Science.gov

Sample records for light diffraction ellipsometry

  1. Ellipsometry of diffractive insect reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; Lee, M. E.

    1996-04-01

    Scales on the wings of certain insects, such as Trichoplusia orichalcea, exhibit a surface microstructure resembling a fine diffraction grating. Diffraction of incident light by this structure is responsible for many of the optical properties of the wings of this moth, such as the metallic yellow color and the almost-specular reflection and polarization properties of the scattered radiation. It is shown that by the use of null ellipsometry the polarization characteristics can be used to obtain the optical constants of the scale material. Theoretical considerations and suitable experimental conditions are discussed and evaluated.

  2. Ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Podraza, N J; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle

    2014-01-01

    Ellipsometry is a technique often used to measure the thickness and properties of a thin film. This article covers the instrumental, theoretical, and practical aspects of this technique. Notably, different types of instruments including nulling ellipsometer, rotating compensator ellipsometer, and photoelastic modulator ellipsometer designs are presented. Elements of proper data analysis are also included, such as the use of an error-based figure of merit.

  3. Spectral Ellipsometry and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analyses of Silicon Surfaces Implanted with Silver Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, V. V.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Vorobev, V. V.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) produced on surfaces of single-crystal substrates (c-Si) by low-energy low-dose implantation of silver ions is studied by spectral ellipsometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Implantation was done with an ion energy of 30 keV at a constant ion beam current density of 2 μA/cm2 and doses of 6.24·1012-1.25·1016 ions/cm2 on room temperature substrate targets. Irradiation was carried out with a current density of 0.1-5 μA/cm2 for implantation doses of 6.24·1013 and 1.87·1014 ions/cm2. It was found that spectral ellipsometry is an accurate andreliable method for monitoring low-dose ion implantation processes.

  4. Quantum ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Kimani Christopher, Jr.

    Ellipsometry is a technique in which the polarization of light is used to determine the optical properties of a material (sample) and infer information such as the thickness of a thin film. Traditional ellipsometric measurements are limited in their accuracy because of the use of an external reference sample for calibration, and because of the quantum noise inherent in the source that becomes important at low light levels. A new technique called quantum ellipsometry is investigated, and is shown to circumvent these limitations by using a non-classical source of light, namely, twin photons generated by the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), in conjunction with a novel polarization interferometer and coincidence-counting detection scheme. Quantum ellipsometry comes in two forms: correlated-photon and entangled-photon ellipsometry. Both ellipsometric techniques yield estimated of the sample reflectance/transmittance with accuracy greater than conventional ellipsometry. Specifically, when the quantum efficiencies of the detectors used are above a certain threshold the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured ellipsometric parameters is larger for quantum ellipsometry than for conventional ellipsometry. This is because the photon pairs generated by SPDC have a fully correlated joint photon counting distribution. Furthermore, both correlated-photon and entangled-photon ellipsometry have the added advantage that they do not require calibration by an external reference sample, which is another limitation on the accuracy for most conventional ellipsometry. Quantum ellipsometry exploits the property of photon number correlation and polarization entanglement. The entanglement property, inherent in entangled-photon ellipsometry, is shown to allow for the movement of the optical elements that precede the sample to the sample-free optical channel in the setup. A theoretical and experimental investigation of quantum ellipsometry was conducted. Both correlated

  5. Light polarization states of a cholesteric liquid crystal probed with optical ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therézio, Eralci M.; da Silva, Silésia F. C.; Dalkiranis, Gustavo G.; Alliprandini Filho, Paulo; Santos, George C.; Ely, Fernando; Bechtold, Ivan H.; Marletta, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    Herein a useful methodology to study optical properties of cholesteric liquid crystals (Ch-LC) is proposed by using the Fourier decomposition ellipsometry technique to calculate the Stokes parameters of transmitted and reflected light in the UV-Vis spectral range. Combining Bragg reflection and optical activity we were able to obtain ∼100% of linear or circular light polarization from the Ch-LC sample using achromatic and non-polarized light source. The photonic bandgap and the polarization components can be controlled with the temperature as a result of alterations in the helix pitch of the cholesteric phase. Finally, it is demonstrated the correlation between the dissymmetry factor (g) calculated via the Stokes parameter S3 and the reflection spectrum. The data revealed that the maximum value of S3 is not coincident with the peak of maximum reflection. The reflected or transmitted light analysis via Stokes parameters obtained by ellipsometry showed an alternative and low cost method for optical characterization in Ch-LC.

  6. Diffraction gratings for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; de Boer, Dick K. G.; Tukker, Teus

    2013-09-01

    Sub-micron diffraction gratings have been used for two LED illumination applications. One is to create a transparent see through luminaire which can be used to illuminate and read a paper document or e-book. A second is a light sensor that can be used in a feedback loop to control a multicolor LED lamp. Optical design and experimental proof-of-principle are presented.

  7. Light by light diffraction in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Daniele; Michinel, Humberto

    2010-07-15

    We show that a laser beam can be diffracted by a more concentrated light pulse due to quantum vacuum effects. We compute analytically the intensity pattern in a realistic experimental configuration, and discuss how it can be used to measure the parameters describing photon-photon scattering in vacuum. In particular, we show that the quantum electrodynamics prediction can be detected in a single-shot experiment at future 100-PW lasers such as ELI or HIPER. On the other hand, if carried out at one of the present high-power facilities, such as OMEGA EP, this proposal can lead either to the discovery of nonstandard physics or to substantial improvement in the current limits by PVLAS collaboration on the photon-photon cross section at optical wavelengths. This example of manipulation of light by light is simpler to realize and more sensitive than existing, alternative proposals, and can also be used to test Born-Infeld theory or to search for axionlike or minicharged particles.

  8. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  9. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory. PMID:20208939

  10. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza-Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light-matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt's number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  11. Atomic oxygen effects on thin film space coatings studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Woollam, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently evaluating Low Earth Orbit (LEO) simulation techniques as well as a variety of thin film protective coatings to withstand atomic oxygen (AO) degradation. Both oxygen plasma ashers and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source are being used for LEO simulation. Thin film coatings are characterized by optical techniques including Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Optical spectrophotometry, and laser light scatterometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is also used to characterize surface morphology. Results on diamondlike carbon (DLC) films show that DLC degrades with simulated AO exposure at a rate comparable to Kapton polyimide. Since DLC is not as susceptible to environmental factors such as moisture absorption, it could potentially provide more accurate measurements of AO fluence on short space flights.

  12. Study on the reversibility of the diffraction light path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Wan, Lingyu; Liu, Yun; Dong, Jianjie; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-08-01

    of grating. First, we studied the reversibility of optical path of grating illuminated by monochromatic light, and then illuminated by polychromatic light. We found that the optical path of diffraction of grating has partial reversibility. Using the partial reversibility of optical path of diffraction of grating, we analyzed the spectral combination characteristic of grating and the bi-grating diffraction imaging effect.

  13. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  14. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  15. Hair treatment device for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, Bruce E.; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2016-01-26

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  16. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  17. Atomic diffraction by light gratings with very short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Lasers with wavelengths of the order of the atomic size are becoming available. We explore the behavior of light-matter interactions in this emergent field by considering the atomic Kapitza-Dirac effect. We derive the diffraction patterns, which are in principle experimentally testable. From a fundamental point of view, our proposal provides an example of system where the periodicity of the diffraction grating is comparable to the size of the diffracted object.

  18. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  19. Light diffraction by acoustically induced domains in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2006-05-15

    The phenomenon of light diffraction by a system of linear domains formed in planar layers of nematic liquid crystals in an oscillating Couette flow, acoustically induced at sound frequencies, is investigated.

  20. Degree of polarization of light diffracted from resting striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1987-04-01

    A laser light diffractometer has been developed to measure directly the total degree of polarization of (alpha t) of light diffracted and randomly scattered from striated muscle fibers. From alpha t the degree of polarization (alpha d) of light diffracted from the periodically arranged contractile filaments is determined. Measurements on single muscle fibers and small fiber bundles indicate that both alpha t and alpha d of the first-order diffraction decrease monotonically with sarcomere length. For the second-order diffraction, alpha t and alpha d exhibit a peak at sarcomere length of about 3.0 micron. A proposed theory based on the anisotropic light scattering efficiencies of the thick and thin filaments can account for the measurements. The comparison between the theory and measurements indicates that the A-band, as well as the I-band, are optically anisotropic. PMID:2443248

  1. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained. PMID:26835636

  2. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E. ); Weaver, H.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. Key words: Spherical diffraction, isomorphic propagation theory, Lommel functions.

  3. Time-dependent dynamic behavior of light diffraction in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Min-Feng; Chou, S. E.; Fu, Chao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    The time-dependent dynamic behavior of diffraction patterns induced by external magnetic field in a suspension of nano-sized magnetic particles (Fe3O4) in a water-based magnetic fluid was investigated. It was observed that the diffraction pattern changed with time as the magnetic field was applied. In the absence of applied magnetic field, there was no diffraction pattern in the screen. When the magnetic field was applied, the transmitted light was perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the diffraction pattern was unstable. There were many small lines and points moving with time. After one minute, the diffraction pattern turned stable, and the small lines became longer. This time-dependent behavior helps us to understand the evolution of the forming chains of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, we have measured the other diffraction pattern, the transmitted light propagating parallel to the applied field. These time-dependent diffraction patterns give a new point to understand the dynamic three-dimensional structure of magnetic fluid under a dc magnetic field.

  4. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Sommargren, G E; Weaver, H J

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. PMID:20577447

  5. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  6. Computation of Diffractive Beam Propagation of Monochromatic Light

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-20

    Computation of diffractive beam propagation of monochromatic light through a l-dimensional (slab) structure defined by a piecewise continuous complex index of refraction. Finite difference equations are fourth-order-accurate in the lateral grid size and include discontinuities of higher-order field derivatives at dielectric interfaces. Variable grid spacing is allowed, and all dielectric interfaces are assumed to coincide with grid points.

  7. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  8. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  9. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  10. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  11. Spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseler, A.

    1992-03-01

    The spectroscopic infrared ellipsometry (SIRE) by means of the combination of a photometric ellipsometer with a Fourier transform spectrometer is used to measure optical properties in the infrared. From the observed four Stokes parameters, the spectrum of the degree of polarization after the reflection at the sample is calculated and discussed.

  12. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  13. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  14. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  15. Generalized Ellipsometry in Unusual Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Holcomb, David Eugene; Hunn, John D; Rouleau, Christopher M; Wright, Gomez W

    2006-01-01

    Most ellipsometry experiments are performed by shining polarized light onto a sample at a large angle of incidence, and the results are interpreted in terms of thin film thicknesses and isotropic optical functions of the film or substrate. However, it is possible to alter the geometrical arrangement, either by observing the sample in transmission or at normal-incidence reflection. In both cases, the experiment is fundamentally the same, but the interpretation of the results is considerably different. Both configurations can be used in conjunction with microscope optics, allowing for images to be made of the sample. The results of three examples of these different configurations using the two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) are reported: (1) spectroscopic birefringence measurements of ZnO, (2) electric field-induced birefringence (Pockels effect) in GaAs, and (3) normal-incidence reflection anisotropy of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG).

  16. Ellipsometry: a sophisticated tool for optical metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Rasheed M. A.

    2000-11-01

    Ellipsometry is a sensitive optical technique for non- invasive in-situ (in any optically transparent environment) and ex-situ (in air) characterization of surfaces, interfaces, and thin films which is based on measurement of the polarization of light before and after reflection from a given sample at different angles of incidence and as a function of wavelength. The spectral range of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) -typically 1-6eV of photon energy- has been extended to the mid and far IR on one side and to the VUV, EUV, and X-ray region on the other. Significant advances and sophistication of available instrumentation and supportive software have resulted in extensive use of ellipsometry in biology, chemistry, physics, materials science and engineering, and industrial applications over the past two decades. Fast ellipsometers are used for real- time on-line monitoring and feedback process control of various thin films and for the fabrication of pre-engineered multilayer and graded-composition structures. As a metrology tool, ellipsometry yields information on dielectric functions of layered optically isotropic or anisotropic materials, film thicknesses, interface roughnesses, and compositions (void and alloy fractions) and depth profiles of inhomogeneous thin films.

  17. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  18. Teaching Diffraction of Light and Electrons: Classroom Analogies to Classic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velentzas, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and interference are phenomena that demonstrate the wave nature of light and of particles. Experiments relating to the diffraction/interference of light can easily be carried out in an educational lab, but it may be impossible to perform experiments involving electrons because of the lack of specialized equipment needed for such…

  19. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  20. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOEpatents

    Bishop, Kenneth P.; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Gaspar, Susan M.; Hickman, Kirt C.; McNeil, John R.; Naqvi, S. Sohail H.; Stallard, Brian R.; Tipton, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  1. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, G.V.

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  3. Pixel Detectors For Diffraction Experiments At The Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Huelsen, G.; Eikenberry, E.F.; Schmitt, B.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Tomizaki, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Willmott, P.; Patterson, B.; Broennimann, Ch.; Horisberger, R.; Toyokawa, H.; Borchert, G. L.

    2004-05-12

    The PILATUS detector (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a large, quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography which is currently under construction. Its basic units are modules with 16 CMOS chips bump-bonded to a large, continuously sensitive silicon sensor with 157x366 pixels of 217x217 {mu}m2, leading to an active area of 34x80 mm2. With a counting circuit in each pixel, X-rays are detected in single photon counting mode, leading to excellent, noise-free data. The main properties of the detector are an energy range of 6 to 30 keV, no back-ground due to leakage current or readout-noise, fast read-out time of 6.7 ms, a rate/pixel >104/s and a PSF of one pixel. PILATUS detectors are installed at the SLS X06SA protein crystallography beamline, and at both the surface diffraction (SD) station and the radiography and tomography (XTM) station of beamline X04SA. The detectors are operated at room temperature and thus are very easy to use. Experiments benefit from the ability to detect very weak diffraction spots with high precision. At the SD station and at the XTM station, which is equipped with a Bragg magnifier, diffraction, radiography and tomography experiments showed promising results. At beamline X06SA, a three-module array (1120x157 pixels) with a readout time of 6.7 ms was tested. This system was used to collect fine phi-sliced protein crystal data in continuous sample rotation mode in which the crystal was continuously rotated with a slow angular velocity of 0.04 deg./s without any shutter operation. Exposure time per frame ranged from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the crystal. These initial experiments show the potential of this method.

  4. Chromatic compensation of broadband light diffraction: ABCD-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jésus; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Climent, Vicent; Andrés, Pedro; Caraquitena, José

    2004-10-01

    Compensation of chromatic dispersion for the optical implementation of mathematical transformations has proved to be an important tool in the design of new optical methods for full-color signal processing. A novel approach for designing dispersion-compensated, broadband optical transformers, both Fourier and Fresnel, based on the collimated Fresnel number is introduced. In a second stage, the above framework is fully exploited to achieve the optical implementation of the fractional Fourier transform (FRT) of any diffracting screen with broadband illumination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the amount of shift variance of the dispersion-compensated FRT can be tuned continuously from the spatial domain, which is totally space variant, to the spectral domain, which is totally space invariant, with the chromatic correction remaining unaltered. PMID:15497415

  5. Light coupling into an optical microcantilever by an embedded diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, K; Dominguez, C; Plaza, J A; Cadarso, V; Lechuga, L M

    2006-01-10

    By measuring the excitation efficiency of an optical waveguide on a diffraction grating one can accurately register the changes in the incidence angle of the exciting light beam. This phenomenon was applied to detect ultrasmall deflections of silicon dioxide cantilevers of submicrometer thickness that were fabricated with corrugation on top to act as diffraction grating couplers. The power of light coupled into the cantilevers was monitored with a conventional photodetector and modulated using mechanical vibration of the cantilever, thus changing the spatial orientation of the coupler with respect to the incident light beam. The technique can be considered as an alternative to the methods known for detection of cantilever deflection. PMID:16422154

  6. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  7. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  8. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  9. Effect of spectral correlations on spectral switches in the diffraction of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro; Lü, Baida

    2003-10-01

    The subject is the spectral characteristics of partially coherent light whose spectral degree of coherence satisfies or violates the scaling law in diffraction by a circular aperture. Three kinds of spectral correlations of the incident light are considered. It is shown that no matter whether the partially coherent light satisfies or violates the scaling law, a spectral switch defined as a rapid transition of spectral shifts is always found in the diffraction field. Different spectral correlations of the incident field in the aperture result in different points at which the spectral switch occurs. With an increment in the correlations, the position at which the spectral switch takes place moves toward the point at which the phase of the center frequency component omega0 becomes singular for illumination by spatially fully coherent light. For light that satisfies the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to the diffraction-induced spectral changes; for partially coherent light that violates the scaling law, the spectral switch is attributed to both the diffraction-induced spectral changes and the correlation-induced spectral changes. PMID:14570106

  10. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes. PMID:26393758

  11. Investigation of correlation properties of light fields by Fresnel diffraction from a step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. R.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new method, based on Fresnel diffraction of light from a step, for the study of correlation properties (temporal and spatial) of optical fields. The method renders to measure wavelength, coherence length, and coherence width by recording the visibility of the diffraction fringes versus optical path difference and spacing of the interfering beams. In addition, the method permits to specify the spectral line shape, particularly, of lights with short coherence lengths and the spatial coherence behavior of the lights with short coherence widths. Since, in the introduced method the optical path difference can be varied by changing the light incident angle, practically, in an interval of 90º, a large volume of data is acquired which leads to reliable and accurate study of the subject. The method can be applied easily using modest equipment. We have applied the method to the study of correlation properties of the lights emitted by LED, incandescent bulb, and Hg lamp.

  12. Minimization of diffraction peaks of spatial light modulators using Voronoi diagrams.

    PubMed

    Benoît-Pasanau, Céline; Goudail, Francois; Chavel, Pierre; Cano, Jean-Paul; Ballet, Jérôme

    2010-07-01

    It is possible to reduce the diffraction peaks of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) by breaking the periodicity of the pixels shape. We propose a theoretical investigation of a SLM that would be based on a Voronoi diagram, obtained by deforming a regular grid, and show that for a specific deformation parameter the diffraction peaks disappear and are replaced with a speckle-like diffraction halo. We also develop a simple model to determine the shape and the level of this halo. PMID:20640008

  13. Small modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharme, Stephen P. (Inventor); El Hajj, Hassanayn M. (Inventor); Johs, Blaine D. (Inventor); Woollam, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In an ellipsometer, a phase-modulated, polarized light beam is applied to a sample, electrical signals are obtained representing the orthogonal planes of polarization of the light after it has interacted with the sample and the constants of the sample are calculated from the two resulting electrical signals. The phase modulation is sufficiently small so that the calibration errors are negligible. For this purpose, the phase modulator phase modulates the light within a range of no more than ten degrees modulations peak to peak. The two electrical signals are expanded by Fourier analysis and the coefficients thereof utilized to calculate psi and delta.

  14. Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo

    2009-03-10

    Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

  15. Polarization-independent light-dispersing device based on diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report a light-dispersing device comprised of two transmission gratings and a wave plate. The gratings split the light incident at the Bragg angle into two orthogonally polarized components. The wave plate, which is placed between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique illumination. Appropriate assembly of these optical parts results in efficient diffraction of the unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device with a grating period of 400 nm for the spectral range of 680 ± 50 nm. We verified the proposed polarization-independent light-dispersing concept from the evaluation of this device.

  16. Observation of light diffraction by time-resolved femtosecond correlation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zeylikovich, I; Bai, G; Alfano, R R

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrate time development of the diffraction of light waves from objects for what is to our knowledge the f irst time by using a new femtosecond correlation interferometry. This new dynamical optics method allows for the conversion of temporal information to space information with femtosecond resolution and has the potential to produce a time-resolved femtosecond movie for the visualization of light-wave propagation in space for scientific, biological, and medical applications. PMID:19862089

  17. Polarization sensitivity of light diffraction for periodic array of anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ming-shan Liu, Tung-kai; Tsen, Chun-yu; Ting, Chen-ching

    2015-06-15

    This article aims to analyze the first order diffraction intensity of the incident polarized light which is diffracted by the gold nanoparticles array in terms of the surface plasmon effect. The inspected gold nanoparticles array films are built in grating pattern with stripe thickness of 4 μm and diameters of gold nanoparticles ca. 10–56 nm, which are formed by annealing at temperatures of 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, respectively. The probing light is linearly polarized with wavelengths of 450–800 nm and counterclockwise turns its polarization direction from 0° to 90° during measurements. The results show that the diffraction intensity depends on the anisotropic configuration samples which gold nanoparticles are orientated by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images. It results that the localized surface plasmon effect induced by incident field depends on orientation and causes the sample polarization-sensitive.

  18. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  19. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  20. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  1. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  2. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  3. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  4. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  5. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  6. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  7. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  8. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept. PMID:24921129

  9. Automatic null ellipsometry with an interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2009-11-10

    A new approach to automatic null ellipsometry is described in which the analyzer of a traditional polarizer compensator sample analyzer (PCSA) null ellipsometer is replaced with a heterodyne Michelson interferometer. One arm of this interferometer is modified such that it produces a fixed, linearly polarized reference beam, irrespective of the input polarization state. This beam is recombined interferometrically with the measurement beam and spatially separated into its p and s polarizations. The relative phase of the resulting temporal fringes is a linear function of the polarizer azimuthal angle P, and thus this component can be driven to its null position without iteration. Once at null, the azimuthal angle of the reflected, linearly polarized light is trivially determined from the relative amplitude of the fringes. Measurements made with this instrument on a native oxide film on a silicon wafer were in excellent agreement with those made with a traditional PCSA null ellipsometer.

  10. Scattering of white light from levitated oblate water drops near rainbows and other diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H J; Marston, P L

    1991-08-20

    Oblate drops of water illuminated perpendicular to their symmetry axis generate a hyperbolic-umbilic diffraction catastrophe near the primary rainbow [P. L. Marston and E. H. Trinh, Nature London 312, 529-531 (1984)]. Observations were made of this diffraction catastrophe generated by white-light illumination of acoustically levitated drops of water in air. The observations suggest what generalized rainbows would look like if they were produced in nature when sunlight illuminates large raindrops. Unlike the usual rainbow arc, the transverse cusp of the unfolded catastrophe is not distinctly colored. The hyperbolic-umbilic focal section is distinctly colored as is another diffraction catastrophe generated in the rainbow region when the drop is highly oblate. PMID:20706412

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis: Measured vs. calculated quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a very powerful technique for optical characterization of thin-film and bulk materials, but the technique measures functions of complex reflection coefficients, which are usually not of interest per se. The interesting characteristics such as film thickness, surface roughness thickness, and optical functions can be determined only by modeling the near-surface region of the sample. However, the measured quantities are not equivalent to those determined from the modeling. Ellipsometry measurements determine elements of the sample Mueller matrix, but the usual result of modeling calculations are elements of the sample. Often this difference is academic, but if the sample depolarizes the light, it is not. Ellipsometry calculations also include methods for determining the optical functions of materials. Data for bulk materials are usually accurate for substrates, but are not appropriate for most thin films. Therefore, reasonable parameterizations are quite useful in performing spectroscopic ellipsometry data analysis. Recently, there has been an increased interest in anisotropic materials, both in thin-film and bulk form. A generalized procedure will be presented for calculating the elements of the Jones matrix for any number of layers, any one of which may or may not be uniaxial.

  12. Analysis of beam steering by diffraction and the scattering of light by turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Jing M.

    This thesis addresses two problems. The first is the performance of non-mechanical beam steering devices based on diffractive optics, and the second is the problem of the scattering of light by turbulence. Two beam steering devices namely holographic optical elements and optical phased arrays are analyzed. Of particular interest are the wavelength selectivity of the uniform volume holographic grating and the impact of dispersion on the spatial and temporal fidelity of an optically transmitted communication signal through both beamsteering devices. Longitudinal refractive index modulation (apodization) in photosensitive glass is used to improve sidelobe. Theoretical methods are developed to model both devices. For uniform grating, it is shown that the temporal dispersion due to the diffraction increase with beam diameter yielding a higher power penalty for large diffraction angles and aperture sizes. For an optical phased array, it is shown the power penalty increase as the diffraction angles and diameters increase. In addition, the scattering of light in turbulent medium is investigated. Of particular interest is to determine region of validity of the Born approximation which is used to compute the scattering field. Pade approximants are used to analyze the propagation through a media having strong turbulent intensity. It is shown that the region of convergence of Born approximation increases as the outer scale of the turbulence decreases. In the case of the strong turbulence, the Born approximation does not capture the correct angular distribution of the scattering intensity.

  13. Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Katsev, I L; Prikhach, A S; Kazak, N S; Kroening, M

    2006-04-30

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable. (light beams)

  14. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijun; Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-01

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400-800 nm) and bottom (800-1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  15. LIGHT BEAMS: Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, I. L.; Prikhach, A. S.; Kazak, N. S.; Kroening, M.

    2006-04-01

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable.

  16. Birefringence characterization using transmission ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nee, Soe-Mie F.

    1992-12-01

    Birefringence can be obtained from the phase difference (Delta) between the ordinary and the extraordinary rays for normal transmission through a birefringent slab. Rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) and null ellipsometry (NE) were used to measure (Delta) . NE gives accurate phase spectrum which shows linear dependence of phase on wave-number. The phase spectrum by RAE looks like a damped oscillatory curve. The calibration of RAE against NE shows that the extrema of RAE phase spectrum correspond to (Delta) equals m(pi) of NE spectrum, where m equals integer; the phases near m (pi) + (pi) /2 are about the same from both methods. Error caused by partially coherent interference of the multiple reflected waves within the slab consists basically of the sinusoidal functions of (Delta) and its harmonics, and is zero at (Delta) equals m(pi) . These errors can be suppressed by the least-square fit of m to a quadratic function of 1/(lambda) . The birefringence spectrum measured for a sapphire sample in the 0.4 to 0.9 micrometers wavelength region agrees with the handbook values.

  17. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  18. Improvement of the diffraction efficiency and kinetics of holographic gratings in photochromic media by auxiliary light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert; Juchem, Thorsten

    2004-12-01

    Holographic gratings recorded in photochromic media often do not obtain the maximally achievable diffraction efficiency because of diminishing the fringe contrast caused, e.g., by a photochemically active readout beam or unequal intensities of object and reference waves. For nonreversible materials this problem causes a decrease in diffraction efficiency that is proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, in nonlinear materials such as photochromic media, for which saturation effects need to be considered, an out-of-proportion decrease in the SNR results. It is shown that an overshooting peak during hologram growth, which then decays to a lower permanent level of diffraction, is an indicator for such a situation. Even a weak readout beam may cause such effects, which significantly affect the hologram kinetics. The observed overshooting diffraction efficiency may even be misinterpreted to be dependent on material properties. Experimental and theoretical proof that with low levels of auxiliary light this type of problem can be eliminated completely is presented. Throughout this research bacteriorhodopsin films were used, but the results are valid for photochromic media in general.

  19. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  20. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  1. Differential near-edge coherent diffractive imaging using a femtosecond high-harmonic XUV light source.

    PubMed

    Weise, Fabian; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R; Gessner, Oliver

    2012-11-19

    Element-specific contrast enhancement in tabletop coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is demonstrated by employing an ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source with tunable photon energy. By combining two measurements performed at energies below and above the Al L(2,3) absorption edge, the spatial autocorrelation function of a micron-scale double pinhole in a 300 nm thick aluminum foil is retrieved despite a dominant background signal from directly transmitted light across the entire range of detectable diffraction angles. The fringe visibility in the diffraction patterns is 0 below the Al L(2,3) edge, 0.53 ± 0.06 above the edge, and 0.73 ± 0.08 in the differential image that combines the two measurements. The proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that the variations of XUV optical constants in the vicinity of an inner-shell absorption edge can be utilized to improve the chemical sensitivity and image reconstruction quality of laboratory-based ultrafast imaging experiments. PMID:23187472

  2. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  3. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  4. Characterization of semicrystalline polymers after nanoimprint by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si; Rond, Johannes; Steinberg, Christian; Papenheim, Marc; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2016-02-01

    Semicrystalline Reg-P3HT (regio-regular poly-3-hexylthiophene) is a promising material for organic electronics. It features relatively high charge mobility and enables easy preparation because of its solubility. Due to its high optical and electrical anisotropy, the size, number and orientation of the ordered domains are important for applications. To control these properties without limitation from crystalline domains existing after spin coating, thermal nanoimprint is performed beyond the melting point. The state of the art of measurement to analyze the complex morphology is X-ray diffraction (XRD). We address an alternative measurement method to characterize the material by its optical properties, spectroscopic ellipsometry. It provides information on the degree of order from the typical fingerprint absorption spectrum. In addition, when the material is modeled as a uniaxial layer, an anisotropy factor can be derived. The results obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry are in accordance with those from XRD. In particular, spectroscopic ellipsometry is able to distinguish between order along the backbone and order in π- π stacking direction, which is important with respect to conductivity.

  5. Toward the optical "magic carpet": reducing the divergence of a light sheet below the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Golub, Ilya; Chebbi, Brahim; Golub, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In 3D, diffraction-free or Bessel beams are well known and have found applications in diverse fields. An analog in 2D, or pseudonondiffracting (PND) beams, is a nontrivial problem, and existing methods suffer from deficiencies. For example, Airy beams are not highly localized, some PND beams have significant side lobes, and a cosine beam has to be truncated by a very narrow aperture thus discarding most of the energy. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that it is possible to generate a quasi-nondiffracting 2D light beam in a simple and efficient fashion. This is achieved by placing a mask consisting of a pair of double slits on a cylindrical lens. The applications include light sheet microscopy/optical sectioning and particle manipulation. PMID:26512534

  6. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  7. Novel light trapping concepts for crystalline silicon solar cells using diffractive rear side structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenlohr, J.; Tucher, N.; Bett, Alexander; Hauser, H.; Graf, M.; Benick, J.; Goldschmidt, J. C.; Bläsi, B.; Hermle, M.

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells absorb light in the near infrared only weakly. To utilize also the infrared light of the solar spectrum with energies still greater than the band gap of silicon, the effective path of the light inside the solar cell has to be enhanced. Light paths can be manipulated at the front side as well as at the rear side of a solar cell. For the front side, pyramidal textures that also show anti-reflection properties are widely used. These anti-reflection properties, however, can also be achieved with planar dielectric coatings or nanostructured surfaces. In this case, the path length enhancement can be achieved with rear side structures that are especially optimized for this purpose, thus de-coupling anti-reflection and path-length enhancement functionalities. This de-coupling creates leeway to optimize not only the optical properties but also the electrical properties of the optically active structures, and to realize structures that are compatible with very thin silicon wafers. To this end, this paper investigates two kinds of diffractive rear side structures, both, theoretically and experimentally. First, hexagonal sphere gratings that are produced by a self-organized growth process using spin coating, and second, binary gratings produced via nano-imprint lithography. Both process chains are potentially scalable to large areas. In optical measurements we determined potential photocurrent density gains of over 1 mA/cm2 for 250 μm thick wafers for both structures. Furthermore, we developed a process for contact formation as one key step to fully processed solar cells with diffractive rear side structures.

  8. Nanoimprinted Diffraction Gratings for Light Trapping in Crystal-Silicon Film Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Weiss

    2010-11-29

    Crystal-silicon (c-Si) film photovoltaics hold the promise of combining the advantages of state-of-the-art wafer-silicon technology with the scalability and the inherently much lower cost of thin-film solar technologies. In the thickness range of 2-20 μm very effective light trapping is essential to absorb sufficient red and near-infrared (NIR) light and reach targeted efficiencies of 16%–18%, as defined by the U.S. National Solar Technology Roadmap. One proposed method is diffractive light trapping, which, at least in certain wavelength ranges, can theoretically outperform light trapping through random scattering at a rough surface or interface. The goals of this project were (1) to develop a nanoimprinting process for a high-refractive-index dielectric material, (2) to fabricate diffraction gratings as back-reflectors using this material, and (3) to demonstrate for a 2 μm c-Si film an improvement in AM1.5 photon absorption of at least 80% relative to single-pass absorption. We achieved goals (1) and (2). We developed a soft-imprint method for sol-based titanium dioxide precursor films (index range 2.3-2.4) and integrated imprinted films in thin-film silicon devices. We did not fully reach goal (3): depending on the model used for interpretation of the optical experimental data, AM1.5 photon absorption was improved by only 53% (coherent electromagnetic model) to 66% (non-coherent ray-tracing model). When compared to a metallized flat reference film (double-pass absorption), the improvement due to the grating is only 6%, if the (more conservative) electromagnetic model is used. Other important achievements from this project were: -We perfected an imprinting method for another ceramic material, aluminum oxide phosphate, which is index-matched with glass. -We tested diffractive light trapping at different incidence angles and found positive evidence for light trapping for angles up to 50°, although the light-trapping efficiency

  9. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  10. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction. PMID:22505104

  11. Quantum-mechanical diffraction theory of light from a small hole: Extinction-theorem approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Keller, Ole

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. A 90, 043830 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.043830] it was shown that the so-called aperture response tensor is the central concept in the microscopic quantum theory of light diffraction from a small hole in a flat screen. It was further shown that the quantum mechanical theory of diffraction only requires a preknowledge of the incident field plus the electronic properties of identical screens with and without a hole. Starting from the quantum mechanical expression for the linear conductivity tensor, we study the related causal conductivity tensor paying particular attention to diamagnetic electron dynamics. Using a nonlocal-potential separation assumption, we present a calculation of the diamagnetic causal surface conductivity for a jellium quantum-well screen using a two-dimensional Hartree-Fock model. In the diamagnetic case the difference between the light-unperturbed electron densities for screens with (n0) and without (n∞0) holes are the primary quantities for the diffraction theory. In a central part (Sec. IV) of this article we determine n0 via a quantum-mechanical two-dimensional extinction-theorem approach related to elastic electron scattering from a hole with an electronic selvedge. For heuristic purposes we illustrate aspects of the extinction-theorem theory by applying the approach for an infinitely high potential barrier to the vacuum hole. Finally, we calculate and discuss the aperture response tensor in the small hole limit and in the zeroth-order Born approximation. Our final result for the aperture response tensor establishes the bridge to the anisotropic electric dipole polarizability tensor of the hole. It turns out that the effective optical aperture (hole) size relates closely to the extension of the relevant electronic wave functions scattered from the hole.

  12. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and function as free-floating optically trapped waveguides. Dynamic coupling of focused light via these structures being moved in three-dimensional space is done holographically. However, calculating the necessary holograms is not straightforward when using counter-propagating trapping geometry. The generation of the coupling spots is done in real time following the position of each microtool with the aid of an object tracking routine. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the microtools which can be useful in a variety of biophotonics applications. To complement the targeted-light delivery capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales.

  13. Progress on the prevention of stray light and diffraction effects on the Thai National Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisset, Christophe; Prasit, Apirat; Leckngam, Apichat; Lépine, Thierry; Poshyajinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Irawati, Puji; Richichi, Andrea; Sawangwit, Utane; Dhillon, Vik; Hardy, Liam K.

    2015-09-01

    The 2.4-m Thai National Telescope (TNT) is the main facility of the Thai National Observatory located on the Doi Inthanon, Thailand's highest mountain. The first astronomical images obtained at the TNT suffered from diffraction and stray light problems: bright spikes spread from bright stellar images over few arcminutes in the focal plane, and the images taken during observations in bright moon conditions were contaminated by high levels of stray light. We performed targeted investigations to identify the origin of these problems. In a first time, these investigations consisted of analyzing the irradiance distribution of defocused stellar images and of identifying the contributors. We concluded that these bright spikes around the bright stellar images were due to the chamfer and the wavefront error at the mirror edge. We thus installed an annular mask along the edge of the primary mirror that fully suppressed these spikes and we quantified the improvement by observing the double star Sirius. In a second time, we identified the contributors to the stray light by placing a pinhole camera at the TNT focal plane. Then, we designed a new baffle to improve the stray light rejection. The final design of the baffle comprises 21 diaphragms, is painted with an ordinary black paint and was designed, developed and installed on the TNT in less than 8 months. We assessed the improvement on the performance by measuring the variation of the stray light signal before and after installing the baffle in the telescope structure. These steps significantly improved the image quality and enhanced the rejection of the stray light at the focal plane level. In this paper, we present our investigations, we describe the method used to design the TNT baffle, and we present the improvement in quantitative terms.

  14. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  15. High Quantum Efficiency Nanopillar Photodiodes Overcoming the Diffraction Limit of Light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook-Jae; Senanayake, Pradeep; Farrell, Alan C; Lin, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-01-13

    InAs1-xSbx nanowires have recently attracted interest for infrared sensing applications due to the small bandgap and high thermal conductivity. However, previous reports on nanowire-based infrared sensors required low operating temperatures in order to mitigate the high dark current and have shown poor sensitivities resulting from reduced light coupling efficiency beyond the diffraction limit. Here, InAsSb nanopillar photodiodes with high quantum efficiency are achieved by partially coating the nanopillar with metal that excites localized surface plasmon resonances, leading to quantum efficiencies of ∼29% at 2390 nm. These high quantum efficiency nanopillar photodiodes, with 180 nm diameters and 1000 nm heights, allow operation at temperatures as high as 220 K and exhibit a detection wavelength up to 3000 nm, well beyond the diffraction limit. The InAsSb nanopillars are grown on low cost GaAs (111)B substrates using an InAs buffer layer, making our device architecture a promising path toward low-cost infrared focal plane arrays with high operating temperature. PMID:26682745

  16. Development of diffractive XUV-VUV light extractors for fusion plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Caravelli, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2009-11-01

    The diagnostic and control of next generation MFE and ICF fusion experiments will require optical light extractors capable of withstanding intense plasma and radiation exposure. A solution applicable from the XUV to the infrared is to use free-standing diffractive optics such as transmission gratings or zone plates. Here we present results on XUV-VUV diffractive extractors for the diagnostic of boundary MFE plasmas. For the VUV range we developed Si transmission gratings having 1 μm period, 5 μm thickness, 40% open fraction, 1x2 mm active area, and coated with Ni, while for the XUV range we use SiN gratings having 0.2 μm period, 0.3 μm thickness, 1x1 mm area, and coated with Ta. The grating extractors are spectrally and spatially calibrated in the laboratory using a newly developed extended XUV-VUV source and will be employed for imaging spectrometry on the NSTX experiment. The operational characteristics of the extended source and first space resolved XUV-VUV spectra will be presented. Work supported by DoE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54523 at JHU and Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PU.

  17. Coherent EUV light from high-order harmonic generation: Enhancement and applications to lensless diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Ariel J.

    2007-12-01

    The first half of this thesis presents the first demonstration of quasi-phase matching in the coherent high-order harmonic conversion of ultrafast laser pulses into the EUV region of the spectrum. To achieve this quasi-phase matching, a novel method of fabricating hollow waveguides with a modulated inner diameter was developed. This technique lead to significant enhancements of EUV flux at wavelengths shorter than were previously accessible by known phase-matching techniques. In the second half of this thesis, the first tabletop demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging with EUV light is presented using HHG in a gas-filled hollow waveguide to provide coherent illumination. This tabletop microscope shows a spatial resolution of ˜ 200 nm and a large depth of field. Furthermore, the technique is easily scalable to shorter wavelengths of interest to biological imaging.

  18. Modular sub-wavelength diffractive light modulator for high-definition holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Richard; Rochus, Veronique; Rottenberg, Xavier; Cosemans, Stefan; Haspeslagh, Luc; Severi, Simone; Van der Plas, Geert; Lafruit, Gauthier; Donnay, Stephane

    2013-02-01

    Holography is undoubtedly the ultimate 3D visualization technology, offering true 3D experience with all the natural depth cues, without the undesirable side-effects of current stereoscopic systems (uncomfortable glasses, strained eyes, fatiguing experience). Realization of a high-definition holographic display however requires a number of breakthroughs from existing prototypes. One of the main challenges lies in technology scaling, as holography is based on light diffraction and interference - to achieve wide viewing angles, the light-modulating pixels need to be spaced close to or below the wavelength of the used visible light. Furthermore, achieving high 3D image quality, hundreds of millions of such individually programmable pixels are needed. As a solution, we develop a modular sub-wavelength light modulator, consisting of three main sub-systems: the optical sub-system, comprising a 2D array of sub-wavelength pixels; the driver sub-system for individual pixel control, and the holographic computational engine. Based on conclusions from our state-of-the art studies, numerous experiments and holographic demonstrators, we have focused on reflective phase-modulating MEMS-based system and its scaling beyond 500nm pitch. We have devised a unique binary-programmable phase-modulating pixel architecture realizing vertical pixel displacement of up to 150nm at 500nm by 500nm pixel pitch, while sustaining low operating voltages compatible with CMOS driver circuitry. IMEC SiGe MEMS technology enables integration of the CMOS pixel-line drivers, scan-line drivers and I/O circuits underneath the 2D MEMS array, resulting in a compact and modular single-chip system design. Refresh rates of few hundred frames per second are achieved using our patented segmented driver-array architecture. Integrated circuits implementing parallel holographic computational engines can be added to the module using advanced 3D stacking technology. Herein we further report on our progress in realizing

  19. Determining Concentration of Nanoparticles from Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chipman, Russell

    2008-01-01

    A method of using ellipsometry or polarization analysis of light in total internal reflection of a surface to determine the number density of gold nanoparticles on a smooth substrate has been developed. The method can be modified to enable determination of densities of sparse distributions of nanoparticles in general, and is expected to be especially useful for measuring gold-nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules on microarrays. The method is based on theoretical calculations of the ellipsometric responses of gold nanoparticles. Elements of the calculations include the following: For simplicity, the gold nanoparticles are assumed to be spherical and to have the same radius. The distribution of gold nanoparticles is assumed to be a sub-monolayer (that is, sparser than a monolayer). The optical response of the sub-monolayer is modeled by use of a thin-island-film theory, according to which the polarizabilities parallel and perpendicular to the substrate are functions of the wavelength of light, the dielectric functions (permittivities expressed as complex functions of frequency or wavelength) of the gold and the suspending medium (in this case, the suspending medium is air), the fraction of the substrate area covered by the nanoparticles, and the radius of the nanoparticles. For the purpose of the thin-island-film theory, the dielectric function of the gold nanoparticles is modeled as the known dielectric function of bulk gold plus a correction term that is necessitated by the fact that the mean free path length for electrons in gold decreases with decreasing radius, in such a manner as to cause the imaginary part of the dielectric function to increase with decreasing radius (see figure). The correction term is a function of the nanoparticle radius, the wavelength of light, the mean free path and the Fermi speed of electrons in bulk gold, the plasma frequency of gold, and the speed of light in a vacuum. These models are used to calculate ellipsometric responses for

  20. Efficient high-order diffraction of extreme-ultraviolet light and soft x-rays by nanostructured volume gratings.

    PubMed

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G; Gullikson, E M

    2001-08-01

    We report what is believed to be the first demonstration that volume gratings diffract extreme-ultraviolet light (EUV) or soft x-rays into high orders approximately an order of magnitude more efficiently than predicted by classical thin-grating theory. At the 13-nm wavelength, copolymer grating structures with 200-nm period and aspect ratios of ~10:1 achieved diffraction efficiencies of 11.2%, 15.3%, 11.5%, and 9.1% in the orders m of 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. In addition, the measured transmission spectra are consistent with electrodynamic calculations by coupled-wave theory. High-order diffraction can now be employed for substantially improved diffractive EUV and x-ray optics, e.g., highly resolving diffractive lenses and large-aperture condensers. PMID:18049562

  1. Tracking the motion of charges in a terahertz light field by femtosecond X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, A; Wall, S; Simpson, C; Statz, E; Ward, D W; Nelson, K A; Rini, M; Schoenlein, R W

    2006-08-10

    In condensed matter, light propagation near resonances is described in terms of polaritons, electro-mechanical excitations in which the time-dependent electric field is coupled to the oscillation of charged masses. This description underpins our understanding of the macroscopic optical properties of solids, liquids and plasmas, as well as of their dispersion with frequency. In ferroelectric materials, terahertz radiation propagates by driving infrared-active lattice vibrations, resulting in phonon-polariton waves. Electro-optic sampling with femtosecond optical pulses can measure the time-dependent electrical polarization, providing a phase-sensitive analogue to optical Raman scattering. Here we use femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction, a phase-sensitive analogue to inelastic X-ray scattering, to measure the corresponding displacements of ions in ferroelectric lithium tantalate, LiTaO(3). Amplitude and phase of all degrees of freedom in a light field are thus directly measured in the time domain. Notably, extension of other X-ray techniques to the femtosecond timescale (for example, magnetic or anomalous scattering) would allow for studies in complex systems, where electric fields couple to multiple degrees of freedom. PMID:16900195

  2. Photonic spatial reformatting of stellar light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; MacLachlan, D. G.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Brown, G.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm full width at half-maximum, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20 per cent depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 ± 4 per cent. We show how a fully-optimized device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  3. Tracking the motion of charges in a terahertz light field byfemtosecond X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, A.; Wall, S.; Simpson, C.; Statz, E.; Ward, D.W.; Nelson, K.A.; Rini, M.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2006-07-01

    In condensed matter, light propagation near resonances isdescribed in terms of polaritons, electro-mechanical excitations in whichthe time-dependent electric field is coupled to the oscillation ofcharged masses. This description under pins our understanding of themacroscopic optical properties of solids, liquids and plasmas, as well asof their dispersion with frequency. In ferroelectric materials, terahertzradiation propagates by driving infrared-active lattice vibrations,resulting in phononpolariton waves. Electro-optic sampling withfemtosecond optical pulses can measure the time-dependent electricalpolarization, providing a phase-sensitive analogue to optical Ramanscattering. Here we use femtosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction, aphase-sensitive analogue to inelastic X-ray scattering, to measure thecorresponding displacements of ions in ferroelectric lithium tantalate,LiTaO3. Amplitude and phase of all degrees of freedom in a light fieldare thus directly measured in the time domain. Notably, extension ofother X-ray techniques to the femtosecond timescale (for example,magnetic or anomalous scattering) would allow for studies in complexsystems, where electric fields couple to multiple degrees offreedom.

  4. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Tarun Kr; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Roy, Anushree; Kar, Sayan

    2006-06-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this paper, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (e.g. for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analysis seem to support the claim that this simple, low cost apparatus is capable of providing a wealth of information on liquids and liquid surface waves in a non-destructive way.

  5. High throughput imaging of blood smears using white light diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    While automated blood cell counters have made great progress in detecting abnormalities in blood, the lack of specificity for a particular disease, limited information on single cell morphology and intrinsic uncertainly due to high throughput in these instruments often necessitates detailed inspection in the form of a peripheral blood smear. Such tests are relatively time consuming and frequently rely on medical professionals tally counting specific cell types. These assays rely on the contrast generated by chemical stains, with the signal intensity strongly related to staining and preparation techniques, frustrating machine learning algorithms that require consistent quantities to denote the features in question. Instead we opt to use quantitative phase imaging, understanding that the resulting image is entirely due to the structure (intrinsic contrast) rather than the complex interplay of stain and sample. We present here our first steps to automate peripheral blood smear scanning, in particular a method to generate the quantitative phase image of an entire blood smear at high throughput using white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a single shot and common path interferometric imaging technique.

  6. Stability of UV exposed RR-P3BT films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Diware, Mangesh S.; Byun, J. S.; Hwang, S. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2013-02-05

    Stability of regioregular poly(3-butylthiophene) (RR-P3BT) films under irradiation of ultra-violet (UV) light has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. Consistent decrease in dielectric function with UV exposure time showed the degree of degradation of polymer. This work suggests that, protective methods are mandatory to use this kind of material in optical devices.

  7. Rotatable broadband retarders for far infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T.D.; Carr, G.; Zhou, T.; Kotelyanskii, M.; Sirenko, A.A.

    2010-12-09

    Rotatable retarders have been developed for applications in spectroscopic, full Mueller Matrix ellipsometry in the far-IR spectral range. Several materials, such as silicon, KRS-5, and a commercial polymer plastic (TOPAS) have been utilized to achieve a fully adjustable retardation between 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Experimental characteristics of the rotatable retarders that utilize three- and four-bounce designs are compared with calculations. We discuss the effect of light focusing on the performance of these rotatable retarders. Broadband optical retarders are required for spectroscopic ellipsometry in its full Mueller matrix (MM) realization. Performance of the MM ellipsometer depends on the capability to produce substantially linearly-independent Stokes vectors for the light incident onto the sample. As has been shown, the errors in the measuredMMof the sample are proportional to the condition number of the 4 x 4 matrix composed of the Stokes vectors of four polarization states incident at the sample. It can be proven that it is impossible to cover the Poincare sphere with linearly-independent Stokes vectors by only changing the linear polarization at the input surface of a stationary retarder. As we will illustrate further in this paper, total coverage of the Poincare sphere is possible by rotating a tandem of a linear polarizer and a retarder with a retardation of 90{sup o}. It is this goal that we are trying to achieve in the retarder designs described in this paper.

  8. Optical fiber diameter measurement by the diffraction method with digital processing of the light scattering indicatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokodii, N. G.; Natarova, A. O.

    2016-07-01

    Relations between the position of the first diffraction minima and the fiber diameter are derived based on the solution of the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction on a transparent fiber with a circular cross section. The obtained formulas are used to measure the fiber diameter. The diffraction pattern is recorded with a digital camera. The obtained image is digitally processed to determine the positions of the first two scattering indicatrix minima.

  9. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N; Daurer, Benedikt J; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Reddy, Hemanth K N; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S D; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N Duane; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Sierra, Raymond G; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum

    PubMed Central

    Cranston, Laura J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment–protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1–RC ‘core’ complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.36, c = 80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer. PMID:24915099

  11. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F.; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G.; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A.; Reddy, Hemanth K.N.; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N. Duane; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O.; Williams, Garth J.; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  12. Young-Kirchhoff-Rubinowicz theory of diffraction in the light of Sommerfeld's solution.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2008-11-01

    Kirchhoff's theory of diffraction is derived by transforming the exact solution of Sommerfeld into surface integrals for the half-plane problem. It is shown that the exact solution directly yields the integral theorem of Kirchhoff in the context of the modified diffraction theory of Kirchhoff. The line integrals of Young-Rubinowicz are also derived by considering the rigorous solution of the reflected scattered fields for grazing incidence. PMID:18978850

  13. Cascading processes in the nonlinear diffraction of light by standing acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Bentivegna, F. F. L.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.; Lee, Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of two types of cascading process to the nonlinear optical diffraction of electromagnetic waves from a standing acoustic wave in a GaAs crystal is theoretically studied. The first type of cascading process results from second-harmonic generation followed by linear acousto-optical diffraction, while the second type involves linear acousto-optical diffraction from the standing acoustic wave and subsequent sum-frequency generation. In contrast to the third, direct, nonlinear acousto-optical diffraction process we previously investigated, the photoelastic interaction between electromagnetic and acoustic waves is here linear. We establish the rules governing the cascading processes and show that in most cases the output signal simultaneously results from two or even three of the possible nonlinear diffraction mechanisms. However, we demonstrate that a careful choice of the incidence angles of the incoming electromagnetic waves, of the polarization combinations of the incoming and diffracted waves, and of the type of acoustic wave (longitudinal or transverse) makes it always possible to distinguish between the direct and either of the two cascading processes.

  14. In Situ Ellipsometry for Shock Compression Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the α→ɛ phase transition.

  15. Generalized Ellipsometry on Ferromagnetic Sculptured Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Hofmann, Tino; Mok, Kah; Schmidt, Heidemarie; Skomski, Ralf; Schubert, Eva; Schubert, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    We present and discuss generalized ellipsometry and generalized vector-magneto-optic ellipsometry investigations on cobalt nanostructured thin films with slanted, highly-spatially coherent, columnar arrangement. The samples were prepared by glancing angle deposition. The thin films are highly transparent and reveal strong form-induced birefringence. We observe giant Kerr rotation in the visible spectral region, tunable by choice of the nanostructure geometry. Spatial magnetization orientation hysteresis and magnetization magnitude hysteresis properties are studied using a 3-dimensional Helmholtz coil arrangement allowing for arbitrary magnetic field direction at the sample position for field strengths up to 0.4 Tesla. Analysis of data obtained within this novel vector-magneto-optic setup reveals magnetization anisotropy of the Co slanted nanocolumns supported by mean-field theory modeling.

  16. IN SITU ELLIPSOMETRY FOR SHOCK COMPRESSION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-28

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the alpha->epsilon phase transition.

  17. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Applications in Advanced Lithography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Pribil, Greg K.; Hilfiker, James N.; Edwards, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is an optical metrology technique widely used in the semiconductor industry. For lithography applications SE is routinely used for measurement of film thickness and refractive index of polymer photoresist and antireflective coatings. While this remains a primary use of SE, applications are now expanding into other areas of advanced lithography research. New applications include immersion lithography, phase-shift photomasks, transparent pellicles, 193 and 157 nm lithography, stepper optical coatings, imprint lithography, and even real-time monitoring of etch development rate in liquid ambients. Of recent interest are studies of immersion fluids where knowledge of the fluid refractive index and absorption are critical to their use in immersion lithography. Phase-shift photomasks are also of interest as the thickness and index of the phase-shift and absorber layers must be critically controlled for accurate intensity and phase transmission. Thin transparent pellicles to protect these masks must be also characterized for thickness and refractive index. Infrared ellipsometry is sensitive to chemical composition, film thickness, and how film chemistry changes with processing. Real-time monitoring of polymer film thickness during etching in a liquid developer allows etch rate and endpoint determination with monolayer sensitivity. This work considers these emerging applications to survey the current status of spectroscopic ellipsometry as a characterization technique in advanced lithography applications.

  18. Overcoming the Diffraction Limit Using Multiple Light Scattering in a Highly Disordered Medium

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kang, Pilsung; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.; Choi, Wonshik

    2012-01-01

    We report that disordered media made of randomly distributed nanoparticles can be used to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional imaging system. By developing a method to extract the original image information from the multiple scattering induced by the turbid media, we dramatically increase a numerical aperture of the imaging system. As a result, the the resolution is enhanced by more than five times over the diffraction limit and a field of view is extended over the physical area of the camera. Our technique lays the foundation to use a turbid medium as a far-field superlens. PMID:21797607

  19. Microstructured Air Cavities as High-Index Contrast Substrates with Strong Diffraction for Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Moon, Daeyoung; Jang, Jeonghwan; Na, Jin-Young; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Kim, Sunghee; Bae, Dukkyu; Park, Eun Hyun; Park, Yongjo; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional high-index-contrast dielectric gratings exhibit unconventional transmission and reflection due to their morphologies. For light-emitting devices, these characteristics help guided modes defeat total internal reflections, thereby enhancing the outcoupling efficiency into an ambient medium. However, the outcoupling ability is typically impeded by the limited index contrast given by pattern media. Here, we report strong-diffraction, high-index-contrast cavity engineered substrates (CESs) in which hexagonally arranged hemispherical air cavities are covered with a 80 nm thick crystallized alumina shell. Wavelength-resolved diffraction measurements and Fourier analysis on GaN-grown CESs reveal that the high-index-contrast air/alumina core/shell patterns lead to dramatic excitation of the low-order diffraction modes. Large-area (1075 × 750 μm(2)) blue-emitting InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on a 3 μm pitch CES exhibit ∼39% enhancement in the optical power compared to state-of-the-art, patterned-sapphire-substrate LEDs, while preserving all of the electrical metrics that are relevant to LED devices. Full-vectorial simulations quantitatively demonstrate the enhanced optical power of CES LEDs and show a progressive increase in the extraction efficiency as the air cavity volume is expanded. This trend in light extraction is observed for both lateral- and flip-chip-geometry LEDs. Measurements of far-field profiles indicate a substantial beaming effect for CES LEDs, despite their few-micron-pitch pattern. Near-to-far-field transformation simulations and polarization analysis demonstrate that the improved extraction efficiency of CES LEDs is ascribed to the increase in emissions via the top escape route and to the extraction of transverse-magnetic polarized light. PMID:27045458

  20. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V.; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarimetry for materials and systems analysis at the nanometer scale: state-of-the-art, potential, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Losurdo, Maria; Bergmair, Michael; Bruno, Giovanni; Cattelan, Denis; Cobet, Christoph; de Martino, Antonello; Fleischer, Karsten; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Zorana; Esser, Norbert; Galliet, Melanie; Gajic, Rados; Hemzal, Dušan; Hingerl, Kurt; Humlicek, Josef; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Popovic, Zoran V; Saxl, Ottilia

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the fundamentals, applications, potential, limitations, and future perspectives of polarized light reflection techniques for the characterization of materials and related systems and devices at the nanoscale. These techniques include spectroscopic ellipsometry, polarimetry, and reflectance anisotropy. We give an overview of the various ellipsometry strategies for the measurement and analysis of nanometric films, metal nanoparticles and nanowires, semiconductor nanocrystals, and submicron periodic structures. We show that ellipsometry is capable of more than the determination of thickness and optical properties, and it can be exploited to gain information about process control, geometry factors, anisotropy, defects, and quantum confinement effects of nanostructures. PMID:21170135

  2. Optical characterization of CuIn5S8 crystals by ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Mehmet; Gasanly, Nizami

    2016-04-01

    Optical properties of CuIn5S8 crystals grown by Bridgman method were investigated by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficients were obtained from the analysis of ellipsometry experiments performed in the 1.2-6.2 eV spectral region. Analysis of spectral dependence of the absorption coefficient revealed the existence of direct band gap transitions with energy 1.53 eV. Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models were used to find the oscillator energy, dispersion energy, zero-frequency refractive index and high-frequency dielectric constant values. Structural properties of the CuIn5S8 crystals were investigated using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

  3. Ellipsometry study of optical parameters of AgIn5S8 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Mehmet; Gasanly, Nizami

    2015-12-01

    AgIn5S8 crystals grown by Bridgman method were characterized for optical properties by ellipsometry measurements. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the pseudodielectric function, pseudorefractive index, pseudoextinction coefficient, reflectivity and absorption coefficient were obtained from ellipsometry experiments carried out in the 1.2-6.2 eV range. Direct band gap energy of 1.84 eV was found from the analysis of absorption coefficient vs. photon energy. The oscillator energy, dispersion energy and zero-frequency refractive index, high-frequency dielectric constant values were found from the analysis of the experimental data using Wemple-DiDomenico and Spitzer-Fan models. Crystal structure and atomic composition ratio of the constituent elements in the AgIn5S8 crystal were revealed from structural characterization techniques of X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  4. Performance of ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators for polarization and color diffractive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ignacio; García-Martínez, P.; Sánchez-López, M. M.; Martínez-García, A.; Martínez, J. L.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we applied a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon (FLCoS) display for implementing monochrome and color diffractive optical elements (DOE). We first apply a reverse engineering process specifically adapted to characterize the optical parameters of a commercial FLCoS display, specifically the phase shift and the tilt angle. We then analyze the performance of the device for implementing a binary polarization diffraction grating (PDG), and how it adopts the form of either a binary amplitude grating or a binary phase grating as particular cases when the polarization states emerging from the display are projected to an analyzer. As a final experiment, we have applied the FLCoS display to generate RGB improved dynamic color binary-phase Fourier computer-generated holograms (CGHs). We have electronically synchronized the properly scaled image addressed to the display with a color filter wheel with RGB filters. Experimental results show an excellent chromatic compensation of the color image reconstruction.

  5. Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction study of lightly doped Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Sanhita; Mukherjee, G. D.; Ghosh, Anirudha; Raj, Satyabrata; Oishi, S.

    2011-03-21

    Temperature dependent x-ray diffraction studies have been carried out on nonstoichiometric lightly doped sodium tungsten bronze (Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} for x=0.025). The investigation reveals a structural modification around 230 K. Although the high and low temperature phases are monoclinic but at low temperature the corner sharing WO{sub 6} octahedra get significantly distorted due to displacement of tungsten and oxygen atoms from its mean position. This structural modification induces polaron formation in Na{sub 0.025}WO{sub 3} below 230 K.

  6. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro Sánchez, Juan; Sáenz, Jacobo; de la Torre, Luis; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Heradio, Rubén; Dormido, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This work describes two experiments: "study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation" and "the photoelectric effect". Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  7. Development of diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline BL07 at the SAGA Light Source and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumitani, Kazushi; Ishiji, Kotaro; Kawamoto, Masahide; Yoneyama, Akio; Tabata, Masaaki; Okajima, Toshihiro; Hirai, Yasuharu

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) system at beamline BL07 at the SAGA Light Source. BL07 is a beamline for using high energy X-rays up to 35 keV generated from a superconducting wiggler placed in the straight section of the storage ring. The DEI measurement system is composed of a Si(220) asymmetric crystal for expanding the beam, a Si(220) crystal analyser, and a high-resolution CCD camera. We demonstrated the observation of a rope recovered from the ruins of the Mietsu Navy in Japan.

  8. Analyzing biomolecular interactions by variable angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lee, J. H.; Shiue, Shuen-Chen; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Shiming

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative ellipsometer is developed and applied to metrology of the biomolecular interaction on a protein biochip. Both the theory, optical and opto-mechanical configurations of this newly developed ellipsometer and methodologies adopted in system design to improve the system performance are presented. It will be shown that by measuring the ellipsometric parameters, the corresponding concentration variation in biochemical reaction can be calculated according to stoichiometry analysis. By applying the variable angle ellipsometry to analysis of a multi-layered sample, the thickness and concentration are resolved. It is believed that the newly developed ellipsometer biosensor is able to undertake an accurate measurement on biomedical interaction.

  9. Near-field diffraction of laser light by dielectric corner step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafeev, S.; Kotlyar, V.; Kovalev, A.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction of a linearly polarized plane wave by a corner dielectric microstep of height equals of two incident wavelengths was studied using finite-difference time domain method and near-field scanning optical microscopy. It was shown that the corner step generates an elongated region of enhanced intensity, termed as a curved laser microjet. The curved laser microjet has a length of about DOF = 9.5λ and the smallest diameter FWHM = (1.94+/-0.15)λ at distance z = 5.5λ.

  10. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  11. Measurement of yarn twist based on backward light scattering and small-angle far-field diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Z. G.; Tao, X. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive, non-contact method for measuring the twist of a yarn based on light scattering and diffraction. The surface twist angle is measured by determining the direction of the line with the highest intensity on the backward light scattering pattern which is perpendicular to the surface fibers, which is verified by both theoretical analysis based on Beckmann’s scattering model and experiments. The yarn diameter is measured with good accuracy by using the small-angle far-field diffraction pattern of the yarn body. Yarn twist is then derived from the measured surface twist angle and yarn diameter. Further studies reveal that the measured yarn twists by the proposed method are comparable to those measured based on microscopic images of the yarn. This method requires no high-magnification optics and is able to pick up short-term variations of twist with less labor intensity, indicating its potential application in the on-line measuring of yarn twist and its distribution.

  12. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  13. OPTICAL WAVEPACKETS (OPTICAL BULLETS): A NEW DIFFRACTION FREE FORM OF LIGHT TRAVEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. FUNK; J. NICHOLSON; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We conducted studies of the propagation of self-confined packets of light or ''Optical Bullets'' through air. These packets are self-forming and require no active optics. At the present time, theoretical explanations provide an incomplete description of this process. Generation of these pulses requires a light source of sufficient energy and with a short enough pulse-width that the intensity exceeds a critical wavelength dependent value. We used a Ti:Sapphire based system to generate the pulses and we observed pulse-splitting and chirp-dependent control of the formation of these filaments. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm for extracting the phase and electric field of these pulses using Frequency Resolved Optical Gating coupled to genetic algorithms for pulse retrieval.

  14. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  15. Hybrid refractive/diffractive optical system design for light and compact uncooled longwave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Bai, Yu; Luo, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Compares with traditional optics,the difractive optical element(DOE) has unique property of minus dispersion.The special state can be used in the optical system to improve performance,lighten weight and reduce volume effectively.In the paper,an infrared optical system with DOE for LWIR thermal imager is proposed.The primary optical parameters of thermal imager are wavelength range 8.0- 12.0μm,effective focal length (EFL) 150 mm,f/numbe 1.0 and field of view 8.58 degrees.The system uses uncooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The f/number matches the sensitivity range of detector array. The infrared optical system is designed by CODE-V optical design software.It is consisted of two lens,the materials of the two lenses are Germanium.The DOE is fabricated on the convex of the first lens and it can be fabricated by diamond turning technology.The imaging quafity of the optical system approached to diffraction limit.The value of modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency(11lp/mm) is great than 0.78.

  16. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  17. Potential Modulation on Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Niu, Yu; Viana, A S; Correia, Jorge P; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical-total internal reflection ellipsometry (EC-TIRE) has been proposed as a technique to observe the redox reactions on the electrode surface due to its high phase sensitivity to the electrolyte/electrode interface. In this paper, we mainly focus on the influence of the potential modulation on the TIRE response. The analysis suggests that both dielectric constant variation of gold and the electric double layer transformation would modulate the reflection polarization of the surface. For a nonfaradaic process, the signal of TIRE would be proportional to the potential modulation. To testify the analysis, linear sweep voltammetry and open circuit measurement have been performed. The results strongly support the system analysis. PMID:26889871

  18. Characterization on Smart Optics Using Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, NASA Langley Research Center developed a smart active optical concept to filter narrow band pass or to control optical intensity. To characterize developed smart optics materials, we have measured thickness and reflection properties of the materials using a WVASE32 ellipsometry. This project allowed us to: (1) prepare the smart optical materials for measurement of thickness and optical properties at NASA Langley Research Center; (2) measure thickness and optical properties of the smart optical materials; (3) evaluate the measured properties in terms of applications for narrow band-pass filters. The outcomes of this research provide optical properties and physical properties of the smart optics on a selected spectral range. The applications of this development were used for field-controlled spectral smart filters.

  19. Beyond crystallography: diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianwei; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Robinson, Ian K; Murnane, Margaret M

    2015-05-01

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century. PMID:25931551

  20. Beyond crystallography: Diffractive imaging using coherent x-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Robinson, I. K.; Murnane, M. M.

    2015-04-30

    X-ray crystallography has been central to the development of many fields of science over the past century. It has now matured to a point that as long as good-quality crystals are available, their atomic structure can be routinely determined in three dimensions. However, many samples in physics, chemistry, materials science, nanoscience, geology, and biology are noncrystalline, and thus their three-dimensional structures are not accessible by traditional x-ray crystallography. Overcoming this hurdle has required the development of new coherent imaging methods to harness new coherent x-ray light sources. Here we review the revolutionary advances that are transforming x-ray sources and imaging in the 21st century.

  1. Nanoscale Ice: Spectroscopic Ellipsometry of Epitaxially-Grown Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumiskey, A.; Grippaldi, J.; Magee, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    A new laboratory technique has been developed to examine the surface characteristics and kinetics of ice crystals at the nanoscale. Uncertainties remain regarding the fundamental physics of nucleation and depositional growth in atmospheric ice crystals. These molecular-scale uncertainties propagate upward into modeling outcomes at all scales of atmospheric interest: particle models, cloud models, mesoscale models, and climate models. Molecular-scale growth mechanisms and kinetics have been mainly inferred from bulk and particle-scale experiments as well as crystal-growth theory. The precarious nature of the ice surface resisted the first generation of direct nanoscale probing technologies, but new in-situ techniques including ESEM, AFM, and ellipsometry promise to divulge a wealth of new knowledge. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measures changes in the polarization state of light as it reflects off the surface of a thin film. This non-destructive technique is capable of measuring layer thicknesses as small as a single monolayer (~1 Å) and up to thicknesses of ~10 μm. Other physical parameters including index of refraction and surface roughness are also accessible. At the TCNJ Cloud Physics Laboratory, a Horiba Scientific Auto-SE ellipsometer (440 - 1000 nm spectral range) has been adapted for in-situ measurements of ice crystals. The ice crystals are grown epitaxially on various horizontal substrates in a custom-built static diffusion chamber. The diffusion chamber is housed within a vacuum chamber and an optical path is provided from the ellipsometer light source to sample stage and back to the ellipsometer analyzer at 75° from normal. The diffusion chamber is cooled in two stages, with initial cooling accomplished with a fluid-chilled block and final chilling controlled by two independent thermoelectric cells. A wide range of temperatures, pressures, and saturation ratios are accessible: from 0°C to -30°C, 50mb to atmospheric pressure, and from subsaturated to

  2. Light scattering of a non-diffracting zero-order Bessel beam by uniaxial anisotropic bispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. J.; Wu, Z. S.; Qu, T.; Li, H. Y.; Bai, L.; Gong, L.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the generalized multi-particle Mie theory and the Fourier transformation approach, light scattering of two interacting homogeneous uniaxial anisotropic spheres with parallel primary optical axes illuminated by a zero-order Bessel beam (ZOBB) is investigated. The size and configuration of the particles are arbitrary. The expansion expressions of the ZOBB are given in terms of the spherical vector wave functions (SVWFs) and the expansion coefficients are derived. Utilizing the vector addition theorem of the SVWFs, the interactive scattering coefficients are derived through the continuous boundary conditions on which the interaction of the bispheres is considered. The effects of the conical angle, beam centre position, sphere separation distance, and anisotropic parameters on the far-region field distributions are numerically analyzed in detail. Some results are compared with those results for a Gaussian beam incidence. Selected results of bispheres consisting of typical medium such as TiO2, SiO2, Silicon, water are exhibited. This investigation could provide an effective test for further research on the scattering characteristic of an aggregate of anisotropic spheres by a high-order Bessel vortex beam and radiation forces, which are important in optical tweezers and particle manipulation applications.

  3. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cindy B; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of novel nanostructured transparent conducting oxide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroabadi, Akram A.; Norwood, R. A.

    2013-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been used to find the optical constants, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, thickness and volume fraction of nanostructured transparent conducting oxides including indium tin oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO). We observed sharp features in the ellipsometry data, with the spectral peaks and positions depending on the nanostructure dimensions and material. A superposition of Lorentzian oscillators and the effective medium approximation has been applied to determine the volume ratio of voids and nanopillars, thereby providing the effective optical constants.

  5. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  6. Advanced ellipsometry for very thin films and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduschek, Peter; Tamme, Michael; Hankey, Thomas D.

    1995-09-01

    In an introduction, problems of modern thin film research and production of thin films are discussed. Possible solutions with different measurement methods like nulling ellipsometers, RAE-ellipsometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and interferometry are compared. RAE- ellipsometry with respect to precision for thin films below 100 angstrom are discussed. Repeatabilities of below 0.1 angstrom are shown. Thicker films even above a few microns can be evaluated with multi-wavelength measurements at distinct wavelengths at 543 nm, HeNe, 790 nm, IR 1.3 micrometers , and IR 1.5 micrometers . This interferometer emulation concept is practically free of order ambiguity--a problem with traditional ellipsometry. Multiple wavelengths are also used to characterize multilayers such as ONO, OPO, etc. with multiple results. Multiple wavelength ellipsometry is compared to multiple incidence angle ellipsometry. For multilayer stacks (transparent or absorbing) the SPI program was developed and is shown. In this program the known parameters as well as the to-be-measured parameters can be selected (substrate value, refractive index, k-value, thickness). Measurement spotsize effects are discussed--high lateral resolution measurements are presented.

  7. Creation of vector beams from a polarization diffraction grating using a programmable liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a q-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badham, Katherine Emily

    This thesis presents the ability of complete polarization control of light to create a polarization diffraction grating (PDG). This system has the ability to create diffracted light with each order having a separate high-order polarization state in one location on the optical axis. First, an external Excel program is used to create a grating phase profile from userspecified target diffraction orders. High-order vector beams in this PDG are created using a combination of two devices---a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) manufactured by Seiko Epson, and a tunable q -plate from Citizen Holdings Co. The transmissive SLM is positioned in an optical setup with a reflective architecture allowing control over both the horizontal and vertical components of the laser beam. The SLM has its LC director oriented vertically only affecting the vertically polarized state, however, the optical setup allows modulation of both vertical and horizontal components by the use of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a mirror to rotate the polarizations 90 degrees. Each half of the SLM is encoded with an anisotropic phase-only diffraction grating which are superimposed to create a select number of orders with the desired polarization states and equally distributed intensity. The technique of polarimetry is used to confirm the polarization state of each diffraction order. The q-plate is an inhomogeneous birefringent waveplate which has the ability to convert zero-order vector beams into first-order vector beams. The physical placement of this device into the system converts the orders with zero-order polarization states to first-order polarization states. The light vector patterns of each diffraction order confirm which first-order polarization state of is produced. A specially made PDG sextuplicator is encoded onto the SLM to generate six diffraction orders with separate states of polarization.

  8. Interferometric method for phase calibration in liquid crystal spatial light modulators using a self-generated diffraction-grating.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, José Luis Martínez; Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-27

    An auto-referenced interferometric method for calibrating phase modulation of parallel-aligned liquid crystal (PAL) spatial light modulators (SLM) is described. The method is experimentally straightforward, robust, and requires solely of a collimated beam, with no need of additional optics. This method uses the SLM itself to create a tilted plane wave and a reference wave which mutually interfere. These waves are codified by means of a binary diffraction grating and a uniformly distributed gray level area (piston) into the SLM surface. Phase shift for each gray level addressed to the piston section can then be evaluated. Phase modulation on the SLM can also be retrieved with the proposed method over spatially resolved portions of the surface. Phase information obtained with this novel method is compared to other well established calibration procedures, requiring extra elements and more elaborated optical set-ups. The results show a good agreement with previous methods. The advantages of the new method include high mechanical stability, faster performance, and a significantly easier practical implementation. PMID:27410574

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokas, R. B.; Jena, Shuvendu; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    In present work, HfO2 thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  10. Light control in Ge2Sb2Te5-coated opaline photonic crystals mediated by interplay of Wood anomalies and 3D Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A. B.; Poddubny, A. N.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of light reflection spectra from hybrid structures formed by Ge2Sb2Te5 chalcogenide film on top of 3D opaline photonic crystal. We demonstrate the presence of diffraction anomalies (Wood anomalies) in the spectra. These anomalies are caused by the light scattering on the hybrid structure surface of hexagonal symmetry. To interpret the experimental results, we develop a qualitative theoretical model, taking into account the dispersion of quasi-waveguide modes supported by the surface layer of the hybrid structure. We consider the conditions for the coupling between the Bragg resonances associated with the diffraction of light on the 3D opal lattice and the resonances due to Wood anomalies.

  11. Progress in spectroscopic ellipsometry: Applications from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfiker, James N.; Bungay, Corey L.; Synowicki, Ron A.; Tiwald, Thomas E.; Herzinger, Craig M.; Johs, Blaine; Pribil, Greg K.; Woollam, John A.

    2003-07-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a noncontact and nondestructive optical technique for thin film characterization. In the past 10 yr, it has migrated from the research laboratory into the semiconductor, data storage, display, communication, and optical coating industries. The wide acceptance of SE is a result of its flexibility to measure most material types: dielectrics, semiconductors, metals, superconductors, polymers, biological coatings, and even multilayers of these materials. Measurement of anisotropic materials has also made huge strides in recent years. Traditional SE measurements cover the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared wavelengths. This spectral range is now acquired within seconds with high accuracy due to innovative optical configurations and charge coupled device detection. In addition, commercial SE has expanded into both the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and midinfrared (IR). This wide spectral coverage was achieved by utilizing new optical elements and detection systems, along with UV or Fourier transform IR light sources. Modern instrumentation is now available with unprecedented flexibility promoting a new range of possible applications. For example, the VUV spectral region is capable of characterizing lithographic materials for 157 nm photolithography. The VUV also provides increased sensitivity for thin layers (e.g., gate oxides or self-assembled monolayers) and allows investigation of high-energy electronic transitions. The infrared spectral region contains information about semiconductor doping concentration, phonon absorption, and molecular bond vibrational absorptions. In this work, we review the latest progress in SE wavelength coverage. Areas of significant application in both research and industrial fields will be surveyed, with emphasis on wavelength-specific information content.

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a sensitive monitor of materials contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Jeffrey S.; Hilfiker, James N.; Spady, Blaine; Synowicki, R.; Woollam, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is demonstrated to be extremely sensitive to contamination layers in the thickness range from 0.1 nm to 10 microns. In the present experiments we deposit either a thin lubricating oil (WD-40) or mineral oil continuously onto Ir, Cu, Al, Au, and V substrates from a bubbler, and monitor its thickness growth from sub-nanometer to tens of nanometers as a function of time. Re-evaporation of contaminant oils is also monitored in real-time by ellipsometry.

  13. Optical properties of post-annealed ZnO:Al thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.H.; Kim, H.M.; Um, Y.H.; Park, H.Y.

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, effects of the thermal annealing on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films prepared by reactive radio-frequency sputtering were investigated. From the X-ray diffraction observations, the orientation of ZnO:Al films was found to be a c-axis in the hexagonal structure. The optical properties of the films were investigated by optical transmittance and spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization. Based on Tauc–Lorentz model, the optical constants of ZnO:Al films were extracted in the photon energy ranging from 1.0 to 4.5 eV. Our result showed that the refractive index and extinction coefficient of the films changed consistently with annealing temperature.

  14. Optical characteristics of pulsed laser deposited Ge-Sb-Te thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, P.; Prikryl, J.; Frumar, M.; Nazabal, V.

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for the fabrication of (GeTe){sub 1-x}(Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}){sub x} (x = 0, 0.33, 0.50, 0.66, and 1) amorphous thin films. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity, and sheet resistance temperature dependences as well as variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize as-deposited (amorphous) and annealed (rocksaltlike) layers. In order to extract optical functions of the films, the Cody-Lorentz model was applied for the analysis of ellipsometric data. Fitted sets of Cody-Lorentz model parameters are discussed in relation with chemical composition and the structure of the layers. The GeTe component content was found to be responsible for the huge optical functions and thickness changes upon amorphous-to-fcc phase transition.

  15. Far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask for linearly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Anping; Wang, Xianyou; Zhang, Zhihai; Li, Yuyan; Wen, Zhongquan; Li, Chen; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Senling; Lin, Feng

    2016-05-16

    Planar lenses are attractive photonic devices due to its minimized size and easy to integrate. However, planar lenses designed in traditional ways are restricted by the diffraction limit. They have difficulties in further reducing the focal spot size beyond the diffraction limit. Super-oscillation provides a possible way to solve the problem. However, lenses based on super-oscillation have always been affected by huge sidelobes, which resulted in limited field of view and difficulties in real applications. To address the problem, in the paper, a far-field sub-diffraction lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask was demonstrated under illumination of linearly polarized plane wave at wavelength 632.8 nm. The lens realized a long focal length of 148λ (94 µm), and the full width at half maximum of the focal line was 0.406λ, which was super-oscillatory. More important is that such a flat lens has small sidelobes and wide field of view. Within the measured range of [-132λ, + 120λ], the maximum sidelobe observed on the focal plane was less than 22% of the central peak. Such binary amplitude-phase planar lens can also be extended to long focal length far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens for other spectrum ranges. PMID:27409922

  16. Mask-assisted deterministic phase-amplitude retrieval from a single far-field intensity diffraction pattern: two experimental proofs of principle using visible light.

    PubMed

    Podorov, Sergey G; Bishop, Alexis I; Paganin, David M; Pavlov, Konstantin M

    2011-06-01

    We recently developed a simple closed-form algorithm, which allows one to reconstruct the complex scalar wavefield at the exit surface of a sample, from the intensity of its far-field coherent diffraction pattern which is obtained in the presence of a suitable object-plane mask. In the first variant of this algorithm, the sample is contained within a uniformly illuminated sharp rectangular aperture in which at least one transverse dimension is at least twice that of the object. In the second variant, the sample is uniformly illuminated and is transversely displaced from an opaque rectangular mask in the object plane. For both variants, the far-field diffraction pattern is first Fourier transformed and then differentiated with respect to both transverse coordinates, in order to deterministically yield a series of independent reconstructions of the sample. Here we give an experimental demonstration of each of these two variants of our technique, using visible light. PMID:21664548

  17. Effects of Polarization Azimuth of Writing Beams on Diffraction Properties in Vector Holograms Using Radially Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    It is very important for realizing the polarization-multiplex holographic memory to clarify the optical properties of vector holograms recorded using the inhomogeneous polarized beams. In the present paper we present a simple yet useful method using the radially polarized writing beams to systematically investigate the optical properties of complicated vector holograms and preliminary data about effects of polarization azimuth of writing beams on diffraction properties. The diffraction properties of the vector holograms written in the azobenzene-containing polymers were strongly dependent on the angle between the grating vector and polarization azimuth of the writing beam. Considering the above-mentioned dependence, the theoretical calculation on the basis of Jones calculus revealed optical properties of the vector holograms written by various types of radially polarized beams.

  18. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  19. Errors in ellipsometry measurements made with a photoelastic modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, F.A.; Jellison, G.E. Jr; Gruzalski, G.R.

    1983-07-01

    The equations governing ellipsometry measurements made with a photoelastic modulator are presented in a simple but general form. These equations are used to study the propagation of both systematic and random errors, and an assessment of the accuracy of the ellipsometer is made. A basis is provided for choosing among various ellipsommeter configurations, measurement procedures, and methods of data analysis. Several new insights into the performance of this type of ellipsometer are supplied.

  20. Theory of optical ellipsometric measurements from muscle diffraction studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1988-01-01

    A theory of optical ellipsometry describing the complete phase shift and ellipticity of light diffracted from a single muscle fiber is developed. We show that both the phase shift information, described commonly by the birefringence of the fiber, and the ellipticity information, described by the differential polarizability ratio, are necessary to provide a complete picture of the complex contributions to the total optical anisotropy spectra from a diffraction pattern derived from the striated muscle cell. Both form and intrinsic contributions play significant roles in either the birefringence measurement or the differential field ratio measurement. However, we show that their relative weights in these two measured quantities are different, and measuring both of these parameters is necessary to obtain a more complete assessment of the cross-bridge structure and dynamics. The theoretical results have been tested for three different situations: solvent index matching, passive stretch of a resting fiber, and cross-bridge changes under isometric conditions. Comparisons between experimental data and simple model calculations provide much information regarding cross-bridge orientation and structure. PMID:3207822

  1. Two-modulator generalized ellipsometry: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Modine, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    A new ellipsometer is described that uses two photoelastic modulator-polarizer pairs, where the photoelastic modulators are operating at differing resonant frequencies. The time-dependent intensity of the light beam is extremely complicated but can be analyzed so that all elements of the sample Mueller matrix are obtained. For a given configuration, nine of the Mueller matrix elements can be measured at any one time; the other seven elements are accessible when the azimuthal angles of the photoelastic modulators are changed. The single-configuration measurement is often sufficient to characterize a number of real situations completely, such as film growth in a vacuum environment, anisotropic samples, and simple depolarization. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  2. Sensitivity analysis for OMOG and EUV photomasks characterized by UV-NIR spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Meiner, K.; Richter, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the potentials, applicability and advantages of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for the characterization of high-end photomasks. The SE measurements were done in the ultraviolet-near infrared (UVNIR) wavelength range from 300 nm to 980 nm, at angle of incidences (AOI) between 10 and 70° and with a microspot size of 45 x 10 μm2 (AOI=70°). The measured Ψ and 𝛥 spectra were modeled using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to determine the structural parameters of a periodic array, i.e. the pitch and critical dimension (CD). Two different types of industrial photomasks consisting of line/space structures were evaluated, the reflecting extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and the transmitting opaque MoSi on glass (OMOG) mask. The Ψ and 𝛥 spectra of both masks show characteristic differences, which were related to the Rayleigh singularities and the missing transmission diffraction in the EUV mask. In the second part of the paper, a simulation based sensitivity analysis of the Fourier coefficients α and β is presented, which is used to define the required measurement precision to detect a CD deviation of 1%. This study was done for both mask types to investigate the influence of the stack transmission. It was found that sensitivities to CD variations are comparable for OMOG and EUV masks. For both masks, the highest sensitivities appear close to the Rayleigh singularities and significantly increase at very low AOI. To detect a 1% CD deviation for pitches below 150 nm a measurement precision in the order of 0.01 is required. This measurement precision can be realized with advanced optical hardware. It is concluded that UV-NIR ellipsometry is qualified to characterize photomasks down to the 13 nm technology node in 2020.

  3. Diffraction by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, F.; Gomer, V.; Schadwinkel, H.; Ueberholz, B.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed diffraction of a laser probe beam by a trapped sample of cold atoms. The effect is only visible in the vicinity of a resonance line. The observed diffraction pattern arises from interference of the incident and scattered light wave, allowing reconstruction of geometric properties of the trapped sample from the holographic record.

  4. New insights into colloidal gold flakes: structural investigation, micro-ellipsometry and thinning procedure towards ultrathin monocrystalline layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, B.; Bashouti, M. Y.; Feichtner, T.; Mačković, M.; Dieker, C.; Salaheldin, A. M.; Richter, P.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Spiecker, E.; Christiansen, S.

    2016-02-01

    High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have been found to not interfere with the presented nanopatterning. Micro-Ellipsometry was carried out to determine the complex dielectric function and to compare it to previous measurements of bulk single crystalline gold. Finally, we used focused ion beam milling to prepare smooth crystalline layers and high-quality nanostructures with desired thickness down to 10 nm to demonstrate the outstanding properties of the flakes. Our findings support the plasmonics and nano optics community with a better understanding of this material which is ideally suited for superior plasmonic nanostructures.High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have

  5. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  6. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  7. Recent in-situ studies of the evolution of surfaces and interfaces of thin films by spectroscopic phase-modulated ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V.; Drevillon, Bernard; Layadi, Nace; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    1993-04-01

    Application of spectroscopic phase modulated ellipsometry (PME) to study both ultrafast and slow processes of interaction of silane (SiH4) with thin film Pd, and to the investigation of the growth kinetics of a-Si:H films deposited by rf glow discharge under UV light irradiation are presented. As compared to other ellipsometric techniques like rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE), the phase modulation uses a high frequency of about 50 kHz provided by a photoelastic modulator. Thus, PME allows one to reach 1 - 5 ms time resolution which permits faster real-time measurements than RAE. This remarkable feature of PME makes it particularly suitable for in-situ applications. Changes of optical properties of Pd thin films exposed to SiH4 at different fluxes are monitored by in situ single wavelength ellipsometry in the case of high fluxes which lead to ultrafast process and by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry at small fluxes and slow kinetics. The study reveals a complicated character of the process which depends on initial flux of silane and leads to formation of Pd disilicide, Pd hydride, and an intrinsic porosity. A qualitative model of the process is proposed.

  8. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dufek, Eric J.

    2014-08-28

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF₆ shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  9. Application of imaging ellipsometry to the detection of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    An, Ilsin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging ellipsometry (IE) is applied to visualize latent fingermarks on specular surfaces. Instead of a real image, IE provides images related to the polarization states, which are changed by the imprinted layer on a surface. Fingermarks formed on the surfaces of various materials are investigated, including a shiny metal and a black-colored plastic. Relatively clear IE images are obtained from most surfaces on which the optical properties are distinguishable from those of the fingermarks. Also, it is shown that discernible IE images can be obtained even after a fingermark is vigorously rubbed with lab tissues. PMID:26042438

  10. Versatile transmission ellipsometry to study linear ferrofluid magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Kooij, E S; Gâlcă, A C; Poelsema, B

    2006-12-01

    Linear birefringence and dichroism of magnetite ferrofluids are studied simultaneously using spectroscopic ellipsometry in transmission mode. It is shown that this versatile technique enables highly accurate characterisation of magneto-optical phenomena. Magnetic field-dependent linear birefringence and dichroism as well as the spectral dependence are shown to be in line with previous results. Despite the qualitative agreement with established models for magneto-optical phenomena, these fail to provide an accurate, quantitative description of our experimental results using the bulk dielectric function of magnetite. We discuss the results in relation to these models, and indicate how the modified dielectric function of the magnetite nanoparticles can be obtained. PMID:16997315

  11. Evaluation of the SEI using a multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry model

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek

    2014-08-01

    A multilayer spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) model has been developed to characterize SEI formation. The model, which consists of two Cauchy layers, is constructed with an inner layer meant to model primarily inorganic compounds adjacent to an electrode and an outer layer which mirrors polymeric, organic constituents on the exterior of the SEI. Comparison of 1:1 EC:EMC and 1:4 EC:EMC with 1.0 M LiPF6 shows distinct differences in the two modeled layers. The data suggest that the thickness of both layers change over a wide potential range. These changes have been linked with other reports on the growth of the SEI.

  12. ELLIPSOMETRY IN THE STUDY OF DYNAMIC MATERIAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Obst, A. W.; Alrick, K.R.; Boboridis, K.; Buttler, William T.; Lamoreaux, Steve Keith; Montgomery, S. L.; Payton, J. R.; Wilke, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the time-dependent absolute temperature of surfaces shocked using high explosives (HE) provide valuable constraints on the equations-of-state (EOS) of materials and on the state of ejecta from those surfaces. In support of these dynamic surface temperature measurements, techniques for measuring the dynamic surface emissivity of shocked metals in the near infrared (IR) are being developed. These consist of time-dependent laser ellipsometric measurements, using several approaches. A discussion of these ellipsometric techniques is included here. Ellipsometry permits an accurate determination of the dynamic emissivity at a given wavelength, and may also provide a signature of melt in shocked metals.

  13. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  14. Antifreeze glycopeptide adsorption on single crystal ice surfaces using ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P. W.; Beaglehole, D.; DeVries, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic fishes synthesise antifreeze proteins which can effectively inhibit the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism relies on adsorption of these proteins to the ice surface. Ellipsometry has been used to quantify glycopeptide antifreeze adsorption to the basal and prism faces of single ice crystals. The rate of accumulation was determined as a function of time and at concentrations between 0.0005 and 1.2 mg/ml. Estimates of packing density at saturation coverage have been made for the basal and prism faces. PMID:19431902

  15. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  16. Cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological samples at SACLA: a correlative approach with cryo-electron and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Yonekura, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging at cryogenic temperature (cryo-CXDI) allows the analysis of internal structures of unstained, non-crystalline, whole biological samples in micrometre to sub-micrometre dimensions. Targets include cells and cell organelles. This approach involves preparing frozen-hydrated samples under controlled humidity, transferring the samples to a cryo-stage inside a vacuum chamber of a diffractometer, and then exposing the samples to coherent X-rays. Since 2012, cryo-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments have been carried out with the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Complementary use of cryo-electron microscopy and/or light microscopy is highly beneficial for both pre-checking samples and studying the integrity or nature of the sample. This article reports the authors' experience in cryo-XFEL-CDI of biological cells and organelles at SACLA, and describes an attempt towards reliable and higher-resolution reconstructions, including signal enhancement with strong scatterers and Patterson-search phasing. PMID:26919369

  17. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  18. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further. PMID:23041848

  19. Spectral ellipsometry studying of iron's optical and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernukha, Yevheniia; Stashchuk, Vasyl S.; Polianska, Olena; Oshtuk, Olexsandr

    2014-05-01

    Fe's optical and electronic properties were investigated at room temperature in different structural states. The sample's surface was explored in wide spectral range λ = 0,23-17,0 μm (E = 4,96 - 0,07 еV ) by the Beatty's spectral ellipsometry method. While an experiment was carried out ellipsometry parameters Δ and ψ were measure near the principal angle of incidence. The refraction index R , permittivity Ɛ and optical conductivity σ( hν ) , that is proportional to the interband density of electronic states, were calculated using these parameters. Fe's optical conductivities in liquid, amorphous and crystalline states were compared in this work. The optical conductivity was calculated using the published data of the iron's density of electronic states in crystalline, amorphous and liquid states for the comparison of the experimental and theoretical results. It is shown that, at structural transformations "amorphous, liquid state- crystalline state", the optical properties of metallic iron are determined, in the first turn, by the nearest neighborhood, and the electronic structure is not subjected to significant modifications.

  20. New insights into colloidal gold flakes: structural investigation, micro-ellipsometry and thinning procedure towards ultrathin monocrystalline layers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Bashouti, M Y; Feichtner, T; Mačković, M; Dieker, C; Salaheldin, A M; Richter, P; Gordan, O D; Zahn, D R T; Spiecker, E; Christiansen, S

    2016-02-28

    High-quality fabrication of plasmonic devices often relies on wet-chemically grown ultraflat, presumably single-crystalline gold flakes due to their superior materials properties. However, important details about their intrinsic structure and their optical properties are not well understood yet. In this study, we present a synthesis routine for large flakes with diameters of up to 70 μm and an in-depth investigation of their structural and optical properties. The flakes are precisely analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and micro-ellipsometry. We found new evidence for the existence of twins extending parallel to the Au flake {111} surfaces which have been found to not interfere with the presented nanopatterning. Micro-Ellipsometry was carried out to determine the complex dielectric function and to compare it to previous measurements of bulk single crystalline gold. Finally, we used focused ion beam milling to prepare smooth crystalline layers and high-quality nanostructures with desired thickness down to 10 nm to demonstrate the outstanding properties of the flakes. Our findings support the plasmonics and nano optics community with a better understanding of this material which is ideally suited for superior plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26661036

  1. Visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances and lighting conditions after implantation of an aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to evaluate the visual acuity and patient satisfaction at varied distances under photopic and mesopic lighting conditions in patients bilaterally implanted with aspheric diffractive multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses. Methods In this retrospective–prospective study, 16 patients with a mean age of 66.2±9.2 years (range: 50–81 years) who had undergone bilateral phacoemulsification surgery with implantation of a Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lens (ZMB00) were evaluated. Monocular and binocular uncorrected and distance-corrected visual acuities were measured at distance (20 ft), intermediate (70–80 cm), and near (35–40 cm) under photopic (85 cd/m2) and mesopic (3 cd/m2) lighting conditions and were compared using the paired t-test. All patients also completed a subjective questionnaire. Results At a mean follow-up of 9.5±3.9 months, distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity improved significantly from preoperative acuity. Under photopic and mesopic conditions, 93.8% and 62.5% of patients, respectively, had binocular uncorrected intermediate visual acuity of 20/40 or better, and 62.5% and 31.3% of patients had binocular uncorrected near visual acuity of 20/20 or better. All patients were satisfied with their overall vision without using glasses and/or contact lenses when compared with before surgery. A total of 87.5% of patients reported no glare and 68.8% of patients reported no halos around lights at night. Conclusion Tecnis multifocal one-piece intraocular lenses provide good distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity under photopic as well as mesopic lighting conditions. High levels of spectacle independence with low levels of photic phenomenon were achieved, resulting in excellent patient satisfaction. PMID:27536061

  2. A comparative study of ultrasound and laser light diffraction techniques for particle size determination in dairy beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S.; Berrut, S.; Goodenough, T. I. J.; Rajendram, V. S.; Pinfield, V. J.; Povey, M. J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of milkfat droplets of raw and homogenized milk was determined by a diagnostic ultrasound technique that was initially calibrated with colloidal silica. The quality of the fit between ultrasound theory and experiment is discussed and provides a basis for comparison with the reference laser light scattering technique. The predicted ultrasonic attenuation was determined from the ECAH (Epstein P S and Carhart R R 1953 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 25 553-65, Allegra J R and Hawley S A 1972 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51 1545-64) model using thermophysical data for milkfat and milk serum. New thermophysical properties of milkfat were established. The experimental data were obtained with the Ultrasizer spectrometer. Both techniques were affected by the milk proteins and could provide only qualitative milkfat PSD for the raw and the homogenized milk samples. Therefore, they showed their limitations to characterize multiple emulsions. However, preliminary results are shown for the ultrasound technique that account for the impact of the protein on the measured data and hence obtain quantitative results for the milkfat size distributions.

  3. Phases and phase transitions of polymeric liquid crystals: A high resolution x ray diffraction and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachaliel, Ehud

    1991-03-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) were compared with monomeric liquid crystals (MLC) by means of high-resolution x-ray (HIREX) and light scattering (LIS). Both HIREX and LIS were used to study the nematic-smectic(sub a) phase transition of P4.1 polysiloxane; the following critical exponents were determined: nu(sub parallel) = 0.77 +/-0.05; nu(sub normal) = 0.57 +/-0.08; gamma = 1.3 +/-0.10. The bare correlation lengths were found to be: xi(sup 0)(sub parallel) = 3.27 +/-0.08; xi(sup 0)(sub normal)q(sub 0) = 1.09 +/-0.14 which are unusually large in comparison with MLC. LIS experiments confirmed these values and indicated 'cross over' of nu(sub parallel) from 0.77 to 0.53. These results are typical of a system near to a tricritical point. HIREX was used to study the nematic-smectic(sub c) phase transition in C6-polysiloxane; the results were a good fit to Chen and Lubensky's mean field theory but the correlation lengths saturated near the transition to the nematic phase. A study of the smectic(sub a) phase of PA6 polyacrylate, near the transition to the nematic phase, showed that, except very close to the transition, the first and second harmonics of the x-ray structure factor were found to be consistent with the harmonic theory of de Gennes and Caille. This is thought to indicate the importance of anharmonic corrections near the phase transition. Fits to the experimental data yielded the compressibility constant, B and the splay elastic constant, K(sub s). B was found to obey a power law: B varies as t(sup phi) in which phi = 0.82 +/-0.08. In good agreement with theoretical predictions using exponents from the literature, but in disagreement with previous experimental results on MLC's. The splay elastic constant K(sub s) has roughly the same magnitude as in MLC's but tends to decrease by approximately 50% upon approaching the transition from below. This temperature dependence might give further evidence for the importance of anharmonicity in the system. Finally, the

  4. Characterization of SiGe/Ge heterostructures and graded layers using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croke, E. T.; Wang, K. L.; Heyd, A. R.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Lee, C. H.

    1996-01-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) has been used to characterize Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge superlattices (SLs) grown on Ge substrates and thick Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge heterostructures grown on Si substrates. Our VASE analysis yielded the thicknesses and alloy compositions of all layers within the optical penetration depth of the surface. In addition, strain effects were observed in the VASE results for layers under both compressive and tensile strain. Results for the SL structures were found to be in close agreement with high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements made on the same samples. The VASE analysis has been upgraded to characterize linearly graded Si(x)Ge(1-x) buffer layers. The algorithm has been used to determine the total thickness of the buffer layer along with the start and end alloy composition by breaking the total thickness into many (typically more than 20) equal layers. Our ellipsometric results for 1 (mu)m buffer layers graded in the ranges 0.7 less than or = x less than or = 1.0, and 0.5 less than or = x less than or = 1.0 are presented, and compare favorably with the nominal values.

  5. Characterization of High Ge Content SiGe Heterostructures and Graded Alloy Layers Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyd, A. R.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Croke, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    Si(x)Ge(1-x)heterostructures on Si substrates have been widely studied due to the maturity of Si technology. However, work on Si(x)Ge)1-x) heterostructures on Ge substrates has not received much attention. A Si(x)Ge(1-x) layer on a Si substrate is under compressive strain while Si(x)Ge(1-x) on Ge is under tensile strain; thus the critical points will behave differently. In order to accurately characterize high Ge content Si(x)Ge(1-x) layers the energy shift algorithm used to calculate alloy compositions, has been modified. These results have been used along with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) measurements to characterize Si(x)Ge(1-x)/Ge superlattices grown on Ge substrates. The results agree closely with high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements made on the same samples. The modified energy shift algorithm also allows the VASE analysis to be upgraded in order to characterize linearly graded layers. In this work VASE has been used to characterize graded Si(x)Ge(1-x) layers in terms of the total thickness, and the start and end alloy composition. Results are presented for a 1 micrometer Si(x)Ge(1-x) layer linearly graded in the range 0.5 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.0.

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and electrical characterizations of InGaAs:Mg thin films lattice matched to InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeydi, I.; Ezzedini, M.; Sayari, A.; Shalaan, E.; Wageh, S.; Sfaxi, L.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; M'Gaieth, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mg-doped InGaAs films were grown at 560 ° C lattice matched to InP semi-insulating substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) under various Cp2Mg flow conditions. Hall effect, photoluminescence (PL), high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) are the tools used in this work. The crystalline quality and the n-p conversion of the InGaAs:Mg films are described and discussed in relation to the Cp2Mg flow. Distinguishing triple emissions peaks in PL spectra are observed and seem to be strongly dependent on the Cp2Mg flow. SE was used to investigate the interband transitions in InGaAs:Mg/InP heterointerfaces and the different critical point energies were identified.

  7. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan

    2013-11-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  8. Investigation of optical properties of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, E. R.; Emam-Ismail, M.; Abbady, Gh.; Prakash, Deo; El-Hagary, M.; Afify, N.; Verma, K. D.

    2016-02-01

    Different compositions of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by the thermal evaporation technique. Their amorphous structural characteristics were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical constants (n, k) of amorphous Ge15Se85-xCux thin films were obtained by fitting the ellipsometric parameters (ψ and Δ) data for the first time using three layers model system in the wavelength range 300-1100 nm. It was found that the refractive index, n, increases with the increase of Cu content. The possible optical transition in these films is found to be indirect transitions. The optical energy gap decreases linearly from 1.83 to 1.44 eV with increasing the Cu. The experimental transmittances spectrum can be simulated using the thickness and optical constants modeled by spectroscopic ellipsometry model.

  9. Measurement of organic/polymer material by phase modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong; Teboul, Eric; Kramer, Alan R.

    2004-06-01

    Due to they can be tailored to provide a wide range of physical properties and their easiness of processing and fabrication, polymeric materials have found widespread use in the manufacture of microwave, electronics, photonics and bio-tech systems. This paper presents the basic principle of phase modulation spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) and its advantages over other ellipsometry in measuring polymer film. Used for thin film measurements ultra-thin dielectric, meal film and organic film, the PMSE technique is now used over a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid infrared. Film thickness ranging from Angstrom up to 50um can be measured by PMSE. Applications of PMSE on measurement and characterization of polymer/organic material are given in the paper.

  10. Modeling ellipsometry and electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Keenan A.; Miskovic, Zoran L.; Diebold, Alain C.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-03-31

    Recent studies of electronic excitations in graphene by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have revealed massive high-frequency peaks assigned to the π and σ+π plasmons [1], which were semi-quantitatively modeled with a two-dimensional, two-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model [2]. On the other hand, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) of graphene covers the region of nearly constant absorbance due to graphene’s universal optical conductivity at infrared frequencies, which is not clearly resolved by EELS, and goes up to cover the π-plasmon peak at ultraviolet frequencies [3]. To attempt to model both the SE and EELS, we amend the HD model by including a low-frequency contribution of graphene’s inter-band transitions, while monitoring the fulfillment of the f-sum rule [4] up to frequencies that cover excitations of all valence electrons.

  11. Adsorption of water on porous Vycor glass studied by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Herrero, A; Heredero, R L; Bernabeu, E; Levy, D

    2001-02-01

    The variation of the optical properties of porous Vycor glass (Corning, Model 7930) under different relative-humidity conditions was studied. The adsorption of water into the glass pores was investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The change of the refractive index was Deltan approximately 0.04 between 5% and 90% relative humidity. A linear relation between the ellipsometer parameter tan Psi, the amount of water adsorbed in the glass pores, and information about the pore-size distributions was established. The results are in accord with the values obtained from N2 isotherms, transmission electron microscope micrographs, and the manufacturer's specifications (radius of approximately 20 A). The possibility of using this material as a transducer for implementation in a fiber-optic sensor to measure humidity was evaluated. PMID:18357027

  12. The calculation of thin film parameters from spectroscopic ellipsometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterization, but the results of SE experiments must first be compared with calculations to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions. This process requires 4 steps: (1) The quantities measured must be specified and the equivalent calculated parameters identified. (2) The film structure must be modeled, where the number of films is specified and certain characteristics of each layer specified, such as whether or not the film is isotropic or anisotropic, homogeneous or graded. (3) The optical functions of each layer must be specified or parameterized. (4) The data must be compared with the calculated spectra, where a quantifiable figure of merit is used for the comparison. The last step is particularly important because without it, no {open_quotes}goodness of fit{close_quotes} parameter is calculated and one does not know whether or not the calculated spectrum fits the data.

  13. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  14. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-12-28

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs{sub 0.911}Sb{sub 0.089} bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} (x ∼ 0.1–0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and −380 and −367 meV for the valence band.

  15. Measurement of InAsSb bandgap energy and InAs/InAsSb band edge positions using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Synowicki, R. A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The structural and optical properties of lattice-matched InAs0.911Sb0.089 bulk layers and strain-balanced InAs/InAs1-xSbx (x ˜ 0.1-0.4) superlattices grown on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates by molecular beam epitaxy are examined using X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and temperature dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence and ellipsometry measurements determine the ground state bandgap energy and the X-ray diffraction measurements determine the layer thickness and mole fraction of the structures studied. Detailed modeling of the X-ray diffraction data is employed to quantify unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattices. A Kronig-Penney model of the superlattice miniband structure is used to analyze the valence band offset between InAs and InAsSb, and hence the InAsSb band edge positions at each mole fraction. The resulting composition dependence of the bandgap energy and band edge positions of InAsSb are described using the bandgap bowing model; the respective low and room temperature bowing parameters for bulk InAsSb are 938 and 750 meV for the bandgap, 558 and 383 meV for the conduction band, and -380 and -367 meV for the valence band.

  16. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  17. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Piovera, C; Dallera, C; Gupta, A; Carpene, E

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark. PMID:25638099

  18. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark.

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-Bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F Y; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-04-15

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca(2+)] = 10(-6.8)M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm(-1)along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  20. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  1. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  2. TEACHING PHYSICS: Refractive index determination of materials on thin transparent substrates using ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, L.

    2000-09-01

    Ellipsometry techniques are often used in the microelectronics industry to monitor substrate cleanliness. The principle of ellipsometry is introduced briefly by describing what is involved when measuring transparent materials. This exercise helps in understanding why absorbing substrates are often used in the ellipsometry technique, without having to derive complicated equations. Moreover, the technique is presented in a simple way with a view to applying and reviewing the concepts of internal reflections occurring in a thin piece of material (substrate). Refractive index measurements of thin transparent substrates such as glass slides can be inaccurate when using ellipsometry because of multiple reflections occurring on both the top and bottom surfaces. Some measurements of the refractive indices of transparent substrates (glass slides) are presented and discussed.

  3. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface sensitive tool to probe thin film growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    1999-02-19

    Sputtered thin film and multilayer x-ray mirrors are made routinely at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the APS users. Precise film growth control and characterization are very critical in fabricating high-quality x-ray mirrors. Film thickness calibrations are carried out using in situ and ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, interferometry, and x-ray scattering. To better understand the growth and optical properties of different thin film systems, we have carried out a systematic study of sputtered thin films of Au, Rh, Pg Pd, Cu, and Cr, using in situ ellipsometry. Multiple data sets were obtained in situ for each film material with incremental thicknesses and were analyzed with their correlation in mind. We found that in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry as a surface-sensitive tool can also be used to probe the growth and morphology of the thin film system. This application of in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry for metal thin film systems will be discussed.

  4. Kinetic Mie ellipsometry to determine the time-resolved particle growth in nanodusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Sebastian; Greiner, Franko; Tadsen, Benjamin; Piel, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The growth of nanometer-sized particles in a reactive argon-acetylene plasma is investigated by means of kinetic single-wavelength Mie ellipsometry from the change of the polarization state of scattered light. This requires advanced measurement techniques as well as complex methods for the analysis of the measured data. Today commercial devices reduce the metrological effort, but the data analysis is still a challenging topic. We present a scheme to gain time-resolved information about the size evolution of monodisperse spherical particles and to determine their optical properties, represented by the complex refractive index N, without limiting assumptions concerning the evolution of the particle size or the need for additional ex situ diagnostics. The method is applied on typical particle growth processes at varying optical depth and compared to ex situ SEM measurements. It is shown that more complex processes, including particle etching, can be analyzed. This demonstrates the applicability of the analysis on a strongly non-linear process.

  5. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  6. Characterization by spectroscopic Ellipsometry, the physical properties of silver nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coanga, Jean-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are able to change their minds through their experiments. I think it is time to go kick the curse and go further in research if we want a human future. I work in the Nano-Optics and Plasmonics research. I defined with ellipsomètrie the structure of new type of Nano particles of silver. It's same be act quickly to replace the old dirty leaded electronic-connexion chip and by the other hand to find a new way for the heath care of cancer disease by nanoparticles the next killers of bad cells. Silver nanoparticle layers are obtained by Spark Plasma Sintering are investigated as an alternative to lead alloy based material for solder joint in power mechatronics modules. These layers are characterized by mean of conventional techniques that is the dilatometry technique, the resistivity measurement through the van der Pauw method, and the flash laser technique. Furthermore, the nanoparticles of silver layer are deeply studied by UV-Visible spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectroscopic angles parameters are determined in function of temperature and dielectric constants are deduced and analyzed through an optical model which takes into account a Drude and a Lorentz component within the Bruggeman effective medium approximation (EMA). The relaxation times and the electrical conductivity are plot in function of temperature. The obtained electrical conductivity give significant result in good agreement to those reported by four points electrical measurement method.

  7. Polypeptide Multilayer Self-Assembly Studied by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Etchegoin, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    A polypeptide nanofilm made by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly was built on a surface that mimics nonwoven, a material commonly used in wound dressings. Poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA) are the building blocks of the nanofilm, which is intended as an enzymatically degradable lid for release of bactericides to chronic wounds. Chronic wounds often carry infection originating from bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and a release system triggered by the degree of infection is of interest. The dry nanofilm was studied with ellipsometry. The thickness of the nanofilm was 60% less in its dry state than in its wet state. The measurements showed that a primer was not necessary to build a stable nanofilm, which is practically important in our case because a nondegradable primer is highly unwanted in a wound care dressing. Added V8 (glutamyl endopeptidase) enzymes only showed adsorption on the nanofilm at room temperature, indicating that the PLL/PLGA “lid” may remain intact until the dressing has been filled with wound exudate at the elevated temperature typical of that of the wound. PMID:24660065

  8. Structural investigations of human hairs by spectrally resolved ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Benjamin; Chan, D.; Ruebhausen, M.; Wessel, S.; Wepf, R.

    2006-03-01

    Human hair is a biological layered system composed of two major layers, the cortex and the cuticle. We show spectrally resolved ellipsometry measurements of the ellipsometric parameters ψ and δ of single human hairs. The spectra reflect the layered nature of hair and the optical anisotropy of the hair’s structure. In addition, measurements on strands of human hair show a high reproducibility of the ellipsometric parameters for different hair fiber bundles from the same person. Based on the measurements, we develop a model of the dielectric function of hair that explains the spectra. This model includes the dielectric properties of the cuticle and cortex as well as their associated layer thicknesses. In addition, surface roughness effects modelled by a roughness layer with an complex refractive index given by an effective medium approach can have a significant effect on the measurements. We derive values for the parameters of the cuticle surface roughness layer of the thickness dACu= 273-360 nm and the air inclusion fA= 0.6 -5.7%. [1] accepted for publication in J. Biomed Opt., 2005

  9. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  10. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  11. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Miller, B.; Parzinger, E.; Thiesen, P.; Holleitner, A. W.; Wurstbauer, U.

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1–2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping.

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-08-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effects of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that after a 20-s 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si(100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si(100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber, and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface-layer, after being heated to approximately 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of HF treated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huade; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-06-01

    Both ex situ and in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements were employed to investigate the effect of HF cleaning on Si surfaces. The hydrogen-terminated (H-terminated) Si surface was modeled as an equivalent dielectric layer, and monitored in real time by SE measurements. The SE analyses indicate that, after a 20-sec 9:1 HF dip without rinse, the Si (100) surface was passivated by the hydrogen termination and remained chemically stable. Roughness of the HF-etched bare Si (100) surface was observed, in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber (UHV), and analyzed by the in situ SE. Evidence for desorption of the H-terminated Si surface layer, after being heated to about 550 C in the UHV chamber, is presented and discussed. This is the first use of an ex situ and in situ real-time, nondestructive technique capable of showing state of passivation, the rate of reoxidation, and the surface roughness of the H-terminated Si surfaces.

  14. Imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry of MoS2.

    PubMed

    Funke, S; Miller, B; Parzinger, E; Thiesen, P; Holleitner, A W; Wurstbauer, U

    2016-09-28

    Micromechanically exfoliated mono- and multilayers of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are investigated by spectroscopic imaging ellipsometry. In combination with knife edge illumination, MoS2 flakes can be detected and classified on arbitrary flat and also transparent substrates with a lateral resolution down to 1-2 µm. The complex dielectric functions from mono- and trilayer MoS2 are presented. They are extracted from a multilayer model to fit the measured ellipsometric angles employing an anisotropic and an isotropic fit approach. We find that the energies of the critical points of the optical constants can be treated to be independent of the utilized model, whereas the magnitude of the optical constants varies with the used model. The anisotropic model suggests a maximum absorbance for a MoS2 sheet supported by sapphire of about 14% for monolayer and of 10% for trilayer MoS2. Furthermore, the lateral homogeneity of the complex dielectric function for monolayer MoS2 is investigated with a spatial resolution of 2 µm. Only minor fluctuations are observed. No evidence for strain, for a significant amount of disorder or lattice defects can be found in the wrinkle-free regions of the MoS2 monolayer from complementary µ-Raman spectroscopy measurements. We assume that the minor lateral variation in the optical constants are caused by lateral modification in the van der Waals interaction presumably caused by the preparation using micromechanical exfoliation and viscoelastic stamping. PMID:27460278

  15. Monitoring Photodeposition of Polymer Films from Diacetylene Monomer Solutions Using In Situ Real-Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Du; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kim, Yeon-Taik; An, Ilsin; Paley, Mark S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Photodeposition of thin polymer (PDAMNA) films from diacetylene monomer (DAMNA) solutions onto gold coated silica substrates with UV light was studied using the technique of in-situ real time spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dielectric function of PDAMNA was determined; and the thickness of the growing PDAMNA films over a 4 hour time interval was determined using a linear regression fit of the experimental data to a homogeneous four phase optical model. It was found that stirring the solution dramatically lowers the rate of film deposition, suggesting that convection can affect the attachment kinetics of the film to the substrate. Lastly, the morphology of the PDAMNA films was examined using non-contact mode atomic force microscopy.

  16. Effect of Ta concentration on the refractive index of TiO2:Ta studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfani, Eka; Kurniawan, Robi; Muhammady, Shibghatullah; Marlina, Resti; Sutjahja, Inge M.; Winata, Toto; Rusydi, Andrivo; Darma, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated optical properties of Ta-doped TiO2 thin film on LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) at room temperature. Amplitude ratio Ψ and phase difference L1 between p- and s- polarized light waves are obtained by multiple incident angles measurement (60°, 70°, and 80°) at energy range of 0.5 - 6.5 eV. In order to obtain optical properties for every Ta concentrations (0.01, 0.4, and 5 at. %), multilayer modelling was performed simultaneously by using Drude-Lorentz model. Refractive index and optical dispersion parameters were determined by Wemple-DiDomenico relation. In general, refractive index at zero photon energy n(0) increases by increasing Ta concentration. Furthermore, optical band gap shows a significant increasing due to presence of Ta dopant. In addition, other optical constants are discussed as well.

  17. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  18. Spectroscopic rotating compensator ellipsometry in the infrared: retarder design and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boer, J. H. W. G.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; de Hoog, F. J.

    1997-05-01

    Rotating compensator ellipsometry (RCE) is an approach to ellipsometry that is superior to the widely used rotating analyser ellipsometry (RAE). An essential component in RCE is a retarder that generates a retardance close to 0957-0233/8/5/004/img1. In contrast to RCE at a single wavelength, spectroscopic RCE requires a retarder that performs well over a wide range of the used spectrum. The designed retarder is capable of this and works on the principle of total internal reflection. Making use of this retarder, RCE is tested by measuring the optical characteristics of a Teflon-like layer on an aluminium substrate. The results show good agreement with similar RAE measurements, as well as data calculated from an ellipsometric model.

  19. Single shot dynamic ellipsometry mesaurements of laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, C. A.

    2007-12-12

    A technique has been developed to measure the time-resolved position of a laser-driven shock wave and the subsequent material flow. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, using a chirped femtosecond laser pulse, probes picosecond material dynamics in a single shot by capitalizing on the refractive index changes in the shocked material. For transparent materials, the shock velocity, the particle velocity, and the shocked material's refractive index are extracted. Hugoniot data for poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene-co-vinylidene fluoride) (Kel-F 800) was obtained using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, and the data agrees well with previous data on macroscopic samples obtained in plate impact gas gun experiments.

  20. Study of the interaction between HSA and oligo-DNA using total internal reflection ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y. W.; Byun, J. S.; Kim, Y. D.; Hemzal, D.; Humliček, J.

    2012-04-01

    Techniques of quantitative analysis are very important for studies of the interactions between bio-molecules in the field of biotechnology and drug development. The total internal reflection ellipsometry system (TIRE) is an attractive label-free procedure for the quantitative analysis of biomolecules because it combines the analytic ability of ellipsometry and the high surface sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance. In this work, we have used TIRE to study the optical properties of an aquatic monolayer of human serum albumin (HSA) and oligo-DNA. Also, we have monitored the adsorption and the interaction processes of protein layers.

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on Si/SiO{sub 2}/graphene tri-layer system exposed to downstream hydrogen plasma: Effects of hydrogenation and chemical sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Baran; Fu, Wangyang; Marot, Laurent Calame, Michel; Steiner, Roland; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-05

    In this work, the optical response of graphene to hydrogen plasma treatment is investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Although the electronic transport properties and Raman spectrum of graphene change after plasma hydrogenation, ellipsometric parameters of the Si/SiO2/graphene tri-layer system do not change. This is attributed to plasma hydrogenated graphene still being electrically conductive, since the light absorption of conducting 2D materials does not depend on the electronic band structure. A change in the light transmission can only be observed when higher energy hydrogen ions (30 eV) are employed, which chemically sputter the graphene layer. An optical contrast is still apparent after sputtering due to the remaining traces of graphene and hydrocarbons on the surface. In brief, plasma treatment does not change the light transmission of graphene; and when it does, this is actually due to plasma damage rather than plasma hydrogenation.

  2. Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopic analysis of graphene films grown directly on Si substrate via CVD technique for estimating the graphene atomic planes number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hazmi, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Alshahrie, Ahmed; Shokr, F. S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E.

    2016-08-01

    Two reliable approaches for estimating the number of atomic planes of graphene films grown on Si substrate were demonstrated by Raman and ellipsometry spectroscopies. The first approach depends on the measurement of the ratio of the integrated Raman scattering intensity of the graphene G band to the optical phonon band of Si substrate (IG/ISi). The second approach belongs to ellipsometry measurement of the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected polarized light from the surface of the graphene films to the amplitude of reflected polarized light from the surface of the Si substrate (ΨG/ΨSi). These two approaches could efficiently recognize the number of atomic planes in the graphene films (1 ≤ n ≤ 10). The results were compared with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement and showed a linear regression with slope of 0.36 ± 0.01 nm/graphene layer. The Two approaches will open a new avenue to efficiently count the number of graphene layers during the preparation process.

  3. Bonding structure of carbon nitride films by infrared ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.; Gioti, M.

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited by reactive sputtering to study the effect of the ion bombardment during deposition (IBD) on their bonding structure. Fourier-transform infrared (IR) ellipsometry (FTIRE) was used to identify and distinguish the characteristic bands of the sp3 C-N, sp2 C=N, sp1 (-C≡N, -N≡C) and the IR-inactive C=C bonds. The results are compared and discussed in view of the films' electronic behavior through the dielectric function ɛ(ω) in NIR-visible-UV region and with those obtained by nanoindentation measurements. The low-energy IBD is suggested to promote the homogeneous N distribution in the films, resulting in films with low hardness (~6 GPa) and stress. On the contrary, the high-energy IBD results in high-N concentration in localized regions of the films, where possibly the formation of fullerenelike and C3N4 structures is favored. Indeed, hardness values up to 45 GPa were measured at some regions of these films, along with the high stress and hardness that they exhibit. Their absorption due to π-->π* electronic transitions is higher and exhibit strong absorption ~1.6 eV where the low-energy IBD films are transparent. Furthermore, the effect of postdeposition thermal annealing to 900 °C on the bonding structure of the films was investigated. It was found that the structural modifications induced by the N removal from the carbon-nitrogen bonds depend on the bonding structure of the films, as determined by the IBD energy. The N evolution from sp3 C-N bonds is more intense in low-energy IBD films and more pronounced around 450 °C, while the C-N bonds of pentagons and C3N4 structures, contained mainly in high-energy IBD films, are more stable and break at higher temperatures. Above 600 °C, N is evolved from the sp2 C=N bonds, while the most stable structures (i.e., sp1 -N≡C and -C≡N groups) break above 700 °C. The thermal treatment differentially affects the electronic transitions; the π-->π* are almost stable, while

  4. Reflectometry-Ellipsometry Reveals Thickness, Growth Rate, and Phase Composition in Oxidation of Copper.

    PubMed

    Diaz Leon, Juan J; Fryauf, David M; Cormia, Robert D; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Samuels, Kathryn; Williams, R Stanley; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2016-08-31

    The oxidation of copper is a complicated process. Copper oxide develops two stable phases at room temperature and standard pressure (RTSP): cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO). Both phases have different optical and electrical characteristics that make them interesting for applications such as solar cells or resistive switching devices. For a given application, it is necessary to selectively control oxide thickness and cupric/cuprous oxide phase volume fraction. The thickness and composition of a copper oxide film growing on the surface of copper widely depend on the characteristics of as-deposited copper. In this Research Article, two samples, copper films prepared by two different deposition techniques, electron-beam evaporation and sputtering, were studied. As the core part of the study, the formation of the oxidized copper was analyzed routinely over a period of 253 days using spectroscopic polarized reflectometry-spectroscopic ellipsometry (RE). An effective medium approximation (EMA) model was used to fit the RE data. The RE measurements were complemented and validated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our results show that the two samples oxidized under identical laboratory ambient conditions (RTSP, 87% average relative humidity) developed unique oxide films following an inverse-logarithmic growth rate with thickness and composition different from each other over time. Discussion is focused on the ability of RE to simultaneously extract thickness (i.e., growth rate) and composition of copper oxide films and on plausible physical mechanisms responsible for unique oxidation habits observed in the two copper samples. It appears that extended surface characteristics (i.e., surface roughness and grain boundaries) and preferential crystalline orientation of as-deposited polycrystalline copper films control the growth kinetics of the copper oxide film. Analysis based on a noncontact

  5. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G. A.; Schülli, T. U.; Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G.; Richard, M.-I.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup −5} (Δa/a) with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 μm. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive μ-Raman and μ-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  6. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  7. Optical properties of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Hou, Yun; Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Yanqing

    2010-10-01

    Transition metal oxide (TMO) has been extensively focused in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the optical properties of a typical TMO material of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 (x=0-1) thin films. Different compositions of x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 thin films are grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by chemical solution deposition method under annealing temperature of 750°C. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 thin films are polycrystalline with spinel structure. The optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature in the wavelength range of 400-1700nm. By fitting the measured ellipsometric data with a three-phase model (air/sample/Pt), the optical constants of thin films are determined. The refractive index and extinction coefficient don't show apparent variation with different composition. The obtained optical constants are very significant in the potential applications of optoelectronic devices.

  8. Optical properties of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leibo; Hou, Yun; Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Gao, Yanqing

    2011-02-01

    Transition metal oxide (TMO) has been extensively focused in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the optical properties of a typical TMO material of Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 (x=0-1) thin films. Different compositions of x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 thin films are grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by chemical solution deposition method under annealing temperature of 750°C. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that Ni(1-x)Mn(2+x)O4 thin films are polycrystalline with spinel structure. The optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature in the wavelength range of 400-1700nm. By fitting the measured ellipsometric data with a three-phase model (air/sample/Pt), the optical constants of thin films are determined. The refractive index and extinction coefficient don't show apparent variation with different composition. The obtained optical constants are very significant in the potential applications of optoelectronic devices.

  9. Ellipsometry with polarisation analysis at cryogenic temperatures inside a vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.; Grees, B.; Spitzer, D.; Beck, M.; Bottesch, R.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Schäfer, T.; Wegmann, A.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Ostrick, B.; Telle, H. H.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper we describe a new variant of null ellipsometry to determine thicknesses and optical properties of thin films on a substrate at cryogenic temperatures. In the PCSA arrangement of ellipsometry the polarizer and the compensator are placed before the substrate and the analyzer after it. Usually, in the null ellipsometry the polarizer and the analyzer are rotated to find the searched minimum in intensity. In our variant we rotate the polarizer and the compensator instead, both being placed in the incoming beam before the substrate. Therefore the polarisation analysis of the reflected beam can be realized by an analyzer at fixed orientation. We developed this method for investigations of thin cryogenic films inside a vacuum chamber where the analyzer and detector had to be placed inside the cold shield at a temperature of T≈ 90 K close to the substrate. All other optical components were installed at the incoming beam line outside the vacuum chamber, including all components which need to be rotated during the measurements. Our null ellipsometry variant has been tested with condensed krypton films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate (HOPG) at a temperature of T≈ 25 K. We show that it is possible to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG substrate as well as thickness of krypton films with reasonable accuracy.

  10. Ellipsometry with polarisation analysis at cryogenic temperatures inside a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Grees, B.; Spitzer, D.; Beck, M.; Bottesch, R.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Ostrick, B.; Schäfer, T.; Telle, H. H.; Wegmann, A.; Zbořil, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we describe a new variant of null ellipsometry to determine thicknesses and optical properties of thin films on a substrate at cryogenic temperatures. In the PCSA arrangement of ellipsometry the polarizer and the compensator are placed before the substrate and the analyzer after it. Usually, in the null ellipsometry the polarizer and the analyzer are rotated to find the searched minimum in intensity. In our variant we rotate the polarizer and the compensator instead, both being placed in the incoming beam before the substrate. Therefore the polarisation analysis of the reflected beam can be realized by an analyzer at fixed orientation. We developed this method for investigations of thin cryogenic films inside a vacuum chamber where the analyzer and detector had to be placed inside the cold shield at a temperature of T ≈ 90 K close to the substrate. All other optical components were installed at the incoming beam line outside the vacuum chamber, including all components which need to be rotated during the measurements. Our null ellipsometry variant has been tested with condensed krypton films on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate (HOPG) at a temperature of T ≈ 25 K. We show that it is possible to determine the indices of refraction of condensed krypton and of the HOPG substrate as well as thickness of krypton films with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Real-Time In Situ Monitoring of GaAs (211) Oxide Desorption and CdTe Growth by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, C. M.; Almeida, L. A.; Jacobs, R. N.; Markunas, J. K.; Smith, P. J.; Arias, J.; Brown, A. E.; Pellegrino, J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the growth of CdTe (211)B by molecular beam epitaxy on large-area epiready GaAs (211)B substrates. Prior to CdTe growth, GaAs substrates were thermally cleaned under an As4 flux. Oxide desorption was verified by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The use of in situ SE played a significant role in the study of CdTe-on-GaAs growth and annealing processes. An effective medium approximation (EMA) was used to model the overlayer thickness variation of CdTe epilayers throughout growth and in situ annealing cycles. A correlation between SE-derived EMA thickness values and surface defect formation mitigation is discussed. All annealed samples (11.5 μm to 13 μm thick) exhibited excellent crystalline quality with average double crystal rocking curve full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of ~60 arcsec.

  12. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  13. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  14. Secondary diffraction of diffracted Gaussian beam of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, Yu. V.; Kozar', A. V.; Matyunin, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The diffraction of a narrow Gaussian beam of laser radiation on mutually perpendicular edges of crossed, superimposed sharp wedge-shaped blades (safety razors) has been studied. The diffraction pattern observed on a flat screen behind the blades comprises a very bright central spot, which exhibits the structure of a "light network" with rectangular cells, and four groups of narrow bright bands that expand from the central spot toward the periphery and form a rectangular cross. The spatial frequency of light-field modulation on the screen can be controlled by varying the distance from the blades to screen.

  15. Symmetry and light stuffing of H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 characterized by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroudi, Kristen; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Cava, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    The H o2T i2O7 , E r2T i2O7 , and Y b2T i2O7 pyrochlores were studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction to determine whether the (002) peak, forbidden in the pyrochlore space group F d -3 m but observed in single crystal neutron scattering measurements, is present due to a deviation of their pyrochlore structure from F d -3 m symmetry. Synchrotron diffraction measurements on precisely synthesized stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric powders and a crushed floating zone crystal of H o2T i2O7 revealed that the (002) reflection is absent in all cases to a sensitivity of approximately one part in 30 000 of the strongest x-ray diffraction peak. This indicates to high sensitivity that the space group of the crystal structure of these rare earth titanate pyrochlores is F d -3 m , and that, thus, the (002) peak observed in the neutron scattering experiments has a nonstructural origin. The cell parameters and internal strain for lightly stuffed H o2 +xT i2 -xO7 are also presented.

  16. Subwavelength diffractive color beam combiner.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Nikolai I; Nikitin, Vladislav G; Danilov, Viktor A; Popov, Vladimir V; Usievich, Boris A

    2014-09-01

    A high-efficiency subwavelength diffractive beam combiner operating in a visible spectral range is designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. Such a device combines red, green, and blue color beams into one output light beam. Diffraction efficiencies of different types of gratings are calculated for various materials, incidence angles, and polarizations of light. It is shown that the plasmon resonance via a grating coupling occurs at the determined conditions. Subwavelength gratings with a period of 400 nm are fabricated and tested using laser and laser diode sources. PMID:25321371

  17. Fourier Ellipsometry -- An Ellipsometric Approach to Fourier Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, P.; Kumar, N.; Fried, M.; Fodor, B.; Juhasz, G.; Pereira, S. F.; Burger, S.; Urbach, H. P.

    2015-01-01

    An extension of Fourier scatterometry is presented, aiming at increasing the sensitivity by measuring the phase difference between the reflections polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The ellipsometric approach requires no additional hardware elements compared with conventional Fourier scatterometry. Furthermore, incoherent illumination is also sufficient, which enables spectroscopy using standard low-cost light sources.

  18. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  19. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core–shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core–shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip.

  20. Nanofocus x-ray diffraction and cathodoluminescence investigations into individual core-shell (In,Ga)N/GaN rod light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Rosenthal, Martin; Burghammer, Manfred; Ledig, Johannes; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2016-08-12

    Employing nanofocus x-ray diffraction, we investigate the local strain field induced by a five-fold (In,Ga)N multi-quantum well embedded into a GaN micro-rod in core-shell geometry. Due to an x-ray beam width of only 150 nm in diameter, we are able to distinguish between individual m-facets and to detect a significant in-plane strain gradient along the rod height. This gradient translates to a red-shift in the emitted wavelength revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements. We interpret the result in terms of numerically derived in-plane strain using the finite element method and subsequent kinematic scattering simulations which show that the driving parameter for this effect is an increasing indium content towards the rod tip. PMID:27352816

  1. Structured beam diffraction.

    PubMed

    Castagna, R; Di Donato, A; Nucara, L; Xu, J H; Lucchetta, D E; Simoni, F

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of a modulated pattern induced by a single laser beam in a polymeric film. In spite of the simple geometrical configuration, the analysis of the far field diffraction pattern allows a sensitive retrieving of the wavelength of the recording beam and of its incidence angle, pointing out the high information content of the recorded spot. A theoretical model is presented which satisfactorily explains the observed behavior. It takes into account the interaction of structured light with structured matter with the same symmetries and spatial modulation frequencies close to each other. This result shows a feature of the interaction between structured light and structured matter which has not been explored yet. PMID:27192262

  2. From angle-resolved ellipsometry of light scattering to imaging in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, Gaelle; Arnaud, Laurent; Siozade, Laure; Le Neindre, Nora; Chazallet, Frederic; Zerrad, Myriam; Deumie, Carole; Amra, Claude

    2008-05-01

    A procedure is described to allow selective cancellation of polarized scattering within optical substrates and multilayers. It is shown how bulk scattering(respectively surface) can be directly eliminated while the remaining roughness(respectively bulk) signal is still measurable. The same procedure can be applied to isolate a single interface or bulk within a stack or to detect slight departure from perfect correlation within multilayers. Experiments and a procedure for selective imaging in random media are described.

  3. Optical characterization of isotactic polypropylene and carbon nanotube composites using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Kalakonda, Parvathalu; Georgiev, Georgi; Iannacchione, Germano

    2013-03-01

    We report the dielectric properties of optically characterized isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and its composites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Characterization was performed at angles ranging from 50 to 70 degrees and for the spectral range between 300-1000 nm. CNT concentrations varied from 0 to 5 wt% in the iPP/CNT composites investigated. Ellipsometry is a non-invasive and non-destructive technique that enabled us to determine the dielectric properties of the materials investigated. A concentration dependency on CNT wt% was found to exist for both the refractive index and the extinction coefficient for the iPP/CNT composites. At higher concentrations however, this distinction was not very clear, suggesting that saturation levels were reached in the material. We will also discuss our efforts to separate the optical properties of bound CNT from the analyzed nanocomposites.

  4. Dielectric function of the ferromagnetic semiconductor CdMnCrTe studied by using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Younghun; Um, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    We describe the pseudo-dielectric function of Cd1- x- y Mn x Cr y Te ferromagnetic semiconductor alloys by using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the 1.0 ~ 6.0 eV spectral range at room temperature. The ellipsometry data include structures that can be attributed to the effects of Cr concentration on the E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 critical points. Critical-point (CP) parameters were obtained by fitting standard critical point (SCP) model line shapes to the numerically-calculated second- energy derivatives of ɛ( ω) = ɛ 1( ω) + iɛ 2( ω). The E 0, E 1, E 1 + Δ1, and E 2 energies decreased with Cr content y; this phenomenon is related to the hybridization of the valence and the conduction bands in CdTe with the 3 d states of Mn and Cr.

  5. Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P.; Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R.

    2012-07-15

    The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

  6. Modeling Ellipsometry Measurements of Molecular Thin-Film Contamination on Genesis Array Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a molecular thin-film contamination on Genesis flown array samples changed the course of preliminary assessment strategies. Analytical techniques developed to measure solar wind elemental abundances must now compensate for a thin-film contamination. Currently, this is done either by experimental cleaning before analyses or by depth-profiling techniques that bypass the surface contamination. Inside Johnson Space Center s Genesis dedicated ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom laboratory, the selection of collector array fragments allocated for solar wind analyses are based on the documentation of overall surface quality, visible surface particle contamination greater than 1 m, and the amount of thin film contamination measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Documenting the exact thickness, surface topography, and chemical composition of these contaminates is also critical for developing accurate cleaning methods. However, the first step in characterization of the molecular film is to develop accurate ellipsometry models that will determine an accurate thickness measurement of the contamination film.

  7. Single shot ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) of laser-driven shocks in single crystal explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Von H; Mcgrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Eakins, Dan E; Bolme, Cindy A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the first experiments to measure states in shocked energetic single crystals with dynamic ellipsometry. We demonstrate that these ellipsometric techniques can produce reasonable Hugoniot values using small amounts of crystalline RDX and PETN. Pressures, particle velocities and shock velocities obtained using shocked ellipsometry are comparable to those found using gas-gun flyer plates and molecular dynamics calculations. The adaptation of the technique from uniform thin films of polymers to thick non-perfect crystalline materials was a significant achievement. Correct sample preparation proved to be a crucial component. Through trial and error, we were able to resolve polishing issues, sample quality problems, birefringence effects and mounting difficulties that were not encountered using thin polymer films.

  8. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI–CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kamiński, Radosław; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, Elżbieta; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies. PMID:25238405

  9. Thin-film hermeticity - A quantitative analysis of diamondlike carbon using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzeszko, S.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the successful application of variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry to quantitative thin-film hermeticity evaluation. It is shown that, under a variety of film preparations and moisture introduction conditions, water penetrates only a very thin diamondlike carbon (DLC) top surface-roughness region. Thus, DLC is an excellent candidate for use as protective coatings in adverse chemical and aqueous environments.

  10. Structure and Thermotropic phase Behavior of Fluorinated Phospholipid Bilayers: A combined Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR Spectroscopy and Imaging Ellipsometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuy, Steffen; Faiss, Simon; Yoder, Nicholas C.; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Kumar, Krishna; Janshoff, Andreas; Vogel, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Lipid bilayers consisting of lipids with terminally perfluoroalkylated chains have remarkable properties. They exhibit increased stability and phase-separated nanoscale patterns in mixtures with nonfluorinated lipids. In order to understand the bilayer properties that are responsible for this behavior, we have analyzed the structure of solid-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and of a DPPC analogue with 6 terminal perfluorinated methylene units (F6-DPPC). Polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that for F6-DPPC, the tilt of the lipid acyl chains to the bilayer normal is increased to 39° as compared to 21° for native DPPC, for both lipids in the gel phase. This substantial increase of the tilt angle is responsible for a decrease of the bilayer thickness from 5.4 nm for DPPC to 4.5 nm for F6-DPPC, as revealed by temperature-controlled imaging ellipsometry on microstructured lipid bilayers and solution atomic force microscopy. During the main phase transition from the gel to the fluid phase, both the relative bilayer thickness change and the relative area change are substantially smaller for F6-DPPC than for DPPC. In light of these structural and thermotropic data, we propose a model in which the higher acyl-chain tilt angle in F6-DPPC is the result of a conformational rearrangement to minimize unfavorable fluorocarbon–hydrocarbon interactions in the center of the bilayer due to chain staggering. PMID:18563929

  11. Study of the Dielectric Function of Graphene from Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Florence

    For more than 60 years, semiconductor research has been advancing up the periodic table. The first transistor was made from germanium. This later gave way to silicon-based devices due to the latter's ability to form an excellent interface with thermally-grown oxide. Now for the last ˜8 years, the focus has moved up one more row to carbon for post-CMOS devices in order to comply with the scaling limitations of Moore's law. However, for each of these, the measurements of film properties and dimensions have always been required for technological applications. These measurement methods often incorporate the use of light or electrons in order to take advantage of a wavelength that is on the order of, or smaller than, the feature sizes of interest. This thesis compares the dielectric function of graphene measured by an optical method to that obtained from an electron energy loss method in order to observe the effect of contamination and substrate on the optical properties of graphene exposed to the environment. Whether viewed in terms of how light affects a material (dielectric function) or how a material affects light (refractive index), the optical response is a quantity that may be used to obtain information about a film's thickness, energy structure, and the types of excitations that are responsible for energy loss. The three main experimental methods used in this thesis work are spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). SE is commonly used in clean-room environments for optical measurement over the energy range of ˜0-5 eV. This method is used to study graphene's dielectric function from the ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) regions through use of an oscillator dispersion model. A nearly constant absorbance over the IR and into the visible region is observed due to vertical transitions between graphene's linearly dispersed pi-bands at the Dirac points. An exciton

  12. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drévillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine. PMID:12477127

  13. Use of rotating compensator spectroscoic ellipsometry for monitoring the photoresist etching on Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Kim, Yun-Hwan; Kim, Gon-Ho; Oh, Hye-Keun; An, Ilsin

    2003-05-01

    Etching is one of the important processes of semiconductor production. In this study, we monitored surface etching process, which is used for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, of photoresist (PR) on Si wafer by using rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry (RCSE). Ellipsometry has mono-layer sensitivity and we can use it in a severe atmosphere such as a reactive gas, plasma and high temperature etc. Also, it is possible to perform non-destructive, real-time, and in-situ measurement. DBD reactor used 20 kV pulse power. We used alumina as dielectric material. The atmosphere of DBD plasma was operated without dark period in optimal frequency. We used 248 nm PR as sample. The PR is coated by spin coater on Si wafer with 248 nm anti-reflection coating (ARC), and wafer is baked after that. Samples are not exposed and are not developed, but are etched after bake. The PR is removed linearly with respect to time and temperature. We obtained several results at various experimental conditions - temperature, gas flow, process time and frequency. On the assumption that PR is removed homogeneously, we can calculate the etching rate by continuous measurement of thickness of PR by ellipsometry.

  14. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  15. Diffraction Analysis of Solar Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Douglas M.; gong, qian

    2016-05-01

    The design of a solar coronagraph is predicated on controlling diffracted and scattered light using principles dating back to Bernard Lyot in the 1930’s. The existence of many successful ground- and space-based coronagraphs testifies to our ability to apply these principles in specific cases, but it is difficult to explore a significant range of design parameters because the calculations are tricky and time-consuming. Indeed, scattered light is so design-specific that ad hoc analysis is unavoidable once guidelines from experience are used to create a first-guess system of baffles and low-scatter surfaces. Here we describe a combination of analytic and computational approaches that has the potential to explore coronagraph design space somewhat more systematically with respect to diffracted light.

  16. Intensity Measurements in a Fresnel Diffraction Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, R.; Fortin, E.

    1972-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate optics laboratory experiment to verify the law of intensity in the Fesnel diffraction of a thin wire. A gas laser as light source and a photocell as detector scan the diffraction pattern. The agreement with the theoretical pattern is remarkably good. (Author/TS)

  17. Fresnel diffraction of aperture with rough edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Meina; Teng, Shuyun

    2015-06-01

    The Fresnel diffraction of an aperture with a rough edge is studied in this paper. Circular and elliptical apertures with sinusoidal and random edges are chosen as examples to investigate the influence of the aperture edge on the diffraction. The numerical calculation results indicate intuitively the variations of the transverse and longitude diffraction intensity distributions with the edge parameters of the aperture. The data files of aperture models are obtained through the numerical calculations, and the aperture samples are obtained with the help of a liquid crystal light modulator (LCLM). Thus, the practical experiments of the diffractions of apertures with rough edges are carried out. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones. The approximate analytic expressions of the diffraction by the modified aperture are deduced on the basis of the Fresnel diffraction theory and the statistic optics, and the reasonable explanations for the influence of edge parameters on the diffraction are given through the theoretical analysis.

  18. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  19. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  20. Real-Time Ellipsometry-Based Transmission Ultrasound Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Poco, J F; Ashby, A E

    2007-02-14

    -Perot system has never been fully implemented for area imaging, and the critical angle modulation system is not sensitive enough for medical imaging. We proposed an entirely new way of using acoustic pressure to modulate a light beam. This new technology should be sensitive enough to be useful for medical imaging and have a large enough aperture to speed acquisition by orders of magnitude over point sampling. Unfortunately, we were unable to bring this technology to fruition.

  1. DIFFRACTION-LIMITED VISIBLE LIGHT IMAGES OF ORION TRAPEZIUM CLUSTER WITH THE MAGELLAN ADAPTIVE SECONDARY ADAPTIVE OPTICS SYSTEM (MagAO)

    SciTech Connect

    Close, L. M.; Males, J. R.; Morzinski, K.; Kopon, D.; Follette, K.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Wu, Y-L.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Riccardi, A.; Pinna, E.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Uomoto, A; Hare, T.

    2013-09-10

    We utilized the new high-order (250-378 mode) Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high spatial resolution observations in ''visible light'' with MagAO's VisAO CCD camera. In the good-median seeing conditions of Magellan (0.''5-0.''7), we find MagAO delivers individual short exposure images as good as 19 mas optical resolution. Due to telescope vibrations, long exposure (60 s) r' (0.63 {mu}m) images are slightly coarser at FWHM = 23-29 mas (Strehl {approx}28%) with bright (R < 9 mag) guide stars. These are the highest resolution filled-aperture images published to date. Images of the young ({approx}1 Myr) Orion Trapezium {theta}{sup 1} Ori A, B, and C cluster members were obtained with VisAO. In particular, the 32 mas binary {theta}{sup 1} Ori C{sub 1} C{sub 2} was easily resolved in non-interferometric images for the first time. The relative positions of the bright trapezium binary stars were measured with {approx}0.6-5 mas accuracy. We are now sensitive to relative proper motions of just {approx}0.2 mas yr{sup -1} ({approx}0.4 km s{sup -1} at 414 pc)-this is a {approx}2-10 Multiplication-Sign improvement in orbital velocity accuracy compared to previous efforts. For the first time, we see clear motion of the barycenter of {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 2} B{sub 3} about {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 1}. All five members of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system appear likely to be a gravitationally bound ''mini cluster'', but we find that not all the orbits can be both circular and co-planar. The lowest mass member of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system (B{sub 4}; mass {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun }) has a very clearly detected motion (at 4.1 {+-} 1.3 km s{sup -1}; correlation = 99.9%) w.r.t. B{sub 1}. Previous work has suggested that B{sub 4} and B{sub 3} are on long-term unstable orbits and will be ejected from this ''mini cluster''. However, our new ''baseline'' model of the {theta}{sup 1} Ori B system suggests a more hierarchical system than previously thought, and so

  2. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  3. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings. PMID:23400074

  4. Characterization of the diffraction properties of quantum-dot-array diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanke; Kuang, Longyu; Wang, Zhebin; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun; Cao, Leifeng; Foerster, Eckhart; Wang, Deqiang; Xie, Changqing; Ye, Tianchun

    2007-05-01

    A new dispersive element named as quantum-dot-array diffraction grating [L. F. Cao, China patent No. 200410081499 (August 10, 2004)] for visible light has been developed and characterized experimentally. A large number of quantum dots distributed on a substrate as sinusoidal function can be used to diffract x rays without higher-order diffraction. The experimental patterns show that the higher-order diffractions which inevitably exist in the spectrum recorded using traditional diffraction gratings can be eliminated effectively by this newly designed element. It indicates that quantum-dot-array diffraction grating could be an attractive alternative of presently used diffraction grating in soft x-ray spectroscopy application to get rid of the higher-order diffraction distortions.

  5. Characterization of the diffraction properties of quantum-dot-array diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chuanke; Kuang Longyu; Wang Zhebin; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Cao Leifeng; Foerster, Eckhart; Wang Deqiang; Xie Changqing; Ye Tianchun

    2007-05-15

    A new dispersive element named as quantum-dot-array diffraction grating [L. F. Cao, China patent No. 200410081499 (August 10, 2004)] for visible light has been developed and characterized experimentally. A large number of quantum dots distributed on a substrate as sinusoidal function can be used to diffract x rays without higher-order diffraction. The experimental patterns show that the higher-order diffractions which inevitably exist in the spectrum recorded using traditional diffraction gratings can be eliminated effectively by this newly designed element. It indicates that quantum-dot-array diffraction grating could be an attractive alternative of presently used diffraction grating in soft x-ray spectroscopy application to get rid of the higher-order diffraction distortions.

  6. Light-induced structural changes in (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2: An X-ray single-crystal diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppi, M.; Bindi, L.; Rödl, T.; Pielnhofer, F.; Weihrich, R.; Pfitzner, A.; Bonazzi, P.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the behaviour of the As4S4 molecule within a crystal-chemical environment differing from realgar, α-As4S4, and its high-temperature polymorph, β-As4S4, the effects of the light exposure on the structure of the (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2 adduct have been studied. Differently from the cases previously studied, the action of the light filtered using a 550 nm long-wavelength pass filter did not produce any evident effect on the unit-cell. On the other hand, employing the 440 nm long-wavelength pass filter, remarkable variations of the unit-cell parameters were observed. In particular, an increase of the a, c, and β, and a decrease of the b parameter, producing on the whole an expansion of the unit-cell volume, is observed as a function of the light exposure times. Structure refinements indicated that the increase of the unit-cell volume is to ascribe to the formation of an increasing fraction (up to 20%) of pararealgar-type replacing the realgar-type molecule. Further light-exposure did not cause any further increase of the lattice parameters. On the contrary, a decrease of the unit-cell volume occurred by keeping the crystal in the dark (46 days): due to the loss of the crystallinity, only the core of the crystal, less altered and with smaller unit-cell volume, contributes to the diffraction effects. Micro-Raman spectra were collected on crystals exposed to the above mentioned wavelength light for increasing times. The peak at 275(±1) cm-1 whose intensity increases as a function of the exposure time confirms the transition from a realgar- to a pararealgar-type molecule in the (HgBr2)3(As4S4)2 adduct. Relativistic DFT-GGA ab initio band structure calculations reveal a direct band gap of 2.04 eV and quite flat valence and conduction bands around the Fermi level. According to analyses of the atomic orbital contributions to the electronic band structures the highest occupied states are attributed to non-bonding p-states of As.

  7. Anisotropic dielectric functions of (0001) sapphire from spectroscopic ellipsometry and first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Zhang, W. J.; Liu, L. H.

    2015-09-01

    This work aims at understanding and predicting the high-temperature anisotropic dielectric functions of (0001) sapphire over the entire infrared-visible-ultraviolet spectrum via the state-of-the-art infrared variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (IR-VASE) and first-principles method without empirical parameters. Upon measuring the high-symmetry orientation of c-plane surface, the IR-VASE determines the anisotropic infrared dielectric functions of (0001) sapphire for wavelengths ranging from 10 to 25 μm and temperatures from 300 to 573 K. As ellipsometry experiments indicate, the maxima of ordinary infrared dielectric functions consistently decrease and shift to longer wavelength as temperature increases. By fitting ellipsometry data with the Lorentz oscillator model, the Lorentz parameters, e.g., oscillator strength, resonance frequency and broadening parameter, for infrared-active phonon modes are obtained to interpret the temperature effect. Moreover, the calculated vibration frequencies at varying temperatures by the first-principles method coincide with the positions of infrared absorption peaks, indicating that infrared optical absorption mainly arises from the coupling of incident photon with lattice vibration. In the visible-ultraviolet spectral range, the first-principles and lattice dynamics methods are combined to understand the temperature effect on dielectric functions of (0001) sapphire. This method reproduces the essential feature of previous room-temperature reflectivity experiments and detects the slight change of dielectric functions as temperature increases. The convincing results enable us to predict the high-temperature visible-ultraviolet dielectric functions of (0001) sapphire by the first-principles method.

  8. Measurement of the optical properties of a transparent, conductive carbon nanotube film using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Kim, Yeji; Azumi, Reiko

    2015-07-01

    We have measured the complex refractive indices of a transparent, conductive carbon nanotube film by spectroscopic ellipsometry at wavelengths of 300-1700 nm (this includes the visible range). The film was produced on a quartz substrate by the doctor-blade method using single-walled carbon nanotube-polymer ink. The imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the film was found to be lower than 0.09 over the entire wavelength range. This film has a large advantage as a transparent, flexible, and conductive material.

  9. Investigation of the optical properties of MoS{sub 2} thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Chanyoung; O'Brien, Maria; Winters, Sinéad; McEvoy, Niall; Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-03-10

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) thin films grown by vapor phase sulfurization is reported. By developing an optical dispersion model, the extinction coefficient and refractive index, as well as the thickness of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) films, were extracted. In addition, the optical band gap was obtained from SE and showed a clear dependence on the MoS{sub 2} film thickness, with thinner films having a larger band gap energy. These results are consistent with theory and observations made on MoS{sub 2} flakes prepared by exfoliation, showing the viability of vapor phase derived TMDs for optical applications.

  10. Dielectric function of sol-gel prepared nano-granular zinc oxide by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliot, Mickaël Hadjadj, Aomar; Eypert, Céline

    2013-11-14

    ZnO thin films have been prepared by sol gel and deposited by spin coating. The dielectric function has been determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric spectra are inverted by a direct numerical method without using the standard fitting procedures. The obtained dielectric function presents a broad excitonic effect. The dielectric function is studied using Elliot excitonic theory including exciton plus band-to-band Coulomb interactions with standard Lorentzian broadening. A modification of this model dielectric function with independent bound and unbound exciton contributions is empirically proposed to improve modelling of the band gap excitonic peak.

  11. Ionization of covalent immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) monolayers measured by ellipsometry, QCM and SPR

    PubMed Central

    Uppalapati, Suji; Kong, Na; Norberg, Oscar; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-01-01

    Covalently immobilized poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) monolayer films were fabricated by spin coating PVP on perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized surface followed by UV irradiation. The pH-responsive behavior of these PVP ultrathin films was evaluated by ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By monitoring the responses of these films to pH in situ, the ionization constant of the monolayer thin films was obtained. The apparent pKa value of these covalently immobilized PVP monolayers, 13.4 by SPR, was 3 units higher than that of the free polymer in aqueous solution. PMID:26097271

  12. Total internal reflection ellipsometry and SPR detection of low molecular weight environmental toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, A. V.; Tsargorodskaya, A.; Hassan, A. K.; Starodub, N. F.

    2005-06-01

    The environmental toxins, such as herbicides simazine and atrazine, and T2 mycotoxin were registered with the optical methods of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and recently developed total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The immune assay approach was exploited for in situ registration of the above low molecular weight toxins with specific antibodies immobilised onto the gold surface via (poly)allylamine hydrochloride layer using electrostatic self-assembly (ESA) technique. The comparison of two methods of SPR and TIRE shows a higher sensitivity of the latter.

  13. Application of ellipsometry to crystal growth by organometallic molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Quinn, W. E.; Gregory, S.

    1990-06-01

    We report the first use of ellipsometry as a real-time monitor of III-V semiconductor crystal growth by molecular beam epitaxy, specifically growth of GaAs and AlGaAs from arsine, triethylgallium, and triethylaluminum sources. Our results provide new insight into the oxide desorption process and show a sensitivity of ±0.03 in compositions x>0.2 for 10 Å thickness increments of AlxGa1-xAs during initial deposition on GaAs.

  14. Optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hsiang-Lin Shen, Chih-Chiang; Su, Sheng-Han; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Li, Ming-Yang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2014-11-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to characterize the complex refractive index of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The extraordinary large value of the refractive index in the visible frequency range is obtained. The absorption response shows a strong correlation between the magnitude of the exciton binding energy and band gap energy. Together with the observed giant spin-orbit splitting, these findings advance the fundamental understanding of their novel electronic structures and the development of monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of homoepitaxial diamond multilayers and delta-doped structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet, J.; Chicot, G.; Eon, D.; Bustarret, E.

    2014-01-13

    The optimization of diamond-based unipolar electronic devices such as pseudo-vertical Schottky diodes or delta-doped field effect transistors relies in part on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p{sup –}) and heavily boron doped (p{sup ++}) layers with well-controlled thicknesses and steep interfaces. Optical ellipsometry offers a swift and contactless method to characterize the thickness, roughness, and electronic properties of semiconducting and metallic diamond layers. We report ellipsometric studies carried out on delta-doped structures and other epitaxial multilayers with various boron concentrations and thicknesses (down to the nanometer range). The results are compared with Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy and transport measurements.

  16. Study of InGaAs based MODFET structures using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Sieg, R. M.; Yao, H. D.; Snyder, P. G.; Woollam, J. A.; Pamulapati, J.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Sekula-Moise, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to estimate the thicknesses of all layers within the optical penetration depth of InGaAs based MODFET structures. Strained and unstrained InGaAs channels were made by MBE on InP substrates and by MOCVD on GaAs substrates. In most cases, ellipsometrically determined thicknesses were within 10 percent of the growth calibration results. The MBE made InGaAs strained layers showed large strain effects, indicating a probable shift in the critical points of their dielectric function toward the InP lattice matched concentration.

  17. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer phase grating designs

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction phase gratings are employed in phase-shifting point diffraction interferometers to improve the interferometric fringe contrast. The diffraction phase grating diffracts a zeroth-order diffraction of light at a first power level to the test-beam window of a mask that is positioned at the image plane and a first-order diffraction at a second power to the reference-beam pinhole. The diffraction phase grating is preferably selected to yield a desired ratio of the first power level to second power level.

  18. Electrospinning deposition of hydrogel fibers used as scaffold for biomembranes. Thermal stability of DPPC corroborated by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    González-Henríquez, C M; Sarabia-Vallejos, M A

    2015-09-01

    DPPC bilayers were deposited over thin hydrogel scaffolds using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique (with DPPC thickness ∼ 6.2 nm). Wrinkled hydrogels films were used to maintain a moist environment in order to enhance DPPC bilayer stability. Polymer mixtures were prepared using HEMA (as a base monomer) and DEGDMA, PEGDA575, PEGDA700 or AAm (as crosslinking agents); a thermal initiator was added to obtain a final pre-hydrogel (oligomer) with an adequate viscosity for thin film formation. This mixture was deposited as wrinkled film/fibers over hydrophilic silicon wafers using an electrospinning technique. Later, these samples were exposed to UV light to trigger photopolymerization, generating crosslinking bonds between hydrogel chains; this process also generated remnant surface stresses in the films that favored wrinkle formation. In the cases where DEGDMA and AAm were used as crosslinking agents, HEMA was added in higher amounts. The resultant polymer film surface showed homogenous layering with some small isolated clusters. If PEGDA575/700 was used as the crosslinking agent, we observed the formation of polymer wrinkled thin films, composed by main and secondary chains (with different dimensions). Moreover, water absorption and release was found to be mediated through surface morphology, ordering and film thickness. The thermal behavior of biomembranes was examined using ellipsometry techniques under controlled heating cycles, allowing phases and phase transitions to be detected through slight thickness variations with respect to temperature. Atomic force microscopy was used to determinate surface roughness changes according to temperature variation, temperature was varied sufficiently for the detection and recording of DPPC phase limits. Contact angle measurements corroborated and quantified system wettability, supporting the theory that wrinkled hydrogel films act to enhance DPPC bilayer stability during thermal cycles. PMID:26206414

  19. Cooling Rate Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements to Determine the Dynamics of Thin Glassy Films.

    PubMed

    Glor, Ethan C; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to fully describe the experimental technique of using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg (CR-Tg) experiments. These measurements are simple high-throughput characterization experiments, which can determine the glass transition temperature (Tg), average dynamics, fragility and the expansion coefficient of the super-cooled liquid and glassy states for a variety of glassy materials. This technique allows for these parameters to be measured in a single experiment, while other methods must combine a variety of different techniques to investigate all of these properties. Measurements of dynamics close to Tg are particularly challenging. The advantage of cooling rate dependent Tg measurements over other methods which directly probe bulk and surface relaxation dynamics is that they are relatively quick and simple experiments, which do not utilize fluorophores or other complicated experimental techniques. Furthermore, this technique probes the average dynamics of technologically relevant thin films in temperature and relaxation time (τα) regimes relevant to the glass transition (τα > 100 sec). The limitation to using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg experiments is that it cannot probe relaxation times relevant to measurements of viscosity (τα < 1 sec). Other cooling rate dependent Tg measurement techniques, however, can extend the CR-Tg method to faster relaxation times. Furthermore, this technique can be used for any glassy system so long as the integrity of the film remains throughout the experiment. PMID:26863256

  20. Ultrafast pump-probe ellipsometry setup for the measurement of transient optical properties during laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Stephan; Kaiser, Michael; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers offer a high potential in precise and efficient material processing and deep understanding of the fundamental laser-material interaction aspects is of great importance. The transient pulse reflectivity in conjunction with the transient absorption influences decisively the laser-material interaction. Direct measurements of the absorption properties by ultrafast time-resolved ellipsometry are missing to date. In this work, a unique pump-probe ellipsometry microscope is presented allowing the determination of the transient complex refractive index with a sub-ps temporal resolution. Measurements on molybdenum show ultrafast optical penetration depth changes of -6% to + 77% already within the first 10 ps after the laser pulse impact. This indicates a significant absorption variation of the pump pulse or subsequent pulses irradiating the sample on this timescale and paves the road towards a better understanding of pulse duration dependent laser ablation efficiency, double or burst mode laser ablation and lattice modifications in the first ps after the laser pulse impact. PMID:27505728

  1. Probing Physical and Chemical Properties of Laser Shocked Materials using Ultrafast Dynamic Ellipsometry and Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Nhan

    2013-06-01

    Ultrafast laser techniques allow resolution of shock induced physics and chemistry picoseconds behind the shock front. In this presentation, the 350 ps sustained laser-generated shocks will be shown to combine with ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry to measure the shock state and transient absorption to measure the molecular electronic response to shock loading. Experimental data will be presented on shocked explosive crystals and liquids. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry was used to measure the shock and particle velocity as well as the shocked refractive index. Transient absorption spectra of RDX and simple molecular liquids in the spectral region from 440 to 780 nm were measured to map out shock reactivity during the first 350 ps, over shock stress states from 7 to 20 GPa. Additionally, nonlinear spectroscopic probes will be demonstrated to offer the potential to measure even more details of the molecular shock response, such as evolution of chemical species and vibrational temperature. Preliminary results of shocked phenylacetylene obtained using vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and the capability of femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) data to measure the nonequilibrium time evolution of mode specific vibrational temperatures on picosecond time scales will be discussed.

  2. Probing initial-stages of ALD growth with dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2015-02-01

    The initial stages of ALD surface reactions are probed using dynamic in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) technique during plasma-enhanced ALD of zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films in spectral range of 0.73-6.4 eV. The measured change in the ellipsometry parameter Δ, with every precursor (TDMAZr) and reactant (forming gas plasma) exposure is interpreted as the combined effect of film growth and change in surface chemistry during ALD. We present application of Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (B-EMA) in the analysis of d-iSE data to determine fractional surface coverage (θ) of ALD grown film at the end of every deposition cycle. During the deposition of first few ZrN monolayers, d-iSE datasets are analyzed on the basis of surface diffusion enhanced ALD growth, where the surface adsorbed precursor molecules can diffuse over substrate surface to occupy energetically favorable surface sites. The determined surface coverage of ZrN films highlights the effects of substrate enhanced ALD growth.

  3. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry during atomic layer deposition of Pt, Ru and Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leick, N.; Weber, J. W.; Mackus, A. J. M.; Weber, M. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    The preparation of ultra-thin platinum-group metal films, such as Pt, Ru and Pd, by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was monitored in situ using spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range of 0.75–5 eV. The metals’ dielectric function was parametrized using a ‘flexible’ Kramers–Kronig consistent dielectric function because it was able to provide accurate curve shape control over the optical response of the metals. From this dielectric function, it was possible to extract the film thickness values during the ALD process. The important ALD process parameters, such as the nucleation period and growth per cycle of Pt, Ru and Pd could be determined from the thickness evolution. In addition to process parameters, the film resistivity in particular could be extracted from the modeled dielectric function. Spectroscopic ellipsometry thereby revealed itself as a feasible and valuable technique to be used in research and development applications, as well as for process monitoring during ALD.

  4. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry study of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Han; Qi, Jie; Willis, Brian G.

    2014-07-01

    Selective area copper atomic layer deposition on palladium seed layers has been investigated with in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry to probe the adsorption/desorption and reaction characteristics of individual deposition cycles. The reactants are copper bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) vapor and hydrogen gas. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition was observed in the temperature range of 135–230 °C in a low pressure reactor. Under optimal conditions, growth occurs selectively on palladium and not on silicon dioxide or silicon nitride layers. Based on in-situ ellipsometry data and supporting experiments, a new mechanism for growth is proposed. In the proposed mechanism, precursor adsorption is reversible, and dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen are the stable surface intermediates between growth cycles. The mechanism is enabled by continuous diffusion of palladium from the seed layer into the deposited copper film and strong H* binding to palladium sites. Less intermixing can be obtained at low growth temperatures and short cycle times by minimizing Cu/Pd inter-diffusion.

  5. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; Del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  6. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767

  7. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; Del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767

  8. Calibration of misalignment errors in composite waveplates using Mueller matrix ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Honggang; Liu, Shiyuan; Chen, Xiuguo; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-02-01

    Composite waveplates consisting of two or more single waveplates are widely used in optical instruments, such as ellipsometry, polarimetry, cryptography, and photoelasticity. Accurate calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates is of great importance (to minimize or correct the spurious artifacts in the final collected spectral data of these instruments induced by the misalignment errors). In this paper, we choose the fast axis azimuth and the rotary angle of composite waveplates as the detected characteristic parameters to calibrate the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. We first derive a general analytical model to describe the relationship between the mislignment errors and the characteristic parameters, and then propose an inverse approach to the calibration of the misalignment errors in composite waveplates. An experimental device based on the dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry principle is set up to measure the characteristic parameters of composite waveplates. Both numerical simulations and experiments on an MgF(2)-MgF(2)-quartz triplate demonstrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed approach. It is expected that the proposed approach can be readily extended to calibrate the misalignment errors in more complex composite waveplates. PMID:25967775

  9. Terahertz ellipsometry study of the soft mode behavior in ultrathin SrTiO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsik, P.; Sen, K.; Khmaladze, J.; Yazdi-Rizi, M.; Mallett, B. P. P.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a combined study with time-domain terahertz and conventional far-infrared ellipsometry of the temperature dependent optical response of SrTiO3 thin films (82 and 8.5 nm) that are grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (La0.3Sr0.7)(Al0.65Ta0.35)O3 (LSAT) substrates. We demonstrate that terahertz ellipsometry is very sensitive to the optical response of these thin films, in particular, to the soft mode of SrTiO3. We show that for the 82 nm film the eigenfrequency of the soft mode is strongly reduced by annealing at 1200 °C, whereas for the 8.5 nm film it is hardly affected. For the latter, after annealing the mode remains at 125 cm-1 at 300 K and exhibits only a weak softening to about 90 cm-1 at 10 K. This suggests that this ultrathin film undergoes hardly any relaxation of the compressive strain due to the LSAT substrate.

  10. Glass Transition of Polystyrene Thin Films on Silicon Wafer Measured by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Catheryn; Lan, Tian; Caporale, Stefan; Torkelson, John

    Measuring the glass transition temperature, Tg, of polymer films in the thickness range of 20-500 nm is non-routine but commercially important for polymer films used in applications such as membranes and electronic circuit boards. Various specialized methods have been used or developed to determine Tg in thin films, including thermal ellipsometry and many others. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a more conventional method that has been used to measure Tg, but since the thin films must be scraped from the wafer, consolidation and annealing can occur in the pan and may negate effects due to film thickness. Here we report results for polystyrene (PS) spin coated on silicon wafers in the range of 20-500 nm using a benchtop dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) in the 3-point bending mode. For the DMA, the peak tan δ temperature is related to the polymer Tg and effects due to confinement as a function of film thickness are compared to literature values. We use thermal ellipsometry as a control method to measure film thickness and Tg in parallel. Low level additives present in commercial PS were observed to strongly affect the results for thin films and are described.

  11. Evolution of optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D X; Shen, B; Zheng, Y X; Wang, S Y; Zhang, J B; Yang, S D; Zhang, R J; Chen, L Y; Wang, C Z; Ho, K M

    2014-03-24

    The temperature dependent optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The dielectric function of liquid Sn was different from solid, and an interband transition near 1.5 eV was easily observed in solid while it apparently disappeared upon melting. From the evolution of optical properties with temperature, an optical measurement to acquire the melting point by ellipsometry was presented. From first principles calculation, we show that the local structure difference in solid and liquid is responsible for this difference in the optical properties observed in experiment.

  12. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  13. The dynamics of diffracted rays in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufaile, A.; Tufaile, A. P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied some aspects of the optics of the light scattering in foams. This paper describes the difference between rays and diffracted rays from the point of view of geometrical theory of diffraction. We have represented some bifurcations of light rays using dynamical systems. Based on our observations of foams, we created a solid optical device. The interference patterns of light scattering in foams forming Airy fringes were explored observing the pattern named as the eye of Horus. In the cases we examine, these Airy fringes are associated with light scattering in curved surfaces, while the halo formation is related to the law of edge diffraction. We are proposing a Pohl interferometer using a three-sided bubble/Plateau border system.

  14. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  15. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  16. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and structural study of HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Cantas, Ayten; Aygun, Gulnur; Basa, Deepak Kumar

    2014-08-28

    We have investigated the reduction of unwanted interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer at HfO{sub 2}/Si interface brought about by the deposition of thin Hf metal buffer layer on Si substrate prior to the deposition of HfO{sub 2} thin films for possible direct contact between HfO{sub 2} thin film and Si substrate, necessary for the future generation devices based on high-κ HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics. Reactive rf magnetron sputtering system along with the attached in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was used to predeposit Hf metal buffer layer as well as to grow HfO{sub 2} thin films and also to undertake the in-situ characterization of the high-κ HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited on n-type 〈100〉 crystalline silicon substrate. The formation of the unwanted interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer and its reduction due to the predeposited Hf metal buffer layer as well as the depth profiling and also structure of HfO{sub 2} thin films were investigated by in-situ SE, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction. The study demonstrates that the predeposited Hf metal buffer layer has played a crucial role in eliminating the formation of unwanted interfacial layer and that the deposited high-κ HfO{sub 2} thin films are crystalline although they were deposited at room temperature.

  17. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Atuchin, V. V.; Kalinkin, A. V.; Kochubey, V. A.; Kruchinin, V. N.; Vemuri, R. S.; Ramana, C. V.

    2011-03-15

    Lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films were grown by the reactive dc magnetron sputtering and studied their structural, chemical and optical parameters. La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited onto Si substrates by sputtering La-metal in a reactive gas (Ar+O{sub 2}) mixture at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements confirm the amorphous state of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. Chemical analysis of the top-surface layers evaluated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the presence of a layer modified by hydroxylation due to interaction with atmosphere. Optical parameters of a-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were determined with spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). There is no optical absorption over spectral range {lambda}=250-1100 nm. Dispersion of refractive index of a-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was defined by fitting of SE parameters over {lambda}=250-1100 nm.

  18. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-08-17

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample.

  19. Analysis of diffraction imaging in non-conjugate configurations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ran; Feng, Yuanming; Sa, Yu; Lu, Jun Q; Jacobs, Kenneth M; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2014-12-15

    Diffraction imaging of scattered light allows extraction of information on scatterer's morphology. We present a method for accurate simulation of diffraction imaging of single particles by combining rigorous light scattering model with ray-tracing software. The new method has been validated by comparison to measured images of single microspheres. Dependence of fringe patterns on translation of an objective based imager to off-focus positions has been analyzed to clearly understand diffraction imaging with multiple optical elements. The calculated and measured results establish unambiguously that diffraction imaging should be pursued in non-conjugate configurations to ensure accurate sampling of coherent light distribution from the scatterer. PMID:25607106

  20. Confinement effects on glass transition temperature, transition breadth, and expansivity: Comparison of ellipsometry and fluorescence measurements on polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Hewlett, S. A.; Roth, C. B.; Torkelson, J. M.

    2009-09-01

    Using ellipsometry, we characterized the nanoconfinement effect on the glass transition temperature (T gof supported polystyrene (PS) films employing two methods: the intersection of fits to the temperature (Tdependences of rubbery- and glassy-state thicknesses, and the transition mid-point between rubbery- and glassy-state expansivities. The results demonstrate a strong effect of thickness: ensuremath Tg(bulk)-Tg(23{ nm})= 10 circ C. The T -range needed for accurate measurement increases significantly with decreasing thickness, an effect that arises from the broadening of the transition with confinement and a region below T g where expansivity slowly decreases with decreasing T . As determined from expansivities, the T g breadth triples in going from bulk films to a 21-nm-thick film; this broadening of the transition may be a more dramatic effect of confinement than the T g reduction itself. In contrast, there is little effect of confinement on the rubbery- and glassy-state expansivities. Compared with ellipsometry, T g ’s from fluorescence agree well in bulk films but yield lower values in nanoconfined films: T g(bulk) - T g(23 nm) = 15° C via fluorescence. This small difference in the T g confinement effect reflects differences in how fluorescence and ellipsometry report “average T g ” with confinement. With decreasing nanoscale thickness, fluorescence may slightly overweight the contribution of the free-surface layer while ellipsometry may evenly weight or underweight its contribution. in here

  1. High-diffraction-efficiency pseudorandom encoding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Stark, H; Gurkan, D; Lawson, C L; Cohn, R W

    2000-02-01

    Pseudorandom encoding (PRE) is a statistics-based procedure in which a pure-phase spatial light modulator (SLM) can yield, on the average, the prescribed diffraction pattern specified by the user. We seek to combine PRE with the optimization of an aperture-based target function. The target function is a fully complex input transmittance, unrealizable by a phase-only SLM, that generates a prescribed light intensity. The optimization is done to increase the diffraction efficiency of the overall process. We compare three optimization methods-Monte Carlo simulation, a genetic algorithm, and a gradient search-for maximizing the diffraction efficiency of a spot-array generator. Calculated solutions are then encoded by PRE, and the resulting diffraction patterns are computer simulated. Details on the complexity of each procedure are furnished, as well as comparisons on the quality, such as uniformity of the output spot array. PMID:10680630

  2. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  3. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P P; Goldberg, K A

    1999-06-01

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer has recently been developed and implemented at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to meet the significant metrology challenge of characterizing extreme ultraviolet projection lithography systems. Here we present a refined version of this interferometer that overcomes the original design's susceptibility to noise attributed to scattered light. The theory of the new hybrid spatial- and temporal-domain (dual-domain) point diffraction interferometer is described in detail and experimental results are presented. PMID:18319953

  4. Diffraction in time: An exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussev, Arseni

    2014-03-01

    In optics, diffraction is typically portrayed as deflection of light incident upon an obstacle with sharp boundaries, that can not be accounted for by reflection or refraction. Interestingly, quantum mechanics allows for an additional, intrinsically time-dependent manifestation of the phenomenon: Owing to the dispersive nature of quantum matter waves, sudden changes in boundary conditions may cause the particle wave function to develop interference fringes akin to those in stationary (optical) diffraction problems. This phenomenon, pioneered in 1952 by Moshinsky [Phys. Rev. 88, 625 (1952)] and presently referred to as ``diffraction in time,'' is at the heart of a vibrant area of experimental and theoretical research concerned with quantum transients. In my talk, I will introduce a new versatile exactly-solvable model of diffraction in time. The model describes dynamics of a quantum particle in the presence of an absorbing time-dependent barrier, and enables a quantitative description of diffraction and interference patterns in a large variety of setups.

  5. Solution of the Inverse Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Problem for an Absorbing Substrate with a Dielectric Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stas'kov, N. I.; Shulga, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    An analytical solution of the inverse spectroscopic ellipsometry problem for a transparent layer on an absorbing substrate is obtained based on the envelope function approximation. It is used to determine the spectral dependences of the refractive index n(λ) and absorption k(λ) for model and real silicon substrates with silicon dioxide layers. It was possible to determine analytically the effective optical characteristics of the silicon substrate in the approximation of a layer-substrate model with ideal interface boundaries. This result, together with the relative positions of the spectral curves for the ellipsometric angles tan ψ(λ) and cos Δ(λ) measured for a silicon substrate with a natural surface layer and for a silicon dioxide layer-silicon substrate structure, can be explained by the fact that the silicon dioxide layer is surrounded by transition and surface layers.

  6. Rapid, non-destructive evaluation of ultrathin WSe{sub 2} using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hossain, Lorraine; Eichfeld, Chad M.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) in electronic and optoelectronic devices depends on the ability to understand and control the process-property relationship during synthesis. We demonstrate that spectroscopic ellipsometry is an excellent technique for accurate, non-destructive determination of ultra-thin (<30 nm) WSe{sub 2} properties. The refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k) were found to be independent of thickness down to 1.3 nm, and were used to determine film thickness, which was confirmed to be within 9% of values found via atomic force microscopy. Finally, the optical bandgap was found to closely correlate with thickness, ranging from 1.2 to 1.55 eV as the WSe{sub 2} is thinned to the equivalent of 2 atomic layers.

  7. Ellipsometry study on gold-nanoparticle-coated gold thin film for biosensing application

    PubMed Central

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2011-01-01

    The amplified plasmonic response from various distributions of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on top of gold thin film was studied via ellipsometry under total internal reflection mode. The surface plasmon resonance dip can be tuned from the visible to near infrared by simply varying the AuNP concentration. Theoretical modeling based on effective medium theory with a multi-slice model has been employed to fit the experimental results. Additionally, this experimental tool has been further extended to study bio-molecular interactions with metal surfaces as well as in studying protein-protein interaction without any labeling. Hence, this technique could provide a non-destructive way of designing tunable label-free optical biosensors with very high sensitivity. PMID:21991549

  8. In Situ Infrared Ellipsometry for Protein Adsorption Studies on Ultrathin Smart Polymer Brushes in Aqueous Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kroning, Annika; Furchner, Andreas; Aulich, Dennis; Bittrich, Eva; Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Seeber, Michael; Luzinov, Igor; Kilbey, S. Michael; et al

    2015-02-10

    The protein-adsorbing and -repelling properties of various smart nanometer-thin polymer brushes with high potential for biosensing and biomedical applications are studied by in-situ infrared-spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). IRSE as a highly sensitive non-destructive technique allows us to investigate protein adsorption on polymer brushes in aqueous environment in dependence of external stimuli like temperature and pH. These stimuli are, for instance, relevant in switchable mixed brushes containing poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid), respectively. We use such brushes as model surfaces for controlling protein adsorption of human serum albumin and human fibrinogen. IRSE can distinguish between polymer-specific vibrational bands, which yield insights intomore » the hydration state of the brushes, and changes in the protein-specific amide bands, which are related to changes of the protein secondary structure.« less

  9. Fourier transform infrared synchrotron ellipsometry for studying the anisotropy of small organic samples.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, K; Gensch, M; Röseler, A; Korte, E H; Sahre, K; Eichhorn, K J; Esser, N; Schade, U

    2003-10-01

    An experimental setup for polarization-dependent and spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements was developed that utilizes the brilliance of synchrotron infrared radiation at the electron storage ring at BESSY II for investigations of small samples and sample areas. During commissioning of the beamline and the experimental setup, a 1 mm2 piece of a well-characterized polyimide film was studied to show the benefits of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) synchrotron ellipsometry. The band shapes are interpreted with respect to the anisotropic distribution of transition dipole moments within the film. In comparison to a globar source, the signal intensity has been improved by more than one order of magnitude for this example. PMID:14639753

  10. Composition Dependence of the Optical Conductivity of NiPt Alloys Determined by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Lina; Tawalbeh, Tarek; Vasiliev, Igor; Zollner, Stefan; Lavoie, Christian; Ozcan, Ahmet; Raymond, Mark

    2012-10-01

    The complex dielectric function of different Ni-Pt alloys (0% to 25% Pt concentration, 10nm thickness) was determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry over a broad photon energy range from 0.6 to 6.6eV. Data were fitted using basis spline functions as well as Drude-Lorentz oscillators to describe free carrier absorption and interband transitions. We found absorption peaks at 1.5 and 4.7 eV due to interband transitions. Results showed a broadening in the absorption peak of Nickel with increasing the Platinum concentration in the alloy. The experimental results were compared with ab initio density functional theory band structure calculations which showed that adding Platinum enhances the density of states of Nickel especially at low energies. Annealing the metals at 500^o C for 30 s increases the optical conductivity.

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals

    SciTech Connect

    León, M. Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R.; Levcenko, S.; Gurieva, G.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Arushanov, E.; Schorr, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.

    2014-08-11

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E{sub 0}, E{sub 1A}, and E{sub 1B} interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range.

  12. Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry - Application to GaAs-AlGaAs multilayer homogeneity characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Snyder, Paul G.; Merkel, Kenneth G.; Woollam, John A.; Radulescu, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to a GaAs-AlGaAs multilayer structure to obtain a three-dimensional characterization, using repetitive measurements at several spots on the same sample. The reproducibility of the layer thickness measurements is of order 10 A, while the lateral dimension is limited by beam diameter, presently of order 1 mm. Thus, the three-dimensional result mainly gives the sample homogeneity. In the present case three spots were used to scan the homogeneity over 1 in of a wafer which had molecular-beam epitaxially grown layers. The thickness of the AlGaAs, GaAs, and oxide layers and the Al concentration varied by 1 percent or less from edge to edge. This result was confirmed by two methods of data analysis. No evidence of an interfacial layer was observed on top of the AlGaAs.

  13. In Situ Potentiometry and Ellipsometry: A Promising Tool to Study Biofouling of Potentiometric Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Arnebrant, Thomas; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Bobacka, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2016-03-15

    In situ potentiometry and null ellipsometry was combined and used as a tool to follow the kinetics of biofouling of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The study was performed using custom-made solid-contact K(+)-ISEs consisting of a gold surface with immobilized 6-(ferrocenyl)hexanethiol as ion-to-electron transducer that was coated with a potassium-selective plasticized polymer membrane. The electrode potential and the ellipsometric signal (corresponding to the amount of adsorbed protein) were recorded simultaneously during adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the surface of the K(+)-ISEs. This in situ method may become useful in developing sensors with minimized biofouling. PMID:26864883

  14. Characterization of multilayer GaAs/AlGaAs transistor structures by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkel, Kenneth G.; Snyder, Paul G.; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel; Rai, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) has been implemented as a means of determining layer thickness, alloy composition, and growth quality of GaAs/AlGaAs samples composed of relatively thick layers as well as superlattices. The structures studied in this work contained GaAs/AlGaAs multilayers with a superlattice 'barrier' and were grown for later formation of modulation-doped field effect transistors (MODFETs). Sample modeling was performed by treating the superlattice as a bulk AlGaAs layer of unknown composition. Extremely good data fits were realized when five layer thicknesses and two alloy ratios were allowed to vary in a regression analysis. Room temperature excitonic effects associated with the e-hh(1), e-lh(1) and e-hh(2) transitions were observed in the VASE data.

  15. Electronic Excitations in B12As2 and their Temperature Dependence by Vacuum Ultraviolet Ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    S Bakalova; Y Gong; C Cobet; N Esser; Y Zhang; J Edgar; Y Zhang; M Dudley; M Kuball

    2011-12-31

    The dielectric response function of epitaxial B{sub 12}As{sub 2} films on 4H-SiC was determined at room temperature and at 10 K in the spectral region of 3.6-9.8 eV, i.e., in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region, by synchrotron ellipsometry. The experimental dielectric function was simulated with the critical point parabolic band model. The parameters of the dispersive structures were derived by numerical fitting of the experimental data to the proposed model. New high energy optical transitions are resolved at 5.95, 7.8 and 8.82 eV and their lineshape and origin are discussed. The temperature dependence of the critical point energies and transition strengths was determined, and the excitonic effect is considered.

  16. In Situ Infrared Ellipsometry for Protein Adsorption Studies on Ultrathin Smart Polymer Brushes in Aqueous Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kroning, Annika; Furchner, Andreas; Aulich, Dennis; Bittrich, Eva; Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Seeber, Michael; Luzinov, Igor; Kilbey, S. Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Minko, Sergiy; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2015-02-10

    The protein-adsorbing and -repelling properties of various smart nanometer-thin polymer brushes with high potential for biosensing and biomedical applications are studied by in-situ infrared-spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). IRSE as a highly sensitive non-destructive technique allows us to investigate protein adsorption on polymer brushes in aqueous environment in dependence of external stimuli like temperature and pH. These stimuli are, for instance, relevant in switchable mixed brushes containing poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid), respectively. We use such brushes as model surfaces for controlling protein adsorption of human serum albumin and human fibrinogen. IRSE can distinguish between polymer-specific vibrational bands, which yield insights into the hydration state of the brushes, and changes in the protein-specific amide bands, which are related to changes of the protein secondary structure.

  17. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry of pH-responsive polymer brushes on gold substrates.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen

    2013-11-01

    The dynamic and reversible switching behaviour of polyelectrolyte brushes of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) toward changes of the pH value was studied by in situ VIS-spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). For this, PDMAEMA brushes with three different molecular weights were synthesized via the "grafting from" method using surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. In detail, the applicability of different SE data modelling to describe the optical properties of the different brush layers in the swollen and collapsed state was investigated. Especially for the PDMAEMA brushes with a high molecular weight, an improved optical modelling of the experimental data could be achieved and revealed an exponential distribution of the PDMAEMA fraction in the brush layer. PMID:23812852

  18. Detection of a MoSe{sub 2} secondary phase layer in CZTSe by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Demircioğlu, Özden; Riedel, Ingo; Gütay, Levent; Mousel, Marina; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Weiss, Thomas; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2015-11-14

    We demonstrate the application of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for identification of secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} in polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) samples. A MoSe{sub 2} reference sample was analyzed, and its optical constants (ε{sub 1} and ε{sub 2}) were extracted by SE analysis. This dataset was implemented into an optical model for analyzing SE data from a glass/Mo/CZTSe sample containing MoSe{sub 2} at the back side of the absorber. We present results on the n and k values of CZTSe and show the extraction of the thickness of the secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} layer. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm the SE results.

  19. In situ ellipsometry of Cu surfaces immersed in benzotriazole–hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Eiichi; Kawakami, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Jin, Lianhua; Hamada, Satomi; Shima, Shohei; Hiyama, Hirokuni

    2016-06-01

    In the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Cu, the Cu surface is oxidized and is concurrently removed by the mechanical function of an abrasive. Surface oxidation can lead to severe surface corrosion, and to prevent this, a corrosion inhibitor is added to slurries. Accurate understanding of the competition between oxidation and passivation is essential for advanced Cu CMP technologies. In this work, layer formation on clean Cu surfaces in benzotriazole (BTA), H2O2, and BTA–H2O2 aqueous solutions was studied by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. Time changes of ellipsometric parameters are discussed with respect to BTA and H2O2 concentrations. It was found that the BTA adsorbs onto the Cu surface and the adsorbed BTA transforms into a Cu–BTA complex in about 3 min after the onset of adsorption. The BTA/complex layer passivates the Cu surface against oxidation by H2O2.

  20. Measurement of the dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constant using the spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Masahiro; Postava, Kamil; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Akashika, Kumiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kitamura, Fujikazu

    2003-05-01

    The dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constants (low-k) materials have been determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, and Fourier transform infrared transmission spectrometry over a wide spectral range from 0.03 to 5.4 eV (230nm to 40.5um wavelength region). The electric and ionic contributions to the overall static dielectric constants were determined for representative materials used in the semiconductor industry for interlayer dielectrics: (1) FLARE - organic spin-on polymer, (2) HOSP - spin-on hybrid organic-siloxane polymer from the Honeywell Electric Materials Company, and (3) SiLK- organic dielectric resin from the Dow Chemical Company. The main contributions to the static dielectric constant of the low-k materials studied were found to be the electric and ionic absorption.

  1. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. PMID:21767504

  2. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu2ZnSnSe4 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, M.; Levcenko, S.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Gurieva, G.; Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R.; Schorr, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Arushanov, E.

    2014-08-01

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu2ZnSnSe4 bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8-4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E0, E1A, and E1B interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8-4.5 eV photon energy range.

  3. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net. PMID:25242914

  4. HgCdTe Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth Temperature Calibration Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilela, M. F.; Pribil, G. K.; Olsson, K. R.; Lofgreen, D. D.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is demonstrated as a technique to calibrate growth temperature measurement devices (thermocouples and pyrometers) prior to real mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) growth. A pyrometer is used to control the substrate temperature in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the growth of HgCdTe-based material. It is known that a very narrow optimal growth temperature range exists for HgCdTe, typically ±5°C. A nonoptimal growth temperature will negatively impact on material quality by inducing growth defects, reducing composition uniformity, causing difficulty in controlling doping incorporation, promoting poor electronic properties, and having other adverse effects. Herein, we present a method for measuring and calibrating substrate temperature measurement equipment by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) prior to real HgCdTe growth. This method is easy to implement, nondestructive, and reliable. The proposed method requires one substrate with a surface material with optical properties well known in the temperature range of interest, but not necessarily the same base material as the material to be grown. In the specific case of this work, we use epitaxial CdTe material on top of a Si substrate. This wafer was used to create a database of its optical properties as a function of temperature by using SE. From the collected optical parameters, a model is built and a fit is generated from the SE data collected. The temperature can then be determined by fitting the temperature-dependent SE measurements from this specific CdTe material. The angle offset and surface roughness parameters are also included in the model to account for changes in the average run-to-run angle variations and surface conditions over time. This work does not attempt to obtain an absolute temperature, but rather a reliable and repeatable relative temperature measurement.

  5. Expanded beam spectro-ellipsometry for big area on-line monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, M.; Major, C.; Juhasz, G.; Petrik, P.; Horvath, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Non-destructive analysing tools are needed at all stages of thin film process-development, especially photovoltaic (PV) development, and on production lines. In the case of thin films, layer thicknesses, micro-structure, composition, layer optical properties, and their uniformity are important parameters. An important focus is to express the dielectric functions of each component material in terms of a handful of wavelength independent parameters whose variation can cover all process variants of that material. With the resulting database, spectroscopic ellipsometry coupled with multilayer analysis can be developed for on-line point-by-point mapping and on-line line-by-line imaging. Off-line point-by-point mapping can be effective for characterization of non-uniformities in full scale PV panels or big area (even 450 mm diameter) Si-wafers in developing labs but it is slow in the on-line mode when only 15 points can be obtained (within 1 min) as a 120 cm long panel moves by the mapping station. Last years [M. Fried et al, Thin Solid Films 519, 2730 (2011)], a new instrumentation was developed that provides a line image of spectroscopic ellipsometry (wl=350- 1000 nm) data. Earlier a single 30 point line image could be collected in 10 s over a 15 cm width of PV material. Recent years we have built a 30, a 45 and a 60 cm width expanded beam ellipsometer which speed is increased by 10x. Now, 1800 points can be mapped in a 1 min traverse of a 60*120 cm PV panel or flexible roll-to-roll substrate.

  6. Transmittance analysis of diffraction phase grating.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xufeng; Jin, Yunxia

    2011-03-20

    In order to accurately analyze and design the transmittance characteristic of a diffraction phase grating, the validity of both the scalar diffraction theory and the effective medium theory is quantitatively evaluated by the comparison of diffraction efficiencies predicted from both simplified theories to exact results calculated by the rigorous vector electromagnetic theory. The effect of surface profile parameters, including the normalized period, the normalized depth, and the fill factor for the precision of the simplified methods is determined at normal incidence. It is found that, in general, when the normalized period is more than four wavelengths of the incident light, the scalar diffraction theory is useful to estimate the transmittance of the phase grating. When the fill factor approaches 0.5, the error of the scalar method is minimized, and the scalar theory is accurate even at the grating period of two wavelengths. The transmittance characteristic as a function of the normalized period is strongly influenced by the grating duty cycle, but the diffraction performance on the normalized depth is independent of the fill factor of the grating. Additionally, the effective medium theory is accurate for evaluating the diffraction efficiency within an error of less than around 1% when no higher-order diffraction waves appear and only the zero-order waves exist. The precision of the effective medium theory for calculating transmittance properties as a function of the normalized period, the normalized groove depth, and the polarization state of incident light is insensitive to the fill factor of the phase grating. PMID:21460923

  7. Chromatic confocal microscopy using staircase diffractive surface.

    PubMed

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-08-10

    A chromatic confocal microscope (CCM) is a high-dynamic-range noncontact distance measurement sensor; it is based on a hyperchromatic lens. The vast majority of commercial CCMs use refractive-based chromatic dispersion to chromatically code the optical axis. This approach significantly limits the range of applications and performance of the CCM. In order to be a suitable alternative to a laser triangulation gauge and laser encoder, the performance of the CCM must be improved. In this paper, it is shown how hybrid aspheric diffractive (HAD) lenses can bring the CCM to its full potential by increasing the dynamic range by a factor of 2 and the resolution by a factor of 5 while passively athermizing and increasing the light throughput efficiency of the optical head [M. Rayer, U.S. patent 1122052.2 (2011)]. The only commercially suitable manufacturing process is single-point diamond turning. However, the optical power carried by the diffractive side of a hybrid aspheric diffractive lens is limited by the manufacturing process. A theoretical study of manufacturing losses has revealed that the HAD configuration with the highest diffraction efficiency is for a staircase diffractive surface (SDS). SDS lenses have the potential to reduce light losses associated with manufacturing limits by a factor of 5 without increasing surface roughness, allowing scalar diffraction-limited optical design with a diffractive element. PMID:25320920

  8. Unusual features of Drell-Yan diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2006-12-01

    The cross section of the diffractive Drell-Yan (DY) process, pp{yields}llXp, where the system llX is separated by a large rapidity gap from the recoil proton, is calculated in the light-cone dipole approach. This process reveals unusual features, quite different from what is known for diffractive deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) and non-Abelian radiation: (i) the diffractive radiation of a heavy dilepton by a quark vanishes in the forward direction; (ii) the diffractive production of a dilepton is controlled by the large hadronic radius; (iii) in contrast with DIS where diffraction is predominantly soft, the diffractive DY reaction is semihard-semisoft; (iv) as a result of the saturated shape of the dipole cross section, the fraction of diffractive DY events steeply falls with energy but rises as a function of the hard scale. These features are common for other Abelian bremsstrahlung processes (higgsstrahlung, Z-strahlung, etc.). Measurements of diffractive DY processes at modern colliders would be a sensitive probe for the shape of the dipole cross section at large separations.

  9. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  10. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  11. Scalar Potential Model of photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2011-04-01

    Some observations of light are inconsistent with a wave-like model. Other observations of light are inconsistent with a traditional particle-like model. A single model of light has remained a mystery. Newton's speculations, Democritus's speculations, the Bohm interpretation, and the fractal philosophy are combined with the cosmological Scalar Potential Model (SPM). The resulting model of photon structure and dynamics is tested by a toy computer experiment. The simulations included light from a distance and Young's experiment. The patterns on the screens showed diffraction wave patterns fit by the Fresnel equation. The model is consistent with the Afshar experiment and with the concepts of Bohmian mechanics.

  12. Liquid crystal filled diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Mary Lou

    1997-12-01

    Liquid crystal technology is becoming increasingly important for flat displays in electronics, computers and TV. Most liquid crystal displays currently made have as their basic unit, two flat surfaces each coated with a transparent, conductive layer, between which a thin layer of liquid crystals is sandwiched. The work detailed in this dissertation is based on a modification of the basic liquid crystal unit and studies the properties of structures which consist of certain anisotropic liquid crystals confined between a flat substrate and a corrugated one, each substrate being transparent and having a thin trans-parent conductive coating. Without an applied electric field, the refractive indices of the liquid crystal and corrugated substrate do not match, and thus strong diffraction occurs. When an electric field is applied to the device, the liquid crystals are re-oriented so that the refractive indices now match, and the device behaves as a uniform slab of homogeneous material producing no diffraction. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was developed to design the ideal devices and analyze the performance of our experimental ones. 99% diffraction efficiencies in single wavelength polarized illumination are shown to be possible with this class of devices. The best device we fabricated showed a 62% distraction efficiency, as our fabrication process roughened the top surface of the device so that (≃30%) of the incident light was lost to scatter. Several new fabrication processes are proposed to eliminate this scatter problem, and that details of fabrication processes thus far attempted are outlined.

  13. Diffraction Effects in a Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of diffraction effects in the AIRES optical system using GLAD by Applied Optics Research. AIRES (or Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer) employs two gratings in series. The small, first-order (i.e., predisperser) grating sorts orders for the large, high-order echelle grating, thus providing moderately high spectral resolution over 3.6 octaves in wavelength. The AIRES' optical design includes three field stops (i.e., a circular aperture and two long, narrow slits) and four pupil stops. A detailed diffraction analysis is required to evaluate critical trade-offs between spectral resolution, optical throughput, detector background, scattered light, and system size and weight. Such an analysis must consider diffraction effects at the pupil stops (edge diffraction), at the field stops (spatial filtering), and at intermediate positions where other optical elements are located. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing of the second slit relative to the first, baffling at the Lyot stop and subsequent pupil stops, and the necessity for oversizing other optical elements are presented and discussed. It is found that for narrow slits, the downstream energy distribution is significantly broadened relative to that for large slits, where telescope diffraction dominates, leading to significantly more light loss than anticipated, unless other key optical elements are oversized. The importance of performing a proper diffraction analysis is emphasized and the suitability of GLAD for this task is discussed.

  14. Calculating incoherent diffraction MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Melvin; Vizgaitis, Jay

    2008-04-01

    The incoherent diffraction MTF plays an increasingly important role in the range performance of imaging systems as the wavelength increases and the optical aperture decreases. Accordingly, all NVESD imager models have equations that describe the incoherent diffraction MTF of a circular entrance pupil. NVThermIP, a program which models thermal imager range performance, has built in equations which analytically model the incoherent diffraction MTF of a circular entrance pupil and has a capability to input a table that describes the MTF of other apertures. These can be calculated using CODE V, which can numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF in the vertical or horizontal direction for an arbitrary aperture. However, we are not aware of any program that takes as input a description of the entrance pupil and analytically outputs equations that describe the incoherent diffraction MTF. This work explores the effectiveness of Mathematica to analytically and numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF for an arbitrary aperture. In this work, Mathematica is used to analytically and numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF for a variety of apertures and the results are compared with CODE V calculations.

  15. Issues in Optical Diffraction Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on unresolved or poorly documented issues pertaining to Fresnel’s scalar diffraction theory and its modifications. In Sec. 2 it is pointed out that all thermal sources used in practice are finite in size and errors can result from insufficient coherence of the optical field. A quarter-wave criterion is applied to show how such errors can be avoided by placing the source at a large distance from the aperture plane, and it is found that in many cases it may be necessary to use collimated light as on the source side of a Fraunhofer experiment. If these precautions are not taken the theory of partial coherence may have to be used for the computations. In Sec. 3 it is recalled that for near-zone computations the Kirchhoff or Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are applicable, but fail to correctly describe the energy flux across the aperture plane because they are not continuously differentiable with respect to the assumed geometrical field on the source side. This is remedied by formulating an improved theory in which the field on either side of a semi-reflecting screen is expressed as the superposition of mutually incoherent components which propagate in the opposite directions of the incident and reflected light. These components are defined as linear combinations of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, so that they are rigorous solutions of the wave equation as well as continuously differentiable in the aperture plane. Algorithms for using the new theory for computing the diffraction patterns of circular apertures and slits at arbitrary distances z from either side of the aperture (down to z = ± 0.0003 λ) are presented, and numerical examples of the results are given. These results show that the incident geometrical field is modulated by diffraction before it reaches the aperture plane while the reflected field is spilled into the dark space. At distances from the aperture which are large compared to the wavelength λ these field expressions are

  16. Design, Development, and Applications of Image Scanning Ellipsometry for the Measurement of Thin Film Thickness Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, An-Hong

    A novel technique, Image Scanning Ellipsometry, to measure the two dimensional thickness profile of a non -uniform, thin film, from several nm up to several mum, in the transient state as well as in the steady state was developed and tested in this thesis. Image Scanning Ellipsometry (ISE) is a full-field imaging technique which can study every point on the surface at the same time with high spatial resolution and thickness sensitivity; i.e., it can measure and map a liquid or solid film thickness profile in two dimensions. The long-term objective of the development of ISE is to determine the stability and heat transfer characteristics of evaporating thin films. The main purpose of this thesis was to develop the basic concept of ISE and demonstrate its use by measuring the thickness profiles of non-uniform solid films in a steady state as well as the profile of draining liquid films of wetting and partially wetting fluids in a transient state. In this thesis, ISE has been proven to be as accurate as a null ellipsometer by measuring a known solid wedge profile of ThF_4 on a Si substrate. In addition, the ability of ISE to measure liquid draining films such as FC-5311, FC-77, and FC-70 in a transient state was demonstrated. Moreover, ISE was also used to measure a partially wetting, draining film of dodecane, and to record the details of film rupture. The approximate solutions of a modeling equation for the thickness profile during draining was compared to the experimental profile. The agreement between theory and experiment is quite good. The theoretical profiles agree with the experimental profiles in both the thicker hydrodynamic region and in the thin film region which is under 100 nm. However, because the current limited magnification of the ISE hinders the exact location of a null point and the allocation of the exact position of the dark fringes is limited by the ability to accurately digitize and analyze the images, discrepancies between the modeling and the

  17. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  18. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  19. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Thickness Dispersion of Surface Plasmon of Ag Nano-thin Films: Determination by Ellipsometry Iterated with Transmittance Method

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Junbo; Dai, Rucheng; Wang, Zhongping; Zhang, Zengming

    2015-01-01

    Effective optical constants of Ag thin films are precisely determined with effective thickness simultaneously by using an ellipsometry iterated with transmittance method. Unlike the bulk optical constants in Palik's database the effective optical constants of ultrathin Ag films are found to strongly depend on the thickness. According to the optical data two branches of thickness dispersion of surface plasmon energy are derived and agreed with theoretical predication. The thickness dispersion of bulk plasmon is also observed. The influence of substrate on surface plasmon is verified for the first time by using ellipsometry. The thickness dependent effective energy loss function is thus obtained based on this optical method for Ag ultrathin films. This method is also applicable to other ultrathin films and can be used to establish an effective optical database for ultrathin films. PMID:25797217

  1. Optical diffraction by inhomogeneous volume objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Gustavo; Lencina, Alberto; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Nestor

    2008-08-01

    Electromagnetic waves propagation research in volume media increases considerably in the last years. The study evolved from thick hologram gratings, Bragg and Raman-Nath diffraction regimes up to current research in photonics materials. Usually differential methods are employed to account for the light transmitted for volume media. In our proposal, we develop a simple and versatile integral method to calculate the diffracted field provided the media refractive index has low variations in a wavelength scale. In fact, starting from first principles, we obtain a modified version of the Fresnel propagator of the scalar diffraction theory. Our method is valid for some kind of magnetic, dielectric and absorbent inhomogeneous media. In particular, for TE (TM) fields, we can study media where the permittivity (permeability) gradient is perpendicular to the electric (magnetic) field and its permeability (permittivity) is constant. To validate the approach, we applied it to (in) homogeneous media having well known diffraction properties.

  2. Spin-dependent diffraction of evanescent waves by subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-08-15

    We present a way to observe the spin-to-orbital conversion phenomenon. A spinning evanescent wave can be asymmetrically transformed into propagation waves through one certain diffraction order by a periodical subwavelength grating. By detecting diffraction field distribution behind the grating, we observed spin-dependent diffraction patterns. Furthermore, replacing the periodical grating by a Fibonacci grating, we can simultaneously observe multiple order diffractions of a spin evanescent wave. In this case, the multiple diffraction beams can interfere with each other behind the quasi-periodical grating to form asymmetric interference patterns. Our work provides another way toward the realization of spin-to-orbital conversion of light. PMID:26274640

  3. Mueller matrix ellipsometry studies of the optical phonons and crystal field excitations in multiferroic orthoferrites RFeO3 (R=Tb,Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, V. A.; Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Sirenko, A. A.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Wang, Yazhong; Cheong, S. W.

    Optical properties of multiferroic orthoferrites RFeO3 (R=Tb,Dy) bulk crystals have been studied in the far-infrared range from 50 to 1000 cm-1 and temperatures from 7 K to 300 K. Mueller matrix and rotating analyzer ellipsometry measurements were carried out at the U4IR beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Lab. Optical phonon spectra and crystal field excitations were measured for all three orthorhombic axes of RFeO3. In the experimental temperature dependencies of the phonon frequencies we found non-Grüneisen behavior caused by the electron-phonon and spin-phonon interactions. We determined the symmetries and selection rules for the crystal field transitions in Tb3+ and Dy3+ ions. Magnetic field dependencies of the optical spectra allowed us to determine anisotropy of the crystal field g-factors for Tb3+ and Dy3+ ions. This Project is supported by collaborative DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER46382 between Rutgers U. and NJIT. Use of NSLS-BNL was supported by DOE DE-AC02-98CH10886. V.A. Martinez was supported by NEU NSF-1343716.

  4. Complex Refractive Index Spectra of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Thin Films Determined by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Löper, Philipp; Stuckelberger, Michael; Niesen, Bjoern; Werner, Jérémie; Filipič, Miha; Moon, Soo-Jin; Yum, Jun-Ho; Topič, Marko; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The complex refractive index (dielectric function) of planar CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature is investigated by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectrophotometry. Knowledge of the complex refractive index is essential for designing photonic devices based on CH3NH3PbI3 thin films such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, or lasers. Because the directly measured quantities (reflectance, transmittance, and ellipsometric spectra) are inherently affected by multiple reflections, the complex refractive index has to be determined indirectly by fitting a model dielectric function to the experimental spectra. We model the dielectric function according to the Forouhi-Bloomer formulation with oscillators positioned at 1.597, 2.418, and 3.392 eV and achieve excellent agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results agree well with previously reported data of the absorption coefficient and are consistent with Kramers-Kronig transformations. The real part of the refractive index assumes a value of 2.611 at 633 nm, implying that CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cells are ideally suited for the top cell in monolithic silicon-based tandem solar cells. PMID:26263093

  5. Hard diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.L.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    We present new evidence for events with a rapidity gap between jets in {bar p}-p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV based on data collected by triggering the Collider Detector at Fermilab on two high transverse momentum forward jets and results of a search for diffractive W{+-} and dijet production where diffraction is tagged by the rapidity gap technique. We also present the results of a search for diffractive dijets using data collected by triggering on a very forward particle in the recently installed roman-pot detectors. The dijet events exhibit additional diffractive characteristics such as rapidity gaps and boosted center of mass system, however the recoil antiproton measured in the roman-pots is in a regime in which the non- pomeron contribution is significant.

  6. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  7. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ångstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  8. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist DIll parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulate directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  9. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist Dill parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulated directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  10. Strontium titanate (100) surfaces monitoring by high temperature in situ ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovsky, D.; Berini, B.; Fouchet, A.; Aureau, D.; Keller, N.; Etcheberry, A.; Dumont, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We report monitoring and analysis of the contamination overlayer on the surface of different SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Substrates of STO with different terminations, random and TiO2 terminated, were heated from room temperature up to 720 °C under oxygen pressure in UHV chamber similar to conditions commonly used for epitaxial growth of perovskite oxides. Contamination layer on the substrate was modeled as an equivalent dielectric overlayer with a thickness of 2 nm at room temperature which decreases progressively during the heating up to reach its minimum (around 1 unit cell) at the temperature around 550 °C. After exposition to air, surface recovers a contamination layer on both types of substrates (with random termination and TiO2 termination). XPS analysis confirmed that water and carbon dioxide as adventitious carbon species present in air are chemically adsorbed on the STO surface, providing evidence of desorption process which persists until 550 °C. This condition is an important issue in order to obtain clean controlled interface between STO and deposited film for low temperature growth as for instance atomic layer deposition and integration of STO buffer layer on silicon. In situ SE commonly present in thin layer deposition systems is a powerful tool to monitor in situ surface contamination and decontamination temperature as it can be performed in situ even in operando.

  11. In Situ Infrared Ellipsometry for Protein Adsorption Studies on Ultrathin Smart Polymer Brushes in Aqueous Environment.

    PubMed

    Kroning, Annika; Furchner, Andreas; Aulich, Dennis; Bittrich, Eva; Rauch, Sebastian; Uhlmann, Petra; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Seeber, Michael; Luzinov, Igor; Kilbey, S Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Minko, Sergiy; Hinrichs, Karsten

    2015-06-17

    The protein-adsorbing and -repelling properties of various smart nanometer-thin polymer brushes containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid) with high potential for biosensing and biomedical applications are studied by in situ infrared-spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). IRSE is a highly sensitive nondestructive technique that allows protein adsorption on polymer brushes to be investigated in an aqueous environment as external stimuli, such as temperature and pH, are varied. These changes are relevant to conditions for regulation of protein adsorption and desorption for biotechnology, biocatalysis, and bioanalytical applications. Here brushes are used as model surfaces for controlling protein adsorption of human serum albumin and human fibrinogen. The important finding of this work is that IRSE in the in situ experiments in protein solutions can distinguish between contributions of polymer brushes and proteins. The vibrational bands of the polymers provide insights into the hydration state of the brushes, whereas the protein-specific amide bands are related to changes of the protein secondary structure. PMID:25668395

  12. Spectroscopic ellipsometry of anisotropic materials: application to the optical constants of HgI2.

    PubMed

    En Naciri, A; Johann, L; Kleim, R; Sieskind, M; Amann, M

    1999-02-01

    A variable angle-of-incidence spectroscopic fixed-polarizer, rotating-polarizer, fixed-analyzer ellipsometer (PRPSE) across a spectral range from 300 to 800 nm is used to determine the optical properties of anisotropic uniaxial tetragonal red mercuric iodide (HgI(2)). For the first time, to our knowledge, the bulk crystal HgI(2) surface measured by ellipsometry was not subjected to potassium iodide cutting or etching. Measurements were made at an air-HgI(2) interface with the optic axis parallel to the sample surface. To determine the optical constants, we varied both the angle of incidence and the azimuth of the optic axis with the plane of incidence. The detailed formulas needed for reliable procedures for analyzing the data are presented. The ordinary and extraordinary complex indices of refraction, (n(o)--ik(o)) and (n(e)--ik(e)), respectively, are determined. Good agreement between PRPSE and the prism technique for the refractive index is observed. The surface aging effects of the ellipsometric parameters of HgI(2), during 30 h of exposure to air, were detected by PRPSE. PMID:18305658

  13. Determination of the optical properties of organic thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sward, Mark L.

    1990-12-01

    This theses demonstrated the feasibility of determining the optical properties of organic and polymer thin films through the use of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE). Tan Psi and cos Delta data from 300 to 800 nanometers (NM) were taken with a Rudolph Research s2000 spectroscopic ellipsometer four samples: indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass; five layer poly-benzyl-L glutamate (PBLG) organic film on ITO coated glass; eight layer PBLG film on ITO coated glass; and a thiophene polymer film on a microscope slide. The data sets were fit to a choice of four computer models based on a paper written by Dwight Berreman in 1972. The four were written in MATLAB to take advantage of its matrix manipulative capabilities. The models were: a single layer isotropic film on an isotropic substrate; a single layer anisotropic film on an isotropic substrate; two isotropic films on an isotropic substrate; and two anisotropic films on an isotropic substrate. Using only tan Psi data over a restricted wavelength region, all four data sets were fit to variances of 0.01 or less.

  14. A full Stokes vector ellipsometry measurement system for in situ diagnostics in dynamic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2012-05-01

    A fast ellipsometry system with a resolution of only a few nanoseconds that can simultaneously measure all four Stokes parameters was developed for use in dynamic experiments. Due to its fine temporal resolution, the system is useful for a wide variety of dynamic setups, two of which are presented, fast foil heating and shock compression. As a test case the optical properties of nickel were measured in a fast foil heating setup. The complex index of refraction and emissivity at 532 nm and in the range of 1000-1900 K are presented. It was found that the emissivity monotonously increases below and above the melting point while an abrupt increase of about 2% was observed at the phase transition. These results are in accordance with the literature. Shock compression experiments included sample-free surface measurements. Samples of 1020 steel were shocked up to 25 GPa on the Hugoniot curve. The measured optical properties under these conditions showed a significant change; the value of the emissivity was doubled.

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of N+ ion-implanted ethylene-norbornene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiljegović, M.; Kačarević-Popović, Z. M.; Stchakovsky, M.; Radosavljević, A. N.; Korica, S.; Novaković, M.; Popović, M.

    2014-05-01

    The optical properties of 150 keV N+ implanted ethylene-norbornene (TOPAS 6017S-04) copolymer were investigated using phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry (PMSE) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy in the ranges of 0.6-6.5 eV and of 1.5-6.2 eV, respectively. The single-effective-oscillator model was used to fit the calculated data to the experimental ellipsometric spectra. The results show that the oscillator and dispersion energies decrease with increasing ion fluence up to 1015 cm-2, and then these parameters increase with further fluence increasing. Analysis of the UV-Vis absorption spectra revealed the presence of indirect electronic transitions with the band gap energy in the range of 1.3 to 2.8 eV. It was found that both the band gap energy and the energy width of the distribution of localized band tail states decrease, while the values of Tauc coefficient increase with increasing the ion fluence. From the ellipsometric data we found that the real part of the dielectric function increased about 7% after irradiation with 1015 cm-2, and decreased about 10% in samples modified with 1016 cm-2.

  16. Application of Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine line edge roughness on photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Dirnstorfer, I.; Bischoff, J.; Richter, U.; Ketelson, H.; Meiner, K.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-10-01

    We report on Mueller Matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MM-SE) to examine undesired asymmetries in structural parameters, i.e. line edge roughness (LER). The investigation was done on a photomask containing line space arrays with intentionally modulated line edges. The Mueller Matrix (MM) elements were measured within the complete azimuth angle range (0 - 360°) and a wavelength range from 300 nm to 980 nm. The results are presented in polar coordinates with the azimuth angle and wavelength as the angular and radial coordinate, respectively. It was found that LER significantly impacts the MM elements, which is indicated by the increase of the isotropic character of the array. The experimental data are confirmed by Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) simulations on perturbed arrays. Based on RCWA the impact of LER amplitudes in the nm range is determined. It was found that both deviation of critical dimension (CD) and LER amplitude impact the MM elements. Based on the intensity ratios of the elements and their spectral distribution both errors create a characteristic finger print, which allows to separate them. Finally, the required measurement precision for LER in the nm range is estimated at 0.001. This precision is challenging but achievable with today's metrology.

  17. Optical characterization of ferroelectric PZT thin films by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Shafiqur; Garcia, Carlos D.; Bhalla, Amar; Guo, Ruyan

    2014-09-01

    Ferroelectric thin films are used as high dielectric constant capacitors, infrared detectors, piezoelectric transducers, optical modulators, optical waveguides, and nonvolatile memory chips for dynamic random access memory (DRAM) etc. While ferroelectric and dielectric properties of these films have been extensively investigated, their optical properties have been comparatively less studied and of limited use in quantitative evaluation of multilayer thin films. In this work we explored the variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) technique for its effectiveness in physical property characterization. The VASE combined with its computer modeling tool enables nondestructive, nonintrusive, and contactless optical means for optical characterization. Crystalline Lead Zirconium Titanate PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) thin films, fabricated on SrTiO3 layer atop of Si substrates, were characterized using VASE (J.A. Woollam; Lincoln, NE, USA) by determining the ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ as a function of wavelengths (200-1000 nm) and incident angles (65°, 70°,75°) at room temperature. A physical representation of the multilayer system was constructed by a six layer model (analysis software WVASE32, J.A. Woollam) through a step-by-step method. Other physical properties characterized by several well-known techniques on structure, morphology and topographical features correspond well with the models developed using VASE alone. The technique and the methodology developed have shown promises in identifying the respective thickness and optical properties of multilayer thin film system, with limited input of processing or composition information.

  18. Influence of the graphene substrate on morphology of the gold thin film. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostruba, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    In metal optics gold assumes a special status because of its practical importance in optoelectronic and nanooptical devices, and its role huge increases when occurs combination of gold with two-dimension materials. We performed spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on evaporated gold, and gold-graphene nanostructures to determine the optical dielectric function across a broad spectral range from 250 to 1000 nm. It was found that the deposition of gold film on the quartz substrate covered by graphene flake leads to significant changes in structural and dielectric properties of thin gold layer. Such changes can be explained by increasing of the gold cluster size. The model fit of the ellipsometric data demonstrates that the bilayer “graphene-gold” nanostructure can be described as a uniform optically homogeneous layer with modified optical properties. We can suggest that graphene flake creates a matrix for epitaxial alignment of the crystalline structure of the gold film during its growing. Effective doping of the graphene by free electrons of the gold clusters tends to decrease the optical contrast at the graphene-gold interface.

  19. InGaP grown on Ge (100) by molecular beam epitaxy: a spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Khai Loke, Wan; Zhou, Qian; Fatt Yoon, Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the optical properties of disordered In0.52Ga0.48P alloys by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the far-infrared to ultraviolet energy range (0.037-5.1 eV). The alloys were grown on Ge (100) substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The far-infrared dielectric function reveals two absorption peaks that can be attributed to InP- and GaP-like vibrational modes. The visible-UV dielectric function of In0.52Ga0.48P alloys nearly lattice-matched to Ge shows the critical points E 0, E 1, and E 2, energies of which are determined using a derivative analysis. A weak transition that can be identified as the E 1 + Δ1 critical point is revealed. The vibrational frequencies and the transition energies in In0.52Ga0.48P are lower relative to In0.49Ga0.51P lattice-matched to GaAs. The downward shifts in E 0 and phonons can be estimated using the compositional dependence of E 0 and phonons of bulk alloys.

  20. A full Stokes vector ellipsometry measurement system for in situ diagnostics in dynamic experiments.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, L; Eliezer, S; Appelbaum, G; Nissim, N; Perelmutter, L; Mond, M

    2012-05-01

    A fast ellipsometry system with a resolution of only a few nanoseconds that can simultaneously measure all four Stokes parameters was developed for use in dynamic experiments. Due to its fine temporal resolution, the system is useful for a wide variety of dynamic setups, two of which are presented, fast foil heating and shock compression. As a test case the optical properties of nickel were measured in a fast foil heating setup. The complex index of refraction and emissivity at 532 nm and in the range of 1000-1900 K are presented. It was found that the emissivity monotonously increases below and above the melting point while an abrupt increase of about 2% was observed at the phase transition. These results are in accordance with the literature. Shock compression experiments included sample-free surface measurements. Samples of 1020 steel were shocked up to 25 GPa on the Hugoniot curve. The measured optical properties under these conditions showed a significant change; the value of the emissivity was doubled. PMID:22667630

  1. Glass Transition in Thin Supported Polymer Films Probed by Temperature-Modulated Ellipsometry in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Mikhail; Nealey, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Glass transition in model glass-forming polymer coatings is probed by ellipsometry in vacuum. Novel temperature-modulated modification of the technique is used alongside with traditional linear temperature program [1]. Spin-cast 2 - 200 nm thick polystyrene (PS) and 10 - 200 nm thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films on silicon are studied. Measurements are performed at 10-6 - 10-8 torr residual gas pressure. Temperature modulation allows effective separation of reversible glass transition from accompanying irreversible processes. It is found that glass transition in both polymers demonstrates no appreciable dependence on film thickness for more than 20 nm thick coatings. The temperature of the transition (Tg) in thinnest PS films does depend on film thickness, but does not follow often accepted Tg(h)=Tg(∞)[1-(Ah)^δ] function (where h is film thickness, A and δ are constants). Effects of polymer molecular weight and substrate surface pre-treatment on glass transition will be discussed also.[4pt] [1]. M. Yu. Efremov, A. V. Kiyanova, and P. F. Nealey, Macromolecules, 41, 5978 (2008).

  2. Gate Spacer Width Monitoring Study with Scatterometry Based on Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachellerie, V.; Kremer, S.; Elazami, A.; Morin, P.; Julien, C.; Duca, D.; Guiheux, D.; Bicais, N.; Pokrant, S.

    2005-09-01

    Critical Dimension (CD) control of Gate Spacers is key to achieve in well controlled implantations and a tight distribution of Vt for transistors on semiconductors devices. Presently, historical methods for CD control (top-down low-voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy or Electrical CD measurement) are facing limitations with regards to precision, matching, throughput or sample damage. So, with the reduction of design rules approaching the 65nm technology node, the need for a fast, precise and versatile "in-line" (at the process step) measurement of the spacer width and profile becomes critical, in order to shorten the spacer process development phase and the response time to production excursions. In this paper, we investigate the metrology performances and limitations (sensitivity, precision and accuracy) of Scatterometry (SCD) based on Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for this application using a KLA-TENCOR SpectraCD system. We show that it will be suitable for, at least, a simple oxide-nitride spacer configuration. We also explore its capability to measure more complex structures like the double-spacer configuration (LDD offset & S/D spacer). Finally, we show how additional information provided by Scatterometry helps in understanding process variations and how they correlate to end of line parametric test results.

  3. Phase transition of individually addressable microstructured membranes visualized by imaging ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Faiss, Simon; Schuy, Steffen; Weiskopf, Daniela; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2007-12-20

    The phase transition of individually addressable microstructured lipid bilayers was investigated by means of imaging ellipsometry. Microstructured bilayers were created on silicon substrates by micromolding in capillaries, and the thermotropic behavior of various saturated diacyl phosphatidylcholine (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dipentadecoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)) bilayers as well as DMPC/cholesterol membranes was determined by measuring the area expansion and thickness of the bilayer as a function of temperature. We found an increase in the main phase transition temperature T(M) of 2-6 degrees C and a substantially reduced cooperativity compared to multilamellar vesicles. Measurements of lateral diffusion constants D employing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed, however, only a marginal decrease in D compared to those found for vesicles and multibilayers. The known dependencies of T(M) both on the chain length of diacyl PC membranes and on the cholesterol content were reproduced on a solid support. Microstructured bilayers offer the unique advantage of integrating an internal standard of known thermotropic properties, which turned out to be important for reducing the measurement error and for ruling out the slightly changing impact of the surface on the phase transition behavior due to the surface pretreatment. PMID:18044861

  4. High-k dielectric characterization by VUV spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, P.; Evrard, P.; Piel, J. P.; Defranoux, C.; Fouere, J. C.; Bellandi, E.; Bender, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this study, we use vacuum UV spectroscopic ellipsometry (VUVSE) to characterize new high dielectric materials. Indeed, all the candidates for high k dielectrics become strongly absorbent when the wavelength is reduced down to 140nm. So, the correlation between thickness and refractive index is reduced in the VUV range and much more precise structural information can be deduced. HfO2, Al2O3 and mixed HfAlOx layers have been studied with and without thin SiO2 oxide at the interface. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) has been used to measure precisely the layer thickness and roughness. The two techniques are included in the same automated metrology system dedicated to 300mm technology which is also presented. We show in particular that VUVSE can detect the crystalline character of the layers and their composition can be measured in addition to the layer thickness. Results are compared to those obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) and x-ray photoemission (XPS).

  5. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  6. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  7. Probing the carrier concentration profiles in phosphorus-implanted germanium using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-02-21

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry with photon energy in the 0.045–0.65 eV range was used to investigate germanium samples implanted with 30 keV phosphorus ions and annealed at 700 °C. The infrared response of implanted layers is dominated by free carrier absorption which is modeled using a Drude oscillator. The carrier concentration profiles were modeled using an error function, and compared with those obtained by electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry. In the flat region of the carrier concentration profile, average carrier concentration and mobility of 1.40 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} and 336 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}, respectively, were obtained. A phosphorus diffusivity of ∼1.2 × 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s was obtained. The mobility versus carrier concentration relationships obtained for the implanted samples are close to the empirical relationship for bulk Ge.

  8. Skeletal silica characterization in porous-silica low-dielectric-constant films by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Syozo; Hata, Nobuhiro; Seino, Yutaka; Fujii, Nobutoshi; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2005-06-01

    Porous-silica low-dielectric-constant (low-k) films were prepared using a sol-gel method based on the self-assembly of surfactant templates. No change in the refractive index at 633 nm nor in the infrared-absorption intensities of C-H and O-H stretching vibrations at around 2900 and 3400cm-1 of porous-silica low-k films were observed after annealing at each temperature from 523 to 723 K. On the other hand, the Young's elastic modulus and hardness increased with the increase of annealing temperature. The structure in the complex dielectric function of porous-silica low-k films observed in between 1000 and 1400cm-1 is assigned as the asymmetric stretching vibration mode of the Si-O-Si bond. By applying the effective-medium theory by Bruggeman to the experimental results from infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry, we analyzed the skeletal silica structures. The peak positions of transverse (ωTO) and longitudinal (ωLO) vibration modes for Si-O-Si network in the silica skeleton of porous-silica films changed from 1061 to 1068cm-1 and from 1219 to 1232cm-1, respectively, with the annealing temperature. It is shown that the ωLO2/ωTO2 of skeletal silica correlates with Young's elastic modulus of porous-silica low-k films.

  9. Characterization of Physical Properties of Supported Phospholipid Membranes Using Imaging Ellipsometry at Optical Wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Michael C.; Szmodis, Alan W.; Sanii, Babak; Parikh, Atul N.

    2007-01-01

    Subnanometer-scale vertical z-resolution coupled with large lateral area imaging, label-free, noncontact, and in situ advantages make the technique of optical imaging ellipsometry (IE) highly suitable for quantitative characterization of lipid bilayers supported on oxide substrates and submerged in aqueous phases. This article demonstrates the versatility of IE in quantitative characterization of structural and functional properties of supported phospholipid membranes using previously well-characterized examples. These include 1), a single-step determination of bilayer thickness to 0.2 nm accuracy and large-area lateral uniformity using photochemically patterned single 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers; 2), hydration-induced spreading kinetics of single-fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers to illustrate the in situ capability and image acquisition speed; 3), a large-area morphological characterization of phase-separating binary mixtures of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and galactosylceramide; and 4), binding of cholera-toxin B subunits to GM1-incorporating bilayers. Additional insights derived from these ellipsometric measurements are also discussed for each of these applications. Agreement with previous studies confirms that IE provides a simple and convenient tool for a routine, quantitative characterization of these membrane properties. Our results also suggest that IE complements more widely used fluorescence and scanning probe microscopies by combining large-area measurements with high vertical resolution without the use of labeled lipids. PMID:17142265

  10. Normal-incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarized reflectometry for measurement and control of photoresist critical dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, James M.; Gubiotti, Thomas; McGahan, William A.; Dusa, Mircea V.; Kiers, Ton

    2002-07-01

    We report here on initial results for the characterization and modeling of 100 nm lithography features based on normal incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry and polarized reflectometry. In this work, a set of wafers was exposed as focus-exposure and separate focus or exposure matrices to create resists patterns with extremely small variations in CD and pattern shape. These variations were generated along scan, within slit and across full wafer. Optical CD scatterometry was used to extract critical feature parameters such as complete shape and associated linear dimensions. Extracted pattern parameters were compared to FIB sections and used to predict lithography process latitudes. We explore effects of using multi normal incidence ellipsometric signals with various profile models to increase accuracy of extracted lithography parameters. We propose a metric for identifying effects of scan-dynamic does and focus variations upon slit-intrafield and scan- intrafield CD errors. This has been tested over ranges of defocus and exposure that are larger than typical FE latitudes of 100 nm features. As a result of spectroscopic scatterometry calculations of pattern shape, we identified pattern shape variations caused by dose and defocus that are clearly coupled to changes in feature size. These could be used for unique determination of dose-focus deviations using scatterometry-extracted information from measurements of a grating structure.

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry for characterization of InAs/Ga1-xInxSb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Schmitz, J.; Herres, N.; Fuchs, F.; Walther, M.

    1998-05-01

    The pseudodielectric function of InAs/Ga1-xInxSb superlattices (SLs) grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy, was measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) for photon energies ranging from 1.2 to 5 eV. The width of the extrema in the SL pseudodielectric function derived from the E1 and E1+Δ1 interband transitions of the SL constituents InAs and Ga1-xInxSb, was found to depend on the structural quality of the SL. Differences in the SL quality caused by different sequences of InSb- like and GaAs-like interfaces, were easily detected by SE. The formation of the intended interface alternations was verified by Raman spectroscopy. The extrema in the SL pseudodielectric function originating from the E1 and E1+Δ1 interband transitions of Ga1-xInxSb were found to shift to lower energies with increasing In content x. Finally SE has been applied to the analysis of a complete InAs/Ga1-xInxSb SL detector structure.

  12. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  13. Nonlocal Interactions between Two Spatially Divided Light Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, R. Sh.; Karamyan, G. G.; Gevorkyan, A. S.; Manukyan, A. M.; Va rdanyan, V. T.; Nikoghosyan, A. G.; Sargsyan, V. R.

    2011-03-01

    Experiments with light scattering from diffraction slit are carried out. The changes in light intensities were observed when light was propagated through the remote coil of optical fiber in vicinity of diffraction slit. The time dependencies of intensities of scattered light in different diffraction zones are measured and analyzed. The qualitative interpretation of observed effects is proposed.

  14. Design of Hybrid Lens for Compact Camera Module Considering Diffraction Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun; Yoon, Yong-Joong; Kim, Byungwook; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Wan-Chin; Park, No-Cheol; Park, Young-Pil; Kang, Shinill

    2008-08-01

    We introduce the design method of a hybrid lens composed a refractive lens and a diffractive optical element (DOE) considering the diffraction effect for a compact camera module. When imaging optical system is designed using the DOE, diffraction efficiency of the DOE and stray light due to the unintended diffraction light should be considered. Therefore, to analyze the effect of diffraction efficiency of the DOE on image characteristics, we evaluate the performances of two designed compact camera lenses, which have different construction wavelengths, using the modulation transfer function (MTF) considering diffraction efficiency. The stray light that is induced by the diffraction effect of the DOE is analyzed by calculating the focal position according to each diffraction order, and a method for the reduction of the stray light is proposed.

  15. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  16. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  17. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  18. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  19. Fabrication and applications of large aperture diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Britten, J B; Hyde, R; Rushford, M; Summers, L; Toeppen, J

    2002-02-19

    Large aperture diffractive optics are needed in high power laser applications to protect against laser damage during operation and in space applications to increase the light gathering power and consequently the signal to noise. We describe the facilities we have built for fabricating meter scale diffractive optics and discuss several examples of these.

  20. Diffraction radiation generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, Viktor P.; Vertii, Aleksei A.; Ermak, Gennadii P.; Skrynnik, Boris K.; Khlopov, Grigorii I.; Tsvyk, Aleksei I.

    Research in the field of diffraction radiation generators (DRG) conducted at the Radio Physics and electronics Institute of the Ukranian Academy of Sciences over the past 25 years is reviewed. The effect of diffraction radiation is analyzed in detail, and various operating regimes of DRGs are discussed. The discussion then focuses on the principal requirements for the design of packaged DRGs and their principal parameters. Finally, applications of DRGs in various fields of science and technology are reviewed, including such applications as DRG spectroscopy, diagnostics of plasma, biological specimens, and vibration, and DRG radar systems.

  1. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-04-15

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  2. Measurement of Diffraction Properties of Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selan, Nicholas; Blades, Michael; Joy, Midhun; Gilchrist, James; Rotkin, Slava

    Close-packed, self-assembled arrays of micrometer polystyrene or silica spheres are high quality artificial crystals that generate well-defined diffraction patterns in the visible range. Such crystals are explored as possible substrates for deposition of nanomaterials such as graphene. Quasi-monochromatic visible light diffraction microscopy is used to characterize effective refractive index and crystal structure, specifically grain size, orientation, and lattice parameters. These parameters can be used to monitor deformations of the colloidal crystal lattice during transfer of nanomaterials. NSF ECCS-1509786, N.S. acknowledges RET supplement to NSF ECCS-1202398.

  3. Sub-nanometer expansions of redox responsive polymer films monitored by imaging ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Feng, Xueling; Ramos, Lionel Dos; Hempenius, Mark A.; Schön, Peter; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-09-01

    We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of a micro-patterned substrate containing circular patterns of passive (non-redox active) 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU) within a redox-responsive oligoethylene sulfide end-functionalized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (ES-PFS) film on a gold substrate. The non-redox responsive MCU layer was used as a molecular reference layer for the direct visualization of the minute thickness variations of the ES-PFS film. The ellipsometric microscopy images were recorded in aqueous electrolyte solutions at potentials of -0.1 V and 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl corresponding to the reduced and oxidized redox states of ES-PFS, respectively. The ellipsometric contrast images showed a 37 (+/-2)% intensity increase in the ES-PFS layer upon oxidation. The thickness of the ES-PFS layer reversibly changed between 4.0 (+/-0.1) nm and 3.4 (+/-0.1) nm upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, as determined by IE. Additionally, electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) was used to verify the redox controlled thickness variations. The proposed method opens novel avenues to optically visualize minute and rapid height changes occurring e.g. in redox active (and other stimulus responsive) polymer films in a fast and non-invasive manner.We describe a novel approach to quantitatively visualize sub nm height changes occurring in thin films of redox active polymers upon reversible electrochemical oxidation/reduction in situ and in real-time with electrochemical imaging ellipsometry (EC-IE). Our approach is based on the utilization of a micro-patterned substrate containing circular patterns of passive (non-redox active) 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU) within a redox-responsive oligoethylene sulfide end

  4. Determination of thicknesses of oxide films grown on titanium under argon irradiation by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-04-01

    In this article we present a study of the oxidation of pure titanium bulk samples under argon ion irradiation at 500 °C under rarefied air. In particular we follow the dependence of the oxide thickness as a function of the energy of argon ions. The novelty of this study consists in the range of ion energy explored, from 1 to 9 MeV. Until very recently it was commonly accepted that metal surfaces were transparent to ion beams in this low energy range (few MeV), and no surface modifications were expected. In a previous paper by the authors of this work, the formation of shallow craters in the surface of titanium was reported as a result of argon ion bombardment with energies of 2, 4 and 9 MeV under the same environmental conditions. We show here that around 3 MeV the oxide growth is unexpectedly enhanced. We think that an interplay of electronic excitations and nuclear ballistic collisions could possibly explain this enhanced oxide growth. We have used spectroscopic visible ultraviolet ellipsometry and XPS to determine the thickness of the oxide layers and characterize their optical properties. From the optical properties of the oxides we observed that for ion energies below 3-4 MeV the oxides show a dielectric-like behavior, whereas for ion energies above 3-4 MeV the oxides show a metal-like behavior. These findings indicate also that ion bombardment in this energy range may change substantially the oxygen-to-titanium ratio in the oxide films grown under irradiation leading to the formation of titanium sub-oxides.

  5. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb and GaInAsSb: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Mu {tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-06-30

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[={epsilon}{sub 1}(E)+i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single-crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3-5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0} (direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1}) and (E{sub 0}{prime}, E{sub 0}{prime}+{Delta}{sub 0}{prime}) doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} CPs was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/k{sup {rightharpoonup}}{center_dot}p{sup {rightharpoonup}} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}. The experimental results were compared to other evaluations of the optical constants of GaSb.

  6. Optical properties of As33S67-xSex bulk glasses studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Šik, J.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.

    2008-04-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was employed to study the optical properties of As33S67-xSex (x =0, 17, 33.5, 50, and 67at.%) bulk glasses in the UV-vis-NIR (near infrared) spectral region for photon energies from 0.54to4.13eV (photon wavelengths from 2300to300nm). For data analysis, we employed Tauc-Lorentz (TL) dispersion model in the entire measured near bandgap spectral region and standard Cauchy dispersion model in the spectral region below the bandgap. With increasing Se content (x) in the bulk glass, we observed a linear decrease in optical bandgap energy Egopt from 2.52±0.02eV for As33S67 to 1.75±0.01eV for As33Se67 and linear increase in refractive index nTL in the NIR spectral region, e.g., at 0.80eV from 2.327 for As33S67 to 2.758 for As33Se67. The amplitude A decreased with increasing Se content. The peak transition energy E0 and broadening C had a maximum value for x =33.5at.% and systematically decreased for higher S or Se content in glasses. Our study showed that TL model is suitable to describe dielectric functions of studied chalcogenide bulk glasses in the broad spectral region. The bulk glasses had a higher refractive index compared to thin films of corresponding composition. The bulk glasses with high S content had higher value of optical bandgap energy than was previously reported for thin films. The optical bandgap energy of glasses with higher Se content was very similar to the thin films.

  7. Diffracting holographic lenses created on azo-polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabat, Ribal Georges

    2014-02-01

    Various superimposed chirped relief gratings, acting as diffracting holographic lenses, were photo-inscribed on azopolymer films upon exposure to the interference pattern of a plane and a curved laser light wavefronts. Depending on the configuration used, this resulted in incident light being focused independently of polarization along the 0th or 1st diffracted order of the grating. The focal point and focalization angle of the resulting holographic lenses were easily tuned during the fabrication process.

  8. High-end spectroscopic diffraction gratings: design and manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Tilman

    2015-02-01

    Diffraction gratings are key components for spectroscopic systems. For high-end applications, they have to meet advanced requirements as, e.g., maximum efficiency, lowest possible scattered light level, high numerical aperture, and minimal aberrations. Diffraction gratings are demanded to allow spectrometer designs with highest resolution, a maximal étendue, and minimal stray light, built within a minimal volume. This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of different high-end spectroscopic gratings, their theoretical design and manufacturing technologies.

  9. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection. PMID:27410900

  10. Impedance Matched to Vacuum, Invisible Edge, Diffraction Suppressed Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G. (Inventor); Roman, Patrick A. (Inventor); Shiri, Sharham (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction suppressed mirrors having an invisible edge are disclosed for incident light at both targeted wavelengths and broadband incident light. The mirrors have a first having at least one discontiguous portion having a plurality of nanostructured apertures. The discontiguous mirror portion impedance matches a relatively high impedance portion of the mirror to a relatively low impedance portion of the mirror, thereby reducing the diffraction edge effect otherwise present in a conventional mirror.

  11. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  12. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  13. Diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-03-01

    I discuss events in high energy hadron collisions that contain a hard scattering, in the sense that very heavy quarks or high P/sub T/ jets are produced, yet are diffractive, in the sense that one of the incident hadrons is scattered with only a small energy loss. 8 refs.

  14. Adsorption of branched-linear polyethyleneimine-ethylene oxide conjugate on hydrophilic silica investigated by ellipsometry and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Angelescu, Daniel George; Nylander, Tommy; Piculell, Lennart; Linse, Per; Lindman, Björn; Tropsch, Jürgen; Detering, Jürgen

    2011-08-16

    The adsorption of and conformation adopted by a branched-linear polymer conjugate to the hydrophilic silica-aqueous solution interface have been studied by in situ null ellipsometry and Monte Carlo simulations. The conjugate is a highly branched polyethyleneimine structure with ethyleneoxide chains grafted to its primary and secondary amino groups. In situ null ellipsometry demonstrated that the polymer conjugate adsorbs to the silica surface from water and aqueous solution of 1 mM asymmetric divalent salt (calcium and magnesium chloride to emulate hard water) over a large pH range. The adsorbed amount is hardly affected by pH and large charge reversal on the negatively charged silica surface occurred at pH = 4.0, due to the adsorption of the cationic polyelectrolyte. The Monte Carlo simulations using an appropriate coarse-grained model of the polymer in solution predicted a core-shell structure with no sharp boundary between the ethyleneimine and ethyleneoxide moieties. The structure at the interface is similar to that in solution when the polymer degree of protonation is low or moderate while at high degree of protonation the strong electrostatic attraction between the ethyleneimine core and oppositely charged silica surface distorts the ethyleneoxide shell so that an "anemone"-like configuration is adopted. The adsorption of alkyl benzene sulfonic acid (LAS) to a preadsorbed polymer layer was also investigated by null ellipsometry. The adsorption data brought additional support for the existence of a strong polymer adsorption and showed the presence of a binding which was further enhanced by the decreased solvency of the surfactant in the salt solution and confirmed the surface charge reversal by the polymer adsorption at pH = 4.0. PMID:21755979

  15. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  16. Fabrication techniques for very fast diffractive lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Anthony M.; Marron, Joseph C.

    1993-01-01

    Aspheric lenses with arbitrary phase functions can be fabricated on thin light weight substrates via the binary optics fabrication technique. However, it is difficult and costly to fabricate a fast lens (f/number less than 1) for use as the shorter wavelengths. The pitch of the masks and the alignment accuracy must be very fine. For a large lens, the space-bandwidth product of the element can also become impractically large. In this paper, two alternate approaches for the fabrication of fast aspheric diffractive lenses are described. The first approach fabricates the diffractive lens interferometrically, utilizing a spherical wavefront to provide the optical power of the lens and a computer generated hologram to create the aspheric components. The second approach fabricates the aspheric diffractive lens in the form if a higher order kinoform which trades groove profile fidelity for coarser feature size. The design and implementation issues for these two fabrication techniques are discussed.

  17. Variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry Application to GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As multiple heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; Rost, Martin C.; Bu-Abbud, George H.; Woollam, John A.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry data to multilayer model parameters is shown to be a strong function of the angle of incidence. A quantitative study of sensitivity versus angle of incidence is performed for a GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs substrate structure, showing that maximum sensitivity to layer thicknesses and AlGaAs composition occurs near the wavelength-dependent principal angle. These results are verified by experimental measurements on two molecular-beam epitaxy grown samples.

  18. Study of temperature-dependent ultrathin oxide growth on Si(111) using variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The monolayer-sensitive variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry technique was used to study the temperature-dependent growth mechanisms of an ultrathin oxide layer on top of silicon. The oxidation was done in atomic oxygen produced in a pure oxygen plasma and driven by an RF power source. The results have been compared with the recently proposed model of Murali and Murarka for ultrathin oxide growth on top of silicon. The activation energies of different growth parameters associated with the oxide growth have also been determined.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Basa, D. K.; Abbate, G.; Ambrosone, G.; Marino, A.; Coscia, U.

    2010-01-15

    The optical properties of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films, prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique from silane and methane gas mixture diluted in helium, have been investigated using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in the photon energy range from 0.73 to 4.59 eV. Tauc-Lorentz model has been employed for the analysis of the optical spectra and it has been demonstrated that the model parameters are correlated with the carbon content as well as to the structural properties of the studied films.

  20. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  1. Diffractive excitation of heavy flavors: Leading twist mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2007-08-01

    Diffractive production of heavy flavors is calculated within the light-cone dipole approach. Novel leading twist mechanisms are proposed, which involve both short and long transverse distances inside the incoming hadron. Nevertheless, the diffractive cross section turns out to be sensitive to the primordial transverse momenta of projectile gluons, rather than to the hadronic size. Our calculations agree with the available data for diffractive production of charm and beauty, and with the observed weak variation of the diffraction-to-inclusive cross section ratios as function of the hard scale.

  2. Visible diffraction from quasi-crystalline arrays of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Timothy P.; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Large area arrays of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are patterned in a quasi-crystalline Penrose tile arrangement through electron beam lithography definition of Ni catalyst dots and subsequent nanotube growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. When illuminated with a 532 nm laser beam high-quality and remarkable diffraction patterns are seen. The diffraction is well matched to theoretical calculations which assume apertures to be present at the location of the VACNTs for transmitted light. The results show that VACNTs act as diffractive elements in reflection and can be used as spatially phased arrays for producing tailored diffraction patterns.

  3. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  4. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  5. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  6. Design of infrared diffractive telescope imaging optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZhouFeng; Hu, BingLiang; Yin, QinYe; Xie, YongJun; Kang, FuZeng; Wang, YanJun

    2015-10-01

    Diffractive telescope is an updated imaging technology, it differs from conventional refractive and reflective imaging system, which is based on the principle of diffraction image. It has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight telescope. However, one of the great challenges of design this optical system is that the diffractive optical element focuses on different wavelengths of light at different point in space, thereby distorting the color characteristics of image. In this paper, we designs a long-wavelength infrared diffractive telescope imaging system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the infrared optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens, achieving broadband light(from 8μm-12μm) to a common focus with 4.6° field of view. At last, the diffuse spot size and MTF function provide diffractive-limited performance.

  7. Central diffraction at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämsä, J. W.; Orava, R.

    2011-02-01

    The ALICE experiment is shown to be well suited for studies of exclusive final states from central diffractive reactions. The gluon-rich environment of the central system allows detailed QCD studies and searches for exotic meson states, such as glueballs, hybrids and new charmonium-like states. It would also provide a good testing ground for detailed studies of heavy quarkonia. Due to its central barrel performance, ALICE can accurately measure the low-mass central systems with good purity. The efficiency of the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) and the Forward Shower Counter (FSC) system for detecting rapidity gaps is shown to be adequate for the proposed studies. With this detector arrangement, valuable new data can be obtained by tagging central diffractive processes.

  8. Programmable diffractive lens for ophthalmic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Romero, Lenny A.; Ramírez, Natalia

    2014-06-01

    Pixelated liquid crystal displays have been widely used as spatial light modulators to implement programmable diffractive optical elements, particularly diffractive lenses. Many different applications of such components have been developed in information optics and optical processors that take advantage of their properties of great flexibility, easy and fast refreshment, and multiplexing capability in comparison with equivalent conventional refractive lenses. We explore the application of programmable diffractive lenses displayed on the pixelated screen of a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator to ophthalmic optics. In particular, we consider the use of programmable diffractive lenses for the visual compensation of refractive errors (myopia, hypermetropia, astigmatism) and presbyopia. The principles of compensation are described and sketched using geometrical optics and paraxial ray tracing. For the proof of concept, a series of experiments with artificial eye in optical bench are conducted. We analyze the compensation precision in terms of optical power and compare the results with those obtained by means of conventional ophthalmic lenses. Practical considerations oriented to feasible applications are provided.

  9. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.; Comley, Andrew J.; Foster, John M.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  10. Atomic structure of Zr-Cu glassy alloys and detection of deviations from ideal solution behavior with Al addition by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron light in transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgarakis, K.; Yavari, A. R.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Antonowicz, J.; Stoica, M.; Li, Y.; Satta, M.; LeMoulec, A.; Vaughan, G.; Inoue, A.

    2009-05-01

    The atomic structure of Zr-Cu binary amorphous alloys was studied using real space pair distribution functions derived from x-ray diffraction. The structure can be modeled by an ideal solution approximation because of relatively weak Cu-Zr atomic interactions. Addition of Al to Zr-Cu metallic glasses modifies the atomic structure in the short and medium range order because of the strongly attractive interaction between Al and Zr atoms. These interactions generate strong deviations from the ideal solution behavior.

  11. Diffraction before destruction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Henry N.; Caleman, Carl; Timneanu, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up the possibility of structure determination of protein crystals at room temperature, free of radiation damage. The femtosecond-duration pulses of these sources enable diffraction signals to be collected from samples at doses of 1000 MGy or higher. The sample is vaporized by the intense pulse, but not before the scattering that gives rise to the diffraction pattern takes place. Consequently, only a single flash diffraction pattern can be recorded from a crystal, giving rise to the method of serial crystallography where tens of thousands of patterns are collected from individual crystals that flow across the beam and the patterns are indexed and aggregated into a set of structure factors. The high-dose tolerance and the many-crystal averaging approach allow data to be collected from much smaller crystals than have been examined at synchrotron radiation facilities, even from radiation-sensitive samples. Here, we review the interaction of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses with materials and discuss the implications for structure determination. We identify various dose regimes and conclude that the strongest achievable signals for a given sample are attained at the highest possible dose rates, from highest possible pulse intensities. PMID:24914146

  12. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  13. Single crystal diffraction by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kvick, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tunability and access to short wavelengths in combination with high intensity and the low divergence of the x-ray radiation produced by synchrotron storage rings opens up new and challenging fields for single crystal diffraction. These areas include microcrystal diffraction, studies of time-dependent phenomena, element selective diffraction, studies of materials under extreme conditions, solution of the crystallographic phase problem either by the use of the wavelength dependency of the anomalous scattering or by direct experimental determination of the phases. Single crystal diffraction from proteins and macromolecules using photographic film as a detection medium has already reached considerable maturity, but high-precision data collections using diffractometers at storage rings are still not routine because of the severe requirements for beam stability over extended periods of time. Development work at institutions such as the National Synchrotron Light Source, The Photon Factory, SSRL, CHESS, Hasylab and Daresbury, however, suggest that synchrotron single-crystal diffraction will become an essential part of the research at the synchrotron storage rings in the near future. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Optimization Algorithm for Designing Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, Viviana A.; Orozco, Ricardo Amézquita

    2008-04-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are commonly used in many applications such as laser beam shaping, recording of micro reliefs, wave front analysis, metrology and many others where they can replace single or multiple conventional optical elements (diffractive or refractive). One of the most versatile way to produce them, is to use computer assisted techniques for their design and optimization, as well as optical or electron beam micro-lithography techniques for the final fabrication. The fundamental figures of merit involved in the optimization of such devices are both the diffraction efficiency and the signal to noise ratio evaluated in the reconstructed wave front at the image plane. A design and optimization algorithm based on the error—reduction method (Gerchberg and Saxton) is proposed to obtain binary discrete phase-only Fresnel DOEs that will be used to produce specific intensity patterns. Some experimental results were obtained using a spatial light modulator acting as a binary programmable diffractive phase element. Although the DOEs optimized here are discrete in phase, they present an acceptable signal noise relation and diffraction efficiency.

  15. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  16. Focusing Diffraction Grating Element with Aberration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength in a single plane, called dispersion plane. Traditional gratings on flat substrates do not perform wavefront transformation in the plane perpendicular to the dispersion plane. The device proposed here exhibits regular diffraction grating behavior, dispersing light. In addition, it performs wavelength transformation (focusing or defocusing) of diffracted light in a direction perpendicular to the dispersion plane (called sagittal plane). The device is composed of a diffraction grating with the grooves in the form of equidistant arcs. It may be formed by defining a single arc or an arc approximation, then translating it along a certain direction by a distance equal to a multiple of a fixed distance ("grating period") to obtain other groove positions. Such groove layout is nearly impossible to obtain using traditional ruling methods, such as mechanical ruling or holographic scribing, but is trivial for lithographically scribed gratings. Lithographic scribing is the newly developed method first commercially introduced by LightSmyth Technologies, which produces gratings with the highest performance and arbitrary groove shape/spacing for advanced aberration control. Unlike other types of focusing gratings, the grating is formed on a flat substrate. In a plane perpendicular to the substrate and parallel to the translation direction, the period of the grating and, therefore, the projection of its k-vector onto the plane is the same for any location on the grating surface. In that plane, no waveform transformation by the grating k-vector occurs, except of simple redirection.

  17. Diffractive acoustic elements for laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Sharples, S. D.; Somekh, M. G.

    2000-05-01

    In a laser based surface acoustic wave (SAW) system the initial wavefront of the SAW is determined by the distribution of generating light on the sample surface. In our usual system the generating light is focussed into an arc or concentric arcs which spatially focus and temporally filter the SAWs. We have developed acoustic diffractive elements (DAEs) which, like diffractive optical elements, can shape the SAW distribution by diffraction. These DAEs are, like their optical analogues, highly dispersive and special consideration has to be made at the design stage in order to accommodate and utilize this dispersion. We demonstrate DAEs that produce well controlled multiple focii, frequency suppression and frequency selection. We also show that these complex acoustic elements can be accurately modelled using a simple angular spectrum technique. The DAEs are produced by computer generated holograms which control the generating distribution of light. These DAEs have applications in multi-frequency acoustic, harmonic acoustic imaging, SAW wavefront control and imaging on curved surfaces.

  18. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Study of Thermochromism in an Ultrathin Poly(diacetylene) Film: Reversibility and Transition Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    CARPICK,R.W.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; BURNS,ALAN R.

    2000-01-18

    We have investigated the thermochromic transition of an ultrathin poly(diacetylene) film. The Langmuir film is composed of three layers of polymerized 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}C{triple_bond}CC{triple_bond}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}COOH] (poly-PCDA) organized into crystalline domains on a silicon substrate. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence intensity measurements are obtained with in-situ temperature control. Poly-PCDA films exhibit a reversible thermal transition between the initial blue form and an intermediate ''purple'' form that exists only at elevated temperature (between 303-333 K), followed by an irreversible transition to the red form after annealing above 320 K. We propose that the purple form is thermally distorted blue poly-PCDA, and may represent a transitional configuration in the irreversible conversion to red. This hypothesis is supported by the appearance of unique features in the absorption spectra for each form as derived from the ellipsometry measurements. Significant fluorescence emission occurs only with the red form, and is reduced at elevated temperatures while the absorption remains unchanged. Reduced emission is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of the irreversible transition have been performed. Using a first-order kinetic analysis of these measurements we deduce an energy barrier of 17.6 {+-} 1.1 kcal mol{sup -1} between the blue and red forms.

  19. Use of optical spacers to enhance infrared Mueller ellipsometry sensitivity: application to the characterization of organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Ndong, Gerald; Lizana, Angel; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Paret, Valerie; Melizzi, Géraldine; Cattelan, Denis; Pelissier, Bernard; Tortai, Jean-Hervé

    2016-04-20

    Mueller ellipsometry in the mid-infrared (IR) spectral range can be used to obtain information about chemical composition through the vibrational spectra of samples. In the case of very thin films (<100  nm), the ellipsometric spectral features due to vibrational absorption are in general quite weak, and sometimes they are hidden by the noise in the measured data. In this work, we present one method based on the use of optical spacers as a tool to enhance the sensitivity of IR Mueller ellipsometry. An optical spacer is a thin film made of a known material which is between the substrate and the layer of interest. We show that, when the thickness of the two layers fulfills a given condition, the spectral features due to vibrational absorptions are enhanced. We explain the enhancement effect in terms of the Airy formula. The theoretical discussion is illustrated with two examples. We analyzed polystyrene thin films deposited on silicon wafers. Some of the wafers were covered by a thin film of thermal silicon dioxide (SiO2), which was used as a spacer. The results show the suitability of the proposed technique to overcome the lack of sensitivity in ellipsometric measurements when it comes to working with either very thin films or materials with low absorption. PMID:27140106

  20. Dielectric functions and carrier concentrations of Hg1-xCdxSe films determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. J.; Peiris, F. C.; Brill, G.; Doyle, K.; Myers, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry, ranging from 35 meV to 6 eV, was used to determine the dielectric functions of a series of molecular beam epitaxy-grown Hg1-xCdxSe thin films deposited on both ZnTe/Si(112) and GaSb(112) substrates. The fundamental band gap as well as two higher-order electronic transitions blue-shift with increasing Cd composition in Hg1-xCdxSe, as expected. Representing the free carrier absorption with a Drude oscillator, we found that the effective masses of Hg1-xCdxSe (grown on ZnTe/Si) vary between 0.028 and 0.050 times the free electron mass, calculated using the values of carrier concentration and the mobility obtained through Hall measurements. Using these effective masses, we determined the carrier concentrations of Hg1-xCdxSe samples grown on GaSb, which is of significance as films grown on such doped-substrates posit ambiguous results when measured by conventional Hall experiments. These models can serve as a basis for monitoring Cd-composition during sample growth through in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry.

  1. Six Classes of Diffraction-Based Optoelectronic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Fuhr, Peter; Schipper, John

    2003-01-01

    Six classes of diffraction-based optoelectronic instruments have been invented as means for wavelength-based processing of light. One family of anticipated applications lies in scientific instrumentation for studying chemical and physical reactions that affect and/or are affected differently by light of different wavelengths or different combinations of wavelengths. Another family of anticipated applications lies in optoelectronic communication systems.

  2. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  3. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  4. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  5. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  6. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  7. Optical Metrology for Directed Self-assembly Patterning Using Mueller Matrix Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Based Scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhairya J.

    The semiconductor industry continues to drive patterning solutions that enable devices with higher memory storage capacity, faster computing performance, lower cost per transistors, and higher transistor density. These developments in the field of semiconductor manufacturing along with the overall minimization of the size of transistors require cutting-edge metrology tools for characterization. Directed self-assembly (DSA) patterning process can be used to fabricate nanoscale line-space patterns and contact holes via thermodynamically driven micro-phase separation of block copolymer (BCP) films with boundary constraints from guiding templates. Its main advantages are high pattern resolution (~10 nm), high throughput, no requirement of a high-resolution mask, and compatibility with standard fab-equipment and processes. Although research into DSA patterning has demonstrated a high potential as a nanoscale patterning process, there are critical challenges that must be overcome before transferring DSA into high volume manufacturing, including achievement of low defect density and high process stability. For this, advances in critical dimension (CD) and overlay measurement as well as rapid defect characterization are required. Both scatterometry and critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM) are routinely used for inline dimensional metrology. CD-SEM inspection is limited, as it does not easily provide detailed line-shape information, whereas scatterometry has the capability of measuring important feature dimensions including: line-width, line-shape, sidewall-angle, and thickness of the patterned samples quickly and non-destructively. The present work describes the application of Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MMSE) based scatterometry to optically characterize DSA patterned line- space grating and contact hole structures fabricated with phase-separated polystyrene-b-polymethylmethacrylate (PS-b-PMMA) at various integration steps of BCP DSA

  8. LED color mixing with diffractive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa; Baumgart, Jörg; Wendel, Simon; Neumann, Cornelius

    2013-03-01

    Lighting solutions with colored LEDs provide many opportunities for illumination. One of these opportunities is to create a color tunable light source. In this way different kinds of white light (color temperature) as well as discrete colors may be realized. This opens the field for applications as mood lighting. But there is always a spatial separation of the distinct LEDs that might get converted into an angular separation by any collimating optics. This angular separation causes such problems like color fringes and colored shadows that cannot be accepted in most applications. Conventional methods to solve these problems include e.g. mixing rods or dichroic filters. A new approach is the use of the dispersive effect of a diffractive structure to compensate the angular separation of the different colors. In this contribution the potential and limitations of diffractive structures in LED color mixing applications are discussed. Ray tracing simulations were performed to analyze such important parameters like efficiency, color performance and the cross section of the color mixing optics. New means for the estimation of color mixing performance were developed. A software tool makes it possible to detect the color distribution within ray trace data and it provides a quality factor to estimate the color mixing performance. It can be shown that the spectral band width has a large influence on the mixing process. Ray tracing simulations are compared with results of an experimental setup such that both measured as well as simulated data is presented.

  9. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  10. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI-CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kami,; #324; ski, Radoslaw; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, El; #380; bieta,; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2014-11-14

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies.

  11. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  12. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  13. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  14. Soft QCD and Diffractive Physics at Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapparone, Eugenio

    2012-12-01

    After a short introduction on the importance of the soft and of the diffractive studies in the understanding of minimum bias events, the main results obtained at LHC are discussed. This overview includes identified particle and inclusive measurements, minimum bias and underlying events, all of them shedding light on the soft process production mechanisms. The results of the inelastic cross-section measurements obtained by the LHC experiments and their compatibility are discussed together with the models used to extrapolate the data at low diffractive masses. A review of the most recent diffraction results is presented, showing the different approaches used by the LHC experiments, relying on different experimental techniques. The combination of the results obtained by ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and TOTEM provides a wide sample of informations, covering an unprecedented pseudorapidity range. A detailed comparison between the obtained results is shown, followed by a critical discussion on the still existing discrepancies between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo used at LHC to simulate soft and diffractive physics.

  15. Water Vapor Uptake of Ultrathin Films of Biologically Derived Nanocrystals: Quantitative Assessment with Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Niinivaara, Elina; Faustini, Marco; Tammelin, Tekla; Kontturi, Eero

    2015-11-10

    Despite the relevance of water interactions, explicit analysis of vapor adsorption on biologically derived surfaces is often difficult. Here, a system was introduced to study the vapor uptake on a native polysaccharide surface; namely, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) ultrathin films were examined with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A significant mass uptake of water vapor by the CNC films was detected using the QCM-D upon increasing relative humidity. In addition, thickness changes proportional to changes in relative humidity were detected using SE. Quantitative analysis of the results attained indicated that in preference to being soaked by water at the point of hydration each individual CNC in the film became enveloped by a 1 nm thick layer of adsorbed water vapor, resulting in the detected thickness response. PMID:26461931

  16. Investigation of temperature dependent dielectric constant of a sputtered TiN thin film by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tripura Sundari, S. Ramaseshan, R.; Jose, Feby; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2014-01-21

    The temperature dependence of optical constants of titanium nitride thin film is investigated using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) between 1.4 and 5 eV in the temperature range of 300 K to 650 K in steps of 50 K. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric functions ε{sub 1}(E) and ε{sub 2}(E) marginally increase with increase in temperature. A Drude Lorentz dielectric analysis based on free electron and oscillator model are carried out to describe the temperature behavior. With increase in temperature, the unscreened plasma frequency and broadening marginally decreased and increased, respectively. The parameters of the Lorentz oscillator model also showed that the relaxation time decreased with temperature while the oscillator energies increased. This study shows that owing to the marginal change in the refractive index with temperature, titanium nitride can be employed for surface plasmon sensor applications even in environments where rise in temperature is imminent.

  17. Sensitivity and performance estimates for the multiple-wavelength multiple-incidence angle ellipsometry for OCD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelyanskii, Michael; Jiang, Gary

    2008-03-01

    Optical metrology techniques are essential for process control of the gate formation process steps from lithography to the dielectric, spacers, gate and straining layer deposition in the sub-65nm technology nodes. Traditionally, optical metrology is based on the measurements of periodic lines or hole arrays using a spectroscopic ellipsometer or reflectometer, collecting data across a wavelength range at a single angle of incidence. In this paper, we discuss measurements using Focused Beam Ellipsometry (FBE), illuminating at discrete laser wavelengths while data is collected over a wide angle of incidence range. We verify precision estimates of the different model parameters with actual values obtained from measured data. We show sensitivity ranges for different applications over the space of measured wavelength spectrum from DUV to IR, angle of incidence range, and sample azimuthal orientations. Major factors contributing to the projected recipe performance - wavelength, orientation of the incident beam are discussed.

  18. Effect of free surface roughness on the apparent glass transition temperature in thin polymer films measured by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsometry is one of the standard methods for observation of glass transition in thin polymer films. This work proposes that sensitivity of the method to surface morphology can complicate manifestation of the transition in a few nm thick samples. Two possible mechanisms of free surface roughening in the vicinity of glass transition are discussed: roughening due to lateral heterogeneity and roughening associated with thermal capillary waves. Both mechanisms imply an onset of surface roughness in the glass transition temperature range, which affects the experimental data in a way that shifts apparent glass transition temperature. Effective medium approximation models are used to introduce surface roughness into optical calculations. The results of the optical modeling for a 5 nm thick polystyrene film on silicon are presented. PMID:25554303

  19. Study of InGaAs-based modulation doped field effect transistor structures using variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Sieg, R. M.; Yao, H. D.; Snyder, P. G.; Woollam, J. A.; Pamulapati, J.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Sekula-Moise, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to estimate the thicknesses of all layers within the optical penetration depth of InGaAs-based modulation doped field effect transistor structures. Strained and unstrained InGaAs channels were made by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on InP substrates and by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on GaAs substrates. In most cases, ellipsometrically determined thicknesses were within 10% of the growth-calibration results. The MBE-made InGaAs strained layers showed large strain effects, indicating a probable shift in the critical points of their dielectric function toward the InP lattice-matched concentration.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electronic transitions in BiFeO{sub 3} thin film studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, T. D.; Jeon, B. C.; Moon, S. J.

    2015-04-07

    The temperature dependence of the electronic response of BiFeO{sub 3} thin film grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate is investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry. By analyzing the pseudodielectric function, we identify two d-d crystal field transitions of Fe{sup 3+} ions in the energy region between 1 and 2 eV. The d-d transitions show abnormal temperature dependence that cannot be attributed to conventional electron-phonon interactions. The origin of the abnormal temperature dependence is discussed in terms of spin-charge coupling. The temperature dependence of the charge transfer transitions located above 2.5 eV is characterized by standard critical point model analysis of the 2nd derivatives of the dielectric function. This analysis provides detailed information of the critical point parameters for charge transfer transitions.

  1. Infrared optical properties of mixed-phase thin films studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry using boron nitride as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Rheinländer, B.; Franke, E.; Neumann, H.; Tiwald, T. E.; Woollam, J. A.; Hahn, J.; Richter, F.

    1997-11-01

    We present a microstructure-dependent anisotropic infrared-optical dielectric function model for mixed-phase polycrystalline material from which we derive the transverse and longitudinal-optical modes observable in thin films. Infrared ellipsometry over the wavelength range from 700 to 3000 cm-1 is then used to determine the phase and microstructure of polycrystalline and multilayered hexagonal and cubic boron nitride thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering onto (100) silicon. The ellipsometric data depend on the thin-film multilayer structure, the layer-phase composition, and the average orientation of the hexagonal grain c axes. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of spectral shifts of longitudinal optical phonons as a function of microstructure, i.e., the average grain crystallographic orientation within the mixed-phase material.

  2. Study of InGaAs-based modulation doped field effect transistor structures using variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Sieg, R. M.; Yao, H. D.; Snyder, P. G.; Woollam, J. A.; Pamulapati, J.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Sekula-Moise, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to estimate the thicknesses of all layers within the optical penetration depth of InGaAs-based modulation doped field effect transistor structures. Strained and unstrained InGaAs channels were made by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on InP substrates and by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaAs substrates. In most cases, ellipsometrically determined thicknesses were within 10 percent of the growth-calibration results. The MBE-made InGaAs strained layers showed large strain effects, indicating a probable shift in the critical point of their dielectric function toward the InP lattice-matched concentration.

  3. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  4. Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Magdich, L N; Yushkov, K B; Voloshinov, V B

    2009-04-30

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 {mu}m. (light modulation)

  5. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence study of thermochromism in an ultrathin poly(diacetylene) film: Reversibility and transition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carpick, R.W.; Mayer, T.M.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Burns, A.R.

    2000-05-16

    The authors have investigated the thermochromic transition of an ultrathin poly(diacetylene)film. The Langmuir film is composed of three layers of polymerized 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid [Ch{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}C{triple_bond}CC{triple_bond}C(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}COOH] (poly-PCDA) organized into crystalline domains on a silicon substrate. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and fluorescence intensity measurements are obtained with in situ temperature control. Poly-PCDA films exhibit a reversible thermal transition between the initial blue form and an intermediate purple form that exists only at elevated temperature (between 303 and 333 K), followed by an irreversible transition to the red form after annealing above 320 K. The authors propose that the purple form is thermally distorted blue poly-PCDA and may represent a transitional configuration in the irreversible conversion to red. This hypothesis is supported by the appearance of unique features in the absorption spectra for each form as derived from the ellipsometry measurements. Significant fluorescence emission occurs only with the red form and is reduced at elevated temperatures while the absorption remains unchanged. Reduced emission is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence is likely related to thermal fluctuations of the hydrocarbon side chains. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of the irreversible transition have been performed. Using a first-order kinetic analysis of these measurements, the authors deduce an energy barrier of 17.6 {+-} 1.1 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} between the blue and red forms.

  6. Investigating organic multilayers by spectroscopic ellipsometry: specific and non-specific interactions of polyhistidine with NTA self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Ilaria; Parisse, Pietro; Gramazio, Federico; Casalis, Loredana; Canepa, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: A versatile strategy for protein–surface coupling in biochips exploits the affinity for polyhistidine of the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group loaded with Ni(II). Methods based on optical reflectivity measurements such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) allow for label-free, non-invasive monitoring of molecule adsorption/desorption at surfaces. Results: This paper describes a SE study about the interaction of hexahistidine (His6) on gold substrates functionalized with a thiolate self-assembled monolayer bearing the NTA end group. By systematically applying the difference spectra method, which emphasizes the small changes of the ellipsometry spectral response upon the nanoscale thickening/thinning of the molecular film, we characterized different steps of the process such as the NTA-functionalization of Au, the adsorption of the His6 layer and its eventual displacement after reaction with competitive ligands. The films were investigated in liquid, and ex situ in ambient air. The SE investigation has been complemented by AFM measurements based on nanolithography methods (nanografting mode). Conclusion: Our approach to the SE data, exploiting the full spectroscopic potential of the method and basic optical models, was able to provide a picture of the variation of the film thickness along the process. The combination of δΔi +1 ,i(λ), δΨi +1 ,i(λ) (layer-addition mode) and δΔ† i ', i +1(λ), δΨ† i ', i +1(λ) (layer-removal mode) difference spectra allowed us to clearly disentangle the adsorption of His6 on the Ni-free NTA layer, due to non specific interactions, from the formation of a neatly thicker His6 film induced by the Ni(II)-loading of the NTA SAM. PMID:27335745

  7. Diffractive optics technology and the NASA Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael; Michaels, Robert L.; Faklis, Dean

    1992-01-01

    Diffractive (or binary) optics offers unique capabilities for the development of large-aperture, high-performance, light-weight optical systems. The Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO) will consist of a variety of instruments to monitor the environmental conditions of the earth and its atmosphere. The aim of this investigation is to analyze the design of the GEO instrument that is being proposed and to identify the areas in which diffractive (or binary) optics technology can make a significant impact in GEO sensor design. Several potential applications where diffractive optics may indeed serve as a key technology for improving the performance and reducing the weight and cost of the GEO sensors have been identified. Applications include the use of diffractive/refractive hybrid lenses for aft-optic imagers, diffractive telescopes for narrowband imaging, subwavelength structured surfaces for anti-reflection and polarization control, and aberration compensation for reflective imaging systems and grating spectrometers.

  8. Detonation diffraction in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pintgen, F.; Shepherd, J.E.

    2009-03-15

    We have experimentally investigated detonation diffraction out of a round tube into an unconfined half-space. The focus of our study is examining how the extent of detonation cellular instability influences the quantitative and qualitative features of diffraction. Detailed quantitative and qualitative measurements were obtained through simultaneous schlieren imaging, multiple-exposure chemiluminescence imaging, and planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH molecules. Two types of stoichiometric mixtures, highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O, were studied in the sub-critical, critical and super-critical regime. These mixture types represent extreme cases in the classification of cellular instability with highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixtures having very regular instability structures and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O having very irregular instability structures. The most striking differences between the mixtures occur in the sub-critical and critical regimes, for which the detonation fails to transition into the unconfined half-space. For the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, the velocity on the center line was found to decay significantly slower than for the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture. In case of the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, it was evident from simultaneous schlieren-fluorescence images that the reaction front was coupled to the lead shock front up to 2.3 tube diameters from the exit plane. For the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture, the reaction front velocity decreased to 60% of the corresponding Chapman-Jouguet value at 1.1 tube diameters from the tube exit plane. A geometric acoustic model showed that the observed differences in failure patterns are not caused by the differences in thermodynamic properties of the two mixtures but is linked to the larger effective activation energy and critical decay time in the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture as compared to the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture. The re-initiation events appear similar for the two

  9. Diffraction off nuclei in color singlet models of shadowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankfurt, L. L.; Strikman, M. I.

    1996-02-01

    The assumption that only color singlet interactions between projectiles and nucleons in nuclei are relevant for the nuclear shadowing and the AGK cutting rules are used to estimate the cross section of diffraction and the multiplicity fluctuations for eA scattering at HERA energies. We find that for sufficiently light nuclei, A ≤ 20, the result only weakly depends on the details of the model, and that a large fraction of events is expected to be of diffractive nature. At the same time, a significant fraction of non-diffractive events should have multiplicities much larger than those observed in ep scattering.

  10. Ultranegative angular dispersion of diffraction in quasiordered biophotonic structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Dong, Biqin; Zhao, Fangyuan; Hu, Xinhua; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2011-04-11

    We report that a three-dimensional quasiordered photonic structure, found in the cuticles of beetle H. sexmaculata, can diffract light in a "wrong" way and its angular dispersion is about one order of magnitude larger than that of a conventional diffraction grating. A new diffraction type of photonic bandgap (from an anticrossing of longitudinal and transverse modes) and additional disorder effect are found to play important roles in this phenomenon. Mimicking the structure could lead to novel optical devices with ultralarge angular dispersion. PMID:21503085

  11. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  12. Muscle diffraction theory. Relationship between diffraction subpeaks and discrete sarcomere length distributions.

    PubMed Central

    Judy, M M; Summerour, V; LeConey, T; Roa, R L; Templeton, G H

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical discussion is presented that describes the diffraction on monochromatic light by a three-dimensional sarcomere array having the following properties. The basic repetitive diffracting unit is the sarcomere. The contiguous arrangement of physically attached serial sarcomeres in the myofibril is contained within the model so that relative position of sarcomeres depend upon the lengths of intervening ones. Sarcomere length is described by a distribution function. This function may be discrete or continuous and contain one or more subpopulations. Two arrangements of sarcomeres are considered: (a) when sarcomeres of different lengths are arranged randomly in myofibrils the amplitude and width of mth order (m greater than or equal to 1) peaks and associated secondary diffraction maxima decrease and increase monotonically, respectively, as the standard deviation of the length distribution increases. No subpeaks are present regardless of the number of subpopulations within the distribution function. This behavior is shown to follow from the dependence of sarcomere position on the length of intervening sarcomeres. (b) When sarcomeres belonging to the same length subpopulation are arranged in serial contiguous fashion to form domains and more than one length subpopulation is present, then mth order diffraction peaks split to form subpeaks. The theoretical basis for this behavior is developed for the first time and may explain the subpeaks evident in diffraction patterns from cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:7059651

  13. Rigorous diffraction analysis using geometrical theory of diffraction for future mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Gek S.; Tay, Cho J.; Quan, Chenggen; Lin, Qunying

    2004-05-01

    Advanced lithographic techniques such as phase shift masks (PSM) and optical proximity correction (OPC) result in a more complex mask design and technology. In contrast to the binary masks, which have only transparent and nontransparent regions, phase shift masks also take into consideration transparent features with a different optical thickness and a modified phase of the transmitted light. PSM are well-known to show prominent diffraction effects, which cannot be described by the assumption of an infinitely thin mask (Kirchhoff approach) that is used in many commercial photolithography simulators. A correct prediction of sidelobe printability, process windows and linearity of OPC masks require the application of rigorous diffraction theory. The problem of aerial image intensity imbalance through focus with alternating Phase Shift Masks (altPSMs) is performed and compared between a time-domain finite-difference (TDFD) algorithm (TEMPEST) and Geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Using GTD, with the solution to the canonical problems, we obtained a relationship between the edge on the mask and the disturbance in image space. The main interest is to develop useful formulations that can be readily applied to solve rigorous diffraction for future mask technology. Analysis of rigorous diffraction effects for altPSMs using GTD approach will be discussed.

  14. Recent CMS results on diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Recent CMS results on diffraction are presented. These include the measurements of the soft diffractive cross sections, of the forward rapidity gap cross section, of the diffractive dijet cross section, the measurement of a large rapidity gap in W and Z boson events and the measurement of the pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles in a single diffractive enhanced sample. This last measurement is the first common result of the CMS and TOTEM collaborations. Some prospects of common CMS-TOTEM data taking are also discussed.

  15. Monitoring Volumetric Changes in Silicon Thin-Film Anodes through In Situ Optical Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duay, Jonathon; Schroder, Kjell W; Murugesan, Sankaran; Stevenson, Keith J

    2016-07-13

    A high-resolution in situ spectroelectrochemical optical diffraction experiment has been developed to understand the volume expansion/contraction process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film anodes. Electrodes consisting of 1D transmissive gratings of silicon have been produced through photolithographic methods. After glovebox assembly in a home-built Teflon cell, monitoring of the diffraction efficiency of these gratings during the lithiation/delithiation process is performed using an optical microscope equipped with a Bertrand lens. When the diffraction efficiency along with optical constants obtained from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is utilized, volume changes of the active materials can be deduced. Unlike transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization methods of observing silicon's volume expansion, this experiment allows for real-time monitoring of the volume change at charge/discharge cycles greater than just the first few along with an experimental environment that directly mimics that of a real battery. This technique shows promising results that provide needed insight into understanding the lithium alloying reaction and subsequent induced capacity fade during the cycling of alloying anodes in lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27311132

  16. A 3-D numerical study of pinhole diffraction to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A. |; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J. |

    1995-12-01

    A 3-D electromagnetic field simulation is used to model the propagation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), 13-nm, light through sub-1500 {Angstrom} dia pinholes in a highly absorptive medium. Deviations of the diffracted wavefront phase from an ideal sphere are studied within 0.1 numerical aperture, to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometersused in at-wavelength testing of nearly diffraction-limited EUV optical systems. Aberration magnitudes are studied for various 3-D pinhole models, including cylindrical and conical pinhole bores.

  17. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  18. GGADT: Generalized Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John; Tarczon, Michael; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-10-01

    GGADT uses anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) to compute the differential scattering cross section (or the total cross sections as a function of energy) for a specified grain of arbitrary geometry (natively supports spheres, ellipsoids, and clusters of spherical monomers). It is written in Fortran 95. ADT is valid when the grain is large compared to the wavelength of incident light. GGADT can calculate either the integrated cross sections (absorption, scattering, extinction) as a function of energy, or it can calculate the differential scattering cross section as a function of scattering angle.

  19. Lessons from LHC elastic and diffractive data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G.

    2015-04-10

    In the light of LHC data, we discuss the global description of all high-energy elastic and diffractive data, using a one-pomeron model, but including multi-pomeron interactions. The LHC data indicate the need of a k{sub t}(s) behaviour, where k{sub t} is the gluon transverse momentum along the partonic ladder structure which describes the pomeron. We also discuss tensions in the data, as well as the t dependence of the slope of dσ{sub el}/dt in the small t domain.

  20. Results on diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, A.

    2003-10-27

    In run I CDF made an extensive range of measurements studying diffractive processes. In run II these measurements can be extended using improved triggering, new detectors and larger data samples. In these proceedings run II measurements of single diffractive dijet production and double pomeron exchange production of dijets are presented.

  1. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  2. Micron-scale lens array having diffracting structures

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2013-10-29

    A novel micron-scale lens, a microlens, is engineered to concentrate light efficiently onto an area of interest, such as a small, light-sensitive detector element in an integrated electronic device. Existing microlens designs imitate the form of large-scale lenses and are less effective at small sizes. The microlenses described herein have been designed to accommodate diffraction effects, which dominate the behavior of light at small length scales. Thus a new class of light-concentrating optical elements with much higher relative performance has been created. Furthermore, the new designs are much easier to fabricate than previous designs.

  3. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  4. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  5. Keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI).

    PubMed

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Vittoria, Fabio Alessio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    2012-11-01

    Electron diffractive imaging (EDI) relies on combining information from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of an isolated kinematically diffracting nano-particle with the corresponding nano-electron diffraction pattern. Phase-retrieval algorithms allow one to derive the phase, lost in the acquisition of the diffraction pattern, to visualize the actual atomic projected potential within the specimen at sub-ångström resolution, overcoming limitations due to the electron lens aberrations. Here the approach is generalized to study extended crystalline specimens. The new technique has been called keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI) because it aims to investigate nano-regions of extended specimens at sub-ångström resolution by properly confining the illuminated area. Some basic issues of retrieving phase information from the EDI/KEDI measured diffracted amplitudes are discussed. By using the generalized Shannon sampling theorem it is shown that whenever suitable oversampling conditions are satisfied, EDI/KEDI diffraction patterns can contain enough information to lead to reliable phase retrieval of the unknown specimen electrostatic potential. Hence, the KEDI method has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments performed on an Si crystal cross section in the [112] zone-axis orientation, achieving a resolution of 71 pm. PMID:23075611

  6. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Studies of Ag and ZnO Thin Films and Their Interfaces for Thin Film Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, Deepak

    Many modern optical and electronic devices, including photovoltaic devices, consist of multilayered thin film structures. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a critically important characterization technique for such multilayers. SE can be applied to measure key parameters related to the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the components of multilayers with high accuracy and precision. One of the key advantages of this non-destructive technique is its capability of monitoring the growth dynamics of thin films in-situ and in real time with monolayer level precision. In this dissertation, the techniques of SE have been applied to study the component layer materials and structures used as back-reflectors and as the transparent contact layers in thin film photovoltaic technologies, including hydrogenated silicon (Si:H), copper indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe). The component layer materials, including silver and both intrinsic and doped zinc oxide, are fabricated on crystalline silicon and glass substrates using magnetron sputtering techniques. These thin films are measured in-situ and in real time as well as ex-situ by spectroscopic ellipsometry in order to extract parameters related to the structural properties, such as bulk layer thickness and surface roughness layer thickness and their time evolution, the latter information specific to real time measurements. The index of refraction and extinction coefficient or complex dielectric function of a single unknown layer can also be obtained from the measurement versus photon energy. Applying analytical expressions for these optical properties versus photon energy, parameters that describe electronic transport, such as electrical resistivity and electron scattering time, can be extracted. The SE technique is also performed as the sample is heated in order to derive the effects of annealing on the optical properties and derived electrical transport parameters, as well as the

  7. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  8. Novel diffraction gratings fabricated by means of plasma nanotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebizuka, N.; Sekine, Makoto; Ishikawa, K.; Kondo, H.; Hori, M.; Sasaki, M.; Bianco, A.; Maria Zerbi, F.; Hirahara, Y.; Aoki, W.

    2012-09-01

    A volume phase holographic grating (VPHG) achieves very high diffraction efficiency up to 100% for S or P polarized light at the first diffraction order. However, diffraction efficiency of the VPHG for non-polarized light becomes low according as Bragg angle becomes large, and bandwidth of diffraction efficiency becomes narrow according as refractive index modulation of grating lattice becomes small. A volume binary grating with rectangular lattice, consists of high and low refractive index media with large or small duty ratio, is able to achieve very high efficiency nearly 100% and a wide band width for both S and P polarization light. We have successfully fabricated germanium immersion gratings of step groove shape with resolving power of 45,000 at 10 micron by using a nano-precision 3D grinding machine and ELID (ELectrolytic In-process Dressing) method. However, the method requires a large amount of machine times and efforts. We had proposed a novel immersion grating with slot shape lattice of total reflection mirrors, which achieves high performance and lower fabrication cost. We describe the photolithography and the latest plasma nano-technologies for fabrications of the novel diffraction gratings in our presentation. We also introduce birefringence volume gratings in this article.

  9. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  10. Bioinspired micrograting arrays mimicking the reverse color diffraction elements evolved by the butterfly Pierella luna

    PubMed Central

    England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Kim, Philseok; Khan, Mughees; Muñoz, Philip; Mazur, Eric; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, diffraction elements that reverse the color sequence normally observed in planar diffraction gratings have been found in the wing scales of the butterfly Pierella luna. Here, we describe the creation of an artificial photonic material mimicking this reverse color-order diffraction effect. The bioinspired system consists of ordered arrays of vertically oriented microdiffraction gratings. We present a detailed analysis and modeling of the coupling of diffraction resulting from individual structural components and demonstrate its strong dependence on the orientation of the individual miniature gratings. This photonic material could provide a basis for novel developments in biosensing, anticounterfeiting, and efficient light management in photovoltaic systems and light-emitting diodes. PMID:25288730

  11. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  12. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  13. Diffraction techniques in engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarczek, K.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.

    1995-12-31

    Diffraction techniques applied to crystalline materials provide quantitative information about the crystallographic structure and mechanical condition of the material. Those two characteristics influence the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of a Component. A concerted application of x-ray and neutron diffraction allows one to comprehensively study the bulk and subsurface variations of such material characteristics as crystallographic texture, residual stress, and cold work. The Residual Stress User Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers academic and industrial researchers both neutron and x-ray diffraction capabilities. Recent examples of the application of work related to thin film, metal, ceramic and composite material technologies are presented.

  14. Quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions with inclined rectangular apertures gratings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuwei; Zhu, Xiaoli; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Wenhai; Fan, Quanping; Wei, Lai; Yang, Zuhua; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Chen, Yong; He, Weihua; Wu, Yinzhong; Yan, Zhuoyang; Hua, Yilei; Zhao, Yidong; Cui, Mingqi; Qiu, Rong; Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhang, Baohan; Xie, Changqing; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the fundamentals and applications of diffraction gratings have received much attention. However, conventional diffraction gratings often suffer from higher-order diffraction contamination. Here, we introduce a simple and compact single optical element, named inclined rectangular aperture gratings (IRAG), for quasi suppression of higher-order diffractions. We show, both in the visible light and soft x-ray regions, that IRAG can significantly suppress higher-order diffractions with moderate diffraction efficiency. Especially, as no support strut is needed to maintain the free-standing patterns, the IRAG is highly advantageous to the extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions. The diffraction efficiency of the IRAG and the influences of fabrication constraints are also discussed. The unique quasi-single order diffraction properties of IRAG may open the door to a wide range of photonic applications. PMID:26563588

  15. Spectroscopic ellipsometry studies on the m-plane Al1‑ x In x N epilayers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on a freestanding GaN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Kagaya, Daiki; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Fujito, Kenji; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-05-01

    Dispersion relationships of the refractive index and extinction coefficient of m-plane Al1‑ x In x N epitaxial films (x = 0.00, 0.23, and 0.30) grown on a freestanding m-plane GaN substrate were determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement. The experimentally obtained ellipsometric parameters tan Ψ and cos Δ, which represent the differences in the p- and s-polarized amplitudes and phases of the incident light, respectively, were well fitted using the standard analytical functions. As the measurement was carried out at photon energies between 1.55 and 5.40 eV, the dispersion curves of the extinction coefficient k exhibited local maxima at approximately the Al1‑ x In x N bandgap energies of x = 0.23 and 0.30, and the sample with x = 0.00 showed an ordinal absorption spectrum with a bandtail formed owing to high-concentration residual impurities. A large and x-dependent energy difference between the absorption and emission spectra (Stokes’ shift) was observed for the Al1‑ x In x N films, suggesting the presence of carrier localization phenomena.

  16. Coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD) and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Q.

    1996-09-01

    We show that an x-ray interference phenomenon, coherent grating x-ray diffraction (CGXD), can be used to study lateral nanostructure arrays on crystal surfaces and interfaces. Compared to Fraunhofer grating diffraction of visible light, x-ray grating diffraction contains information not only about geometric profiles of the surface but also about the internal crystalline structures and lattice strain distributions in the grating features. The grating diffraction pattern can also be measured in a white-beam Laue method using highly collimated polychromatic synchrotron radiation, which provides a parallel data collection scheme and may be useful in {ital in} {ital situ} studies on evolution of nanostructure arrays. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. A Practical Method of Simulating X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisse, F.; Sundararajan, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the beam of X-rays is simulated through the use of a laser as a monochromatic light source and the crystal is replaced by photographically prepared masks. A strong diffraction pattern as large as 20 cm. can be obtained. (GS)

  18. Diffraction-controlled backscattering threshold and application to Raman gap

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey A.; Mounaix, Philippe

    2011-04-15

    In most classic analytical models of linear stimulated scatter, light diffraction is omitted, a priori. However, modern laser optic typically includes a variant of the random phase plate [Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984)], resulting in diffraction limited laser intensity fluctuations - or localized speckles - which may result in explosive reflectivity growth as the average laser intensity approaches a critical value [H. A. Rose and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2883 (1994)]. Among the differences between stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scatter is that the SRS scattered light diffracts more strongly than the laser light with increase of electron density. This weakens the tendency of the SRS light to closely follow the most amplified paths, diminishing gain. Let G{sub 0} be the one-dimensional power gain exponent of the stimulated scatter. In this paper we show that differential diffraction gives rise to an increase of G{sub 0} at the SRS physical threshold with increase of electron density up to a drastic disruption of SRS as electron density approaches one fourth of its critical value from below. For three wave interaction lengths not small compared to a speckle length, this is a physically robust Raman gap mechanism.

  19. Two-Diffraction-Order, Beam-Splitting, Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.; Burns, Ronald N.

    1995-01-01

    Two-octave imaging spectrometer utilizes light of two harmonically related wavelengths diffracted to harmonically related orders at same angles, followed by separation via dichroic beam splitter before final imaging. Conceptual design of spectrometer calls for minimum number of optical elements to achieve coverage of required visible and near-infrared wavelengths in instrument of reduced size, weight, and cost.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  1. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  2. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered. PMID:27505363

  3. Effect of solvent casting on reduced entanglement density in thin films studied by ellipsometry and neutron reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, B.B.; Walsh, D.J. . Central Research and Development)

    1994-01-17

    Neutron reflection (NR) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used for the investigation of the interfaces between films of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME, glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) = [minus]31 C) and polystyrene (PS, T[sub g][approximately] 105 C). The transport of PVME into PS at temperatures below the glass transition of PS was highly non-Fickian. The linear dependence of the front propagation with time, along with the high activation energy for transport indicates some similarities to classical case 2 transport of solvent into polymer glasses. The variation of PVME transport rate with PS molecular weight (MW) illustrates one significant difference as compared to classical case 2 transport. The strong dependence of PVME transport rate on PS MW is attributed to the MW dependence of the rate of swelling and dissolution of PS in the swollen front region. It was also found that the transport rate (front velocity) of PVME into PS depended strongly on the temperature and time of preannealing of the single spin coated PS layer. Preannealing at temperature well above T[sub g] for higher MW PS films was necessary. Birefringence measurements on PS films proved that internal stress was not a factor. A systematic MW study indicated that the major factor was the reduced entanglement density due to spinning of PS films from solution.

  4. Etching of a-Si:H thin films by hydrogen plasma: A view from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjadj, Aomar Larbi, Fadila; Gilliot, Mickaël; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2014-08-28

    When atomic hydrogen interacts with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), the induced modifications are of crucial importance during a-Si:H based devices manufacturing or processing. In the case of hydrogen plasma, the depth of the modified zone depends not only on the plasma processing parameters but also on the material. In this work, we exposed a-Si:H thin films to H{sub 2} plasma just after their deposition. In situ UV-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were performed to track the H-induced changes in the material. The competition between hydrogen insertion and silicon etching leads to first order kinetics in the time-evolution of the thickness of the H-modified zone. We analyzed the correlation between the steady state structural parameters of the H-modified layer and the main levers that control the plasma-surface interaction. In comparison with a simple doped layer, exposure of a-Si:H based junctions to the same plasma treatment leads to a thinner H-rich subsurface layer, suggesting a possible charged state of hydrogen diffusing.

  5. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  6. Characterization of a water-dispersible metal protective coating with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, modulated differential scanning calorimetry, and ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Stamatis C; Douvas, Antonios M; Argyropoulos, Vassilike; Siatou, Amalia; Vlachopoulou, Marilena

    2012-05-01

    An ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymer, formulated by BASF as a waterborne suspension of its alkylammonium salt and used, among other applications, in art conservation as a temporary protective coating was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy aided by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and ellipsometry. The thermal conversion of thin copolymer films from the freshly applied state, where carboxylic acid and carboxylate ion functional groups co-exist, to a purely acidic working state was spectroscopically followed. Transmission mid-infrared data of the working state showed a 1 : 12 ratio of methacrylic acid towards ethylene units. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) in the same state was found at 45 °C. Copolymer films spin-coated on mechanically polished bronze and iron coupons were characterized with transflection infrared spectroscopy and compared to corresponding transmission mid-infrared spectra of copolymer films spin-coated on silicon wafers. In the case of bronze coupons, evidence for interaction of the carboxylate ion with the copper substrate was obtained. The chemical structure and the thermal behavior of the coating, as well as some implications on its protective capability towards iron and copper alloys, is discussed as this material has received considerable attention in the field of metal conservation and coatings. PMID:22524964

  7. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Measurements of Wurtzite Gallium Nitride Surfaces as a Function of Buffered Oxide Etch Substrate Submersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwejkowski, Chester; Constantin, Costel; Duda, John; Hopkins, Patrick; Optical Studies of GaN interfaces Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is considered the most important semiconductor after the discovery of silicon. Understanding the optical properties of GaN surfaces is imperative in determining the utility and applicability of this class of materials to devices. In this work, we present preliminary results of spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements as a function of surface root mean square (RMS). We used commercially available 5mm x 5mm, one side polished GaN (3-7 μm)/Sapphire (430 μm) substrates that have a wurtzite crystal structure and they are slightly n-type doped. The GaN substrates were cleaned with Acetone (20 min)/Isopropanol(20 min)/DI water (20 min) before they were submerged into Buffered Oxide Etch (BOE) for 10s - 60s steps. This BOE treatment produced RMS values of 1-30 nm as measured with an atomic force microscope. Preliminary qualitative ellipsometric measurements show that the complex refractive index and the complex dielectric function decrease with an increase of RMS. More measurements need to be done in order to provide explicit quantitative results. This work was supported by the 4-VA Collaborative effort between James Madison University and University of Virginia.

  8. Study of the interface Si-nc/SiO 2 by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, I.; Gallas, B.; Siozade, L.; Fisson, S.; Vuye, G.; Chenot, S.; Rivory, J.

    2007-04-01

    SiO x films (1< x<2), 0.5 μm thick, have been elaborated by electron-gun evaporation. A thermal annealing of these films induced a phase separation leading to the formation of Si nanocrystals embedded in a SiO 2 matrix. These films have been studied by infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effective dielectric function of the thin films has been extracted in the 600-5000 cm -1 range which allowed us to deduce the dielectric function of the matrix surrounding the Si-nc. A study of the Transverse Optical (TO) vibration mode has revealed the presence of SiO x into the matrix. Before XPS measurements, the films have been etched in fluorhydric acid to remove the superficial SiO 2 layer formed during air exposure. The Si 2p core-level emission has been recorded. The decomposition of the Si 2p peak into contributions of the usual five tetrahedrons Si-(Si 4-nO n) ( n=0-4) has also revealed the presence of a SiO x phase. Consistency between infra-red and XPS results is discussed.

  9. Characterization of Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si Heterostructures for Device Applications Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieg, R. M.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Croke, E. T.; Harrell, M. J.; Tanner, M.; Wang, K. L.; Mena, R. A.; Young, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) characterization of several complex Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si heterostructures prepared for device fabrication, including structures for heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT), p-type and n-type heterostructure modulation doped field effect transistors, has been performed. We have shown that SE can simultaneously determine all active layer thicknesses, Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x) compositions, and the oxide overlayer thickness, with only a general knowledge of the structure topology needed a priori. The characterization of HBT material included the SE analysis of a Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x) layer deeply buried (600 nanometers) under the silicon emitter and cap layers. In the SE analysis of n-type heterostructures, we examined for the first time a silicon layer under tensile strain. We found that an excellent fit can be obtained using optical constants of unstrained silicon to represent the strained silicon conduction layer. We also used SE to measure lateral sample homogeneity, providing quantitative identification of the inhomogeneous layer. Surface overlayers resulting from prior sample processing were also detected and measured quantitatively. These results should allow SE to be used extensively as a non-destructive means of characterizing Si (sub X)Ge (sub 1-x)/Si heterostructures prior to device fabrication and testing.

  10. Temperature-Modulated Ellipsometry in Vacuum: A New Tool for Probing Glass Transition in Thin Supported Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Mikhail; Soofi, Shauheen; Kiyanova, Anna; Cerrina, Franco; Nealey, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Observation of glass transition in thin polymer films is a good example of experimental challenges that measurements at the nanoscale may present. The standard technique in the field, ellipsometry, has been advanced by state-of-the-art approaches: measurements in vacuum and temperature modulation. Glass transition in 5 -- 200 nm thick spin-cast polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films on silicon has been studied at 10-6 -- 10-8 torr residual gas pressure, using both linear and modulated temperature scans [1, 2]. A well-defined glass transition in 5 nm thick PS and 10 nm thick PMMA films is observed. Factors that can alter glass transition temperature assignment will be discussed. Residual gas can affect data even at the pressures mentioned above [1]. An ionization gauge, the standard vacuum equipment, causes sample deterioration [1]. Temperature modulation effectively separates reversible glass transition from accompanying irreversible processes [2]. [1]. M. Yu. Efremov, S. S. Soofi, A. V. Kiyanova, C. J. Munoz, P. Burgardt, F. Cerrina, and P. F. Nealey, Rev. Sci. Instr., 79, 043903 (2008). [2]. M. Yu. Efremov, A. V. Kiyanova, and P. F. Nealey, Macromolecules, 41, 5978 (2008).

  11. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  12. Following the Formation of Supported Lipid Bilayers on Mica: A Study Combining AFM, QCM-D, and Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Ralf P.; Brisson, Alain R.

    2005-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are popular models of cell membranes with potential biotechnological applications and an understanding of the mechanisms of SLB formation is now emerging. Here we characterize, by combining atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and ellipsometry, the formation of SLBs on mica from sonicated unilamellar vesicles using mixtures of zwitterionic, negatively and positively charged lipids. The results are compared with those we reported previously on silica. As on silica, electrostatic interactions were found to determine the pathway of lipid deposition. However, fundamental differences in the stability of surface-bound vesicles and the mobility of SLB patches were observed, and point out the determining role of the solid support in the SLB-formation process. The presence of calcium was found to have a much more pronounced influence on the lipid deposition process on mica than on silica. Our results indicate a specific calcium-mediated interaction between dioleoylphosphatidylserine molecules and mica. In addition, we show that the use of PLL-g-PEG modified tips considerably improves the AFM imaging of surface-bound vesicles and bilayer patches and evaluate the effects of the AFM tip on the apparent size and shape of these soft structures. PMID:15731391

  13. Surface roughness estimation of MBE grown CdTe/GaAs(211)B by ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakaya, Merve; Bilgilisoy, Elif; Arı, Ozan; Selamet, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) ranging from 1.24 eV to 5.05 eV is used to obtain the film thickness and optical properties of high index (211) CdTe films. A three-layer optical model (oxide/CdTe/GaAs) was chosen for the ex-situ ellipsometric data analysis. Surface roughness cannot be determined by the optical model if oxide is included. We show that roughness can be accurately estimated, without any optical model, by utilizing the correlation between SE data (namely the imaginary part of the dielectric function, <ɛ2 > or phase angle, ψ) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) roughness. <ɛ2 > and ψ values at 3.31 eV, which corresponds to E1 critical transition energy of CdTe band structure, are chosen for the correlation since E1 gives higher resolution than the other critical transition energies. On the other hand, due to the anisotropic characteristic of (211) oriented CdTe surfaces, SE data (<ɛ2 > and ψ) shows varieties for different azimuthal angle measurements. For this reason, in order to estimate the surface roughness by considering these correlations, it is shown that SE measurements need to be taken at the same surface azimuthal angle. Estimating surface roughness in this manner is an accurate way to eliminate cumbersome surface roughness measurement by AFM.

  14. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry of 3C-SiC Thin Films Grown on Si Substrates Using Organosilane Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Naoki; Moritani, Akihiro; Kitahara, Kuninori; Asahina, Shuichi; Kanayama, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Suzuki, Michio; Nishino, Shigehiro

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric function spectra of 3C-SiC films on Si substrates in the energy region of 0.73-6.43 eV were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Hexamethyldisilane (Si2(CH3)6) and tetraethylsilane (Si(C2H5)4) were used as safe organosilane sources for the growth of SiC films. The measured spectra were compared with those of 3C-SiC on a Si(001) substrate grown with disilane (Si2H6). First, the pseudodielectric function spectra gave a shoulder structure corresponding to the direct X5-X1 interband transition in the Brillouin zone. Secondly, the dielectric function of 3C-SiC was determined by applying a four-layer model in which we took into account the surface roughness and mixed crystals of a carbonized interface layer. Finally, the third-derivative lineshape of the imaginary part \\varepsilon2 of the complex-dielectric function provided the values of the interband transition energy Eg and the broadening parameter Γ for the X5-X1 interband transition. The measured values of Γ indicated that the crystalline quality of SiC films grown using organosilane sources is comparable to that of SiC films grown using Si2H6.

  15. A total internal reflection ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy study of interactions between Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Sęk, S; Dworecki, K; Kaca, W

    2015-07-01

    Specific antigen-antibody interactions play a central role in the human immune system. The objective of this paper is to detect immune complexes using label-free detection techniques, that is, total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based topography and recognition imaging. Interactions of purified rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies with bacterial endotoxins (Proteus mirabilis S1959 O3 lipopolysaccharides) were studied. Lipopolysaccharide was adsorbed on gold surface for TIRE. In the AFM imaging experiments, LPS was attachment to the PEG linker (AFM tip modification). The mica surface was covered by IgG. In TIRE, the optical parameters Ψ and Δ change when a complex is formed. It was found that even highly structured molecules, such as IgG antibodies (anti-O3 LPS rabbit serum), preserve their specific affinity to their antigens (LPS O3). LPS P. mirabilis O3 response of rabbit serum anti-O3 was also tested by topography and recognition imaging. Both TIRE and AFM techniques were recruited to check for possible detection of antigen-antibody recognition event. The presented data allow for determination of interactions between a variety of biomolecules. In future research, this technique has considerable potential for studying a wide range of antigen-antibody interactions and its use may be extended to other biomacromolecular systems. PMID:25854960

  16. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Synowicki, R. A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.

    2015-02-01

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm-1 as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  17. Determination of the optical properties and size dispersion of Si nanoparticles within a dielectric matrix by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, A.-S.; Naciri, A. En Battie, Y.; Delachat, F.; Carrada, M.; Ferblantier, G.; Slaoui, A.

    2014-09-14

    We report on a comparative study between dielectric functions of Si nanoparticles (Si-NPs) obtained from Bruggeman effective medium approximation (BEMA), Maxwell-Garnett (MG), and a modified Maxwell-Garnett (MMG) models. Unlike BEMA and MG, a size-distribution dependent dielectric function of Si-NPs is considered in the introduced MMG model. We show that the standard deviation σ of a size distribution can be evaluated by analyzing the imaginary part of the dielectric functions of Si-NPs extracted from BEMA and MMG. In order to demonstrate this, several samples composed of Si-NPs embedded in silicon-rich silicon nitride are investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry over the photon energy range varying between 2 and 4 eV. Assuming a lognormal size distribution of the Si nanoparticles, it is evidenced that the parameter σ ranges between 1.15 and 1.35. The values of size dispersion deduced by this methodology are in good agreement with TEM observations.

  18. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  19. Diffractive dijet production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.; CDF Collaboration

    1998-04-17

    We have studied events with a high-x{sub F} antiproton and two central jets in CDF, with p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 630 and 1800 GeV. These events are expected to be dominated by diffraction (pomeron exchange). The jet E{sub T} spectra are very similar to those of non-diffractively produced jets but slightly steeper; their azimuthal difference {Delta}{phi} is more peaked at 180{degree}.

  20. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.