1. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  2. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments. PMID:23187472

  3. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  4. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  5. Toward the optical "magic carpet": reducing the divergence of a light sheet below the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Golub, Ilya; Chebbi, Brahim; Golub, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In 3D, diffraction-free or Bessel beams are well known and have found applications in diverse fields. An analog in 2D, or pseudonondiffracting (PND) beams, is a nontrivial problem, and existing methods suffer from deficiencies. For example, Airy beams are not highly localized, some PND beams have significant side lobes, and a cosine beam has to be truncated by a very narrow aperture thus discarding most of the energy. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that it is possible to generate a quasi-nondiffracting 2D light beam in a simple and efficient fashion. This is achieved by placing a mask consisting of a pair of double slits on a cylindrical lens. The applications include light sheet microscopy/optical sectioning and particle manipulation. PMID:26512534

  6. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  7. Novel light trapping concepts for crystalline silicon solar cells using diffractive rear side structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, J.; Tucher, N.; Bett, Alexander; Hauser, H.; Graf, M.; Benick, J.; Goldschmidt, J. C.; Bläsi, B.; Hermle, M.

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells absorb light in the near infrared only weakly. To utilize also the infrared light of the solar spectrum with energies still greater than the band gap of silicon, the effective path of the light inside the solar cell has to be enhanced. Light paths can be manipulated at the front side as well as at the rear side of a solar cell. For the front side, pyramidal textures that also show anti-reflection properties are widely used. These anti-reflection properties, however, can also be achieved with planar dielectric coatings or nanostructured surfaces. In this case, the path length enhancement can be achieved with rear side structures that are especially optimized for this purpose, thus de-coupling anti-reflection and path-length enhancement functionalities. This de-coupling creates leeway to optimize not only the optical properties but also the electrical properties of the optically active structures, and to realize structures that are compatible with very thin silicon wafers. To this end, this paper investigates two kinds of diffractive rear side structures, both, theoretically and experimentally. First, hexagonal sphere gratings that are produced by a self-organized growth process using spin coating, and second, binary gratings produced via nano-imprint lithography. Both process chains are potentially scalable to large areas. In optical measurements we determined potential photocurrent density gains of over 1 mA/cm2 for 250 μm thick wafers for both structures. Furthermore, we developed a process for contact formation as one key step to fully processed solar cells with diffractive rear side structures.

  8. Nanoimprinted Diffraction Gratings for Light Trapping in Crystal-Silicon Film Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Weiss

    2010-11-29

    Crystal-silicon (c-Si) film photovoltaics hold the promise of combining the advantages of state-of-the-art wafer-silicon technology with the scalability and the inherently much lower cost of thin-film solar technologies. In the thickness range of 2-20 μm very effective light trapping is essential to absorb sufficient red and near-infrared (NIR) light and reach targeted efficiencies of 16%–18%, as defined by the U.S. National Solar Technology Roadmap. One proposed method is diffractive light trapping, which, at least in certain wavelength ranges, can theoretically outperform light trapping through random scattering at a rough surface or interface. The goals of this project were (1) to develop a nanoimprinting process for a high-refractive-index dielectric material, (2) to fabricate diffraction gratings as back-reflectors using this material, and (3) to demonstrate for a 2 μm c-Si film an improvement in AM1.5 photon absorption of at least 80% relative to single-pass absorption. We achieved goals (1) and (2). We developed a soft-imprint method for sol-based titanium dioxide precursor films (index range 2.3-2.4) and integrated imprinted films in thin-film silicon devices. We did not fully reach goal (3): depending on the model used for interpretation of the optical experimental data, AM1.5 photon absorption was improved by only 53% (coherent electromagnetic model) to 66% (non-coherent ray-tracing model). When compared to a metallized flat reference film (double-pass absorption), the improvement due to the grating is only 6%, if the (more conservative) electromagnetic model is used. Other important achievements from this project were: -We perfected an imprinting method for another ceramic material, aluminum oxide phosphate, which is index-matched with glass. -We tested diffractive light trapping at different incidence angles and found positive evidence for light trapping for angles up to 50°, although the light-trapping efficiency

  9. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  10. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction. PMID:22505104

  11. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  12. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and function as free-floating optically trapped waveguides. Dynamic coupling of focused light via these structures being moved in three-dimensional space is done holographically. However, calculating the necessary holograms is not straightforward when using counter-propagating trapping geometry. The generation of the coupling spots is done in real time following the position of each microtool with the aid of an object tracking routine. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the microtools which can be useful in a variety of biophotonics applications. To complement the targeted-light delivery capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales.

  13. Progress on the prevention of stray light and diffraction effects on the Thai National Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisset, Christophe; Prasit, Apirat; Leckngam, Apichat; Lépine, Thierry; Poshyajinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Irawati, Puji; Richichi, Andrea; Sawangwit, Utane; Dhillon, Vik; Hardy, Liam K.

    2015-09-01

    The 2.4-m Thai National Telescope (TNT) is the main facility of the Thai National Observatory located on the Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain. The first astronomical images obtained at the TNT suffered from diffraction and stray light problems: bright spikes spread from bright stellar images over few arcminutes in the focal plane, and the images taken during observations in bright moon conditions were contaminated by high levels of stray light. We performed targeted investigations to identify the origin of these problems. In a first time, these investigations consisted of analyzing the irradiance distribution of defocused stellar images and of identifying the contributors. We concluded that these bright spikes around the bright stellar images were due to the chamfer and the wavefront error at the mirror edge. We thus installed an annular mask along the edge of the primary mirror that fully suppressed these spikes and we quantified the improvement by observing the double star Sirius. In a second time, we identified the contributors to the stray light by placing a pinhole camera at the TNT focal plane. Then, we designed a new baffle to improve the stray light rejection. The final design of the baffle comprises 21 diaphragms, is painted with an ordinary black paint and was designed, developed and installed on the TNT in less than 8 months. We assessed the improvement on the performance by measuring the variation of the stray light signal before and after installing the baffle in the telescope structure. These steps significantly improved the image quality and enhanced the rejection of the stray light at the focal plane level. In this paper, we present our investigations, we describe the method used to design the TNT baffle, and we present the improvement in quantitative terms.

  14. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  15. Development of diffractive XUV-VUV light extractors for fusion plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Caravelli, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2009-11-01

    The diagnostic and control of next generation MFE and ICF fusion experiments will require optical light extractors capable of withstanding intense plasma and radiation exposure. A solution applicable from the XUV to the infrared is to use free-standing diffractive optics such as transmission gratings or zone plates. Here we present results on XUV-VUV diffractive extractors for the diagnostic of boundary MFE plasmas. For the VUV range we developed Si transmission gratings having 1 μm period, 5 μm thickness, 40% open fraction, 1x2 mm active area, and coated with Ni, while for the XUV range we use SiN gratings having 0.2 μm period, 0.3 μm thickness, 1x1 mm area, and coated with Ta. The grating extractors are spectrally and spatially calibrated in the laboratory using a newly developed extended XUV-VUV source and will be employed for imaging spectrometry on the NSTX experiment. The operational characteristics of the extended source and first space resolved XUV-VUV spectra will be presented. Work supported by DoE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54523 at JHU and Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PU.

  16. High Quantum Efficiency Nanopillar Photodiodes Overcoming the Diffraction Limit of Light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook-Jae; Senanayake, Pradeep; Farrell, Alan C; Lin, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-01-13

    InAs1-xSbx nanowires have recently attracted interest for infrared sensing applications due to the small bandgap and high thermal conductivity. However, previous reports on nanowire-based infrared sensors required low operating temperatures in order to mitigate the high dark current and have shown poor sensitivities resulting from reduced light coupling efficiency beyond the diffraction limit. Here, InAsSb nanopillar photodiodes with high quantum efficiency are achieved by partially coating the nanopillar with metal that excites localized surface plasmon resonances, leading to quantum efficiencies of ∼29% at 2390 nm. These high quantum efficiency nanopillar photodiodes, with 180 nm diameters and 1000 nm heights, allow operation at temperatures as high as 220 K and exhibit a detection wavelength up to 3000 nm, well beyond the diffraction limit. The InAsSb nanopillars are grown on low cost GaAs (111)B substrates using an InAs buffer layer, making our device architecture a promising path toward low-cost infrared focal plane arrays with high operating temperature. PMID:26682745

  17. Coherent EUV light from high-order harmonic generation: Enhancement and applications to lensless diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Ariel J.

    2007-12-01

    The first half of this thesis presents the first demonstration of quasi-phase matching in the coherent high-order harmonic conversion of ultrafast laser pulses into the EUV region of the spectrum. To achieve this quasi-phase matching, a novel method of fabricating hollow waveguides with a modulated inner diameter was developed. This technique lead to significant enhancements of EUV flux at wavelengths shorter than were previously accessible by known phase-matching techniques. In the second half of this thesis, the first tabletop demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging with EUV light is presented using HHG in a gas-filled hollow waveguide to provide coherent illumination. This tabletop microscope shows a spatial resolution of ˜ 200 nm and a large depth of field. Furthermore, the technique is easily scalable to shorter wavelengths of interest to biological imaging.

  18. Modular sub-wavelength diffractive light modulator for high-definition holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Richard; Rochus, Veronique; Rottenberg, Xavier; Cosemans, Stefan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Severi, Simone; Van der Plas, Geert; Lafruit, Gauthier; Donnay, Stephane

    2013-02-01

    Holography is undoubtedly the ultimate 3D visualization technology, offering true 3D experience with all the natural depth cues, without the undesirable side-effects of current stereoscopic systems (uncomfortable glasses, strained eyes, fatiguing experience). Realization of a high-definition holographic display however requires a number of breakthroughs from existing prototypes. One of the main challenges lies in technology scaling, as holography is based on light diffraction and interference - to achieve wide viewing angles, the light-modulating pixels need to be spaced close to or below the wavelength of the used visible light. Furthermore, achieving high 3D image quality, hundreds of millions of such individually programmable pixels are needed. As a solution, we develop a modular sub-wavelength light modulator, consisting of three main sub-systems: the optical sub-system, comprising a 2D array of sub-wavelength pixels; the driver sub-system for individual pixel control, and the holographic computational engine. Based on conclusions from our state-of-the art studies, numerous experiments and holographic demonstrators, we have focused on reflective phase-modulating MEMS-based system and its scaling beyond 500nm pitch. We have devised a unique binary-programmable phase-modulating pixel architecture realizing vertical pixel displacement of up to 150nm at 500nm by 500nm pixel pitch, while sustaining low operating voltages compatible with CMOS driver circuitry. IMEC SiGe MEMS technology enables integration of the CMOS pixel-line drivers, scan-line drivers and I/O circuits underneath the 2D MEMS array, resulting in a compact and modular single-chip system design. Refresh rates of few hundred frames per second are achieved using our patented segmented driver-array architecture. Integrated circuits implementing parallel holographic computational engines can be added to the module using advanced 3D stacking technology. Herein we further report on our progress in realizing

  19. Determining Concentration of Nanoparticles from Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chipman, Russell

    2008-01-01

    A method of using ellipsometry or polarization analysis of light in total internal reflection of a surface to determine the number density of gold nanoparticles on a smooth substrate has been developed. The method can be modified to enable determination of densities of sparse distributions of nanoparticles in general, and is expected to be especially useful for measuring gold-nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules on microarrays. The method is based on theoretical calculations of the ellipsometric responses of gold nanoparticles. Elements of the calculations include the following: For simplicity, the gold nanoparticles are assumed to be spherical and to have the same radius. The distribution of gold nanoparticles is assumed to be a sub-monolayer (that is, sparser than a monolayer). The optical response of the sub-monolayer is modeled by use of a thin-island-film theory, according to which the polarizabilities parallel and perpendicular to the substrate are functions of the wavelength of light, the dielectric functions (permittivities expressed as complex functions of frequency or wavelength) of the gold and the suspending medium (in this case, the suspending medium is air), the fraction of the substrate area covered by the nanoparticles, and the radius of the nanoparticles. For the purpose of the thin-island-film theory, the dielectric function of the gold nanoparticles is modeled as the known dielectric function of bulk gold plus a correction term that is necessitated by the fact that the mean free path length for electrons in gold decreases with decreasing radius, in such a manner as to cause the imaginary part of the dielectric function to increase with decreasing radius (see figure). The correction term is a function of the nanoparticle radius, the wavelength of light, the mean free path and the Fermi speed of electrons in bulk gold, the plasma frequency of gold, and the speed of light in a vacuum. These models are used to calculate ellipsometric responses for

  20. Efficient high-order diffraction of extreme-ultraviolet light and soft x-rays by nanostructured volume gratings.

    PubMed

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G; Gullikson, E M

    2001-08-01

    We report what is believed to be the first demonstration that volume gratings diffract extreme-ultraviolet light (EUV) or soft x-rays into high orders approximately an order of magnitude more efficiently than predicted by classical thin-grating theory. At the 13-nm wavelength, copolymer grating structures with 200-nm period and aspect ratios of ~10:1 achieved diffraction efficiencies of 11.2%, 15.3%, 11.5%, and 9.1% in the orders m of 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. In addition, the measured transmission spectra are consistent with electrodynamic calculations by coupled-wave theory. High-order diffraction can now be employed for substantially improved diffractive EUV and x-ray optics, e.g., highly resolving diffractive lenses and large-aperture condensers. PMID:18049562

  1. Tracking the motion of charges in a terahertz light field byfemtosecond X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, A.; Wall, S.; Simpson, C.; Statz, E.; Ward, D.W.; Nelson, K.A.; Rini, M.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2006-07-01

    In condensed matter, light propagation near resonances isdescribed in terms of polaritons, electro-mechanical excitations in whichthe time-dependent electric field is coupled to the oscillation ofcharged masses. This description under pins our understanding of themacroscopic optical properties of solids, liquids and plasmas, as well asof their dispersion with frequency. In ferroelectric materials, terahertzradiation propagates by driving infrared-active lattice vibrations,resulting in phononpolariton waves. Electro-optic sampling withfemtosecond optical pulses can measure the time-dependent electricalpolarization, providing a phase-sensitive analogue to optical Ramanscattering. Here we use femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction, aphase-sensitive analogue to inelastic X-ray scattering, to measure thecorresponding displacements of ions in ferroelectric lithium tantalate,LiTaO3. Amplitude and phase of all degrees of freedom in a light fieldare thus directly measured in the time domain. Notably, extension ofother X-ray techniques to the femtosecond timescale (for example,magnetic or anomalous scattering) would allow for studies in complexsystems, where electric fields couple to multiple degrees offreedom.

  2. Tracking the motion of charges in a terahertz light field by femtosecond X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, A; Wall, S; Simpson, C; Statz, E; Ward, D W; Nelson, K A; Rini, M; Schoenlein, R W

    2006-08-10

    In condensed matter, light propagation near resonances is described in terms of polaritons, electro-mechanical excitations in which the time-dependent electric field is coupled to the oscillation of charged masses. This description underpins our understanding of the macroscopic optical properties of solids, liquids and plasmas, as well as of their dispersion with frequency. In ferroelectric materials, terahertz radiation propagates by driving infrared-active lattice vibrations, resulting in phonon-polariton waves. Electro-optic sampling with femtosecond optical pulses can measure the time-dependent electrical polarization, providing a phase-sensitive analogue to optical Raman scattering. Here we use femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction, a phase-sensitive analogue to inelastic X-ray scattering, to measure the corresponding displacements of ions in ferroelectric lithium tantalate, LiTaO(3). Amplitude and phase of all degrees of freedom in a light field are thus directly measured in the time domain. Notably, extension of other X-ray techniques to the femtosecond timescale (for example, magnetic or anomalous scattering) would allow for studies in complex systems, where electric fields couple to multiple degrees of freedom. PMID:16900195

  3. Photonic spatial reformatting of stellar light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; MacLachlan, D. G.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Brown, G.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm full width at half-maximum, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20 per cent depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 ± 4 per cent. We show how a fully-optimized device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  4. High throughput imaging of blood smears using white light diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    While automated blood cell counters have made great progress in detecting abnormalities in blood, the lack of specificity for a particular disease, limited information on single cell morphology and intrinsic uncertainly due to high throughput in these instruments often necessitates detailed inspection in the form of a peripheral blood smear. Such tests are relatively time consuming and frequently rely on medical professionals tally counting specific cell types. These assays rely on the contrast generated by chemical stains, with the signal intensity strongly related to staining and preparation techniques, frustrating machine learning algorithms that require consistent quantities to denote the features in question. Instead we opt to use quantitative phase imaging, understanding that the resulting image is entirely due to the structure (intrinsic contrast) rather than the complex interplay of stain and sample. We present here our first steps to automate peripheral blood smear scanning, in particular a method to generate the quantitative phase image of an entire blood smear at high throughput using white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a single shot and common path interferometric imaging technique.

  5. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Tarun Kr; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Roy, Anushree; Kar, Sayan

    2006-06-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this paper, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (e.g. for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analysis seem to support the claim that this simple, low cost apparatus is capable of providing a wealth of information on liquids and liquid surface waves in a non-destructive way.

  6. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-02-05

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  7. Rotatable broadband retarders for far infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T.D.; Carr, G.; Zhou, T.; Kotelyanskii, M.; Sirenko, A.A.

    2010-12-09

    Rotatable retarders have been developed for applications in spectroscopic, full Mueller Matrix ellipsometry in the far-IR spectral range. Several materials, such as silicon, KRS-5, and a commercial polymer plastic (TOPAS) have been utilized to achieve a fully adjustable retardation between 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Experimental characteristics of the rotatable retarders that utilize three- and four-bounce designs are compared with calculations. We discuss the effect of light focusing on the performance of these rotatable retarders. Broadband optical retarders are required for spectroscopic ellipsometry in its full Mueller matrix (MM) realization. Performance of the MM ellipsometer depends on the capability to produce substantially linearly-independent Stokes vectors for the light incident onto the sample. As has been shown, the errors in the measuredMMof the sample are proportional to the condition number of the 4 x 4 matrix composed of the Stokes vectors of four polarization states incident at the sample. It can be proven that it is impossible to cover the Poincare sphere with linearly-independent Stokes vectors by only changing the linear polarization at the input surface of a stationary retarder. As we will illustrate further in this paper, total coverage of the Poincare sphere is possible by rotating a tandem of a linear polarizer and a retarder with a retardation of 90{sup o}. It is this goal that we are trying to achieve in the retarder designs described in this paper.

  8. Optical fiber diameter measurement by the diffraction method with digital processing of the light scattering indicatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokodii, N. G.; Natarova, A. O.

    2016-07-01

    Relations between the position of the first diffraction minima and the fiber diameter are derived based on the solution of the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction on a transparent fiber with a circular cross section. The obtained formulas are used to measure the fiber diameter. The diffraction pattern is recorded with a digital camera. The obtained image is digitally processed to determine the positions of the first two scattering indicatrix minima.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum

    PubMed Central

    Cranston, Laura J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment–protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1–RC ‘core’ complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.36, c = 80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer. PMID:24915099

  10. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N; Daurer, Benedikt J; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Reddy, Hemanth K N; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S D; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N Duane; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Sierra, Raymond G; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  11. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F.; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G.; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A.; Reddy, Hemanth K.N.; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N. Duane; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O.; Williams, Garth J.; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  12. Young-Kirchhoff-Rubinowicz theory of diffraction in the light of Sommerfeld's solution.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2008-11-01

    Kirchhoff's theory of diffraction is derived by transforming the exact solution of Sommerfeld into surface integrals for the half-plane problem. It is shown that the exact solution directly yields the integral theorem of Kirchhoff in the context of the modified diffraction theory of Kirchhoff. The line integrals of Young-Rubinowicz are also derived by considering the rigorous solution of the reflected scattered fields for grazing incidence. PMID:18978850

  13. Cascading processes in the nonlinear diffraction of light by standing acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Bentivegna, F. F. L.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.; Lee, Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of two types of cascading process to the nonlinear optical diffraction of electromagnetic waves from a standing acoustic wave in a GaAs crystal is theoretically studied. The first type of cascading process results from second-harmonic generation followed by linear acousto-optical diffraction, while the second type involves linear acousto-optical diffraction from the standing acoustic wave and subsequent sum-frequency generation. In contrast to the third, direct, nonlinear acousto-optical diffraction process we previously investigated, the photoelastic interaction between electromagnetic and acoustic waves is here linear. We establish the rules governing the cascading processes and show that in most cases the output signal simultaneously results from two or even three of the possible nonlinear diffraction mechanisms. However, we demonstrate that a careful choice of the incidence angles of the incoming electromagnetic waves, of the polarization combinations of the incoming and diffracted waves, and of the type of acoustic wave (longitudinal or transverse) makes it always possible to distinguish between the direct and either of the two cascading processes.

  14. In Situ Ellipsometry for Shock Compression Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the α→ɛ phase transition.

  15. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  16. Generalized Ellipsometry on Ferromagnetic Sculptured Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Hofmann, Tino; Mok, Kah; Schmidt, Heidemarie; Skomski, Ralf; Schubert, Eva; Schubert, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    We present and discuss generalized ellipsometry and generalized vector-magneto-optic ellipsometry investigations on cobalt nanostructured thin films with slanted, highly-spatially coherent, columnar arrangement. The samples were prepared by glancing angle deposition. The thin films are highly transparent and reveal strong form-induced birefringence. We observe giant Kerr rotation in the visible spectral region, tunable by choice of the nanostructure geometry. Spatial magnetization orientation hysteresis and magnetization magnitude hysteresis properties are studied using a 3-dimensional Helmholtz coil arrangement allowing for arbitrary magnetic field direction at the sample position for field strengths up to 0.4 Tesla. Analysis of data obtained within this novel vector-magneto-optic setup reveals magnetization anisotropy of the Co slanted nanocolumns supported by mean-field theory modeling.

  17. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Applications in Advanced Lithography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Pribil, Greg K.; Hilfiker, James N.; Edwards, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is an optical metrology technique widely used in the semiconductor industry. For lithography applications SE is routinely used for measurement of film thickness and refractive index of polymer photoresist and antireflective coatings. While this remains a primary use of SE, applications are now expanding into other areas of advanced lithography research. New applications include immersion lithography, phase-shift photomasks, transparent pellicles, 193 and 157 nm lithography, stepper optical coatings, imprint lithography, and even real-time monitoring of etch development rate in liquid ambients. Of recent interest are studies of immersion fluids where knowledge of the fluid refractive index and absorption are critical to their use in immersion lithography. Phase-shift photomasks are also of interest as the thickness and index of the phase-shift and absorber layers must be critically controlled for accurate intensity and phase transmission. Thin transparent pellicles to protect these masks must be also characterized for thickness and refractive index. Infrared ellipsometry is sensitive to chemical composition, film thickness, and how film chemistry changes with processing. Real-time monitoring of polymer film thickness during etching in a liquid developer allows etch rate and endpoint determination with monolayer sensitivity. This work considers these emerging applications to survey the current status of spectroscopic ellipsometry as a characterization technique in advanced lithography applications.

  18. Overcoming the Diffraction Limit Using Multiple Light Scattering in a Highly Disordered Medium

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kang, Pilsung; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.; Choi, Wonshik

    2012-01-01

    We report that disordered media made of randomly distributed nanoparticles can be used to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional imaging system. By developing a method to extract the original image information from the multiple scattering induced by the turbid media, we dramatically increase a numerical aperture of the imaging system. As a result, the the resolution is enhanced by more than five times over the diffraction limit and a field of view is extended over the physical area of the camera. Our technique lays the foundation to use a turbid medium as a far-field superlens. PMID:21797607

  19. Microstructured Air Cavities as High-Index Contrast Substrates with Strong Diffraction for Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Moon, Daeyoung; Jang, Jeonghwan; Na, Jin-Young; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Kim, Sunghee; Bae, Dukkyu; Park, Eun Hyun; Park, Yongjo; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional high-index-contrast dielectric gratings exhibit unconventional transmission and reflection due to their morphologies. For light-emitting devices, these characteristics help guided modes defeat total internal reflections, thereby enhancing the outcoupling efficiency into an ambient medium. However, the outcoupling ability is typically impeded by the limited index contrast given by pattern media. Here, we report strong-diffraction, high-index-contrast cavity engineered substrates (CESs) in which hexagonally arranged hemispherical air cavities are covered with a 80 nm thick crystallized alumina shell. Wavelength-resolved diffraction measurements and Fourier analysis on GaN-grown CESs reveal that the high-index-contrast air/alumina core/shell patterns lead to dramatic excitation of the low-order diffraction modes. Large-area (1075 × 750 μm(2)) blue-emitting InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on a 3 μm pitch CES exhibit ∼39% enhancement in the optical power compared to state-of-the-art, patterned-sapphire-substrate LEDs, while preserving all of the electrical metrics that are relevant to LED devices. Full-vectorial simulations quantitatively demonstrate the enhanced optical power of CES LEDs and show a progressive increase in the extraction efficiency as the air cavity volume is expanded. This trend in light extraction is observed for both lateral- and flip-chip-geometry LEDs. Measurements of far-field profiles indicate a substantial beaming effect for CES LEDs, despite their few-micron-pitch pattern. Near-to-far-field transformation simulations and polarization analysis demonstrate that the improved extraction efficiency of CES LEDs is ascribed to the increase in emissions via the top escape route and to the extraction of transverse-magnetic polarized light. PMID:27045458

  20. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Losurdo, Maria; Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V.; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  2. Optical characterization of CuIn5S8 crystals by ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Mehmet; Gasanly, Nizami

    2016-04-01

    Optical properties of CuIn5S8 crystals grown by Bridgman method were investigated by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficients were obtained from the analysis of ellipsometry experiments performed in the 1.2-6.2 eV spectral region. Analysis of spectral dependence of the absorption coefficient revealed the existence of direct band gap transitions with energy 1.53 eV. Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models were used to find the oscillator energy, dispersion energy, zero-frequency refractive index and high-frequency dielectric constant values. Structural properties of the CuIn5S8 crystals were investigated using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

  3. Ellipsometry study of optical parameters of AgIn5S8 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Mehmet; Gasanly, Nizami

    2015-12-01

    AgIn5S8 crystals grown by Bridgman method were characterized for optical properties by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficient were obtained from ellipsometry experiments carried out in the 1.2-6.2 eV range. Direct band gap energy of 1.84 eV was found from the analysis of absorption coefficient vs. photon energy. The oscillator energy, dispersion energy and zero-frequency refractive index, high-frequency dielectric constant values were found from the analysis of the experimental data using Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models. Crystal structure and atomic composition ratio of the constituent elements in the AgIn5S8 crystal were revealed from structural characterization techniques of X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  4. Performance of ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators for polarization and color diffractive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ignacio; García-Martínez, P.; Sánchez-López, M. M.; Martínez-García, A.; Martínez, J. L.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we applied a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon (FLCoS) display for implementing monochrome and color diffractive optical elements (DOE). We first apply a reverse engineering process specifically adapted to characterize the optical parameters of a commercial FLCoS display, specifically the phase shift and the tilt angle. We then analyze the performance of the device for implementing a binary polarization diffraction grating (PDG), and how it adopts the form of either a binary amplitude grating or a binary phase grating as particular cases when the polarization states emerging from the display are projected to an analyzer. As a final experiment, we have applied the FLCoS display to generate RGB improved dynamic color binary-phase Fourier computer-generated holograms (CGHs). We have electronically synchronized the properly scaled image addressed to the display with a color filter wheel with RGB filters. Experimental results show an excellent chromatic compensation of the color image reconstruction.

  5. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro Sánchez, Juan; Sáenz, Jacobo; de la Torre, Luis; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Heradio, Rubén; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This work describes two experiments: "study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation" and "the photoelectric effect". Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  6. Development of diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline BL07 at the SAGA Light Source and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumitani, Kazushi; Ishiji, Kotaro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Yoneyama, Akio; Tabata, Masaaki; Okajima, Toshihiro; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) system at beamline BL07 at the SAGA Light Source. BL07 is a beamline for using high energy X-rays up to 35 keV generated from a superconducting wiggler placed in the straight section of the storage ring. The DEI measurement system is composed of a Si(220) asymmetric crystal for expanding the beam, a Si(220) crystal analyser, and a high-resolution CCD camera. We demonstrated the observation of a rope recovered from the ruins of the Mietsu Navy in Japan.

  7. Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction study of lightly doped Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Sanhita; Mukherjee, G. D.; Ghosh, Anirudha; Raj, Satyabrata; Oishi, S.

    2011-03-21

    Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction studies have been carried out on nonstoichiometric lightly doped sodium tungsten bronze (Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} for x=0.025). The investigation reveals a structural modification around 230 K. Although the high and low temperature phases are monoclinic but at low temperature the corner sharing WO{sub 6} octahedra get significantly distorted due to displacement of tungsten and oxygen atoms from its mean position. This structural modification induces polaron formation in Na{sub 0.025}WO{sub 3} below 230 K.

  8. Analyzing biomolecular interactions by variable angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lee, J. H.; Shiue, Shuen-Chen; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Shiming

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative ellipsometer is developed and applied to metrology of the biomolecular interaction on a protein biochip. Both the theory, optical and opto-mechanical configurations of this newly developed ellipsometer and methodologies adopted in system design to improve the system performance are presented. It will be shown that by measuring the ellipsometric parameters, the corresponding concentration variation in biochemical reaction can be calculated according to stoichiometry analysis. By applying the variable angle ellipsometry to analysis of a multi-layered sample, the thickness and concentration are resolved. It is believed that the newly developed ellipsometer biosensor is able to undertake an accurate measurement on biomedical interaction.

  9. Near-field diffraction of laser light by dielectric corner step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafeev, S.; Kotlyar, V.; Kovalev, A.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction of a linearly polarized plane wave by a corner dielectric microstep of height equals of two incident wavelengths was studied using finite-difference time domain method and near-field scanning optical microscopy. It was shown that the corner step generates an elongated region of enhanced intensity, termed as a curved laser microjet. The curved laser microjet has a length of about DOF = 9.5λ and the smallest diameter FWHM = (1.94+/-0.15)λ at distance z = 5.5λ.

  10. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  11. Measurement of yarn twist based on backward light scattering and small-angle far-field diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Z. G.; Tao, X. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive, non-contact method for measuring the twist of a yarn based on light scattering and diffraction. The surface twist angle is measured by determining the direction of the line with the highest intensity on the backward light scattering pattern which is perpendicular to the surface fibers, which is verified by both theoretical analysis based on Beckmann’s scattering model and experiments. The yarn diameter is measured with good accuracy by using the small-angle far-field diffraction pattern of the yarn body. Yarn twist is then derived from the measured surface twist angle and yarn diameter. Further studies reveal that the measured yarn twists by the proposed method are comparable to those measured based on microscopic images of the yarn. This method requires no high-magnification optics and is able to pick up short-term variations of twist with less labor intensity, indicating its potential application in the on-line measuring of yarn twist and its distribution.

  12. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  13. OPTICAL WAVEPACKETS (OPTICAL BULLETS): A NEW DIFFRACTION FREE FORM OF LIGHT TRAVEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. FUNK; J. NICHOLSON; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We conducted studies of the propagation of self-confined packets of light or ''Optical Bullets'' through air. These packets are self-forming and require no active optics. At the present time, theoretical explanations provide an incomplete description of this process. Generation of these pulses requires a light source of sufficient energy and with a short enough pulse-width that the intensity exceeds a critical wavelength dependent value. We used a Ti:Sapphire based system to generate the pulses and we observed pulse-splitting and chirp-dependent control of the formation of these filaments. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm for extracting the phase and electric field of these pulses using Frequency Resolved Optical Gating coupled to genetic algorithms for pulse retrieval.

  14. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  15. Hybrid refractive/diffractive optical system design for light and compact uncooled longwave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Bai, Yu; Luo, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Compares with traditional optics,the difractive optical element(DOE) has unique property of minus dispersion.The special state can be used in the optical system to improve performance,lighten weight and reduce volume effectively.In the paper,an infrared optical system with DOE for LWIR thermal imager is proposed.The primary optical parameters of thermal imager are wavelength range 8.0- 12.0μm,effective focal length (EFL) 150 mm,f/numbe 1.0 and field of view 8.58 degrees.The system uses uncooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The f/number matches the sensitivity range of detector array. The infrared optical system is designed by CODE-V optical design software.It is consisted of two lens,the materials of the two lenses are Germanium.The DOE is fabricated on the convex of the first lens and it can be fabricated by diamond turning technology.The imaging quafity of the optical system approached to diffraction limit.The value of modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency(11lp/mm) is great than 0.78.

  16. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  17. Potential Modulation on Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Niu, Yu; Viana, A S; Correia, Jorge P; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical-total internal reflection ellipsometry (EC-TIRE) has been proposed as a technique to observe the redox reactions on the electrode surface due to its high phase sensitivity to the electrolyte/electrode interface. In this paper, we mainly focus on the influence of the potential modulation on the TIRE response. The analysis suggests that both dielectric constant variation of gold and the electric double layer transformation would modulate the reflection polarization of the surface. For a nonfaradaic process, the signal of TIRE would be proportional to the potential modulation. To testify the analysis, linear sweep voltammetry and open circuit measurement have been performed. The results strongly support the system analysis. PMID:26889871

  18. Characterization on Smart Optics Using Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, NASA Langley Research Center developed a smart active optical concept to filter narrow band pass or to control optical intensity. To characterize developed smart optics materials, we have measured thickness and reflection properties of the materials using a WVASE32 ellipsometry. This project allowed us to: (1) prepare the smart optical materials for measurement of thickness and optical properties at NASA Langley Research Center; (2) measure thickness and optical properties of the smart optical materials; (3) evaluate the measured properties in terms of applications for narrow band-pass filters. The outcomes of this research provide optical properties and physical properties of the smart optics on a selected spectral range. The applications of this development were used for field-controlled spectral smart filters.

  19. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Robinson, I. K.; Murnane, M. M.

    2015-04-30

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  20. Beyond crystallography: diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K; Murnane, Margaret M

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century. PMID:25931551

  1. Nanoscale Ice: Spectroscopic Ellipsometry of Epitaxially-Grown Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumiskey, A.; Grippaldi, J.; Magee, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    A new laboratory technique has been developed to examine the surface characteristics and kinetics of ice crystals at the nanoscale. Uncertainties remain regarding the fundamental physics of nucleation and depositional growth in atmospheric ice crystals. These molecular-scale uncertainties propagate upward into modeling outcomes at all scales of atmospheric interest: particle models, cloud models, mesoscale models, and climate models. Molecular-scale growth mechanisms and kinetics have been mainly inferred from bulk and particle-scale experiments as well as crystal-growth theory. The precarious nature of the ice surface resisted the first generation of direct nanoscale probing technologies, but new in-situ techniques including ESEM, AFM, and ellipsometry promise to divulge a wealth of new knowledge. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measures changes in the polarization state of light as it reflects off the surface of a thin film. This non-destructive technique is capable of measuring layer thicknesses as small as a single monolayer (~1 Å) and up to thicknesses of ~10 μm. Other physical parameters including index of refraction and surface roughness are also accessible. At the TCNJ Cloud Physics Laboratory, a Horiba Scientific Auto-SE ellipsometer (440 - 1000 nm spectral range) has been adapted for in-situ measurements of ice crystals. The ice crystals are grown epitaxially on various horizontal substrates in a custom-built static diffusion chamber. The diffusion chamber is housed within a vacuum chamber and an optical path is provided from the ellipsometer light source to sample stage and back to the ellipsometer analyzer at 75° from normal. The diffusion chamber is cooled in two stages, with initial cooling accomplished with a fluid-chilled block and final chilling controlled by two independent thermoelectric cells. A wide range of temperatures, pressures, and saturation ratios are accessible: from 0°C to -30°C, 50mb to atmospheric pressure, and from subsaturated to

  2. Light scattering of a non-diffracting zero-order Bessel beam by uniaxial anisotropic bispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. J.; Wu, Z. S.; Qu, T.; Li, H. Y.; Bai, L.; Gong, L.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the generalized multi-particle Mie theory and the Fourier transformation approach, light scattering of two interacting homogeneous uniaxial anisotropic spheres with parallel primary optical axes illuminated by a zero-order Bessel beam (ZOBB) is investigated. The size and configuration of the particles are arbitrary. The expansion expressions of the ZOBB are given in terms of the spherical vector wave functions (SVWFs) and the expansion coefficients are derived. Utilizing the vector addition theorem of the SVWFs, the interactive scattering coefficients are derived through the continuous boundary conditions on which the interaction of the bispheres is considered. The effects of the conical angle, beam centre position, sphere separation distance, and anisotropic parameters on the far-region field distributions are numerically analyzed in detail. Some results are compared with those results for a Gaussian beam incidence. Selected results of bispheres consisting of typical medium such as TiO2, SiO2, Silicon, water are exhibited. This investigation could provide an effective test for further research on the scattering characteristic of an aggregate of anisotropic spheres by a high-order Bessel vortex beam and radiation forces, which are important in optical tweezers and particle manipulation applications.

  3. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cindy B; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of novel nanostructured transparent conducting oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroabadi, Akram A.; Norwood, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to find the optical constants, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, thickness and volume fraction of nanostructured transparent conducting oxides including indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO). We observed sharp features in the ellipsometry data, with the spectral peaks and positions depending on the nanostructure dimensions and material. A superposition of Lorentzian oscillators and the effective medium approximation has been applied to determine the volume ratio of voids and nanopillars, thereby providing the effective optical constants.

  5. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  6. Advanced ellipsometry for very thin films and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduschek, Peter; Tamme, Michael; Hankey, Thomas D.

    1995-09-01

    In an introduction, problems of modern thin film research and production of thin films are discussed. Possible solutions with different measurement methods like nulling ellipsometers, RAE-ellipsometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and interferometry are compared. RAE- ellipsometry with respect to precision for thin films below 100 angstrom are discussed. Repeatabilities of below 0.1 angstrom are shown. Thicker films even above a few microns can be evaluated with multi-wavelength measurements at distinct wavelengths at 543 nm, HeNe, 790 nm, IR 1.3 micrometers , and IR 1.5 micrometers . This interferometer emulation concept is practically free of order ambiguity--a problem with traditional ellipsometry. Multiple wavelengths are also used to characterize multilayers such as ONO, OPO, etc. with multiple results. Multiple wavelength ellipsometry is compared to multiple incidence angle ellipsometry. For multilayer stacks (transparent or absorbing) the SPI program was developed and is shown. In this program the known parameters as well as the to-be-measured parameters can be selected (substrate value, refractive index, k-value, thickness). Measurement spotsize effects are discussed--high lateral resolution measurements are presented.

  7. Creation of vector beams from a polarization diffraction grating using a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badham, Katherine Emily

    This thesis presents the ability of complete polarization control of light to create a polarization diffraction grating (PDG). This system has the ability to create diffracted light with each order having a separate high-order polarization state in one location on the optical axis. First, an external Excel program is used to create a grating phase profile from userspecified target diffraction orders. High-order vector beams in this PDG are created using a combination of two devices---a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) manufactured by Seiko Epson, and a tunable q -plate from Citizen Holdings Co. The transmissive SLM is positioned in an optical setup with a reflective architecture allowing control over both the horizontal and vertical components of the laser beam. The SLM has its LC director oriented vertically only affecting the vertically polarized state, however, the optical setup allows modulation of both vertical and horizontal components by the use of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a mirror to rotate the polarizations 90 degrees. Each half of the SLM is encoded with an anisotropic phase-only diffraction grating which are superimposed to create a select number of orders with the desired polarization states and equally distributed intensity. The technique of polarimetry is used to confirm the polarization state of each diffraction order. The q-plate is an inhomogeneous birefringent waveplate which has the ability to convert zero-order vector beams into first-order vector beams. The physical placement of this device into the system converts the orders with zero-order polarization states to first-order polarization states. The light vector patterns of each diffraction order confirm which first-order polarization state of is produced. A specially made PDG sextuplicator is encoded onto the SLM to generate six diffraction orders with separate states of polarization.

  8. Interferometric method for phase calibration in liquid crystal spatial light modulators using a self-generated diffraction-grating.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, José Luis Martínez; Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-27

    An auto-referenced interferometric method for calibrating phase modulation of parallel-aligned liquid crystal (PAL) spatial light modulators (SLM) is described. The method is experimentally straightforward, robust, and requires solely of a collimated beam, with no need of additional optics. This method uses the SLM itself to create a tilted plane wave and a reference wave which mutually interfere. These waves are codified by means of a binary diffraction grating and a uniformly distributed gray level area (piston) into the SLM surface. Phase shift for each gray level addressed to the piston section can then be evaluated. Phase modulation on the SLM can also be retrieved with the proposed method over spatially resolved portions of the surface. Phase information obtained with this novel method is compared to other well established calibration procedures, requiring extra elements and more elaborated optical set-ups. The results show a good agreement with previous methods. The advantages of the new method include high mechanical stability, faster performance, and a significantly easier practical implementation. PMID:27410574

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokas, R. B.; Jena, Shuvendu; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    In present work, HfO2 thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  10. Light control in Ge2Sb2Te5-coated opaline photonic crystals mediated by interplay of Wood anomalies and 3D Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A. B.; Poddubny, A. N.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of light reflection spectra from hybrid structures formed by Ge2Sb2Te5 chalcogenide film on top of 3D opaline photonic crystal. We demonstrate the presence of diffraction anomalies (Wood anomalies) in the spectra. These anomalies are caused by the light scattering on the hybrid structure surface of hexagonal symmetry. To interpret the experimental results, we develop a qualitative theoretical model, taking into account the dispersion of quasi-waveguide modes supported by the surface layer of the hybrid structure. We consider the conditions for the coupling between the Bragg resonances associated with the diffraction of light on the 3D opal lattice and the resonances due to Wood anomalies.

  11. Progress in spectroscopic ellipsometry: Applications from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfiker, James N.; Bungay, Corey L.; Synowicki, Ron A.; Tiwald, Thomas E.; Herzinger, Craig M.; Johs, Blaine; Pribil, Greg K.; Woollam, John A.

    2003-07-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a noncontact and nondestructive optical technique for thin film characterization. In the past 10 yr, it has migrated from the research laboratory into the semiconductor, data storage, display, communication, and optical coating industries. The wide acceptance of SE is a result of its flexibility to measure most material types: dielectrics, semiconductors, metals, superconductors, polymers, biological coatings, and even multilayers of these materials. Measurement of anisotropic materials has also made huge strides in recent years. Traditional SE measurements cover the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared wavelengths. This spectral range is now acquired within seconds with high accuracy due to innovative optical configurations and charge coupled device detection. In addition, commercial SE has expanded into both the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and midinfrared (IR). This wide spectral coverage was achieved by utilizing new optical elements and detection systems, along with UV or Fourier transform IR light sources. Modern instrumentation is now available with unprecedented flexibility promoting a new range of possible applications. For example, the VUV spectral region is capable of characterizing lithographic materials for 157 nm photolithography. The VUV also provides increased sensitivity for thin layers (e.g., gate oxides or self-assembled monolayers) and allows investigation of high-energy electronic transitions. The infrared spectral region contains information about semiconductor doping concentration, phonon absorption, and molecular bond vibrational absorptions. In this work, we review the latest progress in SE wavelength coverage. Areas of significant application in both research and industrial fields will be surveyed, with emphasis on wavelength-specific information content.

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a sensitive monitor of materials contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Jeffrey S.; Hilfiker, James N.; Spady, Blaine; Synowicki, R.; Woollam, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is demonstrated to be extremely sensitive to contamination layers in the thickness range from 0.1 nm to 10 microns. In the present experiments we deposit either a thin lubricating oil (WD-40) or mineral oil continuously onto Ir, Cu, Al, Au, and V substrates from a bubbler, and monitor its thickness growth from sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers as a function of time. Re-evaporation of contaminant oils is also monitored in real-time by ellipsometry.

  13. Optical properties of post-annealed ZnO:Al thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.H.; Kim, H.M.; Um, Y.H.; Park, H.Y.

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, effects of the thermal annealing on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films prepared by reactive radio-frequency sputtering were investigated. From the X-ray diffraction observations, the orientation of ZnO:Al films was found to be a c-axis in the hexagonal structure. The optical properties of the films were investigated by optical transmittance and spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization. Based on Tauc–Lorentz model, the optical constants of ZnO:Al films were extracted in the photon energy ranging from 1.0 to 4.5 eV. Our result showed that the refractive index and extinction coefficient of the films changed consistently with annealing temperature.

  14. Optical characteristics of pulsed laser deposited Ge-Sb-Te thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, P.; Prikryl, J.; Frumar, M.; Nazabal, V.

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of (GeTe){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub x} (x = 0, 0.33, 0.50, 0.66, and 1) amorphous thin films. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (rocksaltlike) layers. In order to extract optical functions of the films, the Cody-Lorentz model was applied for the analysis of ellipsometric data. Fitted sets of Cody-Lorentz model parameters are discussed in relation with chemical composition and the structure of the layers. The GeTe component content was found to be responsible for the huge optical functions and thickness changes upon amorphous-to-fcc phase transition.

  15. Far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask for linearly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Anping; Wang, Xianyou; Zhang, Zhihai; Li, Yuyan; Wen, Zhongquan; Li, Chen; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Senling; Lin, Feng

    2016-05-16

    Planar lenses are attractive photonic devices due to its minimized size and easy to integrate. However, planar lenses designed in traditional ways are restricted by the diffraction limit. They have difficulties in further reducing the focal spot size beyond the diffraction limit. Super-oscillation provides a possible way to solve the problem. However, lenses based on super-oscillation have always been affected by huge sidelobes, which resulted in limited field of view and difficulties in real applications. To address the problem, in the paper, a far-field sub-diffraction lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask was demonstrated under illumination of linearly polarized plane wave at wavelength 632.8 nm. The lens realized a long focal length of 148λ (94 µm), and the full width at half maximum of the focal line was 0.406λ, which was super-oscillatory. More important is that such a flat lens has small sidelobes and wide field of view. Within the measured range of [-132λ, + 120λ], the maximum sidelobe observed on the focal plane was less than 22% of the central peak. Such binary amplitude-phase planar lens can also be extended to long focal length far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens for other spectrum ranges. PMID:27409922

  16. Mask-assisted deterministic phase-amplitude retrieval from a single far-field intensity diffraction pattern: two experimental proofs of principle using visible light.

    PubMed

    Podorov, Sergey G; Bishop, Alexis I; Paganin, David M; Pavlov, Konstantin M

    2011-06-01

    We recently developed a simple closed-form algorithm, which allows one to reconstruct the complex scalar wavefield at the exit surface of a sample, from the intensity of its far-field coherent diffraction pattern which is obtained in the presence of a suitable object-plane mask. In the first variant of this algorithm, the sample is contained within a uniformly illuminated sharp rectangular aperture in which at least one transverse dimension is at least twice that of the object. In the second variant, the sample is uniformly illuminated and is transversely displaced from an opaque rectangular mask in the object plane. For both variants, the far-field diffraction pattern is first Fourier transformed and then differentiated with respect to both transverse coordinates, in order to deterministically yield a series of independent reconstructions of the sample. Here we give an experimental demonstration of each of these two variants of our technique, using visible light. PMID:21664548

  17. Effects of Polarization Azimuth of Writing Beams on Diffraction Properties in Vector Holograms Using Radially Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    It is very important for realizing the polarization-multiplex holographic memory to clarify the optical properties of vector holograms recorded using the inhomogeneous polarized beams. In the present paper we present a simple yet useful method using the radially polarized writing beams to systematically investigate the optical properties of complicated vector holograms and preliminary data about effects of polarization azimuth of writing beams on diffraction properties. The diffraction properties of the vector holograms written in the azobenzene-containing polymers were strongly dependent on the angle between the grating vector and polarization azimuth of the writing beam. Considering the above-mentioned dependence, the theoretical calculation on the basis of Jones calculus revealed optical properties of the vector holograms written by various types of radially polarized beams.

  18. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  19. Errors in ellipsometry measurements made with a photoelastic modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.; Jellison, G.E. Jr; Gruzalski, G.R.

    1983-07-01

    The equations governing ellipsometry measurements made with a photoelastic modulator are presented in a simple but general form. These equations are used to study the propagation of both systematic and random errors, and an assessment of the accuracy of the ellipsometer is made. A basis is provided for choosing among various ellipsommeter configurations, measurement procedures, and methods of data analysis. Several new insights into the performance of this type of ellipsometer are supplied.

  20. Theory of optical ellipsometric measurements from muscle diffraction studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1988-01-01

    A theory of optical ellipsometry describing the complete phase shift and ellipticity of light diffracted from a single muscle fiber is developed. We show that both the phase shift information, described commonly by the birefringence of the fiber, and the ellipticity information, described by the differential polarizability ratio, are necessary to provide a complete picture of the complex contributions to the total optical anisotropy spectra from a diffraction pattern derived from the striated muscle cell. Both form and intrinsic contributions play significant roles in either the birefringence measurement or the differential field ratio measurement. However, we show that their relative weights in these two measured quantities are different, and measuring both of these parameters is necessary to obtain a more complete assessment of the cross-bridge structure and dynamics. The theoretical results have been tested for three different situations: solvent index matching, passive stretch of a resting fiber, and cross-bridge changes under isometric conditions. Comparisons between experimental data and simple model calculations provide much information regarding cross-bridge orientation and structure. PMID:3207822

  1. Two-modulator generalized ellipsometry: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Modine, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    A new ellipsometer is described that uses two photoelastic modulator-polarizer pairs, where the photoelastic modulators are operating at differing resonant frequencies. The time-dependent intensity of the light beam is extremely complicated but can be analyzed so that all elements of the sample Mueller matrix are obtained. For a given configuration, nine of the Mueller matrix elements can be measured at any one time; the other seven elements are accessible when the azimuthal angles of the photoelastic modulators are changed. The single-configuration measurement is often sufficient to characterize a number of real situations completely, such as film growth in a vacuum environment, anisotropic samples, and simple depolarization. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  2. Sensitivity analysis for OMOG and EUV photomasks characterized by UV-NIR spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Meiner, K.; Richter, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the potentials, applicability and advantages of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for the characterization of high-end photomasks. The SE measurements were done in the ultraviolet-near infrared (UVNIR) wavelength range from 300 nm to 980 nm, at angle of incidences (AOI) between 10 and 70° and with a microspot size of 45 x 10 μm2 (AOI=70°). The measured Ψ and 𝛥 spectra were modeled using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to determine the structural parameters of a periodic array, i.e. the pitch and critical dimension (CD). Two different types of industrial photomasks consisting of line/space structures were evaluated, the reflecting extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and the transmitting opaque MoSi on glass (OMOG) mask. The Ψ and 𝛥 spectra of both masks show characteristic differences, which were related to the Rayleigh singularities and the missing transmission diffraction in the EUV mask. In the second part of the paper, a simulation based sensitivity analysis of the Fourier coefficients α and β is presented, which is used to define the required measurement precision to detect a CD deviation of 1%. This study was done for both mask types to investigate the influence of the stack transmission. It was found that sensitivities to CD variations are comparable for OMOG and EUV masks. For both masks, the highest sensitivities appear close to the Rayleigh singularities and significantly increase at very low AOI. To detect a 1% CD deviation for pitches below 150 nm a measurement precision in the order of 0.01 is required. This measurement precision can be realized with advanced optical hardware. It is concluded that UV-NIR ellipsometry is qualified to characterize photomasks down to the 13 nm technology node in 2020.

  3. Diffraction by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, F.; Gomer, V.; Schadwinkel, H.; Ueberholz, B.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed diffraction of a laser probe beam by a trapped sample of cold atoms. The effect is only visible in the vicinity of a resonance line. The observed diffraction pattern arises from interference of the incident and scattered light wave, allowing reconstruction of geometric properties of the trapped sample from the holographic record.

  4. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  5. New insights into colloidal gold flakes: structural investigation, micro-ellipsometry and thinning procedure towards ultrathin monocrystalline layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, B.; Bashouti, M. Y.; Feichtner, T.; Mačković, M.; Dieker, C.; Salaheldin, A. M.; Richter, P.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Spiecker, E.; Christiansen, S.

    2016-02-01

    High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have been found to not interfere with the presented nanopatterning. Micro-Ellipsometry was carried out to determine the complex dielectric function and to compare it to previous measurements of bulk single crystalline gold. Finally, we used focused ion beam milling to prepare smooth crystalline layers and high-quality nanostructures with desired thickness down to 10 nm to demonstrate the outstanding properties of the flakes. Our findings support the plasmonics and nano optics community with a better understanding of this material which is ideally suited for superior plasmonic nanostructures.High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have

  6. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  7. Recent in-situ studies of the evolution of surfaces and interfaces of thin films by spectroscopic phase-modulated ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V.; Drevillon, Bernard; Layadi, Nace; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    1993-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic phase modulated ellipsometry (PME) to study both ultrafast and slow processes of interaction of silane (SiH4) with thin film Pd, and to the investigation of the growth kinetics of a-Si:H films deposited by rf glow discharge under UV light irradiation are presented. As compared to other ellipsometric techniques like rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE), the phase modulation uses a high frequency of about 50 kHz provided by a photoelastic modulator. Thus, PME allows one to reach 1 - 5 ms time resolution which permits faster real-time measurements than RAE. This remarkable feature of PME makes it particularly suitable for in-situ applications. Changes of optical properties of Pd thin films exposed to SiH4 at different fluxes are monitored by in situ single wavelength ellipsometry in the case of high fluxes which lead to ultrafast process and by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry at small fluxes and slow kinetics. The study reveals a complicated character of the process which depends on initial flux of silane and leads to formation of Pd disilicide, Pd hydride, and an intrinsic porosity. A qualitative model of the process is proposed.

  8. Versatile transmission ellipsometry to study linear ferrofluid magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Kooij, E S; Gâlcă, A C; Poelsema, B

    2006-12-01

    Linear birefringence and dichroism of magnetite ferrofluids are studied simultaneously using spectroscopic ellipsometry in transmission mode. It is shown that this versatile technique enables highly accurate characterisation of magneto-optical phenomena. Magnetic field-dependent linear birefringence and dichroism as well as the spectral dependence are shown to be in line with previous results. Despite the qualitative agreement with established models for magneto-optical phenomena, these fail to provide an accurate, quantitative description of our experimental results using the bulk dielectric function of magnetite. We discuss the results in relation to these models, and indicate how the modified dielectric function of the magnetite nanoparticles can be obtained. PMID:16997315

  9. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek

    2014-08-01

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF6 shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  10. ELLIPSOMETRY IN THE STUDY OF DYNAMIC MATERIAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Obst, A. W.; Alrick, K.R.; Boboridis, K.; Buttler, William T.; Lamoreaux, Steve Keith; Montgomery, S. L.; Payton, J. R.; Wilke, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the time-dependent absolute temperature of surfaces shocked using high explosives (HE) provide valuable constraints on the equations-of-state (EOS) of materials and on the state of ejecta from those surfaces. In support of these dynamic surface temperature measurements, techniques for measuring the dynamic surface emissivity of shocked metals in the near infrared (IR) are being developed. These consist of time-dependent laser ellipsometric measurements, using several approaches. A discussion of these ellipsometric techniques is included here. Ellipsometry permits an accurate determination of the dynamic emissivity at a given wavelength, and may also provide a signature of melt in shocked metals.

  11. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  12. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dufek, Eric J.

    2014-08-28

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF₆ shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  13. Application of imaging ellipsometry to the detection of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    An, Ilsin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging ellipsometry (IE) is applied to visualize latent fingermarks on specular surfaces. Instead of a real image, IE provides images related to the polarization states, which are changed by the imprinted layer on a surface. Fingermarks formed on the surfaces of various materials are investigated, including a shiny metal and a black-colored plastic. Relatively clear IE images are obtained from most surfaces on which the optical properties are distinguishable from those of the fingermarks. Also, it is shown that discernible IE images can be obtained even after a fingermark is vigorously rubbed with lab tissues. PMID:26042438

  14. Antifreeze glycopeptide adsorption on single crystal ice surfaces using ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P. W.; Beaglehole, D.; DeVries, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic fishes synthesise antifreeze proteins which can effectively inhibit the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism relies on adsorption of these proteins to the ice surface. Ellipsometry has been used to quantify glycopeptide antifreeze adsorption to the basal and prism faces of single ice crystals. The rate of accumulation was determined as a function of time and at concentrations between 0.0005 and 1.2 mg/ml. Estimates of packing density at saturation coverage have been made for the basal and prism faces. PMID:19431902

  15. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  16. Cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological samples at SACLA: a correlative approach with cryo-electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Yonekura, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging at cryogenic temperature (cryo-CXDI) allows the analysis of internal structures of unstained, non-crystalline, whole biological samples in micrometre to sub-micrometre dimensions. Targets include cells and cell organelles. This approach involves preparing frozen-hydrated samples under controlled humidity, transferring the samples to a cryo-stage inside a vacuum chamber of a diffractometer, and then exposing the samples to coherent X-rays. Since 2012, cryo-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments have been carried out with the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Complementary use of cryo-electron microscopy and/or light microscopy is highly beneficial for both pre-checking samples and studying the integrity or nature of the sample. This article reports the authors' experience in cryo-XFEL-CDI of biological cells and organelles at SACLA, and describes an attempt towards reliable and higher-resolution reconstructions, including signal enhancement with strong scatterers and Patterson-search phasing. PMID:26919369

  17. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  18. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further. PMID:23041848

  19. New insights into colloidal gold flakes: structural investigation, micro-ellipsometry and thinning procedure towards ultrathin monocrystalline layers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Bashouti, M Y; Feichtner, T; Mačković, M; Dieker, C; Salaheldin, A M; Richter, P; Gordan, O D; Zahn, D R T; Spiecker, E; Christiansen, S

    2016-02-28

    High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have been found to not interfere with the presented nanopatterning. Micro-Ellipsometry was carried out to determine the complex dielectric function and to compare it to previous measurements of bulk single crystalline gold. Finally, we used focused ion beam milling to prepare smooth crystalline layers and high-quality nanostructures with desired thickness down to 10 nm to demonstrate the outstanding properties of the flakes. Our findings support the plasmonics and nano optics community with a better understanding of this material which is ideally suited for superior plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26661036

  20. Spectral ellipsometry studying of iron's optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernukha, Yevheniia; Stashchuk, Vasyl S.; Polianska, Olena; Oshtuk, Olexsandr

    2014-05-01

    Fe's optical and electronic properties were investigated at room temperature in different structural states. The sample's surface was explored in wide spectral range λ = 0,23-17,0 μm (E = 4,96 - 0,07 еV ) by the Beatty's spectral ellipsometry method. While an experiment was carried out ellipsometry parameters Δ and ψ were measure near the principal angle of incidence. The refraction index R , permittivity Ɛ and optical conductivity σ( hν ) , that is proportional to the interband density of electronic states, were calculated using these parameters. Fe's optical conductivities in liquid, amorphous and crystalline states were compared in this work. The optical conductivity was calculated using the published data of the iron's density of electronic states in crystalline, amorphous and liquid states for the comparison of the experimental and theoretical results. It is shown that, at structural transformations "amorphous, liquid state- crystalline state", the optical properties of metallic iron are determined, in the first turn, by the nearest neighborhood, and the electronic structure is not subjected to significant modifications.

  1. Visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances and lighting conditions after implantation of an aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to evaluate the visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances under photopic and mesopic lighting conditions in patients bilaterally implanted with aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses. Methods In this retrospective–prospective study, 16 patients with a mean age of 66.2±9.2 years (range: 50–81 years) who had undergone bilateral phacoemulsification surgery with implantation of a Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lens (ZMB00) were evaluated. Monocular and binocular uncorrected and distance-corrected visual acuities were measured at distance (20 ft), intermediate (70–80 cm), and near (35–40 cm) under photopic (85 cd/m2) and mesopic (3 cd/m2) lighting conditions and were compared using the paired t-test. All patients also completed a subjective questionnaire. Results At a mean follow-up of 9.5±3.9 months, distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity improved significantly from preoperative acuity. Under photopic and mesopic conditions, 93.8% and 62.5% of patients, respectively, had binocular uncorrected intermediate visual acuity of 20/40 or better, and 62.5% and 31.3% of patients had binocular uncorrected near visual acuity of 20/20 or better. All patients were satisfied with their overall vision without using glasses and/or contact lenses when compared with before surgery. A total of 87.5% of patients reported no glare and 68.8% of patients reported no halos around lights at night. Conclusion Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses provide good distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity under photopic as well as mesopic lighting conditions. High levels of spectacle independence with low levels of photic phenomenon were achieved, resulting in excellent patient satisfaction. PMID:27536061

  2. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  3. Phases and phase transitions of polymeric liquid crystals: A high resolution x ray diffraction and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachaliel, Ehud

    1991-03-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) were compared with monomeric liquid crystals (MLC) by means of high-resolution x-ray (HIREX) and light scattering (LIS). Both HIREX and LIS were used to study the nematic-smectic(sub a) phase transition of P4.1 polysiloxane; the following critical exponents were determined: nu(sub parallel) = 0.77 +/-0.05; nu(sub normal) = 0.57 +/-0.08; gamma = 1.3 +/-0.10. The bare correlation lengths were found to be: xi(sup 0)(sub parallel) = 3.27 +/-0.08; xi(sup 0)(sub normal)q(sub 0) = 1.09 +/-0.14 which are unusually large in comparison with MLC. LIS experiments confirmed these values and indicated 'cross over' of nu(sub parallel) from 0.77 to 0.53. These results are typical of a system near to a tricritical point. HIREX was used to study the nematic-smectic(sub c) phase transition in C6-polysiloxane; the results were a good fit to Chen and Lubensky's mean field theory but the correlation lengths saturated near the transition to the nematic phase. A study of the smectic(sub a) phase of PA6 polyacrylate, near the transition to the nematic phase, showed that, except very close to the transition, the first and second harmonics of the x-ray structure factor were found to be consistent with the harmonic theory of de Gennes and Caille. This is thought to indicate the importance of anharmonic corrections near the phase transition. Fits to the experimental data yielded the compressibility constant, B and the splay elastic constant, K(sub s). B was found to obey a power law: B varies as t(sup phi) in which phi = 0.82 +/-0.08. In good agreement with theoretical predictions using exponents from the literature, but in disagreement with previous experimental results on MLC's. The splay elastic constant K(sub s) has roughly the same magnitude as in MLC's but tends to decrease by approximately 50% upon approaching the transition from below. This temperature dependence might give further evidence for the importance of anharmonicity in the system. Finally, the

  4. Characterization of SiGe/Ge heterostructures and graded layers using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croke, E. T.; Wang, K. L.; Heyd, A. R.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Lee, C. H.

    1996-01-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) has been used to characterize Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge superlattices (SLs) grown on Ge substrates and thick Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge heterostructures grown on Si substrates. Our VASE analysis yielded the thicknesses and alloy compositions of all layers within the optical penetration depth of the surface. In addition, strain effects were observed in the VASE results for layers under both compressive and tensile strain. Results for the SL structures were found to be in close agreement with high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements made on the same samples. The VASE analysis has been upgraded to characterize linearly graded Si(x)Ge(1-x) buffer layers. The algorithm has been used to determine the total thickness of the buffer layer along with the start and end alloy composition by breaking the total thickness into many (typically more than 20) equal layers. Our ellipsometric results for 1 (mu)m buffer layers graded in the ranges 0.7 less than or = x less than or = 1.0, and 0.5 less than or = x less than or = 1.0 are presented, and compare favorably with the nominal values.

  5. Characterization of High Ge Content SiGe Heterostructures and Graded Alloy Layers Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyd, A. R.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Croke, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    Si(x)Ge(1-x)heterostructures on Si substrates have been widely studied due to the maturity of Si technology. However, work on Si(x)Ge)1-x) heterostructures on Ge substrates has not received much attention. A Si(x)Ge(1-x) layer on a Si substrate is under compressive strain while Si(x)Ge(1-x) on Ge is under tensile strain; thus the critical points will behave differently. In order to accurately characterize high Ge content Si(x)Ge(1-x) layers the energy shift algorithm used to calculate alloy compositions, has been modified. These results have been used along with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) measurements to characterize Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge superlattices grown on Ge substrates. The results agree closely with high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements made on the same samples. The modified energy shift algorithm also allows the VASE analysis to be upgraded in order to characterize linearly graded layers. In this work VASE has been used to characterize graded Si(x)Ge(1-x) layers in terms of the total thickness, and the start and end alloy composition. Results are presented for a 1 micrometer Si(x)Ge(1-x) layer linearly graded in the range 0.5 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.0.

  6. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan

    2013-11-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  7. Investigation of optical properties of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, E. R.; Emam-Ismail, M.; Abbady, Gh.; Prakash, Deo; El-Hagary, M.; Afify, N.; Verma, K. D.

    2016-02-01

    Different compositions of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by the thermal evaporation technique. Their amorphous structural characteristics were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical constants (n, k) of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films were obtained by fitting the ellipsometric parameters (ψ and Δ) data for the first time using three layers model system in the wavelength range 300-1100 nm. It was found that the refractive index, n, increases with the increase of Cu content. The possible optical transition in these films is found to be indirect transitions. The optical energy gap decreases linearly from 1.83 to 1.44 eV with increasing the Cu. The experimental transmittances spectrum can be simulated using the thickness and optical constants modeled by spectroscopic ellipsometry model.

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical characterizations of InGaAs:Mg thin films lattice matched to InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeydi, I.; Ezzedini, M.; Sayari, A.; Shalaan, E.; Wageh, S.; Sfaxi, L.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; M'Gaieth, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mg-doped InGaAs films were grown at 560 ° C lattice matched to InP semi-insulating substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) under various Cp2Mg flow conditions. Hall effect, photoluminescence (PL), high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) are the tools used in this work. The crystalline quality and the n-p conversion of the InGaAs:Mg films are described and discussed in relation to the Cp2Mg flow. Distinguishing triple emissions peaks in PL spectra are observed and seem to be strongly dependent on the Cp2Mg flow. SE was used to investigate the interband transitions in InGaAs:Mg/InP heterointerfaces and the different critical point energies were identified.

  9. Modeling ellipsometry and electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Keenan A.; Miskovic, Zoran L.; Diebold, Alain C.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-03-31

    Recent studies of electronic excitations in graphene by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have revealed massive high-frequency peaks assigned to the π and σ+π plasmons [1], which were semi-quantitatively modeled with a two-dimensional, two-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model [2]. On the other hand, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) of graphene covers the region of nearly constant absorbance due to graphene’s universal optical conductivity at infrared frequencies, which is not clearly resolved by EELS, and goes up to cover the π-plasmon peak at ultraviolet frequencies [3]. To attempt to model both the SE and EELS, we amend the HD model by including a low-frequency contribution of graphene’s inter-band transitions, while monitoring the fulfillment of the f-sum rule [4] up to frequencies that cover excitations of all valence electrons.

  10. Adsorption of water on porous Vycor glass studied by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Herrero, A; Heredero, R L; Bernabeu, E; Levy, D

    2001-02-01

    The variation of the optical properties of porous Vycor glass (Corning, Model 7930) under different relative-humidity conditions was studied. The adsorption of water into the glass pores was investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The change of the refractive index was Deltan approximately 0.04 between 5% and 90% relative humidity. A linear relation between the ellipsometer parameter tan Psi, the amount of water adsorbed in the glass pores, and information about the pore-size distributions was established. The results are in accord with the values obtained from N2 isotherms, transmission electron microscope micrographs, and the manufacturer's specifications (radius of approximately 20 A). The possibility of using this material as a transducer for implementation in a fiber-optic sensor to measure humidity was evaluated. PMID:18357027

  11. Measurement of organic/polymer material by phase modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong; Teboul, Eric; Kramer, Alan R.

    2004-06-01

    Due to they can be tailored to provide a wide range of physical properties and their easiness of processing and fabrication, polymeric materials have found widespread use in the manufacture of microwave, electronics, photonics and bio-tech systems. This paper presents the basic principle of phase modulation spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) and its advantages over other ellipsometry in measuring polymer film. Used for thin film measurements ultra-thin dielectric, meal film and organic film, the PMSE technique is now used over a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid infrared. Film thickness ranging from Angstrom up to 50um can be measured by PMSE. Applications of PMSE on measurement and characterization of polymer/organic material are given in the paper.

  12. The calculation of thin film parameters from spectroscopic ellipsometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterization, but the results of SE experiments must first be compared with calculations to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions. This process requires 4 steps: (1) The quantities measured must be specified and the equivalent calculated parameters identified. (2) The film structure must be modeled, where the number of films is specified and certain characteristics of each layer specified, such as whether or not the film is isotropic or anisotropic, homogeneous or graded. (3) The optical functions of each layer must be specified or parameterized. (4) The data must be compared with the calculated spectra, where a quantifiable figure of merit is used for the comparison. The last step is particularly important because without it, no {open_quotes}goodness of fit{close_quotes} parameter is calculated and one does not know whether or not the calculated spectrum fits the data.

  13. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-12-28

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs{sub 0.911}Sb{sub 0.089} bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} (x ∼ 0.1–0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and −380 and −367 meV for the valence band.

  14. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Synowicki, R. A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs0.911Sb0.089 bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs1-xSbx (x ˜ 0.1-0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and -380 and -367 meV for the valence band.

  15. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  16. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Piovera, C; Dallera, C; Gupta, A; Carpene, E

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark. PMID:25638099

  17. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark.

  18. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-Bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F Y; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-04-15

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca(2+)] = 10(-6.8)M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm(-1)along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  20. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  1. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  2. TEACHING PHYSICS: Refractive index determination of materials on thin transparent substrates using ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, L.

    2000-09-01

    Ellipsometry techniques are often used in the microelectronics industry to monitor substrate cleanliness. The principle of ellipsometry is introduced briefly by describing what is involved when measuring transparent materials. This exercise helps in understanding why absorbing substrates are often used in the ellipsometry technique, without having to derive complicated equations. Moreover, the technique is presented in a simple way with a view to applying and reviewing the concepts of internal reflections occurring in a thin piece of material (substrate). Refractive index measurements of thin transparent substrates such as glass slides can be inaccurate when using ellipsometry because of multiple reflections occurring on both the top and bottom surfaces. Some measurements of the refractive indices of transparent substrates (glass slides) are presented and discussed.

  3. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface sensitive tool to probe thin film growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    1999-02-19

    Sputtered thin film and multilayer x-ray mirrors are made routinely at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the APS users. Precise film growth control and characterization are very critical in fabricating high-quality x-ray mirrors. Film thickness calibrations are carried out using in situ and ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, interferometry, and x-ray scattering. To better understand the growth and optical properties of different thin film systems, we have carried out a systematic study of sputtered thin films of Au, Rh, Pg Pd, Cu, and Cr, using in situ ellipsometry. Multiple data sets were obtained in situ for each film material with incremental thicknesses and were analyzed with their correlation in mind. We found that in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface-sensitive tool can also be used to probe the growth and morphology of the thin film system. This application of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for metal thin film systems will be discussed.

  4. Kinetic Mie ellipsometry to determine the time-resolved particle growth in nanodusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Sebastian; Greiner, Franko; Tadsen, Benjamin; Piel, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The growth of nanometer-sized particles in a reactive argon-acetylene plasma is investigated by means of kinetic single-wavelength Mie ellipsometry from the change of the polarization state of scattered light. This requires advanced measurement techniques as well as complex methods for the analysis of the measured data. Today commercial devices reduce the metrological effort, but the data analysis is still a challenging topic. We present a scheme to gain time-resolved information about the size evolution of monodisperse spherical particles and to determine their optical properties, represented by the complex refractive index N, without limiting assumptions concerning the evolution of the particle size or the need for additional ex situ diagnostics. The method is applied on typical particle growth processes at varying optical depth and compared to ex situ SEM measurements. It is shown that more complex processes, including particle etching, can be analyzed. This demonstrates the applicability of the analysis on a strongly non-linear process.

  5. Polypeptide Multilayer Self-Assembly Studied by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Etchegoin, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    A polypeptide nanofilm made by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly was built on a surface that mimics nonwoven, a material commonly used in wound dressings. Poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA) are the building blocks of the nanofilm, which is intended as an enzymatically degradable lid for release of bactericides to chronic wounds. Chronic wounds often carry infection originating from bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and a release system triggered by the degree of infection is of interest. The dry nanofilm was studied with ellipsometry. The thickness of the nanofilm was 60% less in its dry state than in its wet state. The measurements showed that a primer was not necessary to build a stable nanofilm, which is practically important in our case because a nondegradable primer is highly unwanted in a wound care dressing. Added V8 (glutamyl endopeptidase) enzymes only showed adsorption on the nanofilm at room temperature, indicating that the PLL/PLGA “lid” may remain intact until the dressing has been filled with wound exudate at the elevated temperature typical of that of the wound. PMID:24660065

  6. Structural investigations of human hairs by spectrally resolved ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Benjamin; Chan, D.; Ruebhausen, M.; Wessel, S.; Wepf, R.

    2006-03-01

    Human hair is a biological layered system composed of two major layers, the cortex and the cuticle. We show spectrally resolved ellipsometry measurements of the ellipsometric parameters ψ and δ of single human hairs. The spectra reflect the layered nature of hair and the optical anisotropy of the hair’s structure. In addition, measurements on strands of human hair show a high reproducibility of the ellipsometric parameters for different hair fiber bundles from the same person. Based on the measurements, we develop a model of the dielectric function of hair that explains the spectra. This model includes the dielectric properties of the cuticle and cortex as well as their associated layer thicknesses. In addition, surface roughness effects modelled by a roughness layer with an complex refractive index given by an effective medium approach can have a significant effect on the measurements. We derive values for the parameters of the cuticle surface roughness layer of the thickness dACu= 273-360 nm and the air inclusion fA= 0.6 -5.7%. [1] accepted for publication in J. Biomed Opt., 2005

  7. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  9. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Miller, B.; Parzinger, E.; Thiesen, P.; Holleitner, A. W.; Wurstbauer, U.

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1–2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  10. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  11. Characterization by spectroscopic Ellipsometry, the physical properties of silver nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coanga, Jean-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are able to change their minds through their experiments. I think it is time to go kick the curse and go further in research if we want a human future. I work in the Nano-Optics and Plasmonics research. I defined with ellipsomètrie the structure of new type of Nano particles of silver. It's same be act quickly to replace the old dirty leaded electronic-connexion chip and by the other hand to find a new way for the heath care of cancer disease by nanoparticles the next killers of bad cells. Silver nanoparticle layers are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering are investigated as an alternative to lead alloy based material for solder joint in power mechatronics modules. These layers are characterized by mean of conventional techniques that is the dilatometry technique, the resistivity measurement through the van der Pauw method, and the flash laser technique. Furthermore, the nanoparticles of silver layer are deeply studied by UV-Visible spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectroscopic angles parameters are determined in function of temperature and dielectric constants are deduced and analyzed through an optical model which takes into account a Drude and a Lorentz component within the Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA). The relaxation times and the electrical conductivity are plot in function of temperature. The obtained electrical conductivity give significant result in good agreement to those reported by four points electrical measurement method.

  12. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2.

    PubMed

    Funke, S; Miller, B; Parzinger, E; Thiesen, P; Holleitner, A W; Wurstbauer, U

    2016-09-28

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1-2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping. PMID:27460278

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-08-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  14. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-06-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  15. Monitoring Photodeposition of Polymer Films from Diacetylene Monomer Solutions Using In Situ Real-Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Du; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kim, Yeon-Taik; An, Ilsin; Paley, Mark S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Photodeposition of thin polymer (PDAMNA) films from diacetylene monomer (DAMNA) solutions onto gold coated silica substrates with UV light was studied using the technique of in-situ real time spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dielectric function of PDAMNA was determined; and the thickness of the growing PDAMNA films over a 4 hour time interval was determined using a linear regression fit of the experimental data to a homogeneous four phase optical model. It was found that stirring the solution dramatically lowers the rate of film deposition, suggesting that convection can affect the attachment kinetics of the film to the substrate. Lastly, the morphology of the PDAMNA films was examined using non-contact mode atomic force microscopy.

  16. Effect of Ta concentration on the refractive index of TiO2:Ta studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfani, Eka; Kurniawan, Robi; Muhammady, Shibghatullah; Marlina, Resti; Sutjahja, Inge M.; Winata, Toto; Rusydi, Andrivo; Darma, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated optical properties of Ta-doped TiO2 thin film on LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) at room temperature. Amplitude ratio Ψ and phase difference L1 between p- and s- polarized light waves are obtained by multiple incident angles measurement (60°, 70°, and 80°) at energy range of 0.5 - 6.5 eV. In order to obtain optical properties for every Ta concentrations (0.01, 0.4, and 5 at. %), multilayer modelling was performed simultaneously by using Drude-Lorentz model. Refractive index and optical dispersion parameters were determined by Wemple-DiDomenico relation. In general, refractive index at zero photon energy n(0) increases by increasing Ta concentration. Furthermore, optical band gap shows a significant increasing due to presence of Ta dopant. In addition, other optical constants are discussed as well.

  17. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  18. Spectroscopic rotating compensator ellipsometry in the infrared: retarder design and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boer, J. H. W. G.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; de Hoog, F. J.

    1997-05-01

    Rotating compensator ellipsometry (RCE) is an approach to ellipsometry that is superior to the widely used rotating analyser ellipsometry (RAE). An essential component in RCE is a retarder that generates a retardance close to 0957-0233/8/5/004/img1. In contrast to RCE at a single wavelength, spectroscopic RCE requires a retarder that performs well over a wide range of the used spectrum. The designed retarder is capable of this and works on the principle of total internal reflection. Making use of this retarder, RCE is tested by measuring the optical characteristics of a Teflon-like layer on an aluminium substrate. The results show good agreement with similar RAE measurements, as well as data calculated from an ellipsometric model.

  19. Study of the interaction between HSA and oligo-DNA using total internal reflection ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y. W.; Byun, J. S.; Kim, Y. D.; Hemzal, D.; Humliček, J.

    2012-04-01

    Techniques of quantitative analysis are very important for studies of the interactions between bio-molecules in the field of biotechnology and drug development. The total internal reflection ellipsometry system (TIRE) is an attractive label-free procedure for the quantitative analysis of biomolecules because it combines the analytic ability of ellipsometry and the high surface sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance. In this work, we have used TIRE to study the optical properties of an aquatic monolayer of human serum albumin (HSA) and oligo-DNA. Also, we have monitored the adsorption and the interaction processes of protein layers.

  20. Single shot dynamic ellipsometry mesaurements of laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, C. A.

    2007-12-12

    A technique has been developed to measure the time-resolved position of a laser-driven shock wave and the subsequent material flow. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, using a chirped femtosecond laser pulse, probes picosecond material dynamics in a single shot by capitalizing on the refractive index changes in the shocked material. For transparent materials, the shock velocity, the particle velocity, and the shocked material's refractive index are extracted. Hugoniot data for poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene-co-vinylidene fluoride) (Kel-F 800) was obtained using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, and the data agrees well with previous data on macroscopic samples obtained in plate impact gas gun experiments.

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on Si/SiO{sub 2}/graphene tri-layer system exposed to downstream hydrogen plasma: Effects of hydrogenation and chemical sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Baran; Fu, Wangyang; Marot, Laurent Calame, Michel; Steiner, Roland; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-05

    In this work, the optical response of graphene to hydrogen plasma treatment is investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Although the electronic transport properties and Raman spectrum of graphene change after plasma hydrogenation, ellipsometric parameters of the Si/SiO2/graphene tri-layer system do not change. This is attributed to plasma hydrogenated graphene still being electrically conductive, since the light absorption of conducting 2D materials does not depend on the electronic band structure. A change in the light transmission can only be observed when higher energy hydrogen ions (30 eV) are employed, which chemically sputter the graphene layer. An optical contrast is still apparent after sputtering due to the remaining traces of graphene and hydrocarbons on the surface. In brief, plasma treatment does not change the light transmission of graphene; and when it does, this is actually due to plasma damage rather than plasma hydrogenation.

  2. Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopic analysis of graphene films grown directly on Si substrate via CVD technique for estimating the graphene atomic planes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hazmi, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Alshahrie, Ahmed; Shokr, F. S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E.

    2016-08-01

    Two reliable approaches for estimating the number of atomic planes of graphene films grown on Si substrate were demonstrated by Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopies. The first approach depends on the measurement of the ratio of the integrated Raman scattering intensity of the graphene G band to the optical phonon band of Si substrate (IG/ISi). The second approach belongs to ellipsometry measurement of the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected polarized light from the surface of the graphene films to the amplitude of reflected polarized light from the surface of the Si substrate (ΨG/ΨSi). These two approaches could efficiently recognize the number of atomic planes in the graphene films (1 ≤ n ≤ 10). The results were compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement and showed a linear regression with slope of 0.36 ± 0.01 nm/graphene layer. The Two approaches will open a new avenue to efficiently count the number of graphene layers during the preparation process.

  3. Bonding structure of carbon nitride films by infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.; Gioti, M.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited by reactive sputtering to study the effect of the ion bombardment during deposition (IBD) on their bonding structure. Fourier-transform infrared (IR) ellipsometry (FTIRE) was used to identify and distinguish the characteristic bands of the sp3 C-N, sp2 C=N, sp1 (-C≡N, -N≡C) and the IR-inactive C=C bonds. The results are compared and discussed in view of the films' electronic behavior through the dielectric function ɛ(ω) in NIR-visible-UV region and with those obtained by nanoindentation measurements. The low-energy IBD is suggested to promote the homogeneous N distribution in the films, resulting in films with low hardness (~6 GPa) and stress. On the contrary, the high-energy IBD results in high-N concentration in localized regions of the films, where possibly the formation of fullerenelike and C3N4 structures is favored. Indeed, hardness values up to 45 GPa were measured at some regions of these films, along with the high stress and hardness that they exhibit. Their absorption due to π-->π* electronic transitions is higher and exhibit strong absorption ~1.6 eV where the low-energy IBD films are transparent. Furthermore, the effect of postdeposition thermal annealing to 900 °C on the bonding structure of the films was investigated. It was found that the structural modifications induced by the N removal from the carbon-nitrogen bonds depend on the bonding structure of the films, as determined by the IBD energy. The N evolution from sp3 C-N bonds is more intense in low-energy IBD films and more pronounced around 450 °C, while the C-N bonds of pentagons and C3N4 structures, contained mainly in high-energy IBD films, are more stable and break at higher temperatures. Above 600 °C, N is evolved from the sp2 C=N bonds, while the most stable structures (i.e., sp1 -N≡C and -C≡N groups) break above 700 °C. The thermal treatment differentially affects the electronic transitions; the π-->π* are almost stable, while

  4. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  5. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G. A.; Schülli, T. U.; Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G.; Richard, M.-I.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup −5} (Δa/a) with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 μm. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive μ-Raman and μ-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  6. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  7. Optical properties of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Hou, Yun; Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Yanqing

    2010-10-01

    Transition metal oxide (TMO) has been extensively focused in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the optical properties of a typical TMO material of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 (x=0-1) thin films. Different compositions of x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 thin films are grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by chemical solution deposition method under annealing temperature of 750°C. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 thin films are polycrystalline with spinel structure. The optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature in the wavelength range of 400-1700nm. By fitting the measured ellipsometric data with a three-phase model (air/sample/Pt), the optical constants of thin films are determined. The refractive index and extinction coefficient don't show apparent variation with different composition. The obtained optical constants are very significant in the potential applications of optoelectronic devices.

  8. Optical properties of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Hou, Yun; Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Yanqing

    2011-02-01

    Transition metal oxide (TMO) has been extensively focused in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the optical properties of a typical TMO material of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 (x=0-1) thin films. Different compositions of x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 thin films are grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by chemical solution deposition method under annealing temperature of 750°C. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 thin films are polycrystalline with spinel structure. The optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature in the wavelength range of 400-1700nm. By fitting the measured ellipsometric data with a three-phase model (air/sample/Pt), the optical constants of thin films are determined. The refractive index and extinction coefficient don't show apparent variation with different composition. The obtained optical constants are very significant in the potential applications of optoelectronic devices.

  9. Ellipsometry with polarisation analysis at cryogenic temperatures inside a vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.; Grees, B.; Spitzer, D.; Beck, M.; Bottesch, R.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Schäfer, T.; Wegmann, A.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Ostrick, B.; Telle, H. H.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper we describe a new variant of null ellipsometry to determine thicknesses and optical properties of thin films on a substrate at cryogenic temperatures. In the PCSA arrangement of ellipsometry the polarizer and the compensator are placed before the substrate and the analyzer after it. Usually, in the null ellipsometry the polarizer and the analyzer are rotated to find the searched minimum in intensity. In our variant we rotate the polarizer and the compensator instead, both being placed in the incoming beam before the substrate. Therefore the polarisation analysis of the reflected beam can be realized by an analyzer at fixed orientation. We developed this method for investigations of thin cryogenic films inside a vacuum chamber where the analyzer and detector had to be placed inside the cold shield at a temperature of T≈ 90 K close to the substrate. All other optical components were installed at the incoming beam line outside the vacuum chamber, including all components which need to be rotated during the measurements. Our null ellipsometry variant has been tested with condensed krypton films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate (HOPG) at a temperature of T≈ 25 K. We show that it is possible to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG substrate as well as thickness of krypton films with reasonable accuracy.

  10. Ellipsometry with polarisation analysis at cryogenic temperatures inside a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Grees, B.; Spitzer, D.; Beck, M.; Bottesch, R.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Ostrick, B.; Schäfer, T.; Telle, H. H.; Wegmann, A.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we describe a new variant of null ellipsometry to determine thicknesses and optical properties of thin films on a substrate at cryogenic temperatures. In the PCSA arrangement of ellipsometry the polarizer and the compensator are placed before the substrate and the analyzer after it. Usually, in the null ellipsometry the polarizer and the analyzer are rotated to find the searched minimum in intensity. In our variant we rotate the polarizer and the compensator instead, both being placed in the incoming beam before the substrate. Therefore the polarisation analysis of the reflected beam can be realized by an analyzer at fixed orientation. We developed this method for investigations of thin cryogenic films inside a vacuum chamber where the analyzer and detector had to be placed inside the cold shield at a temperature of T ≈ 90 K close to the substrate. All other optical components were installed at the incoming beam line outside the vacuum chamber, including all components which need to be rotated during the measurements. Our null ellipsometry variant has been tested with condensed krypton films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate (HOPG) at a temperature of T ≈ 25 K. We show that it is possible to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG substrate as well as thickness of krypton films with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Real-Time In Situ Monitoring of GaAs (211) Oxide Desorption and CdTe Growth by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, C. M.; Almeida, L. A.; Jacobs, R. N.; Markunas, J. K.; Smith, P. J.; Arias, J.; Brown, A. E.; Pellegrino, J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the growth of CdTe (211)B by molecular beam epitaxy on large-area epiready GaAs (211)B substrates. Prior to CdTe growth, GaAs substrates were thermally cleaned under an As4 flux. Oxide desorption was verified by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The use of in situ SE played a significant role in the study of CdTe-on-GaAs growth and annealing processes. An effective medium approximation (EMA) was used to model the overlayer thickness variation of CdTe epilayers throughout growth and in situ annealing cycles. A correlation between SE-derived EMA thickness values and surface defect formation mitigation is discussed. All annealed samples (11.5 μm to 13 μm thick) exhibited excellent crystalline quality with average double crystal rocking curve full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of ~60 arcsec.

  12. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  13. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  14. Secondary diffraction of diffracted Gaussian beam of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, Yu. V.; Kozar', A. V.; Matyunin, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The diffraction of a narrow Gaussian beam of laser radiation on mutually perpendicular edges of crossed, superimposed sharp wedge-shaped blades (safety razors) has been studied. The diffraction pattern observed on a flat screen behind the blades comprises a very bright central spot, which exhibits the structure of a "light network" with rectangular cells, and four groups of narrow bright bands that expand from the central spot toward the periphery and form a rectangular cross. The spatial frequency of light-field modulation on the screen can be controlled by varying the distance from the blades to screen.

  15. Symmetry and light stuffing of H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 characterized by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroudi, Kristen; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Cava, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    The H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 pyrochlores were studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction to determine whether the (002) peak, forbidden in the pyrochlore space group F d -3 m but observed in single crystal neutron scattering measurements, is present due to a deviation of their pyrochlore structure from F d -3 m symmetry. Synchrotron diffraction measurements on precisely synthesized stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric powders and a crushed floating zone crystal of H o2T i2O7 revealed that the (002) reflection is absent in all cases to a sensitivity of approximately one part in 30 000 of the strongest x-ray diffraction peak. This indicates to high sensitivity that the space group of the crystal structure of these rare earth titanate pyrochlores is F d -3 m , and that, thus, the (002) peak observed in the neutron scattering experiments has a nonstructural origin. The cell parameters and internal strain for lightly stuffed H o2 +xT i2 -xO7 are also presented.

  16. Subwavelength diffractive color beam combiner.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Nikolai I; Nikitin, Vladislav G; Danilov, Viktor A; Popov, Vladimir V; Usievich, Boris A

    2014-09-01

    A high-efficiency subwavelength diffractive beam combiner operating in a visible spectral range is designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. Such a device combines red, green, and blue color beams into one output light beam. Diffraction efficiencies of different types of gratings are calculated for various materials, incidence angles, and polarizations of light. It is shown that the plasmon resonance via a grating coupling occurs at the determined conditions. Subwavelength gratings with a period of 400 nm are fabricated and tested using laser and laser diode sources. PMID:25321371

  17. Fourier Ellipsometry -- An Ellipsometric Approach to Fourier Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, P.; Kumar, N.; Fried, M.; Fodor, B.; Juhasz, G.; Pereira, S. F.; Burger, S.; Urbach, H. P.

    2015-01-01

    An extension of Fourier scatterometry is presented, aiming at increasing the sensitivity by measuring the phase difference between the reflections polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The ellipsometric approach requires no additional hardware elements compared with conventional Fourier scatterometry. Furthermore, incoherent illumination is also sufficient, which enables spectroscopy using standard low-cost light sources.

  18. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  19. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core–shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core–shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip.

  20. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core-shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-12

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core-shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip. PMID:27352816

  1. Structured beam diffraction.

    PubMed

    Castagna, R; Di Donato, A; Nucara, L; Xu, J H; Lucchetta, D E; Simoni, F

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of a modulated pattern induced by a single laser beam in a polymeric film. In spite of the simple geometrical configuration, the analysis of the far field diffraction pattern allows a sensitive retrieving of the wavelength of the recording beam and of its incidence angle, pointing out the high information content of the recorded spot. A theoretical model is presented which satisfactorily explains the observed behavior. It takes into account the interaction of structured light with structured matter with the same symmetries and spatial modulation frequencies close to each other. This result shows a feature of the interaction between structured light and structured matter which has not been explored yet. PMID:27192262

  2. From angle-resolved ellipsometry of light scattering to imaging in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, Gaelle; Arnaud, Laurent; Siozade, Laure; Le Neindre, Nora; Chazallet, Frederic; Zerrad, Myriam; Deumie, Carole; Amra, Claude

    2008-05-01

    A procedure is described to allow selective cancellation of polarized scattering within optical substrates and multilayers. It is shown how bulk scattering(respectively surface) can be directly eliminated while the remaining roughness(respectively bulk) signal is still measurable. The same procedure can be applied to isolate a single interface or bulk within a stack or to detect slight departure from perfect correlation within multilayers. Experiments and a procedure for selective imaging in random media are described.

  3. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.

    2012-07-15

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  4. Optical characterization of isotactic polypropylene and carbon nanotube composites using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Kalakonda, Parvathalu; Georgiev, Georgi; Iannacchione, Germano

    2013-03-01

    We report the dielectric properties of optically characterized isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and its composites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Characterization was performed at angles ranging from 50 to 70 degrees and for the spectral range between 300-1000 nm. CNT concentrations varied from 0 to 5 wt% in the iPP/CNT composites investigated. Ellipsometry is a non-invasive and non-destructive technique that enabled us to determine the dielectric properties of the materials investigated. A concentration dependency on CNT wt% was found to exist for both the refractive index and the extinction coefficient for the iPP/CNT composites. At higher concentrations however, this distinction was not very clear, suggesting that saturation levels were reached in the material. We will also discuss our efforts to separate the optical properties of bound CNT from the analyzed nanocomposites.

  5. Dielectric function of the ferromagnetic semiconductor CdMnCrTe studied by using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Younghun; Um, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    We describe the pseudo-dielectric function of Cd1- x- y Mn x Cr y Te ferromagnetic semiconductor alloys by using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the 1.0 ~ 6.0 eV spectral range at room temperature. The ellipsometry data include structures that can be attributed to the effects of Cr concentration on the E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 critical points. Critical-point (CP) parameters were obtained by fitting standard critical point (SCP) model line shapes to the numerically-calculated second- energy derivatives of ɛ( ω) = ɛ 1( ω) + iɛ 2( ω). The E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 energies decreased with Cr content y; this phenomenon is related to the hybridization of the valence and the conduction bands in CdTe with the 3 d states of Mn and Cr.

  6. Single shot ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) of laser-driven shocks in single crystal explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Von H; Mcgrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Eakins, Dan E; Bolme, Cindy A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first experiments to measure states in shocked energetic single crystals with dynamic ellipsometry. We demonstrate that these ellipsometric techniques can produce reasonable Hugoniot values using small amounts of crystalline RDX and PETN. Pressures, particle velocities and shock velocities obtained using shocked ellipsometry are comparable to those found using gas-gun flyer plates and molecular dynamics calculations. The adaptation of the technique from uniform thin films of polymers to thick non-perfect crystalline materials was a significant achievement. Correct sample preparation proved to be a crucial component. Through trial and error, we were able to resolve polishing issues, sample quality problems, birefringence effects and mounting difficulties that were not encountered using thin polymer films.

  7. Modeling Ellipsometry Measurements of Molecular Thin-Film Contamination on Genesis Array Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a molecular thin-film contamination on Genesis flown array samples changed the course of preliminary assessment strategies. Analytical techniques developed to measure solar wind elemental abundances must now compensate for a thin-film contamination. Currently, this is done either by experimental cleaning before analyses or by depth-profiling techniques that bypass the surface contamination. Inside Johnson Space Center s Genesis dedicated ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom laboratory, the selection of collector array fragments allocated for solar wind analyses are based on the documentation of overall surface quality, visible surface particle contamination greater than 1 m, and the amount of thin film contamination measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Documenting the exact thickness, surface topography, and chemical composition of these contaminates is also critical for developing accurate cleaning methods. However, the first step in characterization of the molecular film is to develop accurate ellipsometry models that will determine an accurate thickness measurement of the contamination film.

  8. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI–CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kamiński, Radosław; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, Elżbieta; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies. PMID:25238405

  9. Thin-film hermeticity - A quantitative analysis of diamondlike carbon using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzeszko, S.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the successful application of variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry to quantitative thin-film hermeticity evaluation. It is shown that, under a variety of film preparations and moisture introduction conditions, water penetrates only a very thin diamondlike carbon (DLC) top surface-roughness region. Thus, DLC is an excellent candidate for use as protective coatings in adverse chemical and aqueous environments.

  10. Structure and Thermotropic phase Behavior of Fluorinated Phospholipid Bilayers: A combined Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR Spectroscopy and Imaging Ellipsometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuy, Steffen; Faiss, Simon; Yoder, Nicholas C.; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Kumar, Krishna; Janshoff, Andreas; Vogel, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Lipid bilayers consisting of lipids with terminally perfluoroalkylated chains have remarkable properties. They exhibit increased stability and phase-separated nanoscale patterns in mixtures with nonfluorinated lipids. In order to understand the bilayer properties that are responsible for this behavior, we have analyzed the structure of solid-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and of a DPPC analogue with 6 terminal perfluorinated methylene units (F6-DPPC). Polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that for F6-DPPC, the tilt of the lipid acyl chains to the bilayer normal is increased to 39° as compared to 21° for native DPPC, for both lipids in the gel phase. This substantial increase of the tilt angle is responsible for a decrease of the bilayer thickness from 5.4 nm for DPPC to 4.5 nm for F6-DPPC, as revealed by temperature-controlled imaging ellipsometry on microstructured lipid bilayers and solution atomic force microscopy. During the main phase transition from the gel to the fluid phase, both the relative bilayer thickness change and the relative area change are substantially smaller for F6-DPPC than for DPPC. In light of these structural and thermotropic data, we propose a model in which the higher acyl-chain tilt angle in F6-DPPC is the result of a conformational rearrangement to minimize unfavorable fluorocarbon–hydrocarbon interactions in the center of the bilayer due to chain staggering. PMID:18563929