Science.gov

Sample records for light regulate delta

  1. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  2. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  3. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  4. Dual regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity by {delta}Np63 in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.-K.; Lee, K.-C.; Chow, S.-E.; Chen, J.-K. . E-mail: jkc508@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-04-21

    p63 splicing variants lacking NH{sub 2}-terminal transactivating domain, known as {delta}Np63, are thought to antagonize p53 and p63 functions and are suggested to play roles in keratinocyte differentiation. Here, we show that {delta}Np63 has a dual-regulatory effect on the activity of its own promoter in NPC-076 cell. Down-regulation of the transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is present in low levels. In contrast, up-regulation of {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is expressed at higher levels. The down-regulation effect is abolished when the p53-binding site of the {delta}Np63 promoter is mutated. In sharp contrast, similar mutation does not affect the up-regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity under the same experimental conditions. Further study shows that the up-regulation is correlated with the activation of the STAT3, as the blockade of STAT3 nuclear translocation abolishes the up-regulation by {delta}Np63. Thus, {delta}Np63 exerts a bidirectional regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity in NPC-076 cell.

  5. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  6. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin; McDonald, Fiona J.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  7. Regulation by light in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Javier; Estrada, Alejandro F

    2010-11-01

    The genus Fusarium stands out as research model for pathogenesis and secondary metabolism. Light stimulates the production of some Fusarium metabolites, such as the carotenoids, and in many species it influences the production of asexual spores and sexual fruiting bodies. As found in other fungi with well-known photoresponses, the Fusarium genomes contain several genes for photoreceptors, among them a set of White Collar (WC) proteins, a cryptochrome, a photolyase, a phytochrome and two presumably photoactive opsins. The mutation of the opsin genes produced no apparent phenotypic alterations, but the loss of the only WC-1 orthologous protein eliminated the photoinduced expression of the photolyase and opsin genes. In contrast to other carotenogenic species, lack of the WC photoreceptor did not impede the light-induced accumulation of carotenoids, but produced alterations in conidiation, animal pathogenicity and nitrogen-regulated secondary metabolism. The regulation and functional role of other Fusarium photoreceptors is currently under investigation. PMID:20460165

  8. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  9. Proteasome involvement in agonist-induced down-regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, K; Bandari, P; Chinen, N; Howells, R D

    2001-04-13

    This study investigated the mechanism of agonist-induced opioid receptor down-regulation. Incubation of HEK 293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged delta and mu receptors with agonists caused a time-dependent decrease in opioid receptor levels assayed by immunoblotting. Pulse-chase experiments using [(35)S]methionine metabolic labeling indicated that the turnover rate of delta receptors was accelerated 5-fold following agonist stimulation. Inactivation of functional G(i) and G(o) proteins by pertussis toxin-attenuated down-regulation of the mu opioid receptor, while down-regulation of the delta opioid receptor was unaffected. Pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of lysosomal proteases, calpain, and caspases had little effect on mu and delta opioid receptor down-regulation. In marked contrast, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors attenuated agonist-induced mu and delta receptor down-regulation. In addition, incubation of cells with proteasome inhibitors in the absence of agonists increased steady-state mu and delta opioid receptor levels. Immunoprecipitation of mu and delta opioid receptors followed by immunoblotting with ubiquitin antibodies suggested that preincubation with proteasome inhibitors promoted accumulation of polyubiquitinated receptors. These data provide evidence that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a role in agonist-induced down-regulation and basal turnover of opioid receptors. PMID:11152677

  10. Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Charlie

    2000-08-20

    The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

  11. IL-1 beta-dependent regulation of C/EBP delta transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Svotelis, Amy; Doyon, Geneviève; Bernatchez, Gérald; Désilets, Antoine; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2005-03-11

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor C/EBP delta is involved in the intestinal inflammatory response. C/EBP delta regulates several inflammatory response genes, such as haptoglobin, in the rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6 in response to IL-1. However, the different C/EBP delta domains involved in IL-1 beta-mediated transcriptional activation and the kinases implicated have not been properly defined. To address this, we determined the role of the p38 MAP kinase in the regulation of C/EBP delta transcriptional activity. The IL-1-dependent induction of the acute phase protein gene haptoglobin in IEC-6 cells was decreased in response to the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580, as determined by Northern blot. Transcriptional activity of C/EBP delta was repressed by the specific inhibitor of the p38 MAP kinase, as assessed by transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis studies and transient transfection assays revealed an important domain for transcriptional activation between amino acids 70 and 108. This domain overlapped with a docking site for the p38 MAP kinase, between amino acids 75 and 85, necessary to insure C/EBP delta phosphorylation. Deletion of this domain led to a decrease in basal transcriptional activity of C/EBP delta and in p300-dependent transactivation, as assessed by transient transfection assays, and in IL-1-dependent haptoglobin induction. This unusual arrangement of a kinase docking site within a transactivation domain may functionally be important for the regulation of C/EBP delta transcriptional activity. PMID:15694370

  12. Are the C delta light nitrogen and noble gases located in the same carrier?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Shukolyukov, Yuri A.

    1993-01-01

    Light nitrogen and the HL family noble gas components of C(sub delta) appear to be separable by high resolution pyrolysis experiments. Thus C(sub delta) is not a homogeneous material and probably consists of debris of many stars. The question of whether the N and Xe(HL) actually reside in different carriers continues to be addressed. It is well known that C(sub delta) which was identified as nanometer sized diamonds contains isotopically anamalous elements, in particular noble gases including Xe(HL) and its family and light nitrogen (delta(N-15) down to -350 percent). Before the true nature of C(sub delta) was recognized, it was easy to suppose that the Xe(HL) and light nitrogen were located in the same carrier. However, recognition that light nitrogen in diamond from different samples varies by greater than a factor of six compared to Xe(HL) fluctuations of ca. 20 percent makes such an assumption questionable. On the basis of simple arithmetic logic, the Xe and nitrogen cannot be absolutely co-located. The average diamond grain consists of only about 1000-2000 atoms of carbon; one grain among a few x 10(exp 6) contains an atom of Xe(HL) while 5-30 atoms of light nitrogen are the typical number which need to be in every diamond grain to account for observed concentrations. If some grains are devoid of N, the others have to have a higher N concentration. Even if we were able to analyze an individual grain of the diamond for noble gases and nitrogen, we would be faced with the monumental task of locating the one amongst 10(exp 6) identical grains containing the Xe atom to examine its nitrogen content. The problem can be simplified to some extent if instead of Xe, He which is 10(exp 4) times more abundant is assumed to be a member of the HL family. Attempts to fractionate the separate carriers might be attempted using He and N as guiding indicators but even experiments of this nature are for the future. Faced with apparently insoluble problems, we have returned to an

  13. Light regulation of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    Precise allocation of limited resources between growth and defense is critical for plant survival. In shade-intolerant species, perception of competition signals by informational photoreceptors activates shade-avoidance responses and reduces the expression of defenses against pathogens and insects. The main mechanism underlying defense suppression is the simultaneous downregulation of jasmonate and salicylic acid signaling by low ratios of red:far-red radiation. Inactivation of phytochrome B by low red:far-red ratios appears to suppress jasmonate responses by altering the balance between DELLA and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins in favor of the latter. Solar UVB radiation is a positive modulator of plant defense, signaling through jasmonate-dependent and jasmonate-independent pathways. Light, perceived by phytochrome B and presumably other photoreceptors, helps plants concentrate their defensive arsenals in photosynthetically valuable leaves. The discovery of connections between photoreceptors and defense signaling is revealing novel mechanisms that control key resource allocation decisions in plant canopies. PMID:24471835

  14. Food web implications of delta13C and delta15N variability over 370 km of the regulated Colorado River USA.

    PubMed

    Shannon, J P; Blinn, D W; Haden, G A; Benenati, E P; Wilson, K P

    2001-01-01

    Dual stable isotope analysis in the regulated Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park, USA, revealed a food web that varied spatially through this arid biome. Down-river enrichment of delta13C data was detected across three trophic levels resulting in shifted food webs. Humpack chub delta13C and delta15N values from muscle plugs and fin clips did not differ significantly. Humpback chub and rainbow trout trophic position is positively correlated with standard length indicating an increase in piscivory by larger fishes. Recovery of the aquatic community from impoundment by Glen Canyon Dam and collecting refinements for stable isotope analysis within large rivers are discussed. PMID:11924849

  15. Regulation of delta-aminolevulinate synthase activity during the development of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T V

    1999-06-01

    Activities of rat liver delta-aminolevulinate synthetase (delta-ALAS), glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GSH content in the liver, and the absorption spectrum of blood serum were investigated after CoCl2, HgCl2, or beta-adrenoblocker (propranolol) injection and after CoCl2 and propranolol co-administration. Inhibition of the activity of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme delta-ALAS was most pronounced and prolonged during the first hours after CoCl2 and CoCl2 plus propranolol injections; this was associated with accumulation of Co2+--protoporphyrin-containing products of hemolysis. Inhibition of delta-ALAS after propranolol injection is not mediated by hemolysis. A decrease in GSH content precedes the induction of heme biosynthesis only in the case of HgCl2 administration, and this was associated with inhibition of GR and G6PDH. The decreased GSH content during the first hours after injection of propranolol and co-administration of CoCl2 and propranolol was not followed by increase in delta-ALAS activity 24 h after the injection. The mechanisms of the increase in the free heme content in the liver during the early stages of oxidative stress and the regulation of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme are discussed. PMID:10395986

  16. The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

    2000-06-19

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

  17. Asymmetric Rab 11 endosomes regulate delta recycling and specify cell fate in the Drosophila nervous system.

    PubMed

    Emery, Gregory; Hutterer, Andrea; Berdnik, Daniela; Mayer, Bernd; Wirtz-Peitz, Frederik; Gaitan, Marcos Gonzalez; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2005-09-01

    Drosophila sensory organ precursor (SOP) cells are a well-studied model system for asymmetric cell division. During SOP division, the determinants Numb and Neuralized segregate into the pIIb daughter cell and establish a distinct cell fate by regulating Notch/Delta signaling. Here, we describe a Numb- and Neuralized-independent mechanism that acts redundantly in cell-fate specification. We show that trafficking of the Notch ligand Delta is different in the two daughter cells. In pIIb, Delta passes through the recycling endosome which is marked by Rab 11. In pIIa, however, the recycling endosome does not form because the centrosome fails to recruit Nuclear fallout, a Rab 11 binding partner that is essential for recycling endosome formation. Using a mammalian cell culture system, we demonstrate that recycling endosomes are essential for Delta activity. Our results suggest that cells can regulate signaling pathways and influence their developmental fate by inhibiting the formation of individual endocytic compartments. PMID:16137758

  18. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  19. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  20. Differential regulation of. mu. , delta, kappa opioid receptors by Mn/sup + +/

    SciTech Connect

    Szuecs, M.; Oetting, G.M.; Coscia, C.J.

    1986-03-05

    Differential effects of Mn/sup + +/ on three opioid receptor subtypes of rat brain membranes were evaluated. Concentration dependency studies performed with 0.05-20 mM Mn/sup + +/ revealed that only the delta receptors are stimulated at any concentration. The binding of 1 nM /sup 3/H-DAGO was not stimulated by low concentrations (< 1mM) of Mn/sup + +/, and was significantly inhibited at higher concentrations (40% at 20 mM). 1 nM /sup 3/H-EKC (+100nM DAGO and 100nM DADLE) binding was inhibited by Mn/sup + +/ in the entire concentration range. While regulation of ..mu.. receptor binding did not change during postnatal development, delta and kappa binding displayed a pronounced developmental time-dependency. Kappa sites were hardly affected by Mn/sup + +/ at day 5, and adult levels of inhibition were reached only after the third week postnatal. In contrast, 1 nM /sup 3/H-DADLE (+10nM DAGO) binding was most sensitive to Mn/sup + +/ on day 5 after birth (100% stimulation with 5-20 mM). The ED/sub 50/ of Mn/sup + +/ stimulation was unchanged during maturation. These immature delta sites displayed a similar extent of Mn/sup + +/ reversal of Gpp(NH)p inhibition as seen in microsomes, which represent a good model of N/sub i/-uncoupled receptors. These data suggest that ..mu.., delta and kappa receptors are differently coupled to N/sub i/. Moreover, a second divalent cation binding site, in addition to that on N/sub i/ might exist for delta receptors.

  1. Endocytic trafficking routes of wild type and DeltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Cui, Liying; Wu, Yufeng; Ozols, Victor V; Choudhury, Amit; Pagano, Richard E; Riordan, John R

    2004-06-01

    Intracellular trafficking of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a focus of attention because it is defective in most patients with cystic fibrosis. DeltaF508 CFTR, which does not mature conformationally, normally does not exit the endoplasmic reticulum, but if induced to do so at reduced temperature is short-lived at the surface. We used external epitope-tagged constructs to elucidate the itinerary and kinetics of wild type and DeltaF508 CFTR in the endocytic pathway and visualized movement of CFTR from the surface to intracellular compartments. Modulation of different endocytic steps with low temperature (16 degrees C) block, protease inhibitors, and overexpression of wild type and mutant Rab GTPases revealed that surface CFTR enters several different routes, including a Rab5-dependent initial step to early endosomes, then either Rab11-dependent recycling back to the surface or Rab7-regulated movement to late endosomes or alternatively Rab9-mediated transit to the trans-Golgi network. Without any of these modulations DeltaF508 CFTR rapidly disappears from and does not return to the cell surface, confirming that its altered structure is detected in the distal as well as proximal secretory pathway. Importantly, however, the mutant protein can be rescued at the plasma membrane by Rab11 overexpression, proteasome inhibitors, or inhibition of Rab5-dependent endocytosis. PMID:15075371

  2. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  3. Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A.; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Mennicken, Françoise; O’Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Woodbury, C. Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I.; MacDermott, Amy B.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  4. AN Lyn: a multiperiodic Delta Scuti star showing atypical light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Gonzalez-Bedolla, S. F.; Rolland, A.; Costa, V.; Lopez-Gonzalez, M. J.; Lopez de Coca, P.

    1997-07-01

    We have collected simultaneous uvby photometry of the Delta Sct star AN Lyn during the years 1995 and 1996 at the observatories of San Pedro Mertir, Mexico and Sierra Nevada, Spain. Firstly, analysis of frequencies of our 1995's data set was carried out using the Discrete Fourier Transform method, as described in Lopez de Coca et al. (1984), to the filter v. The periodograms showed a principal peak at v1 ~ 10.1756 c/d, very close to that frequency which corresponds to the period P ~0.0982739 d derived from earlier works. After prewhitening for v1 we found a second peak at 20.3525 c/d that corresponds to 2*v1. When these two frequencies are subtracted from the light curves, the periodograms show some peaks that reveal that additional frequencies are remaining in the spectra at very low amplitude as compared with the amplitude of the main peak (less than 5%).

  5. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  6. DeltaA/DeltaD regulate multiple and temporally distinct phases of notch signaling during dopaminergic neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Julia; Filippi, Alida; Driever, Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons develop at distinct anatomical sites to form some of the major neuromodulatory systems in the vertebrate brain. Despite their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases and the interests in reconstitutive therapies from stem cells, mechanisms of the neurogenic switch from precursor populations to dopaminergic neurons are not well understood. Here, we investigated neurogenesis of different dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuron populations in the zebrafish embryo. Birth-dating analysis by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation revealed temporal dynamics of catecholaminergic neurogenesis. Analysis of Notch signaling mutants and stage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Notch processing revealed that dopaminergic neurons form by temporally distinct mechanisms: dopaminergic neurons of the posterior tuberculum derive directly from neural plate cells during primary neurogenesis, whereas other dopaminergic groups form in continuous or wavelike neurogenesis phases from proliferating precursor pools. Systematic analysis of Notch ligands revealed that the two zebrafish co-orthologs of mammalian Delta1, DeltaA and DeltaD, control the neurogenic switch of all early developing dopaminergic neurons in a partially redundant manner. DeltaA/D may also be involved in maintenance of dopaminergic precursor pools, as olig2 expression in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic precursors is affected in dla/dld mutants. DeltaA/D act upstream of sim1a and otpa during dopaminergic specification. However, despite the fact that both dopaminergic and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons derive from sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursors, DeltaA/D does not act as a lineage switch between these two neuronal types. Rather, DeltaA/D limits the size of the sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursor pool from which dopaminergic neurons differentiate. PMID:21148001

  7. Protein kinase C delta inhibits Caco-2 cell proliferation by selective changes in cell cycle and cell death regulators.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Mustafi, R; Little, H; Cohen, G; Khare, S; Moore, C; Majumder, P; Bissonnette, M

    2006-05-25

    PKC-delta is a serine/threonine kinase that mediates diverse signal transduction pathways. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of PKC-delta slowed the G1 progression of Caco-2 colon cancer cells, accelerated apoptosis, and induced cellular differentiation. In this study, we further characterized the PKC-delta dependent signaling pathways involved in these tumor suppressor actions in Caco-2 cells overexpressing PKC-delta using a Zn2+ inducible expression vector. Consistent with a G1 arrest, increased expression of PKC-delta caused rapid and significant downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins (50% decreases, P<0.05), while mRNA levels remained unchanged. The PKC agonist, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, 100 nM, 4 h), induced two-fold higher protein and mRNA levels of p21(Waf1), a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in PKC-delta transfectants compared with empty vector (EV) transfected cells, whereas the PKC-delta specific inhibitor rottlerin (3 microM) or knockdown of this isoenzyme with specific siRNA oligonucleotides blocked p21(Waf1) expression. Concomitantly, compared to EV control cells, PKC-delta upregulation decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin E proteins co-immunoprecipitating with cdk6 and cdk2, respectively. In addition, overexpression of PKC-delta increased binding of cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) to cdk4. These alterations in cyclin-cdks and their inhibitors are predicted to decrease G1 cyclin kinase activity. As an independent confirmation of the direct role PKC-delta plays in cell growth and cell cycle regulation, we knocked down PKC-delta using specific siRNA oligonucleotides. PKC-delta specific siRNA oligonucleotides, but not irrelevant control oligonucleotides, inhibited PKC-delta protein by more than 80% in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, PKC-delta knockdown enhanced cell proliferation ( approximately 1.4-2-fold, P<0.05) and concomitantly increased cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression ( approximately 1.7-fold, P<0.05). This was a specific

  8. An Expanded Notch-Delta Model Exhibiting Long-Range Patterning and Incorporating MicroRNA Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry S.; Gumbayan, Abygail M.; Zeller, Robert W.; Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Notch-Delta signaling is a fundamental cell-cell communication mechanism that governs the differentiation of many cell types. Most existing mathematical models of Notch-Delta signaling are based on a feedback loop between Notch and Delta leading to lateral inhibition of neighboring cells. These models result in a checkerboard spatial pattern whereby adjacent cells express opposing levels of Notch and Delta, leading to alternate cell fates. However, a growing body of biological evidence suggests that Notch-Delta signaling produces other patterns that are not checkerboard, and therefore a new model is needed. Here, we present an expanded Notch-Delta model that builds upon previous models, adding a local Notch activity gradient, which affects long-range patterning, and the activity of a regulatory microRNA. This model is motivated by our experiments in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis showing that the peripheral sensory neurons, whose specification is in part regulated by the coordinate activity of Notch-Delta signaling and the microRNA miR-124, exhibit a sparse spatial pattern whereby consecutive neurons may be spaced over a dozen cells apart. We perform rigorous stability and bifurcation analyses, and demonstrate that our model is able to accurately explain and reproduce the neuronal pattern in Ciona. Using Monte Carlo simulations of our model along with miR-124 transgene over-expression assays, we demonstrate that the activity of miR-124 can be incorporated into the Notch decay rate parameter of our model. Finally, we motivate the general applicability of our model to Notch-Delta signaling in other animals by providing evidence that microRNAs regulate Notch-Delta signaling in analogous cell types in other organisms, and by discussing evidence in other organisms of sparse spatial patterns in tissues where Notch-Delta signaling is active. PMID:24945987

  9. Recently Determined Light Elements for the delta Scuti Star ZZ Microscopii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsen, R. A.; Napier-Munn, T.

    2015-06-01

    The delta Scuti star ZZ Microscopii (HD 199757) was studied by photoelectric photometry (PEP) on three nights in 2008 and by DSLR photometry on three nights in 2014. PEP yielded 51 magnitude measurements in V, including 4 peaks of the light curve, and DSLR photometry yielded 622 measurements, including 14 peaks of the light curve. Fourier analysis of the DSLR photometric data found a principle frequency F1 of 14.8853 (0.0001) c/d, and a harmonic frequency 2F1 of 29.7706 (0.0007) c/d, similar to the results of others. Another frequency F2 of 22.2049 (0.0025) c/d, of much lower amplitude than F1, was identified. F2 is higher than the frequency (19.15 c/d) previously reported in the literature, and its accuracy is regarded as uncertain as the semi-amplitude of F2 is low. Regression analysis of an O-C diagram, plotted from 33 historical times of maximum from 1960 to 2003, 4 times of maximum from our PEP in 2008, and 14 times of maximum light from our DSLR photometry in 2014 indicated that a cubic regression provided the best fit. The fitted curve confirms conclusions of others that the period of ZZ Mic was increasing at a constant rate during the years 1960 to 2003, and indicates that the period has decreased during more recent years. The following cubic ephemeris was derived, with zero epoch defined as the first peak of the DSLR photometry light curve on 19 July 2014: Tmax (HJD) = 2456858.0131 (0.0002) - 7.644 (2.532) • 10-19 E3 - 2.646 (0.973) • 10-13 E2 + 0.06717917 (0.00000001) E.

  10. Hypoxia-Regulated Delta-like 1 Homologue Enhances Cancer Cell Stemness and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Zelterman, Daniel; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, inhibits differentiation and facilitates stem cell maintenance. Hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors and promotes malignant progression. Hypoxic tumors are aggressive and exhibit stem cell–like characteristics. It remains unclear, however, whether and how hypoxia regulates cancer cell differentiation and maintains cancer cell stemness. Here, we show that hypoxia increases the expression of the stem cell gene DLK1, or delta-like 1 homologue (Drosophila), in neuronal tumor cells. Inhibition of DLK1 enhances spontaneous differentiation, decreases clonogenicity, and reduces in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of DLK1 inhibits differentiation and enhances tumorigenic potentials. We further show that the DLK1 cytoplasmic domain, especially Tyrosine339 and Serine355, is required for maintaining both clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Because elevated DLK1 expression is found in many tumor types, our observations suggest that hypoxia and DLK1 may constitute an important stem cell pathway for the regulation of cancer stem cell–like functionality and tumorigenicity. PMID:19934310

  11. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  12. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  13. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li; Shen, Chen Yi; Ma, Qun Li; Cao, Ting Bing; Wang, Li Juan; Nie, Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhi Ming

    2007-03-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p<0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p<0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-delta. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-delta by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00+/-0.06 (n=3) to 1.91+/-0.06 (n=3; p<0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-delta significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39+/-0.03 (n=3; p<0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Both CB1 and PPAR-delta are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:17223076

  14. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments. PMID:26905653

  15. Glutamate Delta-1 Receptor Regulates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Signaling in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Pratyush S; Gupta, Subhash C; Yadav, Roopali; Kesherwani, Varun; Liu, Jinxu; Dravid, Shashank M

    2016-08-01

    The delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors consists of glutamate delta-1 (GluD1) and glutamate delta-2 receptors. We have previously shown that GluD1 knockout mice exhibit features of developmental delay, including impaired spine pruning and switch in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit, which are relevant to autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we identified a novel role of GluD1 in regulating metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) signaling in the hippocampus. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated colocalization of mGlu5 with GluD1 punctas in the hippocampus. Additionally, GluD1 protein coimmunoprecipitated with mGlu5 in the hippocampal membrane fraction, as well as when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, demonstrating that GluD1 and mGlu5 may cooperate in a signaling complex. The interaction of mGlu5 with scaffold protein effector Homer, which regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, was abnormal both under basal conditions and in response to mGlu1/5 agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in GluD1 knockout mice. The basal levels of phosphorylated mTOR and protein kinase B, the signaling proteins downstream of mGlu5 activation, were higher in GluD1 knockout mice, and no further increase was induced by DHPG. We also observed higher basal protein translation and an absence of DHPG-induced increase in GluD1 knockout mice. In accordance with a role of mGlu5-mediated mTOR signaling in synaptic plasticity, DHPG-induced internalization of surface α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor subunits was impaired in the GluD1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate that GluD1 interacts with mGlu5, and loss of GluD1 impairs normal mGlu5 signaling potentially by dysregulating coupling to its effector. These studies identify a novel role of the enigmatic GluD1 subunit in hippocampal function. PMID:27231330

  16. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, the aerosol scattering coefficients at RH in the range of 40 to ~ 90 % were measured using a humidified nephelometer system in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation (SD) of enhancement factors at RH = 85 % for the scattering coefficient (f(85 %)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85 %)), and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85 %)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07, and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e., aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25 % as the RH increased from 40 to 85 %. Concurrently, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21 %. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) or inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH). The highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of OM, and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated with f(85 %), which suggests that NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass fraction of nitrate also had a close relationship to the curvature of the humidograms; higher mass fractions of nitrate were associated with humidograms that had the least curvature. Aerosol hygroscopic growth caused a 47 % increase in the calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing at 85 % RH, compared to the forcing at 40 % RH.

  17. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  18. Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Li Wenqi; Cheng Senping; Yao Hua; Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan; Ke Zunji; Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok; Luo Jia; Shi Xianglin

    2011-06-15

    Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

  19. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H. C.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, a field campaign was carried out in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation of enhancement factors at RH=85% for the scattering coefficient (f(85%)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85%)) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85%)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07 and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e. aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25% as the RH increased from 40 to 85%. Meanwhile, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21%. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) and inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH), the highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of organic matter (OM), and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated to f(85%), which suggests NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass percentage of nitrate also had a close relation to the curvature of humidograms, namely, the higher the nitrate concentration is, the straighter the humidogram will be. Air masses that arrived at LinAn in March can be classified into northerly-polluted, locally-polluted and dust-influenced types, the scattering enhancement factors at 85% RH were 1.52 ± 0.10, 1.64 ± 0.09 and 1.48 ± 0.05, respectively. The sensitivity of the aerosol radiative forcing to f(RH) at the measured mean ambient RH 67% for various aerosol types was also estimated. The direct radiative forcing increased by 11.8, 19.5, and 10.5%, respectively, for locally-polluted, northerly-polluted and dust-influenced aerosols due to aerosol

  20. Aniline exposure associated with up-regulated transcriptional responses of three glutathione S-transferase Delta genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Chiao; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2015-03-01

    Complex transcriptional profile of glutathione S-transferase Delta cluster genes occurred in the developmental process of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this project was to quantify the expression levels of Gst Delta class genes altered by aniline exposure and to understand the relationship between aniline dosages and the variation of Gst Delta genes expressed in D. melanogaster. Using RT-PCR expression assays, the expression patterns of the transcript mRNAs of the glutathione S-transferase Delta genes were revealed and their expression levels were measured at eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. The adult stage was selected for further dose-response assays. After analysis, the results indicated that three Gst Delta genes (Gst D2, Gst D5 and Gst D6) were found to show a peak of up-regulated transcriptional response at 6-8h of exposure of aniline. Furthermore, the dose-response relationship of their induction levels within the dose regiments (from 1.2 to 2.0 μl/tube) had been measured. The expression patterns and annotations of these genes were discussed in the context. PMID:25682008

  1. Characterization of wild-type and deltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator in human respiratory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kreda, Silvia M; Mall, Marcus; Mengos, April; Rochelle, Lori; Yankaskas, James; Riordan, John R; Boucher, Richard C

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies in native tissues have produced conflicting data on the localization and metabolic fate of WT and deltaF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) in the lung. Combining immunocytochemical and biochemical studies utilizing new high-affinity CFTR mAbs with ion transport assays, we examined both 1) the cell type and region specific expression of CFTR in normal airways and 2) the metabolic fate of deltaF508 CFTR and associated ERM proteins in the cystic fibrosis lung. Studies of lungs from a large number of normal subjects revealed that WT CFTR protein localized to the apical membrane of ciliated cells within the superficial epithelium and gland ducts. In contrast, other cell types in the superficial, gland acinar, and alveolar epithelia expressed little WT CFTR protein. No deltaF508 CFTR mature protein or function could be detected in airway specimens freshly excised from a large number of deltaF508 homozygous subjects, despite an intact ERM complex. In sum, our data demonstrate that WT CFTR is predominantly expressed in ciliated cells, and deltaF508 CFTR pathogenesis in native tissues, like heterologous cells, reflects loss of normal protein processing. PMID:15716351

  2. The Light Responsive Transcriptome of the Zebrafish: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weger, Benjamin D.; Sahinbas, Meltem; Otto, Georg W.; Mracek, Philipp; Armant, Olivier; Dolle, Dirk; Lahiri, Kajori; Vallone, Daniela; Ettwiller, Laurence; Geisler, Robert; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Dickmeis, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms possess circadian clocks that are able to anticipate the day/night cycle and are reset or “entrained” by the ambient light. In the zebrafish, many organs and even cultured cell lines are directly light responsive, allowing for direct entrainment of the clock by light. Here, we have characterized light induced gene transcription in the zebrafish at several organizational levels. Larvae, heart organ cultures and cell cultures were exposed to 1- or 3-hour light pulses, and changes in gene expression were compared with controls kept in the dark. We identified 117 light regulated genes, with the majority being induced and some repressed by light. Cluster analysis groups the genes into five major classes that show regulation at all levels of organization or in different subset combinations. The regulated genes cover a variety of functions, and the analysis of gene ontology categories reveals an enrichment of genes involved in circadian rhythms, stress response and DNA repair, consistent with the exposure to visible wavelengths of light priming cells for UV-induced damage repair. Promoter analysis of the induced genes shows an enrichment of various short sequence motifs, including E- and D-box enhancers that have previously been implicated in light regulation of the zebrafish period2 gene. Heterologous reporter constructs with sequences matching these motifs reveal light regulation of D-box elements in both cells and larvae. Morpholino-mediated knock-down studies of two homologues of the D-box binding factor Tef indicate that these are differentially involved in the cell autonomous light induction in a gene-specific manner. These findings suggest that the mechanisms involved in period2 regulation might represent a more general pathway leading to light induced gene expression. PMID:21390203

  3. A search for the {Delta}{sup {minus}} wave-function component in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.; Zumbro, J.D.; Boudrie, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    We have studied the ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {+-}}p) reactions on {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at incident energy 500 MeV in quasi-free kinematics. A signature attributable to pre-existing {Delta} components of the ground state wave function is observed.

  4. Delta-Like Ligand 4 Modulates Liver Damage by Down-Regulating Chemokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Dewidar, Bedair; Hu, Junhao; Park, Ogyi; Feng, Teng; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Qi; Meyer, Christoph; Ilkavets, Iryna; Müller, Alexandra; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Munker, Stefan; Liebe, Roman; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Mertens, Peter R; Li, Hai; Ten Dijke, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G; Li, Jun; Gao, Bin; Ebert, Matthias P; Dooley, Steven; Li, Youming; Weng, Hong-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Disrupting Notch signaling ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis. However, the role of individual Notch ligands in liver damage is unknown. We investigated the effects of Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) in liver disease. DLL4 expression was measured in 31 human liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. Dll4 function was examined in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-challenged mouse models in vivo and evaluated in hepatic stellate cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in vitro. DLL4 was expressed in patients' Kupffer and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Recombinant Dll4 protein (rDll4) ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice after carbon tetrachloride challenge. In vitro, rDll4 significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide-dependent chemokine expression in both Kupffer and hepatic stellate cells. In bile duct ligation mice, rDll4 induced massive hepatic necrosis, resulting in the death of all animals within 1 week. Inflammatory cell infiltration and chemokine ligand 2 (Ccl2) expression were significantly reduced in rDll4-receiving bile duct ligation mice. Recombinant Ccl2 rescued bile duct ligation mice from rDll4-mediated death. In patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, DLL4 expression was inversely associated with CCL2 abundance. Mechanistically, Dll4 regulated Ccl2 expression via NF-κB. Taken together, Dll4 modulates liver inflammatory response by down-regulating chemokine expression. rDll4 application results in opposing outcomes in two models of liver damage. Loss of DLL4 may be associated with CCL2-mediated cytokine storm in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:27171900

  5. Characterization of the transport properties of channel delta-doped structures by light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Young, P. G.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The transport properties of channel delta-doped quantum well structures were characterized by conventional Hall effect and light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements. The large number of carriers that become available due to the delta-doping of the channel, leads to an apparent degeneracy in the well. As a result of this degeneracy, the carrier mobility remains constant as a function of temperature from 300 K down to 1.4 K. The large amount of impurity scattering, associated with the overlap of the charge carriers and the dopants, resulted in low carrier mobilities and restricted the observation of the oscillatory magneto-resistance used to characterize the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by conventional SdH measurements. By light-modulating the carriers, we were able to observe the SdH oscillation at low magnetic fields, below 1.4 tesla, and derive a value for the quantum scattering time. Our results for the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times are lower than those previously measured for similar structures using much higher magnetic fields.

  6. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  7. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. PMID:25443853

  8. Circadian and light-driven regulation of rod dark adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous visual perception and the dark adaptation of vertebrate photoreceptors after bright light exposure require recycling of their visual chromophore through a series of reactions in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE visual cycle). Light-driven chromophore consumption by photoreceptors is greater in daytime vs. nighttime, suggesting that correspondingly higher activity of the visual cycle may be required. However, as rod photoreceptors are saturated in bright light, the continuous turnover of their chromophore by the visual cycle throughout the day would not contribute to vision. Whether the recycling of chromophore that drives rod dark adaptation is regulated by the circadian clock and light exposure is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that mouse rod dark adaptation is slower during the day or after light pre-exposure. This surprising daytime suppression of the RPE visual cycle was accompanied by light-driven reduction in expression of Rpe65, a key enzyme of the RPE visual cycle. Notably, only rods in melatonin-proficient mice were affected by this daily visual cycle modulation. Our results demonstrate that the circadian clock and light exposure regulate the recycling of chromophore in the RPE visual cycle. This daily melatonin-driven modulation of rod dark adaptation could potentially protect the retina from light-induced damage during the day. PMID:26626567

  9. Let there be light: Regulation of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation relies on a variety of molecular mechanisms affecting different steps of a messenger RNA (mRNA) life: transcription, processing, splicing, alternative splicing, transport, translation, storage and decay. Light induces massive reprogramming of gene expression in plants. Differences in alternative splicing patterns in response to environmental stimuli suggest that alternative splicing plays an important role in plant adaptation to changing life conditions. In a recent publication, our laboratories showed that light regulates alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes encoding proteins involved in RNA processing by chloroplast retrograde signals. The light effect on alternative splicing is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. These results point at alternative splicing regulation by retrograde signals as an important mechanism for plant adaptation to their environment. PMID:25590224

  10. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  11. [Action of delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol on the central cardiovascular regulation : mechanism and localization].

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulos, N; Schmitt, H; Laubie, M

    1975-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (30-300 mug.kg-1 i.v.) induced in cats and dogs a decrease in blood pressure and heart rate. This decrease appears to be centrally mediated. In fact, the splanchnic and cardiac discharges were reduced in intact animals as well as in debuffered cats ruling out a reflexly mediated action. The mechanism of this central decrease in the sympathetic tone appears to be different from the mechanism of the reduction induced by clonidine or by narcotic analgesics agents. In fact, piperoxan (1 mg.kg-1 i.v.), an alpha adrenoceptor blocking agent, antagonized or reversed the centrally mediated reduction in the sympathetic tone induced by clonidine or L-dopa, but did not change the effects of narcotic analgesic agents and of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Naloxone (30 mug.kg-1 i.v.) prevented or reversed the cardiovascular effects of fentanyl and the reduction in splanchnic discharges induced by this agent, but no change was found after naloxone in the effects of clonidine or delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The pressor response to high frequency stimulation of the medulla oblongata was abolished by small doses of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. This agent did not reduce the pressor response to stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus induced by supramaximal stimulation and did not alter the hypertensive effect induced by stimulation of the cervical spinal cord. Medulla oblogata appears therefore to be the main site of action. PMID:240671

  12. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  13. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Wiltbank, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. PMID:26861023

  14. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Regulates Hippocampal GABA(A) Receptor Delta Subunit Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Follesa, Paolo; Floris, Gabriele; Asuni, Gino P.; Ibba, Antonio; Tocco, Maria G.; Zicca, Luca; Mercante, Beniamina; Deriu, Franca; Gorini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes structural and functional reorganization in the hippocampus and induces alterations in the gene expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs). Distinct forced intermittent exposure models have been used previously to investigate changes in GABAAR expression, with contrasting results. Here, we used repeated cycles of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm to examine the relationship between voluntary, dependence-associated ethanol consumption, and GABAAR gene expression in mouse hippocampus. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to four 16-h ethanol vapor (or air) cycles in inhalation chambers alternated with limited-access two-bottle choice between ethanol (15%) and water consumption. The mice exposed to ethanol vapor showed significant increases in ethanol consumption compared to their air-matched controls. GABAAR alpha4 and delta subunit gene expression were measured by qRT-PCR at different stages. There were significant changes in GABAAR delta subunit transcript levels at different time points in ethanol-vapor exposed mice, while the alpha4 subunit levels remained unchanged. Correlated concurrent blood ethanol concentrations suggested that GABAAR delta subunit mRNA levels fluctuate depending on ethanol intoxication, dependence, and withdrawal state. Using a vapor-based Chronic Intermittent Ethanol procedure with combined two-bottle choice consumption, we corroborated previous evidences showing that discontinuous ethanol exposure affects GABAAR delta subunit expression but we did not observe changes in alpha4 subunit. These findings indicate that hippocampal GABAAR delta subunit expression changes transiently over the course of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm associated with voluntary intake, in response to ethanol-mediated disturbance of GABAergic neurotransmission. PMID:26617492

  15. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  16. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  17. Effect of two yellow delta-emitting layers on device performance of phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Yu, Junsheng; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) with a structure of ITO/TAPC/δ-EML1/mCP:FIrpic/δ-EML2/Bphen/Mg:Ag were fabricated, wherein two ultrathin and host-free emitting layers (EMLs) were formed by using yellow bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C2'] iridium (acetylacetonate) [(tbt)2Ir(acac)] and referred to as delta-EMLs (δ-EML1 and δ-EML2). By adjusting the thicknesses of δ-EMLs, a maximum current efficiency of 27.6 cd/A, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10%, together with low efficiency roll-off at high luminance were achieved. The results showed that δ-EML1 played a dominant role on charge carrier trapping, while δ-EML2 had major impact on yellow light emission, which were highly sensitive to the location of δ-EMLs. Furthermore, by introducing 5-nm Au as anode modifying layer, high device efficiency was maintained along with excellent color stability of warm white emission, displaying color coordinates of (0.38, 0.42) and color temperature of 4348 K at a luminance of 7000 cd/m2. Importantly, explanation and analysis for the influence of both ultrathin δ-EMLs and anode modifying layer on device performance were proposed.

  18. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  19. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b6f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  20. Synergy between suppressor of Hairless and Notch in regulation of Enhancer of split m gamma and m delta expression.

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, D S; Slee, R; Skoufos, E; Bangalore, L; Bray, S; Delidakis, C

    1997-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is known to regulate cell fate decisions in a variety of organisms from worms to humans. Although several components of the pathway have been characterized, the actual mechanism and molecular results of signaling remain elusive. We have examined the role of the Notch signaling pathway in the transcriptional regulation of two Drosophila Enhancer of split [E(spl)] genes, whose gene products have been shown to be downstream players in the pathway. Using a reporter assay system in Drosophila tissue culture cells, we have observed a significant induction of E(spl) m gamma and m delta expression after cotransfection with activated Notch. Characterization of the 5' regulatory regions of these two genes led to the identification of a number of target sites for the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] protein, a transcription factor activated by Notch signaling. We show that Notch-inducible expression of E(spl) m gamma and m delta both in cultured cells and in vivo is dependent on functional Su(H). Although overexpression of Su(H) augments the level of induction of the reporter genes by activated Notch, Su(H) alone is insufficient to produce high levels of transcriptional activation. Despite the synergy observed between activated Notch and Su(H), the former affects neither the nuclear localization nor the DNA binding activity of the latter. PMID:9271437

  1. Temperature and Light modulate the trans-delta3-hexadecenoic acid content of phosphatidylglycerol: light-harvesting complex II organization and non-photochemical quenching.

    PubMed

    Gray, Gordon R; Ivanov, Alexander G; Król, Marianna; Williams, John P; Kahn, Mobashoher U; Myscich, Elizabeth G; Huner, Norman P A

    2005-08-01

    The interaction of light and temperature in the modulation of the trans-delta3-hexadecenoic acid (trans-16:1) content of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in winter rye (Secale cereale L.) was assessed and related to the organization of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII). Increasing the growth irradiance from 50 to 800 micromol m(-2) s(-1) at 20 degrees C resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in the trans-16:1 content in PG which favoured a greater preponderance of oligomeric LHCII, measured in vitro as the ratio of oligomer : monomer. Similar irradiance-dependent increases were observed during growth at 5 degrees C; however, 1.4-fold lower trans-16:1 contents and lower LHCII oligomer : monomer ratios were observed compared with growth at 20 degrees C and the same irradiance. These trends were also observed under natural field conditions. Thus, the accumulation of trans-16:1, as well as the organization of LHCII are modulated by both growth irradiance and growth temperature in an independent but additive manner. We also examined how changes in the supramolecular organization of LHCII affected the capacity for non-photochemical quenching (q(N)) and photoprotection via antenna quenching (q(O)). While q(O) was positively correlated with q(N), there was no correlation with either LHCII organization or xanthophyll cycle activity under the steady-state growth conditions examined. PMID:15946983

  2. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  3. III-Nitride Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes with Delta-Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Fan, Z. Y.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Li, J.; Jin, S. X.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2004-03-01

    Currently, there is a great need of solid-state ultraviolet (UV) emitters for many applications, ranging from the fluorescence detection of chemical and biological agents to the next generation solid-state lighting. Other applications include the use of compact UV sources (λ <350 nm) in medical and health research. We present the results on the fabrication and characterization of 310 nm ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on InAlGaN quaternary alloys grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing δ -doping in the n- and p-type layers together with the use of AlN epilayer template, we have demonstrated enhanced structural quality. The output power of a 300 x 300 μ m^2 LED chip measured from the sapphire side reached a maximum value of about 1.0 mW under a DC operating condition at 120 mA, 0.25 mW under a standard DC operating condition at 20 mA and about 10 mW under a pulsed current driving at 1A with 1% duty cycle. The improved performance was attributed to the reduction in dislocation density in the device structure by δ -doping and the use of AlN epilayer template. Preliminary results on deep UV emitters (≤ 300 nm) will also be discussed.

  4. Light and Acetate Regulate a Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Friedhelm; Grölz-Krug, Sabine; Boschek, Bruce; Zetsche, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    A malate dehydrogenase was purified from the unicellular green alga Chlorogonium elongatum Dangeard. The enzyme was localized in the mitochondria by immunogold electron microscopy and was found to be present on the cristae. The concentration of the enzyme is regulated by acetate and light. In cells cultured heterotrophically with acetate as carbon source the activity and the concentration of the enzyme is 5- to 6-fold higher than in autotrophic cells. In mixotrophically cultured cells (light and acetate) the enzyme level attains only half of the value of that in heterotrophic cells. Acetate induces an increase of the enzyme concentration while light has an inhibitory effect on this process. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665643

  5. Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase: Phylogeny, Regulation, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michal; Mysliwa-Kurdziel, Beata

    2015-09-01

    This Current Topic focuses on light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR, EC 1.3.1.33). POR catalyzes the penultimate reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, i.e., the light-triggered reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. In this reaction, the chlorin ring of the chlorophyll molecule is formed, which is crucial for photosynthesis. POR is one of very few enzymes that are driven by light; however, it is unique in the need for its substrate to absorb photons to induce the conformational changes in the enzyme, which are required for its catalytic activation. Moreover, the enzyme is also involved in the negative feedback of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway and controls chlorophyll content via its light-dependent activity. Even though it has been almost 70 years since the first isolation of active POR complexes, our knowledge of them has markedly advanced in recent years. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of POR, including the phylogenetic roots of POR, the mechanisms of the regulation of POR genes expression, the regulation of POR activity, the import of POR into plastids, the role of POR in PLB formation, and the molecular mechanism of protochlorophyllide reduction by POR. To the best of our knowledge, no previous review has compiled such a broad set of recent findings about POR. PMID:26230427

  6. p53 regulates the transcription of its Delta133p53 isoform through specific response elements contained within the TP53 P2 internal promoter.

    PubMed

    Marcel, V; Vijayakumar, V; Fernández-Cuesta, L; Hafsi, H; Sagne, C; Hautefeuille, A; Olivier, M; Hainaut, P

    2010-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress and regulates genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Nine p53 isoforms have been described that may modulate suppressive functions of the canonical p53 protein. Among them, Delta133p53 lacks the 132 proximal residues and has been shown to modulate p53-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Delta133p53 is expressed from a specific mRNA, p53I4, driven by an alternative promoter P2 located between intron 1 and exon 5 of TP53 gene. Here, we report that the P2 promoter is regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Delta133p53 expression is increased in response to DNA damage by doxorubicin in p53 wild-type cell lines, but not in p53-mutated cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays using P2 promoter deletion constructs indicate that p53 binds functional response elements located within the P2 promoter. We also show that Delta133p53 does not bind specifically to p53 consensus DNA sequence in vitro, but competes with wild-type p53 in specific DNA-binding assays. Finally, we report that Delta133p53 counteracts p53-dependent growth suppression in clonogenic assays. These observations indicate that Delta133p53 is a novel target of p53 that may participate in a negative feedback loop controlling p53 function. PMID:20190805

  7. Light regulation of gene expression in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, E.M.; Silverthorne, J.

    1985-01-01

    In this review areas of currently active research are considered which have demonstrated that a plant's response to light involves changes in the expression of specific genes at the level of RNA. The regulation of gene expression by phytochrome and the UV-sensitive photoreceptor have been studied most extensively at the molecular level, and this review particularly focuses on such studies in higher plants. Some of the observations made on the differences in gene expression between light-grown and dark-grown plants are also included, although the photoreceptor(s) responsible for the differences may not have been ascertained. In some of these cases, phytochrome involvement has been or may be demonstrated in later studies, while in others the observed differences may be a result of the action of other photoreceptors or of multiple light-affected processes. One such process is the development of chloroplasts, a major developmental step triggered by light in angiosperms. In addition, many of the genes whose expression is changed by light and which have been studied at a molecular level encode chloroplast proteins. 156 references.

  8. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  9. Reservoir impacts downstream in highly regulated river basins: the Ebro delta and the Guadalquivir estuary in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, María J.; Rovira, Albert; García-Contreras, Darío; Contreras, Eva; Millares, Agustín; Aguilar, Cristina; Losada, Miguel A.

    2016-05-01

    Regulation by reservoirs affects both the freshwater regime and the sediment delivery at the area downstream, and may have a significant impact on water quality in the final transitional water bodies. Spain is one the countries with more water storage capacity by reservoirs in the world. Dense reservoir networks can be found in most of the hydrographic basins, especially in the central and southern regions. The spatial redistribution of the seasonal and annual water storage in reservoirs for irrigation and urban supply, mainly, has resulted in significant changes of water flow and sediment load regimes, together with a fostered development of soil and water uses, with environmental impacts downstream and higher vulnerability of these areas to the sea level rise and drought occurrence. This work shows these effects in the Guadalquivir and the Ebro River basins, two of the largest regulated areas in Spain. The results show a 71 % decrease of the annual freshwater input to the Guadalquivir River estuary during 1930-2014, an increase of 420 % of the irrigated area upstream the estuary, and suspended sediment loads up to 1000 % the initial levels. In the Ebro River delta, the annual water yield has decreased over a 30 % but, on the contrary, the big reservoirs are located in the main stream, and the sediment load has decreased a 99 %, resulting in a delta coastal regression up to 10 m per year and the massive presence of macrophytes in the lower river. Adaptive actions proposed to face these impacts in a sea level rise scenario are also analyzed.

  10. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  11. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Tong, Nanwei

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  12. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  13. Human p38{delta} MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki; Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa; Kubota, Eiro; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro

    2010-06-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38{alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta}. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38{alpha} and {beta}, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38{gamma} and/or {delta} was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38{delta} attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38{delta} with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38{delta} isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38{alpha} and/or {beta} isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  14. Sediment dispersal and accumulation off the present Huanghe (Yellow River) delta as impacted by the Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao; Bi, Naishuang; Yuan, Ping; Li, Song; Wang, Houjie

    2015-12-01

    Surface sediment samples from 15 stations around the present Huanghe (Yellow River) river mouth were collected before, during and after the Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme (WSRS) in 2010 for grain size analysis. Hydrographic surveys conducted simultaneously at stations along three transects off the river mouth during the WSRS in 2013 were used to investigate the dispersal and accumulation of the Huanghe sediment off the present Huanghe subaqueous delta. During the WSRS period, the diluted water from the river covered all over the study area within the surface layer, whereas high-concentrated sediment was found in the bottom layers and to be limited in nearshore area shallower than 12 m, indicating that the buoyant river plume was the main sediment dispersal pattern during the WSRS. At the early stage of the WSRS when large amount of clear water was released from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir, sediment eroded from the downstream riverbed in the lower reaches increased the median grain size of surface sediment at the river mouth. During the second stage when water discharge was reduced but sediment discharge was dramatically increased, the fine-grained sediment derived from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir mixed with the previously deposited coarser surface sediment, leading to the decreasing median grain size of surface sediment that approached to be poorly sorted. After the physical sorting from winter storms, the surface sediment was redistributed and varied regularly with water depth. As the median grain size of suspended sediment discharge to the sea has been significantly increased due to the WSRS, the river-delivered sediment mostly accumulated in the nearshore area, which effectively extended the subaerial delta and steepened the subaqueous slope off the present river mouth.

  15. Identification of the lrp gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and its role in regulation of delta-aminolevulinic acid uptake.

    PubMed Central

    King, N D; O'Brian, M R

    1997-01-01

    The heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is taken up by the dipeptide permease (Dpp) system in Escherichia coli. In this study, we identified a Bradyrhizobium japonicum genomic library clone that complemented both ALA and dipeptide uptake activities in E. coli dpp mutants. The complementing B. japonicum DNA encoded a product with 58% identity to the E. coli global transcriptional regulator Lrp (leucine-responsive regulatory protein), implying the presence of Dpp-independent ALA uptake activity in those cells. Data support the conclusion that the Lrp homolog induced the oligopeptide permease system in the complemented cells by interfering with the repressor activity of the endogenous Lrp, thus conferring oligopeptide and ALA uptake activities. ALA uptake by B. japonicum was effectively inhibited by a tripeptide and, to a lesser extent, by a dipeptide, and a mutant strain that expressed the lrp homolog from a constitutive promoter was deficient in ALA uptake activity. The data show that Lrp negatively affects ALA uptake in E. coli and B. japonicum. Furthermore, the product of the isolated B. japonicum gene is both a functional and structural homolog of E. coli Lrp, and thus the regulator is not restricted to enteric bacteria. PMID:9045849

  16. Oscillatory control of Delta-like1 in cell interactions regulates dynamic gene expression and tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Hiromi; Isomura, Akihiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kori, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates tissue morphogenesis through cell–cell interactions. The Notch effectors Hes1 and Hes7 are expressed in an oscillatory manner and regulate developmental processes such as neurogenesis and somitogenesis, respectively. Expression of the mRNA for the mouse Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) is also oscillatory. However, the dynamics of Dll1 protein expression are controversial, and their functional significance is unknown. Here, we developed a live-imaging system and found that Dll1 protein expression oscillated in neural progenitors and presomitic mesoderm cells. Notably, when Dll1 expression was accelerated or delayed by shortening or elongating the Dll1 gene, Dll1 oscillations became severely dampened or quenched at intermediate levels, as modeled mathematically. Under this condition, Hes1 and Hes7 oscillations were also dampened. In the presomitic mesoderm, steady Dll1 expression led to severe fusion of somites and their derivatives, such as vertebrae and ribs. In the developing brain, steady Dll1 expression inhibited proliferation of neural progenitors and accelerated neurogenesis, whereas optogenetic induction of Dll1 oscillation efficiently maintained neural progenitors. These results indicate that the appropriate timing of Dll1 expression is critical for the oscillatory networks and suggest the functional significance of oscillatory cell–cell interactions in tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26728556

  17. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration. PMID

  18. A Chloroplast Light-Regulated Oxidative Sensor for Moderate Light Intensity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dangoor, Inbal; Peled-Zehavi, Hadas; Wittenberg, Gal; Danon, Avihai

    2012-01-01

    The transition from dark to light involves marked changes in the redox reactions of photosynthetic electron transport and in chloroplast stromal enzyme activity even under mild light and growth conditions. Thus, it is not surprising that redox regulation is used to dynamically adjust and coordinate the stromal and thylakoid compartments. While oxidation of regulatory proteins is necessary for the regulation, the identity and the mechanism of action of the oxidizing pathway are still unresolved. Here, we studied the oxidation of a thylakoid-associated atypical thioredoxin-type protein, ACHT1, in the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast. We found that after a brief period of net reduction in plants illuminated with moderate light intensity, a significant oxidation reaction of ACHT1 arises and counterbalances its reduction. Interestingly, ACHT1 oxidation is driven by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx), which in turn eliminates peroxides. The ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx reaction characteristics in plants further indicated that ACHT1 oxidation is linked with changes in the photosynthetic production of peroxides. Our findings that plants with altered redox poise of the ACHT1 and 2-Cys Prx pathway show higher nonphotochemical quenching and lower photosynthetic electron transport infer a feedback regulatory role for this pathway. PMID:22570442

  19. The Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 Regulates Multiple Stages of Early Hemato-Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Hélia; Gomes, Andreia C.; Saavedra, Pedro; Carvalho, Catarina C.; Duarte, António; Cidadão, António; Parreira, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    Background In mouse embryos, homozygous or heterozygous deletions of the gene encoding the Notch ligand Dll4 result in early embryonic death due to major defects in endothelial remodeling in the yolk sac and embryo. Considering the close developmental relationship between endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages, which share a common mesoderm-derived precursor, the hemangioblast, and many key regulatory molecules, we investigated whether Dll4 is also involved in the regulation of early embryonic hematopoiesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Embryoid Bodies (EBs) derived from embryonic stem cells harboring hetero- or homozygous Dll4 deletions, we observed that EBs from both genotypes exhibit an abnormal endothelial remodeling in the vascular sprouts that arise late during EB differentiation, indicating that this in vitro system recapitulates the angiogenic phenotype of Dll4 mutant embryos. However, analysis of EB development at early time points revealed that the absence of Dll4 delays the emergence of mesoderm and severely reduces the number of blast-colony forming cells (BL-CFCs), the in vitro counterpart of the hemangioblast, and of endothelial cells. Analysis of colony forming units (CFU) in EBs and yolk sacs from Dll4+/− and Dll4−/− embryos, showed that primitive erythropoiesis is specifically affected by Dll4 insufficiency. In Dll4 mutant EBs, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seemingly unaffected and cardiomyocyte differentiation was increased, indicating that SMC specification is Dll4-independent while a normal dose of this Notch ligand is essential for the quantitative regulation of cardiomyogenesis. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights a previously unnoticed role for Dll4 in the quantitative regulation of early hemato-vascular precursors, further indicating that it is also involved on the timely emergence of mesoderm in early embryogenesis. PMID:22514637

  20. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  1. FADS2 genotype regulates delta-6 desaturase activity and inflammation in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Vaittinen, Maija; Walle, Paula; Kuosmanen, Emmi; Männistö, Ville; Käkelä, Pirjo; Ågren, Jyrki; Schwab, Ursula; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with disturbed lipid metabolism and low-grade inflammation in tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between FA metabolism and adipose tissue (AT) inflammation in the Kuopio Obesity Surgery study. We investigated the association of surgery-induced weight loss and FA desaturase (FADS)1/2 genotypes with serum and AT FA profile and with AT inflammation, measured as interleukin (IL)-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression, in order to find potential gene-environment interactions. We demonstrated an association between serum levels of saturated and polyunsaturated n-6 FAs, and estimated enzyme activities of FADS1/2 genes with IL-1β expression in AT both at baseline and at follow-up. Variation in the FADS1/2 genes associated with IL-1β and NFκB pathway gene expression in SAT after weight reduction, but not at baseline. In addition, the FA composition in subcutaneous and visceral fat correlated with serum FAs, and the associations between serum PUFAs and estimated D6D enzyme activity with AT inflammation were also replicated with corresponding AT FAs and AT inflammation. We conclude that the polymorphism in FADS1/2 genes associates with FA metabolism and AT inflammation, leading to an interaction between weight loss and FADS1/2 genes in the regulation of AT inflammation. PMID:26609056

  2. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixiang; Xie, Shaojun; Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  3. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  4. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  5. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  6. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  7. Properties of the six isoforms of p63: p53-like regulation in response to genotoxic stress and cross talk with DeltaNp73.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, A; Ruptier, C; Tribollet, V; Hautefeuille, A; Chardon, F; Cavard, C; Puisieux, A; Hainaut, P; Caron de Fromentel, C

    2008-02-01

    TP63, a member of the TP53 gene family, encodes two groups of three isoforms (alpha, beta and gamma). The TAp63 isoforms act as transcription factors. The DeltaNp63 isoforms lack the main transcription activation domain and act as dominant-negative inhibitors of transactivation (TA) isoforms. To clarify the role of these isoforms and to better understand their functional overlap with p53, we ectopically expressed each p63 isoform in the p53-null hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep3B. All TA isoforms, as well as DeltaNp63alpha, had a half-life of <1 h when transiently expressed and were degraded by the proteasome pathway. The most stable form was DeltaNp63gamma, with a half-life of >8 h. As expected, TA isoforms differed in their transcriptional activities toward genes regulated by p53, TAp63gamma being the most active form. In contrast, DeltaNp63 isoforms were transcriptionally inactive on genes studied and inhibited TA isoforms in a dose-dependent manner. When stably expressed in polyclonal cell populations, TAp63beta and gamma isoforms were undetectable. However, when treated with doxorubicin (DOX), p63 proteins rapidly accumulated in the cells. This stabilization was associated with an increase in phosphorylation. Strikingly, in DOX-treated polyclonal populations, increase in TAp63 levels was accompanied by overexpression of DeltaNp73. This observation suggests complex regulatory cross talks between the different isoforms of the p53 family. In conclusion, p63 exhibits several transcriptional and stress-response properties similar to those of p53, suggesting that p63 activities should be taken into consideration in approaches to improve cancer therapies based on genotoxic agents. PMID:18048390

  8. Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 signature motif region rescue processing and functional defects of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator delta f508.

    PubMed

    DeCarvalho, Ana C V; Gansheroff, Lisa J; Teem, John L

    2002-09-27

    The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) is the most prevalent CF-causing mutation and results in defective protein processing and reduced CFTR function, leading to chloride impermeability in CF epithelia and heterologous systems. Using a STE6/CFTRDeltaF508 chimera system in yeast, we isolated two novel DeltaF508 revertant mutations, I539T and G550E, proximal to and within the conserved ABC signature motif of NBD1, respectively. Western blot and functional analysis in mammalian cells indicate that mutations I539T and G550E each partially rescue the CFTRDeltaF508 defect. Furthermore, a combination of both revertant mutations resulted in a 38-fold increase in CFTRDeltaF508-mediated chloride current, representing 29% of wild type channel activity. The G550E mutation increased the sensitivity of CFTRDeltaF508 and wild type CFTR to activation by cAMP agonists and blocked the enhancement of CFTRDeltaF508 channel activity by 2 mm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The data show that the DeltaF508 defect can be significantly rescued by second-site mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 region, that includes the LSGGQ consensus motif. PMID:12110684

  9. The delta F508 mutation decreases the stability of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the plasma membrane. Determination of functional half-lives on transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, G L; Chang, X B; Bear, C; Kartner, N; Mohamed, A; Riordan, J R; Grinstein, S

    1993-10-15

    Deletion of the phenylalanine at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the most prevalent mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF). This mutation (delta F508CFTR) leads to a reduced cAMP-sensitive Cl- conductance in epithelial cells. While the mutant protein can function as a Cl- channel, it seems to be misprocessed and unable to accumulate at normal levels in the plasma membrane. Under conditions where the biosynthetic block of delta F508CFTR is not complete, the residence time of delta F508CFTR in the plasma membrane is a critical determinant of the cAMP-sensitive Cl- conductance. To assess the stability of the mutant and wild-type CFTR, we compared their functional half-lives at the plasma membrane of transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The plasma membrane Cl- conductance was assessed by patch-clamp recordings and/or by fluorimetric determinations of the membrane potential. Accumulation of delta F508CFTR in the plasma membrane was promoted by growing the transfected cells at reduced temperature (24-28 degrees C), and was verified by immunoblotting and by detecting the appearance of a plasmalemmal cAMP-activated Cl- conductance. Subsequently increasing the temperature to 37 degrees C inhibited further delivery of newly synthesized delta F508CFTR to the surface membrane. By studying the time dependence of the disappearance of the Cl- conductance, the functional half-life of the mutant protein at the plasma membrane was determined to be < 4 h, which is considerably shorter than the half-life of wild-type CFTR (> 24 h). The latter was estimated by terminating protein synthesis or secretion with cycloheximide or brefeldin A, respectively. Inhibition of protein synthesis did not alter the rate of disappearance of delta F508CFTR at 37 degrees C, validating the difference in turnover between mutant and wild-type CFTR. These results indicate that the structural abnormality of delta F508CFTR affects not only the delivery of the

  10. A chimeric light-regulated amino acid transport system allows the isolation of blue light regulator (blr) mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Carattoli, A; Kato, E; Rodriguez-Franco, M; Stuart, W D; Macino, G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a system for the isolation of Neurospora crassa mutants that shows altered responses to blue light. To this end we have used the light-regulated promoter of the albino-3 gene fused to the neutral amino acid permease gene mtr. The product of the mtr gene is required for the uptake of neutral aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, as well as toxic analogs such as p-flurophenylalanine or 4-methyltryptophan. mtr trp-2-carrying cells were transformed with the al-3 promoter-mtr wild-type gene (al-3p-mtr+) to obtain a strain with a light-regulated tryptophan uptake. This strain is sensitive to p-fluorophenylalanine when grown under illumination and resistant when grown in the dark. UV mutagenesis of the al-3p-mtr(+)-carrying strain allowed us to isolate two mutant strains, BLR-1 and BLR-2 (blue light regulator), that are light-resistant to p-fluorophenylalanine and have lost the ability to grow on tryptophan. These two strains have a pale-orange phenotype and show down-regulation of all the photoregulated genes tested (al-3, al-1, con-8, and con-10). Mutations in the BLR strains are not allelic with white collar 1 or white collar 2, regulatory genes that are also involved in the response to blue light. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7604041

  11. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D.; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized (‘entrained’) with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3′UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light. PMID:24423866

  12. The light-induced transcriptome of the zebrafish pineal gland reveals complex regulation of the circadian clockwork by light.

    PubMed

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Alon, Shahar; Mracek, Philipp; Faigenbloom, Lior; Tovin, Adi; Vatine, Gad D; Eisenberg, Eli; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    Light constitutes a primary signal whereby endogenous circadian clocks are synchronized ('entrained') with the day/night cycle. The molecular mechanisms underlying this vital process are known to require gene activation, yet are incompletely understood. Here, the light-induced transcriptome in the zebrafish central clock organ, the pineal gland, was characterized by messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing (mRNA-seq) and microarray analyses, resulting in the identification of multiple light-induced mRNAs. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the molecular clock (14 genes) is light-induced in the pineal gland. Four of these genes, encoding the transcription factors dec1, reverbb1, e4bp4-5 and e4bp4-6, differentially affected clock- and light-regulated promoter activation, suggesting that light-input is conveyed to the core clock machinery via diverse mechanisms. Moreover, we show that dec1, as well as the core clock gene per2, is essential for light-entrainment of rhythmic locomotor activity in zebrafish larvae. Additionally, we used microRNA (miRNA) sequencing (miR-seq) and identified pineal-enhanced and light-induced miRNAs. One such miRNA, miR-183, is shown to downregulate e4bp4-6 mRNA through a 3'UTR target site, and importantly, to regulate the rhythmic mRNA levels of aanat2, the key enzyme in melatonin synthesis. Together, this genome-wide approach and functional characterization of light-induced factors indicate a multi-level regulation of the circadian clockwork by light. PMID:24423866

  13. Regulation by blue light of the fluffy gene encoding a major regulator of conidiation in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, María; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Corrochano, Luis M

    2010-03-01

    The development of asexual spores, that is, the process of conidiation, in the fungus Neurospora crassa is increased by light. The fluffy (fl) gene, encoding a major regulator of conidiation, is activated by light. We describe here a detailed characterization of the regulation by blue light of fl in vegetative hyphae. This induction requires the white collar complex (WCC) while the FLD protein acts as a dark repressor of fl transcription. We show that the WCC directly regulates fl transcription in response to blue light after transiently binding the promoter. We propose that fl is repressed by FLD in vegetative mycelia and that the repression is lost after light exposure and WCC activation. The increase in fl mRNA in vegetative mycelia after light exposure, and the corresponding increase in the amount of the regulatory FL protein, should promote the activation of the conidiation pathway. The activation by light of fl provides a simple mechanism for the activation of conidiation by blue light in Neurospora that may be at work in other fungi. PMID:20026679

  14. Bi-objective analysis of water-sediment regulation for channel scouring and delta maintenance: A study of the lower Yellow River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dongxian; Miao, Chiyuan; Wu, Jingwen; Jiang, Lin; Duan, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Long-term hydrological data and remotely-sensed satellite images were used to analyze the effects of the water-sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) implemented in the lower Yellow River (LYR), China, between 1983 and 2013. The WSRS aimed to control channel scouring in the LYR and maintain the Yellow River Delta (YRD). Channel erosion in the LYR has primarily depended on the incoming sediment concentration at Xiaolangdi, where the concentration must be lower than approximately 9.17 × 10- 3 t m- 3 to avoid rising of the riverbed. In 1996, an artificial diversion altered the evolution of the YRD. To maintain delta equilibrium, an average sediment load of about 441 × 106 t year- 1 was required before 1996, after which this value decreased to 167 × 106 t year- 1. We provide a preliminary estimate of the incoming water and sediment conditions required at the Xiaolangdi station to guarantee both LYR channel scouring and maintenance of the YRD. Our results show that it is feasible to transport sediment originally deposited in the LYR to the river mouth to maintain the delta, which is of great significance for the future management and environmental protection of the LYR.

  15. Fast light-regulated genes of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, T; Chambers, J A; Eberle, J; Lauter, F R; Russo, V E

    1989-01-01

    Several physiological reactions including the sexual differentiation of the ascomycete Neurospora crassa are triggered by blue light. Mutants in the white-collar genes wc-1 and wc-2 are blind for all the blue light effects tested so far. We have previously shown that blue light induces some translatable mRNAs at different times after beginning the illumination. Here we report the cDNA cloning of four genes that are induced by blue light. Induction of these transcripts is temporally ordered (lag times from 2 to 45 min). Analysis of run-on transcripts show that the increases in mRNA levels are due to de novo transcription. None of these transcripts is inducible in white-collar mutants. Images PMID:2527354

  16. Blue Light Regulation of Cell Division in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Münzner, Petra; Voigt, Jürgen

    1992-01-01

    A delay in cell division was observed when synchronized cultures of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growing under heterotrophic conditions were exposed to white light during the second half of the growth period. This effect was also observed when photosynthesis was blocked by addition of the photosystem II inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Light pulses of 10 minutes were sufficient to induce a delay in cell division in the presence or absence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. A delay in cell division was induced by blue light but not by illumination with red or far-red light. The equal intensity action spectrum revealed two peaks at 400 and 500 nm. PMID:16669046

  17. Man made deltas

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  18. Man made deltas.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  19. Characterization and source apportionment of aerosol light extinction with a coupled model of CMB-IMPROVE in Hangzhou, Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Yu-fen; Feng, Yin-chang; Zheng, Xian-jue; Jiao, Li; Hong, Sheng-mao; Shen, Jian-dong; Zhu, Tan; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics and sources of aerosol light extinction in the Yangtze River Delta of China, a campaign was carried out in Hangzhou from December 2013 to November 2014. Hourly data for air pollutants including PM2.5, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO, and aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficient and aerosol absorbing coefficient was obtained in the environmental air quality automatic monitoring station. Meteorological parameters were measured synchronously in the automated meteorology monitoring station. Additionally, around seven sets of ambient PM2.5 samples per month were collected and analyzed during the campaign. The annual mean aerosol scattering coefficient, aerosol absorbing coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo measured in this study was 514 ± 284 Mm- 1, 35 ± 20 Mm- 1 and 94% respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient reconstructed using the modified IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment) formula was compared to the measured extinction coefficient. Better correlations could be found between the measured and reconstructed extinction coefficient when RH was under 90%. A coupled model of CMB (chemical mass balance) and modified IMPROVE was used to apportion the sources of aerosol light extinction in Hangzhou. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate were identified as the most significant sources for aerosol light extinction, accounted for 30.2%, 24.1% and 15.8% respectively.

  20. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation: Regulation of light energy distribution in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has become apparent that green plants possess the ability to adapt to changes in the spectral quality of ambient light. This phenomenon, state transitions, involves a reversible distribution of light energy between the two photosystems in response to changes in the excitation state of photosystems 1 and 2. Thus, the quantum efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport is maintained under different illumination conditions, and damage caused by excessive energetic input of light (photoinhibition) is prevented. This model comprises a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of three major components: substrates, the protein kinase(s) and protein phosphatase(s) responsible for the specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these of substrates, and the control mechanisms whereby the protein kinase(s) is activated/deactivated in response to redox and /or conformational changes in the thylakoid. This report considers the three components in some detail.

  1. Design of adaptation actions to compensate the hydrological impact of the river regulation by dams on the Ebro Delta (Spain): combining modeling and field work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Darío; Jurado, Alicia; Carpintero, Miriam; Rovira, Albert; Polo, María J.

    2016-04-01

    River regulation by dams for both flood control and water storage has allowed to decrease both uncertainty and risks associated to extreme hydrological events. However, the alteration of the natural river flow regime and the detraction of high water volumes usually lead to significant effects downstream on the morphology, water quality, ecological status of water… and this is particularly relevant in the transitional waters since the sea level rise poses an additional threat on such conditions. The Ebro River, in northeastern Spain, is one of the highly regulated rivers in Spain with the dams located in the mainstream. Besides an estimated decrease of a 30% of the freshwater inputs, the sediment delivery to the final delta in the Mediterranean has dramatically been decreased up to a 99%, with environmental risks associated to the reduction of the emerged areas from the loss of sediment supply, the impact on the subsidence dynamics, and the sea level rise. The Ebro Delta suffers a mean regression of 10 m per year, and the persistence of macrophyte development in the final reach of the river due to the low water mean flow regime. The project LIFE EBRO-ADMICLIM (ENV/ES/001182), coordinated by the IRTA in Catalonia (Spain), puts forwards pilot actions for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change in the Ebro Delta. An integrated approach is proposed for managing water, sediment and habitats (rice fields and wetlands), with the multiple aim of optimizing ground elevation, reducing coastal erosion, increasing the accumulation (sequestration) of carbon in the soil, reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and improving water quality. This work presents the pilot actions included in the project to mitigate the loss of water flow and sediment supply to the delta. Sediment injections at different points upstream have been designed to calibrate and validate a sediment transport model coupled to a 2D-hydrodinamic model of the river. The combination of an a

  2. Phytochrome-Mediated Light Regulation of PHYA- and PHYB-GUS Transgenes in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, D. E.; Quail, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    Phytochrome wild-type gene-[beta]-glucuronidase (PHY-GUS) gene fusions were used in transgenic Arabidopsis to compare the activity levels and light regulation of the PHYA and PHYB promoters and to identify the photoreceptors mediating this regulation. In dark-grown seedlings, both promoters are 4-fold more active in shoots than in roots,but the PHYA promoter is nearly 20-fold more active than that of PHYB in both organs. In shoots, white light represses the activities of the PHYA and PHYB promoters 10- and 2-fold, respectively, whereas in roots light has no effect on the PHYA promoter but increases PHYB promoter activity 2-fold. Consequently, PHYA promoter activity remains higher than that of PHYB in light in both shoots (5-fold) and roots (11-fold). Experiments with narrow-waveband light and photomorphogenic mutants suggest that no single photoreceptor is necessary for full white-light-directed PHYA repression in shoots, but that multiple, independent photoreceptor pathways are sufficient alone or in combination. In contrast, phytochrome B appears both necessary and sufficient for a light-mediated decrease in PHYB activity in shoots, and phytochrome A mediates a far-red-light-stimulated increase in PHYB promoter activity. Together, the data indicate that the PHYA and PHYB genes are regulated in divergent fashion at the transcriptional level, both developmentally and by the spectral distribution of the prevailing light, and that this regulation may be important to the photosensory function of the two photoreceptors. PMID:12228380

  3. Light-regulated translocation of signaling proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Frechter, Shahar; Minke, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Illumination of Drosophila photoreceptor cells induces multi-facet responses, which include generation of the photoreceptor potential, screening pigment migration and translocation of signaling proteins which is the focus of recent extensive research. Translocation of three signaling molecules is covered in this review: (1) Light-dependent translocation of arrestin from the cytosol to the signaling membrane, the rhabdomere, determines the lifetime of activated rhodopsin. Arrestin translocates in PIP3 and NINAC myosin III dependent manner, and specific mutations which disrupt the interaction between arrestin and PIP3 or NINAC also impair the light-dependant translocation of arrestin and the termination of the response to light. (2) Activation of Drosophila visual G protein, DGq, causes a massive and reversible, translocation of the α subunit from the signaling membrane to the cytosol, accompanied by activity-dependent architectural changes. Analysis of the translocation and the recovery kinetics of DGqα in wild-type flies and specific visual mutants indicated that DGqα is necessary but not sufficient for the architectural changes. (3) The TRP-like (TRPL) but not TRP channels translocate in a light-dependent manner between the rhabdomere and the cell body. As a physiological consequence of this light-dependent modulation of the TRP/TRPL ratio, the photoreceptors of dark-adapted flies operate at a wider dynamic range, which allows the photoreceptors enriched with TRPL to function better in darkness and dim background illumination. Altogether, signal-dependent movement of signaling proteins plays a major role in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells. PMID:16458490

  4. Regulation of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase expression and activity in the hypophysectomized rat ovary: Interactions between the stimulatory effect of human chorionic gonadotropin and the luteolytic effect of prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, C.; Labrie, C.; Dupont, E.; Couet, J.; Trudel, C.; Rheaume, E.; Simard, J.; Luu-The, V.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1990-12-01

    The enzyme 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta 5-delta 4 isomerase (3 beta-HSD) catalyzes an obligatory step in the conversion of pregnenolone and other 5-ene-3 beta-hydroxysteroids into progesterone as well as precursors of all androgens and estrogens in the ovary. Since 3 beta-HSD is likely to be an important target for regulation by pituitary hormones, we have studied the effect of chronic treatment with LH (hCG), FSH, and PRL on ovarian 3 beta-HSD expression and activity in hypophysectomized adult female rats. Human CG (hCG) (10 IU, twice a day (bid)), ovine FSH (0.5 microgram, bid), and ovine PRL (1 mg, bid) were administered, singly or in combination, for a period of 10 days starting 15 days after hypophysectomy. In hypophysectomized rats, PRL exerted a potent inhibitory effect on all the parameters studied. In fact, PRL caused a 81% decrease in ovarian 3 beta-HSD mRNA content accompanied by a similar decrease in 3 beta-HSD activity and protein levels. In addition, ovarian weight decreased by 40% whereas serum progesterone fell dramatically from 1.92 nmol/liter to undetectable levels after treatment with PRL. Whereas hCG alone had only slight stimulatory effects on 3 beta-HSD mRNA, protein content and activity levels, treatment with the gonadotropin partially or completely reversed the potent inhibitory effects of oPRL on all the parameters measured. FSH, on the other hand, had no significant effect on 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. In situ hybridization experiments using the 35S-labeled rat ovary 3 beta-HSD cDNA probe show that the inhibitory effect of PRL is exerted primarily on luteal cell 3 beta-HSD expression and activity. On the other hand, it can be seen that hCG stimulates 3 beta-HSD mRNA accumulation in interstitial cells.

  5. Regulation of formation of volatile compounds of tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves by single light wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiumin; Chen, Yiyong; Mei, Xin; Katsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of plant growth and development by light wavelength has been extensively studied. Less attention has been paid to effect of light wavelength on formation of plant metabolites. The objective of this study was to investigate whether formation of volatiles in preharvest and postharvest tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves can be regulated by light wavelength. In the present study, in contrast to the natural light or dark treatment, blue light (470 nm) and red light (660 nm) significantly increased most endogenous volatiles including volatile fatty acid derivatives (VFADs), volatile phenylpropanoids/benzenoids (VPBs), and volatile terpenes (VTs) in the preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, blue and red lights significantly up-regulated the expression levels of 9/13-lipoxygenases involved in VFADs formation, phenylalanine ammonialyase involved in VPBs formation, and terpene synthases involved in VTs formation. Single light wavelength had less remarkable influences on formation of volatiles in the postharvest leaves compared with the preharvest leaves. These results suggest that blue and red lights can be promising technology for remodeling the aroma of preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, our study provided evidence that light wavelength can activate the expression of key genes involved in formation of plant volatiles for the first time. PMID:26567525

  6. Fully digital image sensor employing delta-sigma indirect feedback ADC with high-sensitivity to low-light illuminations for astronomical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricic, Danijel; Ignjatovic, Zeljko; Figer, Donald F.; Ashe, Brian; Hanold, Brandon J.; Montagliano, Thomas; Stauffer, Don; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2010-07-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with column-parallel delta-sigma (ΔΣ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The design employs three transistor pixels (3T1) where the unique configuration of the ΔΣ ADC reduces the noise contribution of the readout transistor. A 128 x 128 pixel image sensor prototype is fabricated in 0.35μm TSMC technology. The reset noise and the offset fixed pattern noise (FPN) are removed in the digital domain. The measured readout noise is 37.8μV for an exposure time of 33ms. The low readout noise allows an improved low light response in comparison to other state-of-art designs. The design is suitable for applications demanding excellent low-light response such as astronomical imaging. The sensor has a measured intra-scene dynamic range (DR) of 91 dB, and a peak signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 54 dB.

  7. Light-Regulated Molecular Trafficking in a Synthetic Water-Soluble Host.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, Jesús; Ryan, Seán T J; Jambrina, Pablo G; Rosta, Edina; Scherman, Oren A

    2016-05-11

    Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8])-mediated complexation of a dicationic azobenzene in water allows for the light-controlled encapsulation of a variety of second guest compounds, including amino acids, dyes, and fragrance molecules. Such controlled guest sequestration inside the cavity of CB[8] enables the regulation of the thermally induced phase transition of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-which is not photosensitive-thus demonstrating the robustness and relevancy of the light-regulated CB[8] complexation. PMID:26876686

  8. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue–green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment. PMID:26082770

  9. Characterization of light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Amy S; Kertho, Albert; Nguyen, Mary

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the light-dependent regulation of state transitions in gymnosperms. Two species of conifer were examined: eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss], as well as the angiosperm pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo). Both diurnal time courses in the field and manipulated light experiments in growth chambers were conducted. Results from chlorophyll fluorescence analysis indicated that pumpkin was able to use a larger fraction of absorbed light to drive photochemistry and retain a lower reduction state at a given light intensity relative to the conifers. Results from western blots using anti-phosphothreonine demonstrate that in field conditions, conifers maintained higher light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation than pumpkin; however, this was likely due to a more variable light environment. Manipulated light experiments showed that general patterns of light-dependent LHCII phosphorylation were similar in conifers and pumpkin, with low levels of LHCII phosphorylation occurring in darkness and maximal levels occurring in low light conditions. However, high light-dependent dephosphorylation of LHCIII appears to be regulated differently in conifers, with conifers maintaining phosphorylation of LHCII proteins at higher excitation pressure compared with pumpkin. Additionally, spruce needles maintained relatively high phosphorylation of LHCII even in very high light conditions. Our results suggest that this difference in dephosphorylation of LHCII may be due to differences in the stromal redox status in spruce relative to pine and pumpkin. PMID:26802541

  10. The Regulation of Light Sensing and Light-Harvesting Impacts the Use of Cyanobacteria as Biotechnology Platforms.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Light is harvested in cyanobacteria by chlorophyll-containing photosystems embedded in the thylakoid membranes and phycobilisomes (PBSs), photosystem-associated light-harvesting antennae. Light absorbed by the PBSs and photosystems can be converted to chemical energy through photosynthesis. Photosynthetically fixed carbon pools, which are constrained by photosynthetic light capture versus the dissipation of excess light absorbed, determine the available organismal energy budget. The molecular bases of the environmental regulation of photosynthesis, photoprotection, and photomorphogenesis are still being elucidated in cyanobacteria. Thus, the potential impacts of these phenomena on the efficacy of developing cyanobacteria as robust biotechnological platforms require additional attention. Current advances and persisting needs for developing cyanobacterial production platforms that are related to light sensing and harvesting include the development of tools to balance the utilization of absorbed photons for conversion to chemical energy and biomass versus light dissipation in photoprotective mechanisms. Such tools can be used to direct energy to more effectively support the production of desired bioproducts from sunlight. PMID:25023122

  11. DEG9, a serine protease, modulates cytokinin and light signaling by regulating the level of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wei; Li, Jing; He, Baoye; Chai, Xin; Xu, Xiumei; Sun, Xuwu; Jiang, Jingjing; Feng, Peiqiang; Zuo, Jianru; Lin, Rongcheng; Rochaix, Jean-David; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-06-21

    Cytokinin is an essential phytohormone that controls various biological processes in plants. A number of response regulators are known to be important for cytokinin signal transduction. ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 4 (ARR4) mediates the cross-talk between light and cytokinin signaling through modulation of the activity of phytochrome B. However, the mechanism that regulates the activity and stability of ARR4 is unknown. Here we identify an ATP-independent serine protease, degradation of periplasmic proteins 9 (DEG9), which localizes to the nucleus and regulates the stability of ARR4. Biochemical evidence shows that DEG9 interacts with ARR4, thereby targeting ARR4 for degradation, which suggests that DEG9 regulates the stability of ARR4. Moreover, genetic evidence shows that DEG9 acts upstream of ARR4 and regulates the activity of ARR4 in cytokinin and light-signaling pathways. This study thus identifies a role for a ubiquitin-independent selective protein proteolysis in the regulation of the stability of plant signaling components. PMID:27274065

  12. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism. PMID:26965118

  13. Red Light-Regulated Reversible Nuclear Localization of Proteins in Mammalian Cells and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Juillot, Samuel; Herbst, Kathrin; Samodelov, Sophia L; Müller, Konrad; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Römer, Winfried; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc; Strähle, Uwe; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-09-18

    Protein trafficking in and out of the nucleus represents a key step in controlling cell fate and function. Here we report the development of a red light-inducible and far-red light-reversible synthetic system for controlling nuclear localization of proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish. First, we synthetically reconstructed and validated the red light-dependent Arabidopsis phytochrome B nuclear import mediated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 in a nonplant environment and support current hypotheses on the import mechanism in planta. On the basis of this principle we next regulated nuclear import and activity of target proteins by the spatiotemporal projection of light patterns. A synthetic transcription factor was translocated into the nucleus of mammalian cells and zebrafish to drive transgene expression. These data demonstrate the first in vivo application of a plant phytochrome-based optogenetic tool in vertebrates and expand the repertoire of available light-regulated molecular devices. PMID:25803699

  14. Blue-light-regulated transcription factor, Aureochrome, in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    During the course of evolution through various endosymbiotic processes, diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes acquired blue light (BL) responses that do not use photosynthetic pathways. Photosynthetic stramenopiles, which have red algae-derived chloroplasts through secondary symbiosis, are principal primary producers in aquatic environments, and play important roles in ecosystems and aquaculture. Through secondary symbiosis, these taxa acquired BL responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast photo-relocation movement, and photomorphogenesis similar to those which green plants acquired through primary symbiosis. Photosynthetic stramenopile BL receptors were undefined until the discovery in 2007, of a new type of BL receptor, the aureochrome (AUREO), from the photosynthetic stramenopile alga, Vaucheria. AUREO has a bZIP domain and a LOV domain, and thus BL-responsive transcription factor. AUREO orthologs are only conserved in photosynthetic stramenopiles, such as brown algae, diatoms, and red tide algae. Here, a brief review is presented of the role of AUREOs as photoreceptors for these diverse BL responses and their biochemical properties in photosynthetic stramenopiles. PMID:26781435

  15. Regulation of Transcription through Light-Activation and Light-Deactivation of Triplex-Forming Oligonucleotides in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Hemphill, James; Lively, Mark O.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are efficient tools to regulate gene expression through the inhibition of transcription. Here, nucleobase-caging technology was applied to the first temporal regulation of transcription through light-activated TFOs. Through site-specific incorporation of caged thymidine nucleotides, the TFO:DNA triplex formation is blocked, rendering the TFO inactive. However, after a brief UV irradiation, the caging groups are removed, activating the TFO, and leading to the inhibition of gene transcription. Furthermore, the synthesis and site-specific incorporation of caged deoxycytidine nucleotides within TFO inhibitor sequences was developed, and allows for the light-deactivation of TFO function and thus photochemical activation of gene expression. After UV-induced removal of the caging groups, the TFO forms a DNA dumbbell structure, rendering it inactive, releasing it from the DNA, and activating transcription. These are the first examples of light-regulated TFOs and their application in the photochemical activation and deactivation of gene expression. In addition, hairpin loop structures were found to significantly increase the efficacy of phosphodiester DNA-based TFOs in tissue culture. PMID:22540192

  16. Regulation of transcription through light-activation and light-deactivation of triplex-forming oligonucleotides in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Govan, Jeane M; Uprety, Rajendra; Hemphill, James; Lively, Mark O; Deiters, Alexander

    2012-07-20

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are efficient tools to regulate gene expression through the inhibition of transcription. Here, nucleobase-caging technology was applied to the temporal regulation of transcription through light-activated TFOs. Through site-specific incorporation of caged thymidine nucleotides, the TFO:DNA triplex formation is blocked, rendering the TFO inactive. However, after a brief UV irradiation, the caging groups are removed, activating the TFO and leading to the inhibition of transcription. Furthermore, the synthesis and site-specific incorporation of caged deoxycytidine nucleotides within TFO inhibitor sequences was developed, allowing for the light-deactivation of TFO function and thus photochemical activation of gene expression. After UV-induced removal of the caging groups, the TFO forms a DNA dumbbell structure, rendering it inactive, releasing it from the DNA, and activating transcription. These are the first examples of light-regulated TFOs and their application in the photochemical activation and deactivation of gene expression. In addition, hairpin loop structures were found to significantly increase the efficacy of phosphodiester DNA-based TFOs in tissue culture. PMID:22540192

  17. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency selectively up-regulates delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices in rat liver: prevention by normalization of omega-3 fatty acid status.

    PubMed

    Hofacer, Rylon; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Magrisso, I Jack; Benoit, Stephen C; McNamara, Robert K

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of perinatal dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid depletion and subsequent repletion on the expression of genes that regulate long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in rat liver and brain. It was hypothesized that chronic n-3 fatty acid deficiency would increase liver Fads1 and Fads2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression/activity and that n-3 fatty acid repletion would normalize this response. Adult rats fed the n-3-free diet during perinatal development exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte, liver, and frontal cortex LCn-3 fatty acid composition and reciprocal elevations in LC omega-6 (n-6) fatty acid composition compared with controls (CONs) and repleted rats. Liver Fads2, but not Fads1, Elovl2, or Elovl5, mRNA expression was significantly greater in n-3-deficient (DEF) rats compared with CONs and was partially normalized in repleted rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, an index of delta6-desturase activity, was significantly greater in DEF rats compared with CON and repleted rats and was positively correlated with Fads2 mRNA expression among all rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, but not Fads2 mRNA expression, was also positively correlated with erythrocyte and frontal cortex LCn-6 fatty acid compositions. Neither Fads1 or Fads2 mRNA expression was altered in brain cortex of DEF rats. These results confirm previous findings that liver, but not brain, delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices are negatively regulated by dietary n-3 fatty acids. PMID:22024496

  18. Light vehicle regulated and unregulated emissions from different biodiesels.

    PubMed

    Karavalakis, George; Stournas, Stamoulis; Bakeas, Evangelos

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the regulated and unregulated emissions profile and fuel consumption of an automotive diesel and biodiesel blends, prepared from two different biodiesels, were investigated. The biodiesels were a rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and a palm-based methyl ester (PME). The tests were performed on a chassis dynamometer with constant volume sampling (CVS) over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the non-legislated Athens Driving Cycle (ADC), using a Euro 2 compliant passenger vehicle. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of biodiesel chemical structure on the emissions, as well as the influence of the applied driving cycle on the formation of exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. The results showed that NO(x) emissions were influenced by certain biodiesel properties, such as those of cetane number and iodine number. NO(x) emissions followed a decreasing trend over both cycles, where the most beneficial reduction was obtained with the application of the more saturated biodiesel. PM emissions were decreased with the palm-based biodiesel blends over both cycles, with the exception of the 20% blend which was higher compared to diesel fuel. PME blends led to increases in PM emissions over the ADC. The majority of the biodiesel blends showed a tendency for lower CO and HC emissions. The differences in CO(2) emissions were not statistically significant. Fuel consumption presented an increase with both biodiesels. Total PAH and nitro-PAH emission levels were decreased with the use of biodiesel independently of the source material. Lower molecular weight PAHs were predominant in both gaseous and particulate phases. Both biodiesels had a negative impact on certain carbonyl emissions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant aldehydes emitted from both fuels. PMID:19269679

  19. Melanopsin Regulates Both Sleep-Promoting and Arousal-Promoting Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Shu K. E.; Hughes, Steven; Jagannath, Aarti; Hankins, Mark W.; Bannerman, David M.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Nolan, Patrick M.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Light plays a critical role in the regulation of numerous aspects of physiology and behaviour, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep. These responses involve melanopsin (OPN4)-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) in addition to rods and cones. Nocturnal light exposure in rodents has been shown to result in rapid sleep induction, in which melanopsin plays a key role. However, studies have also shown that light exposure can result in elevated corticosterone, a response that is not compatible with sleep. To investigate these contradictory findings and to dissect the relative contribution of pRGCs and rods/cones, we assessed the effects of light of different wavelengths on behaviourally defined sleep. Here, we show that blue light (470 nm) causes behavioural arousal, elevating corticosterone and delaying sleep onset. By contrast, green light (530 nm) produces rapid sleep induction. Compared to wildtype mice, these responses are altered in melanopsin-deficient mice (Opn4-/-), resulting in enhanced sleep in response to blue light but delayed sleep induction in response to green or white light. We go on to show that blue light evokes higher Fos induction in the SCN compared to the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), whereas green light produced greater responses in the VLPO. Collectively, our data demonstrates that nocturnal light exposure can have either an arousal- or sleep-promoting effect, and that these responses are melanopsin-mediated via different neural pathways with different spectral sensitivities. These findings raise important questions relating to how artificial light may alter behaviour in both the work and domestic setting. PMID:27276063

  20. Role of a COP1 interactive protein in mediating light-regulated gene expression in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y Y; Matsui, M; Ang, L H; Deng, X W

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings display distinct patterns of gene expression and morphogenesis according to the ambient light condition. An Arabidopsis nuclear protein, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), acts to repress photomorphogenesis in the absence of light. The Arabidopsis CIP7 protein was identified by its capability to interact with COP1. CIP7 is a novel nuclear protein that contains transcriptional activation activity without a recognizable DNA binding motif. CIP7 requires light for its high level of expression, and COP1 seems to play a role in repressing its expression in darkness. Decreasing CIP7 expression by introducing antisense CIP7 RNA resulted in defects in light-dependent anthocyanin and chlorophyll accumulation. Antisense plants also displayed reduced expression of light-inducible genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photosynthesis. However, no defect was observed in light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Taken together, our data indicate that CIP7 acts as a positive regulator of light-regulated genes and is a potential direct downstream target of COP1 for mediating light control of gene expression. PMID:9668129

  1. Chromoselective Photocatalysis: Controlled Bond Activation through Light-Color Regulation of Redox Potentials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; König, Burkhard

    2016-06-27

    Catalysts that can be regulated in terms of activity and selectivity by external stimuli may allow the efficient multistep synthesis of complex molecules and pharmaceuticals. Herein, we report the light-color regulation of the redox potential of a photocatalyst to control the activation of chemical bonds. Light-color control of the redox power of a photocatalyst introduces a new selectivity parameter to photoredox catalysis: Instead of changing the catalyst or ligand, alteration of the color of the visible-light irradiation adjusts the selectivity in catalytic transformations. By using this principle, the selective activation of aryl-halide bonds for C-H arylation and the sequential conversion of functional groups with different reduction potentials is possible by simply applying different colors of light for excitation of the photocatalyst. PMID:27198967

  2. Translational regulation of protein synthesis, in response to light, at a critical stage of Volvox development

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.M.; Kirk, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    In Volvox cultures synchronized by a light-dark cycle, juveniles containing presumptive somatic and reproductive cells are produced during the dark, but their cells do not differentiate until after the lights come on. The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly after the lights come on. Action spectra and effects of photosynthesis inhibitors indicate that this protein synthetic change is not simply a consequence of renewed flow of energy from illuminated chloroplasts. Actinomycin, at a level adequate to block the response to heat shock, has virtually no effect on the response of the same cells to light; furthermore, RNAs isolated from unilluminated and illuminated juveniles yield indistinguishable in vitro translation products. The authors conclude, therefore, that this effect of light is exerted almost exclusively at the translational level, generating one of the most striking examples of translational regulation yet described.

  3. Light regulates expression of a Fos-related protein in rat suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Aronin, N; Sagar, S M; Sharp, F R; Schwartz, W J

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythmicity is endogenously generated by a pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and precisely entrained to the 24-hr day/night cycle by periodic environmental light cues. We show that light alters the immunoreactive levels of a transcriptional regulatory protein, Fos, in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of albino rats. Photic regulation of Fos immunoreactivity does not occur in other retino-recipient brain areas except for the intergeniculate leaflet, which appears to be involved in mediating some of the complex effects of light on expressed circadian rhythms. Our results point to a promising new functional marker for the cellular effects of light and suggest that the expression of Fos or a related nuclear protein may be part of the mechanism for photic entrainment of the circadian clock to environmental light/dark cycles. Images PMID:2116012

  4. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  5. Cross-talk between light and glucose regulation controls toxin production and morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Atoui, A.; Kastner, C.; Larey, C.M.; Thokala, R.; Etxebeste, O.; Espeso, E.A.; Fischer, R.

    2010-01-01

    Light is a major environmental stimulus that has a broad effect on organisms, triggering a cellular response that results in an optimal adaptation enhancing fitness and survival. In fungi, light affects growth, and causes diverse morphological changes such as those leading to reproduction. Light can also affect fungal metabolism, including the biosynthesis of natural products. In this study we show that in Aspergillus nidulans the effect of light on the production of the sterigmatocystin (ST) toxin depends on the glucose concentration. In cultures grown with 1% glucose and exposed to light, ST production was lower than when grown in the dark. This lower ST production coincided with an elevated rate of cellular damage with partial loss of nuclear integrity and vacuolated cytoplasm. However, in cultures grown with 2% glucose these effects were reversed and light enhanced ST production. Glucose abundance also affected the light-dependent subcellular localization of the VeA (velvet) protein, a key regulator necessary for normal light-dependent morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in Aspergilli and other fungal genera. The role of other VeA-associated proteins, particularly the blue light-sensing proteins LreA and LreB (WC-1 and WC-2 orthologs), on conidiation could also be modified by the abundance of glucose. We also show that LreA and LreB, as well as the phytochrome FphA, modulate not only the synthesis of sterigmatocystin, but also the production of the antibiotic penicillin. PMID:20816830

  6. Differential Regulation of Duplicate Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductases in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability. Results For cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μE m−2 s−1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μE m−2 s−1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μE m−2 s−1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown. Conclusion Given the sensitivity of diatom por1/POR1 to real-time light cues and adherence of por2/POR2 regulation to

  7. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24048028

  8. HtrA3 is regulated by 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 independently of PPAR{gamma} in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, Sandrine; Mottier, Stephanie; Masson, Damien; Denis, Marc G.

    2010-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been shown to possess anti-proliferative effects in many types of cancer. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the targets involved in these effects are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that, in CCRCC cell lines, the endogenous PPAR{gamma} ligand 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) induces the expression, both at the mRNA and the protein levels, of the HtrA3 gene. This gene belongs to the High-Temperature Requirement Factor A family of serine proteases that repress signaling by TGF-{beta} family members and inhibit cell migration. Rosiglitazone or ciglitazone, synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonists, did not induce HtrA3 expression, and the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 did not prevent 15dPGJ2 induction, suggesting that the up-regulation of HtrA3 by 15dPGJ2 is independent of PPAR{gamma}. The MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 dramatically repressed HtrA3 induction. Altogether, these data indicate that 15dPGJ2 is able to stimulate the expression of HtrA3 through an indirect mechanism involving the MEK/ERK pathway but independent of PPAR{gamma}. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of HtrA3, a potential tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Discrete Redox Signaling Pathways Regulate Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting and Chloroplast Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John F.; Santabarbara, Stefano; Allen, Carol A.; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthesis in chloroplasts, two related regulatory processes balance the actions of photosystems I and II. These processes are short-term, post-translational redistribution of light-harvesting capacity, and long-term adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry initiated by control of chloroplast DNA transcription. Both responses are initiated by changes in the redox state of the electron carrier, plastoquinone, which connects the two photosystems. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase (CSK) is a regulator of transcription of chloroplast genes for reaction centres of the two photosystems, and a sensor of plastoquinone redox state. We asked whether CSK is also involved in regulation of absorbed light energy distribution by phosphorylation of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II). Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated from a CSK T-DNA insertion mutant and from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit similar light- and redox-induced 32P-labelling of LHC II and changes in 77 K chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, while room-temperature chlorophyll fluorescence emission transients from Arabidopsis leaves are perturbed by inactivation of CSK. The results indicate indirect, pleiotropic effects of reaction centre gene transcription on regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting in vivo. A single, direct redox signal is transmitted separately to discrete transcriptional and post-translational branches of an integrated cytoplasmic regulatory system. PMID:22039472

  10. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein expression in the retina is regulated by light.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Souza, E M; Perche, O; Morgans, C W; Duvoisin, R M; Calaza, K C

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a RNA-binding protein that modulates protein synthesis at the synapse and its function is regulated by glutamate. The retina is the first structure that participates in vision, and uses glutamate to transduce electromagnetic signals from light to electrochemical signals to neurons. FMRP has been previously detected in the retina, but its localization has not been studied yet. In this work, our objectives were to describe the localization of FMRP in the retina, to determine whether different exposure to dark or light stimulus alters FMRP expression in the retina, and to compare the pattern in two different species, the mouse and chick. We found that both FMRP mRNA and protein are expressed in the retina. By immunohistochemistry analysis we found that both mouse and chick present similar FMRP expression localized mainly in both plexiform layers and the inner retina. It was also observed that FMRP is down-regulated by 24 h dark adaptation compared to its expression in the retina of animals that were exposed to light for 1 h after 24 h in the dark. We conclude that FMRP is likely to participate in retinal physiology, since its expression changes with light exposure. In addition, the expression pattern and regulation by light of FMRP seems well conserved since it was similar in both mouse and chick. PMID:26719241

  11. A role for barley CRYPTOCHROME1 in light regulation of grain dormancy and germination.

    PubMed

    Barrero, Jose M; Downie, A Bruce; Xu, Qian; Gubler, Frank

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in the regulation of seed dormancy and that transcriptional regulation of genes encoding ABA biosynthetic and degradation enzymes is responsible for determining ABA content. However, little is known about the upstream signaling pathways impinging on transcription to ultimately regulate ABA content or how environmental signals (e.g., light and cold) might direct such expression in grains. Our previous studies indicated that light is a key environmental signal inhibiting germination in dormant grains of barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and Brachypodium distachyon and that this effect attenuates as after-ripening progresses further. We found that the blue component of the light spectrum inhibits completion of germination in barley by inducing the expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and dampening expression of ABA 8'-hydroxylase, thus increasing ABA content in the grain. We have now created barley transgenic lines downregulating the genes encoding the blue light receptors CRYTOCHROME (CRY1) and CRY2. Our results demonstrate that CRY1 is the key receptor perceiving and transducing the blue light signal in dormant grains. PMID:24642944

  12. Highlights of the new Emission Norm for the Regulation of Light Pollution in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanhueza, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Due to the need to deal with the new menace of LEDS, which are very blue emitters, and to address other shortcomings regarding scattering and over illumination of the first lighting regulations passed in Chile in 1998 (DS 686/1998), the Chilean Ministry of Environment (MMA) approved new regulations by Presidential decree (DS 043/2012) on May 03, 2013. This new version of the regulations was developed by OPCC in collaboration with the MMA.This new environmental standard includes the following main restrictions:A full-cut-off requirement for general lighting, which means 0.49cd/Klumen at 90º (i.e., no light distribution above horizontal).For sport and recreational activities, an allowed level of 10cd/Klumen at 90º, together with a visor to cut upper-hemisphere emissions.Spectral restrictions divided into three regulated regions of the visible spectrum (as compared to the total light emission between 380 and 780nm): (a) not more than 15% of total light output in the range 300 to 380nm; (b) not more than 15% in the range 380 to 499nm; and (c) not more than 50% in the range 781nm to 1micron.Over illumination restricted to not more than 20% over the Chilean standard (NSEG 9 n71) for minimal levels in public lighting.Billboards with inner sources of illuminations (LED or plasma big screens) must emit no more than 50cd/m2 at night. No spectral restriction is applied.This new lighting regulation has not come into force yet, due to a delay in approving complementary technical protocols. Enforcement is also a critical issue to deal with, given that the institutional environmental framework in Chile is being modified.The OPCC is working with both the Ministry of Public Works and also Ministry of Housing, seeking to go beyond the new lighting regulation by applying a more restrictive approach in terms of spectral restriction, promoting the use of warm white LEDS with a CCT of 2.700 Kº and, in the case of outdoor illumination near professional observatories, monochromatic

  13. Regulation of Early Light-Inducible Protein Gene Expression by Blue and Red Light in Etiolated Seedlings Involves Nuclear and Plastid Factors.

    PubMed Central

    Adamska, I.

    1995-01-01

    Early light-inducible proteins (ELIPs) are nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins whose genes are transiently transcribed during the greening process of etiolated plants. In the present work the regulation of ELIP gene expression by blue and red light has been investigated in plumulas of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum). The results show that the steady-state level of ELIP transcripts is controlled by a combined action of phytochrome and blue light receptor systems and, in addition, depends on the age of the seedlings. Both a low-light fluence system of blue and a very-low-fluence system of red light are involved in ELIP induction. The threshold for accumulation of ELIP transcripts was as low as 10-5 [mu]E m-2 s-1 for both light qualities but a different pattern of accumulation was obtained in blue and in red light. Blue light not only acts at the level of transcription but also regulates the stability of the ELIP transcripts in a light intensity-dependent manner. Moreover, it is shown that product(s) of nuclear gene(s) negatively regulate the steady-state level of ELIP transcripts during the 1st h of illumination with red light. Preillumination of seedlings with white light abolishes this repression. Accumulation of ELIP transcripts requires "plastid factors" in both blue and red light qualities. PMID:12228423

  14. Light-regulated modification and nuclear translocation of cytosolic G-box binding factors in parsley.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, K; Kircher, S; Frohnmeyer, H; Krenz, M; Nagy, F; Schäfer, E

    1994-01-01

    Functional cell-free systems may be excellent tools with which to investigate light-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in plants. By evacuolation of parsley protoplasts and subsequent silicon oil gradient centrifugation of lysed evacuolated protoplasts, we obtained a highly pure and concentrated plasma membrane-containing cytosol. Using GT- and G-box DNA elements, we were able to demonstrate a specific localization of a pool of G-box binding activity and factors (GBFs) but not one of GT-box binding activity in this cytosolic fraction. The DNA binding activity of the cytosolic GBFs is modulated in vivo as well as in vitro by light and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation activities. The regulation of cytosolic G-box binding activity by irradiation with continuous white light and phosphorylation correlates with a light-modulated transport of GBFs to the nucleus. This was shown by a GBF-antibody cotranslocation assay in permeabilized, cell-free evacuolated parsley protoplasts. We propose that a light-regulated subcellular displacement of cytosolic GBFs to the nucleus may be an important step in the signal transduction pathway coupling photoreception to light-dependent gene expression. PMID:8205004

  15. Regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism by blue LED light irradiation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of red and blue LED lights on the accumulation of ascorbic acid (AsA) were investigated in the juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin, Valencia orange, and Lisbon lemon. The results showed that the blue LED light treatment effectively increased the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties, whereas the red LED light treatment did not. By increasing the blue LED light intensity, the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties accumulated more AsA. Moreover, continuous irradiation with blue LED light was more effective than pulsed irradiation for increasing the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties. Gene expression results showed that the modulation of AsA accumulation by blue LED light was highly regulated at the transcription level. The up-regulation of AsA biosynthetic genes (CitVTC1, CitVTC2, CitVTC4, and CitGLDH), AsA regeneration genes (CitMDAR1, CitMDAR2, and CitDHAR) and two GSH-producing genes (CitGR and CitchGR) contributed to these increases in the AsA content in the three citrus varieties. PMID:25711821

  16. 78 FR 21491 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption... that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P. and DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P., 45 East Avenue, 6th Floor... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  17. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator Concept for High Efficiency Light Weight DC Voltage Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in the efficiency and size of DC-DC converters have resulted from advances in components, primarily semiconductors, and improved topologies. One topology, which has shown very high potential in limited applications, is the Series Connected Boost Unit (SCBU), wherein a small DC-DC converter output is connected in series with the input bus to provide an output voltage equal to or greater than the input voltage. Since the DC-DC converter switches only a fraction of the power throughput, the overall system efficiency is very high. But this technique is limited to applications where the output is always greater than the input. The Series Connected Buck Boost Regulator (SCBBR) concept extends partial power processing technique used in the SCBU to operation when the desired output voltage is higher or lower than the input voltage, and the implementation described can even operate as a conventional buck converter to operate at very low output to input voltage ratios. This paper describes the operation and performance of an SCBBR configured as a bus voltage regulator providing 50 percent voltage regulation range, bus switching, and overload limiting, operating above 98 percent efficiency. The technique does not provide input-output isolation.

  18. Staring at the Cold Sun: Blue Light Regulation Is Distributed within the Genus Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M.; Actis, Luis A.; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility. PMID:23358859

  19. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Regulates Cell Migration in a Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Phosphorylation-independent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Tao, Tao; Wen, Cheng; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Gao, Yun-Qian; Chen, Xin; Wang, Pei; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Hua-Qun; Ye, An-Pei; Peng, Ya-Jing; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has long been implicated in the myosin phosphorylation and force generation required for cell migration. Here, we surprisingly found that the deletion of MLCK resulted in fast cell migration, enhanced protrusion formation, and no alteration of myosin light chain phosphorylation. The mutant cells showed reduced membrane tether force and fewer membrane F-actin filaments. This phenotype was rescued by either kinase-dead MLCK or five-DFRXXL motif, a MLCK fragment with potent F-actin-binding activity. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the absence of MLCK led to attenuated formation of transmembrane complexes, including myosin II, integrins and fibronectin. We suggest that MLCK is not required for myosin phosphorylation in a migrating cell. A critical role of MLCK in cell migration involves regulating the cell membrane tension and protrusion necessary for migration, thereby stabilizing the membrane skeleton through F-actin-binding activity. This finding sheds light on a novel regulatory mechanism of protrusion during cell migration. PMID:25122766

  20. Assessing the Impacts of Reservoir Regulations and Climate Variability on the Peace River Runoff and Peace-Athabasca-Delta Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javid, H.; Davison, B.; Princz, D. G.; Rokaya, P.; Sapriza, G.; Wheater, H. S.; Morales-Marin, L. A.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold region river catchments functioning is permanently altered locally by the anthropogenic changes and at large scale by the climate changes. Anthropogenic changes are represented particularly by reservoirs that affect the hydrology, and thus the ecology and geomorphology of the river catchments. The Peace River Basin and Peace-Athabasca-Delta (PAD), in western Canada have been experiencing similar kind of anthropogenic changes and shifts in the hydrological regime due to the regulation of Peace River in 1960's. Since then, ice jam floods have reduced in the region, which are a very important source for replenishment of the PAD perched basins. The previous studies have regarded regulation and climate change to have equal contribution on the drying of PAD. In this study, a physically based and distributed model, MESH (Modélisation Environmentale Communautaire), that couples the Canadian Land Surface Scheme model (CLASS) and hydrological routing model (WATFLOOD), has been used to generate the runoff of Peace River under the natural flow scenario from 1970 to 2010. The reduced ice jam flooding of the PAD is mainly due to the higher freeze up stage in the lower reaches of the Peace River and declining peak flows in the spring. The former is caused by the release of water in the winter for hydropower generation and the latter is due to the filling of reservoir in the spring. Although climate variability has caused decline in summer streamflows for most of the Peace River and the PAD tributaries, as identified by the observed runoff data analysis, it is shown that the spring flows and its occurrence time would still be good enough to cause mechanical breakup of ice and overbank flooding of the PAD, if the Peace River flow was not regulated. Our results are based on the long term observed runoff analysis and the unregulated streamflows simulated by a state of the art physically based model developed by the Environment Canada.

  1. 15-Deoxy-delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 biphasically regulates the proliferation of mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells by modulating the redox state.

    PubMed

    Katura, Takashi; Moriya, Takahiro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2010-04-01

    The activity of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by various humoral factors. Although prostaglandin (PG) D(2) is known to mediate various physiological brain functions such as sleep, its actions on NPCs have not been fully understood. In the process of investigating the effects of PGD(2) on NPCs, we found that 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), an endogenous metabolite of PGD(2), exhibits a novel regulation of the proliferation of NPCs derived from mouse hippocampus. 15d-PGJ(2) showed biphasic effects on epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation of NPCs; facilitation at low concentrations ( approximately 0.3 muM) and suppression at higher concentrations (0.5-10 microM) in vitro. 2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide (GW9662), an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, known to be a molecular target for 15d-PGJ(2), failed to abolish the effects of 15d-PGJ(2). 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2) (CAY10410), a structural analog of 15d-PGJ(2) lacking the electrophilic carbon in the cyclopentenone ring, did not show 15d-PGJ(2)-like actions. Treatment with 15d-PGJ(2) increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and decreased endogenous GSH levels. Furthermore, supplementation with a membrane-permeable analog of glutathione, GSH ethyl ester (2 mM), diminished the biphasic effects of 15d-PGJ(2). Finally, cell division in the dentate gyrus of postnatal mice was increased by injection of low-dose (1 ng i.c.v.) 15d-PGJ(2) and suppressed by high-dose (30 ng) 15d-PGJ(2). These results suggest that 15d-PGJ(2) regulates the proliferation of NPCs via its electrophilic nature, which enables covalent binding to molecules such as GSH. PMID:20086036

  2. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  3. Transcriptome Profiling of Light-Regulated Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in the Pericarp of Litchi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Wei-Cai; Wang, Hui-Cong; Shi, Sheng-You; Shu, Bo; Liu, Li-Qin; Wei, Yong-Zan; Xie, Jiang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. To enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the pericarp of litchi, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the basis of Illumina sequencing. Fruit clusters were bagged with double-layer Kraft paper bags at 42 days after anthesis. The bags were removed after 2 weeks. Under light conditions, anthocyanins accumulated rapidly in the pericarp. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 75,935 unigenes with an average length of 913 bp. Approximately 74.5% of unigenes (56,601) were annotated against four public protein databases. A total of 16,622 unigenes that significantly differed in terms of abundance were identified. These unigenes are implicated in light signal perception and transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis. In photoreceptors, the expression levels of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8), Phototropin 2 (PHOT2), Phytochrome B (PHYB), and Phytochrome C (PHYC) increased significantly when the fruits were exposed to light. This result indicated that they likely play important roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After analyzed digital gene expression (DGE), we found that the light signal transduction elements of COP1 and COP10 might be responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After the bags were removed, nearly all structural and regulatory genes, such as UDP-glucose: flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40, involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were upregulated. In addition to MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (HY5), NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC), homeodomain leucine zipper proteins (ATHBs), and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (FHY) possibly participate in light-induced responses. On the basis of DGEs and qRT-PCR validation, we observed a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis

  4. Transcriptome Profiling of Light-Regulated Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in the Pericarp of Litchi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Wei-Cai; Wang, Hui-Cong; Shi, Sheng-You; Shu, Bo; Liu, Li-Qin; Wei, Yong-Zan; Xie, Jiang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. To enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in light-regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in the pericarp of litchi, we performed transcriptomic analyses on the basis of Illumina sequencing. Fruit clusters were bagged with double-layer Kraft paper bags at 42 days after anthesis. The bags were removed after 2 weeks. Under light conditions, anthocyanins accumulated rapidly in the pericarp. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 75,935 unigenes with an average length of 913 bp. Approximately 74.5% of unigenes (56,601) were annotated against four public protein databases. A total of 16,622 unigenes that significantly differed in terms of abundance were identified. These unigenes are implicated in light signal perception and transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, carotenoid biosynthesis, plant hormone signal transduction, and photosynthesis. In photoreceptors, the expression levels of UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8), Phototropin 2 (PHOT2), Phytochrome B (PHYB), and Phytochrome C (PHYC) increased significantly when the fruits were exposed to light. This result indicated that they likely play important roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After analyzed digital gene expression (DGE), we found that the light signal transduction elements of COP1 and COP10 might be responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation. After the bags were removed, nearly all structural and regulatory genes, such as UDP-glucose: flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40, involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were upregulated. In addition to MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcription complex, ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (HY5), NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC), homeodomain leucine zipper proteins (ATHBs), and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (FHY) possibly participate in light-induced responses. On the basis of DGEs and qRT-PCR validation, we observed a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis

  5. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyBLys996Arg-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases. PMID:26283376

  6. Differential regulation of duplicate light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ford, Christopher J.; Miller, James S.; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Ianora, Adrianna

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability.more » As a result, for cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μEm–2 s–1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μEm–2 s–1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μEm–2 s–1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown.« less

  7. Light regulation of the cell cycle and gene expression in Euglena gracilis bacillaris

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Muh-ching

    1988-05-01

    Light regulation of the cell division cycle in the photosynthetic unicellular alga Euglena gracilis bacillaris was studied. By inoculating stationary phase, non-dividing cells into fresh media, and exposing the diluted cells to either light or darkness, it was determined that initiation of DNA synthesis is light dependent and requires continuous exposure to more than six hours of light. It is proposed that this is to allow the accumulation of an initiating factor that will enable DNA synthesis to begin. The initiating factor has a half-life of 5 hours in the dark. Flow cytometry analysis shows that once cells are committed to the cell cycle, they will complete the cycle in the dark. The levels of several photosynthetic messenger RNAs have been studied under alternating light-dark conditions and continuous light conditions. RNA levels for psbA, which encodes the Photosynthem II herbicide binding protein known as D1, display a strong circadian rhythm that persists for more than 3 days in continuous light. RNA levels for rbcL, which encodes the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, and for rbcS, which encodes the small subunit of that enzyme, have a shorter free-running circadian cycle. The chloroplast-encoded rbcL is more sensitive to cell cycle state because it does not accumulate in stationary phase cultures while the nuclear-encoded rbcS does accumulate.

  8. A microRNA network regulates expression and biosynthesis of wild-type and DeltaF508 mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H; Jiang, Peng; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Walz, Amy E; Fisher, John T; Keshavjee, Shaf; Lennox, Kim A; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Welsh, Michael J; Xing, Yi; McCray, Paul B

    2012-08-14

    Production of functional proteins requires multiple steps, including gene transcription and posttranslational processing. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate individual stages of these processes. Despite the importance of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel for epithelial anion transport, how its expression is regulated remains uncertain. We discovered that miRNA-138 regulates CFTR expression through its interactions with the transcriptional regulatory protein SIN3A. Treating airway epithelia with an miR-138 mimic increased CFTR mRNA and also enhanced CFTR abundance and transepithelial Cl(-) permeability independent of elevated mRNA levels. An miR-138 anti-miR had the opposite effects. Importantly, miR-138 altered the expression of many genes encoding proteins that associate with CFTR and may influence its biosynthesis. The most common CFTR mutation, ΔF508, causes protein misfolding, protein degradation, and cystic fibrosis. Remarkably, manipulating the miR-138 regulatory network also improved biosynthesis of CFTR-ΔF508 and restored Cl(-) transport to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia. This miRNA-regulated network directs gene expression from the chromosome to the cell membrane, indicating that an individual miRNA can control a cellular process more broadly than recognized previously. This discovery also provides therapeutic avenues for restoring CFTR function to cells affected by the most common cystic fibrosis mutation. PMID:22853952

  9. Light-specific transcriptional regulation of the accumulation of carotenoids and phenolic compounds in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-06-01

    Carotenoids and phenolic compounds are important subgroups of secondary metabolites having an array of functional roles in the growth and development of plants. They are also major sources for health and pharmaceutical benefits, and industrially relevant biochemicals. The control of the biosynthesis of these compounds depends mainly on the quality and quantity of different light sources. Thus, to unravel their light-specific transcriptional regulation in rice leaves, we performed promoter analysis of genes upregulated in response to blue and red lights. The analysis results suggested a crosstalk between different phytohormones and the involvement of key transcription factors such as bHLH, bZIP, MYB, WRKY, ZnF and ERF [jasmonic acid inducible], in the regulation of higher accumulation of carotenoids and phenolic compounds upon blue light. Overall, the current analysis could improve our understanding of the light-specific regulatory mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites via possible critical links between different TFs in rice leaves. PMID:27172458

  10. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  11. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period.

  12. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30-40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period. PMID:26879008

  13. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in association with HSP70 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jinah; Lee, Hyun-Il; Chang, Young-Sun; Lee, Soo Jae; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Sang Ick . E-mail: parksi@nih.go.kr

    2007-05-25

    A natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression by an unknown mechanism. Here we found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced eNOS reduction is inversely associated with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in endothelial cells. Treatment of cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} decreased eNOS protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but independently of PPAR{gamma} with no effect on mRNA levels. Although 15d-PGJ{sub 2} elicited endothelial apoptosis, inhibition of both pan-caspases and cathepsins failed to reverse reduction of eNOS protein. Interestingly, we observed that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoprecipitation and heat shock treatment demonstrated that eNOS reduction was strongly related to HSP70 induction. Cellular fractionation revealed that treatment with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} increased eNOS distribution 2.5-fold from soluble to insoluble fractions. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms whereby eNOS regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} is related to HSP70 induction.

  14. Five-year changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in coastal wetlands affected by flow-sediment regulation in a Chinese delta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjing; Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Xia, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the sources and sinks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) in wetland soils as indicators of soil quality and climate change have received attention worldwide. Soil samples were collected in 2007 and 2012 in the coastal wetlands of the Yellow River Delta and the SOC and TN were determined to investigate a five-year change in their content and stock in these wetlands as affected by flow-sediment regulation. Our results revealed that the soils in 2007 exhibited greater electrical conductivities, SOC content and density, and ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) levels in the top 10 cm soils (p < 0.05) compared with the soils in 2012. In general, the SOC and TN contents decreased with increasing soil depth. However, the highest ratios of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen (molar C/N ratios) were observed in the 30–40 cm soil layer. A significant SOC loss occurred (p < 0.05) in top 10 cm soils, but only a small change in SOC in the top 50 cm soils. Comparatively, TN levels did not show significant differences in the study period. PMID:26879008

  15. Functional analysis of a light-responsive plant bZIP transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Feldbrügge, M; Sprenger, M; Dinkelbach, M; Yazaki, K; Harter, K; Weisshaar, B

    1994-01-01

    Common plant regulatory factor 1 (CPRF1) is a parsley basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor that recognizes specific nucleotide sequences containing ACGT cores. Such a sequence is contained within LRU1, the composite light regulatory unit that is necessary and sufficient for light-dependent activity of the parsley chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter. After light treatment of both etiolated and green seedlings, CPRF1 mRNA levels increased prior to CHS mRNA accumulation. The change in CPRF1 mRNA leads to a light-responsive increase in CPRF1 protein. Transient expression analysis in parsley protoplasts using the CPRF1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) open reading frame indicated that light-dependent CPRF1 mRNA accumulation was under transcriptional control. The 5' untranslated region of the CPRF1 gene includes a cis-acting nucleotide sequence that contains two ACGT elements at a distance of 12 bp between their palindromic centers. This feature is reminiscent of as-1 and octopine synthase (ocs) elements identified in promoters from plant pathogens. This double ACGT Element element, designated dACECPRF1, stimulated transcription when placed 5' to a heterologous core promoter. CPRF1 bound to dACECPRF1 DNA as well as to the ACGT element from the CHS promoter in vitro. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that CPRF1 interacts with these elements in vivo and that overexpression of CPRF1 actually reduced light-dependent transcription from the CHS promoter. CPRF1 thus appears to contribute to the regulation of the CPRF1 gene and to interfere with the activities of light-regulated promoters. PMID:7827494

  16. Developmental and Light Regulation of Desacetoxyvindoline 4-Hydroxylase in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.1

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Flota, Felipe A.; De Luca, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    The expression of desacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase (D4H), which catalyzes the second to the last reaction in vindoline biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus, appears to be under complex, multilevel developmental and light regulation. Developmental studies with etiolated and light-treated seedlings suggested that although light had variable effects on the levels of d4h transcripts, those of D4H protein and enzyme activity could be increased, depending on seedling development, up to 9- and 8-fold, respectively, compared with etiolated seedlings. However, light treatment of etiolated seedlings could stop and reverse the decline of d4h transcripts at later stages of seedling development. Repeated exposure of seedlings to light was also required to maintain the full spectrum of enzyme activity observed during seedling development. Further studies showed that a photoreversible phytochrome appeared to be involved in the activation of D4H, since red-light treatment of etiolated seedlings increased the detectable levels of d4h transcripts, D4H protein, and D4H enzyme activity, whereas far-red-light treatment completely reversed this process. Additional studies also confirmed that different major isoforms of D4H protein exist in etiolated (isoelectric point, 4.7) and light-grown (isoelectric point, 4.6) seedlings, suggesting that a component of the light-mediated activation of D4H may involve an undetermined posttranslational modification. The biological reasons for this complex control of vindoline biosynthesis may be related to the need to produce structures that could sequester away from cellular activities the cytotoxic vinblastine and vincristine dimers that are derived partially from vindoline. PMID:9701591

  17. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α. The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  18. DeltaNp63alpha confers tumor cell resistance to cisplatin through the AKT1 transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tanusree; Sen, Nilkantha; Brait, Mariana; Begum, Shahnaz; Chatterjee, Aditi; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Ratovitski, Edward; Sidransky, David

    2011-02-01

    Strategies to address resistance to platin drugs are greatly needed in human epithelial cancers (e.g., ovarian, head/neck, and lung) where platins are used widely and resistance occurs commonly. We found that upon ΔNp63α overexpression, AKT1 and phospho-AKT1 levels are upregulated in cancer cells. Investigations using gel-shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation and functional reporter assays implicated ΔNp63α in positive regulation of AKT1 transcription. Importantly, we found that ΔNp63α, AKT1, and phospho-AKT levels are greater in 2008CI3 CDDP-resistant ovarian cancer cells than in 2008 CDDP-sensitive cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ΔNp63α expression dramatically decreased AKT1 expression, whereas knockdown of either ΔNp63α or AKT1 decreased cell proliferation and increased death of ovarian and head/neck cancer cells. Conversely, enforced expression of ΔNp63α increased cancer cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Together, our findings define a novel ΔNp63α-dependent regulatory mechanism for AKT1 expression and its role in chemotherapeutic resistance of ovarian and head/neck cancer cells. PMID:21266360

  19. Light-regulated protein and poly(A)+ mRNA synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, J A; Hinkelammert, K; Russo, V E

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effect of illumination upon the patterns of protein synthesis in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa by pulse labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Light did not affect overall rates of protein synthesis but did induce the synthesis of six novel polypeptides whose appearance followed a temporally regulated pattern. When translation products of mRNA from illuminated cultures and dark control cultures were compared it was found that the synthesis of five out of six of the polypeptides specific to illuminated cultures could be seen in vitro. We believe that this is consistent with the hypothesis that light regulates the transcription of some genes in N. crassa, although we cannot exclude effects on mRNA stability or the control of precursor splicing. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2868891

  20. Regulation of the cellulose synthase-like gene family by light in the maize mesocotyl.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Harrie; Walton, Jonathan D

    2009-03-01

    The cellulose synthase-like (ZmCSL) gene family of maize was annotated and its expression studied in the maize mesocotyl. A total of 28 full-length CSL genes and another 13 partial sequences were annotated; four are predicted to be pseudogenes. Maize has all of the CSL subfamilies that are present in rice, but the CSLC subfamily is expanded from 6 in rice to 12 in maize, and the CSLH subfamily might be reduced from 3 to 1. Unlike rice, maize has a gene in the CSLG subfamily, based on its sequence similarity to two genes annotated as CSLG in poplar. Light regulation of glycan synthase enzyme activities and CSL gene expression were analyzed in the mesocotyl. A Golgi-localized glucan synthase activity is reduced by ~50% 12 h after exposure to light. beta-1,4-Mannan synthase activity is reduced even more strongly (>85%), whereas beta-1,4-xylan synthase, callose synthase, and latent IDPase activity respond only slightly, if at all, to light. At least 17 of the CSL genes (42%) are expressed in the mesocotyl, of which four are up-regulated at least twofold, seven are down-regulated at least twofold, and six are not affected by light. The results contribute to our understanding of the structure of the CSL gene family in an important food and biofuel plant, show that a large percentage of the CSL genes are expressed in the specialized tissues of the mesocotyl, and demonstrate that members of the CSL gene family are differentially subject to photobiological regulation. PMID:19130077

  1. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  2. Bacteriophytochrome-dependent regulation of light-harvesting complexes in Rhodopseudomonas palustris anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Noll, Stephan; Beatty, J Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Bacteriophytochromes (Bphs) are photoreceptors that help bacteria sense changes in light wavelength and intensity. Bphs contain a linear tetrapyrrole chromophore that, upon absorption of red or far-red light, undergoes a cis-trans isomerization that leads to a conformational change in the holoprotein. The conformation and type of Bph affects the expression of genes. The linear tetrapyrrole bound by Bphs is thought to come from O(2)-dependent cleavage of heme by a heme oxygenase. We have discovered that the absence of O(2) does not inhibit the normal function of two Bphs in the regulation of Rhodopseudomonas palustris light-harvesting complexes. These observations imply that: (i) a linear tetrapyrrole can be made anaerobically, either through anaerobic heme cleavage by a novel enzyme or directly from the heme precursor hydroxymethylbilane without ring cleavage; or (ii) that Bph-dependent signal transduction does not require a chromophore. PMID:20369239

  3. Evidence for direct carotenoid involvement in the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Zhong; Holt, Nancy E.; Li, Xiao-Ping; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2003-01-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) refers to a process that regulates photosynthetic light harvesting in plants as a response to changes in incident light intensity. By dissipating excess excitation energy of chlorophyll molecules as heat, NPQ balances the input and utilization of light energy in photosynthesis and protects the plant against photooxidative damage. To understand the physical mechanism of NPQ, we have performed femtosecond transient absorption experiments on intact thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These plants have well defined quenching capabilities and distinct contents of xanthophyll (Xan) cycle carotenoids. The kinetics probed in the spectral region of the S1 → Sn transition of Xans (530–580 nm) were found to be significantly different under the quenched and unquenched conditions, corresponding to maximum and no NPQ, respectively. The lifetime and the spectral characteristics indicate that the kinetic difference originated from the involvement of the S1 state of a specific Xan, zeaxanthin, in the quenched case. PMID:12676997

  4. Controlling Spatial Heat and Light Distribution by Using Photothermal Enhancing Auto-Regulated Liposomes (PEARLs).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Weersink, Robert A; Lim, Liang; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2016-08-16

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is enhanced by the use of nanoparticles with a large optical absorption at the treatment wavelength. However, this comes at the cost of higher light attenuation that results in reduced depth of heating as well as larger thermal gradients, leading to potential over- and under-treatment in the target tissue. These limitations can be overcome by using photothermal enhancing auto-regulating liposomes (PEARLs), based on thermochromic J-aggregate forming dye-lipid conjugates that reversibly alter their absorption above a predefined lipid phase-transition temperature. Under irradiation by near-infrared light, deeper layers of the target tissue revert to the intrinsic optical absorption, halting the temperature rise and enabling greater light penetration and heat generation at depth. This effect is demonstrated in both nanoparticle solutions and in gel phantoms containing the nanoparticles. PMID:27411830

  5. Carbon Partitioning in Eelgrass (Regulation by Photosynthesis and the Response to Daily Light-Dark Cycles).

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, R. C.; Kohrs, D. G.; Steller, D. L.; Alberte, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Diel variations in rates of C export, sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SS) activity, and C reserves were investigated in Zostera marina L. (eelgrass) to elucidate the environmental regulation of sucrose formation and partitioning in this ecologically important species. Rates of C flux and SPS activity increased with leaf age, consistent with the ontogenic transition from sink to source status. Rates of C export and photosynthesis were low but quantitatively consistent with those of many terrestrial plant species. The Vmax activity of SPS approached that of maize, but substrate-limited rates were 20 to 25% of Vmax, indicating a large pool of inactive SPS. SPS was unresponsive to the day/night transition or to a 3-fold increase in photosynthesis generated by high [CO2] and showed little sensitivity to inorganic phosphate. Consequently, regulation of eelgrass SPS appeared similar to starch- rather than to sugar-accumulating species even though eelgrass accumulates sucrose. Leaf [sucrose] was constant and high throughout the diel cycle, which may contribute to the down-regulation of SPS. Root sucrose synthase activity was high but showed no response to nocturnal anoxia. Root [sucrose] also showed no diel cycle. The temporal stability of [sucrose] confers an ability for eelgrass to buffer the effects of prolonged light limitation that may be key to its survival and ecological success in environments subject to periods of extreme light limitation and chaotic daily variation in light availability. PMID:12228571

  6. Light-regulated translational control of circadian behavior by eIF4E phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Gkogkas, Christos G; de Zavalia, Nuria; Blum, Ian D; Yanagiya, Akiko; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Xu, Haiyan; Lee, Choogon; Storch, Kai-Florian; Liu, Andrew C; Amir, Shimon; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-06-01

    The circadian (∼24 h) clock is continuously entrained (reset) by ambient light so that endogenous rhythms are synchronized with daily changes in the environment. Light-induced gene expression is thought to be the molecular mechanism underlying clock entrainment. mRNA translation is a key step of gene expression, but the manner in which clock entrainment is controlled at the level of mRNA translation is not well understood. We found that a light- and circadian clock-regulated MAPK/MNK pathway led to phosphorylation of the cap-binding protein eIF4E in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the locus of the master circadian clock in mammals. Phosphorylation of eIF4E specifically promoted translation of Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2) mRNAs and increased the abundance of basal and inducible PER proteins, which facilitated circadian clock resetting and precise timekeeping. Together, these results highlight a critical role for light-regulated translational control in the physiology of the circadian clock. PMID:25915475

  7. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  8. The environmental regulation of maturation in goldfish, Carassius auratus: effects of various LED light spectra.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun Suk; Habibi, Hamid R; Choi, Cheol Young

    2014-02-01

    While there have been a number of studies on the effects of photoperiod and duration of light and dark exposure, much less information is available on the importance of light intensity. This study investigated the effects of exposure of goldfish, Carassius auratus exposed to white fluorescent bulbs, and red (peak at 630nm), and green (530nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) at approximately 0.9W/m(2) (12-h light:12-h dark) for four months on a number of hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis, in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the effects of native GnRH molecules (gonadotropin-releasing hormones; salmon GnRH, sGnRH; and chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II), gonadotropin hormones (GTHα; follicle-stimulating hormone, FSH-β; luteinizing hormone, LH-β2), kisspeptin 1 (Kiss1) and G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) mRNA levels. Furthermore, we measured LH and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone levels in plasma and we performed gonad histological observations. GnRHs, Kiss1, GPR54 and GTH mRNA and plasma LH and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone levels in the in vivo and in vitro groups exposed to green LEDs were significantly higher than the other groups. Histological analysis revealed the presence of oocytes in the yolk stage in fish exposed to green light. These results suggest that green wavelengths regulate the HPG axis and enhance sexual maturation in goldfish. PMID:24239668

  9. Extensive circadian and light regulation of the transcriptome in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes exhibit 24 hr rhythms in flight activity, feeding, reproduction and development. To better understand the molecular basis for these rhythms in the nocturnal malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, we have utilized microarray analysis on time-of-day specific collections of mosquitoes over 48 hr to explore the coregulation of gene expression rhythms by the circadian clock and light, and compare these with the 24 hr rhythmic gene expression in the diurnal Aedes aegypti dengue vector mosquito. Results In time courses from An. gambiae head and body collected under light:dark cycle (LD) and constant dark (DD) conditions, we applied three algorithms that detect sinusoidal patterns and an algorithm that detects spikes in expression. This revealed across four experimental conditions 393 probes newly scored as rhythmic. These genes correspond to functions such as metabolic detoxification, immunity and nutrient sensing. This includes glutathione S-transferase GSTE5, whose expression pattern and chromosomal location are shared with other genes, suggesting shared chromosomal regulation; and pulsatile expression of the gene encoding CYP6M2, a cytochrome P450 that metabolizes pyrethroid insecticides. We explored the interaction of light and the circadian clock and highlight the regulation of odorant binding proteins (OBPs), important components of the olfactory system. We reveal that OBPs have unique expression patterns as mosquitoes make the transition from LD to DD conditions. We compared rhythmic expression between An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti heads collected under LD conditions using a single cosine fitting algorithm, and report distinct similarities and differences in the temporal regulation of genes involved in tRNA priming, the vesicular-type ATPase, olfaction and vision between the two species. Conclusions These data build on our previous analyses of time-of-day specific regulation of the An. gambiae transcriptome to reveal additional rhythmic genes, an

  10. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  11. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  12. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  13. Phycobilisome Mobility and Its Role in the Regulation of Light Harvesting in Red Algae1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaňa, Radek; Kotabová, Eva; Lukeš, Martin; Papáček, Štěpán; Matonoha, Ctirad; Liu, Lu-Ning; Prášil, Ondřej; Mullineaux, Conrad W.

    2014-01-01

    Red algae represent an evolutionarily important group that gave rise to the whole red clade of photosynthetic organisms. They contain a unique combination of light-harvesting systems represented by a membrane-bound antenna and by phycobilisomes situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces. So far, very little has been revealed about the mobility of their phycobilisomes and the regulation of their light-harvesting system in general. Therefore, we carried out a detailed analysis of phycobilisome dynamics in several red alga strains and compared these results with the presence (or absence) of photoprotective mechanisms. Our data conclusively prove phycobilisome mobility in two model mesophilic red alga strains, Porphyridium cruentum and Rhodella violacea. In contrast, there was almost no phycobilisome mobility in the thermophilic red alga Cyanidium caldarium that was not caused by a decrease in lipid desaturation in this extremophile. Experimental data attributed this immobility to the strong phycobilisome-photosystem interaction that highly restricted phycobilisome movement. Variations in phycobilisome mobility reflect the different ways in which light-harvesting antennae can be regulated in mesophilic and thermophilic red algae. Fluorescence changes attributed in cyanobacteria to state transitions were observed only in mesophilic P. cruentum with mobile phycobilisomes, and they were absent in the extremophilic C. caldarium with immobile phycobilisomes. We suggest that state transitions have an important regulatory function in mesophilic red algae; however, in thermophilic red algae, this process is replaced by nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:24948833

  14. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  15. Phycobilisome Mobility and Its Role in the Regulation of Light Harvesting in Red Algae.

    PubMed

    Kaňa, Radek; Kotabová, Eva; Lukeš, Martin; Papáček, Stěpán; Matonoha, Ctirad; Liu, Lu-Ning; Prášil, Ondřej; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-19

    Red algae represent an evolutionarily important group that gave rise to the whole red clade of photosynthetic organisms. They contain a unique combination of light-harvesting systems represented by a membrane-bound antenna and by phycobilisomes situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces. So far, very little has been revealed about the mobility of their phycobilisomes and the regulation of their light-harvesting system in general. Therefore, we carried out a detailed analysis of phycobilisome dynamics in several red alga strains and compared these results with the presence (or absence) of photoprotective mechanisms. Our data conclusively prove phycobilisome mobility in two model mesophilic red alga strains, Porphyridium cruentum and Rhodella violacea. In contrast, there was almost no phycobilisome mobility in the thermophilic red alga Cyanidium caldarium that was not caused by a decrease in lipid desaturation in this extremophile. Experimental data attributed this immobility to the strong phycobilisome-photosystem interaction that highly restricted phycobilisome movement. Variations in phycobilisome mobility reflect the different ways in which light-harvesting antennae can be regulated in mesophilic and thermophilic red algae. Fluorescence changes attributed in cyanobacteria to state transitions were observed only in mesophilic P. cruentum with mobile phycobilisomes, and they were absent in the extremophilic C. caldarium with immobile phycobilisomes. We suggest that state transitions have an important regulatory function in mesophilic red algae; however, in thermophilic red algae, this process is replaced by nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:24948833

  16. Differentially phased leaf growth and movements in Arabidopsis depend on coordinated circadian and light regulation.

    PubMed

    Dornbusch, Tino; Michaud, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movements. Leaf growth is maximal several hours after dawn, requires light, and is regulated by daylength, suggesting coupling between growth and metabolism. We identify both blade and petiole positioning as important components of leaf movements in Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal a temporal delay between growth and movements. In hypocotyls, the combination of circadian expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 and their light-regulated protein stability drives rhythmic hypocotyl elongation with peak growth at dawn. We find that PIF4 and PIF5 are not essential to sustain rhythmic leaf growth but influence their amplitude. Furthermore, EARLY FLOWERING3, a member of the evening complex (EC), is required to maintain the correct phase between growth and movement. Our study shows that the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hypocotyl and leaf growth differ. Moreover, we reveal the temporal relationship between leaf elongation and movements and demonstrate the importance of the EC for the coordination of these phenotypic traits. PMID:25281688

  17. Retinophilin is a light-regulated phosphoprotein required to suppress photoreceptor dark noise in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mecklenburg, Kirk L.; Takemori, Nobuaki; Komori, Naoka; Chu, Brian; Hardie, Roger C.; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; O’Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2010-01-01

    Photoreceptor cells achieve high sensitivity, reliably detecting single photons, while limiting the spontaneous activation events responsible for dark noise. We used proteomic, genetic, and electrophysiological approaches to characterize Retinophilin (RTP/CG10233) in Drosophila photoreceptors, and establish its involvement in dark noise suppression. RTP possesses MORN (Membrane Occupation and Recognition Nexus) motifs, a structure shared with mammalian junctophilins and other membrane-associated proteins found within excitable cells. We show the MORN repeats, and both the N- and C-terminal domains, are required for RTP localization in the microvillar light gathering organelle, the rhabdomere. RTP exists in multiple phosphorylated isoforms under dark conditions and is dephosphorylated by light exposure. An RTP deletion mutant exhibits a high rate of spontaneous membrane depolarization events in dark conditions but retains the normal kinetics of the light response. Photoreceptors lacking NINAC myosin III, a motor protein/kinase, also display a similar dark noise phenotype as the RTP deletion. We show that NINAC mutants are depleted for RTP. These results suggest the increase in dark noise in NINAC mutants is due to lack of RTP, and further, defines a novel role for NINAC in the rhabdomere. We propose that RTP is a light-regulated phosphoprotein that organizes rhabdomeric components to suppress random activation of the phototransduction cascade and thus increases the signaling fidelity of dark-adapted photoreceptors. PMID:20107052

  18. Irradiance-dependent regulation of gravitropism by red light in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Kern, V D; Sack, F D

    1999-09-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. are negatively gravitropic in the dark and positively phototropic in red light. Various fluence rates of unilateral red light were tested to determine whether both tropisms operate simultaneously. At irradiances > or = 140 nmol m-2 s-1 no gravitropism could be detected and phototropism predominated, despite the presence of amyloplast sedimentation. Gravitropism occurred at irradiances lower than 140 nmol m-1 s-1 with most cells oriented above the horizontal but not upright. At these low fluence rates, phototropism was indistinct at 1 g but apparent in microgravity, indicating that gravitropism and phototropism compete at 1 g. The frequency of protonemata that were negatively phototropic varied with the fluence rate and the duration of illumination, as well as with the position of the apical cell before illumination. These data show that the fluence rate of red light regulates whether gravitropism is allowed or completely repressed, and that it influences the polarity of phototropism and the extent to which apical cells are aligned in the light path. PMID:10502096

  19. Irradiance-dependent regulation of gravitropism by red light in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, V. D.; Sack, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. are negatively gravitropic in the dark and positively phototropic in red light. Various fluence rates of unilateral red light were tested to determine whether both tropisms operate simultaneously. At irradiances > or = 140 nmol m-2 s-1 no gravitropism could be detected and phototropism predominated, despite the presence of amyloplast sedimentation. Gravitropism occurred at irradiances lower than 140 nmol m-1 s-1 with most cells oriented above the horizontal but not upright. At these low fluence rates, phototropism was indistinct at 1 g but apparent in microgravity, indicating that gravitropism and phototropism compete at 1 g. The frequency of protonemata that were negatively phototropic varied with the fluence rate and the duration of illumination, as well as with the position of the apical cell before illumination. These data show that the fluence rate of red light regulates whether gravitropism is allowed or completely repressed, and that it influences the polarity of phototropism and the extent to which apical cells are aligned in the light path.

  20. Characterization of nucleoside triphosphatase activity in isolated pea nuclei and its photoreversible regulation by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. R.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    A nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) present in highly purified preparations of pea nuclei was partially characterized. The activity of this enzyme was stimulated by divalent cations (Mg2+ = Mn2+ > Ca2+), but was not affected by the monovalent cations, Na+ and K+. The Mg(2+)-dependent activity was further stimulated by concentrations of Ca2+ in the low micromolar range. It could catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP, all with a pH optimum of 7.5. The nuclear NTPase activity was not inhibited by vanadate, oligomycin, or nitrate, but was inhibited by relatively low concentrations of quercetin and the calmodulin inhibitor, compound 48/80. The NTPase was stimulated more than 50% by red light, and this effect was reversed by subsequent irradiation with far-red light. The photoreversibility of the stimulation indicated that the photoreceptor for this response was phytochrome, an important regulator of photomorphogenesis and gene expression in plants.

  1. Regulating the mucosal immune system: the contrasting roles of LIGHT, HVEM, and their various partners

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Marcos W.; Shui, Jr-Wen; Ware, Carl F.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    LIGHT and herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) comprise a ligand–receptor pair in the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. These molecules play an important role in regulating immunity, particularly in the intestinal mucosa. LIGHT also binds the lymphotoxin β receptor, and HVEM can act as a ligand for immunoglobulin family molecules, including B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator, which suppresses immune responses. Complexity in this pivotal system arises from several factors, including the non-monogamous pairing of ligands and receptors, and reverse signaling or the ability of some ligands to serve as receptors. As a result, recognition events in this fascinating network of interacting molecules can have pro- or anti-inflammatory consequences. Despite complexity, experiments we and others are carrying out are establishing rules for understanding when and in what cell types these molecules contribute to intestinal inflammation. PMID:19495760

  2. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  3. Light-independent developmental regulation of cab gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Brusslan, J A; Tobin, E M

    1992-01-01

    We found a transient increase in the amount of mRNA for four nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins during early development of Arabidopsis thaliana. This increase began soon after germination as cotyledons emerged from the seed coat; it occurred in total darkness and was not affected by external factors, such as gibberellins or light treatments used to stimulate germination. Three members of the cab gene family and the rbcS-1A gene exhibited this expression pattern. Because timing of the increase coincided with cotyledon emergence and because it occurred independently of external stimuli, we suggest that this increase represents developmental regulation of these genes. Further, 1.34 kilobases of the cab1 promoter was sufficient to confer this expression pattern on a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings. The ability of the cab genes to respond to phytochrome preceded this developmental increase, showing that these two types of regulation are independent. Images PMID:1380166

  4. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  5. Light Regulation of Swarming Motility in Pseudomonas syringae Integrates Signaling Pathways Mediated by a Bacteriophytochrome and a LOV Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S.; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. PMID:23760465

  6. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  7. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  8. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  9. 78 FR 45592 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45 East Avenue... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  10. Mutation in cysteine bridge domain of the gamma-subunit affects light regulation of the ATP synthase in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chloroplast ATP synthase functions to synthesize ATP from ADP and free phosphate coupled by the electrochemical potential across the thylakoid membrane in the light. The light-dependent regulation of ATP synthase activity is carried out in part through redox modulation of a cysteine bridge in CF...

  11. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta is a critical regulator of insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Billiard, J.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; McCarthy, T. L.; Rotwein, P.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a major role in promoting skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. Prostaglandin E2 and other agents that induce cAMP production enhance IGF-I gene transcription in cultured rat osteoblasts through a DNA element termed HS3D, located in the proximal part of the major rat IGF-I promoter. We previously determined that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta) is the key cAMP-stimulated regulator of IGF-I transcription in these cells and showed that it transactivates the rat IGF-I promoter through the HS3D site. We now have defined the physical-chemical properties and functional consequences of the interactions between C/EBPdelta and HS3D. C/EBPdelta, expressed in COS-7 cells or purified as a recombinant protein from Escherichia coli, bound to HS3D with an affinity at least equivalent to that of the albumin D-site, a known high affinity C/EBP binding sequence, and both DNA elements competed equally for C/EBPdelta. C/EBPdelta bound to HS3D as a dimer, with protein-DNA contact points located on guanine residues on both DNA strands within and just adjacent to the core C/EBP half-site, GCAAT, as determined by methylation interference footprinting. C/EBPdelta also formed protein-protein dimers in the absence of interactions with its DNA binding site, as indicated by results of glutaraldehyde cross-linking studies. As established by competition gel-mobility shift experiments, the conserved HS3D sequence from rat, human, and chicken also bound C/EBPdelta with similar affinity. We also found that prostaglandin E2-induced expression of reporter genes containing human IGF-I promoter 1 or four tandem copies of the human HS3D element fused to a minimal promoter and show that these effects were enhanced by a co-transfected C/EBPdelta expression plasmid. Taken together, our results provide evidence that C/EBPdelta is a critical activator of IGF-I gene transcription in osteoblasts and potentially in

  12. Light differentially regulates cell division and the mRNA abundance of pea nucleolin during de-etiolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichler, S. A.; Balk, J.; Brown, M. E.; Woodruff, K.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    The abundance of plant nucleolin mRNA is regulated during de-etiolation by phytochrome. A close correlation between the mRNA abundance of nucleolin and mitosis has also been previously reported. These results raised the question of whether the effects of light on nucleolin mRNA expression were a consequence of light effects on mitosis. To test this we compared the kinetics of light-mediated increases in cell proliferation with that of light-mediated changes in the abundance of nucleolin mRNA using plumules of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. These experiments show that S-phase increases 9 h after a red light pulse, followed by M-phase increases in the plumule leaves at 12 h post-irradiation, a time course consistent with separately measured kinetics of red light-induced increases in the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. These increases in cell cycle-regulated genes are photoreversible, implying that the light-induced increases in cell proliferation are, like nucleolin mRNA expression, regulated via phytochrome. Red light stimulates increases in the mRNA for nucleolin at 6 h post-irradiation, prior to any cell proliferation changes and concurrent with the reported timing of phytochrome-mediated increases of rRNA abundance. After a green light pulse, nucleolin mRNA levels increase without increasing S-phase or M-phase. Studies in animals and yeast indicate that nucleolin plays a significant role in ribosome biosynthesis. Consistent with this function, pea nucleolin can rescue nucleolin deletion mutants of yeast that are defective in rRNA synthesis. Our data show that during de-etiolation, the increased expression of nucleolin mRNA is more directly regulated by light than by mitosis.

  13. Regulation of scallop myosin by the regulatory light chain depends on a single glycine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Jancso, A; Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1994-01-01

    Specific Ca2+ binding and Ca2+ activation of ATPase activity in scallop myosin require a regulatory light chain (RLC) from regulated (molluscan or vertebrate smooth) myosin; hybrids containing vertebrate skeletal RLCs do not bind Ca2+ and their ATPase activity is inhibited. Chimeras between scallop and chicken skeletal RLCs restore Ca2+ sensitivity to RLC-free myosin provided that residues 81-117 are derived from scallop. Six mutants (R90M, A94K, D98P, N105K, M116Q, and G117C) were generated by replacing amino acids of the scallop RLC with the corresponding skeletal RLC residues in positions conserved in either regulated or nonregulated myosins. Ca2+ binding was abolished by a G117C and a G117A mutation; however, these mutants have a decreased affinity for the heavy chain. None of the other mutations affected RLC function. Replacement of the respective cysteine with glycine in the skeletal RLC has markedly changed the regulatory properties of the molecule. The single cysteine to glycine mutation conferred to this light chain the ability to restore Ca2+ binding and regulated ATPase activity, although Ca2+ activation of the actin-activated ATPase was lower than with scallop RLC. The presence of amino acids other than glycine at this position in vertebrate skeletal myosin RLCs may explain why these are not fully functional in the scallop system. The results are in agreement with x-ray crystallography data showing the central role of G117 in stabilizing the Ca(2+)-binding site of scallop myosin. Images PMID:8090720

  14. REGULATION OF RAT HEPATIC DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE AND HEME OXYGENASE ACTIVITIES: EVIDENCE FOR CONTROL BY HEME AND AGAINST MEDIATION BY PROSTHETIC IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of in vivo administration of 6 compounds on the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthetase and heme oxygenase were determined. The order of decreasing potency in reducing ALA synthetase activity was heme, bilirubin, protoporphyrin IX, bilirubin dimethyl es...

  15. Light-harvesting regulation from leaf to molecule with the emphasis on rapid changes in antenna size.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da-Quan; Chen, Yue; Chen, Gen-Yun

    2015-05-01

    In the sunlight-fluctuating environment, plants often encounter both light-deficiency and light-excess cases. Therefore, regulation of light harvesting is absolutely essential for photosynthesis in order to maximize light utilization at low light and avoid photodamage of the photosynthetic apparatus at high light. Plants have developed a series of strategies of light-harvesting regulation during evolution. These strategies include rapid responses such as leaf movement and chloroplast movement, state transitions, and reversible dissociation of some light-harvesting complex of the photosystem II (LHCIIs) from PSII core complexes, and slow acclimation strategies such as changes in the protein abundance of light-harvesting antenna and modifications of leaf morphology, structure, and compositions. This review discusses successively these strategies and focuses on the rapid change in antenna size, namely reversible dissociation of some peripheral light-harvesting antennas (LHCIIs) from PSII core complex. It is involved in protective role and species dependence of the dissociation, differences between the dissociation and state transitions, relationship between the dissociation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation, and possible mechanism for thermal dissipation by the dissociated LHCIIs. PMID:25773873

  16. Characterization of the light-regulated operon encoding the phycoerythrin-associated linker proteins from the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed Central

    Federspiel, N A; Grossman, A R

    1990-01-01

    Many biological processes in photosynthetic organisms can be regulated by light quantity or light quality or both. A unique example of the effect of specific wavelengths of light on the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus occurs in cyanobacteria that undergo complementary chromatic adaptation. These organisms alter the composition of their light-harvesting organelle, the phycobilisome, and exhibit distinct morphological features as a function of the wavelength of incident light. Fremyella diplosiphon, a filamentous cyanobacterium, responds to green light by activating transcription of the cpeBA operon, which encodes the pigmented light-harvesting component phycoerythrin. We have isolated and determined the complete nucleotide sequence of another operon, cpeCD, that encodes the linker proteins associated with phycoerythrin hexamers in the phycobilisome. The cpeCD operon is activated in green light and expressed as two major transcripts with the same 5' start site but differing 3' ends. Analysis of the kinetics of transcript accumulation in cultures of F. diplosiphon shifted from red light to green light and vice versa shows that the cpeBA and cpeCD operons are regulated coordinately. A common 17-base-pair sequence is found upstream of the transcription start sites of both operons. A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences of the phycoerythrin-associated linker proteins CpeC and CpeD with sequences of other previously characterized rod linker proteins shows 49 invariant residues, most of which are in the amino-terminal half of the proteins. Images PMID:1694529

  17. Red light regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and gravitropism in etiolated pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steed, C. L.; Taylor, L. K.; Harrison, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    During gravitropism, the accumulation of auxin in the lower side of the stem causes increased growth and the subsequent curvature, while the gaseous hormone ethylene plays a modulating role in regulating the kinetics of growth asymmetries. Light also contributes to the control of gravitropic curvature, potentially through its interaction with ethylene biosynthesis. In this study, red-light pulse treatment of etiolated pea epicotyls was evaluated for its effect on ethylene biosynthesis during gravitropic curvature. Ethylene biosynthesis analysis included measurements of ethylene; the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC); malonyl-conjugated ACC (MACC); and expression levels of pea ACC oxidase (Ps-ACO1) and ACC synthase (Ps-ACS1, Ps-ACS2) genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Red-pulsed seedlings were given a 6 min pulse of 11 micromoles m-2 s-1 red-light 15 h prior to horizontal reorientation for consistency with the timeline of red-light inhibition of ethylene production. Red-pulse treatment significantly reduced ethylene production and MACC levels in epicotyl tissue. However, there was no effect of red-pulse treatment on ACC level, or expression of ACS or ACO genes. During gravitropic curvature, ethylene production increased from 60 to 120 min after horizontal placement in both control and red-pulsed epicotyls. In red-pulsed tissues, ACC levels increased by 120 min after horizontal reorientation, accompanied by decreased MACC levels in the lower portion of the epicotyl. Overall, our results demonstrate that ethylene production in etiolated epicotyls increases after the initiation of curvature. This ethylene increase may inhibit cell growth in the lower portion of the epicotyl and contribute to tip straightening and reduced overall curvature observed after the initial 60 min of curvature in etiolated pea epicotyls.

  18. The C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 of the regulatory light chain is essential for myosin regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, T; Kendrick-Jones, J

    1993-01-01

    In vertebrate smooth/non-muscle myosins, phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains by a specific calmodulin-activated kinase controls both myosin head interaction with actin and assembly of the myosin into filaments. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal domain of the regulatory light chain is crucial for the regulation of these myosin functions. To further dissect the role of this region of the light chain in myosin regulation, a series of chicken smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain mutants has been constructed with successive C-terminal deletions. These mutants were synthesized in Escherichia coli and analysed by their ability to restore Ca2+ regulation to scallop myosin that had been stripped of its native regulatory light chains ('desensitized'). The results show that regulatory light chain mutants with deletions in the C-terminal helix in subdomain 4 were able to reform the regulatory Ca2+ binding site on the scallop myosin head, but had lost the ability to suppress scallop myosin filament assembly and interaction with actin in the absence of Ca2+. Further deletions in the C-terminal domain led to a gradual loss of ability to restore the regulatory Ca2+ binding site. Thus, the regions in the C-terminal half of the regulatory light chain responsible for myosin regulation can be identified. Images PMID:8223496

  19. Evolutionary Adaptations of Plant AGC Kinases: From Light Signaling to Cell Polarity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Eike H.; Offringa, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and trafficking over membranes involves a plethora of transmembrane proteins that control the flow of compounds or relay specific signaling events. Next to external cues, internal stimuli can modify the activity or abundance of these proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). One such regulatory mechanism is protein phosphorylation by membrane-associated kinases, several of which are AGC kinases. The AGC kinase family is one of seven kinase families that are conserved in all eukaryotic genomes. In plants evolutionary adaptations introduced specific structural changes within the AGC kinases that most likely allow modulation of kinase activity by external stimuli (e.g., light). Starting from the well-defined structural basis common to all AGC kinases we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship in plant AGC kinases. Nine of the 39 Arabidopsis AGC kinases have now been shown to be involved in the regulation of auxin transport. In particular, AGC kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the auxin transporters ABCB1 and ABCB19 has been shown to regulate their activity, while auxin transporters of the PIN family are located to different positions at the PM depending on their phosphorylation status, which is a result of counteracting AGC kinase and PP6 phosphatase activities. We therefore focus on regulation of AGC kinase activity in this context. Identified structural adaptations of the involved AGC kinases may provide new insight into AGC kinase functionality and demonstrate their position as central hubs in the cellular network controlling plant development and growth. PMID:23162562

  20. Nucleus accumbens NMDA receptor activation regulates amphetamine cross-sensitization and deltaFosB expression following sexual experience in male rats.

    PubMed

    Beloate, Lauren N; Weems, Peyton W; Casey, Graham R; Webb, Ian C; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-02-01

    Sexual experience in male rats followed by a period of abstinence causes sensitization to d-Amphetamine (Amph) reward, evidenced by an increased conditioned place preference (CPP) for low doses of Amph. Moreover, sexual experience induces neural plasticity within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), including induction of deltaFosB, which plays a key role in Amph reward cross-sensitization. The NMDA receptor subunit NR1 is also upregulated by mating, but the functional relevance of NMDA receptors in sex experience-induced effects is unknown. Here, we examined the influence of intra-NAc MK 801 infusions on sex experience-induced NAc deltaFosB and cFos expression, as well as mating- and Amph-induced CPP in adult male rats. In experiment 1, males received MK 801 or saline into the NAc during each of 4 consecutive days of mating or handling and were tested for Amph CPP and experience-induced deltaFosB 10 days later. Intra-NAc MK 801 during sexual behavior prevented experience-induced increases in Amph CPP and NAc deltaFosB expression without affecting sexual behavior. In experiment 2, the effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced CPP were examined by intra-NAc infusion of MK 801 or saline prior to mating on conditioning days. Intra-NAc MK 801 did not affect mating-induced CPP. Next, effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced cFos immunoreactivity were examined. MK 801 prevented mating-induced cFos expression in NAc shell and core. Together, these results provide evidence that NAc NMDA receptor activation during sexual behavior plays a key role in mating-induced cFos and deltaFosB expression and subsequent experience-induced cross-sensitization to Amph reward. PMID:26391065

  1. PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 is essential for proper acclimation of Arabidopsis photosystem I to naturally and artificially fluctuating light conditions.

    PubMed

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Järvi, Sari; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Rantala, Marjaana; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Paakkarinen, Virpi; Tikkanen, Mikko; Jansson, Stefan; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-07-01

    In nature, plants are challenged by constantly changing light conditions. To reveal the molecular mechanisms behind acclimation to sometimes drastic and frequent changes in light intensity, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana under fluctuating light conditions, in which the low light periods were repeatedly interrupted with high light peaks. Such conditions had only marginal effect on photosystem II but induced damage to photosystem I (PSI), the damage being most severe during the early developmental stages. We showed that PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5)-dependent regulation of electron transfer and proton motive force is crucial for protection of PSI against photodamage, which occurred particularly during the high light phases of fluctuating light cycles. Contrary to PGR5, the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, which mediates cyclic electron flow around PSI, did not contribute to acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus, particularly PSI, to rapidly changing light intensities. Likewise, the Arabidopsis pgr5 mutant exhibited a significantly higher mortality rate compared with the wild type under outdoor field conditions. This shows not only that regulation of PSI under natural growth conditions is crucial but also the importance of PGR5 in PSI protection. PMID:22822205

  2. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  3. Red Light Combined with Blue Light Irradiation Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis in Skin Keratinocytes in Combination with Low Concentrations of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Cai, Qing; Ren, Qu; Wei, Lizhao

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a widely known natural phytochemical from plant Curcuma longa. In recent years, curcumin has received increasing attention because of its capability to induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation as well as its anti-inflammatory properties in different cancer cells. However, the therapeutic benefits of curcumin are severely hampered due to its particularly low absorption via trans-dermal or oral bioavailability. Phototherapy with visible light is gaining more and more support in dermatological therapy. Red light is part of the visible light spectrum, which is able to deeply penetrate the skin to about 6 mm, and directly affect the fibroblast of the skin dermis. Blue light is UV-free irradiation which is fit for treating chronic inflammation diseases. In this study, we show that curcumin at low concentrations (1.25-3.12 μM) has a strong anti-proliferative effect on TNF-α-induced psoriasis-like inflammation when applied in combination with light-emitting-diode devices. The treatment was especially effective when LED blue light at 405 nm was combined with red light at 630 or 660 nm, which markedly amplified the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of curcumin. The experimental results demonstrated that this treatment reduced the viability of human skin keratinocytes, decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, inhibited NF-κB activity and activated caspase-8 and caspase-9 while preserving the cell membrane integrity. Moreover, the combined treatment also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of Akt and ERK. Taken together, our results indicated that the combination of curcumin with LED blue light united red light irradiation can attain a higher efficiency of regulating proliferation and apoptosis in skin keratinocytes. PMID:26382065

  4. Variation in pupil diameter in North American Gartersnakes (Thamnophis) is regulated by immersion in water, not by light intensity.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Clifford L

    2008-07-01

    A variable pupil generally regulates the amount of incoming light available for image formation on the retina. However, some of the semi-aquatic snakes (North American Gartersnakes, Thamnophis) that forage in relatively low light conditions reduce the pupil aperture in response to submergence underwater at the expense incoming light. Given that these snakes have all-cone retinas, reduction of incoming light because of pupillary constriction upon immersion seems counterintuitive. To test the effect of light and water on pupil aperture, three species of North American Gartersnakes (T. atratus, T. hammondii, and T. sirtalis) were exposed to nine light intensities in air and water. There was no effect of light on relative pupil aperture for any species. However, all three species showed a significant reduction in pupil aperture upon submergence underwater. The lack of a light response is surprising, and may be related to the method of accommodation in snakes. Snakes lack a ciliary muscle, and move the lens by constricting the pupil, which increases pressure in the posterior chamber and pushes the lens forward. Upon submergence, the snakes may be attempting to overcome the change in refractive index and defocus imposed by the water, by constricting the pupil. Thus, having the iris muscle involved in accommodation may preclude it from much of a light regulating function. PMID:18514250

  5. Improvement of light to biomass conversion by de-regulation of light-harvesting protein translation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, J; Lehr, F; Finazzi, G; Hankamer, B; Posten, C; Wobbe, L; Kruse, O

    2009-06-01

    The efficient use of microalgae to convert sun light energy into biomass is limited by losses during high light illumination of dense cell cultures in closed bioreactors. Uneven light distribution can be overcome by using cell cultures with smaller antenna sizes packed to high cell density cultures, thus allowing good light penetration into the inner sections of the reactor. We engineered a new small PSII antenna size Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain with improved photon conversion efficiency and increased growth rates under high light conditions. We achieved this goal by transformation of a permanently active variant NAB1* of the LHC translation repressor NAB1 to reduce antenna size via translation repression. NAB1* expression was demonstrated in Stm6Glc4T7 (T7), leading to a reduction of LHC antenna size by 10-17%. T7 showed a approximately 50% increase of photosynthetic efficiency (PhiPSII) at saturating light intensity compared to the parental strain. T7 converted light to biomass with much higher efficiencies with a approximately 50% improved mid log growth phase. Moreover, T7 cultures reached higher densities when grown in large-scale bioreactors. Thus, the phenotype of strain T7 may have important implications for biotechnological applications in which photosynthetic microalgae are used for large-scale culturing as an alternative plant biomass source. PMID:19480949

  6. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    PubMed

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  8. Arsenic and heavy metal pollution in wetland soils from tidal freshwater and salt marshes before and after the flow-sediment regulation regime in the Yellow River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhang, Kejiang; Gao, Haifeng

    2012-07-01

    SummarySoil samples were collected in tidal freshwater and salt marshes in the Yellow River Delta (YRD), northern China, before and after the flow-sediment regulation. Total concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate the characteristics of heavy metal pollution in tidal wetlands before and after the regulation regime. The results demonstrated that marsh soils in both marshes had higher silt and total P contents, higher bulk density and lower sand contents after the flow-sediment regulation; moreover, soil salinity was significantly decreased in the tidal salt marsh. As and Cd concentrations were significantly higher in both marsh soils after the regulation than before, and there were no significant differences in the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn measured before and after the regulation. No significant differences in heavy metal concentrations were observed between freshwater and salt marsh soils, either before or after the regulation. Before the regulation regime, soil organic matter, pH and sulfer (S) were the main factors influencing heavy metal distribution in tidal freshwater marshes, whereas for tidal salt marshes, the main factors are soil salinity and moisture, pH and S. However, bulk density and total P became the main influencing factors after the regulation. The sediment quality guidelines and geoaccumulation indices showed moderately or strongly polluted levels of As and Cd and unpolluted or moderately polluted levels of Cu, Pb and Zn; As and Cd pollution became more serious after the regulation. Factor analysis indicated thatthese heavy metals including As were closely correlated and orginated from common pollution sources before the flow-sediment regulation; however, the sources of As and Cd separated from the sources of Cu, Pb and Zn after the regulation regime, implying that the flow-sediment regulation regime

  9. Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

    2010-12-03

    The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

  10. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  11. Regulation of red fluorescent light emission in a cryptic marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Animal colouration is a trade-off between being seen by intended, intra- or inter-specific receivers while not being seen by the unintended. Many fishes solve this problem by adaptive colouration. Here, we investigate whether this also holds for fluorescent pigments. In those aquatic environments in which the ambient light is dominated by bluish light, red fluorescence can generate high-contrast signals. The marine, cryptic fish Tripterygion delaisi inhabits such environments and has a bright red-fluorescent iris that can be rapidly up- and down-regulated. Here, we described the physiological and cellular mechanism of this phenomenon using a neurostimulation treatment with KCl and histology. Results KCl-treatment revealed that eye fluorescence regulation is achieved through dispersal and aggregation of black-pigmented melanosomes within melanophores. Histology showed that globular, fluorescent iridophores on the anterior side of the iris are grouped and each group is encased by finger-like extensions of a single posterior melanophore. Together they form a so-called chromatophore unit. By dispersal and aggregation of melanosomes into and out of the peripheral membranous extensions of the melanophore, the fluorescent iridophores are covered or revealed on the anterior (outside) of the iris. Conclusion T. delaisi possesses a well-developed mechanism to control the fluorescent emission from its eyes, which may be advantageous given its cryptic lifestyle. This is the first time chromatophore units are found to control fluorescent emission in marine teleost fishes. We expect other fluorescent fish species to use similar mechanisms in the iris or elsewhere in the body. In contrast to a previously described mechanism based on dendritic fluorescent chromatophores, chromatophore units control fluorescent emission through the cooperation between two chromatophore types: an emitting and an occluding type. The discovery of a second mechanism for fluorescence

  12. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is light-regulated and essential for survival in retinal rods.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Agosto, Melina A; Anastassov, Ivan A; Tse, Dennis Y; Wu, Samuel M; Wensel, Theodore G

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in numerous intracellular membrane pathways. Little is known about the regulation or function of these lipids in rod photoreceptor cells, which have highly active membrane dynamics. Using new assays with femtomole sensitivity, we determined that whereas levels of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate were below detection limits, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) levels in rod inner/outer segments increased more than 30-fold after light exposure. This increase was blocked in a rod-specific knockout of the PI-3 kinase Vps34, resulting in failure of endosomal and autophagy-related membranes to fuse with lysosomes, and accumulation of abnormal membrane structures. At early ages, rods displayed normal morphology, rhodopsin trafficking, and light responses, but underwent progressive neurodegeneration with eventual loss of both rods and cones by twelve weeks. The degeneration is considerably faster than in rod knockouts of autophagy genes, indicating defects in endosome recycling or other PI(3)P-dependent membrane trafficking pathways are also essential for rod survival. PMID:27245220

  13. Light-regulated, tissue-specific immunophilins in a higher plant.

    PubMed

    Luan, S; Albers, M W; Schreiber, S L

    1994-02-01

    In addition to their application in organ transplantation, immunosuppressive drugs are valuable tools for studying signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Using affinity chromatography, we have purified immunosuppressive drug receptors (immunophilins) from fava bean. Proteins belonging to both major classes of the immunophilin family identified from animal sources [FK506- and rapamycin-binding proteins (FKBPs) and cyclophilins] were present in this higher plant. FKBP13, the most abundant FKBP family member in leaf tissues, was not detected in root tissues, whereas other FKBPs were present in both tissues. While the abundance of cyclophilin A in leaves was similar to that in roots, cyclophilin B/C was expressed at a much higher level in leaf tissues than in root tissues. Subcellular localization of immunophilins in mesophyll cells showed that chloroplasts contained FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C but not other members, which explains the preferential expression of these two proteins in leaves over roots. The abundance of chloroplast-localized immunophilins, FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C, was regulated by light. Although etiolated leaves produced detectable levels of cyclophilin B/C, they did not express FKBP13. Illumination of etiolated plants dramatically increased the expression of both FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C. The light-induced expression of FKBP13 is closely correlated with the accumulation of chlorophyll in the leaf tissue. Our findings suggest that FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C may play a specific role in chloroplasts. PMID:7508125

  14. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is light-regulated and essential for survival in retinal rods

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Agosto, Melina A.; Anastassov, Ivan A.; Tse, Dennis Y.; Wu, Samuel M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in numerous intracellular membrane pathways. Little is known about the regulation or function of these lipids in rod photoreceptor cells, which have highly active membrane dynamics. Using new assays with femtomole sensitivity, we determined that whereas levels of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate were below detection limits, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) levels in rod inner/outer segments increased more than 30-fold after light exposure. This increase was blocked in a rod-specific knockout of the PI-3 kinase Vps34, resulting in failure of endosomal and autophagy-related membranes to fuse with lysosomes, and accumulation of abnormal membrane structures. At early ages, rods displayed normal morphology, rhodopsin trafficking, and light responses, but underwent progressive neurodegeneration with eventual loss of both rods and cones by twelve weeks. The degeneration is considerably faster than in rod knockouts of autophagy genes, indicating defects in endosome recycling or other PI(3)P-dependent membrane trafficking pathways are also essential for rod survival. PMID:27245220

  15. Chronic Light Exposure in the Middle of the Night Disturbs the Circadian System and Emotional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Yan, Lily

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the circadian system is composed of a principal circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a number of subordinate oscillators in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues/organs. However, how the time-keeping functions of this multiple oscillator circuit are affected by aberrant lighting environments remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic light exposure in the middle of the night on the circadian system by comparing the mice housed in a 12:4:4:4-h L:DLD condition with the controls in 12:12-h L:D condition. Daily rhythms in locomotor activity were analyzed and the expression patterns of protein products of clock genes Period1 and Period2 (PER1 and PER2) were examined in the SCN and extra-SCN brain regions, including the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Following 2 weeks of housing in the L:DLD condition, animals showed disturbed daily rhythms in locomotor activity and lacked daily rhythms of PER1 and PER2 in the SCN. In the extra-SCN brain regions, the PER1 and PER2 rhythms were affected in a region-specific pattern, such that they were relatively undisturbed in the striatum and hippocampus, phase-shifted in the BLA, and abolished in the PVN. In addition, mice in the L:DLD condition showed increased anxiety-like behaviors and reduced brain-derived neurotropic factor messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, which are brain regions that are involved in emotional regulation. These results indicate that nighttime light exposure leads to circadian disturbances not only by abolishing the circadian rhythms in the SCN but also by inducing misalignment among brain oscillators and negatively affects emotional processing. These observations serve to identify risks associated with decisions regarding lifestyle in our modern society. PMID:27075857

  16. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qijun; Judelson, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision. PMID:24704821

  17. Beteigeuze (Alpha Orionis) und Mintaka (Delta Orionis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmann, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    Magnitude measures transformed to Johnson V of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) and Delta Orionis with a wide-angle lens and DSLR are presented and discussed. Alpha Orionis light changes are shown clearly. The primary and secondary eclipses of Delta Orionis with amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.05 mag respectively are clearly recorded. They occur near phase 0.00 and 0.50 respectively of current elements from VSX (2).

  18. Developmental and UV Light Regulation of the Snapdragon Chalcone Synthase Promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, K; Staiger, D; Czaja, I; Walden, R; Schell, J; Wing, D

    1991-01-01

    Expression directed by the 1.1-kb snapdragon chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter linked to the [beta]-glucuronidase reporter gene has been studied in transgenic tobacco. The pattern of expression of the chimeric gene was compared with the expression of the endogenous CHS genes in tobacco and snapdragon. We demonstrate that expression of the CHS promoter is controlled in both an organ-specific and tissue-specific manner. The highest level of expression was observed in immature seeds. Deletions were used to define regions of the promoter required for expression in roots, stems, leaves, seeds, and flower petals of transgenic plants. We have defined the minimal sequences required for expression in different organs and mapped regions of the promoter that influence expression in either a positive or negative manner. A promoter fragment truncated to -39 activates transcription in roots of 4-week-old seedlings, whereas a fragment extending to -197 bp directs expression in petals and seeds. A positive regulatory element located between -661 and -566 and comprising a 47-bp direct repeat is active in all tissues investigated except petals. UV light-regulated expression in leaves of transgenic tobacco seedlings is dependent on the presence of sequences also required for leaf-specific expression. Within the intact promoter, sequences that individually confer different patterns of expression interact to produce the highly regulated expression pattern of CHS. PMID:12324622

  19. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  20. Regulation of Myosin II Dynamics by Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of Its Light Chain in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II, an actin-based motor protein, plays an essential role in actin cytoskeleton organization and cellular motility. Although phosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MRLC) is known to be involved in myosin II filament assembly and motor activity in vitro, it remains unclear exactly how MRLC phosphorylation regulates myosin II dynamics in vivo. We established clones of Madin Darby canine kidney II epithelial cells expressing MRLC-enhanced green fluorescent protein or its mutants. Time-lapse imaging revealed that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are required for proper dynamics of myosin II. Inhibitors affecting myosin phosphorylation and MRLC mutants indicated that monophosphorylation of MRLC is required and sufficient for maintenance of stress fibers. Diphosphorylated MRLC stabilized myosin II filaments and was distributed locally in regions of stress fibers where contraction occurs, suggesting that diphosphorylation is involved in the spatial regulation of myosin II assembly and contraction. We further found that myosin phosphatase or Zipper-interacting protein kinase localizes to stress fibers depending on the activity of myosin II ATPase. PMID:17151359

  1. CUE1: A Mesophyll Cell-Specific Positive Regulator of Light-Controlled Gene Expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hm.; Culligan, K.; Dixon, R. A.; Chory, J.

    1995-01-01

    Light plays a key role in the development and physiology of plants. One of the most profound effects of light on plant development is the derepression of expression of an array of light-responsive genes, including the genes encoding the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins (CAB) of photosystem II. To understand the mechanism by which light signals nuclear gene expression, we developed a genetic selection to identify mutants with reduced CAB transcription. Here, we describe a new Arabidopsis locus, CUE1 (for CAB underexpressed). Mutations at this locus result in defects in expression of several light-regulated genes, specifically in mesophyll but not in bundle-associated or epidermis cells. Reduced accumulation of CAB and other photosynthesis-related mRNAs in the mesophyll was correlated with defects in chloroplast development in these cells, resulting in a reticulate pattern with veins greener than the interveinal regions of leaves. Moreover, chalcone synthase mRNA, although known to be regulated by both phytochrome and a blue light receptor, accumulated normally in the leaf epidermis. Dark basal levels of CAB expression were unaffected in etiolated cue1 seedlings; however, induction of CAB transcription by pulses of red and blue light was reduced, suggesting that CUE1 acts downstream from both phytochrome and blue light photoreceptors. CUE1 appears to play a role in the primary derepression of mesophyll-specific gene expression in response to light, because cue1 mutants are severely deficient at establishing photoautotrophic growth. Based on this characterization, we propose that CUE1 is a cell-specific positive regulator linking light and intrinsic developmental programs in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll cells. PMID:12242356

  2. Regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in the trabecular meshwork: role in aqueous humour outflow facility.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Vasantha; Deng, Peifeng; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Epstein, David L

    2005-02-01

    Cellular contraction and relaxation and integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue have been thought to influence aqueous humour outflow. However, the cellular pathways that regulate these events in TM cells are not well understood. In this study, we investigated physiological agonist-mediated regulation of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in the TM, and correlated such effects with alterations in aqueous outflow facility, since MLC phosphorylation is a critical biochemical determinant of cellular contraction in TM cells. Treatment of serum starved human TM cells with endothelin-1 (0.1 microM), thromboxane A2 mimetic U-46619 (1.0 microM), or angiotensin II (1 microM), all of which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptors, triggered activation of MLC phosphorylation, as determined by urea/glycerol-based Western blot analysis. Agonist-stimulated increase in MLC phosphorylation was associated with activation of Rho GTPase in TM cells, as determined in pull-down assays. In contrast, treatment of human TM cells with a novel Rho-kinase inhibitor H-1152 (0.1-2 microM), in the presence of serum reduced basal MLC phosphorylation. H-1152 also increased aqueous outflow facility significantly in a dose-dependent fashion, in perfusion studies with cadaver porcine eyes. This effect of H-1152 on outflow facility was associated with decreased MLC phosphorylation in TM tissue of drug-perfused eyes. Collectively, this study identifies potential physiological regulators of MLC phosphorylation in human TM cells and demonstrates the significance of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway-mediated MLC phosphorylation in modulation of aqueous outflow facility through TM. PMID:15670798

  3. Gene regulation of carbon fixation, storage, and utilization in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum acclimated to light/dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Chauton, Matilde Skogen; Winge, Per; Brembu, Tore; Vadstein, Olav; Bones, Atle M

    2013-02-01

    The regulation of carbon metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum at the cell, metabolite, and gene expression levels in exponential fed-batch cultures is reported. Transcriptional profiles and cell chemistry sampled simultaneously at all time points provide a comprehensive data set on carbon incorporation, fate, and regulation. An increase in Nile Red fluorescence (a proxy for cellular neutral lipids) was observed throughout the light period, and water-soluble glucans increased rapidly in the light period. A near-linear decline in both glucans and lipids was observed during the dark period, and transcription profile data indicated that this decline was associated with the onset of mitosis. More than 4,500 transcripts that were differentially regulated during the light/dark cycle are identified, many of which were associated with carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Genes not previously described in algae and their regulation in response to light were integrated in this analysis together with proposed roles in metabolic processes. Some very fast light-responding genes in, for example, fatty acid biosynthesis were identified and allocated to biosynthetic processes. Transcripts and cell chemistry data reflect the link between light energy availability and light energy-consuming metabolic processes. Our data confirm the spatial localization of processes in carbon metabolism to either plastids or mitochondria or to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, which are localized to the cytosol, chloroplast, and mitochondria. Localization and diel expression pattern may be of help to determine the roles of different isoenzymes and the mining of genes involved in light responses and circadian rhythms. PMID:23209127

  4. Transcriptional and translational regulation of nitrogenase in light-dark- and continuous-light-grown cultures of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142.

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, M S; Sherman, D M; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium which demonstrated extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. N2 fixation and respiration peaked at 24-h intervals early in the dark or subjective-dark period, whereas photosynthesis was approximately 12 h out of phase and peaked toward the end of the light or subjective-light phase. Gene regulation studies demonstrated that nitrogenase is carefully controlled at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Indeed, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 has developed an expensive mode of regulation, such that nitrogenase was synthesized and degraded each day. These patterns were seen when cells were grown under either light-dark or continuous-light conditions. Nitrogenase mRNA was synthesized from the nifHDK operon during the first 4 h of the dark period under light-dark conditions or during the first 6 h of the subjective-dark period when grown in continuous light. The nitrogenase NifH and NifDK subunits reached a maximum level at 4 to 10 h in the dark or subjective-dark periods and were shown by Western blotting and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry to be thoroughly degraded toward the end of the dark periods. An exception is the NifDK protein (MoFe-protein), which appeared not to be completely degraded under continuous-light conditions. We hypothesize that cellular O2 levels were kept low by decreasing photosynthesis and by increasing respiration in the early dark or subjective-dark periods to permit nitrogenase activity. The subsequent increase in O2 levels resulted in nitrogenase damage and eventual degradation. PMID:9209050

  5. Characterization of the BLR1 gene encoding a putative blue-light regulator in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Junichi; Moriwaki, Akihiro; Tanaka, Nozomi; Ueno, Makoto; Arase, Sakae

    2007-01-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a filamentous ascomycetous fungus that causes brown leaf spot disease in rice. We isolated and characterized BLR1, a gene that encodes a putative blue-light regulator similar to Neurospora crassa white-collar 1 (WC-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of BLR1 showed high degrees of similarity to other fungal blue-light regulator protein. Disruption of the BLR1 gene demonstrated that this gene is essential for conidial development after conidiophore formation and for near-UV radiation-enhanced photolyase gene expression. PMID:17233721

  6. Light-evoked synaptic activity of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells is regulated in developing mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanhua; Wang, Ping; Tian, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a continued maturation of visual responsiveness and synaptic activity of retina after eye opening, including the size of receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), light-evoked synaptic output of RGCs, bipolar cell spontaneous synaptic inputs to RGCs, and the synaptic connections between RGCs and ON and OFF bipolar cells. Light deprivation retarded some of these age-dependent changes. However, many other functional and morphological features of RGCs are not sensitive to visual experience. To determine whether light-evoked synaptic responses of RGCs undergo developmental change, we directly examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to RGCs in developing retinas and found that both light-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents decreased, but not increased, with age. We also examined the light-evoked synaptic inputs from ON and OFF synaptic pathways to amacrine cells in developing retinas and found that the light-evoked synaptic input of amacrine cells is also down-regulated in developing mouse retina. Different from the developmental changes of RGC spontaneous synaptic activity, dark rearing has little effect on the developmental changes of light-evoked synaptic activity of both RGCs and amacrine cells. Therefore, we concluded that the synaptic mechanisms mediating spontaneous and light-evoked synaptic activity of RGCs and amacrine cells are likely to be different. PMID:21091802

  7. Light regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis at the level of 5-aminolevulinate formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Ilag, L L; Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1994-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the universal precursor of tetrapyrroles, such as chlorophyll and heme. The major control of chlorophyll biosynthesis is at the step of ALA formation. In the chloroplasts of plants, as in Escherichia coli, ALA is derived from the glutamate of Glu-tRNA via the two-step C5 pathway. The first enzyme, Glu-tRNA reductase, catalyzes the reduction of Glu-tRNA to glutamate 1-semialdehyde with the release of intact tRNA. The second enzyme, glutamate 1-semialdehyde 2,1-aminomutase, converts glutamate 1-semialdehyde to ALA. To further examine ALA formation in plants, we isolated Arabidopsis genes that encode the enzymes of the C5 pathway via functional complementation of mutations in the corresponding genes of E. coli. The Glu-tRNA reductase gene was designated HEMA and the glutamate 1-semialdehyde 2,1-aminomutase gene, GSA1. Each gene contains two short introns (149 and 241 nucleotides for HEMA, 153 and 86 nucleotides for GSA1). The deduced amino acid sequence of the HEMA protein predicts a protein of 60 kD with substantial similarity (30 to 47% identity) to sequences derived from the known hemA genes from microorganisms that make ALA by the C5 pathway. Purified Arabidopsis HEMA protein has Glu-tRNA reductase activity. The GSA1 gene encodes a 50-kD protein whose deduced amino acid sequence shows extensive homology (55 to 78% identity) with glutamate 1-semialdehyde 2,1-aminomutase proteins from other species. RNA gel blot analyses indicated that transcripts for both genes are found in root, leaf, stem, and flower tissues and that their levels are dramatically elevated by light. Thus, light may regulate ALA, and hence chlorophyll formation, by exerting coordinated transcriptional control over both enzymes of the C5 pathway. PMID:7908550

  8. Constitutive, light-responsive and circadian clock-responsive factors compete for the different l box elements in plant light-regulated promoters.

    PubMed

    Borello, U; Ceccarelli, E; Giuliano, G

    1993-10-01

    The l box is a conserved regulatory motif which is found upstream of plant genes (rbcS, cab and nia) whose transcription is regulated by light and the circadian clock. Gel retardation and UV cross-linking assays were used to resolve two different groups of I box binding factors (IBFs) in tomato nuclear extracts. Active components of the first group (IBF-1) recognize the l box of the light-responsive rbcS promoter; one factor within this group, IBF-1a, also recognizes the adjacent G box, which has been shown previously to bind a different class of plant transcription factors, the G box binding factors (GBFs). To the limit of experimental resolution, IBF-1a and GBF compete for the same nucleotides on the G box. Nevertheless, these two activities are biochemically and immunologically distinct. The relative abundance of IBF-1a shows a vast decrease in dark-adapted plants. Factors in the second group (IBF-2), recognize the l box of the nia promoter, which is regulated both by light and the circadian clock; one factor within this group, IBF-2a, also binds the l box of a second promoter showing similar regulation, the cab promoter. The IBF-2a binding sites on the cab and nia promoters show extensive homology to a circadian clock-responsive promoter element from wheat. The abundance of IBF-2a is diurnally regulated and shows a dramatic induction around the onset of the light period. Transfer of the plants in continuous darkness demonstrates that this induction is under the control of a circadian clock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8252065

  9. Adenosinergic regulation of striatal clock gene expression and ethanol intake during constant light.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Christina L; Vadnie, Chelsea A; Hinton, David J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Walker, Denise L; O'Connor, Katheryn M; Noterman, Maria F; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythm and sleep disruptions occur frequently in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and present significant barriers to treatment. Recently, a variant of adenosine transporter, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1), was associated with the co-occurrence of sleep problems and AUD. We have previously shown that mice lacking ENT1 (ENT1 KO) have reduced adenosine levels in the striatum and drink more alcohol compared with wild types (WT). However, it is unknown whether ENT1 deletion disrupts circadian rhythms, which may contribute to alcohol preference in ENT1 KO mice. Here we used these mice to determine whether endogenous adenosine regulates circadian genetic and behavioral rhythms and influences alcohol intake during chronodisruption. We examined circadian locomotor activity in ENT1 KO vs WT littermates and found that ENT1 KO mice were both active earlier and hyperactive compared with WT mice at night. We used real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry to estimate striatal clock gene levels and found that PER2 expression in the striatum was blunted by ENT1 deletion or A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonism. Next, we exposed ENT1 KO and WT mice to constant light (LL) and found further elevation in ethanol intake in ENT1 KO, but not in WT mice, supporting the notion that circadian dysfunction may contribute to increased alcohol intake in ENT1 KO mice. Finally, we showed that A2AR agonist administration normalized PER1 and PER2 expression and circadian locomotor activity in ENT1 KO mice. Together, our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling regulates cellular and behavioral circadian timing and influences alcohol intake during chronodisruption. PMID:24755889

  10. Adenosinergic Regulation of Striatal Clock Gene Expression and Ethanol Intake During Constant Light

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Christina L; Vadnie, Chelsea A; Hinton, David J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Walker, Denise L; O'Connor, Katheryn M; Noterman, Maria F; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythm and sleep disruptions occur frequently in individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and present significant barriers to treatment. Recently, a variant of adenosine transporter, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1), was associated with the co-occurrence of sleep problems and AUD. We have previously shown that mice lacking ENT1 (ENT1 KO) have reduced adenosine levels in the striatum and drink more alcohol compared with wild types (WT). However, it is unknown whether ENT1 deletion disrupts circadian rhythms, which may contribute to alcohol preference in ENT1 KO mice. Here we used these mice to determine whether endogenous adenosine regulates circadian genetic and behavioral rhythms and influences alcohol intake during chronodisruption. We examined circadian locomotor activity in ENT1 KO vs WT littermates and found that ENT1 KO mice were both active earlier and hyperactive compared with WT mice at night. We used real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry to estimate striatal clock gene levels and found that PER2 expression in the striatum was blunted by ENT1 deletion or A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonism. Next, we exposed ENT1 KO and WT mice to constant light (LL) and found further elevation in ethanol intake in ENT1 KO, but not in WT mice, supporting the notion that circadian dysfunction may contribute to increased alcohol intake in ENT1 KO mice. Finally, we showed that A2AR agonist administration normalized PER1 and PER2 expression and circadian locomotor activity in ENT1 KO mice. Together, our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling regulates cellular and behavioral circadian timing and influences alcohol intake during chronodisruption. PMID:24755889

  11. A Role for Barley CRYPTOCHROME1 in Light Regulation of Grain Dormancy and Germination[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, Jose M.; Downie, A. Bruce; Xu, Qian; Gubler, Frank

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in the regulation of seed dormancy and that transcriptional regulation of genes encoding ABA biosynthetic and degradation enzymes is responsible for determining ABA content. However, little is known about the upstream signaling pathways impinging on transcription to ultimately regulate ABA content or how environmental signals (e.g., light and cold) might direct such expression in grains. Our previous studies indicated that light is a key environmental signal inhibiting germination in dormant grains of barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and Brachypodium distachyon and that this effect attenuates as after-ripening progresses further. We found that the blue component of the light spectrum inhibits completion of germination in barley by inducing the expression of the ABA biosynthetic gene 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and dampening expression of ABA 8’-hydroxylase, thus increasing ABA content in the grain. We have now created barley transgenic lines downregulating the genes encoding the blue light receptors CRYTOCHROME (CRY1) and CRY2. Our results demonstrate that CRY1 is the key receptor perceiving and transducing the blue light signal in dormant grains. PMID:24642944

  12. Opsin co-expression in Limulus photoreceptors: differential regulation by light and a circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Katti, C; Kempler, K; Porter, M L; Legg, A; Gonzalez, R; Garcia-Rivera, E; Dugger, D; Battelle, B-A

    2010-08-01

    A long-standing concept in vision science has held that a single photoreceptor expresses a single type of opsin, the protein component of visual pigment. However, the number of examples in the literature of photoreceptors from vertebrates and invertebrates that break this rule is increasing. Here, we describe a newly discovered Limulus opsin, Limulus opsin5, which is significantly different from previously characterized Limulus opsins, opsins1 and 2. We show that opsin5 is co-expressed with opsins1 and 2 in Limulus lateral and ventral eye photoreceptors and provide the first evidence that the expression of co-expressed opsins can be differentially regulated. We show that the relative levels of opsin5 and opsin1 and 2 in the rhabdom change with a diurnal rhythm and that their relative levels are also influenced by the animal's central circadian clock. An analysis of the sequence of opsin5 suggests it is sensitive to visible light (400-700 nm) but that its spectral properties may be different from that of opsins1 and 2. Changes in the relative levels of these opsins may underlie some of the dramatic day-night changes in Limulus photoreceptor function and may produce a diurnal change in their spectral sensitivity. PMID:20639420

  13. Light-regulated and cell-specific methylation of the maize PEPC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, Ben J.; Woodfield, Helen; Wanchana, Samart; Bruskiewich, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing PEPC expression in maize remain to be fully defined. Differential methylation of a region in the PEPC promoter has been shown to correlate with transcript accumulation, however, to date, investigations into the role of DNA methylation in maize PEPC expression have relied on the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Bisulphite sequencing was used here to provide a single-base resolution methylation map of the maize PEPC promoter. It is shown that four cytosine residues in the PEPC promoter are heavily methylated in maize root tissue. In leaves, de-methylation of these cytosines is dependent on illumination and is coincident with elevated PEPC expression. Furthermore, light-regulated de-methylation of these cytosines occurs only in mesophyll cells. No methylation was discovered in the 0.6 kb promoter required for mesophyll-specific expression indicating that cytosine methylation is not required to direct the cell-specificity of PEPC expression. This raises interesting questions regarding the function of the cell-specific cytosine de-methylation observed in the upstream region of the PEPC promoter. PMID:22143916

  14. The regulation of RhoGEF Lfc by dynein light chain Tctex-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Marc

    Lfc is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small GTPase RhoA, and its GEF activity is tightly regulated through protein-protein interactions, phosphorylation, and cellular localization. Lfc is anchored to microtubules through its interaction with the dynein light chain Tctex-1, which results in inhibition of Lfc's GEF activity. Here we present a crystallographic structure of Tctex-1 in complex with Lfc with residues 143-155 of Lfc bound at the Tctex-1 dimer interface. Structural alignment of our structure with Tctex-1 in complex with the dynein intermediate chain (DIC) shows the binding site of the DIC peptide and Lfc substantially overlap. Biochemical evidence, NMR perturbations assays and intrinsic fluorescence provide structural validation and support an extension of the Lfc binding site to the andalpha;-helices that may accommodate additional contact points with Tctex-1. We postulate a potential mechanism for Lfcandrsquo;s recruitment to the microtubules through a tripartite complex with Tctex-1 and DIC.

  15. The De-Ubiquitinylating Enzyme, USP2, Is Associated with the Circadian Clockwork and Regulates Its Sensitivity to Light

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Heather Dehlin; Humby, Monica; Yadav, Geetha; Zhang, Qingjiong; Fogerty, Joseph; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel component of the circadian clock that regulates its sensitivity to light at the evening light to dark transition. USP2 (Ubiquitin Specific Protease 2), which de-ubiquitinylates and stabilizes target proteins, is rhythmically expressed in multiple tissues including the SCN. We have developed a knockout model of USP2 and found that exposure to low irradiance light at ZT12 increases phase delays of USP2−/− mice compared to wildtype. We additionally show that USP2b is in a complex with several clock components and regulates the stability and turnover of BMAL1, which in turn alters the expression of several CLOCK/BMAL1 controlled genes. Rhythmic expression of USP2 in the SCN and other tissues offers a new level of control of the clock machinery through de-ubiqutinylation and suggests a role for USP2 during circadian adaptation to environmental day length changes. PMID:21966515

  16. Phytochrome-interacting factors PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate anthocyanin biosynthesis under red light in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongjuan; Zhang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Ping; Zhao, Chengzhou; Chen, Yadi; Bi, Yurong

    2015-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor inducing anthocyanin accumulation in plants. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) have been shown to be a family of bHLH transcription factors involved in light signaling in Arabidopsis. Red light effectively increased anthocyanin accumulation in wild-type Col-0, whereas the effects were enhanced in pif4 and pif5 mutants but impaired in overexpression lines PIF4OX and PIF5OX, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are both negative regulators for red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Consistently, transcript levels of several genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulatory pathway, including CHS, F3'H, DFR, LDOX, PAP1 and TT8, were significantly enhanced in mutants pif4 and pif5 but decreased in PIF4OX and PIF5OX compared to in Col-0, indicating that PIF4 and PIF5 are transcriptional repressor of these gene. Transient expression assays revealed that PIF4 and PIF5 could repress red light-induced promoter activities of F3'H and DFR in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) test and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that PIF5 could directly bind to G-box motifs present in the promoter of DFR. Taken together, these results suggest that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate red light-induced anthocyanin accumulation through transcriptional repression of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:26259175

  17. Rapid, Organ-Specific Transcriptional Responses to Light Regulate Photomorphogenic Development in Dicot Seedlings1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Swaminathan, Kankshita; Hudson, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    The dicotyledon seedling undergoes organ-specific photomorphogenic development when exposed to light. The cotyledons open and expand, the apical hook opens, and the hypocotyl ceases to elongate. Using the large and easily dissected seedlings of soybean (Glycine max ‘Williams 82’), we show that genes involved in photosynthesis and its regulation dominate transcripts specific to the cotyledon, even in etiolated seedlings. Genes for cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism are expressed at higher levels in the hypocotyl, while examination of genes expressed at higher levels in the hook region (including the shoot apical meristem) reveals genes involved in cell division and protein turnover. The early transcriptional events in these three organs in response to a 1-h treatment of far-red light are highly distinctive. Not only are different regulatory genes rapidly regulated by light in each organ, but the early-responsive genes in each organ contain a distinctive subset of known light-responsive cis-regulatory elements. We detected specific light-induced gene expression for the root phototropism gene RPT2 in the apical hook and also phenotypes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rpt2 mutants demonstrating that the gene is necessary for normal photomorphogenesis in the seedling apex. Significantly, expression of the RPT2 promoter fused to a β-glucuronidase reporter gene shows differential expression across the hook region. We conclude that organ-specific, light-responsive transcriptional networks are active early in photomorphogenesis in the aerial parts of dicotyledon seedlings. PMID:21653191

  18. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  19. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ted T; García, José R; Paez, Julieta I; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  20. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  1. Light-triggered in vivo Activation of Adhesive Peptides Regulates Cell Adhesion, Inflammation and Vascularization of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have been recently realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  2. Light spectrum regulates cell accumulation during daytime in the raphidophyte Chattonella antiqua causing noxious red tides.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Tomoyuki; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Iwahori, Sho; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-07-01

    Most marine raphidophyte species cause noxious red tides in temperate coastal areas around the world. It is known that swimming abilities enable raphidophytes to accumulation of cells and to actively acquire light at surface layers and nutrients over a wide depth range. However, it remains unclear how the swimming behavior is affected by environmental conditions, especially light condition. In the present study, we observed the accumulation of the harmful red-tide raphidophyte Chattonella antiqua under various light conditions during the daytime in the laboratory. When exposed to ultraviolet-A/blue light (320-480nm) or red light (640-680nm) from above, cells moved downward. In the case of blue light (455nm), cells started to swim downward after 5-15min of irradiation at a photon flux density≥10μmolm(-2)s(-1). When exposed to monochromatic lights (400-680nm) from the side, cells moved away from the blue light source and then descended, but just moved downward under red light. However, mixing of green/orange light (520-630nm) diminished the effects of blue light. When exposed to a mixture of 30μmolm(-2)s(-1) of blue light (440nm) and ≥6μmolm(-2)s(-1) of yellow light (560nm) from above, cells did not move downward. These results indicate that blue light induces negative phototaxis and ultraviolet-A/blue and red lights induce descending, and green/orange light cancels out their effects in C. antiqua. PMID:27107332

  3. Inhibition to retinal rod bipolar cells is regulated by light levels

    PubMed Central

    Mazade, Reece E.; Klein, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    The retina responds to a wide range of light stimuli by adaptation of retinal signaling to background light intensity and the use of two different photoreceptors: rods that sense dim light and cones that sense bright light. Rods signal to rod bipolar cells that receive significant inhibition from amacrine cells in the dark, especially from a rod bipolar cell-activated GABAergic amacrine cell. This inhibition modulates the output of rod bipolar cells onto downstream neurons. However, it was not clear how the inhibition of rod bipolar cells changes when rod signaling is limited by an adapting background light and cone signaling becomes dominant. We found that both light-evoked and spontaneous rod bipolar cell inhibition significantly decrease with light adaptation. This suggests a global decrease in the activity of amacrine cells that provide input to rod bipolar cells with light adaptation. However, inhibition to rod bipolar cells is also limited by GABAergic connections between amacrine cells, which decrease GABAergic input to rod bipolar cells. When we removed this serial inhibition, the light-evoked inhibition to rod bipolar cells remained after light adaptation. These results suggest that decreased inhibition to rod bipolar cells after light adaptation is due to decreased rod pathway activity as well as an active increase in inhibition between amacrine cells. Together these serve to limit rod bipolar cell inhibition after light adaptation, when the rod pathway is inactive and modulation of the signal is not required. This suggests an efficiency mechanism in the retina to limit unnecessary signaling. PMID:23596335

  4. Blue light regulates the accumulation of two psbD-psbC transcripts in barley chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, P E; Mullet, J E

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis of D2, a Photosystem II reaction center protein encoded by psbD, is differentially maintained during light-induced chloroplast maturation. The continued synthesis of D2 is paralleled by selective light-induced accumulation of two psbD-psbC transcripts which share a common 5' terminus. In the present study, we examine the nature of the photoreceptor and the fluence requirement for psbD-psbC transcript induction. The light-induced change in psbD-psbC RNA population can be detected between 1 and 2 h after 4.5 day old dark-grown barley seedlings are transferred to the light. Light-induced transcript accumulation occurs normally in the chlorophyll-deficient barley mutant, xan-f10, indicating that light-activated chlorophyll formation and photosynthesis are not required for RNA induction. High fluence blue light fully induces psbD-psbC transcript accumulation; low or high fluence red or far-red light do not. However, psbD-psbC transcript accumulation elicited by blue light pulses can be partially attenuated if far-red light is given immediately following the blue light treatment. Thus, although blue light is needed to initiate transcript accumulation, phytochrome modulates the amplitude of the response. Pretreatment of dark-grown plants with cycloheximide blocks light-induced psbD-psbC transcript accumulation. This could implicate a blue-light responsive nuclear gene in the light-induced accumulation of the two psbD-psbC transcripts. Images PMID:2479534

  5. Multi-level Modeling of Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Offers New Insights into Its Regulation by Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 1031 distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  6. Multi-level modeling of light-induced stomatal opening offers new insights into its regulation by drought.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M

    2014-11-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 10(31) distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems. PMID:25393147

  7. The Transcription Factor BcLTF1 Regulates Virulence and Light Responses in the Necrotrophic Plant Pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim Christopher; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold diseases in a range of dicotyledonous plant species. The fungus can reproduce asexually by forming macroconidia for dispersal and sclerotia for survival; the latter also participate in sexual reproduction by bearing the apothecia after fertilization by microconidia. Light induces the differentiation of conidia and apothecia, while sclerotia are exclusively formed in the absence of light. The relevance of light for virulence of the fungus is not obvious, but infections are observed under natural illumination as well as in constant darkness. By a random mutagenesis approach, we identified a novel virulence-related gene encoding a GATA transcription factor (BcLTF1 for light-responsive TF1) with characterized homologues in Aspergillus nidulans (NsdD) and Neurospora crassa (SUB-1). By deletion and over-expression of bcltf1, we confirmed the predicted role of the transcription factor in virulence, and discovered furthermore its functions in regulation of light-dependent differentiation, the equilibrium between production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary metabolism. Microarray analyses revealed 293 light-responsive genes, and that the expression levels of the majority of these genes (66%) are modulated by BcLTF1. In addition, the deletion of bcltf1 affects the expression of 1,539 genes irrespective of the light conditions, including the overexpression of known and so far uncharacterized secondary metabolism-related genes. Increased expression of genes encoding alternative respiration enzymes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX), suggest a mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of bcltf1. The hypersensitivity of Δbctlf1 mutants to exogenously applied oxidative stress - even in the absence of light - and the restoration of virulence and growth rates in continuous light by antioxidants, indicate that BcLTF1 is required to cope with oxidative stress that is caused either by exposure to light

  8. Regulation of lipid production by light-emitting diodes in human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Ra; Kim, Sue Jeong; Sohn, Kyung Cheol; Lee, Young; Seo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Ho; Whang, Kyu Uang; Kim, Chang Deok; Lee, Jeung Hoon; Im, Myung

    2015-04-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LED) have been used to treat acne vulgaris. However, the efficacy of LED on sebaceous lipid production in vitro has not been examined. This study investigated the efficacy of 415 nm blue light and 630 nm red light on lipid production in human sebocytes. When applied to human primary sebocytes, 415 nm blue light suppressed cell proliferation. Based on a lipogenesis study using Oil Red O, Nile red staining, and thin-layered chromatography, 630 nm red light strongly downregulated lipid production in sebocytes. These results suggest that 415 nm blue light and 630 nm red light influence lipid production in human sebocytes and have beneficial effects on acne by suppressing sebum production. PMID:25690162

  9. Inhibition of germination of dormant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grains by blue light as related to oxygen and hormonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Hai Ha; Sechet, Julien; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette; Corbineau, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Germination of primary dormant barley grains is promoted by darkness and temperatures below 20 °C, but is strongly inhibited by blue light. Exposure under blue light at 10 °C for periods longer than five days, results in a progressive inability to germinate in the dark, considered as secondary dormancy. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of blue light is reinforced in hypoxia. The inhibitory effect of blue light is associated with an increase in embryo abscisic acid (ABA) content (by 3.5- to 3.8-fold) and embryo sensitivity to both ABA and hypoxia. Analysis of expression of ABA metabolism genes shows that increase in ABA mainly results in a strong increase in HvNCED1 and HvNCED2 expression, and a slight decrease in HvABA8'OH-1. Among the gibberellins (GA) metabolism genes examined, blue light decreases the expression of HvGA3ox2, involved in GA synthesis, increases that of GA2ox3 and GA2ox5, involved in GA catabolism, and reduces the GA signalling evaluated by the HvExpA11 expression. Expression of secondary dormancy is associated with maintenance of high embryo ABA content and a low HvExpA11 expression. The partial reversion of the inhibitory effect of blue light by green light also suggests that cryptochrome might be involved in this hormonal regulation. PMID:24256416

  10. Involvement of maize Dof zinc finger proteins in tissue-specific and light-regulated gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, S; Sheen, J

    1998-01-01

    Dof is a novel family of plant proteins that share a unique and highly conserved DNA binding domain with one C2-C2 zinc finger motif. Although multiple Dof proteins associated with diverse gene promoters have recently been identified in a variety of plants, their physiological functions and regulation remain elusive. In maize, Dof1 (MNB1a) is constitutively expressed in leaves, stems, and roots, whereas the closely related Dof2 is expressed mainly in stems and roots. Here, by using a maize leaf protoplast transient assay, we show that Dof1 is a transcriptional activator, whereas Dof2 can act as a transcriptional repressor. Thus, differential expression of Dof1 and Dof2 may permit leaf-specific gene expression. Interestingly, in vivo analyses showed that although DNA binding activity of Dof1 is regulated by light-dependent development, its transactivation activity and nuclear localization are not. Moreover, in vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Dof1 can interact specifically with the maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene promoter and enhance its promoter activity, which displays a light-regulated expression pattern matching Dof1 activity. We propose that the evolutionarily conserved Dof proteins can function as transcriptional activators or repressors of tissue-specific and light-regulated gene expression in plants. PMID:9477573