Science.gov

Sample records for light scattering mals

  1. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  2. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-08-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  3. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  4. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  5. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  6. Critical fluid light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to measure the decay rates of critical density fluctuations in a simple fluid (xenon) very near its liquid-vapor critical point using laser light scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. Such experiments were severely limited on Earth by the presence of gravity which causes large density gradients in the sample when the compressibility diverges approaching the critical point. The goal is to measure fluctuation decay rates at least two decades closer to the critical point than is possible on earth, with a resolution of 3 microK. This will require loading the sample to 0.1 percent of the critical density and taking data as close as 100 microK to the critical temperature. The minimum mission time of 100 hours will allow a complete range of temperature points to be covered, limited by the thermal response of the sample. Other technical problems have to be addressed such as multiple scattering and the effect of wetting layers. The experiment entails measurement of the scattering intensity fluctuation decay rate at two angles for each temperature and simultaneously recording the scattering intensities and sample turbidity (from the transmission). The analyzed intensity and turbidity data gives the correlation length at each temperature and locates the critical temperature. The fluctuation decay rate data from these measurements will provide a severe test of the generalized hydrodynamic theories of transport coefficients in the critical regions. When compared to equivalent data from binary liquid critical mixtures they will test the universality of critical dynamics.

  7. Standardization of light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Sven; von Finck, Alexander; Duparré, Angela

    2015-10-01

    In every advanced optical system, light scattering caused by the imperfections of optical components sooner or later becomes an issue that needs to be addressed. Light scattering can be a critical factor for both the throughput and the imaging quality of optical systems. On a component level, the quantities to describe these effects are the scatter loss or total scattering (TS) and the scattering distribution function or angle-resolved light scattering (ARS). In the last decades, a number of instruments have been developed worldwide for the measurement of TS and ARS. However, numerous pitfalls have to be avoided to obtain objective, reliable, and reproducible measurement results. This is, in particular, true for low scatter levels of high-end optical components. Standard procedures that have to be both concise and easy to implement are thus of crucial importance for the optics community. This paper tries to give an overview on existing standards as well as an outlook on new standards that are still being developed. Special emphasis is put on ISO standards jointly developed, reviewed, and revised by the international experts in the field.

  8. Light Scattering at Various Angles

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Paul; Pyle, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Mie theory of scattering is used to provide new information on how changes in particle volume, with no change in dry weight, should influence light scattering for various scattering angles and particle sizes. Many biological cells (e.g., algal cells, erythrocytes) and large subcellular structures (e.g., chloroplasts, mitochondria) in suspension undergo this type of reversible volume change, a change which is related to changes in the rates of cellular processes. A previous study examined the effects of such volume changes on total scattering. In this paper scattering at 10° is found to follow total scattering closely, but scattering at 45°, 90°, 135°, and 170° behaves differently. Small volume changes can cause very large observable changes in large angle scattering if the sample particles are uniform in size; however, the natural particle size heterogeneity of most samples would mask this effect. For heterogeneous samples of most particle size ranges, particle shrink-age is found to increase large angle scattering. PMID:4556610

  9. Scattered Light And Fluorescent Photomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourney, M. E.; Chang, Ban W.

    1987-02-01

    A new technique for determining the stress state in a three-dimensional transparent body is described. This method involves cast-ing dye molecules into a model material and using the fluorescent light to analysis the stress state. The techniques of scattered light photoelasticity and speckle interferometry are considered and the enhancement of these techniques by the use of fluorescent is reported. The amount of illumination is greatly increased and the wavelength red-shifted, which eliminates the undesirable boundary halo; however, at the expense of a loss of coherence and a degree of depolarization of the light. Rhodamine 6G dye molecules are cast into gelatin, epoxy resin (PLM-4) and urethane rubber (Solithane 113) model materials. The light scattering, fluorescent, and fringe formation processes of each material is investigated. It is observed that even for the standard scattered light photoelastic materials without dye molecules the scattering is not Rayleigh, but rather has a large amount of wavelength broadening, the center wavelength, is red-shifted, and a high degree of depolarization occurs. A theory of photoelastic fringe formation for fluorescent materials is proposed. Experimental results are presented and the use of digital image processor in filtering background illumination is shown to greatly enhance fringe visibility.

  10. Virus Characterization by FFF-MALS Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razinkov, Vladimer

    2009-03-01

    Adequate biophysical characterization of influenza virions is important for vaccine development. The influenza virus vaccines are produced from the allantoic fluid of developing chicken embryos. The process of viral replication produces a heterogeneous mixture of infectious and non-infectious viral particles with varying states of aggregation. The study of the relative distribution and behavior of different subpopulations and their inter-correlation can assist in the development of a robust process for a live virus vaccine. This report describes a field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FFF-MALS) method optimized for the analysis of size distribution and total particle counts. A method using a combination of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) and multiangle light scattering (MALS) techniques has been shown to improve the estimation of virus particle counts and the amount of aggregated virus in laboratory samples. The FFF-MALS method was compared with several other methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), size exclusion chromatography followed by MALS (SEC-MALS), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT Q-PCR), median tissue culture dose (TCID(50)), and the fluorescent focus assay (FFA). The correlation between the various methods for determining total particle counts, infectivity and size distribution is reported. The pros and cons of each of the analytical methods are discussed.

  11. Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Hovenier, Joop W.

    1998-01-01

    Improved understanding of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles is important to many science and engineering disciplines and was the subject of the Conference on Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications. The conference was held 29 September-1 October 1998 at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City and brought together 115 participants from 18 countries. The main objective of the conference was to highlight and summarize the rapid advancements in the field, including numerical methods for computing the single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic radiation by nonspherical and heterogeneous particles, measurement approaches, knowledge of characteristic features in scattering patterns, retrieval and remote sensing techniques, nonspherical particle sizing, and various practical applications. The conference consisted of twelve oral and one poster sessions. The presentations were loosely grouped based on broad topical categories. In each of these categories invited review talks highlighted and summarized specific active areas of research. To ensure a high-quality conference, all abstracts submitted had been reviewed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee for technical merit and content. The conference program was published in the June 1998 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society and is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim/conference/program.html. Authors of accepted papers and review presentations contributed to a volume of preprints published by the American Meteorological Society' and distributed to participants at the conference.

  12. Development and qualification of a size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle light scattering method for molecular weight determination of unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Beirne, John; Truchan, Hilary; Rao, Lin

    2011-01-01

    The molecular weight of unfractionated heparin was determined by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with multiangle light scattering (MALS) detection. The SEC/MALS method determines absolute molecular weight directly from the angular dependence of scattered light intensity as a function of concentration and does not rely on molecular weight standards for column calibration. The SEC/MALS method developed at Scientific Protein Laboratories was qualified in terms of specificity, precision, robustness, and accuracy. By eliminating the requirement of well-characterized molecular weight standards derived from heparin, the present procedure represents a clear improvement over the column calibration methods used in molecular weight determination. The SEC/MALS method is suitable for routine quality control of unfractionated heparin. PMID:20838778

  13. Organic photo sensors for multi-angle light scattering characterization of particle systems.

    PubMed

    Sentis, Matthias; Onofri, Fabrice R A; Dhez, Olivier; Laurent, Jean-Yves; Chauchard, Fabien

    2015-10-19

    Organic Photo Sensor (OPS) technology allows printing on conformable plastic-like substrates complex-shaped, arbitrarily-sized and pre-aligned photosensitive elements. This article reports, to the best of our knowledge, the first investigation to implement this emerging technology for Multi-Angle Light Scattering (MALS) characterization of nano- and microparticle suspensions. Monte Carlo and Lorenz-Mie theory calculations as well as preliminary experimental results on latex suspensions clearly demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach. PMID:26480413

  14. Dynamic light scattering homodyne probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Inventor); Cannell, David S. (Inventor); Smart, Anthony E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical probe for analyzing a sample illuminated by a laser includes an input optical fiber operably connectable to the laser where the input optical fiber has an entrance end and an exit end. The probe also includes a first beam splitter where the first beam splitter is adapted to transmit an alignment portion of a light beam from the input fiber exit end and to reflect a homodyning portion of the light beam from the input fiber. The probe also includes a lens between the input fiber exit end and the first beam splitter and a first and a second output optical fiber, each having an entrance end and an exit end, each exit end being operably connectable to respective optical detectors. The probe also includes a second beam splitter which is adapted to reflect at least a portion of the reflected homodyning portion into the output fiber entrance ends and to transmit light from the laser scattered by the sample into the entrance ends.

  15. Light scattering of degenerate fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.; Leblanc, L. J.; Myrskog, S.; Extavour, M. H. T.; McKay, D.; Stummer, A.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2006-05-01

    We report on progress in measuring the suppression of resonant light scattering in a gas of degenerate fermions. A gas of trapped degenerate fermions is expected to exhibit narrower optical linewidths and longer excited state lifetimes than single atoms when the Fermi energy is larger than the photon recoil energy [1-3]. In this case, the number of available states into which a scattered atom can recoil is significantly reduced due to the filling of the Fermi sea. We produce a degenerate gas of 4x10^4 ultra-cold fermionic ^40K atoms by sympathetic cooling with bosonic ^87Rb in a micro-magnetic chip trap. The atoms can then be loaded into a tight dipole trap just above the surface of the chip and probed with a near resonance laser pulse. [1] Th. Busch, J. R. Anglin, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Europhys. Lett. 44, 1 (1998). [2] B. DeMarco and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. A 58, R4267 (1998). [3] J. Javanainen and J. Ruostekosky, Phys. Rev. A 52, 3033 (1995). Work supported by NSERC, CFI, OIT, Research Corporation, and PRO.

  16. Biological cell classification by multiangle light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, G.C.; Crowell, J.M.; Mullaney, P.F.

    1975-06-03

    The specification is directed to an apparatus and method for detecting light scattering from a biological cell. Light, preferably from a coherent source of radiation, intercepts an individual biological cell in a stream of cells passing through the beam. Light scattered from the cell is detected at a selected number of angles between 0 and 90/sup 0/ to the longitudinal axis of the beam with a circular array of light responsive elements which produce signals representative of the intensity of light incident thereon. Signals from the elements are processed to determine the light-scattering pattern of the cell and therefrom its identity.

  17. Light scattering from dislocations in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, Vanessa; Capello, Luciana; Kononchuk, Oleg; Pichaud, Bernard

    2010-11-01

    Nondecorated glide dislocations in Czochralski grown silicon have been studied by laser scattering tomography technique. Dependence of intensity of scattered light on polarization of the incident light has been measured for different orientations of the dislocation line and Burgers vector. Detailed theory of light scattering by dislocation in silicon crystals is presented. It is shown that by combination of polarization and tomography measurements it is possible to determine slip system of nondecorated mixed dislocation in Si.

  18. Light scattering by randomly oriented spheroidal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asano, S.; Sato, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the light scattering properties of randomly oriented, identical spheroidal particles is presented. A computation method was developed to integrate the Asano and Yamomoto solution (1975) for scattering from a homogeneous spheroid over all particle orientations; the extinction and scattering cross-sections, the asymmetry factor, and scattering matrix elements are calculated for randomly oriented prolate and oblate spheroids and compared with the calculations for spheres and laboratory measurements. The angular scattering behavior of spheroids is found to be different from that of the spheres for side scattering to backscattering directions, and prolate and oblate spheroids of the same shape parameter have similar angular scattering patterns.

  19. Theory of Light Scattering in Axion Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    Taking account of the axion term in the Maxwell Lagrangian, we present a rigorous theory of light scattering in piecewise-constant axion fields. In particular, we focus on axionic substances with confined and/or curved geometries, and the scattering matrices of an axionic slab, cylinder, and sphere are derived analytically. The axion term generates a surface current with off-diagonal optical conductivity, giving rise to a new type of photospin--orbit interaction. As a result, various novel light-scattering phenomena can take place. We demonstrate enhanced Faraday rotation, parity-violating light scattering, and strong perturbation of dipole radiation.

  20. Forward-peaked scattering of polarized light.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julia P; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-11-15

    Polarized light propagation in a multiple scattering medium is governed by the vector radiative transfer equation. We analyze the vector radiative transfer equation in asymptotic limit of forward-peaked scattering and derive an approximate system of equations for the Stokes parameters, which we call the vector Fokker-Planck approximation. The vector Fokker-Planck approximation provides valuable insight into several outstanding issues regarding the forward-peaked scattering of polarized light such as the polarization memory phenomenon. PMID:25490484

  1. Bidirectional scattering of light from tree leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Smith, James A.; Harnden, Joann M.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory goniometer consisting of an He-Ne laser (632.8 nm), vertical leaf holder, and silicon photovoltaic detector was used to measure the bidirectional scattering (both transmittance and reflectance) of red oak and red maple. The illumination angles were 0, 30, and 60 deg, and the scattering was recorded approximately every 10 deg in the principal plane. The scattering profiles obtained show the non-Lambertian characteristics of the scattering, particularly for the off-nadir illumination directions. The transmitted light was more isotropic than the reflected light.

  2. Light-scattering theory of diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Since diffraction is a scattering process in principle, light propagation through one aperture in a screen is discussed in the light-scattering theory. Through specific calculation, the expression of the electric field observed at an observation point is obtained and is used not only to explain why Kirchhoff's diffraction theory is a good approximation when the screen is both opaque and sufficiently thin but also to demonstrate that the mathematical and physical problems faced by Kirchhoff's theory are avoided in the light-scattering theory. PMID:20208939

  3. Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Correction of sunspot intensities for scattered light usually involves fitting theoretical curves to observed aureoles (Zwaan, 1965; Staveland, 1970, 1972). In this paper we examine the inaccuracies in the determination of scattered light by this method. Earlier analyses are extended to examine uncertainties due to the choice of the expression for limb darkening. For the spread function, we consider Lorentzians and Gaussians for which analytic expressions for the aureole can be written down. Lorentzians lead to divergence and normalization difficulties, and should not be used in scattered light determinations. Gaussian functions are more suitable.

  4. Microscopic Imaging and Spectroscopy with Scattered Light

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Optical contrast based on elastic scattering interactions between light and matter can be used to probe cellular structure and dynamics, and image tissue architecture. The quantitative nature and high sensitivity of light scattering signals to subtle alterations in tissue morphology, as well as the ability to visualize unstained tissue in vivo, has recently generated significant interest in optical scatter based biosensing and imaging. Here we review the fundamental methodologies used to acquire and interpret optical scatter data. We report on recent findings in this field and present current advances in optical scatter techniques and computational methods. Cellular and tissue data enabled by current advances in optical scatter spectroscopy and imaging stand to impact a variety of biomedical applications including clinical tissue diagnosis, in vivo imaging, drug discovery and basic cell biology. PMID:20617940

  5. Factors Influencing Light Scattering in the Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikaunieks, G.; Ozolinsh, M.; Stepanovs, A.; Lejiete, V.; Reva, N.

    2009-01-01

    Our vision in the twilight or dark is strongly affected by the intraocular light scattering (straylight). Of especial importance is to assess this phenomenon in view of the night driving. The authors have studied the spectral dependence of retinal stray-light and estimated the possibility to reduce it with yellow filters and small apertures. For the measurements the direct compensation flicker method was used. The results show that this spectral dependence is close to Rayleigh's scattering (∝λ-4). As could be expected from the known data, the yellow filter should reduce retinal straylight, especially for blue light. However, in the experiments this scattering was not removed with such a filter but instead slightly increased. The optical apertures reduced light scattering in the eye, especially for red color.

  6. Deep Water Cherenkov Light Scatter Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, L; Petta, C.; Russo, G.V.

    2000-12-31

    The relevant parameters for the site choice of an underwater neutrino's telescope are discussed. The in situ measurement of the scattering distribution of the cherenkov light requires a suitable experimental setup. Its main features are described here.

  7. Light scattering and birefrigence by magnetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Jacobson, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The bacterium Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum grows its own internal single domain magnets. For a number of reasons, these magnets make the bacterium an extremely interesting scattering particle. We are engaging in light scattering and birefringence studies on Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Microscope spectrometer for light scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, Aude; Lopez-Rios, Tomas; Dumont, Sylvain; Gay, Frederic; Quemerais, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We describe a setup including a microscope to study volumes of a few {mu}m{sup 3} by static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) in a backscattering configuration. Light scattered by individual objects of micrometric size can be analyzed in the 400-800 nm spectral range. This setup can also be employed to study both diluted and concentrated colloidal solutions by DLS measurements. For diluted solutions we found evidence of the fluctuations of the number of particles in a confocal volume. We discuss their contribution to the autocorrelation function of the scattered intensity measured as a function of time.

  9. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  10. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  11. The Whiteness of Things and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Calza, G.; Oss, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss some simple experiments dealing with intriguing properties of light and its interaction with matter. In particular, we show how to emphasize that light reflection, refraction and scattering can provide a proper, physical description of human perception of the "colour" white. These experiments can be used in the classroom with an enquiry…

  12. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  13. Polarization of light scattered by clover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woessner, Paul; Hapke, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to better understand the factors that govern the polarization of light scattered from vegetation and soils. This phenomenon is not well understood but is potentially of interest for remote sensing of the earth. The intensity and polarization of light scattered by clover in vivo and soil were measured at a number of different angles of incidence and reflectance. Both individual leaves and natural patches of vegetation were measured. The Umov effect, or inverse relation between polarization and reflectance noted by many earlier workers, was observed here and is shown to be a very general property of diffusely scattering surfaces. The light transmitted through the leaves was found to be negatively polarized. The polarization of light scattered from aggregations of leaves is affected by this negatively polarized, transmitted light. The light scattered from the upper leaf surfaces was found to be positively polarized in a manner which could be accounted for quantitatively by specular Fresnel reflection from small, randomly oriented facets on the surfaces of the leaves.

  14. Circularly symmetric light scattering from nanoplasmonic spirals.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Jacob; Cao, Hui; Dal Negro, Luca

    2011-05-11

    In this paper, we combine experimental dark-field imaging, scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy with rigorous electrodynamics calculations in order to investigate light scattering from planar arrays of Au nanoparticles arranged in aperiodic spirals with diffuse, circularly symmetric Fourier space. In particular, by studying the three main types of Vogel's spirals fabricated by electron-beam lithography on quartz substrates, we demonstrate polarization-insensitive planar light diffraction in the visible spectral range. Moreover, by combining dark-field imaging with analytical multiparticle calculations in the framework of the generalized Mie theory, we show that plasmonic spirals support distinctive structural resonances with circular symmetry carrying orbital angular momentum. The engineering of light scattering phenomena in deterministic structures with circular Fourier space provides a novel strategy for the realization of optical devices that fully leverage on enhanced, polarization-insensitive light-matter coupling over planar surfaces, such as thin-film plasmonic solar cells, plasmonic polarization devices, and optical biosensors. PMID:21466155

  15. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  16. Light Scattering Study on SWNTs Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Liu, Tao; Veedu Sreekumar, T.; Kumar, Satish; Tannenbaum, Rina; Moore, Vallerie; Hauge, R. H.; Smalley, R. E.

    2003-03-01

    SWNT/Oleum dispersions are being used to form film and fibers showing high electrical conductivity. PVP wrapped SWNTs have also been dissolved in aqueous medium. Light scattering studies have been performed in this study to understand the nanotube dispersion on both SWNT/Oleum as well as PVP/SWNT/surfactant/water dispersions. Preliminary studies on PVP wrapped SWNTs/water and SWNTs/oleum dispersion system show the existence of a critical concentration (c*) of SWNTs. Below c*, the detected scattering intensity increases with concentration; and above c*, the detected scattering intensity decreases with concentration. This observed phenomenon is attributed to the competition of scattering and strong absorption of SWNTs to visible light. Based on this study, level of SWNT dispersion is being studied. Results of these studies will be reported.

  17. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  18. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V; Sellountos, Euripides J; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 < or = n < or = 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail. PMID:11900021

  19. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  20. An automatic light scattering CCN counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    The counter is a static thermal diffusion chamber which has been modified to include an optical system for the determination of droplet concentration by the measurement of scattered light. The determination of concentration is made by measurement of the peak scattered light signal from the cloud of growing droplets which is a function of both the droplet concentration and chamber supersaturation. Because the formation of the peak is related to the rate of growth of the droplets and sedimentation, both of which are determined by supersaturation, the system calibration can be uniquely determined by comparison with an absolute counter such as a static diffusion chamber with a photographic recording system.

  1. An automatic light scattering CCN counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, G. G.

    1981-11-01

    The counter is a static thermal diffusion chamber which has been modified to include an optical system for the determination of droplet concentration by the measurement of scattered light. The determination of concentration is made by measurement of the peak scattered light signal from the cloud of growing droplets which is a function of both the droplet concentration and chamber supersaturation. Because the formation of the peak is related to the rate of growth of the droplets and sedimentation, both of which are determined by supersaturation, the system calibration can be uniquely determined by comparison with an absolute counter such as a static diffusion chamber with a photographic recording system.

  2. Flexible detection optics for light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratuta, Victor G.; Hurd, Alan J.; Meyer, Robert B.

    1984-05-01

    We have designed and built a compact, modular apparatus for the collection, viewing, and detection of scattered light for less than 1200, based on a commercially available optical bench. The novelty of our instrument is that it has the flexibility of modular design while allowing the user to see exactly what is happening: both the real image of the sample and the spatial coherence of the scattered light can be examined. There is built-in control over polarization, filtering, magnification, and other parameters.

  3. Light scattering from cylindrical structures on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taubenblatt, M A

    1990-03-01

    Light scattering from a dielectric cylindrical structure on a surface by a plane wave with field vector along the cylinder axis is calculated with a modification of the coupled-dipole method. The interaction matrix is calculated with the use of both the direct contribution of a polarization current filament and its reflection from the surface. The reflected cylindrical waves are computed with the use of the Sommerfeld-type integral expression. Light scattering from structures of arbitrary cross section and the size of the order of a wavelength can be quickly determined with this method. PMID:19759774

  4. Study on neutron scattering in light water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotta, Juan Pablo; Marquez Damian, Ignacio; Noguere, Gilles; Bernard, David

    2016-03-01

    It is presented a method to produce covariance matrices of the light water total cross section from thermal scattering laws of the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and CAB model. The generalized least square method was used to fit the LEAPR module parameters of the processing tool NJOY with light water experimental transmission measurements at 293.6K with CONRAD code. The marginalization technique was applied to account for systematic uncertainties.

  5. The whiteness of things and light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Calzà, G.; Oss, S.

    2009-07-01

    We discuss some simple experiments dealing with intriguing properties of light and its interaction with matter. In particular, we show how to emphasize that light reflection, refraction and scattering can provide a proper, physical description of human perception of the 'colour' white. These experiments can be used in the classroom with an enquiry approach, and it is in this spirit that we will present them.

  6. Light scattering by a reentrant fractal surface.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Suárez, A; Méndez, E R

    1997-05-20

    Recently, rigorous numerical techniques for treating light scattering problems with one-dimensional rough surfaces have been developed. In their usual formulation, these techniques are based on the solution of two coupled integral equations and are applicable only to surfaces whose profiles can be described by single-valued functions of a coordinate in the mean plane of the surface. In this paper we extend the applicability of the integral equation method to surfaces with multivalued profiles. A procedure for finding a parametric description of a given profile is described, and the scattering equations are established within the framework of this formalism. We then present some results of light scattering from a sequence of one-dimensional flat surfaces with defects in the form of triadic Koch curves. Beyond a certain order of the prefractal, the scattering patterns become stationary (within the numerical accuracy of the method). It can then be argued that the results obtained correspond to a surface with a fractal structure. These constitute, to our knowledge, the first rigorous calculations of light scattering from a reentrant fractal surface. PMID:18253371

  7. Light scattering by randomly oriented crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Lumme, Kari; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Irvine, William M.

    The scattering phase function and the degree of linear polarization for small crystals oriented randomly in space have been computed using the geometric ray tracing theory and assuming that the crystals are homogeneous and isotropic. Calculations have been carried out for the main crystal geometries. Detection of halos from crystals other than hexagonal water ice is briefly discussed. The crystal size and shape parameters have also been averaged over some simple distributions in order to examine general light scattering properties of sharp-edged particles. A scalar physical optics correction has been developed for the geometric optics phase functions. Results can be applied to light scattering from regoliths and planetary rings, and possibly also to atmospheric halos. Retroreflecting crystals in the regolith would cause an opposition spike, a phenomenon observed for many bright satellites.

  8. Light scattering by randomly oriented crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muinonen, Karri; Lumme, Kari; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Irvine, William M.

    1989-01-01

    The scattering phase function and the degree of linear polarization for small crystals oriented randomly in space have been computed using the geometric ray tracing theory and assuming that the crystals are homogeneous and isotropic. Calculations have been carried out for the main crystal geometries. Detection of halos from crystals other than hexagonal water ice is briefly discussed. The crystal size and shape parameters have also been averaged over some simple distributions in order to examine general light scattering properties of sharp-edged particles. A scalar physical optics correction has been developed for the geometric optics phase functions. Results can be applied to light scattering from regoliths and planetary rings, and possibly also to atmospheric halos. Retroreflecting crystals in the regolith would cause an opposition spike, a phenomenon observed for many bright satellites.

  9. Light scattering from diatomaceous earth aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Jennifer M.; Meland, B.; Laskina, Olga; Young, M. A.; Grassian, V. H.; Kleiber, P. D.

    2013-08-01

    The light scattering and extinction properties of mineral aerosol are strongly affected by dust particle shape. In this work, scattering phase function and polarization profiles of diatomaceous earth aerosol are measured at a wavelength of 550 nm, and the results are compared to T-matrix theory based simulations using uniform spheroid models for the particle shape. The particle shape distribution is determined by spectral fitting of the experimental infrared (IR) extinction spectral line profile for diatomaceous earth dust. It is found that a particle shape model that peaks toward both extreme rod-like and disk-like shapes results in the best fits to the IR spectral data. This particle shape model is then used as a basis for modeling the visible light scattering properties. While the visible simulations show only modestly good agreement with the data, the fits are generally better than those obtained using more commonly invoked particle shape distributions.

  10. Immunoassay control method based on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander I.; Kiselyov, Eugene M.; Petrina, R. O.; Ferensovich, Yaroslav P.; Yaremyk, Roman Y.

    1999-11-01

    The physics principle of registration immune reaction by light scattering methods is concerned. The operation of laser nephelometry for measuring antigen-antibody reaction is described. The technique of obtaining diagnostic and immune reactions of interaction latex agglutination for diphtheria determination is described.

  11. Light fractionation increases the efficacy of ALA-PDT but not of MAL-PDT: What is the role of (vascular) endothelial cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, H. S.; de Vijlder, H. C.; de Haas, E. R. M.; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, A.; Kruijt, B.; Poel-Dirks, D.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; ten Hagen, T. L. M.; Robinson, D. J.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using protoporpyrin IX (PpIX) precursors like 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) has shown to be effective in the treatment of various skin diseases. Using ALA we have shown in numerous studies a significantly improved efficacy by applying light fractionation with a long dark interval. In contrast, in the hairless mouse model, the PDT efficacy using MAL is unaffected by adopting this approach. More acute edema is found after ALA-PDT suggesting a difference in response of endothelial cells to PDT. To investigate the role of endothelial cells, cryo-sections of hairless mouse skin after 4 hours of topical MAL or ALA application were stained with a fluorescent endothelial cell marker (CD31). Co-localization of this marker with the PpIX fluorescence was performed using the spectral imaging function of the confocal microscope. We have also used intra-vital confocal microscopy to image the PpIX fluorescence distribution in correlation with the vasculature of live mouse skin. Our results show PpIX fluorescence at depth in cryo-sections of mouse skin after 4 hours of topical application. Co-localization has shown to be difficult due to the changes in tissue organization caused by the staining procedure. As expected we found high PpIX fluorescence levels in the epidermis after both MAL and ALA application using intra-vital microscopy. After ALA application more PpIX fluorescence was found deep in the dermal layer of the skin than after MAL. Furthermore we detected localized fluorescence in unidentified structures that could not be correlated to blood vessels or nerves.

  12. Depolymerization study of sodium hyaluronate by flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Hye; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2009-09-01

    Thermal depolymerization of ultrahigh-molecular-weight (UHMW) sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) was studied systematically by using frit-inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle light scattering/differential refractive index (FI-AFlFFF/MALS/DRI). FI-AFlFFF was utilized for the size separation of NaHA samples which had been thermally degraded for varied treatment times, followed by light-scattering detection to determine MW and structural information of degraded NaHA products. Analysis of NaHA products showed time-dependent depolymerization of raw molecules into smaller-MW components, as well as unfolding of compact structures of UHMW NaHA. To determine whether the observed decrease in MW of sodium hyaluronate originated from the chain degradation of UHMW molecules or from dissociation of entangled complex particles that may have been formed by intermolecular association, narrow size fractions (1 x 10(7)-6 x 10(7) and >6 x 10(7) MW) of NaHA molecules were collected during FlFFF separation and followed by thermal treatment. Subsequent FI-AFlFFF/MALS analysis of collected fractions after thermal treatment suggested that the ultrahigh-MW region (>10(7) Da) of NaHA is likely to result from supermolecular structures formed by aggregation of large molecules. PMID:19649622

  13. Scattered light in the STIS echelle modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Bowers, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) echelle spectra obtained during the Early Release Observations have non-zero residuals in the cores of saturated interstellar lines, indicating the need for a scattered light correction. A rough measure of the magnitude of the needed correction shows the ratio of the interorder to the in-order flux in different echelle modes in both pre-launch calibration images of a continuum lamp source and in post-launch images of stellar continuum sources. The interorder and in-order fluxes are computed by averaging the central 200 pixels in the dispersion direction. The amount of scattered light in the interorder region rises toward shorter wavelengths for two reasons: (1) the order separation decreases toward shorter wavelengths; and (2) the amount of echelle scattering is expected to have an inverse dependence on wavelength. At the shortest wavelengths the fraction of light scattered into the interorder region can be 10% for the Near-ultraviolet-Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (NUV-MAMA) and 15% for the Far-ultraviolet-Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (FUV-MAMA).

  14. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV. PMID:26409772

  15. Dynamic Light Scattering From Colloidal Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krall, A. H.; Weitz, David A.

    1996-01-01

    We present a brief, preliminary account of the interpretation of dynamic light scattering from fractal colloidal gels. For small scattering angles, and for high initial colloid particle volume fractions, the correlation functions exhibit arrested decay, reflecting the non-ergodic nature of these systems and allowing us to directly determine the elastic modulus of the gels. For smaller initial volume fractions, the correlation functions decay completely. In all cases, the initial decay is not exponential, but is instead described by a stretched exponential. We summarize the principles of a model that accounts for these data and discuss the scaling behavior of the measured parameters.

  16. Multiple Light Scattering Probes of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffold, Frank

    2007-02-01

    I will discuss both static and dynamic properties of diffuse waves. In practical applications the optical properties of colloidal systems play an important role, for example in commercial products such as sunscreen lotions, food (drinks), coatings but also in medicine for example in cataract formation (eye lens turbidity). It is thus of importance to know the key parameters governing optical turbidity from the single to the multiple scattering regime. Temporal fluctuations of multiply scattered light are studied with photon correlation spectroscopy (Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy). This DWS method and its various implementations will be treated.

  17. Light scattering by cirrus cloud layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K.-N.

    1972-01-01

    The properties of the reflection, transmission, and absorption of the cirrus cloud layers are calculated under the assumption that the ice crystals in cirrus clouds may be approximated long circular cylinders randomly oriented in space. The phase function, the single scattering albedo, and the extinction cross section are obtained on the basis of Liou's (1972) calculations of light scattering by ice clouds in the visible and infrared. A modified two-stream approximation for radiative transfer is developed and is used to evaluate the radiative properties of the cirrus cloud layers.

  18. Scattering of dark particles with light mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Davison E.; Spannowsky, Michael; Wallace, Chris J.; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a treatment of the high energy scattering of dark Dirac fermions from nuclei, mediated by the exchange of a light vector boson. The dark fermions are produced by proton-nucleus interactions in a fixed target and, after traversing shielding that screens out strongly interacting products, appear similarly to neutrino neutral current scattering in a detector. Using the Fermilab experiment E613 as an example, we place limits on a secluded dark matter scenario. Visible scattering in the detector includes both the familiar regime of large momentum transfer to the nucleus (Q2) described by deeply inelastic scattering, as well as small Q2 kinematics described by the exchanged vector mediator fluctuating into a quark-antiquark pair whose interaction with the nucleus is described by a saturation model. We find that the improved description of the low Q2 scattering leads to important corrections, resulting in more robust constraints in a regime where a description entirely in terms of deeply inelastic scattering cannot be trusted.

  19. Atmospheric particulate analysis using angular light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Using the light scattering matrix elements measured by a polar nephelometer, a procedure for estimating the characteristics of atmospheric particulates was developed. A theoretical library data set of scattering matrices derived from Mie theory was tabulated for a range of values of the size parameter and refractive index typical of atmospheric particles. Integration over the size parameter yielded the scattering matrix elements for a variety of hypothesized particulate size distributions. A least squares curve fitting technique was used to find a best fit from the library data for the experimental measurements. This was used as a first guess for a nonlinear iterative inversion of the size distributions. A real index of 1.50 and an imaginary index of -0.005 are representative of the smoothed inversion results for the near ground level atmospheric aerosol in Tucson.

  20. Laser light scattering in eye lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, Nadezhda L.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.

    2000-11-01

    Theoretical investigations of laser light radiation scattered by eye lens model as a system of spheres with various parameters were performed on the base of Mie theory of electromagnetic scattering by a single sphere. The calculations were performed for systems of particles whose coordinates were specifically realized in random fashion according to the specified probabilities defined by the approximation of hard spheres. The modeling of lens biotissue was carried out by using of medical data about internal structure of lens of human and some animals. In general the researchable model presents the system of homogeneous spherical particles those are randomly distributed in the layer of thickness. We study the optical properties such as scattering effective cross-section and function of correlation in different models.

  1. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  3. Bacterial Identification Using Light Scattering Measurements: a Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The light scattering properties of single bacterial cells were examined as a possible means of identification. Three species were studied with streptococcus faecalis exhibiting a unique pattern; the light-scattering traces for staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli were quite similar although differences existed. Based on preliminary investigations, the light scattering approach appeared promising with additional research needed to include a wide variety of bacterial species, computer capability to handle and analyze data, and expansion of light scattering theory to include bacterial cells.

  4. Improved Optics For Quasi-Elastic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Harry Michael

    1995-01-01

    Improved optical train devised for use in light-scattering measurements of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and laser spectroscopy. Measurements performed on solutions, microemulsions, micellular solutions, and colloidal dispersions. Simultaneous measurements of total intensity and fluctuations in total intensity of light scattered from sample at various angles provides data used, in conjunction with diffusion coefficients, to compute sizes of particles in sample.

  5. Modeling light scattering from diesel soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia; Shepherd, Ian; Hunt, Arlon

    2002-07-16

    The Mie model is widely used to analyze light scattering from particulate aerosols. The Diesel Particle Scatterometer (DPS), for example, determines the size and optical properties of diesel exhaust particles that are characterized by measuring three angle-dependent elements of the Mueller scattering matrix. These elements are then fitted using Mie calculations with a Levenburg-Marquardt optimization program. This approach has achieved good fits for most experimental data. However, in many cases, the predicted real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction were less than that for solid carbon. To understand this result and explain the experimental data, we present an assessment of the Mie model by use of a light scattering model based on the coupled dipole approximation. The results indicate that the Mie calculation can be used to determine the largest dimension of irregularly shaped particles at sizes characteristic of Diesel soot and, for particles of known refractive index, tables can be constructed to determine the average porosity of the particles from the predicted index of refraction.

  6. The new IAA Light Scattering Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Molina, A.; Guirado, D.; Ramos, J. L.; López, A.; Girela, F.; Costillo, L. P.

    2005-05-01

    We are building up a light scattering setup at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA), Granada, Spain. The design of this new setup is based on the well known apparatus currently located at the Astronomical Institute "Anton Pannekoek", University of Amsterdam, The Neteherlands [1],[2]. By using a polarization modulation technique, all scattering matrix elements as function of the scattering angle are obtained from 8 separate measurement runs. In this new setup we use an Argon-Kripton laser (483 nm, 488 nm, 514 nm, 568 nm, and 647 nm) as light source. The detectors are mounted on dove tails that allow their movement backward and forward. In addition, the detectors have been designed to minimize blockage of the laser beam at positions close to the forward and backward directions. In this way we intend to do measurements covering an angle range from 3 to 177 degrees. The alignment of the optics is automatically done and controlled from the computer reducing the measurement time.

  7. Measurement of light scattering in deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, N.; Balasi, K.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-04-01

    The deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, being prepared by the KM3NET collaboration, will contain thousands of optical sensors to readout. The accurate knowledge of the optical properties of deep-sea water is of great importance for the neutrino event reconstruction process. In this study we describe our progress in designing an experimental setup and studying a method to measure the parameters describing the absorption and scattering characteristics of deep-sea water. Three PMTs will be used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted from six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum. The technique for the evaluation of the parameters is based on Monte Carlo simulations and our results show that we are able to determine these parameters with satisfying precision.

  8. Light Scattering Study of Titania Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Choonghoon; Sorensen, Chris

    1997-03-01

    We studied the fractal morphology of titania aerosols by light scattering. Titania aerosols were generated by the thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a silica tube furnace. TTIP was evaporated at temperatures up to 80^circC and its vapor was carried by dry nitrogen to a furnace with temperature in the range of 400 - 600^circC. A TEM analysis of the generated particles showed a typical DLCA structure with a monomer diameter about 50 nm. The particles were then made to flow through a narrow outlet as a laminar stream. The light scattering from these particles was measured using a He-Ne laser as a light source. The measured structure factor clearly showed the Rayleigh, Guinier, and fractal regimes. The fractal morphological parameters, such as the cluster radius of gyration, the fractal dimension, and the fractal prefactor were studied from the structure factor as a function of particle generation conditions. The cluster radius of gyration was about 1 μm and showed a modest dependency on the generation conditions. The fractal dimension was about 1.7 in all cases. These results are in good agreement with the TEM analysis.

  9. LIGHT SCATTERING FROM EXOPLANET OCEANS AND ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Zugger, M. E.; Kane, T. J.; Kasting, J. F.; Williams, D. M.; Philbrick, C. R.

    2010-11-10

    Orbital variation in reflected starlight from exoplanets could eventually be used to detect surface oceans. Exoplanets with rough surfaces, or dominated by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering, should reach peak brightness in full phase, orbital longitude (OL) = 180{sup 0}, whereas ocean planets with transparent atmospheres should reach peak brightness in crescent phase near OL = 30{sup 0}. Application of Fresnel theory to a planet with no atmosphere covered by a calm ocean predicts a peak polarization fraction of 1 at OL = 74{sup 0}; however, our model shows that clouds, wind-driven waves, aerosols, absorption, and Rayleigh scattering in the atmosphere and within the water column dilute the polarization fraction and shift the peak to other OLs. Observing at longer wavelengths reduces the obfuscation of the water polarization signature by Rayleigh scattering but does not mitigate the other effects. Planets with thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres reach peak polarization near OL = 90{sup 0}, but clouds and Lambertian surface scattering dilute and shift this peak to smaller OL. A shifted Rayleigh peak might be mistaken for a water signature unless data from multiple wavelength bands are available. Our calculations suggest that polarization alone may not positively identify the presence of an ocean under an Earth-like atmosphere; however, polarization adds another dimension which can be used, in combination with unpolarized orbital light curves and contrast ratios, to detect extrasolar oceans, atmospheric water aerosols, and water clouds. Additionally, the presence and direction of the polarization vector could be used to determine planet association with the star, and constrain orbit inclination.

  10. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bihui; Cooper, John; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random-walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low-light-intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity, and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low-intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the line shape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions, including atomic clocks, quantum simulators, and nanophotonic systems.

  11. Atom-interferometric studies of light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Yavin, I.

    2009-07-15

    We have used an echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in a single ground state to investigate the effect of light scattering from pulsed and continuous-wave light. The interferometer uses two off-resonant standing-wave pulses applied at times t=0 and t=T to diffract and recombine momentum states separated by 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k at t=2T. Matter wave interference is associated with the formation of a density grating with period {lambda}/2 in the vicinity of this echo time. The grating contrast is measured by recording the intensity of coherently backscattered light. The interferometer is perturbed by an additional pulse applied at t=2T-{delta}T or by continuous-wave background light. If the additional pulse is a standing wave, the momentum states interfering at t=2T are displaced and the grating contrast can be completely recovered due to constructive interference. In this case, the contrast shows a periodic modulation at the atomic recoil frequency as a function of {delta}T. In a recent work, it was shown that the atomic recoil frequency can be measured easily and precisely when using coherence functions to model the signal shape. This paper provides an alternative description of the signal shape through an analytical calculation of echo formation in the presence of an additional standing-wave pulse. Using this treatment, it is possible to model the effects of spontaneous emission and spatial profile of the laser beam on the signal shape. Additionally, the theory predicts scaling laws as a function of the pulse area and the number of additional standing-wave pulses. These scaling laws are investigated experimentally and can be exploited to improve precision measurements of the atomic recoil frequency. We also show that coherence functions can be used to make a direct measurement of the populations of momentum states associated with the ground state under conditions where the Doppler-broadened velocity distribution of the sample is much

  12. Light Scattering From Fractal Titania Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Rajiv; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    1996-03-01

    We studied the fractal morphology of titania aggregates by light scattering. Titanium dioxide particles were generated by the thermal decomposition of titanium tetra-isopropoxide(TTIP) in a glass furnace at various temperatures in the range of 100 - 500^o C. We scattered vertically polarized He-Ne laser (λ = 6328Ålight from a laminar aerosol stream of particles and measured the optical structure factor. This structure factor shows Rayleigh, Guinier, fractal and Porod regimes. The radius of gyration Rg was determined from the Guinier analysis. The data were then fit to the Fisher-Burford form to determine the fractal dimension of about 2.0. This fit also delineated the crossover from the fractal to Porod regime, which can be used to determine the monomer particle size of about 0.1 μm. These optical measurements will be compared to electron microscope analysis of aggregates collected from the aerosol. This work was supported by NSF grant CTS-9908153.

  13. LIGHT SCATTERING: Fast path-integration technique in simulation of light propagation through highly scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, Aleksandr V.; Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2004-06-01

    Based on the path-integration technique and the Metropolis method, the original calculation scheme is developed for solving the problem of light propagation through highly scattering objects. The elimination of calculations of 'unnecessary' realisations and the phenomenological description of processes of multiple small-angle scattering provided a drastic increase (by nine and more orders of magnitude) in the calculation rate, retaining the specific features of the problem (consideration of spatial inhomogeneities, boundary conditions, etc.). The scheme allows one to verify other fast calculation algorithms and to obtain information required to reconstruct the internal structure of highly scattering objects (of size ~1000 scattered lengths and more) by the method of diffusion optical tomography.

  14. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  15. A Study of Brownian Motion Using Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noel A.; Lunacek, Joseph H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes an apparatus designed to investigate molecular motion by means of light scattering. Light from a He-Ne laser is focused into a cell containing a suspension of polystyrene spheres. The scattered light, collected on the photosurface of a photomultiplier tube, is analyzed. The apparatus won first prize in Demonstration Lecture Apparatus in…

  16. Fourier-transform light scattering of individual colloidal clusters.

    PubMed

    Yu, HyeonSeung; Park, HyunJoo; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Mahn Won; Park, YongKeun

    2012-07-01

    We present measurements of the scalar-field light scattering of individual dimer, trimer, and tetrahedron shapes among colloidal clusters. By measuring the electric field with quantitative phase imaging at the sample plane and then numerically propagating to the far-field scattering plane, the two-dimensional light-scattering patterns from individual colloidal clusters are effectively and precisely retrieved. The measured scattering patterns are consistent with simulated patterns calculated from the generalized multiparticle Mie solution. PMID:22743460

  17. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Bennett N.; James, Robert H.; Calogero, Don; Ilev, Ilko K.

    2015-09-01

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  18. A novel full-angle scanning light scattering profiler to quantitatively evaluate forward and backward light scattering from intraocular lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett N.; James, Robert H.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Calogero, Don

    2015-09-15

    Glare, glistenings, optical defects, dysphotopsia, and poor image quality are a few of the known deficiencies of intraocular lenses (IOLs). All of these optical phenomena are related to light scatter. However, the specific direction that light scatters makes a critical difference between debilitating glare and a slightly noticeable decrease in image quality. Consequently, quantifying the magnitude and direction of scattered light is essential to appropriately evaluate the safety and efficacy of IOLs. In this study, we introduce a full-angle scanning light scattering profiler (SLSP) as a novel approach capable of quantitatively evaluating the light scattering from IOLs with a nearly 360° view. The SLSP method can simulate in situ conditions by controlling the parameters of the light source including angle of incidence. This testing strategy will provide a more effective nonclinical approach for the evaluation of IOL light scatter.

  19. Aggregation behavior of illite using light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Derrendinger, L.; Sposito, G.

    1995-12-01

    Stable environmental particles can be at the origin of facilitated transport of metals and organic compounds, especially contaminants. We investigated the destabilization (aggregation) kinetics of both a reference and a soil clay mineral: Imt-1 (Silver Hill) illite and Hanford soil illite, respectively. Dynamic and static light scattering was used to follow the aggregation kinetics and infer the structure of the resulting clusters. Kinetics curves showed exponential and power-law shapes, corresponding respectively to reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes. The fractal dimension of the clusters showed no observable change with the change of aggregation regime, its value always being between 2.10 and 2.25 ({plus_minus}0.12). The change in aggregation regime for Na-illite (or ccc) was measured to be 45 mol.m{sup -3}.

  20. Improved optics for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, H. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Laser light scattering experiments contemplated for use in a microgravity environment must conform to a number of operational constraints which do not apply on Earth. In particular, the use of index matching fluid to control flare is unacceptable. Work to eliminate index matching fluids by the use of high spatial resolution receiving optics is described. By increasing on-axis spatial resolution flare from the sample cell walls (both the cell sample and cell air interfaces) can be effectively prevented from reaching the photodetector. In general, improving the on-axis discrimination degrades the angular resolution of a receiving optical train. Several different possible configurations of receiving optics are compared for their spatial resolution and angular resolution. For cylinder symmetric optics, the dual lens, fourier transform pair, receiving train with a center mask located between the lenses gives the best on-axis spatial resolution.

  1. Collective processes during stimulated light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovich, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    An approach to the analysis of the phase conjugation by stimulated light scattering that is alternative to the mode theory of 3D hologram, which is usually applied for these purposes, has been studied. As is known, the use of the mode theory is based on the phenomenological gain factor of the Stokes wave, which is induced by a pump wave in a nonlinear medium. The approach developed in this work directly considers the interaction between plane components of the pump and Stokes waves via hypersonic gratings of the dielectric permittivity, which the pump and Stokes waves induce in the medium. It has been shown that, as a result of the phase conjugation, two hypersonic gratings participate equally efficiently in the interaction between any pair of plane components of the pump and Stokes waves, with one of these gratings being excited by the interacting waves themselves. The other grating in each such pair is unambiguously identified with a simplest vector diagram. Conditions have been analyzed under which numerous other gratings, which could also participate in the interaction of each pair of plane components of the pump and Stokes waves without violating the Bragg conditions and the joining conditions of the transverse components of the wave vectors at the interface between the two media, contribute negligibly to stimulated light scattering. It has been shown that, if the pump is spatially coherent, the considered approach yields the same results as the standard mode theory does. In October 2011, I reported the results of this work at the Vavilov State Optical Institute at the Memorial Meeting "Half a Century of New Optics in Russia: Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, and Optical Holography" and at the International Conference "Laser Optics—2012" (June 2012).

  2. LIGHT SCATTERING: Observation of multiple scattering of laser radiation from a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'ev, Andrei V.

    2004-06-01

    Variation in the correlation function of light multiply scattered by a random medium was observed with increasing the incident beam power. The light-induced motion of microparticles in suspension, caused by a high-power laser radiation, serves as an additional factor in the decorrelation of the scattered light. The experimental data are in good agreement with the results of theoretical analysis.

  3. Modeling fluorescent light distributions in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    It is hoped that the non-invasive optical characterization of physiological features of normal and diseased epithelia can be assessed through the fluorescent emission of such tissues. With a high percentage of cancers arising in the epithelium, the characterization of carcinogenesis in such tissues is imperative. Fluorescent emission from the epithelium, e.g. oral mucosa, has been shown to be sensitive to physiological features, such as cellular morphology, and the amount and types of biochemical agents present in the tissue. Efforts to distinguish the spectral signatures of diseased and healthy states of tissues from fluorescence have been confounded by the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescent signature as a result of wavelength dependent absorption and scattering within the tissue. Theoretical models of light propagation in biological media are required for understanding the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence arising from compromised tissues. In this work we model the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence emitted from a tissue with wavelength dependent optical properties, arising from varying blood and water content, using the radiative transport equation. As an example, we demonstrate the ability of blood and water content to distort the signal of a white light source as it is embedded deeper into a tissue.

  4. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  5. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Youngju; Jung, Jaehwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, Hyunjoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from -70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth.

  6. Angle-resolved light scattering of individual rod-shaped bacteria based on Fourier transform light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Jo, YoungJu; Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, Jee Woong; Shin, Della; Park, HyunJoo; Nam, Ki Tae; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved light scattering maps of individual rod-shaped bacteria are measured at the single-cell level. Using quantitative phase imaging and Fourier transform light scattering techniques, the light scattering patterns of individual bacteria in four rod-shaped species (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus casei, Synechococcus elongatus, and Escherichia coli) are measured with unprecedented sensitivity in a broad angular range from −70° to 70°. The measured light scattering patterns are analyzed along the two principal axes of rod-shaped bacteria in order to systematically investigate the species-specific characteristics of anisotropic light scattering. In addition, the cellular dry mass of individual bacteria is calculated and used to demonstrate that the cell-to-cell variations in light scattering within bacterial species is related to the cellular dry mass and growth. PMID:24867385

  7. Angular distribution of light scattered from heavily doped silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, V V; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Salganskii, M Yu; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-10-31

    This paper describes an experimental setup for precision measurements of the angular distribution of light scattered by optical fibres in a wide angular range and demonstrates that the models of anomalous scattering proposed to date need to be refined. We have found and interpreted a discrepancy between the Rayleigh scattering coefficients measured by different techniques.

  8. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salla, Gangi Reddy Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Anwar, Ali; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-13

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  9. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salla, Gangi Reddy; Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-01

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  10. Particle detection by a light-scattering technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kormanyos, S.; Mastroeni, J.

    1972-01-01

    Instrument measures concentration of small particles in aqueous medium in terms of amount of light scattered and degree to which light transmission is attenuated. Sensitivity to small particles is optimized because both scattered and transmitted illumination levels are detected by photodiodes.

  11. UTILITY OF LIGHT SCATTER IN THE MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SPERM

    EPA Science Inventory

    By using an Ortho flow cytometer to detect the forward light scatter from a red (helium-neon) laser, we were able to differentiate the morphologically diverse sperm nuclei of four animal species. ytograms composed of the axial light loss and forward red scatter signals revealed u...

  12. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  13. Utility of light scatter in the morphological analysis of sperm

    EPA Science Inventory

    We were able to differentiate the morphologically diverse sperm nuclei of four animal species by using an Ortho flow cytometer to detect the forward light scatter from a red (helium-neon) laser. Cytograms depicting the axial light loss and forward red scatter signals revealed uni...

  14. Theory of ghost scattering with incoherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the idea of ghost imaging, we propose a ghost scattering scheme to study light scattering with incoherent light sources through the nonlocal correlation measurement of the differential scattering cross-section fluctuations in two different optical paths. We present a rigorous formal theory to describe the ghost scattering process. Also we have derived a simple and closed-form ghost scattering formula within the first-order Born approximation which is particularly suited for weak scatterers. We find that the scattering information of a test scatterer can be obtained by using only a single-pixel detector in the corresponding optical path through the nonlocal correlation measurement with the help of another reference path.

  15. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  16. Light scattering by marine heterotrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Quinones, Renato A.

    1992-01-01

    Mie theory is applied to estimate scattering by polydispersions of marine heterotrophic bacteria, and a simple expression is derived for the bacterial scattering coefficient. The error incurred in deriving bacterial optical properties by use of the van de Hulst approximations is computed. The scattering properties of natural bacterial assemblages in three marine environments, Georges Bank, Northeast Channel, and Sargasso Sea, are assessed by applying Mie theory to field data on bacterial size and abundance. Results are used to examine the potential contribution of bacteria to the scattering properties of seawater. The utility of using pigment data to predict the magnitude of scattering by bacteria is discussed.

  17. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  18. Study of erythrocyte membrane fluctuation using light scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoon; Lee, Sangyun; Park, YongKeun; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-03-01

    It is commonly known that alteration of erythrocyte deformability lead to serious microcirculatory diseases such as retinopathy, nephropathy, etc. Various methods and technologies have been developed to diagnose such membrane properties of erythrocytes. In this study, we developed an innovative method to measure hemorheological characteristics of the erythrocyte membrane using a light scattering analysis with simplified optic setting and multi-cell analysis as well. Light scattering intensity through multiple erythrocytes and its power density spectrum were obtained. The results of light scattering analyses were compared in healthy control and artificially hardened sample which was treated with glutaraldehyde. These results were further compared with conventional assays to measure deformable property in hemorheology. We found that light scattering information would reflect the disturbance of membrane fluctuation in artificially damaged erythrocytes. Therefore, measuring fluctuation of erythrocyte membrane using light scattering signal could facilitate simple and precise diagnose of pathological state on erythrocyte as well as related complications.

  19. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  20. Narrowly peaked forward light scattering on particulate media: II. Angular spreading of light scattered by polystyrene microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, Ioan; Bratfalean, Radu; Neamtu, Silvia

    2008-07-01

    The adequacy of the effective phase function (EPF) used to describe the light scattered at small angles was tested on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres. Angular resolved light scattering measurements were performed on two types of latex suspension, which contained polystyrene spheres of 3 µm and 5 µm diameters, respectively. The experimental data were fitted with two EPF approximants. If the polystyrene spheres are at least 3 µm in diameter the quasi-ballistic light scattering process can be described relatively well by the EPF in a small angular range centered in the forward direction. The forward light scattering by macroscopic samples containing microspheres can be modeled relatively well if the true Mie single particle scattering phase function is replaced by a simpler Henyey-Greenstein dependence having the same width at half-height as the first scattering lobe.

  1. DUST SCATTERING IN TURBULENT MEDIA: CORRELATION BETWEEN THE SCATTERED LIGHT AND DUST COLUMN DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Witt, Adolf N.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative transfer models in a spherical, turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), in which the photon source is situated at the center, are calculated to investigate the correlation between the scattered light and the dust column density. The medium is modeled using fractional Brownian motion structures that are appropriate for turbulent ISM. The correlation plot between the scattered light and optical depth shows substantial scatter and deviation from simple proportionality. It was also found that the overall density contrast is smoothed out in scattered light. In other words, there is an enhancement of the dust-scattered flux in low-density regions, while the scattered flux is suppressed in high-density regions. The correlation becomes less significant as the scattering becomes closer to being isotropic and the medium becomes more turbulent. Therefore, the scattered light observed in near-infrared wavelengths would show much weaker correlation than the observations in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. We also find that the correlation plot between scattered lights at two different wavelengths shows a tighter correlation than that of the scattered light versus the optical depth.

  2. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  3. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  4. Dynamic Light Scattering of Diabetic Vitreopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebag, J.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Dunker, Stephan; Suh, Kwang I.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes induces pathology throughout the body via nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Vitreous, which is replete with type 11 collagen, undergoes significant changes in diabetes. The resultant diabetic vitreopathy plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. Detecting these molecular changes could provide insight into diabetic eye disease as well as molecular effects elsewhere in the body. Human eyes were obtained at autopsy and studied in the fresh, unfixed state. Sclera, choroid, and retina were dissected off the vitreous for dark-field slit microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the former, the entire vitreous was exposed. For the latter, only a window at the equator was dissected in some specimens, and the anterior segment was removed leaving the posterior lens capsule intact in others. DLS was performed to determine particle sizes at multiple sites 0.5 mm apart, spanning the globe at the equator (window dissections) and along the antero-posterior axis. Dark-field slit microscopy in diabetic subjects detected findings typical of age-related vitreous degeneration, but at much younger ages than nondiabetic controls. Noninvasive DLS measurements found a greater heterogeneity and larger particle sizes in vitreous of subjects with diabetes as compared to age-matched controls. DLS can detect and quantify the early molecular effects that cause vitreous collagen fibrils to cross-link and aggregate. This could provide valuable insight into ocular and systemic effects of hyperglycemia, because the molecular changes in diabetic vitreopathy could serve as an index of such effects throughout the body. In addition to the diagnostic implications, this methodology could provide a rapid, reproducible way to monitor the response to therapy with novel agents intended to prevent the complications of diabetes on a molecular level.

  5. Experimental studies of light propagation in active scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Amy Elizabeth

    1998-10-01

    Over the past several years there has been a great deal of renewed interest in multiple scattering systems with gain. Laser action has been demonstrated in systems containing high gain laser dyes mixed with passive scattering particles. In these materials, known as photonic paint, the scatterers redirect the light and provide the feedback mechanism to initiate lasing. A method of decreasing the linewidth which has been used in conventional laser systems is injection locking, in which a seed at the desired wavelength is introduced into the cavity to initiate lasing. Experiments are presented which demonstrate injection locking of this new laser system. It is also of particular interest to study the phenomenon of weak localization of light in these photonic paint systems. The interference between scattered light paths increases the probability of light traveling opposite to the direction of the incident light, and produces a cone of enhanced reflected light in that direction. In the presence of amplification, the coherent backscattering cone narrows. In this high gain scattering system, an unstudied regime can be achieved in which significant amplification takes place over one scattering length. The results of the coherent backscattering experiment in a high gain scattering system is discussed. There are certain intrinsic problems with inversion gain systems, such as photonic paint, which makes the narrowing of the coherent backscattering cone less pronounced. In Raman materials, these effects are greatly reduced. Experimental studies of the amplification of a probe beam in a disordered Raman scattering medium, and the Monte Carlo simulations of this experiment, are presented. It is also of interest to study absorptive scattering systems which appear in a number of different situations, including the determination of the excitation volume in a scattering gain system and the modeling of biological tissue. The addition of an absorbing species into a scattering medium

  6. Light scattering by a finite obstacle and fano resonances.

    PubMed

    Tribelsky, Michael I; Flach, Sergej; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Gorbach, Andrey V; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2008-02-01

    The conditions for observing Fano resonances at elastic light scattering by a single finite-size obstacle are discussed. General arguments are illustrated by consideration of the scattering by a small (relative to the incident light wavelength) spherical obstacle based upon the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem. The most attention is paid to recently discovered anomalous scattering. An exactly solvable one-dimentional discrete model with nonlocal coupling for simulating diffraction in wave scattering in systems with reduced spatial dimensionality is also introduced and analyzed. Deep connections between the resonances in the continuous and discrete systems are revealed. PMID:18352275

  7. Correlating the morphological and light scattering properties of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Marina

    The scattered light pattern from a biological cell is greatly influenced by the internal structure and optical properties of the cell. This research project examines the relationships between the morphological and scattering properties of biological cells through numerical simulations. The mains goals are: (1) to develop a procedure to analytically model biological cells, (2) to quantitatively study the effects of a range of cell characteristics on the features of the light scattering patterns, and (3) to classify cells based on the features of their light scattering patterns. A procedure to create an analytical cell model was developed which extracted structural information from the confocal microscopic images of cells and allowed for the alteration of the cell structure in a controlled and systematic way. The influence of cell surface roughness, nuclear size, and mitochondrial volume density, spatial distribution, size and shape on the light scattering patterns was studied through numerical simulations of light scattering using the Discrete Dipole Approximation. It was found that the light scattering intensity in the scattering angle range of 25° to 45° responded to changes in the surface fluctuation of the cell and the range of 90° to 110° was well suited for characterization of mitochondrial density and nuclear size. A comparison of light scattering pattern analysis methods revealed that the angular distribution of the scattered light and Gabor filters were most helpful in differentiating between the cell characteristics. In addition, a measured increase in the Gabor energy of the light scattering patterns in response to an increase in the complexity of the cell models suggested that a complex nuclear structure and mitochondria should be included when modeling biological cells for light scattering simulations. Analysis of the scattering pattern features with Gabor filters resulted in discrimination of the cell models according to cell surface roughness

  8. Infrared light scattering in biological tissues and fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gordon A.; Koo, Tae-Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2001-03-01

    We have studied the elastic and Raman scattering from whole blood, blood serum and related biological fluids and tissues. The motivation of this work is to determine the composition and elastic scattering properties with a non-invasive, optical method. An example of the possible applications is the determination of the glucose concentration and its variations in a way that would be clinically effective for patients with diabetes. We have imaged the elastically scattered light and determined the scattering parameters in order to assess appropriate geometries for efficient collection of the Raman scattering. Using the Raman apectra we have determined the concentration of glucose and the other analytes under laboratory conditions.

  9. Measurements and interpretations of light scattering from intact biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.

    Visible light interacts with biological cells primarily through elastic scattering. The details of how cells scatter light depend on their morphology and their substructures. In this thesis we first present a series of experiments and models to discern the specific contributions of certain sub-cellular constituents to whole-cell scattering. Exploiting the findings of those studies, we report on experiments within model systems of cell death that demonstrate the potential of light scattering measurements as a tool in modern biology. Instrumentation capable of exploiting the findings of this thesis from a biology-relevant microscopy platform is designed and developed. A Mie theory based interpretation of light scattering signals originating from a collection of particles with a broad size distribution is developed. Upon applying this model to scattering data from intact cells, we find that it robustly extracts the size scale of dominant light scattering particles, suggests that scattering measurements are sensitive primarily to mitochondrial and lysosomal morphology, and unites conflicting results in the literature. Using this model as a basis, we present a collection of studies in which we use various strategies of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a biophysical tool to perturb mitochondria and lysosomes, and observe the effects of these perturbations on whole-cell scattering. Through these experiments, we are able to discern the individual contributions of mitochondria and lysosomes to whole-cell light scattering, and demonstrate that mitochondria are responsible for roughly 80% of the scattering signal. Results of experiments aimed at demonstrating the potential role that light scattering measurements have to play in future studies of cell death biology are presented. We first show that mitochondrial-PDT-induced morphology changes measured with light scattering map into the cell killing efficacy of the therapy. We next demonstrate that mitochondrial

  10. Light scattering from a moving atom.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this work, scattering of an incident electric field from a moving atom is reexamined classically in two steps: the time-dependent current density created by the field inside the atom is first calculated under the electric-dipole approximation, and is then used to calculate the field scattered from the atom. Unlike the conventional frame-hopping method, the present method does not need to treat the Doppler effect as an effect separated from the scattering process, and it derives instead of simply uses the Doppler effect. PMID:23455906

  11. How to distinguish elastically scattered light from Stokes shifted light for solid-state lighting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meretska, M. L.; Lagendijk, A.; Thyrrestrup, H.; Mosk, A. P.; IJzerman, W. L.; Vos, W. L.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the transport of light through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3 phosphor particles that both elastically scatter and Stokes shift light in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm). We excite the phosphor with a narrowband light source and measure spectra of the outgoing light. The Stokes shifted light is spectrally separated from the elastically scattered light in the measured spectra, and using this technique, we isolate the elastic transmission of the plates. This result allows us to extract the transport mean free path ltr over the full wavelength range by employing diffusion theory. Simultaneously, we determine the absorption mean free path labs in the wavelength range 400 to 530 nm where YAG:Ce+3 absorbs. The diffuse absorption (μa=1/labs ) spectrum is qualitatively similar to the absorption coefficient of YAG:Ce+3 in powder, with the diffuse spectrum being wider than the absorption coefficient. We propose a design rule for the solid-state lighting diffuser plates.

  12. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure.

  13. Bright-white beetle scales optimise multiple scattering of light.

    PubMed

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure. PMID:25123449

  14. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    PubMed Central

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Whiteness arises from diffuse and broadband reflection of light typically achieved through optical scattering in randomly structured media. In contrast to structural colour due to coherent scattering, white appearance generally requires a relatively thick system comprising randomly positioned high refractive-index scattering centres. Here, we show that the exceptionally bright white appearance of Cyphochilus and Lepidiota stigma beetles arises from a remarkably optimised anisotropy of intra-scale chitin networks, which act as a dense scattering media. Using time-resolved measurements, we show that light propagating in the scales of the beetles undergoes pronounced multiple scattering that is associated with the lowest transport mean free path reported to date for low-refractive-index systems. Our light transport investigation unveil high level of optimisation that achieves high-brightness white in a thin low-mass-per-unit-area anisotropic disordered nanostructure. PMID:25123449

  15. Dynamic light scattering by polyelectrolytes in low ionic strength buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, K.S.

    1993-12-31

    Dynamic light scattering is a generic term which refers to all techniques that monitor fluctuation in the intensity of scattered light. Quasielastic light scattering (QELS) is that configuration in which no external field is applied in the course of data collection. In the case of charged macroions, QELS studies indicate a bifurcation in the relaxation modes as the ionic strength is lowered. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of an extended couple mode theory in which the dynamics of the macroions are coupled with those of the electrolyte ions. The QELS results are correlated with studies in which external electric fields of wave forms that are constant (ELS, electrophoretic light scattering) or pure sinusoidal (QELS-SEF).

  16. Hierarchical mesoporous silica nanoparticles as superb light scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaehoon; Yun, Juyoung; Lee, Jungsup; Lee, Kisu; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach to enhance the light scattering effect was explored by applying hierarchical silica nanoparticles in DSSCs as scattering layers. The WSN-incorporated cells showed a PCE value of 9.53% and a PCE enhancement of 30.19% compared with those of the reference cells. PMID:26699659

  17. Design of fiber optic probes for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the role of optical fibers in laser light scattering. Design of a general fiber optic/microlens probe by means of ray tracing is described. Several different geometries employing an optical fiber of the type used in lightwave communications and a graded index microlens are considered. Experimental results using a nonimaging fiber optic detector probe show that due to geometrical limitations of single mode fibers, a probe using a multimode optical fiber has better performance, for both static and dynamic measurements of the scattered light intensity, compared with a probe using a single mode fiber. Fiber optic detector probes are shown to be more efficient at data collection when compared with conventional approaches to measurements of the scattered laser light. Integration of fiber optic detector probes into a fiber optic spectrometer offers considerable miniaturization of conventional light scattering spectrometers, which can be made arbitrarily small. In addition static and dynamic measurements of scattered light can be made within the scattering cell and consequently very close to the scattering center.

  18. Depolarization of Light Scattered from Rough Cylindrical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, R.; Quintián, F. Perez; Rebollo, M. A.

    2008-04-01

    In this work we study the state of polarization of light scattered from rough cylindrical surfaces. The experimental results show that the amount of cross-polarized light at a particular observation angle is correlated with the roughness of the cylinders. We compare these results with those obtained using the Kirchhoff's vector theory and analyze if the differences can be modeled on multiple-scattering effects.

  19. Evaluation of advanced light scattering technology for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, W. J.; Rosenblum, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of modern light scattering equipment and the uses it might have in studying processes in microgravity are evaluated. Emphasis is on the resolution of polydisperse systems. This choice was made since a major use of light scattering was expected to be the study of crystal growth of macromolecules in low gravity environments. An evaluation of a modern photon correlation spectrometer and a Mie spectrometer is presented.

  20. Efficient light propagation for multiple anisotropic volume scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N. |

    1993-12-01

    Realistic rendering of participating media like clouds requires multiple anisotropic light scattering. This paper presents a propagation approximation for light scattered into M direction bins, which reduces the ``ray effect`` problem in the traditional ``discrete ordinates`` method. For a volume of n{sup 3} elements, it takes O(M n{sup 3} log n + M{sup 2} n{sup 3}) time and O(M n{sup 3}) space.

  1. Interpretation of light scattering and turbidity measurements in aggregated systems: effect of intra-cluster multiple-light scattering.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Lattuada, Marco; Sefcik, Jan

    2009-11-12

    In this work we studied the effect of intracluster multiple-light scattering on the scattering properties of a population of fractal aggregates. To do so, experimental data of diffusion-limited aggregation for three polystyrene latexes with similar surface properties but different primary particle diameters (equal to 118, 420, and 810 nm) were obtained by static light scattering and by means of a spectrophotometer. In parallel, a population balance equation (PBE) model, which takes into account the effect of intracluster multiple-light scattering by solving the T-matrix and the mean-field version of T-matrix, was formulated and validated against time evolution of the root mean radius of gyration, , of the zero angle intensity of scattered light, I(0), and of the turbidity, tau. It was found that the mean-field version of the T-matrix theory is able to correctly predict the time evolution of all measured light scattering quantities for all sizes of primary particles without any adjustable parameter. The structure of the aggregates, characterized by fractal dimension, d(f), was independent of the primary particle size and equal to 1.7, which is in agreement with values found in literature. Since the mean-field version of the T-matrix theory used is rather complicated and requires advanced knowledge of cluster structure (i.e., the particle-particle correlation function), a simplified version of the light scattering model was proposed and tested. It was found that within the range of operating conditions investigated, the simplified version of the light scattering model was able to describe with reasonable accuracy the time evolution of all measured light scattering quantities of the cluster mass distribution (CMD) for all three sizes of primary particles and two values of the laser wavelength. PMID:19845324

  2. Inelastic light scattering from a Mott insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Oosten, D. van; Dickerscheid, D.B.M.; Farid, B.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Straten, P. van der

    2005-02-01

    We propose to use Bragg spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of the Mott-insulator state of an atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice. We calculate the structure factor of the Mott insulator taking into account both the self-energy corrections of the atoms and the corresponding dressing of the atom-photon interaction. We determine the scattering rate of photons in the stimulated Raman transition and show that by measuring this scattering rate in an experiment, in particular, the excitation gap of the Mott insulator can be determined.

  3. Molecular origin of background light in Thomson scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    The plasma background light in Thomson scattering measurements is often far higher than expected for a pure hydrogen plasma. The spectral distribution of light from three plasmas (duration: 1 ms to steady state; electron density: below 10/sup 12/ to over 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/; temperature: below 20 to over 1000 eV) and signal-to-noise and intensity data from the Thomson scattering systems used on them are compared with analytic estimates to show that in two of these plasmas molecular light dominates the spectrum, while in the other, molecular light is present, but bremsstrahlung is usually more intense. Knowledge of the mechanism for background light can aid in designing detection systems for Thomson scattering and provide information on the neutral species composition and effective charge of the plasma.

  4. Circular polarization of light scattered by randomly built aggregates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, D.; Moreno, F.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2007-06-01

    We present calculations of the scattering angle dependence of the degree of linear polarization of light singly scattered at 500 nm by randomly oriented randomly built aggregates of optically inactive homogenous identical spheres. Using the T-matrix method we analyzed the effect of changing the size of the monomers for two different geometries. The values of the computed degreee of circular polarization are comparable to the observed ones for light scattered by dust particles in comets P/Halley, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1999 S4 (LINEAR).

  5. Hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal light scattering device.

    PubMed

    Qasim, M M; Khan, A A; Kostanyan, A; Kidambi, P R; Cabrero-Vilatela, A; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Gardiner, D J; Hofmann, S; Wilkinson, T D

    2015-09-01

    A hybrid graphene nematic liquid crystal (LC) light scattering device is presented. This device exploits the inherent poly-crystallinity of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene films to induce directional anchoring and formation of LC multi-domains. This thereby enables efficient light scattering without the need for crossed polarisers or separate alignment layers/additives. The hybrid LC device exhibits switching thresholds at very low electric fields (< 1 V μm(-1)) and repeatable, hysteresis free characteristics. This exploitation of LC alignment effects on CVD graphene films enables a new generation of highly efficient nematic LC scattering displays as well as many other possible applications. PMID:26243047

  6. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  7. Holographic light scattering in photorefractive crystals with local response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulkov, M.; Odoulov, S.; Woike, Th.; Imbrock, J.; Imlau, M.; Krätzig, E.; Bäumer, C.; Hesse, H.

    2002-05-01

    Strong polarization-isotropic wide-angle light scattering in photorefractive crystals with dominating photovoltaic response is explained referring to different experimental results obtained for LiTaO3:Fe crystals. It is shown experimentally that the steady-state amplification of the light scattering results from a nonzero shift in the temporal frequency between the coherent optical noise and the pump beam. Competition of photovoltaic and diffusion contributions in the photorefractive effect leads to a spatial and temporal asymmetry of nonlinear scattering. Contributions of ``hot'' electrons in the diffusion process have to be assumed.

  8. Light scattering of semitransparent sintered polytetrafluoroethylene films.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Lee, Bong Jae; Zhang, Zhuomin M; Allen, David W

    2008-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a strongly scattering material and has been regarded to have optical properties similar to biological tissues. In the present study, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and the bidirectional transmittance distribution function (BTDF) of several PTFE films, with thicknesses from 0.11 to 10 mm, are measured using a laser scatterometer at the wavelength of 635 nm. The directional-hemispherical reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) were obtained by integrating BRDF and BTDF for normal incidence. Comparison of the ratio of the measured R and T with that calculated from the adding-doubling method allows the determination of the reduced scattering coefficient. Furthermore, the effect of surface scattering is investigated by measuring the polarization-dependent BRDF and BTDF at oblique incidence. By analyzing the measurement uncertainty of BTDF in the near-normal observation angles at normal incidence, the present authors found that the scattering coefficient of PTFE should exceed 1200 cm(-1), which is much greater than that of biological tissues. On the other hand, the absorption coefficient of PTFE must be less than 0.01 cm(-1), much smaller than that of biological tissues, a necessary condition to achieve R > or =0.98 with a 10-mm-thick slab. PMID:19021442

  9. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  10. Huge light scattering from active anisotropic spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Shen, Zexiang; Luk'yanchuk, Boris

    2010-11-22

    The light scattering by a spherical particle with radial anisotropic permittivity ε and permeability μ are discussed in detail by expanding Mie theory. With the modified vector potential formulation, the electric anisotropy effects on scattering efficiency are addressed by studying the extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross sections following the change of the transverse permittivity ε(t), the longitudinal permittivity ε(r) and the particle size q. The huge scattering cross sections are shown by considering the possible coupling between active medium and plasmon polaritons and this will be possible to result in spaser from the active plasmons of small particle. PMID:21164832

  11. Angle- and Spectral-Dependent Light Scattering from Plasmonic Nanocups

    SciTech Connect

    King, Nicholas S.; Li, Yang; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Brannan, Travis; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2011-09-27

    As optical frequency nanoantennas, reduced-symmetry plasmonic nanoparticles have light-scattering properties that depend strongly on geometry, orientation, and variations in dielectric environment. Here we investigate how these factors influence the spectral and angular dependence of light scattered by Au nanocups. A simple dielectric substrate causes the axial, electric dipole mode of the nanocup to deviate substantially from its characteristic cos² θ free space scattering profile, while the transverse, magnetic dipole mode remains remarkably insensitive to the presence of the substrate. Nanoscale irregularities of the nanocup rim and the local substrate permittivity have a surprisingly large effect on the spectral- and angle-dependent light-scattering properties of these structures.

  12. Study of Light Scattering in the Human Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, I. Kelly; Bruce, N. C.; Valdos, L. R. Berriel

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of the human eye to be used in studies of the scattering of light in different components of the eye's optical system. Different parts of the eye are susceptible to produce scattering for different reasons; age, illness or injury. For example, cataracts can appear in the human lens or injuries or fungi can appear on the cornea. The aim of the study is to relate the backscattered light, which is what doctors measure or detect, to the forward scattered light, which is what affects the patient's vision. We present the model to be used, the raytrace procedure and some preliminary results for the image on the retina without scattering.

  13. Simulation of light scattering from exoskeletons of scarab beetles.

    PubMed

    Valyukh, Sergiy; Arwin, Hans; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2016-03-21

    An approach for simulation of light scattering from beetles exhibiting structural colors originating from periodic helicoidal structures is presented. Slight irregularities of the periodic structure in the exoskeleton of the beetles are considered as a major cause of light scattering. Two sources of scattering are taken into account: surface roughness and volume non-uniformity. The Kirchhoff approximation is applied to simulate the effect of surface roughness. To describe volume non-uniformity, the whole structure is modeled as a set of domains distributed in space in different orientations. Each domain is modeled as an ideal uniformly twisted uniaxial medium and differs from each other by the pitch. Distributions of the domain parameters are assumed to be Gaussian. The analysis is performed using the Mueller matrix formalism which, in addition to spectral and spatial characteristics, also provides polarization properties of the scattered light. PMID:27136777

  14. Polar nephelometer for light-scattering measurements of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Barkey, B; Liou, K N

    2001-02-15

    We report on a small, lightweight polar nephelometer for the measurement of the light-scattering properties of cloud particles, specifically designed for use on a balloonborne platform in cirrus cloud conditions. The instrument consists of 33 fiber-optic light guides positioned in a two-dimensional plane from 5 degrees to 175 degrees that direct the scattered light to photodiode detectors-amplifier units. The system uses an onboard computer and data acquisition card to collect and store the measured signals. The instrument's calibration is tested by measurement of light scattered into a two-dimensional plane from small water droplets generated by an ultrasonic humidifier. Excellent comparisons between the measured water-droplet scattering properties and expectations generated by Mie calculation are shown. The measured scattering properties of ice crystals generated in a cold chamber also compare reasonably well with the theoretical results based on calculations from a unified theory of light scattering by ice crystals that use the particle size distribution measured in the chamber. PMID:18033557

  15. Wide-angle light scattering (WALS) for soot aggregate characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Oltmann, Hergen; Reimann, Joerg; Will, Stefan

    2010-03-15

    A novel set-up for the experimental determination of aggregate morphology in combustion processes based on elastic light scattering has been designed and realized. A key feature of this wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach is an ellipsoidal mirror which is used to collect scattered light over a wide angular range of about 10-170 . The set-up employs a cw solid-state laser as light source and an intensified CCD-camera as detector. By means of the mirror the scattered light is imaged onto the detector allowing for a simultaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with a high angular resolution of about 0.6 . To demonstrate the performance of the approach, measurements for various sooting flames produced by premixed combustion in a flat flame burner were carried out, where the burner was operated with different equivalence ratios and fuels. It is shown that radii of gyration of soot particles may efficiently be obtained from an analysis of the scattering diagrams. (author)

  16. Rayleigh Light Scattering from Nematic Liquid Crystals at Oblique Incidence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da, Xiao-Yi.

    Ryuichi Akiyama 1980 and his co-workers first showed the possibility that light scattering experiments on nematic liquid crystals could be carried out preferably by using oblique incidence rather than the conventional normal incidence. Miraldi, et al 1980 strongly recommended the application of oblique incidence, and gave a discussion in detail. The present work starts from an attempt to obtain the three Frank elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals by Rayleigh light scattering. A suitable scattering geometry has been chosen; a systematic method of measuring these constants and coefficients has been developed by measuring the linewidths of the scattered light from a single sample at various incidence angles and fitting the measured linewidths with appropriate theoretical expressions. It is shown in the present work that the light scattering experiments on nematic liquid crystals at oblique incidence have many advantages over the same kind of experiments at normal incidence so far widely employed, and show a promising future. After a brief introduction to the general theory of the dynamic light scattering, nematic liquid crystals and light scattering from nematic liquid crystals in Chapters 1, 2, and 3, and a brief review of the measurements of elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals by light scattering in Chapter 4, a straightforward method concerning the calculation of variations of the wave vectors upon scattering is developed in Chapter 5. This method assumes that a nematic liquid crystal behaves optically like a uniaxial crystal. In doing so, all we have to know is the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices n(,o) and n(,e) of the sample under consideration. The linewidth and intensity distributions of the scattered light can then be determined by inserting the variations in wave vectors into appropriate equations for a known material for which the knowledge of the elastic constants as well

  17. Surface Characterization from Doubly Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Quintián, Fernando; Rebollo, María A.

    2004-05-01

    When a translucent diffuser is illuminated by a speckle pattern, a new speckle pattern is produced. We show that the decorrelation of this intensity pattern by displacement of the diffusing surface is related to the standard deviation of the slope's distribution when the illuminating speckle grain is chosen appropriately small. The experimental results are compared with those obtained by measuring the angular distribution of the mean scattered intensity, and they show good agreement with each other.

  18. Scattering Meters For Light In The Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Willard H.

    1984-09-01

    To solve radiative transfer problems in seawater, we need two inherent properties, the volume scattering function (VSF) and the absorption. The traditional direct way to obtain these quantities uses a transmissometer and a scattering meter. However, there are prob-lems with the small sample size and errors in obtaining absorption by integration of the VSF. An indirect method also shows promise. One measures the radiance field and then inverts the equations of radiative transfer to obtain the inherent properties from the apparent. The only serious shortcoming is that radiance must be a function of only one position coordinate (plus two angles). (This coordinate is depth in the case of sunlight, or distance from an isotropic lamp otherwise.) We discuss two practical implementations of this indirect approach. One would measure the radiance field with a set of fisheye cameras (following R. Smith's precedent). This very thorough method produces lots of data and requires extensive calibration and number crunching. A proposed alternate radiometer would measure certain spherical moments of the radiance field, the moments being selected to facilitate recovery of the inherent properties [Appl. Opt. 22, 2313 (Aug 83)]. This scheme would produce fewer data, but it permits recovery of absorption and moments of the VSF in (nearly) real time. Similar direct and indirect approaches apply to the measurement of very small-angle scattering, from a milliradian to a few degrees, the sort of angles that blur vision. The indirect method infers small-angle scattering from the loss of contrast in images of bar charts. In this case, the indirect method is clearly superior for the same reasons that bar charts and other test patterns are widely used (instead of point spread functions) to evaluate the performance of television and various optical systems. We built a seawater MTF meter on this principle before 1970, and its features are briefly reviewed.

  19. Scattering of light by molecules over a rough surface.

    PubMed

    Long, Maureen; Khine, Michelle; Kim, Arnold D

    2010-05-01

    We present a theory for the multiple scattering of light by obstacles situated over a rough surface. This problem is important for applications in biological and chemical sensors. To keep the formulation of this theory simple, we study scalar waves. This theory requires knowledge of the scattering operator (t-matrix) for each of the obstacles as well as the reflection operator for the rough surface. The scattering operator gives the field scattered by the obstacle due to an exciting field incident on the scatterer. The reflection operator gives the field reflected by the rough surface due to an exciting field incident on the rough surface. We apply this general theory for the special case of point scatterers and a slightly rough surface with homogeneous Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. We show examples that demonstrate the utility of this theory. PMID:20448766

  20. Light focusing through strongly scattering media by binary amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui-ling; Sun, Cun-zhi; Chen, Zi-yang; Pu, Ji-xiong

    2015-07-01

    Based on the angular spectrum method and the circular Gaussian distribution (CGD) model of scattering media, we numerically simulate light focusing through strongly scattering media. A high contrast focus in the target area is produced by using feedback optimization algorithm with binary amplitude modulation. It is possible to form the focusing with one focus or multiple foci at arbitrary areas. The influence of the number of square segments of spatial light modulation on the enhancement factor of intensity is discussed. Simulation results are found to be in good agreement with theoretical analysis for light refocusing.

  1. Polarized light transport in refractive weak scattering media.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Vadim Y

    2016-07-01

    This paper is devoted to modeling of the light transport in refractive and weak scattering media by means of the vector radiative transfer equation. In refractive media polarization of light depends not only on the law of scattering but also on the refractive index distribution and can change along curved light trajectories according to the Rytov law of the polarization ellipse rotation. Results of numerical simulations are presented in the form of CCD camera images, which is how data are acquired in tomographic imaging experiments. PMID:27409689

  2. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  3. Comparative Study of Light Scattering from Hepatoma Cells and Hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Guo, Xiaoen

    2012-11-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the highest mortality malignant tumors in the world. China is a high occurrence area of primary liver cancer. Diagnosis of liver cancer, especially early diagnosis, is essential for improving patients' survival. Light scattering and measuring method is an emerging technology developed in recent decades, which has attracted a large number of biomedical researchers due to its advantages, such as fast, simple, high accuracy, good repeatability, and non-destructive. The hypothesis of this project is that there may be some different light scattering information between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte. Combined with the advantages of the dynamic light scattering method and the biological cytology, an experimental scheme to measure the light scattering information of cells was formulated. Hepatoma cells and hepatic cells were irradiated by a semiconductor laser (532 nm). And the Brookhaven BI-200SM wide-angle light scattering device and temperature control apparatus were adopted. The light scattering information of hepatoma cells and hepatic cells in vitro within the 15°C to 30°C temperature range was processed by a BI-9000AT digital autocorrelator. The following points were found: (a) the scattering intensities of human hepatic cells and hepatoma cells are nearly not affected by the temperature factor, and the former is always greater than the latter and (b) the relaxation time of hepatoma cells is longer than that of hepatic cells, and both the relaxation time are shortened with increasing temperature from 15°C to 25°C. It can be concluded that hepatoma cells could absorb more incident light than hepatic cells. The reason may be that there exists more protein and nucleic acid in cancerous cells than normal cells. Furthermore, based on the length relaxation time, a conclusion can be inferred that the Brownian movement of cancer cells is greater.

  4. Cell light scattering characteristic research based on FDTD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Zhu, Hao; Li, Wenchao; Ye, Changbin

    2015-10-01

    As with the number of cancer increases year by year, so it is important to be found and treated earlier. With biological cells and tissues are sensitive to infrared and visible light, cell morphology and physical structure of the optical properties can easily obtain, we can provide theoretical basis for the early diagnosis of cancer by observing the difference of optical properties between normal and cancerous cells. Compared with Mie scattering theory, finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm can analyze any complex structure model. In this paper we use mathematical modeling method to establish the single cell mathematical model and with finite difference time domain algorithm to simulate the propagation and scattering of light in the biological cells, you can calculate the scattering of electromagnetic field distribution at anytime and anywhere. With radar cross section (RCS) to measure the results of the scattering characteristics. Due to the difference between normal cells and cancerous cells are embodied in cell shape, size and the refractive index, through the simulation we can get different cell parameters of light scattering information, Find out the cell parameters change the changing rule of the influence on the scattering characteristics and find out change regularity of scattering characteristics. These data can judge very accurate of the cells is normal or cancerous cells.

  5. Reconstruction of Rain Microstructure From Spectrum of Scattering Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlyadkin, V.; Gluschenko, A.

    Night photoregistration of light, scattered by drops had proved that practically all drops oscillate as they fall. As drop oscillation frequency W monotony diminish with drop volume V rise, so different fractions of rain form different parts of spectrum. Thereby it is possible to reconstruct rain microstructure from remote optical measure- ments. In common case the form of spectrum depends not only on drop size distri- bution N(V) but also on oscillation amplitudes function, scattering phase function for oscillating drops and on frequency dependence W(V). The statistical treatment of our field data had shown that average oscillation amplitude rise with drop volume V as , where A is a some constant. This result allows to solve the inverse problem: to re- construct drop size distribution N(V) from the power spectrum of light, scattering by rain. Scattering phase function for nonspherical and oscillating drops was calculated in straight-line approximation. Analysis of optical properties of oscillating water drop had shown some optimal measurement geometry for registration of rain microstruc- ture. For low intensity rains it is reasonable to use the effect of abnormal high modu- lation of light scattered by oscillating drops, which we discovered earlier in laboratory condition and under field measurements. (The effect of abnormal high modulation al- lows us to detect 2-3 mm raindrop deformations from 5 m distance). The results of reconstruction of drop size distributions from spectra of light, scattered by rains are presented and discussed.

  6. Transport calculations for light scattering in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, G D; McCormick, N J; Reynolds, L O

    1976-01-01

    In vivo measurement of the oxygen saturation levels in blood may be obtained from relative amounts of backscattered monochromatic light at two different wavelengths, as measured with a fiber-optic catheter oximeter. Because of the short mean free path length of light in blood, the backscattering can be well approximated by a previously-derived, one-wavelength transport theory solution for the half-space searchlight problem. This solution, unlike simple diffusion approximations has the advantage that the boundary condition describing illumination of a localized area of blood by a monodirectional light beam can be rigorously satisfied. Sample calculations using the solution are compared with experimental values of the reflectance of blood. PMID:1252576

  7. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-07-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete-dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  8. Effects of dust particle internal structure on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, O.; Nousiainen, T.; Jeong, G. Y.

    2015-10-01

    There is a large variety of internal structures inside atmospheric dust particles, making them inherently inhomogeneous. Such structures may have a large effect on ground-level and atmospheric radiation. So far, dust particle internal structures and their effect on the light scattering properties have proved to be hard to quantify, in part due to challenges in obtaining information about these structures. Recently, internal structures of individual dust particles were revealed through focused ion beam milling and analyzed. Here, we perform a sensitivity study to evaluate the optical impacts of some of the typical internal structures revealed. To obtain suitable model particles, the first step is to generate inhomogeneous particles with varying internal structures by using an algorithm that is based on three-dimensional Voronoi tessellation. The parameters for the particle generation are obtained from studies of real-world Asian dust particles. The second step is to generate homogeneous versions of the generated particles by using an effective-medium approximation, for comparison. Third, light scattering by both versions of these particles is simulated with discrete dipole approximation code. This allows us to see how different internal structures affect light scattering, and how important it is to account for these structures explicitly. Further, this allows us to estimate the potential inaccuracies caused by using only homogeneous model particles for atmospheric studies and remote-sensing measurements. The results show that the effects vary greatly between different kinds of internal structures and single-scattering quantity considered, but for most structure types the effects are overall notable. Most significantly, hematite inclusions in particles impact light scattering heavily. Furthermore, internal pores and hematite-rich coating both affect some form of light scattering noticeably. Based on this work, it seems that it is exceedingly important that the

  9. Molecular characterization of solution styrene-butadiene rubber: thermal field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Jin; Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Seung Hwa; Kim, A-Ju; Kwag, Gwanghoon; Lee, Seungho

    2013-11-01

    Solution styrene-butadiene rubber (SSBR) is mainly constituted of a random copolymer of styrene and butadiene. SSBR usually contains microgels, having ultrahigh molecular weight (M>10(7)g/mol), affecting rheological properties of the rubber. Thus, determinations of M and size distribution of these microgels are critical in performance evaluation and control for SSBR. We employ thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF), combined with online multi-angle light scattering (MALS), as most suited for characterization of solutions containing the microgels since they can be characterized in toto without removing the microgels from the solution. ThFFF-MALS was applied for characterization of linear and branched SBR materials from various commercial sources, and the results were compared to those from size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). ThFFF provides higher resolution than SEC for high molecular fractions and allowed gel content to be measured. The gel content was determined by subtracting the amount of sol from total injection mass, and was measured to be 10-15%. We infer from the characterization results that the microgel content may not be correlated to the microstructure, the styrene and vinyl content of butadiene but to the fraction of high molecular weight in SSBR. Finally, the macromolecular structure and the content of microgel (larger than about 100nm) were found to significantly affect various rheological parameters such as viscosity, mechanical and dynamic properties. PMID:24063984

  10. Scattered light in the IUE spectra of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitner, B.; Chapman, R. D.; Kondo, Y.; Stencel, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    As a result of this work it was found that light scattered from the longer wavelengths constitutes a small but non-negligible, wavelength and time dependent fraction of the measured flux in the far UV. The reality of the UV excess has not been unambigiously ruled out. However, it is noted that there are still uncertainties in the assumed scattering profile. New measurements of the scattering properties of the cross disperser grating are planned in order to verify the results of Mount and Fastie and extend the wavelength coverage into the far wings of the profile. The results of these measurements will no doubt reduce some of these uncertainties. For the present, it is felt that the BCH approach is a significant improvement over the methods heretofore available for the treatment of scattered light in IUE spectra.

  11. Indigenous development of static laser light scattering (SLS) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, David; Kumar, Amit

    2013-02-01

    An indigenous laser light scattering spectrometer is being developed for the studies of biological cells, macromolecules and their interactions. A laboratory spectrometer is used and modified as scattering arm, Turn Table and Collimating arm. Both the arms have polarizers, one acting as polarizer and the other as analyzer. The scattered light from the scattering cell is analyzed by an analyzer and is fed to a PMT and a photon counting module. Except for the PMT all the accessories are being fabricated indigenously. The studies are based initially on the studies of red blood cells. Studies are focused on for their single particle and their aggregation behavior. Using the ORT program developed by Otto Glatter the morphology of red blood cells will be analyzed.

  12. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthan, J.; Netz, U.; Minet, O.; Klose, Annerose D.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A.; Henniger, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient μs, absorption coefficient μa, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results.

  13. Resonance light scattering determination of metallothioneins using levofloxacin-palladium complex as a light scattering probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jin-Hua; Qian, Qiu-Mei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Meng, Xia-Ling; Liu, Lu

    2013-02-01

    A novel method of resonance light scattering (RLS) was developed for the analysis of trace metallothioneins (MTs) in human urine. In a CH3COOH-CH3COONa buffer solution of pH 4.5, the formation of a complex between levofloxacin (LEV)-Pd and MTs led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system, and the enhanced RLS intensity at 468 nm was proportional to the concentration of MTs in the range of 0.059-22.4 μg mL-1. The linear regression equation was ΔI = 127.5 ρ (μg mL-1)-88.02 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992, and the detection limit of 17.8 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation and the average recovery were 3.8-5.4% (n = 11) and 92.15%, respectively. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive, and has been used successfully for the determination of trace MTs in human urine samples.

  14. An experimental study of light scattering by large, irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Audrey F.; Hapke, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered by a variety of types of artificial partices large compared to the wavelength were measured as a function of phase angle. Shape, surface roughness, absorption coefficient, and internal scattering coefficient were varied systematically and their effects studied. Scattering by clear, smooth-surfaced spheres is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the geometrical optics (ray theory) approximation to physical optics (Mie theory). The phase functions of almost all of the particles measured have both forward and backward scattering lobes. A two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein function generally provides reasonably good descriptions of the data, while keeping the number of free parameters to the minimum necessary. On a double Henyey- Greenstein parameter plot all of the particles fall into an L-shaped area of restricted size in which the location is characteristic of the particle type. Formalisms based on the equivalent slab model are also given for estimating the scattering efficiency of a large, irregular particle. For most dielectric particles the transmitted, forward scattered light is partially negatively polarized. It is this component that is respopnsible for the well-known maximum in the polarization curves of planetary regoliths at phase angles around 100 deg. For phase angles between about 30 deg and 70 deg the internally scattered light is found to be randomly polarized in the particles studied here, so that the only contribution to the second component of the Stokes vector is by Fresnel reflection from the particle surface. If this empirical result is general, measurement of the second Stokes vector of the light scattered from a regolith at these angles may provide a method of remotely measuring the mean refractive index.

  15. Scattering of non-separable states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumangatt, Chithrabhanu; Salla, Gangi Reddy; Anwar, Ali; Aadhi, A.; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally show that the non-separability of polarization and orbital angular momentum present in a light beam remains preserved under scattering through a random medium like rotating ground glass. We verify this by measuring the degree of polarization and observing the intensity distribution of the beam when projected to different polarization states, before as well as after the scattering. We extend our study to the non-maximally non-separable states also.

  16. Neutron and light scattering studies of light-harvesting photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-06-28

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been employed in studying the structural information of various biological systems, particularly in systems without high-resolution structural information available. In this report, we briefly present some principles and biological applications of neutron scattering and DLS, compare the differences in information that can be obtained with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and then report recent studies of SANS and DLS, together with other biophysical approaches, for light-harvesting antenna complexes and reaction centers of purple and green phototrophic bacteria.

  17. Inferring mixture Gibbs free energies from static light scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Thurston, George

    We describe a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing that applies to connected, isotropic ternary and quaternary liquid composition domains, including restricted domains which may not touch all binary axes. For restricted domains, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns obtained at different wavelengths can correspond to the same underlying free energy, and supplement the available information. We discuss well-posed problems for this fully nonlinear, degenerate elliptic partial differential equation. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, and indicate how measurement time depends on instrument throughput. These methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain liquid domains. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  18. Diffusion of interacting particles: light scattering study of microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazabat, A.M.; Langevin, D.

    1981-03-15

    The diffusion coefficient data obtained from light scattering experiments on water-in-oil microemulsions have been compared with existing theoretical treatments involving the interaction potential. The observed behavior deviates largely from hard sphere systems and independent information was obtained about the interaction potential to check the theories. This was achieved by measuring simultaneously the intensity and the correlation function of the scattered light. The intensity has been analyzed with a very simple model for interaction forces involving only 2 parameters: a hard sphere radius and the amplitude of a small perturbation added to hard sphere potential. This model allows for the variation of the diffusion coefficient at small volume fractions. Light scattering techniques are a very useful method for obtaining information about sizes and interactions in microemulsions. Some general conclusions have been made: droplet sizes depend mostly on the ratio of water to soap, and interactions on continuous phase polarity and alcohol chain length.

  19. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  20. Light scattering study of enzymatic degradation of polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himel, Denny; Norwood, David; Howard, Gary

    2000-11-01

    It is known that naturally occurring enzymes produced by members of the genus Pseudomonas hydrolytically degrade synthetic polyesterurethanes. Enzymes from the three species Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas clororaphis and Comamonas acidovarans have been isolated and show hydrolytic activity. Further, it has been shown that static laser light scattering, in both batch mode (SLS) and time resolved (TRSLS), is a technique effective in characterizing systems undergoing enzymatic degradation. A general theory of TRSLS is summarized. This theory is then used when we employ static laser light scattering (SLS) to carefully characterize both the high molecular weight polyurethane substrate and the isolated enzymes, and time resolved static laser light scattering (TRSLS) to determine the absolute rate of degradation and to characterize the mechanism of enzymes isolated from bacteria mentioned above.

  1. Multiple light scattering methods for multiphase flow diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevadeordal, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Multiphase flows of gases and liquids containing droplets, bubbles, or particulates present light scattering imaging challenges due to the interference from each phase, such as secondary reflections, extinctions, absorptions, and refractions. These factors often prevent the unambiguous detection of each phase and also produce undesired beam steering. The effects can be especially complex in presence of dense phases, multispecies flows, and high pressure environments. This investigation reports new methods for overcoming these effects for quantitative measurements of velocity, density, and temperature fields. The methods are based on light scattering techniques combining Mie and filtered Rayleigh scattering and light extinction analyses and measurements. The optical layout is designed to perform multiple property measurements with improved signal from each phase via laser spectral and polarization characterization, etalon decontamination, and use of multiple wavelengths and imaging detectors.

  2. Scattered light in the IUE spectra of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altner, B.; Chapman, R. D.; Kondo, Y.; Stencel, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent infrared photometry indicates that the alleged disk of particulate matter surrounding the mysterious secondary object in the Epsilon Aur system is cold, around 500 K. IUE spectra, on the other hand, contain significant flux in excess of that expected from an F0 Ia star in the far UV, which if interpreted as a hot secondary star leads to a possible contradiction with the IR data. Other models of the UV excess have been proposed, including the idea that the bulk of the short-wavelength flux is light scattered into the SWP camera from longer wavelengths. With the recent availability of a detailed generalized IUE descattering algorithm it is possible to thoroughly investigate the scattered-light contribution to the short-wavelength continuum. It is found that the IUE spectra are indeed partially contaminated by scattered light, but that even after correction for this instrumental effect a significant time-dependent UV excess is still present.

  3. Additivity of light-scattering patterns of aggregated biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper is focused on light scattering by aggregates of optically soft particles with a size larger than the wavelength, in particular, blood platelets. We conducted a systematic simulation of light scattering by dimers and larger aggregates of blood platelets, each modeled as oblate spheroids, using the discrete dipole approximation. Two-dimensional (2-D) light scattering patterns (LSPs) and internal fields showed that the multiple scattering between constituent particles can be neglected. Additionally, we derived conditions of the scattering angle and orientation of the dimer, under which the averaging of the 2-D LSPs over the azimuthal scattering angle washes out interference in the far field, resulting in averaged LSPs of the aggregate being equal to the sum of that for its constituents. We verified theoretical conclusions using the averaged LSPs of blood platelets measured with the scanning flow cytometer (SFC). Moreover, we obtained similar results for a model system of aggregates of polystyrene beads, studied both experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we discussed the potential of discriminating platelet aggregates from monomers using the SFC.

  4. Novel Trapping and Scattering of Light in Resonant Nanophotonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei

    Nanophotonic structures provide unique ways to control light and alter its behaviors in ways not possible in macroscopic structures. In this thesis, we explore novel behaviors of light created by nanophotonic structures, with a common theme on resonance effects. The first half of the thesis focuses on a peculiar type of electromagnetic resonance, where the resonance lifetime diverges to infinity. These states, called bound states in the continuum, remain localized in space even though their frequency lie within a continuum of extended modes. We find such states in photonic crystal slabs and the surface of bulk photonic crystals. We show the conditions necessary for them to exist, and provide the first experimental observation of these unusual states. We also show that these states have a topological nature, with conserved and quantized topological charges that govern their generation, evolution, and annihilation. The second half of the thesis concerns light scattering from resonant nanophotonic structures, where resonances can enhance or suppress scattering at particular wavelengths and angles. We show that multiple resonances in one nanostructure and in the same multipole channel generally lead to a scattering dark state where the structure becomes transparent. Based on the coherent interference from multiple scatterers, we show there are geometries that can achieve a sharp structural color where the hue, saturation, and brightness are all viewing-angle independent. We also invent a new type of transparent display based on wavelength-selective light scattering from nanostructures.

  5. Forward-scattered light: Spectral broadening and temporal coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, N. L.; van Winkle, D. H.

    1997-06-01

    Fabry-Pérot spectroscopy was used to observe a spectral broadening of 1.3+/-0.2 MHz in laser light forward scattered through a colloidal solution. Light from a single-mode argon-ion laser was collected after scattering through water to which measured amounts of diatomaceous earth or 0.08-μm-diam polystyrene spheres were successively added. The broadening is attributed to coupling between fluctuations in particle concentration and spontaneous thermal fluctuations. Though spontaneous fluctuations exist in all pure fluids, they are very weak in water. However, the presence of the particles induces temperature gradients in the fluid, which in turn induce fluctuations in particle concentration.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate an ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environmental light for field use. The CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. The filters in both the spectral domain and the frequency domain effectively blocked the room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  7. Investigation of light scattering on a single dust grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlu, Jiri; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Barton, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Complex phenomenon of light scattering by dust grains plays an important role in all dust--light interactions, especially in space, e.g., light passing through dense dusty clouds in the space as well as in the upper atmosphere, dust charging by photoemission, etc. When the wavelength of the incident light is about the size of the grain, the Mie theory is often used to characterize the scattering process. Unfortunately, we have only very limited knowledge of necessary material constants for most of the space-related materials and also the solution of Mie equations for general grain shapes is difficult or unknown. We develop an apparatus for observations of light scattering on small (micrometer-sized) arbitrary shaped dust grains. We directly measure the scattering by levitating grains in the field created by the standing-wave ultrasonic trap, where we can study single grains or small grain clusters. The experiment is performed at atmospheric air --- unlike other experiments, where grains were measured in water or other liquids. Therefore, the background effects are significantly reduced. Currently, the trap is under development and first tests are carried out. Besides initial results, we focus on theoretical computations of the ultrasonic field of the selected trap.

  8. Study of resonance light scattering for remote optical probing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, C. M.; Morey, W. W.; St. Peters, R. L.; Silverstein, S. D.; Lapp, M.; White, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Enhanced scattering and fluorescence processes in the visible and UV were investigated which will enable improved remote measurements of gas properties. The theoretical relationship between scattering and fluorescence from an isolated molecule in the approach to resonance is examined through analysis of the time dependence of re-emitted light following excitation of pulsed incident light. Quantitative estimates are developed for the relative and absolute intensities of fluorescence and resonance scattering. New results are obtained for depolarization of scattering excited by light at wavelengths within a dissociative continuum. The experimental work was performed in two separate facilities. One of these utilizes argon and krypton lasers, single moded by a tilted etalon, and a 3/4 meter double monochromator. This facility was used to determine properties of the re-emission from NO2, I2 and O3 excited by visible light. The second facility involves a narrow-line dye laser, and a 3/4 meter single monochromator. The dye laser produces pulsed light with 5 nsec pulse duration and 0.005 nm spectral width.

  9. Bulk and surface light scattering from transparent silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.; Bergkvist, Mikael

    1992-11-01

    Elastic light scattering has been used to study structural properties of different transparent aerogels, which may be used as filling materials in super-windows. With a goniometer having an angular resolution better than 0.6 degree(s) and a He-Ne laser as the light source we investigated the angular distribution of scattered intensity from transparent silica aerogels and one xerogel. The densities ranged between 0.11 and 0.60 gcm-3. An exponential correlation function for the density fluctuations of a random porous medium has been utilized to analyze the large-angle scattering, which is dominated by bulk scattering, for different polarization of the incident light. The determination of correlation lengths in the nanometer range was possible, because the absolute scattering intensities were determined. For relative angular dependence measurements, this range would have been accessible only to small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The resulting mean pore sizes between 8 nm and 50 nm and specific surface areas between 500 and 700 m2/g agree well with nitrogen-porosimetry data from the literature. The data compare quite well with correlation lengths calculated from specular transmittance data from an ordinary spectrophotometer. This method, which is not sensitive to the angular distribution of superposed forward scattering with large correlation lengths, has also been applied to a series of base-catalyzed TMOS aerogels with different catalyst concentrations. The forward scattering peak of the signal may be attributed to correlation lengths in the micrometer range. Experimental results for aerogel surfaces with evaporated aluminum indicate that this might be due to the surface properties. A quantitative analysis, however, is not possible yet.

  10. Wavelet transform fast inverse light scattering analysis for size determination of spherical scatterers

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Derek; Kim, Sanghoon; Drake, Tyler K.; Eldridge, Will J.; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast approach for size determination of spherical scatterers using the continuous wavelet transform of the angular light scattering profile to address the computational limitations of previously developed sizing techniques. The potential accuracy, speed, and robustness of the algorithm were determined in simulated models of scattering by polystyrene beads and cells. The algorithm was tested experimentally on angular light scattering data from polystyrene bead phantoms and MCF-7 breast cancer cells using a 2D a/LCI system. Theoretical sizing of simulated profiles of beads and cells produced strong fits between calculated and actual size (r2 = 0.9969 and r2 = 0.9979 respectively), and experimental size determinations were accurate to within one micron. PMID:25360350

  11. Visualizing Light Scattering in Silicon Waveguides with Black Phosphorus Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Hu, Shuren; Chamlagain, Bhim; Hong, Tu; Zhou, Zhixian; Weiss, Sharon M; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2016-09-01

    A black phosphorus photodetector is utilized to investigate the light-scattering patterns of a silicon waveguide through wavelength- and polarization-dependent scanning photocurrent measurements. The photocurrent signals exhibit similar patterns to the light-intensity distribution of the waveguide calculated by finite-difference time-domain simulations, suggesting that photoexcited electron-hole pairs in the silicon waveguide can be injected into phosphorene to induce its photoresponse. PMID:27296253

  12. Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procura, Massimiliano; Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Stoffer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The largest uncertainties in the Standard Model calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (g - 2)μ come from hadronic contributions. In particular, in a few years the subleading hadronic light-by-light (HLbL) contribution might dominate the theory uncertainty. We present a dispersive description of the HLbL tensor, which is based on unitarity, analyticity, crossing symmetry, and gauge invariance. This opens up the possibility of a data-driven determination of the HLbL contribution to (g - 2)μ with the aim of reducing model dependence and achieving a reliable error estimate. Our dispersive approach defines unambiguously the pion-pole and the pion-box contribution to the HLbL tensor. Using Mandelstam's double-spectral representation, we have proven that the pion-box contribution coincides exactly with the one-loop scalar QED amplitude, multiplied by the appropriate pion vector form factors.

  13. Effects of acetic acid on light scattering from cells

    PubMed Central

    Marina, Oana C.; Sanders, Claire K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Acetic acid has been used for decades as an aid for the detection of precancerous cervical lesions, and the use of acetic acid is being investigated in several other tissues. Nonetheless, the mechanism of acetowhitening is unclear. This work tests some of the hypotheses in the literature and measures changes in light scattering specific to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Wide angle side scattering from both the nucleus and the cytoplasm increases with acetic application to tumorigenic cells, with the increase in nuclear scattering being greater. In one cell line, the changes in nuclear scattering are likely due to an increase in number or scattering efficiency of scattering centers smaller than the wavelength of excitation light. There are likely several cellular changes that cause acetowhitening and the cellular changes may differ with cell type. These results should lead to a better understanding of acetowhitening and potentially the development of adjunct techniques to improve the utility of acetic acid application. For the well-studied case of cervical tissue, acetowhitening has been shown to be sensitive, but not specific for oncogenic changes needing treatment. PMID:23224185

  14. The impact of dust particle morphological details on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, Osku; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Jeong, Gi Young

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the impact of dust particle surface roughness and internal structure on light scattering. Starting from digital representation of realistically shaped dust particles, we vary the particle morphology, and perform light scattering simulations to both the original and the modified particles. By mapping the changes in morphology to the changes in scattering, we will get information of how strongly and in which way a particular change affects scattering. All investigations have been done with complex, irregular particle shapes. For surface roughness studies we have kept the particle total volume virtually constant during the roughening process, and the roughness element size small enough to keep the overall shape relatively unchanged. For internal structure studies, the size and the external shape are kept constant. These safety measures help ensure that the effects seen are in fact due to the feature studied. The work is notable for model development, because some models can not include surface roughness, for example. In that case, the people who use such models have to adjust for the fact that the results are inaccurate, and by knowing how surface roughness typically changes the scattering results, the adjustment can be made. As a corollary, if it is shown that a particular feature does not change scattering results in any noticeable way, the model developers can confidently ignore or simplify it.

  15. Circular polarization of light scattered by asymmetrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, D.; Hovenier, J. W.; Moreno, F.

    2007-07-01

    We present calculations of the degree of circular polarization of light singly scattered by some kinds of asymmetrical particles in random orientation as a function of the scattering angle, using the T-matrix method. To clarify the possible contribution of asymmetry of particles to circular polarization we considered aggregates of optically inactive homogeneous identical spheres. We analysed the effect of changing the size of the monomers and the refractive index. We also performed calculations for two different geometries. The values of the computed degree of circular polarization are generally in the range of the observed ones for light scattered by dust particles in comets P/Halley, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), in the interplanetary medium and in the interstellar medium of our galaxy.

  16. Light scattering by nonspherical particles: some practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farafonov, Victor G.; Il'in, Vladimir; Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Prokopjeva, M. S.

    2005-03-01

    Real scatterers are known to usually have complex shape and some structure. Therefore, to perform light scattering simulations, one should specify their models and select proper computational methods. To help in solution of these problems, we have created an internet cite DOP (Database of Optical Properties of non-spherical particles). The currnet content of the DOP (optical constants, reviews and bibliographies, codes, etc.) is briefly described. A special attention is paid to recently developed fast methods and codes to treat light scattering by non-spherical inhomogeneous particles using the layered models. First results of application of these tools to comparable study of the optical properties of layered particles and particles with inclusions are presented.

  17. Debye series for light scattering by a multilayered sphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Renxian; Han, Xiange; Jiang, Huifen; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2006-02-20

    We have derived the formula for the Debye-series decomposition for light scattering by a multilayered sphere. This formulism permits the mechanism of light scattering to be studied. An efficient algorithm is introduced that permits stable calculation for a large sphere with many layers. The formation of triple first-order rainbows by a three-layered sphere and single-order rainbows and the interference of different-order rainbows by a sphere with a gradient refractive index, are then studied by use of the Debye model and Mie calculation. The possibility of taking only one single mode or several modes for each layer is shown to be useful in the study of the scattering characteristics of a multilayered sphere and in the measurement of the sizes and refractive indices of particles. PMID:16523791

  18. A Study of Brownian Motion Using Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noel A.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Presents an advanced laboratory experiment and lecture demonstration by which the intensity spectrum of light scattered by a suspension of particles in a fluid can be studied. From this spectrum, it is possible to obtain quantitative information about the motion of the particles, including an accurate determination of their diffusion constant.…

  19. Light Scattering by Polymers: Two Experiments for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, G. P.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, equipment, and results for two experiments are presented. The first involves the measurement of the mass-average and degree of coiling of polystyrene and is interpreted by the full mathematical theory of light scattering. The second is the study of transitions in gelatin. (JN)

  20. Angular and spectral light scattering from complex multidielectric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grèzes-Besset, Catherine; Torricini, Didier; Krol, Hélène; Zerrad, Myriam; Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2011-09-01

    Due to the improvement of deposition technologies and polishing techniques, light scattering has been considerably reduced in optical coatings these last decades, with the result of high quality dense optical filters with minimal losses. However such improvements coupled with modern monitoring techniques have also allowed designing and producing more complex coatings with layer numbers exceeding several hundred in some situations. Within this framework light scattering must again be revisited and analysed in detail, including global loss levels together with angular and spectral analysis. This paper is devoted to the optical balance of sophisticated components for Earth Observation, where the same scene is observed simultaneously in several adjacent wavebands. Self-blocking multilayer stacks are involved to eliminate out-of band harmonics in the instrument but the filter performances are degraded due to an increase of cross talk originating from light scattering. To address this problem we use the theories of light scattering from surface roughness and bulk heterogeneity, which allows to quantity cross-talk levels and choose more adequate filters. A special emphasis is given to the case of hyperspectral filters assemblies located in the focal plane for image filtering.

  1. OLIGOMERIZATION STATE OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE REVEALED BY DYNAMIC LIGHT SCATTERING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The self-association of Rubisco activase has been suggested to be required for Rubisco activation via ATP hydrolysis. To study the oligmerization patterns in detail, we initially measured the size of each isoform (42 KDa and 45 KDa) of recombinant spinach activase using dynamic light scattering spec...

  2. Half a century of light scatter metrology and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, John C.

    2014-09-01

    Back in the early days Bill Wolf once said something like: "The guy with the lowest scatter measurement is closest to the right answer." He was often right then - but not anymore. Everything has changed. Today measurements are limited by Rayleigh scatter from the air - not the instrument. We have both written and physical standards and everybody spells BRDF the same way. In the time it takes to give this talk, over 100,000 silicon wafers will be inspected around the world using a few thousand scatterometers - average price about one million dollars each. The way the world illuminates everything from homes to football fields is changing with the advent of high brightness LED's and these lighting systems are designed using a combination of scatter metrology and analysis techniques - many of which were started at The Optical Sciences Center. This paper reviews two major highlights in half a century of scatter metrology progress.

  3. Resonating Rays in Light Ion Scattering from AN Optical Potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Basil John

    Recent experimental investigations reveal that resonances of composite ion-ion systems are a general phenomenon in light- and heavy-ion scattering. The experimentally observed phenomenon known as the anomalous large-angle scattering (ALAS) of alpha-particle from certain isotopes, such as (alpha)-('40)Ca, manifests itself in the form of successive peaks in the back-scattering excitation function. Earlier theoretical studies were mainly concentrated either on the surface-wave or geometrical-wave description of these phenomena, whereas the pont of view taken here, which is based on the results of physical acoustics, is that the ion-ion scattering amplitude contains both the surface-wave and the geometrical-wave contributions. Therefore a comprehensive approach would be to investigate both of these contributions simultaneously. This is achieved in the present work through a decomposition, by applying the Sommerfeld-Watson and Imai transformations, of the scattering amplitude into its ingredients and by analyzing both the resulting geometrical rays and the surface waves in terms of resonances. This procedure generates a precise mathematical description of resonance processes in ion scattering (via the S-function poles) and at the same time leads in a semi -classical framework to their thorough physical interpretation (via the generalized Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition). The existence of resonances in both the geometrical and surface waves emerges from such a description, and is exemplified by numerical calculations for (alpha)-('40)Ca elastic scattering.

  4. Free-form thin lens design with light scattering surfaces for practical LED down light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Raychiy J.; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2016-05-01

    The free-form optical quasilens surface technology was utilized to develop and design a solid transparent plastic optical lens for the LED down light with the narrow angular light distribution requirement in the LED lighting applications. In order to successfully complete the mission, the precise mid-field angular distribution model of the LED light source was established and built. And also the optical scattering surface property of the Harvey BSDF scattering model was designed, measured, and established. Then, the optical simulation for the entire optical system was performed to develop and design this solid transparent plastic optical lens system. Finally, the goals of 40 deg angular light distribution pattern defined at full width half maximum with glare reduced in the areas of interest and the optical performance of nearly 82% light energy transmission optics were achieved for the LED down light illumination.

  5. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-01

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data. PMID:25578045

  6. Scattering Optical Elements: Stand-Alone Optical Elements Exploiting Multiple Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongchan; Cho, Joong-Yeon; Park, Chunghyun; Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Heon; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Park, YongKeun

    2016-07-26

    Optical design and fabrication techniques are crucial for making optical elements. From conventional lenses to diffractive optical elements and to recent metasurfaces, various types of optical elements have been proposed to manipulate light where optical materials are fabricated into desired structures. Here, we propose a scattering optical element (SOE) that exploits multiple light scattering and wavefront shaping. Instead of fabricating optical materials, the SOE consists of a disordered medium and a photopolymer-based wavefront recorder, with shapes impinging on light on demand. With the proposed stand-alone SOEs, we experimentally demonstrate control of various properties of light, including intensity, polarization, spectral frequency, and near field. Due to the tremendous freedom brought about by disordered media, the proposed approach will provide unexplored routes to manipulate arbitrary optical fields in stand-alone optical elements. PMID:27331616

  7. Shape-dependent light scattering properties of subwavelength silicon nanoblocks.

    PubMed

    Ee, Ho-Seok; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2015-03-11

    We explore the shape-dependent light scattering properties of silicon (Si) nanoblocks and their physical origin. These high-refractive-index nanostructures are easily fabricated using planar fabrication technologies and support strong, leaky-mode resonances that enable light manipulation beyond the optical diffraction limit. Dark-field microscopy and a numerical modal analysis show that the nanoblocks can be viewed as truncated Si waveguides, and the waveguide dispersion strongly controls the resonant properties. This explains why the lowest-order transverse magnetic (TM01) mode resonance can be widely tuned over the entire visible wavelength range depending on the nanoblock length, whereas the wavelength-scale TM11 mode resonance does not change greatly. For sufficiently short lengths, the TM01 and TM11 modes can be made to spectrally overlap, and a substantial scattering efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the scattering cross section to the physical cross section of the nanoblock, of ∼9.95, approaching the theoretical lowest-order single-channel scattering limit, is achievable. Control over the subwavelength-scale leaky-mode resonance allows Si nanoblocks to generate vivid structural color, manipulate forward and backward scattering, and act as excellent photonic artificial atoms for metasurfaces. PMID:25668601

  8. IQENS - dynamic light scattering complementarity on hydrogenous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magazu', S.

    1996-02-01

    This paper deals with two comparative studies of dynamic light scattering and incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (IQENS) on hydrogenous systems, namely polymeric aqueous solutions and alcohols. In the first topic, attention is focused on the peculiar hydration processes present in poly(ethylene oxide) aqueous solutions and their influence on translational diffusive properties. Dynamic light scattering shows that water behaves as a good solvent and furnishes the temperature evolution of the hydration number. IQENS, on the other hand, reveals the presence of entangled water and evidences the effects of H-bond on the diffusive motions. The second topic concerns the study of rotational diffusion in two isomeric alcohols, normal-pentanol and 2-methyl-2-butanol. The comparison of the rotational relaxation times, obtained by IQENS and light scattering, allows to separate the self particle contribution from the collective one. The results allow, following Angell's classification, to attribute a more fragile character to the tertiary isomer and a stronger one to the primary alcohol.

  9. Dynamic Light Scattering Study of Pig Vitreous Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Toyoaki; Idota, Naokazu; Hara, Yoshiaki; Annaka, Masahiko

    The phase behaviors and dynamical properties of pig vitreous body were studied by macroscopic observation of swelling behavior and dynamic light scattering under various conditions. From the observations of the dynamics of light scattered by the pig vitreous body under physiological condition, intensity autocorrelation functions that revealed two diffusion coefficients, D fast and D slow were obtained. We developed the theory for describing the density fluctuation of the entities in the vitreous gel system with sodium hyaluronate filled in the meshes of collagen fiber network. The dynamics of collagen and sodium hyaluronate explains two relaxation modes of the fluctuation. The diffusion coefficient of collagen obtained from D fast and D slow is very close to that in aqueous solution, which suggests the vitreous body is in the swollen state. Divergent behavior in the measured total scattered light intensities and diffusion coefficients upon varying the concentration of salt (NaCl and CaCl2) was observed. Namely, a slowing down of the dynamic modes accompanied by increased “static” scattered intensities was observed. This is indicative of the occurrence of a phase transition upon salt concentration.

  10. The Scattering of Light III. External Scattering from a Finite Molecular Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynne, F.; Bullough, R. K.

    1990-03-01

    We calculate the external incoherent scattering from a finite molecular fluid exposed to a weak, external, coherent electromagnetic field. The scattered field is detected outside the fluid and the system models a real scattering experiment in all its aspects. The analysis is based on a classical all order many-body theory developed in two previous papers. The theory is microscopic, i.e. is developed ab initio and in detail in terms of individual scattering processes in vacuo at a strictly molecular level. But it is shown that the collective action of these generates all of the macroscopic features expected in the external scattering: for example, the refractive index, as it was calculated previously from the many-body theory, plays much of its expected macroscopic role. These macroscopic results are reached by showing that the complete scattering process (from a wave incident in vacuo on the fluid to a wave in vacuo scattered from the fluid) separates into three independent collective processes compactly described by a particular quadrilinear form quadratic in a field E induced in the fluid by any coherent external field, and quadratic in a `weight' field ɛ describing the scattered field in the fluid. The internal fields E and ɛ couple separately to the external incoming field and to one representing the external scattered field respectively. In each case they account for all collective surface effects. The kernel of the quadrilinear form accounts for all of the internal scattering processes in the fluid. The weight field ɛ and the equations associated with it describe refraction and (multiple) internal reflection of the scattered light at the surface of the medium in all details: these collective surface effects are managed in a very effective way through a new reciprocity principle derived from the microscopic theory and containing a new form of optical extinction theorem for external scattering. The kernel of the quadrilinear form for internal scattering has

  11. Light Scattering by Fractal Dust Aggregates. I. Angular Dependence of Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaki, Ryo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Kataoka, Akimasa; Nomura, Hideko

    2016-06-01

    In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T-matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh–Gans–Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates—ballistic cluster–cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle–cluster agglomerates. First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scattering angles, and their small-scale structure determines the intensity at large scattering angles. Second, it was determined that the EMT underestimates the backward scattering intensity by multiple orders of magnitude, especially in BCCAs, because the EMT averages the structure within the size of the aggregates. It was concluded that the RGD theory is a very useful method for calculating the optical properties of BCCAs.

  12. Absorption and elastic scattering of light by particle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quinten, M; Kreibig, U

    1993-10-20

    Light scattering and absorption by spherical particles is extended to aggregates of spheres with arbitrary shape and size. We applied the theory of G6rardy and Ausloos [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4204-4229 (1082)] to compute the total extinction loss spectra of several aggregates of nanometer-sized silver spheres from the near IR to the near UV. Silver was best suited to provide quantitative comparison with experiments concerning the scattering and absorption in the visible spectral region. Additional resonant extinction was obtained besides the resonant extinction of the single silver sphere. The spectra were discussed in detail to give general results that are independent of the particle material. PMID:20856447

  13. Cooperative scattering of light and atoms in ultracold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, H.; Meystre, P.

    2008-07-01

    Superradiance and coherent atomic recoil lasing are two closely related phenomena, both resulting from the cooperative scattering of light by atoms. In ultracold atomic gases below the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation these processes take place with the simultaneous amplification of the atomic matter waves. We explore these phenomena by surveying some of the experimental and theoretical developments that have emerged in this field of study since the first observation of superradiant scattering from a Bose-Einstein condensate in 1999 [1].

  14. Halos and rainbows: The elastic scattering of light exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.; Hussein, M.H.

    1993-10-01

    The scattering of an exotic light nucleus with a halo is compared with that of a normal nucleus. Four, sometimes opposing effects arising from the halo are identified. Semiclassical expressions are derived which embody these effects. The cases of {sup 11}Li and {sup 11}C scattering from {sup 12}C at E/A = 60 MeV are compared. We conclude that the {sup 11}Li differential cross sections are probably smaller than those for {sup 11}C, in agreement with recent analyses of the measurements.

  15. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-15

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the {alpha} and {beta} primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the {alpha} and the {beta} rainbows.

  16. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-01

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the α and β primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the α and the β rainbows.

  17. Characterization of super smooth surfaces by light scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Lars H.

    1989-03-01

    A characteristic feature of a supersmooth surface is its low scatter. The scatter is proportional to the square of the rms surface roughness. Therefore, light scattering is a suitable and nondestructive method for characterization of smooth surfaces. It is possible to detect scattering created by height differences of a few atomic layers but the lateral sensitivity is limited to the order of the wavelength, ~0.5μm. The new F 1048-87 ASTM standard test method for measuring the effective surface roughness of optical components is based on total integrated scattering (TIS). The amount of scattering, caused by the surface roughness, is of primary interest for optical applications, while the roughness itself is of greater concern in the fields of microelectronics and magnetic memory storage. This paper will highlight the use of a low noise TIS instrument for characterization of sub-Å roughness on semiconductor wafers, for thin film characterization, and for detection of traces of contamination on silicon surfaces.

  18. The UAS(MAL) is a bidirectional promotor element required for the expression of both the MAL61 and MAL62 genes of the Saccharomyces MAL6 locus.

    PubMed

    Levine, J; Tanouye, L; Michels, C A

    1992-09-01

    Maltose fermentation in Saccharomyces yeasts requires one of five unlinked MAL loci: MAL1, 2, 3, 4, or 6. Each locus consists of three genes encoding maltose permease, maltase and the MAL activator. At MAL6 the genes are called MAL61, MAL62 and MAL63, respectively. Transcription of MAL61 and MAL62 is coordinately induced by maltose and repressed by glucose and this regulation is mediated by the MAL activator. By deletion analysis of the MAL61-MAL62 intergenic region, we show that a 68-basepair region, from base pairs -515 to -582 upstream of the MAL61 start codon, contains a sequence necessary for the maltose-induced expression of MAL61 and MAL62, the UAS(MAL). This sequence contains two copies of an 11-basepair dyad which may be the active elements of the UAS(MAL). Using heterologous gene plasmid constructs, we demonstrate that the UAS(MAL) sequence is sufficient for maltose inducibility of MAL62 and that this regulated expression requires a functional MAL activator. Our results suggest that the MAL61-MAL62 intergenic region contains additional distinct elements which function to precisely regulate MAL61 and/or MAL62 expression. Among these are repressing sequences, including a glucose-responsive element located between base pairs -583 and -638, which is partially responsible for mediating glucose-repression of MAL62 expression. PMID:1525871

  19. Orientation-Preserving Transfer and Directional Light Scattering from Individual Light-Bending Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Barhoumi, Aoune; Lassiter, J. Britt; Halas, Naomi J.

    2011-04-13

    A nanocup, or semishell, is an asymmetric plasmonic “Janus” nanoparticle with electric and magnetic plasmon modes; the latter scatters light in a direction controlled by nanoparticle orientation, making it the nanoscale analog of a parabolic antenna. Here we report a method for transferring nanocups from their growth substrate to oxide-terminated substrates that precisely preserves their three-dimensional orientation, enabling their use as nanophotonic components. This enables us to selectively excite and probe the electric and magnetic plasmon modes of individual nanocups, showing how the scattered light depends on the direction of incoming light and the orientation of this nanoparticle antenna.

  20. Efficient light scattering in plasmonic light trapping designs for thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liming; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic structures have been proposed for enhancing light absorption in thin film solar cells, for which insufficient light absorption is a limiting factor for further improvement of efficiency. The optical path of light in the absorber layer of a solar cell is increased due to the enhanced light scattering by plasmonic structures at resonance. This process involves two steps of energy conversion: light-electron and then electron-light. The first step couples optical energy into the kinetic energy of collective electron motions in plasmonic structures, forming oscillating current. This step is easy to implement as long as plasmonic structures are at resonance. The second step releases the energy from electrons to photons. An efficient release of photon energy is a must for solar cell applications and it is dependent on the two competing effects: light scattering and field localization that results in heat loss. Theoretical discussions and simulation work are provided in the paper. The scattering of light by a plasmonic structure is analyzed based on the antenna radiation theory. Three factors are found to be important for the efficiency of a plasmonic light trapping design: the radiation of each unit structure, the array factor and the energy feeding of the structure. An efficient plasmonic light trapping design requires proper considerations of all the three factors.

  1. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  2. Characterization of sodium hyaluronate blends using frit inlet asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Hwang, Euijin; Cho, Il-Hwan; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    We characterized ultrahigh molecular weight sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) and blended pharmaceutical products containing NaHA using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering-differential refractive index (FlFFF-MALS-DRI). NaHA is a water-soluble polysaccharide with a range of molecular weights (MW; 10(5)~10(8) Da) that is found in body fluids and tissues. NaHA is also used commercially in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. We used a frit inlet asymmetrical FlFFF channel to separate aqueous polymers according to their hydrodynamic size, and we used on-line measurements of light scattering to obtain the MW distribution (MWD) as well as structural information about NaHA in aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated NaHA and anti-adhesive blend mixtures of NaHA (a commercial NaHA blend mixture containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and a new blend with hydroxyethyl starch (HES)) to determine the molecular weight distribution MWD of NaHA and the blend mixtures and to obtain structural information about these compounds in aqueous solution. We also examined the characteristics of NaHA-HES-polylactic-co-glycolic acid film products exposed to gamma radiation for sterilization purposes. PMID:22101460

  3. Long-wavelength scattered-light halos in ASC CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, Marco; Clampin, Mark; Hartig, George F.; Rafal, Marc D.; Ford, Holland C.; Golimowski, David A.; Tremonti, C.; Illingworth, Garth; Blouke, Morley M.; Lesser, Michael P.; Burmester, William; Kimble, Randy A.; Sullivan, Pamela; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Yagelowicz, John

    1998-07-01

    During the ground calibration of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) large scattered light haloes were identified in images of point sources and long slit spectral images at long wavelengths (greater than 750 nm). The long wavelength scattering was traced to the SITe 1024 X 1024 CCD and its header package, raising concerns for the performance of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) CCD detectors. ACS is a third generation axial instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and will be installed during the 1999 Servicing Mission. Two of the ACS imaging channels employ SITe CCDs, so the ACS team have conducted a study of the long- wavelength scattering, in collaboration with SITe, to assess the impact to the ACS science program and develop a solution. In this paper we discuss our solution, its implementation on ACS CCDs, and describe the results of initial tests.

  4. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.

    2001-01-01

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  5. Angularly-resolved elastic light scattering of micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.

    From microbiology to astrophysics, the scientific community has long embraced elastic light scattering from small particles as a diagnostic tool. Elastic light scattering has an extremely large scattering cross-section, allowing for single particle interrogation. This is critical in applications where trace amounts of suspect particles are to be detected in a diverse background of natural aerosols. By angularly-resolving the elastically scattered light, features can be detected in these patterns that are sensitive to a particle's morphology (shape, size, internal structure, and composition). An apparatus to collect LA TAOS (Large-Angle Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) patterns from single particles in-situ and in real-time was designed and constructed. The setup utilizes a cross-beam trigger system to minimize the effects of the aberration coma stemming from the main collection optic, an ellipsoidal mirror. LA TAOS patterns of ambient aerosols were collected and analyzed. Approximately 15% of the ambient aerosol had a sphere-like shape. The refractive index of these spheres was estimated by curve-fitting to Lorenz-Mie theory. In addition, the island features prevalent in the LA TAOS pattern were analyzed. Metrics generated from these were used to get partial discrimination between clusters of Bacillus subtilis spores (a simulant for anthrax) and aerosol particles found in the ambient atmosphere. A novel experimental setup for collecting simultaneously LA TAOS patterns at two wavelengths in the mid-infrared was also implemented. With this setup, the relative strength of single-particle absorption could be discerned at the two illuminating wavelengths.

  6. A Possible Application of Coherent Light Scattering on Biological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Dan; Chicea, Liana Maria

    2007-04-01

    Human urine from both healthy patients and patients with different diseases was used as scattering medium in a coherent light scattering experiment. The time variation of the light intensity in the far field speckle image was acquired using a data acquisition system on a PC and a time series resulted for each sample. The autocorrelation function for each sample was calculated and the autocorrelation time was determined. The same samples were analyzed in a medical laboratory using the standard procedure. We found so far that the autocorrelation time is differently modified by the presence of pus, albumin, urobilin and sediments. The results suggest a fast procedure that can be used as laboratory test to detect the presence not of each individual component in suspensions but of big conglomerates as albumin, cylinders, oxalate crystals.

  7. Space telescope low scattered light camera - A model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuper, T. G.; Shack, R. V.

    1982-01-01

    A design approach for a camera to be used with the space telescope is given. Camera optics relay the system pupil onto an annular Gaussian ring apodizing mask to control scattered light. One and two dimensional models of ripple on the primary mirror were calculated. Scattered light calculations using ripple amplitudes between wavelength/20 wavelength/200 with spatial correlations of the ripple across the primary mirror between 0.2 and 2.0 centimeters indicate that the detection of an object a billion times fainter than a bright source in the field is possible. Detection of a Jovian type planet in orbit about alpha Centauri with a camera on the space telescope may be possible.

  8. Comprehensive nanostructure and defect analysis using a simple 3D light-scatter sensor.

    PubMed

    Herffurth, Tobias; Schröder, Sven; Trost, Marcus; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-05-10

    Light scattering measurement and analysis is a powerful tool for the characterization of optical and nonoptical surfaces. A new 3D scatter measurement system based on a detector matrix is presented. A compact light-scatter sensor is used to characterize the scattering and nanostructures of surfaces and to identify the origins of anisotropic scattering features. The results from the scatter sensor are directly compared with white light interferometry to analyze surface defects as well as surface roughness and the corresponding scattering distributions. The scattering of surface defects is modeled based on the Kirchhoff integral equation and the approach of Beckmann for rough surfaces. PMID:23669841

  9. SCATTERED NEBULAR LIGHT IN THE EXTENDED ORION NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, C. R.; Goss, W. M.

    2009-11-15

    We have combined 327.5 MHz radio observations and optical spectroscopy to study conditions in the Extended Orion Nebula (EON). We see a steady progression of characteristics with increasing distance from the dominant photoionizing star {theta}{sup 1}Ori C. This progression includes a decrease in the F(H{alpha})/F(H{beta}) ratio, an increase in the relative strength of scattered stellar continuum, decrease in electron density determined from the [S II] doublet, and increase in the ratio of emission measures derived from the H{beta} line and the 327.5 MHz radio continuum. We conclude that beyond about 5' south of {theta}{sup 1}Ori C that scattered light from the much brighter central Huygens region of the nebula significantly contaminates local emission. This strengthens earlier arguments that wavelength and model-dependent scattering of emission-line radiation imposes a fundamental limit on our ability to determine the physical conditions and abundances in this and arguably other similar Galactic Nebulae. The implications for the study of extragalactic H II regions are even more severe. We confirm the result of an earlier study that at least the eastern boundary of the EON is dominated by scattered light from the Huygens region.

  10. Light pulse propagation and charge carrier scattering in semiconductor amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, R.; Knorr, A.; Koch, S.W.

    1994-12-31

    The carrier dynamics in inverted semiconductors (optical amplifiers) and light pulse propagations in optical amplifiers have been studied extensively both theoretically and experimentally. Light induced carrier heating processes, which are caused, for example, by two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption, have been studied mainly on the basis of phenomenological models. The full microscopic theory of these processes and their influence on light pulse propagation is still an unsolved problem. Here, the authors present theoretical results on light pulse propagation in inverted semiconductors and semiconductor laser diodes. The theory is based on the semiconductor Maxwell Bloch equations and includes incoherent phenomena due to charge-carrier scattering based on the solution of the appropriate Boltzman equation.

  11. Metamaterials. Invisibility cloaking in a diffusive light scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Wegener, Martin

    2014-07-25

    In vacuum, air, and other surroundings that support ballistic light propagation according to Maxwell's equations, invisibility cloaks that are macroscopic, three-dimensional, broadband, passive, and that work for all directions and polarizations of light are not consistent with the laws of physics. We show that the situation is different for surroundings leading to multiple light scattering, according to Fick's diffusion equation. We have fabricated cylindrical and spherical invisibility cloaks made of thin shells of polydimethylsiloxane doped with melamine-resin microparticles. The shells surround a diffusively reflecting hollow core, in which arbitrary objects can be hidden. We find good cloaking performance in a water-based diffusive surrounding throughout the entire visible spectrum and for all illumination conditions and incident polarizations of light. PMID:24903561

  12. Light source for narrow and broadband coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Maximilian; Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    We present a light source that is well adapted to both narrow- and broadband coherent Raman scattering (CRS) methods. Based on a single oscillator, the light source delivers synchronized broadband pulses via supercontinuum generation and narrowband, frequency-tunable pulses via four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber. Seeding the four-wave mixing with a spectrally filtered part of the supercontinuum yields high-pulse energies up to 8 nJ and the possibility of scanning a bandwidth of 2000  cm(-1) in 25 ms. All pulses are emitted with a repetition frequency of 1 MHz, which ensures efficient generation of CRS signals while avoiding significant damage of the samples. Consequently, the light source combines the performance of individual narrow- and broadband CRS light sources in one setup, thus enabling hyperspectral imaging and rapid single-resonance imaging in parallel. PMID:26625022

  13. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is providing and coordinating the technology for placing a compact Laser Light Scattering (LLS) instrument in a microgravity environment. This will be accomplished by defining and assessing user requirements for microgravity experiments, coordinating needed technological developments, and filling technical gaps. This effort is striving to brassboard and evaluate a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument. The progress of the program is reported.

  14. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model. PMID:662693

  15. Using light scattering to evaluate the separation of polydisperse nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Galyean, Anne A; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Filliben, James J; Holbrook, R David; Ripple, Dean C; Weinberg, Howard S

    2015-07-30

    The analysis of natural and otherwise complex samples is challenging and yields uncertainty about the accuracy and precision of measurements. Here we present a practical tool to assess relative accuracy among separation protocols for techniques using light scattering detection. Due to the highly non-linear relationship between particle size and the intensity of scattered light, a few large particles may obfuscate greater numbers of small particles. Therefore, insufficiently separated mixtures may result in an overestimate of the average measured particle size. Complete separation of complex samples is needed to mitigate this challenge. A separation protocol can be considered improved if the average measured size is smaller than a previous separation protocol. Further, the protocol resulting in the smallest average measured particle size yields the best separation among those explored. If the differential in average measured size between protocols is less than the measurement uncertainty, then the selected protocols are of equivalent precision. As a demonstration, this assessment metric is applied to optimization of cross flow (V(x)) protocols in asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF(4)) separation interfaced with online quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) detection using mixtures of polystyrene beads spanning a large size range. Using this assessment metric, the V(x) parameter was modulated to improve separation until the average measured size of the mixture was in statistical agreement with the calculated average size of particles in the mixture. While we demonstrate this metric by improving AF(4) V(x) protocols, it can be applied to any given separation parameters for separation techniques that employ dynamic light scattering detectors. PMID:26320655

  16. Periodic or random nanostructures for light scattering control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berginc, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Our paper mainly focuses on the control of light scattering by periodic or randomly rough structures. First designed with bi-periodical structures, antireflective surfaces can be achieved with random patterns. We present some new structures with periodic or random patterns, which have been designed by rigorous numerical methods (FDTD) or analytical methods. We show that random interfaces offer new degrees of freedom and possibilities by control of their statistical properties.

  17. Elasticity of biomembranes studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujime, Satoru; Miyamoto, Shigeaki

    1991-05-01

    Combination of osmotic swelling and dynamic light scattering makes it possible to measure the elastic modulus of biomembranes. By this technique we have observed a drastic increase in membrane flexibility on activation of Na/glucose cotransporters in membrane vesicles prepared from brush-borders of rat small intestine and on activation by micromolar [Ca2] of exocytosis in secretory granules isolated from rat pancreatic acinar cells and bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 1 .

  18. Light scattering studies of an electrorheological fluid in oscillatory shear

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.

    1995-12-31

    We have conducted a real time, two-dimensional light scattering study of the nonlinear dynamics of field-induced structures in an electrorheological fluid subjected to oscillatory shear. We have developed a kinetic chain model of the observed dynamics by considering the response of a fragmenting/aggregating particle chain to the prevailing hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces. This structural theory is then used to describe the nonlinear rheology of ER fluids.

  19. Fiber optic detector probes for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Wu, Chi; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the role of fiber optic detector probes in laser light scattering is presented. A quantitative comparison between different detector configurations is accomplished by measuring the time taken for one million photocounts to be accumulated in the extrapolated zeroth delay channel of the net unnormalized intensity time correlation function. A considerable reduction in the accumulation time is achieved by relaxing a rather stringent requirement for the spatial coherence of the optical field.

  20. Light scattering by microorganisms in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Kiefer, Dale A.

    Recent enumeration and identification of marine particles that are less than 2μm in diameter, suggests that they may be the major source of light scattering in the open ocean. The living components of these small particles include viruses, heterotrophic and photoautotrophic bacteria and the smallest eucaryotic cells. In order to examine the relative contribution by these (and other) microorganisms to scattering, we have calculated a budget for both the total scattering and backscattering coefficients (at 550nm) of suspended particles. This budget is determined by calculating the product of the numerical concentration of particles of a given category and the scattering cross-section of that category. Values for this product are then compared to values for the particulate scattering coefficients predicted by the models of GORDON and MOREL (1983) and MOREL (1988). In order to make such a comparison, we have estimated both the total scattering and backscattering cross-section of various microbial components that include viruses, heterotrophic bacteria, prochlorophytes, cyanobacteria, ultrananoplankton (2-8μm), larger nanoplankton (8-20μm) and microplankton (>20 μm). Such determinations are based upon Mie scattering calculations and measurements of the cell size distribution and the absorption and scattering coefficients of microbial cultures. In addition, we have gathered published information on the numerical concentration of living and detrial marine particles in the size range from 0.03 to 100μm. The results of such a study are summarized as follows. The size distribution of microorganisms in the ocean roughly obeys an inverse 4th power law over three orders of magnitude in cell diameter, from 0.2 to 100μm. Thus, the size distribution of living organisms is similar to that for total particulate matter as determined by electronic particle counters. For representative values of refractive index, it appears that most of the scattering in the sea comes from

  1. Light Scattering and Intermediate Range Order in Glasses: Nanoscale Inhomogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, John; Kratzer, Joseph H.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.; Hwa, Luu-Gen

    2002-03-01

    Light scattering from oxide and halide glasses at temperatures up to the glass transition region exhibits anomalous Rayleigh scattering. In all glasses a hysteresis effect is seen in the Rayleigh scattering intensity behavior when heating and cooling experiments are compared. This hysteresis effect in the Rayleigh scattering is an indication that an intermediate range order exists in these glasses. Measurements of the Boson peak, a low lying Raman line that is intrinsic to all glass systems, located about 20/cm to 110/cm from the exciting line frequency are identified with the existence of intermediate range order in glass. Large pressure induced changes in the Boson peak frequency location are observed and predicted from existing theory. The non-coincidence effect, a comparison of the Boson peak maximum location for isotropic versus anisotropic spectra, gives additional evidence that glasses have tendencies to form intermediate range order. This intermediate range order or nanoscale inhomogeneities extend from about two to five nanometers in size for the glasses under consideration. These nanoscale inhomogeneities will be identified as a possible source for non-exponential structural relaxation kinetics in all glasses. The nature of the Boson peak, the anomalous Rayleigh scattering and non-coincidence effect in glasses, is discussed with respect to their interrelationships in terms of existing theories.

  2. Screening for enzyme activity in turbid suspensions with scattered light.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert; Wulfhorst, Helene; Maksym, Lukas; Stehr, Regina; Pöhnlein, Martin; Jäger, Gernot; Spiess, Antje C; Büchs, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    New screening techniques for improved enzyme variants in turbid media are urgently required in many industries such as the detergent and food industry. Here, a new method is presented to measure enzyme activity in different types of substrate suspensions. This method allows a semiquantitative determination of protease activity using native protein substrates. Unlike conventional techniques for measurement of enzyme activity, the BioLector technology enables online monitoring of scattered light intensity and fluorescence signals during the continuous shaking of samples in microtiter plates. The BioLector technique is hereby used to monitor the hydrolysis of an insoluble protein substrate by measuring the decrease of scattered light. The kinetic parameters for the enzyme reaction (V(max,app) and K(m,app)) are determined from the scattered light curves. Moreover, the influence of pH on the protease activity is investigated. The optimal pH value for protease activity was determined to be between pH 8 to 11 and the activities of five subtilisin serine proteases with variations in the amino acid sequence were compared. The presented method enables proteases from genetically modified strains to be easily characterized and compared. Moreover, this method can be applied to other enzyme systems that catalyze various reactions such as cellulose decomposition. PMID:21302369

  3. Photovoltaic structures having a light scattering interface layer and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangxin; Compaan, Alvin D.; Paudel, Naba Raj

    2015-10-13

    Photovoltaic (PV) cell structures having an integral light scattering interface layer configured to diffuse or scatter light prior to entering a semiconductor material and methods of making the same are described.

  4. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  5. An investigation of light transport through scattering bodies with non-scattering regions.

    PubMed

    Firbank, M; Arridge, S R; Schweiger, M; Delpy, D T

    1996-04-01

    Near-infra-red (NIR) spectroscopy is increasingly being used for monitoring cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics. One current concern is the effect of the clear cerebrospinal fluid upon the distribution of light in the head. There are difficulties in modelling clear layers in scattering systems. The Monte Carlo model should handle clear regions accurately, but is too slow to be used for realistic geometries. The diffusion equation can be solved quickly for realistic geometries, but is only valid in scattering regions. In this paper we describe experiments carried out on a solid slab phantom to investigate the effect of clear regions. The experimental results were compared with the different models of light propagation. We found that the presence of a clear layer had a significant effect upon the light distribution, which was modelled correctly by Monte Carlo techniques, but not by diffusion theory. A novel approach to calculating the light transport was developed, using diffusion theory to analyze the scattering regions combined with a radiosity approach to analyze the propagation through the clear region. Results from this approach were found to agree with both the Monte Carlo and experimental data. PMID:8730669

  6. Signal sources in elastic light scattering by biological cells and tissues: what can elastic light scattering spectroscopy tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Wu, Tao T.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2008-02-01

    We used a unified Mie and fractal model to analyze elastic light spectroscopy of cell suspensions to obtain the size distributions of cells and nuclei, their refractive indices, and the background refractive index fluctuation inside the cell, for different types of cells, including human cervical squamous carcinoma epithelial (SiHa) cells, androgen-independent malignant rat prostate carcinoma epithelial (AT3.1) cells, non-tumorigenic fibroblast (Rat1p) cells in the plateau phase of growth, and tumorigenic fibroblast (Rat1-T1E) cells in the exponential phase of growth. Signal sources contributing to the scattering (μs) and reduced scattering (μ 's) coefficients for these cells of various types or at different growth stages are compared. It is shown that the contribution to μ s from the nucleus is much more important than that from the background refractive index fluctuation. This trend is more significant with increase of the probing wavelength. On the other hand, the background refractive index fluctuation overtakes the nucleus and may even dominate in the contribution to reduced scattering. The implications of the above findings on biomedical light scattering techniques are discussed.

  7. Multispectral light scattering imaging and multivariate analysis of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Skelsey, Charles R.; Fuerstenau, Stephen D.

    2005-05-01

    Light scattering patterns from non-spherical particles and aggregates exhibit complex structure that is only revealed when observing in two angular dimensions. However, due to the varied shape and packing of such aerosols, the rich structure in the two-dimensional angular optical scattering (TAOS) pattern varies from particle to particle. We examine two-dimensional light scattering patterns obtained at multiple wavelengths using a single CCD camera with minimal cross talk between channels. The integration of the approach with a single CCD camera assures that data is acquired within the same solid angle and orientation. Since the optical size of the scattering particle is inversely proportional to the illuminating wavelength, the spectrally resolved scattering information provides characteristic information about the airborne particles simultaneously in two different scaling regimes. The simultaneous acquisition of data from airborne particulate matter at two different wavelengths allows for additional degrees of freedom in the analysis and characterization of the aerosols. Whereas our previous multivariate analyses of aerosol particles has relied solely on spatial frequency components, our present approach attempts to incorporate the relative symmetry of the particledetector system while extracting information content from both spectral channels. In addition to single channel data, this current approach also examines relative metrics. Consequently, we have begun to employ multivariate techniques based on novel morphological descriptors in order to classify "unknown" particles within a database of TAOS patterns from known aerosols utilizing both spectral and spatial information acquired. A comparison is made among several different classification metrics, all of which show improved classification capabilities relative to our previous approaches.

  8. Light Scattering and Absorption Studies of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    1997-11-01

    The use of physical techniques has been very important in understanding the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. In particular, light scattering and absorption studies have been used to measure the kinetics of sickle cell hemoglobin polymerization and depolymerization (melting). The theory of sickle cell polymerization that has been derived and tested by these methods has not only led to an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease but has also led to improved treatment strategies. Sickle cell disease effects about 1 out of 600 people of African descent born in the United States. The disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin (the oxygen transporting molecule in the blood), hemoglobin S (HbS), which differs from normal adult hemoglobin by the substitution of a single amino acid for another. The polymerization of HbS, which occurs under conditions of low oxygen pressure, causes distortion and increased rigidity of the sickle red blood cell that leads to blockage of the capillaries and a host of resulting complications. The disease is associated with tissue damage, severe painful crises and a high degree of mortality. Light scattering studies of purified HbS and whole cells (conducted by F.A. Ferrone, J. Hofrichter, W.A. Eaton, and their associates) have been used to determine the mechanism of HbS polymerization. Polymerization will generally not occur when the hemoglobin is in an oxygen-rich environment. The question is, when HbS is rapidly deoxygenated (as it is when going from the lungs to the tissues) what is the kinetics of polymerization? Photolysis methods were used to rapidly deoxygenate HbS and light scattering was used as a function of time to measure the kinetics of polymerization. Polarized light scattering may be a more effective way to measure polymer content than total intensity light scattering. It was found that no polymerization occurs during a period of time called the delay time and subsequent polymerization occurs

  9. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  10. Stray-light suppression with high-collection efficiency in laser light-scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deilamian, K.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Kelleher, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An optical system is described for collecting a large fraction of fluorescent light emitted isotropically from a cylindrical interaction region. While maintaining an overall detection efficiency of 9 percent, the system rejects, by more than 12 orders of magnitude, incident laser light along a single axis that intersects the interaction region. Such a system is useful for a wide variety of light-scattering experiments in which high-collection efficiency is desirable, but in which light from an incident laser beam must be rejected without resorting to spectral filters.

  11. Light scattering Q-space analysis of irregularly shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinson, Yuli W.; Maughan, Justin B.; Heinson, William R.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    We report Q-space analysis of light scattering phase function data for irregularly shaped dust particles and of theoretical model output to describe them. This analysis involves plotting the scattered intensity versus the magnitude of the scattering wave vector q = (4π/λ)sin(θ/2), where λ is the optical wavelength and θ is the scattering angle, on a double-logarithmic plot. In q-space all the particle shapes studied display a scattering pattern which includes a q-independent forward scattering regime; a crossover, Guinier regime when q is near the inverse size; a power law regime; and an enhanced backscattering regime. Power law exponents show a quasi-universal functionality with the internal coupling parameter ρ'. The absolute value of the exponents start from 4 when ρ' < 1, the diffraction limit, and decreases as ρ' increases until a constant 1.75 ± 0.25 when ρ' ≳ 10. The diffraction limit exponent implies that despite their irregular structures, all the particles studied have mass and surface scaling dimensions of Dm = 3 and Ds = 2, respectively. This is different from fractal aggregates that have a power law equal to the fractal dimension Df because Df = Dm = Ds < 3. Spheres have Dm = 3 and Ds = 2 but do not show a single power law nor the same functionality with ρ'. The results presented here imply that Q-space analysis can differentiate between spheres and these two types of irregularly shaped particles. Furthermore, they are applicable to analysis of the contribution of aerosol radiative forcing to climate change and of aerosol remote sensing data.

  12. A Light Scattering Layer for Internal Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Silver Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keunsoo; Shin, Jin-Wook; Park, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Jonghee; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Doo-Hee; Lim, Jong Tae; Oh, Min-Cheol; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Moon, Jaehyun

    2016-07-13

    We propose and fabricate a random light scattering layer for light extraction in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with silver nanodots, which were obtained by melting silver nanowires. The OLED with the light scattering layer as an internal light extraction structure was enhanced by 49.1% for the integrated external quantum efficiency (EQE). When a wrinkle structure is simultaneously used for an external light extraction structure, the total enhancement of the integrated EQE was 65.3%. The EQE is maximized to 65.3% at a current level of 2.0 mA/cm(2). By applying an internal light scattering layer and wrinkle structure to an OLED, the variance in the emission spectra was negligible over a broad viewing angle. Power mode analyses with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations revealed that the use of a scattering layer effectively reduced the waveguiding mode while introducing non-negligible absorption. Our method offers an effective yet simple approach to achieve both efficiency enhancement and spectral stability for a wide range of OLED applications. PMID:27314500

  13. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  14. Investigating nanoparticle aggregation dynamics in an aqueous magnetic fluid by light scattering anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Dan

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering on particles having the diameter comparable with the wavelength is accurately described by the Mie theory and the light scattering anisotropy can conveniently be described by the one parameter Henyey Greenstein phase function. An aqueous suspension containing magnetite nanoparticles was the target of a coherent light scattering experiment. By fitting the scattering phase function on the experimental data the scattering anisotropy parameter can be assessed. As the scattering parameter strongly depends of the scatterer size, the average particle diameter was thus estimated and particle aggregates presence was probed. This technique was used to investigate the nanoparticle aggregation dynamics and the results are presented in this work.

  15. Studies of toxic aerosols via elastic and inelastic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, W.; Li, W.; Allen, T.M.; Blair, D.S.; Davis, E.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Evaporation rates and chemical characteristics of potentially toxic aerosols have been determined by elastic and inelastic light-scattering measurements. The aerosol systems examined were a commercial catalyst consisting of a mixture of stannous octanoate (SNO) and 2-ethylhexanoic acid (EHA) and droplets emitted from open tanks of chromic acid solutions used for anodizing aluminum. The heavy metals contained in these aerosols represent a danger to the workplace if such materials are inhaled. Nanogram amounts of the solutions were studied by suspending single microdroplets in electrodynamic balances in a flow of air to measure evaporation rates and to obtain Raman spectra. Elastic scattering data include phase functions and morphological resonance spectra from which droplet sizes are determined. The inelastic light-scattering data or Raman spectra provide molecular vibrational bond information. It was found that EHA spectra agree with bulk data in the literature, and that SNO Raman spectra, which are not available in the literature, are consistent with infrared spectra for bulk SNO. At room temperature the vapor pressure of SNO is on the order of 0.01 Pa while that of EHA is on the order of 0.1 Pa. Raman data for the residue of evaporated chromic acid solutions show the presence of chromium oxides (Cr[sup 6+] compounds), surfactants, and bound (nonvolatile) water. 31 refs., 14 figs.

  16. Discovery of polarized light scattered by dust around Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, R. S.; Tapia, S.

    1978-01-01

    Following the suggestion by Jura and Jacoby (1976), linearly polarized blue continuum starlight scattered by the dust shell around the M2 Iab star Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) has been discovered. The polarization has been traced in the NE, NW, SE, and SW directions and has positive (tangential) orientation. Some asymmetry of the optical depth in the shell exists 15 and 30 arcsec from the star. In the NE direction the polarization was measured as far as 90 arcsec (17,000 AU) from the star. The dependence of the average intensity of the scattered light from the nebula on angular distance from the star is more consistent with an inverse-square density law than with inverse 1.5 or inverse-cube laws. Assuming that the density is proportional to the inverse square of distance from the star, the scattering optical depth in blue light along a radius of 0.03 arcsec is no more than 0.15 + or - 0.05. Future observations of the wavelength dependence of polarization will allow a determination of grain size.

  17. Development of an image-analysis light-scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algarni, Saad; Kashuri, Hektor; Iannacchione, Germano

    2013-03-01

    We describe the progress in developing a versatile image-analysis approach for a light-scattering experiment. Recent advances in image analysis algorithms, computational power, and CCD image capture has allowed for the complete digital recording of the scattering of coherent laser light by a wide variety of samples. This digital record can then yield both static and dynamic information about the scattering events. Our approach is described using a very simple and in-expensive experimental arrangement for liquid samples. Calibration experiments were performed on aqueous suspensions of latex spheres having 0.5 and 1.0 micrometer diameter for three concentrations of 2 X 10-6, 1 X 10-6, and 5 X 10-7 % w/w at room temperature. The resulting data span a wave-vector range of q = 102 to 105 cm-1 and time averages over 0.05 to 1200 sec. The static analysis yield particle sizes in good agreement with expectations and a simple dynamic analysis yields an estimate of the characteristic time scale of the particle dynamics. Further developments in image corrections (laser stability, vibration, curvature, etc.) as well as time auto-correlation analysis will also be discussed.

  18. Overview of single-cell elastic light scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Matti; Karmenyan, Artashes

    2015-05-01

    We present and discuss several modern optical methods based on elastic light scattering (ELS), along with their technical features and applications in biomedicine and life sciences. In particular, we review some ELS experiments at the single-cell level and explore new directions of applications. Due to recent developments in experimental systems (as shown in the literature), ELS lends itself to useful applications in the life sciences. Of the developed methods, we cover elastic scattering spectroscopy, optical tweezer-assisted measurement, goniometers, Fourier transform light scattering (FTLS), and microscopic methods. FTLS significantly extends the potential analysis of single cells by allowing monitoring of dynamical changes at the single-cell level. The main aim of our review is to demonstrate developments in the experimental investigation of ELS in single cells including issues related to theoretical “representations” and modeling of biological systems (cells, cellular systems, tissues, and so on). Goniometric measurements of ELS from optically trapped single cells are shown and the importance of the experimental verification of theoretical models of ELS in the context of biomedical applications is discussed. PMID:25760756

  19. Static and dynamic light scattering of healthy and malaria-parasite invaded red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongkeun; Diez-Silva, Monica; Fu, Dan; Popescu, Gabriel; Choi, Wonshik; Barman, Ishan; Suresh, Subra; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the light scattering of individual Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized human red blood cells (Pf-RBCs), and demonstrate progressive alterations to the scattering signal arising from the development of malaria-inducing parasites. By selectively imaging the electric fields using quantitative phase microscopy and a Fourier transform light scattering technique, we calculate the light scattering maps of individual Pf-RBCs. We show that the onset and progression of pathological states of the Pf-RBCs can be clearly identified by the static scattering maps. Progressive changes to the biophysical properties of the Pf-RBC membrane are captured from dynamic light scattering.

  20. Profiling and light scattering studies of Si surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.; Stover, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    There is great interest in the semiconductor industry in developing light-scattering techniques for detecting ``killer particles`` on Si wafer surfaces. The surface power spectral density (PSD) is important since it determines the intensity and angular dependence of the background scattering; understanding it will lead to a deeper understanding of finishing processes. Scattering measurements showed that Si wafer surfaces have the radiation-wavelength and angular dependences expected for weak topographic scattering. The data and independent profile measurements were used to deduce consistent values of the surface PSDs over the wavelength range 50 nm to 1 mm. The profile PSDs were found to consist of a sum of inverse power-law components, i.e., the surfaces are fractal-like. There is an analogy between the results and spontaneous thermodynamic roughening of solid surfaces: Below the critical roughening temperature, the surface topography is determined by the underlying crystal structure, while above it, the surface ``melts`` and the roughness is determined by capillary-wave excitations of the surface. Capillary waves have the well-known 1/f{sub x} profile power spectrum.

  1. The application of dynamic light scattering to complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschinger, Andreas; Winter, Jörg

    2012-09-01

    The dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique is applied to the dust component of a complex (dusty) plasma, revealing a Gaussian intensity autocorrelation function for scattering angles between 4° and 175°. The Gaussian decay form represents free (ballistic) particle motion and allows determination of the one-dimensional squared particle velocity \\left \\langle v_x^2\\right \\rangle . At scattering angles below 1°, the intensity autocorrelation function is shown to be a combination of a Gaussian and an exponential function. This allows determination of the particle velocity and the diffusion constants at the same time. The dust system is fully described by the two components of motion in the horizontal and vertical directions. The two components are simultaneously measured on two scattering paths using only a single incident laser beam. In contrast to standard imaging techniques, the DLS method can be applied even to the disordered phase state where the dust particles have very high kinetic energies. In the ordered phase state, the assumptions of the DLS approach were verified by the independent Charge Coupled Device technique on the fundamental kinetic level. Furthermore, a careful discussion of the standard deviation of the DLS method proves that it can be used to study phase transitions of complex plasmas in detail.

  2. Measurements of the nonlinear refractive index in scattering media using the Scattered Light Imaging Method--SLIM.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Kelly C; García, Hans A; Amaral, Anderson M; Reyna, Albert S; Menezes, Leonardo de S; de Araújo, Cid B

    2015-07-27

    The Scattered Light Imaging Method (SLIM) was applied to measure the nonlinear refractive index of scattering media. The measurements are based on the analysis of the side-view images of the laser beam propagating inside highly scattering liquid suspensions. Proof-of-principle experiments were performed with colloids containing silica nanoparticles that behave as light scatterers. The technique allows measurements with lasers operating with arbitrary repetition rate as well as in the single-shot regime. The new method shows advantages and complementarity with respect to the Z-scan technique which is not appropriate to characterize scattering media. PMID:26367609

  3. Scattering of light by crystals - A modified Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muinonen, Karri

    1989-01-01

    A modified Kirchhoff approximation (MKA) is developed for the scattering of light by randomly oriented crystals. The reflected and transmitted near fields are calculated from ray tracing; the corresponding far fields are then obtained via the vector Kirchhoff integral. On the shadow side of the particle, an additional near field exactly cancels the incident field and causes the forward diffraction. MKA contains a particle size dependence, which is not included in ray optics treatments, and satisfactory results can be obtained for size parameters larger than ten. The scattering phase functions and degrees of linear polarization are calculated for some hexagonal and cubic water ice crystals using MKA. The Kirchhoff approximation for particles other than crystals is discussed, and attention is paid to the backscattering enhancement due to the cyclic passage of internally or multiply externally reflected electromagnetic waves.

  4. Speckle size of light scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlasso, Ricardo G.; Quintian, Fernando Perez; Rebollo, Maria A.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.; Brea, Luis Miguel Sanchez; Martinez, Eusebio Bernabeu

    2002-04-01

    This research is an extension of the optical method of quality control presented in a previous paper [Appl. Opt. 39, 5811 (2000)] to the case of slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. Applying the Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory yields an analytical expression of the autocorrelation function of the intensity scattered from slightly rough cylindrical surfaces. This function, which is related to speckle size and shape, is shown to depend on the surface correlation length, unlike for plane surfaces for which the speckle depends on the illuminated area only. The theoretical expression is compared with that for the speckle produced by the light scattered from a cylindrical bearing and from various high-quality wires, showing that the method allows the correlation lengths of high-quality cylindrical surfaces to be determined.

  5. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Anthony J.; Lee, James P.; Ellis, David J. P.; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F.; Griffths, Jonathan P.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  6. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Anthony J; Lee, James P; Ellis, David J P; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F; Griffths, Jonathan P; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  7. An introduction to dynamic light scattering of macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, K.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques provide information about size, shape, and flexibility of particles as well as offering insight concerning the nature of the interactions between particles and their environments. This book offers a study of DLS by macromolecular and polyelectrolyte solutions. With an emphasis on the interpretation of DLS data, the material is organized according to the increasing complexity of the system, ranging from dilute solutions of noninteracting small particles to the more complex multicomponent systems of strongly interacting large particles. Because the dynamics of these systems can be complex, various methods used to analyze correlation functions of multidecay processes are discussed. Also covered are complementary techniques that assist in the interpretation of DLS data - such as neutron scattering and spin echo.

  8. Light scattering in porous materials: Geometrical optics and stereological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinka, Aleksey V.

    2014-07-01

    Porous material has been considered from the point of view of stereology (geometrical statistics), as a two-phase random mixture of solid material and air. Considered are the materials having the refractive index with the real part that differs notably from unit and the imaginary part much less than unit. Light scattering in such materials has been described using geometrical optics. These two - the geometrical optics laws and the stereological approach - allow one to obtain the inherent optical properties of such a porous material, which are basic in the radiative transfer theory: the photon survival probability, the scattering phase function, and the polarization properties (Mueller matrix). In this work these characteristics are expressed through the refractive index of the material and the random chord length distribution. The obtained results are compared with the traditional approach, modeling the porous material as a pack of particles of different shapes.

  9. CIRCULAR INTENSITY DIFFERENTIAL SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY HELICAL STRUCTURES. III. A GENERAL POLARIZABILITY TENSOR AND ANOMALOUS SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamante, Carlos; Maestre, Marcos F.; Tinoco, Jr., Ignacio

    1980-11-01

    Numerical calculations of the circular intensity differential scattering of light by oriented helical structures made of units with general polarizability tensors are presented. The effects on the scattering patterns of both absorptive and dispersive properties of the units are illustrated. The differential scattering and the total scattering both show anomalous scattering phenomena; the differential scattering pattern is asymmetric when the wavelength of incident light is within an absorption band. Equations for bi-axial polarizabilities are used to derive the symmetry properties of the differential scattering pattern and to show how this symmetry can be used to determine the right- or left-handed sense of the helical structure. The wavelength dependence of the scattering pattern is obtained for a Lorentzian polarizability.

  10. Dynamic light scattering in veterinary medicine: refinement of diagnostic criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Stephen; Zietz, Stanley; Gabriel, Karl L.; Gabriel, David; DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    2001-05-01

    In dynamic light scattering (DLS), the structure or material of interest, suspended in a fluid, is illuminated by a beam of laser light and the scattered light is interpreted in terms of diffusion coefficient, particle size or its distribution. DLS has shown clear promise as a non-invasive, objective and precise diagnostic modality for investigation of lens opacity (cataract) and other medical and toxicological problems. The clinical potential of LDS has been demonstrated in several species both in vivo and in vitro. In many clinical cases, discernment between normal and diseased patients is possible by simple inspection of the particle size distribution. However a more rigorous and sensitive classification scheme is needed, particularly for evaluation of therapy and estimation of tissue injury. The data supplied by DLS investigation is inherently multivariate and its most efficient interpretation requires a multivariate approach which includes the variability among specimens as well as any correlation among the variables (e.g. across the particle size distribution). We present a brief review of DLS methodology, illustrative data and our efforts toward a diagnostic classification scheme. In particular we will describe application of the Mahalanobis distance and related statistical methods to DLS data.

  11. Estimating aerosol light scattering at the Fresno Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John G.; Chow, Judith C.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Magliano, Karen L.

    Aerosol light scattering (Bsp) was estimated from particle size and chemical measurements during the winter intensive period (15 December 2000-3 February 2001) at the Fresno Supersite as part of the California Regional PM 10/PM 2.5 Air Quality Study (CRPAQS). Bsp was underestimated by 41-46% from scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and optical particle counter (OPC) particle size distributions depending on assumptions about refractive index and hygroscopic growth. Bsp was underestimated by 35% using the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) light extinction equation and by 25% using chemical size distributions measured with micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) cascade impactors and a Desert Research Institute (DRI) PM 2.5 sequential filter sampler (SFS). Underestimation of Bsp in Fresno was related to differences in the temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which various measurements were made. Evaporation of ammonium nitrate in the heated environment in which the SMPS and OPC instruments were located caused a reduction in particle size and number concentration. The MOUDI was operated outdoors at ambient temperature and RH, while a smart-heater equipped Radiance nephelometer was operated at RH <72%. Comparing estimated and measured Bsp required adjusting the SMPS, OPC, and MOUDI size distributions to the nephelometer RH. A systematic low-bias in estimated scattering suggests that organic aerosols may have contributed to hygroscopic growth. Consistent measurement strategies are needed to properly estimate aerosol light extinction under conditions such as those found in Fresno during winter.

  12. The role of cellular environment in dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2011-03-01

    We have developed motility contrast imaging (MCI) as a coherence-domain volumetric imaging approach that uses subcellular dynamics as an endogenous imaging contrast agent of living tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy analysis of dynamic light scattering (DLS) from 3-D tissue has identified functional frequency bands related to organelle transport, membrane undulations and cell shape change. In this paper, we track the behavior of dynamic light scattering as we bridge the gap between the two extremes of 2-D cell culture on the one hand, and 3-D tissue spheroids on the other. In a light backscattering geometry, we capture speckle from 2-D cell culture consisting of isolated cells or planar rafts of cells on cell-culture surfaces. DLS from that cell culture shows differences and lower sensitivity to intra-cellular dynamics compared with the 3-D tissue. The motility contrast is weak in this limit. As the cellular density increases to cover the surface, the motility contrast increases. As environmental perturbations or pharmaceuticals are applied, the fluctuation spectral response becomes more dramatic as the dimensionality of the cellular aggregations increases. We show that changing optical thickness of the cellular-to-tissue targets usually causes characteristic frequency shifts in the spectrograms, while changing cellular dimensionality causes characteristic frequencies to be enhanced or suppressed.

  13. Light scattering in opal-based photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonov, M. F.

    2010-05-01

    We present a new light scattering pattern in low-contrast opal-based photonic crystals (PhCs). The structure of real opals is always imperfect because of the a-SiO2 particles being inherently inhomogeneous and nonuniform in size and average dielectric permittivity. We found that opals possess all predictable properties of multi-component PhCs, which we define as periodic structures consisting of inhomogeneous or multiple (three or more) components. By theory, by properly tuning the permittivity of one of the components in ordered, low-contrast multi-component PhCs (for instance, of the filler ɛf in an opal), one can produce selective disappearance of any non-resonant (hkl) stop band. A study of transmission spectra of opals revealed that stop bands exhibit different (including resonant) behavior under variation of ɛf. Experiment did not, however, substantiate complete disappearance of stop bands predicted by theory for an ordered PhC. In the region of the predicted disappearance, a new effect has been observed, namely flip-over of the Bragg band, i.e., transformation of the Bragg dip into a Bragg rise. The flip-over effect, which has been studied in considerable detail in the particular example of the (111) stop band, originates from the nonuniformity of a-SiO2 particles. This nonuniformity leads to additional broad-band light scattering, the character of which is determined by Mie scattering. Thus, Mie scattering is responsible for two components in opal transmission spectra, more specifically, narrow Bragg bands and broad-band background. Their interference gives rise to formation of the Fano resonance, which in opal spectra becomes manifest, first, in a Bragg band asymmetry, and, second, in the flip-over effect, i.e., transformation of a photonic stop band into a photonic pass band.

  14. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-01

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing. PMID:26628172

  15. Changes in hemodynamics and light scattering during cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) has been known to play an important role in the mechanism of migraine, stroke and brain injure. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals has been shown a powerful method for characterizing the spatial and temporal pattern of the propagation of CSD. However, the possible physiological mechanisms underlying the intrinsic optical signal (IOS) during CSD still remain incompletely understood. In this study, a spectroscopic recording of the change in optical intrinsic signal during CSD was performed and an analysis method based on the modified Beer-Lambert law was used to estimate the changes in the concentration of HbO2 and Hb, and changes in light scattering from the spectra data. The CSD were induced by pinprick in 10 α-chloralose/urethane anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. In all experiments, four-phasic changes in optical reflectance were observed at 450 nm ~ 570 nm, and triphasic changes in optical reflectance were observed in the range of 570 nm ~750 nm. But at 750 nm ~ 850 nm, only biphasic changes of optical signal were detected. Converting the spectra data to the changes in light scattering and concentration of Hb and HbO2, we found that the CSD induced an initial increase in concentration of HbO2 (amplitude: 9.0+/-3.7%), which was 26.2+/-18.6 s earlier than the onset of increase of Hb concentration. Furthermore, the concentration of HbO2 showed a four-phasic change, whereas the concentration of Hb only showed a biphasic change. For the changes in light scattering during CSD, a triphasic change was observed.

  16. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-01

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing.

  17. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2015-11-15

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing.

  18. A biophysical study of clathrin utilizing light scattering, neutron scattering and structure based computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Matthew Lee

    A principal component in the protein coats of certain post-golgi and endocytic vesicles is clathrin, which appears as a three-legged heteropolymer (known as a triskelion) that assembles into polyhedral baskets principally made up of pentagonal and hexagonal faces. In vitro, this assembly depends on the pH, with baskets forming more readily at low pH and less readily at high pH. We have developed procedures, based on static and dynamic light scattering, to determine the radius of gyration, Rg, and hydrodynamic radius, RH, of isolated triskelia under conditions where basket assembly occurs. Calculations based on rigid molecular bead models of a triskelion show that the measured values can be accounted for by bending of the legs and a puckering at the vertex. We also show that the values of Rg and R H measured for clathrin triskelia in solution are qualitatively consistent with the conformation of an individual triskelion that is part of a "D6 barrel" basket assembly measured by cryo-EM tomography. We extended this study by performing small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on isolated triskelia in solution under conditions where baskets do not assemble. SANS experiments were consistent with previous static light scattering experiments but showed a shoulder in the scattering function at intermediate q-values just beyond the central diffraction peak (the Guinier regime). Theoretical calculations based on rigid bead models of a triskelion showed well-defined features in this region different from the experiment. A flexible bead-spring model of a triskelion and Brownian dynamics simulations were used to generate a time averaged scattering function. This model adequately described the experimental data for flexibilities close to previous estimates from the analysis of electron micrographs.

  19. Thomson scattering calibration with ultrabright supercontinuum light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Alfier, A.

    2006-10-15

    The recently developed supercontinuum light source (SLS) finds a useful application in the calibration of a Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. When filter polychromators are used, the relative responsivity of the spectral channels is generally measured with a cw halogen light source from the dc output of the detectors, while the TS signal is measured from an ac output. In a TS system with optical delay lines, like in RFX-mod, a cw light source cannot discriminate differences between the relative responsivities of the positions that share the same polychromator but are connected to different delay lines: this can be achieved with a pulsed white light source instead. In addition a pulsed source with a time response similar to the TS signals would avoid any frequency response problem, because the same ac output of the detectors used for the TS signals could also be used for the calibration. An SLS produces a 5 ns Gaussian pulse, with a wide and smooth spectrum that covers the range of 550-1600 nm. The SLS provides a light source sufficiently bright to calibrate simultaneously all spectrometers. The experimental setup used for the calibration and obtained results are presented.

  20. Polarized light scattering technique for morphological characterization of waterborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Venkat V.; Manickavasagam, Sivakumar

    2009-05-01

    We have recently developed an elliptically polarized light scattering (EPLS) technique to characterize the morphology of fine particles suspended in an optically non-absorbing medium such as water. This technique provides the size distribution, shape and agglomeration characteristics of suspended particles. This technique can be used to detect various types of biological pathogens such as bacteria, protozoa and viruses in potable water systems. Here we report results obtained from EPLS measurements on two strains of Bacillus spores suspended in water along with comparison with electron microscopy.

  1. POLARIZED LIGHT REFLECTED AND TRANSMITTED BY THICK RAYLEIGH SCATTERING ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Natraj, Vijay; Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-03-20

    Accurate values for the intensity and polarization of light reflected and transmitted by optically thick Rayleigh scattering atmospheres with a Lambert surface underneath are presented. A recently reported new method for solving integral equations describing Chandrasekhar's X- and Y-functions is used. The results have been validated using various tests and techniques, including the doubling-adding method, and are accurate to within one unit in the eighth decimal place. Tables are stored electronically and expected to be useful as benchmark results for the (exo)planetary science and astrophysics communities. Asymptotic expressions to obtain Stokes parameters for a thick layer from those of a semi-infinite atmosphere are also provided.

  2. Peregrinations through topics in light scattering and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    In this van de Hulst essay, I have taken the liberty to present a journey through some topics in light scattering and radiative transfer which I feel were major contributions to the field but the number of topics I would like to cover is far more numerous than I have the time or the space to present. I also wanted to share with the reader some heartwarming memories I have of my wonderful friend and truly distinguished colleague Hendrik Christoffel van de Hulst (affectionately known to his colleagues as "Henk") whom I consider to be one of the preeminent scientists of his era.

  3. Goniometric observations of light scattered from soils and leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kestner, Joann M.; Leidecker, Henning W.; Irons, James R.; Smith, James A.; Brakke, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The laboratory established at NASA-Goddard to measure and model the light-scattering properties of soil samples and individual plant leaves employs two goniometers: one for the measurement of directional reflectance and transmittance from vertically-mounted leaf samples, and the other for measurement of directional reflectance from such horizontal, semiinfinite particulate surfaces as soil samples. Sample observations of various soil minerals and plant leaves are presented; these goniometric data are compared to the results of a reflectance model from particulate surfaces and those of a ray-tracing model of leaf reflectance and transmittance.

  4. Multiple scattering of light in three-dimensional photonic quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Alexandra; Wiersma, Diederik S; Wegener, Martin; von Freymann, Georg

    2009-02-01

    Recent experiments on three-dimensional icosahedral dielectric photonic quasicrystals have shown several unexpected features: transmitted femtosecond pulses developed a trailing "diffusive" exponential tail and the sum of (zeroth-order) transmittance and reflectance was well below unity. These experimental findings have previously been ascribed to sample imperfections. Here, we analyze these findings by using 3D periodic approximants of the ideal photonic quasicrystals. We show that the experimental observations can be explained in terms of multiple scattering of light within these structures, i.e., in terms of intrinsic rather than purely extrinsic quasicrystal properties. PMID:19189014

  5. HD100546 multi-epoch scattered light observations

    SciTech Connect

    Avenhaus, Henning; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Brittain, Sean D.; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.

    2014-07-20

    We present H, K{sub s}, and L' filter polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) data for the transitional disk around HD100546 obtained in 2013, together with an improved re-reduction of previously published 2006 data. We reveal the disk in polarized scattered light in all three filters, achieving an inner working angle of ∼0.''1. Additional, short-exposure observations in the H and K{sub s} filters probe the surroundings of the star down to ∼0.''03 (∼3 AU). HD100546 is fascinating because of its variety of sub-structures possibly related to forming planets in the disk, and PDI is currently the best technique for imaging them in the near-IR. For the first time ever, we detect a disk in L-band PDI data, and we constrain the outer radius of the inner hole to 14 ± 2 AU and its eccentricity to <0.133. A dark lane is detected between ∼0.''2-0.''6 AU in the front side of the disk, which is likely an effect of the scattering angle and the scattering function of the grains. We find a spiral arm in the northeast that has no obvious connection to spiral arms seen before by other authors further out in the disk, but winds are in the same direction (clockwise). The two bright scattering peaks along the semi-major axis are asymmetric, with the southeastern one being significantly brighter. This could be related to the inner companion candidate that is close to the brighter side of the disk at the time of the observations. The scattering color is close to gray between the H and K{sub s} filters ([H]–[K{sub s}] = 0.19 ± 0.11), but the scattering in the L' filter is significantly weaker ([H]–[L'] = –1.08 ± 0.35, [K{sub s}]–[L'] = –1.27 ± 0.35). We measure the position angle of the disk to be 138° ± 3°, consistent with previous observations, and we derive the dust scattering function in the H and K{sub s} filters between ∼35° and ∼130° at two different radii (30-50 and 80-110 AU) and show that our results are consistent with a disk that is more strongly

  6. Light-Scattering Study of Petroleum Asphaltene Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burya, Yevgeniy G.; Yudin, Igor K.; Dechabo, Victor A.; Kosov, Victor I.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2001-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering with an original optical scheme has been used for the investigation of opaque (strongly light-absorbing) asphaltene colloids in crude oils and hydrocarbon mixtures. Diffusion-limited aggregation and reaction-limited aggregation as well as a crossover between these two regimes have been observed. A simple interpolation for the crossover kinetics is proposed. Asphaltene colloidal structures, originally persisting in crude oils, have been detected. Addition of a precipitant above a threshold induces asphaltene aggregation. Depending on the nature of the precipitant, different crude oils respond differently on its addition: (a) exponential-in-time growth of aggregates to huge flocks or (b) fast formation of stable-in-size particles.

  7. Light-scattering Characteristics of Metal Nanoparticles on a Single Bacterial Cell.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takamasa; Kiso, Keita; LE, Dung Q; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles express unique light-scattering characteristics based on the localized surface plasmon resonance, which depends on the metal species, particle size, and aggregation state of the nanoparticles. Therefore, we focused on the light-scattering characteristics of metal nanoparticles, such as silver, gold, and copper oxide, adsorbed on a bacterium. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles expressed the strongest scattered light among them, and showed various colors of scattered light. Although a monodisperse gold nanoparticle produced monochromatic light (green color), the color of the scattered light strongly depended on the aggregation state of the nanoparticles on a bacterium. On the other hand, copper oxide nanoparticles expressed monochromatic light (blue color), regardless of their aggregation states on a bacterium. We examined details concerning the light-scattering characteristics of metal nanoparticles, and discussed the possibility of their applications to bacterial cell imaging. PMID:26960609

  8. Study of Scattered Light from Known Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, a group of edge on debris disks, surrounding main-sequence shell stars have been discovered in the infrared. These disks are of high interest because they not only have dust, but an observed amount of circumstellar gas. HD158352 was an ideal target to try and image the disk because it was one of the closest stars in this group. Using the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), we attempted to take a direct image of the light scattered from the known disk in a broad optical bandpass. Studying these particular type of disks in high detail will allow us to learn more about gas-dust interactions. In particular, this will allow us to learn how the circumstellar gas evolves during the planet-forming phase. Even though it was predicted that the disk should have a magnitude of 20.5 at 3", no disk was seen in any of the optical images. This suggests that the parameters used to predict the brightness of the disk are not what we first anticipated and adjustments to the model must be performed. We also present the blue visible light spectrum of the scattered light from the debris disk surrounding Beta Pictoris. We are analyzing archival observations taken by Heap, using Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument. A long slit with a bar was used to occult Beta Pictoris as well as the PSF star. This was done because it is necessary to subtract a PSF observed the same way at the target to detect the disk. It appears that we have detected light from the disk but the work was in progress at the time of the abstract deadline.

  9. Discrimination of airborne material particles from light scattering (TAOS) patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yong-Le; Videen, Gorden; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Chang, Richard K.

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) is an experimental method which collects the intensity pattern of monochromatic light scattered by a single, micron-sized airborne particle. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. The solution proposed herewith relies on a learning machine (LM): rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified. The LM consists of two interacting modules: a feature extraction module and a linear classifier. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine Fourier transform and non-linear operations. Linear classification relies on multivariate statistical analysis. Interaction enables supervised training of the LM. The application described in this article aims at discriminating the TAOS patterns of single bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis) from patterns of atmospheric aerosol and diesel soot particles. The latter are known to interfere with the detection of bacterial spores. Classification has been applied to a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns from various materials. Some classification experiments are described, where the size of training sets has been varied as well as many other parameters which control the classifier. By assuming all training and recognition patterns to come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to ≍ 20% false negatives from Bacillus subtilis particles and <= 11% false positives from environmental and diesel particles.

  10. THE SPECTRUM OF THE DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT: THE MILKY WAY IN SCATTERED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Draine, B. T.

    2012-01-10

    We measure the optical spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL)-the local Milky Way in reflection-using 92,000 blank sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We correlate the SDSS optical intensity in regions of blank sky against 100 {mu}m intensity independently measured by the Cosmic Background Explorer and Infrared Astronomy satellites, which provides a measure of the dust column density times the intensity of illuminating starlight. The spectrum of scattered light is very blue and shows a clear 4000 A break and broad Mg b absorption. This is consistent with scattered starlight, and the continuum of the DGL is well reproduced by a simple radiative transfer model of the Galaxy. We also detect line emission in H{alpha}, H{beta}, [N II], and [S II], consistent with scattered light from the local interstellar medium. The strength of [N II] and [S II], combined with upper limits on [O III] and He I, indicates a relatively soft ionizing spectrum. We find that our measurements of the DGL can constrain dust models, favoring a grain size distribution with relatively few large grains. We also estimate the fraction of high-latitude H{alpha} which is scattered to be 19% {+-} 4%.

  11. Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering investigation of the size, shape and metal-release of silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium for nano-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marassi, Valentina; Casolari, Sonia; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Panzavolta, Silvia; Tofail, Syed A M; Ortelli, Simona; Delpivo, Camilla; Blosi, Magda; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2015-03-15

    Due to the increased use of silver nanoparticles in industrial scale manufacturing, consumer products and nanomedicine reliable measurements of properties such as the size, shape and distribution of these nano particles in aqueous medium is critical. These properties indeed affect both functional properties and biological impacts especially in quantifying associated risks and identifying suitable risk-mediation strategies. The feasibility of on-line coupling of a fractionation technique such as hollow-fiber flow field flow fractionation (HF5) with a light scattering technique such as MALS (multi-angle light scattering) is investigated here for this purpose. Data obtained from such a fractionation technique and its combination thereof with MALS have been compared with those from more conventional but often complementary techniques e.g. transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. The combination of fractionation and multi angle light scattering techniques have been found to offer an ideal, hyphenated methodology for a simultaneous size-separation and characterization of silver nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic radii determined by fractionation techniques can be conveniently correlated to the mean average diameters determined by multi angle light scattering and reliable information on particle morphology in aqueous dispersion has been obtained. The ability to separate silver (Ag(+)) ions from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via membrane filtration during size analysis is an added advantage in obtaining quantitative insights to its risk potential. Most importantly, the methodology developed in this article can potentially be extended to similar characterization of metal-based nanoparticles when studying their functional effectiveness and hazard potential. PMID:25698553

  12. Total internal reflection and dynamic light scattering microscopy of gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Brian F.

    Two different techniques which apply optical microscopy in novel ways to the study of biological systems and materials were built and applied to several samples. The first is a system for adapting the well-known technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to an optical microscope. This can detect and scatter light from very small volumes, as compared to standard DLS which studies light scattering from volumes 1000x larger. The small scattering volume also allows for the observation of nonergodic dynamics in appropriate samples. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) forms a gel at low pH which lines the epithelial cell layer and acts as a protective barrier against the acidic stomach environment. The dynamics and microscopic viscosity of PGM at different pH levels is studied using polystyrene microspheres as tracer particles. The microscopic viscosity and microrheological properties of the commercial basement membrane Matrigel are also studied with this instrument. Matrigel is frequently used to culture cells and its properties remain poorly determined. Well-characterized and purely synthetic Matrigel substitutes will need to have the correct rheological and morphological characteristics. The second instrument designed and built is a microscope which uses an interferometry technique to achieve an improvement in resolution 2.5x better in one dimension than the Abbe diffraction limit. The technique is based upon the interference of the evanescent field generated on the surface of a prism by a laser in a total internal reflection geometry. The enhanced resolution is demonstrated with fluorescent samples. Additionally. Raman imaging microscopy is demonstrated using the evanescent field in resonant and non-resonant samples, although attempts at applying the enhanced resolution technique to the Raman images were ultimately unsuccessful. Applications of this instrument include high resolution imaging of cell membranes and macroscopic structures in gels and proteins. Finally, a third

  13. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  14. Lysozyme Aggregation and Fibrillation Monitored by Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Schmit, Jeremy; Sorensen, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins provides a rich phase space with significant biomedical implications, including a link with several age-related diseases. We employed dynamic light scattering to monitor the aggregation of lysozyme, a model protein, from a monomeric state until the formation of micron-sized fibrils. For an aqueous lysozyme solution buffered at pH 2, the auto-correlation function of the scattered light intensity was found to be well-fit by a single exponential function with decay time τ = 1/(2Dq^2) = 0.25 ms, which corresponds to a mean hydrodynamic radius (RH) of 2.2 nm, very likely generated by monomers. Ethanol (4% v/v final concentration) induced a partial unfolding, to RH = 4.6 nm. The subsequent addition of 70 mM KCl was found to shrink the size back to RH = 2.5 nm, as expected when a denatured protein refolds due to partial screening of the intramolecular repulsion. However, further aggregation was not observed. At pH 4, using a low-salt acetate buffer, more ethanol (10% v/v) was required to initiate unfolding, but once it occurred, larger aggregates formed. These results are consistent with the model that partial unfolding, which exposes beta-motif secondary structure, is a prerequisite for aggregation and fibrillation, but the aggregation fate depends on the protein charge state (pH) and screening (salt concentration).

  15. Probing a Spray Using Frequency-Analyzed Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2008-01-01

    Frequency-analyzed laser-light scattering (FALLS) is a relatively simple technique that can be used to measure principal characteristics of a sheet of sprayed liquid as it breaks up into ligaments and then the ligaments break up into droplets. In particular, through frequency analysis of laser light scattered from a spray, it is possible to determine whether the laser-illuminated portion of the spray is in the intact-sheet region, the ligament region, or the droplet region. By logical extension, it is possible to determine the intact length from the location of the laser beam at the transition between the intact-sheet and ligament regions and to determine a breakup frequency from the results of the frequency analysis. Hence, FALLS could likely be useful both as a means of performing research on sprays in general and as a means of diagnostic sensing in diverse applications in which liquid fuels are sprayed. Sprays are also used for drying and to deposit paints and other coating materials.

  16. Particle sizing by weighted measurements of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a measurement method, applicable to a poly-dispersion of particles, in which the intensity of scattered light at any angle is weighted by a factor proportional to that angle. Determination is then made of four angles at which the weighted intensity is four fractions of the maximum intensity. These yield four characteristic diameters, i.e., the diameters of the volume/area mean (D sub 32 the Sauter mean) and the volume/diameter mean (D sub 31); the diameters at cumulative volume fractions of 0.5 (D sub v0.5 the volume median) and 0.75 (D sub v0.75). They also yield the volume dispersion of diameters. Mie scattering computations show that an average diameter less than three micrometers cannot be accurately measured. The results are relatively insensitive to extraneous background light and to the nature of the diameter distribution. Also described is an experimental method of verifying the conclusions by using two microscopic slides coated with polystyrene microspheres to simulate the particles and the background.

  17. Dynamic light scattering of cutinase in AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Melo, E P; Fojan, P; Cabral, J M; Petersen, S B

    2000-08-01

    The fungal lipolytic enzyme cutinase, incorporated into sodium bis-(2ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reversed micelles has been investigated using dynamic light scattering. The reversed micelles form spontaneously when water is added to a solution of sodium bis-(2ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate in isooctane. When an enzyme is previously dissolved in the water before its addition to the organic phase, the enzyme will be incorporated into the micelles. Enzyme encapsulation in reversed micelles can be advantageous namely to the conversion of water insoluble substrates and to carry out synthesis reactions. However protein unfolding occurs in several systems as for cutinase in sodium bis-(2ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reversed micelles. Dynamic light scattering measurements of sodium bis-(2ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reversed micelles with and without cutinase were taken at different water to surfactant ratios. The results indicate that cutinase was attached to the micellar wall and that might cause cutinase unfolding. The interactions between cutinase and the bis-(2ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate interface are probably the driving force for cutinase unfolding at room temperature. Twenty-four hours after encapsulation, when cutinase is unfolded, a bimodal distribution was clearly observed. The radii of reversed micelles with unfolded cutinase were determined and found to be considerable larger than the radii of the empty reversed micelles. The majority of the reversed micelles were empty (90-96% of mass) and the remainder (4-10%) containing unfolded cutinase were larger by 26-89 A. PMID:10930568

  18. Multiangle dynamic light scattering analysis using an improved recursion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Wanyan; Zeng, Xianjiang; Chen, Junyao; Du, Peng; Yang, Kecheng

    2015-10-01

    Multiangle dynamic light scattering (MDLS) compensates for the low information in a single-angle dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement by combining the light intensity autocorrelation functions from a number of measurement angles. Reliable estimation of PSD from MDLS measurements requires accurate determination of the weighting coefficients and an appropriate inversion method. We propose the Recursion Nonnegative Phillips-Twomey (RNNPT) algorithm, which is insensitive to the noise of correlation function data, for PSD reconstruction from MDLS measurements. The procedure includes two main steps: 1) the calculation of the weighting coefficients by the recursion method, and 2) the PSD estimation through the RNNPT algorithm. And we obtained suitable regularization parameters for the algorithm by using MR-L-curve since the overall computational cost of this method is sensibly less than that of the L-curve for large problems. Furthermore, convergence behavior of the MR-L-curve method is in general superior to that of the L-curve method and the error of MR-L-curve method is monotone decreasing. First, the method was evaluated on simulated unimodal lognormal PSDs and multimodal lognormal PSDs. For comparison, reconstruction results got by a classical regularization method were included. Then, to further study the stability and sensitivity of the proposed method, all examples were analyzed using correlation function data with different levels of noise. The simulated results proved that RNNPT method yields more accurate results in the determination of PSDs from MDLS than those obtained with the classical regulation method for both unimodal and multimodal PSDs.

  19. Polyelectrolyte Conformation, Interactions and Hydrodynamics as Studied by Light Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Snehasish

    Polyelectrolyte conformation, interactions and hydrodynamics show a marked dependence on the ionic strength (C_{rm s}) of the medium, the concentration (C_{rm p}) of the polymer itself and their charge density (xi). The apparent electrostatic persistence length obtained from static light scattering varied approximately as the inverse square root of C _{rm s} for highly pure, high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA) as well as for variably ionized acrylamide/sodium acrylate copolymers (NaPAA), and linearly with xi. The experimental values of persistence length and second virial coefficient (A_2) are compared to predictions from theories based on the Debye-Huckel approximation for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and on excluded-volume. Although the mean square radius of gyration (< S^2>) depended strongly on C _{rm s}. < S^2> decreasing with increasing C_{rm s} for both HA and NaPAA indicating clear evidence of polyion expansion, dynamic light scattering values of the translational diffusion coefficient (D) remains constant when extrapolated to infinite polymer concentration for both the polymers. The behavior of D is compared to predictions from coupled mode theory in the linear limit. The effects of NaOH on the conformations, interactions, diffusion and hydrolysis rates of HA are characterized in detail using static, dynamic and time-dependent light scattering supplemented by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). For the HA < S^2>, A_2 and the hydrolysis rates all resemble superposing titration curves, while the D remains independent of both the concentration of NaOH, and the contraction of < S^2>. The indication is that the interactions, conformations and the hydrolysis rates are all controlled by the titration of the HA hydroxyl groups by the NaOH to yield -O ^-, which (i) destroys single strand hydrogen bonds, leading to de-stiffening and contraction of the HA coil and a large decrease in intermolecular interaction, and (ii) slowly depolymerizes HA. The experimental

  20. Phase separation of polymer mixtures induced by light and heat: a comparative study by light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Yuki; Kawakubo, Rie; Van-Pham, Dan-Thuy; Kitamura, Yuki; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2015-12-01

    Phase separation of binary blends composed of a polystyrene derivative (PS) and poly (vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) was experimentally induced by two different methods: heating and UV light irradiation. Using laser light scattering combined with the temperature jump (T-jump) technique, it was demonstrated that in the case of heating, the mixture undergoes phase separation via the nucleation-and-growth (NG) and the spinodal decomposition (SN) processes under shallow and deep quenches, respectively. Particularly, the crossover from the spinodal decomposition to the nucleation-and-growth process was observed at long time under a deep T-jump by light-scattering experiments. On the other hand, in the photo-crosslink case, the PS/PVME blends undergo a nucleation-and-growth process upon irradiation with weak light intensity, whereas the mixture exhibits the spinodal decomposition under irradiation with strong light intensity. From the analysis of the light-scattering data obtained for the blends under the photo-crosslink, the kinetic data reveal the suppression of morphologies having large characteristic length scales. This feature clearly differs from the phase separation induced by heating where no mode-suppression process was observed. It was also found that distribution of the characteristic length scales (the regularity) of the morphology becomes narrow as the phase separation proceeds for reacting blends, whereas it becomes broader as the phase separation proceeds by heating, revealing the important roles of reaction in the suppression of fluctuations with long wavelengths. These experimental results establish a method to control the length scales and the regularity of the morphology of polymer blends by chemical reaction.

  1. Resolving the electromagnetic mechanism of surface-enhanced light scattering at single hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-González, P.; Albella, P.; Schnell, M.; Chen, J.; Huth, F.; García-Etxarri, A.; Casanova, F.; Golmar, F.; Arzubiaga, L.; Hueso, L.E.; Aizpurua, J.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2012-01-01

    Light scattering at nanoparticles and molecules can be dramatically enhanced in the 'hot spots' of optical antennas, where the incident light is highly concentrated. Although this effect is widely applied in surface-enhanced optical sensing, spectroscopy and microscopy, the underlying electromagnetic mechanism of the signal enhancement is challenging to trace experimentally. Here we study elastically scattered light from an individual object located in the well-defined hot spot of single antennas, as a new approach to resolve the role of the antenna in the scattering process. We provide experimental evidence that the intensity elastically scattered off the object scales with the fourth power of the local field enhancement provided by the antenna, and that the underlying electromagnetic mechanism is identical to the one commonly accepted in surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We also measure the phase shift of the scattered light, which provides a novel and unambiguous fingerprint of surface-enhanced light scattering. PMID:22353715

  2. The application of scattered light to transmitted light rate in the measurement of milk constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Juan; Zou, Zhongyu; Zhao, Hong

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a new method to measure the constituents of the milk, which uses the scattered light to transmitted light rate of the laser(called s-t rate for short) to detect the protein and fat content of the milk. The basic theory is discussed in the test in detail and the feasibility of the plan is analyzed. A relation curve between the fat and protein of milk and the ratio is built by multiple linear regression method. The uncertainty of the result is mentioned in the paper.

  3. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  4. Scanning radiometer for measurement of forward-scattered light to determine mean diameter of spray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A scanning radiometer is reported that measures forward-scattered light to determine the mean diameter of spray particles. An optical scanning method gives a continuous measurement of the light-scattering angle during spray nozzle tests. A method of calibration and a correction for background light are presented. Mean particle diameters of 10 to 500 micrometers can be measured.

  5. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-01-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  6. Elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup of light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Guimarães, V.; Aguilera, E. F.

    2016-05-01

    The present status of fusion reactions involving light ( A < 20) radioactive projectiles at energies around the Coulomb barrier ( E < 10 MeV per nucleon) is reviewed, emphasizing measurements made within the last decade. Data on elastic scattering (providing total reaction cross section information) and breakup channels for the involved systems, demonstrating the relationship between these and the fusion channel, are also reviewed. Similarities and differences in the behavior of fusion and total reaction cross section data concerning halo nuclei, weakly-bound but less exotic projectiles, and strongly-bound systems are discussed. One difference in the behavior of fusion excitation functions near the Coulomb barrier seems to emerge between neutron-halo and proton-halo systems. The role of charge has been investigated by comparing the fusion excitation functions, properly scaled, for different neutron- and proton-rich systems. Possible physical explanations for the observed differences are also reviewed.

  7. Preface: Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles XIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Labonnete, Laurent; Litvinov, Pavel; Parol, Frederic; Mischenko, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The 14th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference (ELS-XIV) was held at the Universit de Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France on 17-21 June 2013. The conference was attended by 200 scientists from 26 countries. The scientific program included one plenary lecture, 12 invited reviews, 100 contributed oral talks, and 86 poster presentations. The program, the abstracts, and the slides of the oral presentations are available at the conference web site http:www-loa.univ-lille1.frELS-XIV. To highlight one of the traditional ELS themes, the ELS-XIV featured a special session on Remote sensing of aerosols and clouds using polarimetric observations. This session was sponsored and co-organized by the French space agency CNES and attracted representatives from nearly all research teams word-wide involved in the development and active use of space-borne, in situ, and ground-based polarimetric observations.

  8. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticle by dynamic light scattering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we provide a complete review on the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to study the size distribution and colloidal stability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The mathematical analysis involved in obtaining size information from the correlation function and the calculation of Z-average are introduced. Contributions from various variables, such as surface coating, size differences, and concentration of particles, are elaborated within the context of measurement data. Comparison with other sizing techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy, revealed both the advantages and disadvantages of DLS in measuring the size of magnetic nanoparticles. The self-assembly process of MNP with anisotropic structure can also be monitored effectively by DLS. PMID:24011350

  9. Synthesis of Polymeric Microgels and their Characterization with Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunder, Christian; Streletzky, Kiril A.; Freeman, Krista; Mino, Janna

    Polymeric microgels were synthesized in by chemically crosslinking hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) chains in aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide at temperatures above the low critical solution temperature (LCST) of HPC. In order to create a narrower size distribution of HPC microgels, surfactant was added. It was found that the LCST of the solution moved from 40C up to 80C with an increase in surfactant concentration from 0 to 12 g/l. Formed microgels were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Microgel solutions synthesized resulted in reasonably monodispersed nanoparticles with Rh of 90-150 nm below the transition, and Rh of 50-90 nm above the transition. The effect of synthesis temperature and crosslinker concentration on microgel size, polydispersity, and swelling ratio were also studied.

  10. Spray characterization with a nonintrusive technique using absolute scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.; Espinosa, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique to measure the size and velocity of particles is discussed, and results are presented. In this technique two small laser beams of one color identify the center of a laser beam of a different color. This defines a region of almost uniform intensity where the light scattered by the individual particles can be related to their sizes. A variation of this technique that uses two polarizations of the same color of laser beam is also presented. Results are presented for monodisperse, bimodal, trimodal, and polydisperse sprays produced by the Berglund-Liu droplet generator and a pressure nozzle. Size distributions obtained at three different ranges for the same spray show excellent self-consistency in the overlapping regions. Measurements of a spray of known characteristics exhibit errors in the order of 10 percent.

  11. Detection of circular polarization in light scattered from photosynthetic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, William B.; Hough, James; Germer, Thomas A.; Chen, Feng; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Robb, Frank T.; Manset, Nadine; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Reid, Neill; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Martin, William

    2009-01-01

    The identification of a universal biosignature that could be sensed remotely is critical to the prospects for success in the search for life elsewhere in the universe. A candidate universal biosignature is homochirality, which is likely to be a generic property of all biochemical life. Because of the optical activity of chiral molecules, it has been hypothesized that this unique characteristic may provide a suitable remote sensing probe using circular polarization spectroscopy. Here, we report the detection of circular polarization in light scattered by photosynthetic microbes. We show that the circular polarization appears to arise from circular dichroism of the strong electronic transitions of photosynthetic absorption bands. We conclude that circular polarization spectroscopy could provide a powerful remote sensing technique for generic life searches. PMID:19416893

  12. Light Scattering By Nonspherical Particles: Current Status and Challenging Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of remote sensing measurements of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and particulate surfaces as well as computations of the Earth's radiation balance require detailed understanding of the interaction of small particles with light and other electromagnetic radiation. The convenient availability of the Lorenz-Mie theory has led to a widespread practice of treating all particles as if they were spheres. However, many natural and anthropogenic particles have nonspherical shapes, and the accumulated knowledge suggests that their scattering and radiative properties can be dramatically different from those of equivalent spheres. This presentation will summarize the recent significant progress achieved in the area of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles and outline major problems that still await solution. The talk will cover the following specific topics: (1) comparison of most widely used exact and approximate theoretical techniques; (2) outline of laboratory and field measurement techniques; (3) compare theory and experiment; (4) need for a statistical approach in dealing with natural particles; (5) remote sensing and radiative transfer applications; and (6) major unsolved problems.

  13. Quantitative characterization of gold nanoparticles by field-flow fractionation coupled online with light scattering detection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Mortensen, Alicja; Sloth, Jens J; Koch, Christian Bender; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-04-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF(4). The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters of the Au and PS NPs were determined online by MALS and DLS, respectively. The three separated Au NPs were quantified by ICPMS and recovered at 50-95% of the injected masses, which ranged between approximately 8-80 ng of each nanoparticle size. Au NPs adhering to the membrane in the separation channel was found to be a major cause for incomplete recoveries. The lower limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.02 ng Au and 0.4 ng Au, with increasing LOD by increasing nanoparticle diameter. The analytical platform was applied to characterization of Au NPs in livers of rats, which were dosed with 10 nm, 60 nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86-123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum albumin even in alkaline medium, separation of the Au NPs by AF(4) was not possible due to association with undissolved remains of the alkali-treated liver tissues as demonstrated by electron microscopy images. PMID:21355549

  14. Detecting skin malignancy using elastic light scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Akman, Ayşe; Çiftçioğlu, M. Akif; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2007-07-01

    We have used elastic light scattering spectroscopy to differentiate between malign and benign skin lesions. The system consists of a UV spectrometer, a single optical fiber probe and a laptop. The single optical fiber probe was used for both delivery and detection of white light to tissue and from the tissue. The single optical fiber probe received singly scattered photons rather than diffused photons in tissue. Therefore, the spectra are correlated with morphological differences of the cells. It has been shown that spectra of malign skin lesions are different than spectra of benign skin lesions. While slopes of the spectra taken on benign lesions or normal skin tissues were positive, slopes of the spectra taken on malign skin lesions tissues were negative. In vivo experiments were conducted on 20 lesions from 18 patients (11 men with mean age of 68 +/- 9 years and 7 women with mean age of 52 +/- 20 years) applied to the Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Before the biopsy, spectra were taken on the lesion and adjacent (approximately 1 cm distant) normal-appearing skin. Spectra of the normal skin were used as a control group. The spectra were correlated to the pathology results with sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 89%, respectively. Due to small diameter of fiber probe and limited number of sampling (15), some positive cases are missed, which is lowered the sensitivity of the system. The results are promising and could suggest that the system may be able to detect malignant skin lesion non-invasively and in real time.

  15. Lectures on the scattering of light. [by dielectric sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxon, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The exact (Mie) theory for the scattering of a plane wave by a dielectric sphere is presented. Since this infinite series solution is computationally impractical for large spheres, another formulation is given in terms of an integral equation valid for a bounded, but otherwise general array of scatterers. This equation is applied to the scattering by a single sphere, and several methods are suggested for approximating the scattering cross section in closed form. A tensor scattering matrix is introduced, in terms of which some general scattering theorems are derived. The application of the formalism to multiple scattering is briefly considered.

  16. Focusing light through scattering media by full-polarization digital optical phase conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuecheng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-01-01

    Digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) is an emerging technique for focusing light through or within scattering media such as biological tissue. Since DOPC systems are based on time reversal, they benefit from collecting as much information about the scattered light as possible. However, existing DOPC techniques record and subsequently phase-conjugate the scattered light in only a single polarization state, limited by the operating principle of spatial light modulators. Here, we develop the first full-polarization DOPC system which records and phase-conjugates scattered light along two orthogonal polarizations. When focusing light through thick scattering media, such as 2 mm and 4 mm thick chicken breast tissue, our full-polarization DOPC system on average doubles the focal peak-to-background ratio achieved by single-polarization DOPC systems and improves the phase conjugation fidelity. PMID:26977651

  17. Focusing light through scattering media by full-polarization digital optical phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuecheng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-03-15

    Digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) is an emerging technique for focusing light through or within scattering media such as biological tissue. Since DOPC systems are based on time reversal, they benefit from collecting as much information about the scattered light as possible. However, existing DOPC techniques record and subsequently phase-conjugate the scattered light in only a single-polarization state, limited by the operating principle of spatial light modulators. Here, we develop the first, to the best of our knowledge, full-polarization DOPC system that records and phase-conjugates scattered light along two orthogonal polarizations. When focusing light through thick scattering media, such as 2 mm and 4 mm-thick chicken breast tissue, our full-polarization DOPC system on average doubles the focal peak-to-background ratio achieved by single-polarization DOPC systems and improves the phase-conjugation fidelity. PMID:26977651

  18. Inelastic neutron scattering and raman light scattering from hydrogen-filled clathrates hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivi, L.; Celli, M.; Giannasi, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2008-07-01

    Several samples of ternary tetrahydrofuran-H2O-H2 and binary H2O-H2 clathrate hydrates have been analysed by high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and Raman light scattering. The neutron spectrum presents several intense bands due to H2 molecule excitations and in particular to rotational transitions, centre-of-mass translational transitions of either para-or ortho-H2, and to combinations of these. The H2 molecule behaves in the clathrate cage as an almost free rotor, and performs a translational motion (rattling), that is a paradigmatic example of the motion of a quantum particle in a non-harmonic three-dimensional potential well. Both the H2 rotational transition and the fundamental of the rattling transition split into triplets. Raman spectra show a similar splitting of the S0(0) rotational transition, due to a significant anisotropy of the potential with respect to the orientation of the molecule in the cage. The comparison of our experimental values for the transition frequencies to a recent quantum mechanical calculation is discussed.

  19. Scattered-field FDTD and PSTD algorithms with CPML absorbing boundary conditions for light scattering by aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Fu, Qiang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2013-12-01

    As fundamental parameters for polarized-radiative-transfer calculations, the single-scattering phase matrix of irregularly shaped aerosol particles must be accurately modeled. In this study, a scattered-field finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model and a scattered-field pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) model are developed for light scattering by arbitrarily shaped dielectric aerosols. The convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. It is found that the PSTD method is generally more accurate than the FDTD in calculation of the single-scattering properties given similar spatial cell sizes. Since the PSTD can use a coarser grid for large particles, it can lower the memory requirement in the calculation. However, the Fourier transformations in the PSTD need significantly more CPU time than simple subtractions in the FDTD, and the fast Fourier transform requires a power of 2 elements in calculations, thus using the PSTD could not significantly reduce the CPU time required in the numerical modeling. Furthermore, because the scattered-field FDTD/PSTD equations include incident-wave source terms, the FDTD/PSTD model allows for the inclusion of an arbitrarily incident wave source, including a plane parallel wave or a Gaussian beam like those emitted by lasers usually used in laboratory particle characterizations, etc. The scattered-field FDTD and PSTD light-scattering models can be used to calculate single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped aerosol particles over broad size and wavelength ranges.

  20. The numerical simulation and goniometric measurements of cells light scattering based on Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Ye, Changbin; Zhu, Hao; Li, Wenchao; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Optical diagnostic technique, due to its rapid and non-invasive for the diagnosis diseases at the cellular level, can be performed in vivo and allow for real-time diagnosis. While light scattering method is capable of characterizing the structural properties of tissue at the cellular and subcellular scale. In this paper, the spherical models of cells light scattering were established based on Mie, and the distribution curves of scattering intensity in the range of 0~180 degrees were got to explore change rule of cells light scattering information at the molecular level. Also, a platform for experiments used to measure the light scattering information of cells was built to get the change rule of cells light scattering information in wide angular range. And the particle size distribution (PSD) of cells was got by the inversion algorithm. A comparative analysis between numerical simulation and goniometric measurements revealed that the forward-scattering and side-scattering were influenced by the particle size of cells and relative index of refraction between cells and surrounding media. It could also be concluded that it was necessary to get and analyze the light scattering information of larger scattering angle range, which may be related to the intracellular organelles and nucleus.

  1. In-situ light-scattering measurements during the CVD of polycrystalline silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, B.W. |; Reichle, P.A.; Besmann, T.M.

    1992-12-31

    Light-scattering was used to monitor the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide from methyltrichlorosilane. Nucleation and growth of SiC caused changes in surface topography that altered the angular scattering spectrum generated by a He-Ne laser. These scattering spectra were analyzed to obtain information about the occurring nucleation and growth processes.

  2. Study of the nanobubble phase of aqueous NaCl solutions by dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkin, N F; Shkirin, A V; Burkhanov, I S; Chaikov, L L; Lomkova, A K

    2014-11-30

    Aqueous NaCl solutions with different concentrations have been investigated by dynamic scattering of laser radiation. It is experimentally shown that these solutions contain scattering particles with a wide size distribution in a range of ∼10 – 100 nm. The experimental results indirectly confirm the existence of quasi-stable gas nanobubbles in the bulk of aqueous ionic solutions. (light scattering)

  3. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  4. Comparability between PM2.5 and particle light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Richards, L Willard

    2002-10-01

    Particle light scattering and PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm) concentration data from air quality studies conducted over the past ten years were examined. Fine particle scattering efficiencies were determined from statistical relationships among measured light scattering and fine and coarse mass concentrations. The resulting fine particle scattering efficiencies ranged from 1.7 m2 g(-1) at Meadview in the Grand Canyon to over 5 m2 g(-1) in Mexico City. Most of the derived line scattering efficiencies were centered around 2 m2 g(-1), which is considerably lower than most values reported from previous studies. PMID:12381021

  5. Scattering of guided light by a single hole in a dielectric slab.

    PubMed

    Mariani, F; van Exter, M P

    2015-06-29

    We study the scattering of waveguided light by a single hole in a dielectric slab with FDTD simulations and investigate two scattering processes: two dimensional (2D) scattering into slab modes and three-dimensional (3D) scattering into the surroundings. We find that 2D scattering typically dominates over the 3D losses. We find important quantitative differences between the single hole scattering and the case of scattering from an infinite Mie cylinder. Additionally, we find that a hole cannot be simply modelled as a dipolar object even in the limit of small scatterers (Rayleigh approximation). This is visible from the angular dependence of the 2D scattered intensity. We discuss the relevance of our findings in the modeling of two dimensional random scattering media. PMID:26191761

  6. Possibilities of implanted control in stimulated light scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarenko, Anatoliy G.; Andreev, Alexandr N.; Kanaev, Andrey V.

    2004-09-01

    Some possibilities of simple and thus reliable schemes of experiment "self-control" exploiting intrinsic features of studied non-linear phenomena like wave front reversal under stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) rather than outer sensors and controls are described. The schemes discussed provide input signal dynamic region broadening in stimulated scattering converters and angle of synchronism self-tuning while two frequency pumping.

  7. Stimulated concentration (diffusion) light scattering on nanoparticles in a liquid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, I. S.; Krivokhizha, S. V.; Chaikov, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    A nonlinear growth of the light scattering intensity has been observed and the frequency shift of the spectral line of scattered light has been measured in light backscattered in suspensions of diamond and latex nanoparticles in water. The shift corresponds to the HWHM of the line of spontaneous scattering on particles. We may conclude that there exists stimulated concentration (diffusion) light scattering on variations of the particle concentration, which is also called the stimulated Mie scattering. In a fibre probe scheme, the growth of the shift of the scattered spectral line is observed with an increase in the exciting beam power. The variation of the frequency shift with an increase in the exciting power is explained by convection in liquid.

  8. Characterization of Mixed Polypeptide Colloidal Particles by Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Hannah E.; Gaeckle, Grace K.; Gavin, John; Holland, Nolan B.; Streletzky, Kiril A.

    2014-03-01

    Temperature-dependent polymer surfactants have been developed by connecting three elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) chains to a charged protein domain (foldon), forming a three-armed star polymer. At low temperatures the polymer is soluble, while at higher temperatures it forms micelles. The behavior of mixtures of the three-armed star ELP (E20-Foldon) and H40-Linear ELP chains was analyzed under different salt and protein concentrations and various foldon to linear ELP ratio using Depolarized Dynamic Light Scattering. It was expected that under certain conditions the pure E20-Foldon would form spherical micelles, which upon adding the linear ELP would change in size and possibly shape. The pure E20-Foldon indeed formed largely spherical micelles with Rh of 10-20nm in solutions with 15-100mM salt and protein concentration between 10 μM and 100 μM. For the mixtures of 50 μM E20-Foldon and varying concentrations of H40-Linear in 25mM of salt, it was discovered that low and high H40-Linear concentration (4 μM and 50 μM) had only one transition. For the mixtures with of 10 and 25 μM of H40-Linear the two distinct transition temperatures were observed by spectrophotometry. The first transition corresponded to significantly elongated diffusive particles of apparent Rh of 30-50nm, while the second transition corresponded to slightly anisotropic diffusive particles with apparent Rh of about 20nm. At all H40-Linear concentrations studied, diffusive particles were seen above the second transition. Their radius and ability to depolarize light increased with the increase of H40-Linear concentration.

  9. Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends in Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Marcelino, Luisa A.; Westneat, Mark W.; Stoyneva, Valentina; Henss, Jillian; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Radosevich, Andrew; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Siple, Margaret; Fang, Andrew; Swain, Timothy D.; Fung, Jennifer; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Calcium carbonate skeletons of scleractinian corals amplify light availability to their algal symbionts by diffuse scattering, optimizing photosynthetic energy acquisition. However, the mechanism of scattering and its role in coral evolution and dissolution of algal symbioses during “bleaching” events are largely unknown. Here we show that differences in skeletal fractal architecture at nano/micro-lengthscales within 96 coral taxa result in an 8-fold variation in light-scattering and considerably alter the algal light environment. We identified a continuum of properties that fall between two extremes: (1) corals with low skeletal fractality that are efficient at transporting and redistributing light throughout the colony with low scatter but are at higher risk of bleaching and (2) corals with high skeletal fractality that are inefficient at transporting and redistributing light with high scatter and are at lower risk of bleaching. While levels of excess light derived from the coral skeleton is similar in both groups, the low-scatter corals have a higher rate of light-amplification increase when symbiont concentration is reduced during bleaching, thus creating a positive feedback-loop between symbiont concentration and light-amplification that exposes the remaining symbionts to increasingly higher light intensities. By placing our findings in an evolutionary framework, in conjunction with a novel empirical index of coral bleaching susceptibility, we find significant correlations between bleaching susceptibility and light-scattering despite rich homoplasy in both characters; suggesting that the cost of enhancing light-amplification to the algae is revealed in decreased resilience of the partnership to stress. PMID:23630594

  10. Physiological and pathological clinical conditions and light scattering in brain.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, Sachiko; Tsuda, Kennosuke; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Saikusa, Mamoru; Hara, Naoko; Oda, Motoki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Araki, Yuko; Sugioka, Takashi; Takashima, Sachio; Iwata, Osuke

    2016-01-01

    MRI of preterm infants at term commonly reveals subtle brain lesions such as diffuse white matter injury, which are linked with later cognitive impairments. The timing and mechanism of such injury remains unclear. The reduced scattering coefficient of near-infrared light (μs') has been shown to correlate linearly with gestational age in neonates. To identify clinical variables associated with brain μs', 60 preterm and full-term infants were studied within 7 days of birth. Dependence of μs' obtained from the frontal head on clinical variables was assessed. In the univariate analysis, smaller μs' was associated with antenatal glucocorticoid, emergency Caesarean section, requirement for mechanical ventilation, smaller gestational age, smaller body sizes, low 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, higher cord blood pH and PO2, and higher blood HCO3(-) at the time of study. Multivariate analysis revealed that smaller gestational age, requirement for mechanical ventilation, and higher HCO3(-) at the time of study were correlated with smaller μs'. Brain μs' depended on variables associated with physiological maturation and pathological conditions of the brain. Further longitudinal studies may help identify pathological events and clinical conditions responsible for subtle brain injury and subsequent cognitive impairments following preterm birth. PMID:27511644

  11. An ultra-efficient energy transfer beyond plasmonic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Sze-Ming; Zhong, Yan-Kai; Lin, Albert

    2014-11-14

    The energy transfer between nano-particles is of great importance for, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, nano-particle waveguides, and other photonic devices. This study shows through novel design and algorithm optimization, the energy transfer efficiency between plasmonic and dielectric nano-particles can be greatly improved. Using versatile designs including core-shell wrapping, supercells and dielectric mediated plasmonic scattering, 0.05 dB/μm attenuation can be achieved, which is 20-fold reduction over the baseline plasmonic nano-particle chain, and 8-fold reduction over the baseline dielectric nano-particle chain. In addition, it is also found that the dielectric nano-particle chains can actually be more efficient than the plasmonic ones, at their respective optimized geometry. The underlying physics is that although plasmonic nano-particles provide stronger coupling and field emission, the effect of plasmonic absorption loss is actually more dominant resulting in high attenuation. Finally, the group velocity for all design schemes proposed in this work is shown to be maintained above 0.4c, and it is found that the geometry optimization for transmission also boosts the group velocity.

  12. Measurement of aggregates' size distribution by angular light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caumont-Prim, Chloé; Yon, Jérôme; Coppalle, Alexis; Ouf, François-Xavier; Fang Ren, Kuan

    2013-09-01

    A novel method is introduced for in situ determination of the size distribution of submicronic fractal aggregate particles by unique measurement of angular scattering of light. This method relies on the dependence of a new defined function Rg⋆ on the polydispersity of the aggregates' size distribution. The function Rg⋆ is then interpreted by the use of iso-level charts to determine the parameters of the log-normal soot size distribution. The main advantage of this method is its independence of the particle optical properties and primary sphere diameter. Moreover, except for the knowledge of fractal dimension, this method does not require any additional measurement. It is validated on monodisperse particles selected by a differential mobility analyzer and polydisperse soot from ethylene diffusion flame whose size distribution is independently determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Finally, the size distribution of soot generated by a commercial apparatus is measured by the proposed method and the comparison to that given by a commercial granulometer shows a good agreement.

  13. Dynamic light scattering of xanthan gum biopolymer in colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Rahdar, Abbas; Almasi-Kashi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The dynamical properties of nanogels of xanthan gum (XG) with hydrodynamic radius controlled in a size range from 5 nm to 35 nm, were studied at the different XG concentrations in water/sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl-sulfosuccinate (AOT)/decane reverse micelles (RMs) vs. mass fraction of nano-droplet (MFD) at W = 40, using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The diffusion study of nanometer-sized droplets by DLS technique indicated that enhancing concentration of the XG polysaccharide resulted in exchanging the attractive interaction between nano-gels to repulsive interaction, as the mass fraction of nano-droplets increased. The reorientation time (τr ) of water nanodroplets decreased with MFD for water-in-oil AOT micro-emulsion comprising high concentration (0.0000625) of XG. On the other hand, decreasing concentration of biopolymer led to increasing the rotational correlation time of water nanodroplets with MFD. In conclusion, a single relaxation curve was observed for AOT inverse microemulsions containing different XG concentrations. Furthermore, the interaction between nanogels was changed from attractive to repulsive versus concentration of XG in the AOT RMs. PMID:27489730

  14. Miniaturized dynamic light scattering instrumentation for use in microfluidic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chastek, Thomas Q.; Beers, Kathryn L.; Amis, Eric J.

    2007-07-15

    Five designs for a miniaturized dynamic light scattering (DLS) instrument are described that incorporate microfluidic flow of the sample volume and fiber optic probes directly embedded into the sample. These instruments were demonstrated to accurately determine the size of 10-100 nm particles dispersed in organic and aqueous solvents with most sample sizes less than 150 {mu}l. Small stir bars were incorporated directly into the instruments, and enabled blending of different solutions immediately prior to DLS measurements. Demonstration of the instruments' capabilities include high throughput measurements of the micelle to unimer transition for poly(styrene-b-isoprene) in mixed toluene/hexadecane solvent, obtained by systematically blending toluene-rich and hexadecane-rich polymer solutions. The critical solvent composition was quickly identified with less than 20 mg of polymer. Further capabilities include temperature control, demonstrated by identification of a critical micelle temperature of poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide), as well as multiangle DLS measurements.

  15. Static and dynamic light scattering studies on dilute polyrotaxane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tetsuya; Araki, Jun; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mayumi, Koichi; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Kohzo

    2009-08-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering measurements were performed for dilute polyrotaxane solutions in different types of solvent systems, i.e. dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or dimethylformamide (DMF) containing 1-6 wt% lithium chloride (LiCl), 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). No aggregation of the polyrotaxane in DMF/LiCl was confirmed in the present study. Radius of gyration of the dissolved polyrotaxane was largest in NaOHaq., followed by values in amide solvents/LiCl and that in DMSO, and was probably dominated not by Coulombic repulsion but by the mutual affinity between solvent and polyrotaxane. Ratio of radius of gyration to hydrodynamic radius suggested the flexible random-coiled conformation in DMSO and relatively more extended, semi-flexible ones in amide solvents/LiCl and NaOHaq. The obtained values of second virial coefficient and weight average molecular weight seemed to be affected by a potential change in differential refractive index increments, caused by selective macrocationization or ionization.

  16. Physiological and pathological clinical conditions and light scattering in brain

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, Sachiko; Tsuda, Kennosuke; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Saikusa, Mamoru; Hara, Naoko; Oda, Motoki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Araki, Yuko; Sugioka, Takashi; Takashima, Sachio; Iwata, Osuke

    2016-01-01

    MRI of preterm infants at term commonly reveals subtle brain lesions such as diffuse white matter injury, which are linked with later cognitive impairments. The timing and mechanism of such injury remains unclear. The reduced scattering coefficient of near-infrared light (μs’) has been shown to correlate linearly with gestational age in neonates. To identify clinical variables associated with brain μs’, 60 preterm and full-term infants were studied within 7 days of birth. Dependence of μs’ obtained from the frontal head on clinical variables was assessed. In the univariate analysis, smaller μs’ was associated with antenatal glucocorticoid, emergency Caesarean section, requirement for mechanical ventilation, smaller gestational age, smaller body sizes, low 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, higher cord blood pH and PO2, and higher blood HCO3− at the time of study. Multivariate analysis revealed that smaller gestational age, requirement for mechanical ventilation, and higher HCO3− at the time of study were correlated with smaller μs’. Brain μs’ depended on variables associated with physiological maturation and pathological conditions of the brain. Further longitudinal studies may help identify pathological events and clinical conditions responsible for subtle brain injury and subsequent cognitive impairments following preterm birth. PMID:27511644

  17. Characterization of dental composite curing kinetics using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells-Gray, Elaine M.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Sakaguchi, Ron L.

    2009-02-01

    Polymer resin composites are a class of widely used restorative dental materials that undergo a complex polymerization curing process that has been the subject of substantial research. This study uses speckle correlation methods based on dynamic light scattering as a tool to monitor the rate and extent of dental composite polymerization during and after photo-curing. Thin disc-shaped samples (<2mm) were constructed using composite consisting of 50:50 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin, quartz silica filler particles, and camphorquinone as photo-initiator. A 633 nm HeNe laser beam was used to probe the top surface of the sample via a backscattered speckle pattern, while the bottom surface was illuminated with a halogen curing lamp (peak wavelength=470nm) to initiate the polymerization reaction. The speckle patterns were recorded with a CCD camera, and stored as a 'speckle cube' for post processing. Correlation values of the intensity fluctuation were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis for pairs of subsequent speckle images and then ensemble averaged. Results show a sharp decrease in correlation at the onset of curing, indicating a large amount of double bond conversion and movement within the composite. Correlation values then quickly increase, eventually reaching a plateau near unity, indicating cessation of molecular rearrangement. The kinetic behavior demonstrated by our correlation curves are in good agreement with curing data found in the literature, and demonstrate the usefulness of this technique for monitoring dental composite curing.

  18. Dynamic light-scattering monitoring of a transient biopolymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, A. F.; Chen, T.; Payne, G. F.; Anisimov, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    We performed dynamic light-scattering (DLS) monitoring and a rheological study to characterize the formation and destruction of a transient (limited lifetime) gel formed from the biopolymers chitosan and gelatin. Gel formation, initiated by the enzyme tyrosinase, is followed by spontaneous gel breakage. Our DLS results demonstrate that this material passes through five stages in which the gel forms, consolidates, “lives”, softens, and eventually breaks. We speculate that the existence of the transient gel is caused by a competition between two processes: a fast-rate chemical reaction leading to formation of a branched-copolymer network and a slow-rate diffusion-like rearrangement of the gelatin branches resulting in eventual gel breakage. Despite a dramatic difference in the characteristic times of the gel formation ( tg) and gel breakage ( tb)-the ratio tb/ tg is of the order 10 3-DLS has revealed an intrinsic monitoring-time symmetry in the formation and destruction of the gel provided that a proper physical choice of the reduced temporal scale is used. In this scale the slow-mode relaxation time for both sides of the process, gel formation and gel destruction, exhibits a power law in the spirit of percolation theory.

  19. LIGHT BEAMS: Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, I. L.; Prikhach, A. S.; Kazak, N. S.; Kroening, M.

    2006-04-01

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable.

  20. Effective phase function of light scattered at small angles by polydisperse particulate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, I.

    2008-06-01

    Particles with typical dimensions higher than the light wavelength and relative refraction indexes close to one, scatter light mainly in the forward direction where the scattered light intensity has a narrow peak. For particulate media accomplishing these requirements the light scattered at small angles in a far-field detecting set-up can be described analytically by an effective phase function (EPF) even in the multiple scattering regime. The EPF model which was built for monodispersed systems has been extended to polydispersed media. The main ingredients consist in the replacement of the single particle phase function and of the optical thickness with their corresponding averaged values. Using a Gamma particle size distribution (PSD) as a testing model, the effect of polydispersity was systematically investigated. The increase of the average radius or/and of the PSD standard deviation leads to the decrease of the angular spreading of the small angle scattered light.

  1. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    PubMed

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  2. The polarization of light scattered by small particles: A personal review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    A personal review of the author's field of research is presented at the occasion of his receipt of the first Van de Hulst Light-Scattering Award. Special attention is given to the relation between the author's work and the contributions of Professor H.C. van de Hulst to the field of light scattering by small particles. History, people and research are intertwined in this paper. The polarization of light scattered by particles is brought into focus. First, the interpretation of the polarization of Venus in terms of properties of its cloud particles is recorded, followed by a discussion of symmetry principles and their interrelationships. The structure of a variety of Mueller matrices is exposed. Experimental work on light scattering is also considered. Finally, the fast growth of knowledge over the past few decades pertaining to light scattering by non-spherical particles is indicated.

  3. Coherence effects in scattering order expansion of light by atomic clouds.

    PubMed

    Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Samoylova, Marina; Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    We interpret cooperative scattering by a collection of cold atoms as a multiple-scattering process. Starting from microscopic equations describing the response of N atoms to a probe light beam, we represent the total scattered field as an infinite series of multiple-scattering events. As an application of the method, we obtain analytical expressions of the coherent intensity in the double-scattering approximation for Gaussian density profiles. In particular, we quantify the contributions of coherent backward and forward scattering. PMID:24979635

  4. Nature of light scattering in dental enamel and dentin at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Glena, Richard E.; Featherstone, John D. B.; Seka, Wolf

    1995-03-01

    The light-scattering properties of dental enamel and dentin were measured at 543, 632, and 1053 nm. Angularly resolved scattering distributions for these materials were measured from 0 deg to 180 deg using a rotating goniometer. Surface scattering was minimized by immersing the samples in an index-matching bath. The scattering and absorption coefficients and the scattering phase function were deduced by comparing the measured scattering data with angularly resolved Monte Carlo light-scattering simulations. Enamel and dentin were best represented by a linear combination of a highly forward-peaked Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function and an isotropic phase function. Enamel weakly scatters light between 543 nm and 1.06 mu m, with the scattering coefficient ( mu s) ranging from mu s = 15 to 105 cm-1. The phase function is a combination of a HG function with g = 0.96 and a 30-60% isotropic phase function. For enamel, absorption is negligible. Dentin scatters strongly in the visible and near IR ( mu s approximately equals 260 cm-1) and absorbs weakly ( mu a approximately equals 4 cm-1). The scattering phase function for dentin is described by a HG function with g = 0.93 and a very weak isotropic scattering component ( approximately 2%).

  5. Light-scattering polarization measurements as a new parameter in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    de Grooth, B.G.; Terstappen, L.W.; Puppels, G.J.; Greve, J.

    1987-11-01

    Polarization measurement of orthogonal light scattering is introduced as a new optical parameter in flow cytometry. In the experimental setup, the electrical field of the incident laser beam is polarized in the direction of the sample flow. The intensity of the orthogonal light scattering polarized along the direction of the incoming laser beam is called depolarized orthogonal light scattering. Theoretical analysis shows that for small values of the detection aperture, the measured depolarization is caused by anisotropic cell structures and multiple scattering processes inside the cell. Measurements of the orthogonal depolarized light scattering in combination with the normal orthogonal light scattering of human leucocytes revealed two populations of granulocytes. By means of cell sorting it was shown that the granulocytes with a relatively high depolarization are eosinophilic granulocytes. Similar experiments with human lymphocytes revealed a minor subpopulation of yet-unidentified lymphocytes with a relative large orthogonal light-scattering depolarization. The results were obtained with an argon ion laser tuned at different wavelengths as well as with a 630-nm helium neon laser. These results show that measurement of depolarized orthogonal light scattering is a useful new parameter for flow-cytometric cell differentiation.

  6. Polarized light imaging specifies the anisotropy of light scattering in the superficial layer of a tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Roussel, Stéphane; Samatham, Ravikant

    2016-07-01

    This report describes how optical images acquired using linearly polarized light can specify the anisotropy of scattering (g) and the ratio of reduced scattering [μs‧=μs(1-g)] to absorption (μa), i.e., N‧=μs‧/μa. A camera acquired copolarized (HH) and crosspolarized (HV) reflectance images of a tissue (skin), which yielded images based on the intensity (I=HH+HV) and difference (Q=HH-HV) of reflectance images. Monte Carlo simulations generated an analysis grid (or lookup table), which mapped Q and I into a grid of g versus N‧, i.e., g(Q,I) and N‧(Q,I). The anisotropy g is interesting because it is sensitive to the submicrometer structure of biological tissues. Hence, polarized light imaging can monitor shifts in the submicrometer (50 to 1000 nm) structure of tissues. The Q values for forearm skin on two subjects (one Caucasian, one pigmented) were in the range of 0.046±0.007 (24), which is the mean±SD for 24 measurements on 8 skin sites×3 visible wavelengths, 470, 524, and 625 nm, which indicated g values of 0.67±0.07 (24).

  7. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  8. Near-zone evanescent waves generated by weak scattering of light from a spatially deterministic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2016-02-01

    It is commonly known that the far-zone spectrum of a scattered field can be utilized to measure the scattering potential of the medium. However, properties of evanescent fields scattered from the medium with the dielectric susceptibility being a deterministic function, to the best of our knowledge, have not been concerned so far. Assuming the scattering potential of a spatially deterministic medium suffices the Gaussian profile, integrations are derived for the near-zone evanescent field generated by the scattering of light from the medium. It is noticed that the spectral density of the scattered field decays exponentially as either the propagation distance of scattered waves or the effective radius of the scattering potential (ERSP) increases. These results are applicable to the near-field biomedical imaging where the considered tiny particles and molecules solely scatter evanescent waves in near-zone regions.

  9. Light scattering from human corneal grafts: Bulk and surface contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël; Georges, Gaëlle; Lamoine, Laure Siozade; Deumié, Carole; Conrath, John; Hoffart, Louis

    2010-09-01

    The cornea is the only transparent tissue in the body. The transparency is the main characteristic of the corneal tissue, and depends not only on the transmission coefficient but also on the losses by scattering and absorption. The scattering properties of the cornea tissues become one of the most important parameters in the case of the corneal graft. These scattering properties are studied in this paper in the reflected half area, similar to the diagnosis configuration. We quantify the influence of the cornea thickness and of the epithelial layer on scattering level. The technique of ellipsometry on scattered field is also used to analyze the polarization properties in order to determine the origin of scattering (surface and/or bulk).

  10. Light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities based on hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with radiosity model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Peng, Zhen; Wang, Xiaorui; Ripoll, Jorge; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling light propagation in the whole body is essential and necessary for optical imaging. However, non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption regions commonly exist in biological tissues, which lead to inaccuracy of the existing light transport models. In this paper, a novel hybrid light transport model that couples the simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN) with the radiosity theory (HSRM) was presented, to accurately describe light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. In the model, the radiosity theory was used to characterize the light transport in non-scattering regions and the SPN was employed to handle the scattering problems, including subsets of low-scattering and high absorption. A Neumann source constructed by the light transport in the non-scattering region and formed at the interface between the non-scattering and scattering regions was superposed into the original light source, to couple the SPN with the radiosity theory. The accuracy and effectiveness of the HSRM was first verified with both regular and digital mouse model based simulations and a physical phantom based experiment. The feasibility and applicability of the HSRM was then investigated by a broad range of optical properties. Lastly, the influence of depth of the light source on the model was also discussed. Primary results showed that the proposed model provided high performance for light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. PMID:24156077

  11. Light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities based on hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with radiosity model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Peng, Zhen; Wang, Xiaorui; Ripoll, Jorge; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling light propagation in the whole body is essential and necessary for optical imaging. However, non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption regions commonly exist in biological tissues, which lead to inaccuracy of the existing light transport models. In this paper, a novel hybrid light transport model that couples the simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN) with the radiosity theory (HSRM) was presented, to accurately describe light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. In the model, the radiosity theory was used to characterize the light transport in non-scattering regions and the SPN was employed to handle the scattering problems, including subsets of low-scattering and high absorption. A Neumann source constructed by the light transport in the non-scattering region and formed at the interface between the non-scattering and scattering regions was superposed into the original light source, to couple the SPN with the radiosity theory. The accuracy and effectiveness of the HSRM was first verified with both regular and digital mouse model based simulations and a physical phantom based experiment. The feasibility and applicability of the HSRM was then investigated by a broad range of optical properties. Lastly, the influence of depth of the light source on the model was also discussed. Primary results showed that the proposed model provided high performance for light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. PMID:24156077

  12. Literature survey for suppression of scattered light in large space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, W. G.; Fannin, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey is presented of articles dealing with all aspects of predicting, measuring, and controlling unwanted scattered (stray) light. The survey is divided into four broad classifications: (1) existing baffle/telescope designs; (2) computer programs for the analysis/design of light suppression systems; (3) the mechanism, measurement, and control of light scattering; and (4) the advantages and problems introduced by the space environment for the operation of diffraction-limited optical systems.

  13. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√{E{(MeV)}} required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  14. Computer simulation studies of the speckle correlations of light scattered from a random array of scatterers: Scalar wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurn, A. R.; Maradudin, A. A.

    2001-10-01

    Two computer simulation studies of the speckle correlations in the light scattered from a volume disordered dielectric medium consisting of a random array of dielectric spheres are made. In both studies light is treated in the scalar wave approximation, and the wavelength of the light is taken to be much greater than the radius of the dielectric spheres. In one study, the scattering medium is formed by placing dielectric spheres of radius R and dielectric constant ɛ randomly in space. The spheres occupy space uniformly, under the provision that no two spheres overlap. In a second study, the scattering medium is formed by placing dielectric spheres of radius R and dielectric constant ɛ randomly on the vertices of a simple cubic lattice so that a fixed fraction of the vertices is occupied by the spheres. The lattice constant of the simple cubic lattice is taken to be of the order of magnitude of the wavelength of light in vacuum. In both studies the the volume filling fraction is the same, and the region outside the spheres is vacuum. The field equations are integrated numerically to determine the scattered fields, and these fields are used to calculate the speckle correlation function defined by C(q-->,k-->\\|q',k')=<[I(q-->\\|k-->)-\\|k-->)>][I(q'\\|k')-. Here I(q-->\\|k-->) is proportional to the differential scattering coefficient for the elastic scattering of light of wave vector k--> into light of wave vector q-->, and < > indicates an average over an ensemble of random systems. Results are presented for C(q-->,k-->\\|q',k') with particular attention paid to regions of k--> space in which either the C(1) or C(10) contributions dominate the correlator.

  15. Experimental demonstration and modeling of the internal light scattering profile within solar cells due to random dielectric scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-01-01

    Many photovoltaic technologies are shifting toward thin-film devices to simultaneously reduce costs and improve carrier collection efficiencies; however, the need for nearly complete light absorption within the semiconductor to achieve large short-circuit currents constrains this thickness reduction. Light trapping strategies can be employed to increase absorption in thinner devices. Random scattering coatings offer a simple, cost-effective way to increase solar cell absorption without the drawback of increased surface recombination or reduced bandwidth that occurs when using surface texturing or gratings. However, coatings that show excellent performance as scatterers in free space generally do not enhance device absorption as much as an ideal Lambertian scatterer. Here, we present an experimental technique and theoretical model that accurately describes the absorption improvement that is achievable with coatings based on random ensembles of dielectric scatterers. We find that the ideal Lambertian model substantially overestimates the experimental scattering results, but significant path length enhancements are still achievable. The experimental techniques presented here should enable the testing of various optical models that attempt to surpass the ray optics light trapping limit, which have in many cases been hindered by the experimental difficulty of coupling the incident light into the optical modes of the absorber.

  16. Seasonal variations in light scattering in the New York region and their relation to sources

    SciTech Connect

    Leaderer, B.P.; Tanner, R.L.; Lioy, P.J.; Stolwijk, J.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Light scattering data collected during two periods of intensive sampling in New York City (one during summer months and one during winter months) are discussed and analyzed for diurnal patterns, their relationship to pollutant emission sources, meteorological parameters, and the size distribution and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol. The lack of a diurnal pattern for light scattering in summer in combination with a strong positive association with ozone and wind direction dependency suggests that in summer the transport of an aged aerosol in photochemically rich air masses rather than local emissions of primary pollutants is largely responsible for the observed levels of light scattering in New York City. Winter levels of light scattering observed in New York City, while approximately 50% lower than summer levels, were much less dependent on wind direction and closely related to pollutant emissions from local sources. This suggests that locally generated aerosol dominates light scattering in the winter. Particles 0.1..mu..m to 1.3..mu..m in diameter were strongly correlated with light scattering in New York City during both summer and winter periods. However, a given volume of aerosol between 0.1..mu..m and 1.3..mu..m scattered more light in summer than in winter, indicating the fresher nature of the winter aerosol. Variance in dry particulate light scattering was found to principally account for light extinction variance (calculated from airport visibility observations) in summer and winter. Sulfate aerosol was strongly correlated with light scattering during both summer and winter periods.

  17. Linear polarization of light scattered by cometary analogs: New samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Buch, A.; Carrasco, N.; Johnson, N.; Nuth, J.

    2014-07-01

    Mixtures of silicates (Mg and Fe) with carbonaceous compounds (carbon and/or organics) are currently proposed as cometary analogs. The particles are fluffy aggregates of submicron-sized constituent grains and compact grains (tens of micrometers), similar to those captured in the Earth's stratosphere (interplanetary dust particles or IDPs) and deduced from the Stardust results. They are lifted or in microgravity or levitated by an air-draught. The light source is unpolarized. The linear polarization of the scattered light floating in the beam is studied as a function of the phase angle. In previous experiments with the PROGRA2 instrument (Hadamcik et al., 2011), the general shape of the cometary polarimetric phase curves is reproduced with a shallow negative branch and a more developed positive branch (maximum polarization around 20--30 %) depending on the size distributions of the particles (compact and/or aggregates) and their constituent grains. To observe the increase of polarization with wavelength, the organic materials were necessary. When fluffy aggregates (silicates and carbon black mixtures) and compact silicate grains of tens of micrometers are present, the whole cometary coma polarization phase curve is well fitted by the phase curves obtained. The maximum polarization value decreases when the ratio of compact silicates to fluffy aggregates increases. The observed differences in polarization between different coma regions may be also simulated. When only fluffy aggregates are used, the maximum polarization corresponds to the polarization in jets of 'high polarization' active comets (Hadamcik and Levasseur-Regourd, 2003). A high polarization region may exist in some 'low polarization' comets, with large slowly moving particles; using the experimental results, we suggest the presence of dark relatively compact particles larger than 20 micrometers (Hadamcik et al., 2007; 2011). When not hidden by jets, a polarimetric halo is sometimes observed in the inner

  18. Spiral arms in scattered light images of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    In the past few years, resolved observations with high angular resolution have revealed rich structures in gaseous protoplanetary disks. Among all discoveries, one of the most prominent is the giant double-spiral structure, found in MWC 758, SAO 206462, and HD 100453. The NIR images of these disks taken by Subaru/HiCIAO, VLT/NACO, and VLT/SPHERE showed two spiral arms at tens of AU from the center. The arms are very open with large pitch angles, and are in a nearly m=2 rotational symmetry. Although planets are known to be able to excite density waves in protoplanetary disks, fitting observations with linear theory of the density wave demands unreasonably big scale height in the disk, thus temperature, in order to make the arms as open as observed (and no need to mention the coincidence that they all have two nearly m=2 arms). Using 3D hydro and radiative transfer simulations, we find that a massive perturber (giant planet, brown dwarf, or stellar mass companion) can excite multiple spiral arms in the density structure, and the arms inside the perturber's orbit are very prominent in NIR scattered light images, in striking similarity with observations. Very recently, the perturber was found for the first time in the HD 100453 disk, as a M dwarf companion. This gives us great confidence of our models, and suggests that the double spirals in the other two objects, MWC 758 and SAO 206462, are very likely to be excited in a similar way, by a currently unseen perturber outside the arms. In particular, by measuring the angular distance between the two arms and comparing it with our models, we determine that the perturber in SAO 206462 is about 6 Jupiter mass.

  19. Dynamic Light Scattering Based Microelectrophoresis: Main Prospects and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    Microelectrophoresis based on the dynamic light scattering (DLS) effect has been a major tool for assessing and controlling the conditions for stability of colloidal systems. However, both the DLS methods for characterization of the hydrodynamic size of dispersed submicron particles and the theory behind the electrokinetic phenomena are associated with fundamental and practical approximations that limit their sensitivity and information output. Some of these fundamental limitations, including the spherical approximation of DLS measurements and an inability of microelectrophoretic analyses of colloidal systems to detect discrete charges and differ between differently charged particle surfaces due to rotational diffusion and particle orientation averaging, are revisited in this work. Along with that, the main prospects of these two analytical methods are mentioned. A detailed review of the role of zeta potential in processes of biochemical nature is given too. It is argued that although zeta potential has been used as one of the main parameters in controlling the stability of colloidal dispersions, its application potentials are much broader. Manipulating surface charges of interacting species in designing complex soft matter morphologies using the concept of zeta potential, intensively investigated recently, is given as one of the examples. Branching out from the field of colloid chemistry, DLS and zeta potential analyses are now increasingly finding application in drug delivery, biotechnologies, physical chemistry of nanoscale phenomena and other research fields that stand on the frontier of the contemporary science. Coupling the DLS-based microelectrophoretic systems with complementary characterization methods is mentioned as one of the prosperous paths for increasing the information output of these two analytical techniques. PMID:23904690

  20. Peculiarities of propagation of quasi-diffraction-free light beams in strongly scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Katsev, I L; Prikhach, A S; Kazak, N S; Kroening, M

    2006-04-30

    Based on the relation between the theory of light field coherence and theory of radiation transfer in scattering media, a method is proposed for calculating the illumination distribution produced by coherent quasi-diffraction-free beams at different penetration depths of radiation into scattering media such as biological tissues. The method uses the optical transfer function or the point spread function (PSF) of the medium. A simple and convenient analytic PSF model is described. Examples of the illumination distribution produced by a Bessel light beam in a medium with optical parameters typical of real biological tissues are presented. It is shown that the half-width of the axial maximum of a Bessel light beam scattered due to scattering almost does not increase up to optical depths where the contribution of multiple scattering is already considerable. (light beams)

  1. Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media: 1. Theory of spectral Vector Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceolato, Romain; Riviere, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media has recently attracted growing interests for various applications due to the production of directional broadband light sources. Here the spectral polarimetric light-scattering signatures of particulate media are simulated using a numerical model based on the spectral Vector Radiative Transfer Equation (VRTE). A microphysical analysis is conducted to understand the dependence of the light-scattering signatures upon the microphysical parameters of particles. We reveal that depolarization from multiple scattering results in remarkable spectral and directional features, which are simulated by our model over a wide spectral range from visible to near-infrared. We propose to use these features to improve the inversion of the scattering problem in the fields of remote sensing, astrophysics, material science, or biomedical.

  2. Measuring the dynamics of structural changes in biological macromolecules from light scattering data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Adriel D.

    1993-01-01

    Examining techniques to study the dynamics of structural changes in various molecules has been an ongoing goal of the space program. Knowing how these phenomena occur in biological systems is fundamental to understanding what is necessary for life to remain functional in the space environment. A hierarchy of biological organization is functionally described when cells join together small organic molecules to form larger and more complex molecules. Characterizing the architecture of a particular macromolecule helps determine how that molecule works in the living cell and is basic to the diversity of life. Understanding this arrangement involves the correlation of the structure of macromolecules with their functions. A light scattering photometer was developed for detecting continuous measurement of the angular spectrum of light scattered by dynamically changing systems. The analysis of light scattered by biological macromolecules can be used to determine concentration, size, shape, molecular weight, and structural changes of cells, such as erythrocytes. Some light scattering photometers can collect and store 120 angular scattering spectra per minute, with an angular resolution of 0.2 deg which can be displayed with computer graphics. The light scattering photometer does the following: functions to produce and detect scattered light; determines scatter angles; and collects, stores, and analyzes data.

  3. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples. PMID:27472601

  4. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg M, M åNs

    2004-01-01

    Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix. PMID:15103398

  5. Retinal image degradation by optical aberrations and light scatter in normal and albino chick eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yibin; Shieh, Kevin; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2007-02-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of retinal image quality requires that light scatter as well as optical aberrations be considered. In investigating how retinal image degradation affects eye growth in the chick model of myopia, we developed a simple method based on Shack-Hartmann images for evaluating the effects of both monochromatic aberrations and light scatter on retinal image quality. We further evaluated our method in the current study by applying it to data collected from both normal chick eyes and albino eyes that were expected to show increased intraocular light scatter. To analyze light scatter in our method, each Shack-Hartmann dot is treated as a local point spread function (PSF) that is the convolution of a local scatter PSF and a lenslet diffraction PSF. The local scatter PSF is obtained by de-convolution, and is fitted with a circularly symmetric Gaussian function using nonlinear regressions. A whole-eye scatter PSF also can be derived from the local scatter PSFs for the analyzed pupil. Aberrations are analyzed using OSA standard Zernike polynomials, and aberration-related PSF calculated from reconstructed wavefront using fast Fourier transform. Modulation transfer functions (MTFs) are computed separately for aberration and scatter PSFs, and a whole-eye MTF is derived as the product of the two. This method was applied to 4 normal and 4 albino eyes. Compared to normal eyes, albino eyes were more aberrated and showed greater light scatter. As a result, overall retinal image degradation was much greater in albino eyes than in normal eyes, with the relative contribution to retinal image degradation of light scatter compared to aberrations also being greater for albino eyes.

  6. Far-ultraviolet and visible light scatter measurements for CVD SiC mirrors for SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Gardner, Larry D.

    1998-12-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has become a popular mirror material for spaceborne solar instrumentation for the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range due to its appreciable broadband reflectance and favorable thermal and opto-mechanical properties. Scatter from surfaces of mirrors operating in this wavelength range can destroy otherwise good image contrast especially for extended targets such as the sun. While valid far ultraviolet (FUV) scatter measurements are entirely non-trivial to conduct and so are rarely performed, visible light scatter measurements are comparatively easy. Unfortunately, it is not straightforward to predict FUV scatter performance based on visible light scatter measurements for mirrors made of CVD SiC. It is hoped that by carrying out scatter measurements in both wavelength regimes for the same CVD SiC mirror, that the ability to make such predictions may be enhanced. Visible light (633 nm) scatter measurements were performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by two different means on CVD SiC telescope mirrors (from the same process and same vendor) for two instruments on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) - - the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) and Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER). Additionally, extensive FUV scatter measurements were made for SUMER telescope mirrors. In this paper, we correlate the results for those FUV and visible light scatter measurements for this important material.

  7. Confocal zero-angle dynamic depolarized light scattering.

    PubMed

    Potenza, M A C; Sanvito, T; Alaimo, M D; Degiorgio, V; Giglio, M

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel Dynamic Depolarized Scattering method based on a tight confocal, zero scattering angle, heterodyne scheme. The method is highly immune from parasitic multiple-scattering contributions, so that it can operate with non-index-matched samples presenting large turbidity. It provides measurements of both rotational and translational diffusion coefficients, the latter via number fluctuation spectroscopy. In addition, the amplitude ratio between the two baselines for the fast rotational mode and the slow translational mode can be used to determine the particles intrinsic birefringence. PMID:20087622

  8. Scattering of Sculpted Light in Intact Brain Tissue, with implications for Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A.; Preece, Daryl; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heap, Lucy A.; Scott, Ethan K.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics uses light to control and observe the activity of neurons, often using a focused laser beam. As brain tissue is a scattering medium, beams are distorted and spread with propagation through neural tissue, and the beam’s degradation has important implications in optogenetic experiments. To address this, we present an analysis of scattering and loss of intensity of focused laser beams at different depths within the brains of zebrafish larvae. Our experimental set-up uses a 488 nm laser and a spatial light modulator to focus a diffraction-limited spot of light within the brain. We use a combination of experimental measurements of back-scattered light in live larvae and computational modelling of the scattering to determine the spatial distribution of light. Modelling is performed using the Monte Carlo method, supported by generalised Lorenz–Mie theory in the single-scattering approximation. Scattering in areas rich in cell bodies is compared to that of regions of neuropil to identify the distinct and dramatic contributions that cell nuclei make to scattering. We demonstrate the feasibility of illuminating individual neurons, even in nucleus-rich areas, at depths beyond 100 μm using a spatial light modulator in combination with a standard laser and microscope optics. PMID:26108566

  9. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Halaney, David L; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E; Feldman, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture. PMID:26538329

  10. A study of the polarization of light scattered by vegetation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woessner, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to better understand the factors that govern the polarization of light scattered from vegetation and soils. The intensity and polarization of light scattered by clover and grass in vivo and soil were measured at a number of different angles of incidence and reflectance. Both individual leaves and natural patches of leaves were measured. The light transmitted through the leaves was found to be negatively polarized. The light scattered from the upper leaf surface was found to be positively polarized in a manner which could be accounted for qualitatively but not quantitatively by the Fresnel reflection coefficients modified by a shadowing function of the form cos sup2 (g/2), where g is the phase angle. Findings indicate that the polarization of light scattered by vegetation is a more complex process than previously thought, and that besides the surface-scattered component of light, the volume-scattered and multiply-scattered components also contribute significantly to the polarization.

  11. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  12. Scattering of Sculpted Light in Intact Brain Tissue, with implications for Optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A; Preece, Daryl; Nieminen, Timo A; Heap, Lucy A; Scott, Ethan K; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics uses light to control and observe the activity of neurons, often using a focused laser beam. As brain tissue is a scattering medium, beams are distorted and spread with propagation through neural tissue, and the beam's degradation has important implications in optogenetic experiments. To address this, we present an analysis of scattering and loss of intensity of focused laser beams at different depths within the brains of zebrafish larvae. Our experimental set-up uses a 488 nm laser and a spatial light modulator to focus a diffraction-limited spot of light within the brain. We use a combination of experimental measurements of back-scattered light in live larvae and computational modelling of the scattering to determine the spatial distribution of light. Modelling is performed using the Monte Carlo method, supported by generalised Lorenz-Mie theory in the single-scattering approximation. Scattering in areas rich in cell bodies is compared to that of regions of neuropil to identify the distinct and dramatic contributions that cell nuclei make to scattering. We demonstrate the feasibility of illuminating individual neurons, even in nucleus-rich areas, at depths beyond 100 μm using a spatial light modulator in combination with a standard laser and microscope optics. PMID:26108566

  13. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  14. Scattering of Sculpted Light in Intact Brain Tissue, with implications for Optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A.; Preece, Daryl; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heap, Lucy A.; Scott, Ethan K.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2015-06-01

    Optogenetics uses light to control and observe the activity of neurons, often using a focused laser beam. As brain tissue is a scattering medium, beams are distorted and spread with propagation through neural tissue, and the beam’s degradation has important implications in optogenetic experiments. To address this, we present an analysis of scattering and loss of intensity of focused laser beams at different depths within the brains of zebrafish larvae. Our experimental set-up uses a 488 nm laser and a spatial light modulator to focus a diffraction-limited spot of light within the brain. We use a combination of experimental measurements of back-scattered light in live larvae and computational modelling of the scattering to determine the spatial distribution of light. Modelling is performed using the Monte Carlo method, supported by generalised Lorenz-Mie theory in the single-scattering approximation. Scattering in areas rich in cell bodies is compared to that of regions of neuropil to identify the distinct and dramatic contributions that cell nuclei make to scattering. We demonstrate the feasibility of illuminating individual neurons, even in nucleus-rich areas, at depths beyond 100 μm using a spatial light modulator in combination with a standard laser and microscope optics.

  15. Dynamic Properties of Langmuir Films by Laser Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, John Newell

    A technique and instrumentation for measuring visco-elastic properties of Langmuir film organic monolayers has been developed. This technique is used to characterize certain films used in the manufacture of Langmuir-Blodgett solid films. Furthermore a comparison of the dynamic viscous and elastic moduli determined by this technique is made with static values determined from the Pressure versus Area Isotherm. Briefly, a Langmuir film consists of amphiphilic organic molecules spread in a trough filled with pure water. The hydrophobic ends of the molecules trap them on the water surface. When spread at a dilute concentration the molecules exhibit two dimensional ideal gas behavior. By increasing the surface concentration one obtains two dimensional liquid and finally two dimensional solid behavior. The measurement is performed by electrodynamically driving the liquid surface with the electric field from a razor blade brought to within less than 1 mm of the surface. A sinusoidally varying electric field induces dipoles in the water subphase and generates waves at twice the driving frequency (Attractive dipoles are generated whether the field is positive or negative). The space propagation and damping of these waves is measured by laser light scattering. A focused laser beam incident on the surface is reflected at an angle due to the slope of the waves on the surface. By observing the movement of the beam the amplitude and phase of the oscillation with respect to the driving function may be determined (via a Lock-In amplifier) at various distances from the razor blade. One may directly profile the waves by translating the profiler, or one may observe the variation in amplitude and phase while scanning the frequency or surface pressure. In the latter cases one uses a known reference state to determine the wavelength and damping from the amplitude and phase change. This data is fit by a non-linear least squares curve fitting program to determine the wavelength and space

  16. Measurement of the light scattering of single micrometer-sized particles captured with a microfluidic trap.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Li, Wei; Gong, Baoyu; Wang, Huimin; Xia, Min; Yang, Kecheng

    2015-11-16

    Light scattering detection of a single particle is significant to both theoretical developments and application progresses of particle scattering. In this work, a new method employing the polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic catcher with self-regulation was developed to detect the light scattering of an individual micro particle (20.42, 23.75, and 31.10 μm) in a wide angular range. This system can rapidly (<2 min) immobilize single particles without aggregations and continuously analyze its light scattering ranging from 2° to 162°. The high success ratio of the capture, good agreement with the anticipation, and moderate time and cost make this method a promising candidate in single-particle-scattering applications. PMID:26698501

  17. Non-exponential Structural Relaxation, Anomalous Light Scattering, and Nanoscale Inhomogeneities in Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Moynihan, C. T.; Schroeder, J.

    1997-03-01

    Light scattering from glasses in the glass transition region exhibits an anomalous Rayleigh scattering. We observe a maximum in the scattering intensity versus temperature curves during heating. It is shown that this behavior is consistent with the presence of nanoscale inhomogeneities (density fluctions) which relax at different rates. Recent observations of anomalous light scattering were carried out on strong glass formers and fragile glass formers. In all cases a hysteresis effect is seen in the light scattering upon heating versus cooling each sample from room temperature through the glass transition region. From these measurements it is suggested that this could be the source of non-exponential structural relaxation kinetics. A model based upon the modified Tool-Narayanaswamy model is found to be in agreement with the calculations based on the experimental results.

  18. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of light by ZnO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Milekhin, A. G. Yeryukov, N. A.; Sveshnikova, L. L.; Duda, T. A.; Zenkevich, E. I.; Kosolobov, S. S.; Latyshev, A. V.; Himcinski, C.; Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Wu, Chia Cheng; Wuu, Dong Sing; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2011-12-15

    Raman scattering (including nonresonant, resonant, and surface enhanced scattering) of light by optical and surface phonons of ZnO nanocrystals and nanorods has been investigated. It has been found that the nonresonant and resonant Raman scattering spectra of the nanostructures exhibit typical vibrational modes, E{sub 2}(high) and A{sub 1}(LO), respectively, which are allowed by the selection rules. The deposition of silver nanoclusters on the surface of nanostructures leads either to an abrupt increase in the intensity (by a factor of 10{sup 3}) of Raman scattering of light by surface optical phonons or to the appearance of new surface modes, which indicates the observation of the phenomenon of surface enhanced Raman light scattering. It has been demonstrated that the frequencies of surface optical phonon modes of the studied nanostructures are in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained from calculations performed within the effective dielectric function model.

  19. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure. PMID:25542570

  20. Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

  1. Investigation of non-decorated glide dislocations by infra-red light scattering tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, V.; Kononchuk, O.; Capello, L.; Pichaud, B.

    2011-02-01

    The laser scattering tomography technique enables the observation of non-decorated dislocations in Si crystals. In polarization and tomography measurements, changes in the dislocation scattering intensity are observed. A study of the light scattering by a dislocation was then developed and described in this paper. Based on theoretical results and experimental observations, slip system of a non-decorated mixed dislocation can be totally determined.

  2. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaux, A.; Passerat de Silans, T.; Guerin, W.; Alibart, O.; Tanzilli, S.; Vakili, F.; Kaiser, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time scales (nanoseconds) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements justify the interest in temporal intensity correlation to access nontrivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  3. Dynamic light scattering investigations of nanoparticle aggregation following a light-induced pH jump.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan J; Pristinski, Denis; Migler, Kalman; Douglas, Jack F; Prabhu, Vivek M

    2010-05-21

    There are many important processes where the stability of nanoparticles can change due to changes in solution environment. These processes are often difficult to study under controlled changes to the solution conditions. Dynamic light scattering was used to measure the initial kinetics of aggregation of carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles after well-defined pH jumps using aqueous solutions of photoacid generator (PAG). With this approach, the pH of the solution was controlled by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light without the delays from mixing or stirring. The aggregation kinetics of the nanoparticles was extremely sensitive to the solution pH. The UV exposure dose is inversely correlated with the resulting surface charge of the nanoparticles. Decreasing pH decreases the electrostatic repulsion force between particles and leads to aggregation. The reaction-limited or diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics was sensitive to the pH quench depth, relative to the acid-equilibrium constant (pK(a)) of the surface carboxylic acid groups on the nanoparticles. Since numerous PAGs are commercially available, this approach provides a flexible method to study the aggregation of a variety of solvent-dispersed nanoparticle systems. PMID:20499988

  4. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  5. Spectrum of laser light scattered by nanoparticles in an ablation-induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masato; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the laser light scattered by nanoparticles in a cavitation bubble, which was induced by laser ablation of a titanium target in water, was measured using a triple-grating spectrograph. The scattered laser light observed at 100 \\upmu s after laser ablation had no wavelength-shifted component, suggesting that nanoparticles at this delay time were metallic. The wavelength-shifted component was observed in the spectrum at a delay time of 200 \\upmu s, suggesting the formation of oxidized nanoparticles. However, we observed no peaks in the spectrum of the scattered laser light in the present in situ laser-light scattering experiment. On the other hand, we observed clear peaks in the Raman spectrum of synthesized nanoparticles. The experimental results suggest slow crystallization of nanoparticles in liquid in liquid-phase laser ablation.

  6. Brillouin-scattering-induced transparency and non-reciprocal light storage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Hua; Shen, Zhen; Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Yan-Lei; Fu, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is a fundamental interaction between light and travelling acoustic waves and arises primarily from electrostriction and photoelastic effects, with an interaction strength several orders of magnitude greater than that of other relevant non-linear optical processes. Here we report an experimental demonstration of Brillouin-scattering-induced transparency in a high-quality whispering-gallery-mode optical microresonantor. The triply resonant Stimulated Brillouin scattering process underlying the Brillouin-scattering-induced transparency greatly enhances the light–acoustic interaction, enabling the storage of light as a coherent, circulating acoustic wave with a lifetime up to 10 μs. Furthermore, because of the phase-matching requirement, a circulating acoustic wave can only couple to light with a given propagation direction, leading to non-reciprocal light storage and retrieval. These unique features establish a new avenue towards integrated all-optical switching with low-power consumption, optical isolators and circulators. PMID:25648234

  7. Coherent reflectometer with a two-fibre scattered-light interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovenko, V S; Gorshkov, B G; Zazirnyi, M V; Kulakov, A T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Paramonov, Vladimir M

    2011-02-28

    We have designed and implemented a new fibre-optic phase-sensitive coherent reflectometer configuration, which allows one to avoid signal fading owing to the use of a two-fibre scattered-light interferometer. (fiber optics)

  8. Light scattering of normal human lens I. Application of random density and orientation fluctuation theory.

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, F A; Paunovic, M

    1979-01-01

    Light-scattering intensities in the I parallel and I+ mode were obtained on thin sections of three human lenses. Random density and orientation fluctuation theory, without cross correlation, was employed to evaluate light-scattering parameters. Both the density correlation distances, as well as the orientation correlation distances, were related to structural elements in the lens fiber cell that have been observed by other investigators with different techniques. The magnitude of these fluctuations were evaluated, and it was demonstrated that the density fluctuations are the main contributors to light scattering in normal human lenses. Changes in the light-scattering parameters were evaluated as a function of position within the lens. The changes observed agree with the biochemical data in the literature that reflects that an aging process occurs when one proceeds from the periphery of the lens toward the center. PMID:262413

  9. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, S.; Besbes, M.; Schilder, N. J.; Jenkins, S. D.; Sauvan, C.; Ruostekoski, J.; Greffet, J.-J.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences.

  10. Dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay for ultra-sensitive detection of tumor marker protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Jiehua; Fan, Qiongxuan; Tao, Yaqin; Li, Genxi

    2016-06-14

    A novel dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay that utilizes manganese dioxide nanosheet-modified gold nanoparticles (MnO2-GNPs) as an activatable nanoprobe has been developed to detect tumor markers down to femtomolar levels. PMID:27247980

  11. Miniature Light Scattering Systems For On-Line Process Particle Size And Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert G.; Burnett, J. G.; Chow, K.; Rarity, J. G.

    1989-03-01

    Light scattering techniques for velocity and particle size analysis are well established research and industrial tools. In general, light scattering instruments have been large and expensive, requiring skilled operation. We have constructed and tested a range of light scattering instruments in miniature form using the recently available range of new semiconductor laser diodes, avalanche and PIN photodiodes and optical fibres. Thus is has been possible to demonstrate laser Doppler and transit anemometers for turbulent flow analysis and dynamic light scattering instruments for particle size analysis all of which are small and cheap enough to be of value in on-line process monitoring and control. We describe the critically important features of the new technologies used, and how we have coupled new devices together into systems for industrial applications of importance eg biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, automobile, aerospace, chemicals, etc.

  12. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  13. In vivo measurement of mid-infrared light scattering from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liakat, Sabbir; Bors, Kevin; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2013-01-01

    Two mid-infrared light sources, a broadband source from a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and a pulsed Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser, are used to measure angle-resolved backscattering in vivo from human skin across a broad spectral range. Scattering profiles measured using the FTIR suggest limited penetration of the light into the skin, with most of the light interacting with the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis. Scattering profiles from the QC laser show modulation patterns with angle suggesting interaction with scattering centers in the skin. The scattering is attributed to interaction of the laser light with components such as collagen fibers and capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. PMID:23577287

  14. Discrete Sources Method for light scattering analysis of non-axisymmetric features of a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Discrete Sources Method (DSM) has been extended to analyze polarized light scattering by non-axial symmetric nano-sized features on a plane substrate. A detailed description of the corresponding numerical scheme is provided. Using a "fictitious" particle approach the new DSM model enables to consider scattering from such substrate defects as a line bump and a line pit. The developed computer model has been employed for demonstrating the ability to perform a comparative analysis of light scattering from such line features. Simulation results corresponding to the Differential Scattering Cross-Section (DSC) and the integral response for P/S polarized light are presented. It was found that the integral response can change by an order of magnitude depending on the orientation of the linear defect with respect to the direction of the incident laser light. In addition, it was shown that some defects can turn out to be "invisible" if an oblique angle of incidence is chosen.

  15. Coherent Scattering of Near-Resonant Light by a Dense Microscopic Cold Atomic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Jennewein, S; Besbes, M; Schilder, N J; Jenkins, S D; Sauvan, C; Ruostekoski, J; Greffet, J-J; Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A

    2016-06-10

    We measure the coherent scattering of light by a cloud of laser-cooled atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light. By interfering a laser beam tuned near an atomic resonance with the field scattered by the atoms, we observe a resonance with a redshift, a broadening, and a saturation of the extinction for increasing atom numbers. We attribute these features to enhanced light-induced dipole-dipole interactions in a cold, dense atomic ensemble that result in a failure of standard predictions such as the "cooperative Lamb shift". The description of the atomic cloud by a mean-field model based on the Lorentz-Lorenz formula that ignores scattering events where light is scattered recurrently by the same atom and by a microscopic discrete dipole model that incorporates these effects lead to progressively closer agreement with the observations, despite remaining differences. PMID:27341230

  16. Diffuse light scattering from a dense and cold microscopic 87Rb sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kasie; Roof, S. J.; Havey, M. D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Kupriyanov, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report investigation of near-resonance light scattering from a cold atomic sample of 87Rb. Measurements are made on the F = 2 -->F' = 3 nearly closed hyperfine transition for atomic densities ranging from ~1010 to ~1013 atoms/cm3. The sample, initially prepared in a magneto-optical trap, is loaded into a far-off-resonance trap (FORT) in which the ensemble has a temperature ~100 μK and initial Gaussian radii of ~3 μm and ~280 μm in the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. The experimental geometry consists of projecting a near-resonance collimated laser beam onto the entire volume of the FORT and detecting the diffusely scattered light. The measured scattered light intensity as a function of detuning, atomic density, and sample size suggests that collective light scattering plays an important role in the experimental results. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. NSF-PHY-1068159).

  17. Measurement of defects by measuring of light scattering from surfaces using focused illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, O.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2016-04-01

    Light scattering has been used as a method of characterizing material or surface roughness in different areas of the science and technology, usually the surface is illuminated with light and the pattern of scattering is measured above the surface. In the literature, the scattered light has been measured using an incident beam with a diameter on the order of a few cm for surfaces with roughness scales of the order of microns, mainly to avoid problems with the speckle pattern of light. However, this kind of measurement does not give information on local variations in roughness or defects present in the sample. Also, it has been reported in many studies that the polarization of the scattered light is affected by the surface material and roughness. In this paper we present a novel experimental device used to identify local defects on surfaces by the measurement of the scattered light pattern using laser light focused onto the surface. We present results of experimental measurements for two surfaces with roughness and defects of the order of 6 to 60 microns using sizes of incident beam of the same order and we compare the results of experimental cases with results of numerical calculation based on the Kirchhoff Approximation of light scattering by rough surfaces. We include preliminary results from the effect on the pattern of light scattering as a function of the polarization state by using focused light to illuminate the surface, we calculate the Mueller matrix for the equivalent period of the surface micro-manufactured experimentally. Finally we conclude about the validity of the method.

  18. Light Scattering by Ice Crystals Containing Air Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Panetta, R. L.; Yang, P.; Bi, L.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative effects of ice clouds are often difficult to estimate accurately, but are very important for interpretation of observations and for climate modeling. Our understanding of these effects is primarily based on scattering calculations, but due to the variability in ice habit it is computationally difficult to determine the required scattering and absorption properties, and the difficulties are only compounded by the need to include consideration of air and carbon inclusions of the sort frequently observed in collected samples. Much of the previous work on effects of inclusions in ice particles on scattering properties has been conducted with variants of geometric optics methods. We report on simulations of scattering by ice crystals with enclosed air bubbles using the pseudo-spectral time domain method (PSTD) and improved geometric optics method (IGOM). A Bouncing Ball Model (BBM) is proposed as a parametrization of air bubbles, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations. Consistent with earlier studies, we find that air inclusions lead to a smoothing of variations in the phase function, weakening of halos, and a reduction of backscattering. We extend these studies by examining the effects of the particular arrangement of a fixed number of bubbles, as well as the effects of splitting a given number of bubbles into a greater number of smaller bubbles with the same total volume fraction. The result shows that the phase function will not change much for stochastic distributed air bubbles. It also shows that local maxima of phase functions are smoothed out for backward directions, when we break bubbles into small ones, single big bubble scatter favors more forward scattering than multi small internal scatters.

  19. Simultaneous holographic imaging and light-scattering pattern measurement of individual microparticles.

    PubMed

    Berg, Matthew J; Holler, Stephen

    2016-07-15

    This work combines digital holography with spatial filtering at two wavelengths to record the hologram and light-scattering pattern for a single particle using a color sensor. Particles 30-100 μm in size and with various shapes are considered. The results demonstrate the ability to unambiguously associate a complicated scattering pattern with the particle size, shape, and orientation. PMID:27420536

  20. Modeling Light Scattering in Tissue as Continuous Random Media Using a Versatile Refractive Index Correlation Function

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeremy D.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Yi, Ji; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Optical interactions with biological tissue provide powerful tools for study, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. When optical methods are used in applications involving tissue, scattering of light is an important phenomenon. In imaging modalities, scattering provides contrast, but also limits imaging depth, so models help optimize an imaging technique. Scattering can also be used to collect information about the tissue itself providing diagnostic value. Therapies involving focused beams require scattering models to assess dose distribution. In all cases, models of light scattering in tissue are crucial to correctly interpreting the measured signal. Here, we review a versatile model of light scattering that uses the Whittle–Matérn correlation family to describe the refractive index correlation function Bn (rd). In weakly scattering media such as tissue, Bn (rd) determines the shape of the power spectral density from which all other scattering characteristics are derived. This model encompasses many forms such as mass fractal and the Henyey–Greenstein function as special cases. We discuss normalization and calculation of optical properties including the scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor. Experimental methods using the model are also described to quantify tissue properties that depend on length scales of only a few tens of nanometers. PMID:25587211

  1. Light scattering characterization of single biological cells in a microfluidic cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xuantao; Kirkwood, Sean E.; Gul, Hilal; Singh, Kirat; Islam, Md. Z.; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Rozmus, Wojciech; Tsui, Ying Y.

    2009-06-01

    The characterization of single biological cells in a microfluidic flow by using a 2D light scattering microfluidic cytometric technique is described. Laser light is coupled into a microfluidic cytometer via an optical fiber to illuminate a single scatterer in a fluidic flow. The 2D light scattering patterns are obtained by using a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. The system is tested by using standard polystyrene beads of 4 μm and 9.6 μm in diameter, and the bead experimental results agree well with 1D Mie theory simulation results. Experiments on yeast cells are performed using the microfluidic cytometer. Cell results are studied by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, which can simulate light scattering from non-homogeneous cells. For example, a complex biological cell model with inner mitochondrial distribution is studied by FDTD in this paper. Considering the yeast cell size variations, the yeast cell 2D scatter patterns agree well with the FDTD 2D simulation patterns. The system is capable of obtaining 2D side scatter patterns from a single biological cell which may contain rich information on the biological cell inner structures. The integration of light scattering, microfluidics and fiber optics described here may ultimately allow the development of a lab-on-chip cytometer for label-free detection of diseases at a single cell level.

  2. A review of light-scattering techniques for the study of colloids in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the movement of colloidal materials in natural waters, we first need to have a means of quantifying their physical characteristics. This paper reviews three techniques which utilize light-scattering phenomena to measure the translational diffusion coefficient, the rotational diffusion coefficient, and the electrophoretic mobility of colloids suspended in water. Primary emphasis is to provide sufficient theoretical detail so that hydrologists can evaluate the utility of photon correlation spectrometry, electrophoretic light scattering, and electric birefringence analysis. ?? 1987.

  3. Protein crystal nucleation kinetics using relative light-scattering techniques: Center director's discretionary fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee

    1989-01-01

    Light-scattering intensity measurements are a sensitive method for following changes in the hydrodynamic radius of particles in solution. The approach used in this report utilizes the light-scattering intensity ratios of a polydisperse to a monodisperse system. By numerically modeling the process, and fitting the model curves to the data, estimates have been obtained for the dimerization equilibrium constant, the dimer + dimer yields tetramer equilibrium constant, and the association rate constant for the dimerization process.

  4. Experimental and theoretical realization of enhanced light scattering spectroscopy of gold nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yunbo; Song, Linlin; Qiao, Yisha

    2015-01-12

    Assisted with transmission electron microscopy and extinction spectra, the enhanced light scattering (ELS) experiments were performed with gold nanoparticles. Although both the nanospheres and nanorods can enhance light scattering in study aggregation, the spectral characteristics of gold nanorods is relatively simple compared to that of nanospheres. This will further extend the application range of ELS method to determinate the amounts of inorganic ions in analytical field and investigate on the macromolecular aggregation in polymeric research due to its simplicity, rapidity, and sensitivity.

  5. Experimental and theoretical realization of enhanced light scattering spectroscopy of gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunbo; Song, Linlin; Qiao, Yisha

    2015-01-01

    Assisted with transmission electron microscopy and extinction spectra, the enhanced light scattering (ELS) experiments were performed with gold nanoparticles. Although both the nanospheres and nanorods can enhance light scattering in study aggregation, the spectral characteristics of gold nanorods is relatively simple compared to that of nanospheres. This will further extend the application range of ELS method to determinate the amounts of inorganic ions in analytical field and investigate on the macromolecular aggregation in polymeric research due to its simplicity, rapidity, and sensitivity.

  6. Regulation of Yersinia enterocolitica mal genes by MalT and Mlc proteins.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Adrianna; Brzóstkowska, Marta; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    To show the role of MalT protein in the regulation of mal genes, encoding proteins involved in transport and metabolism of maltose/ maltodextrins in Yersinia enterocolitica, we constructed a malT mutant which was characterized by a strong reduction in maltose transport and a loss of MBP protein. We also studied the influence of MalT activity on the production of Yop proteins in Y. enterocolitica and found that the level of these virulence factors is not changed in the malT mutant. Subsequently, transcriptional fusion malT::lacZYA was applied to study the activity of malT promoter. Monitoring of beta-galactosidase activity suggests the influence of catabolic repression on malT transcription, sincethe activity of malT promoter was decreased twofold in the presence of glucose. Furthermore, Mlc protein was identified in Y. enterocolitica as a factor regulating the transcription of malT. We observed a two-fold increase in the level of malT transcription in the mlc mutant background. Moreover, overproduction of Mlc protein strongly inhibited the activity of malT promoter. Thus, the data presented in this study suggest that the level of mal gene expression in Y. enterocolitica may be regulated by two proteins: MalT, the activator of mal transcription and Mlc, the repressor of malT expression. PMID:18610652

  7. Maltose-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of the mal Regulon by MalR in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    The maltose regulon (mal regulon) has previously been shown to consist of the mal gene cluster (malMP, malXCD and malAR operons) in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we have further elucidated the complete mal regulon in S. pneumoniae D39 using microarray analyses and β-galactosidase assays. In addition to the mal gene cluster, the complete mal regulon of S. pneumoniae D39 consists of a pullulanase (PulA), a glucosidase (DexB), a glucokinase (RokB), a PTS component (PtsG) and an amylase (AmyA2). Our microarray studies and β-galactosidase assays further showed that the LacI-family transcriptional regulator MalR represses the expression of the mal regulon in the absence of maltose. Furthermore, the role of the pleiotropic transcriptional regulator CcpA in the regulation of the mal regulon in the presence of maltose was explored. Our microarray analysis with a ΔccpA strain showed that CcpA only represses the expression of the malXCD operon and the pulA gene in the presence of maltose. Hence, we extend the mal regulon now consisting of pulA, dexB, rokB, ptsG and amyA2 in addition to malMP, malXCD and malAR operons. PMID:26030923

  8. Maltose-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of the mal Regulon by MalR in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    The maltose regulon (mal regulon) has previously been shown to consist of the mal gene cluster (malMP, malXCD and malAR operons) in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we have further elucidated the complete mal regulon in S. pneumoniae D39 using microarray analyses and β-galactosidase assays. In addition to the mal gene cluster, the complete mal regulon of S. pneumoniae D39 consists of a pullulanase (PulA), a glucosidase (DexB), a glucokinase (RokB), a PTS component (PtsG) and an amylase (AmyA2). Our microarray studies and β-galactosidase assays further showed that the LacI-family transcriptional regulator MalR represses the expression of the mal regulon in the absence of maltose. Furthermore, the role of the pleiotropic transcriptional regulator CcpA in the regulation of the mal regulon in the presence of maltose was explored. Our microarray analysis with a ΔccpA strain showed that CcpA only represses the expression of the malXCD operon and the pulA gene in the presence of maltose. Hence, we extend the mal regulon now consisting of pulA, dexB, rokB, ptsG and amyA2 in addition to malMP, malXCD and malAR operons. PMID:26030923

  9. Observations of aerosol light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology changes as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Lewis, K.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Winter, S.; Day, D.; Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ulbrich, I.; Huffman, A.; Onasch, T.; Trimborn, A.; Kreidenweis, S.; Carrico, C.; Wold, C.; Lincoln, E.; Freeborn, P.; Hao, W.; McMeeking, G.

    2006-12-01

    A very interesting case of smoke aerosol with very low single scattering albedo, yet very large hygroscopic growth for scattering is presented. Several samples of chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), a common and often dominant species in California chaparral, were recently burned at the USFS Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula Montana, and aerosol optics and chemistry were observed, along with humidity-dependent light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology. Photoacoustic measurements of light absorption by two instruments at 870 nm, one on the dry channel, one on the humidified channel, showed strong reduction of aerosol light absorption with RH above 65 percent, and yet a strong increase in light scattering was observed both at 870 nm and 550 nm with nephelometers. Multispectral measurements of aerosol light absorption indicated an Angstrom coefficient for absorption near unity for the aerosols from chamise combustion. It is argued that the hygroscopic growth of scattering is due to uptake of water by the sulfur bearing aerosol. Furthermore, the reduction of aerosol light absorption is argued to be due to the collapse of chain aggregate aerosol as the RH increases wherein the interior of aerosol does no longer contribute to absorption. Implications for biomass burning in general are that humidity processing of aerosols from this source and others like it tends to substantially increase its single scattering albedo, probably in a non-reversible manner. The chemical pathway to hygroscopicity will be addressed.

  10. Accuracy of RGD approximation for computing light scattering properties of diffusing and motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotlarchyk, M; Chen, S H; Asano, S

    1979-07-15

    The quasi-elastic light scattering has become an established technique for a rapid and quantitative characterization of an average motility pattern of motile bacteria in suspensions. Essentially all interpretations of the measured light scattering intensities and spectra so far are based on the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) approximation. Since the range of sizes of bacteria of interest is generally larger than the wavelength of light used in the measurement, one is not certain of the justification for the use of the RGD approximation. In this paper we formulate a method by which both the scattering intensity and the quasi-elastic light scattering spectra can be calculated from a rigorous scattering theory. For a specific application we study the case of bacteria Escherichia coli (about 1 microm in size) by using numerical solutions of the scattering field amplitudes from a prolate spheroid, which is known to simulate optical properties of the bacteria well. We have computed (1) polarized scattered light intensity vs scattering angle for a randomly oriented bacteria population; (2) polarized scattered field correlation functions for both a freely diffusing bacterium and for a bacterium undergoing a straight line motion in random directions and with a Maxwellian speed distribution; and (3) the corresponding depolarized scattered intensity and field correlation functions. In each case sensitivity of the result to variations of the index of refraction and size of the bacterium is investigated. The conclusion is that within a reasonable range of parameters applicable to E. coli, the accuracy of the RGD is good to within 10% at all angles for the properties (1) and (2), and the depolarized contributions in (3) are generally very small. PMID:20212685

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of light scattering from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Ankur

    Light scattering is a subject of intensive research at the present time in diverse fields of research namely, physics, astronomy, meteorology, biology, nanotechnology, etc. Observation and theoretical calculation of the absorption and scattering properties of particles, whose size ranges from micrometer to nanometer, are not only essential to deduce their physical properties but also capable of giving useful information for better understanding of radiation transfer through a medium containing such scatterer. In addition to such experimental and theoretical studies on light scattering by particulate matter several other groups have been extensively using Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate light (photon) propagation in scattering media. Importantly such methods of simulating light scattering properties of artificial particles are proving to be a very useful tool in verifying the experimental observations with real samples as well as providing new clues to improve the accuracy of the existing theoretical models. In this contribution we report a MC method developed by implementing Mie theory to simulate the light scattering pattern from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles in single scattering regime. The computer program was written in ANSI C-language. The accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the MC method were validated by comparing the results generated by using the MC method with other benchmark theoretical results and experimental results with standard samples. Notably the MC method reported here is found to be stable even for very large spherical particles (size parameters > 1000) with large values of real (= 10) and imaginary part (= 10) of the refractive index. The promising field of application of the reported MC method will be in simulating the light (or electromagnetic) scattering properties of different types of planetary and interplanetary dust particles.

  12. Features of polarization decay in the transition between the low-step and multiple scattering of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Taskina, L. A.; Alonova, M. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Isaeva, A. A.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of increase in the uncertainty of local polarization states of laser light forward scattered by random media was studied in the experiments with phantom scatterers. At macroscopic level this effect is related to decay in the degree of polarization of scattered light in the course of transition from single to multiple scattering. Gelatin layers with embedded titania particles were used as the phantom scatterers. Features of distributions of local polarization states in various polarization coordinates were considered.

  13. In-plane light scattering from fractal surfaces: Principles and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiping

    Random rough surfaces play key roles not only in fundamental research but also in technological applications. There are two major experimental methods used by scientists and engineers to study the properties of random rough surfaces: real space techniques such as stylus profilometer, scanning force microscopy, etc., and reciprocal space techniques, namely scattering. The advantages of scattering techniques are non- destructive and can be used in a hostile environment. Based on roughening phenomena observed in thin film growth/etch fronts, we have established models to characterize different kinds of random rough surfaces such as self-affine and mound surfaces. We have also developed scattering theories corresponding to these surface models as well as experimental in-plane light scattering to measure the reciprocal space structures corresponding to these growth/etch surface fronts. We found that measurements using in-plane light scattering are particularly convenient for mapping reciprocal space characteristics. Specifically, we will present three experimental examples using in-plane light scattering: unpolished Si wafer surfaces, pitting corrosion of Al films on Si, and wet chemical etching of Si surfaces. We measured the detailed characteristics of the reciprocal space structures from rough Si (backside) surfaces using in-plane light scattering intensity distribution or an angular profile at various incident angles. Since the backsides of Si wafers can be characterized as self-affine surfaces, all the relevant roughness parameters such as the interface width w, lateral correlation length ξ, and the roughness exponent α can be quantitatively extracted from the scattering characteristics that we developed for self-affine surfaces. The roughness parameters which we extracted from the in-plane light scattering are consistent with those obtained from real space imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy and stylus profilometry. We also studied the pitting

  14. Double scattering of light from Biophotonic Nanostructures with short-range order

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng Fatt; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Prum, Richard O.; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Cao, Hui

    2010-07-28

    We investigate the physical mechanism for color production by isotropic nanostructures with short-range order in bird feather barbs. While the primary peak in optical scattering spectra results from constructive interference of singly-scattered light, many species exhibit secondary peaks with distinct characteristic. Our experimental and numerical studies show that these secondary peaks result from double scattering of light by the correlated structures. Without an analog in periodic or random structures, such a phenomenon is unique for short-range ordered structures, and has been widely used by nature for non-iridescent structural coloration.

  15. Investigation of light scattering as a technique for detecting discrete soot particles in a luminous flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The practicability of using a classical light-scattering technique, involving comparison of angular scattering intensity patterns with theoretically determined Mie and Rayleight patterns, to detect discrete soot particles (diameter less than 50 nm) in premixed propane/air and propane/oxygen-helium flames is considered. The experimental apparatus employed in this investigation included a laser light source, a flat-flame burner, specially coated optics, a cooled photomultiplier detector, and a lock-in voltmeter readout. Although large, agglomerated soot particles were detected and sized, it was not possible to detect small, discrete particles. The limiting factor appears to be background scattering by the system's optics.

  16. Optimal control of light propagation through multiple-scattering media in the presence of noise

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Hasan; Vos, Willem L.; Mosk, Allard P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the control of coherent light propagation through multiple-scattering media in the presence of measurement noise. In our experiments, we use a two-step optimization procedure to find the optimal incident wavefront that generates a bright focal spot behind the medium. We conclude that the control of coherent light propagation through a multiple-scattering medium is only determined by the number of photoelectrons detected per optimized segment. The prediction of our model agrees well with the experimental results. Our results offer opportunities for imaging applications through scattering media such as biological tissue in the shot noise limit. PMID:24049696

  17. Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

  18. Marine organics effect on sea-spray light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishya, Aditya; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Jennings, S. G.; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2013-05-01

    Primary-produced sea-spray is typically composed of sea-salt, but in biologically-active regions, the spray can become enriched with organic matter which reduces hygroscopicity of sea-spray, thereby having a potential impact on aerosol scattering. This study shows that scattering enhancement of marine aerosol, as a function of increasing relative humidity, is reduced when enriched with organics whose results are used to develop a new hygroscopicity growth-factor parameterization for sea-spray enriched in organic matter. The parameterization reveals a dual state which flips from high-hygroscopicity and high-scattering enhancement to low-hygroscopicity and low-scattering enhancement as the organic volume fraction increases from below ˜ 0.55 to above ˜ 0.55. In terms of organic enrichment, the effect on Top of Atmosphere (TOA) direct radiative forcing (ΔF) is to reduce the cooling contribution of sea-spray by ˜ 5.5 times compared to pure sea-salt spray. The results presented here highlight a significant coupling between the marine biosphere and the direct radiative budget through alteration of sea-spray chemical composition, potentially leading to accelerated global warming should biological activity increase with future projected temperature increases.

  19. Elastic scattering and reactions of light exotic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, N.; Alamanos, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.

    2009-10-01

    The present work provides a literature survey of elastic scattering of exotic nuclei from 6He to 17F. It presents a set of definitions that allow different analyses to be put into a common language. A calculational approach is proposed that yields consistent results across different beams and targets so that conclusions concerning the influence of virtual and real breakup as well as transfer couplings on the elastic scattering may be drawn. Calculations of elastic scattering around the Coulomb barrier are emphasised, employing a Pb target whose large Z allows the interplay between nuclear and Coulomb forces to be exploited to maximise possible effects arising from proton or neutron haloes or skins. A series of test calculations is performed and where possible compared to data, demonstrating that there are instances where coupling to transfer channels can have a large effect on the elastic scattering angular distributions. By careful choice of target/beam combination, different aspects of the coupling effects may be emphasised.

  20. Multipole analysis of unidirectional light scattering from plasmonic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutrina, E.; Urbas, A.

    2014-11-01

    We analyze unidirectional scattering produced by sub-wavelength plasmonic dimers formed by two silver strips separated by a thin dielectric spacer and embedded in a uniform dielectric medium. Achieving the Kerker condition, which requires matching the strengths of the electric and magnetic-type contributions of the same multipolar order, is possible with such structures for both forward and backward unidirectional scattering by matching the geometric shape-leveraged resonant magnetic dipolar response with the off-resonant electric dipolar contribution. However, unidirectionality is strongly affected by coupling between the two elements in the dimer structure, leading to the manifestation of the electric quadrupole response in the far field. We develop an approach allowing for an easy inverse scattering retrieval of various multipole contributions to the far-field pattern produced by this type of geometry. The retrieval shows unambiguously that the electric quadrupole response contributes up to 30% of the scattered far-field intensity, in addition to strong manifestation of both electric and magnetic dipolar modes. A modified condition for unidirectionality can be developed based on the principle that suppression of radiation in either the forward or backward direction can be achieved whenever the combined strength of multipolar modes of a certain parity, radiating along the propagation direction, matches that of an opposite parity, and noting that parities of electric and magnetic modes interchange with increasing multipole order. With this condition satisfied, unidirectionality of 26 dB/17 dB for forward/backward scattering, respectively, can be achieved with dimer geometries. We also perform a detailed quantitative analysis of scattering cross sections of dimer structures compared to those of Si and gold spheres, accounting for the actual material losses. We show that dimer structures allow for improving backscattering unidirectionality by 10 dB compared to what

  1. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  2. Spectrum of an electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-04-01

    Spectral shifts and spectral switches of a polychromatic electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium are discussed. It is shown that both the property of the incident field and the character of the scattering medium play roles in the change of the spectrum of the far-zone scattered field. It is also shown that the distribution of the far-zone scattered spectrum, including the magnitude of the spectral shift and the direction at which the spectral switch occurs, is rotationally nonsymmetric. PMID:27140772

  3. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  4. Light scattering by hexagonal ice crystals with distributed inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. Lee; Zhang, Jia-Ning; Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Tang, Guanlin

    2016-07-01

    Inclusions of air bubbles or soot particles have significant effects on the single-scattering properties of ice crystals, effects that in turn have significant impacts on the radiation budget of an atmosphere containing the crystals. This study investigates some of the single-scattering effects in the case of hexagonal ice crystals, including effects on the backscattering depolarization ratio, a quantity of practical importance in the interpretation of lidar observations. One distinguishing feature of the study is an investigation of scattering properties at a visible wavelength for a crystal with size parameter (x) above 100, a size regime where one expects some agreement between exact methods and geometrical optics methods. This expectation is generally borne out in a test comparison of how the sensitivity of scattering properties to the distribution of a given volume fraction of included air is represented using (i) an approximate Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method and (ii) a numerically exact pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) method. Another distinguishing feature of the study is a close examination, using the numerically exact Invariant-Imbedding T-Matrix (II-TM) method, of how some optical properties of importance to satellite remote sensing vary as the volume fraction of inclusions and size of crystal are varied. Although such an investigation of properties in the x>100 regime faces serious computational burdens that force a large number of idealizations and simplifications in the study, the results nevertheless provide an intriguing glimpse of what is evidently a quite complex sensitivity of optical scattering properties to inclusions of air or soot as volume fraction and size parameter are varied.

  5. Speckle-based measurement of the light scattering by red blood cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A.

    2011-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy approach, using non-coherent light sources, has become an important tool for non-invasive analysis in vivo. It is based on the assumption that biochemical characteristics of biological system can be determined through the optical coefficients of blood and tissue particles. Thus, in the framework of this approach, the major concern is to express the obtained optical signals in terms the optical coefficients of the single particle of blood or tissue. However, since the light propagation in tissue is dominated by the multiple-scattering component, a direct measurement of single scattering characteristics turns to be a very difficult task. Practically, only the relative changes of absorption and scattering coefficients are measured. We suggested to adopt the dynamic light scattering (DLS) or speckle technique for the determination of the light scattering coefficients of the red blood cells under stasis conditions in vivo. We assumed that under zero flow conditions the RBC movement is driven mostly by the Brownian motion. It was shown, that under appropriate measurement geometry, the measured optical signal can be decomposed into a few major components. The most dominant components are ascribed to the single backscattering and forward scattering coefficients of the red blood cells. In-vitro and in vivo experimental tests have shown a good correspondence between the theoretically estimated and experientially measured results. The obtained results indicate that the DLS technique can be adopted for the determination of blood particles scattering characteristics in addition to the movement and effective viscosity parameters measurement in vivo.

  6. Comparison of near-forward light scattering on oceanic turbulence and particles.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, D J; Domaradzki, J A; Stramski, D; Zaneveld, J R

    1998-07-20

    We examine and compare near-forward light scattering that is caused by turbulence and typical particulate assemblages in the ocean. The near-forward scattering by particles was calculated using Mie theory for homogeneous spheres and particle size distributions representative of natural assemblages in the ocean. Direct numerical simulations of a passive scalar with Prandtl number 7 mixed by homogeneous turbulence were used to represent temperature fluctuations and resulting inhomogeneities in the refractive index of water. Light scattering on the simulated turbulent flow was calculated using the geometrical-optics approximation. We found that the smallest temperature scales contribute the most to scattering, and that scattering on turbulence typically dominates over scattering on particles for small angles as large as 0.1 degrees . The scattering angle deviation that is due to turbulence for a light beam propagating over a 0.25-m path length in the oceanic water can be as large as 0.1 degrees . In addition, we carried out a preliminary laboratory experiment that illustrates the differences in the near-forward scattering on refractive-index inhomogeneities and particles. PMID:18285924

  7. Far Ultraviolet and Visible Light Scatter Measurements for CVD Silicon Carbide Mirrors for SOHO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Gardner, Larry D.

    1998-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has become a popular mirror material for spaceborne solar instrumentation for the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range due to its appreciable broadband reflectance and favorable thermal and opto-mechanical properties. Scatter from surfaces of mirrors operating in this wavelength range can destroy otherwise good image contrast especially for extended targets such as the sun. While visible light scatter measurements are relatively easy to conduct, far ultraviolet (FUV) scatter measurements are not so easy. Visible light (633 nm) scatter measurements were performed on CVD SiC telescope mirrors (from the same vendor) for two instruments on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) -- Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) and Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER). Additionally, extensive FUV scatter measurements were made for SUMER telescope mirrors. We attempt to correlate the results for those visible light scatter measurements and to explore the usefulness of visible scatter measurements to predictions of FUV scatter for this important material.

  8. Stray light analysis for the Thomson scattering diagnostic of the ETE Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Berni, L. A.; Albuquerque, B. F. C.

    2010-12-15

    Thomson scattering is a well-established diagnostic for measuring local electron temperature and density in fusion plasma, but this technique is particularly difficult to implement due to stray light that can easily mask the scattered signal from plasma. To mitigate this problem in the multipoint Thomson scattering system implemented at the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) a detailed stray light analysis was performed. The diagnostic system was simulated in ZEMAX software and scattering profiles of the mechanical parts were measured in the laboratory in order to have near realistic results. From simulation, it was possible to identify the main points that contribute to the stray signals and changes in the dump were implemented reducing the stray light signals up to 60 times.

  9. Stray light analysis for the Thomson scattering diagnostic of the ETE Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Berni, L A; Albuquerque, B F C

    2010-12-01

    Thomson scattering is a well-established diagnostic for measuring local electron temperature and density in fusion plasma, but this technique is particularly difficult to implement due to stray light that can easily mask the scattered signal from plasma. To mitigate this problem in the multipoint Thomson scattering system implemented at the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esférico) a detailed stray light analysis was performed. The diagnostic system was simulated in ZEMAX software and scattering profiles of the mechanical parts were measured in the laboratory in order to have near realistic results. From simulation, it was possible to identify the main points that contribute to the stray signals and changes in the dump were implemented reducing the stray light signals up to 60 times. PMID:21198020

  10. Use of fast scopes to enable Thomson scattering measurement in presence of fluctuating plasma light.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H; Moller, J; Hill, D

    2004-04-19

    The addition of inexpensive high-speed oscilloscopes has enabled higher Te Thomson scattering measurements on the SSPX spheromak. Along with signal correlation techniques, the scopes allow new analyses based on the shape of the scattered laser pulse to discriminate against fluctuating background plasma light that often make gated-integrator measurements unreliable. A 1.4 J Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is the scattering source. Spatial locations are coupled by viewing optics and fibers to 4-wavelength-channel filter polychrometers. Ratios between the channels determine Te while summations of the channels determine density. Typically, the channel that provides scattered signal at higher Te is contaminated by fluctuating background light. Individual channels are correlated with either a modeled representation of the laser pulse or a noise-free stray light signal to extract channel amplitudes.

  11. Single-shot measurement of soot aggregate sizes by wide-angle light scattering (WALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmann, H.; Reimann, J.; Will, S.

    2012-01-01

    The wide-angle light scattering (WALS) approach has been utilized for the measurement of soot aggregate sizes (radii of gyration) in flames on a single-shot basis. Key elements are a pulsed laser and an ellipsoidal mirror, which images the light scattered within a plane onto an intensified CCD camera, thus allowing for an instantaneous acquisition of a full scattering diagram with high resolution. Results for a laminar premixed flame exhibit good agreement with averaged data and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The applicability of the technique to unsteady combustion processes is demonstrated by measuring aggregate sizes in a weakly turbulent jet-diffusion flame. In both cases light scattering results are verified by data obtained from electron microscopy analysis of sampled soot.

  12. Investigation of the domain wall dynamic by the inelastic light scattering method (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreines, N. M.

    1991-04-01

    Light scattering by a moving domain wall (DW) has been investigated by means of Brillouin-Mandel'stam spectroscopy for the first time.1,2 The proportional to the DW velocity frequency shift due to Doppler effect has been observed in the light scattering spectra in the weak ferromagnets. The DW velocity (till 13 km/s) and the intensity of the scattered light as a function of pulsed magnetic field are determined from the spectra at different temperatures. As the DW velocity approaches that of sound (transversal or longitudinal) the scattered light intensity increases dramatically due to phonons emitted by the DW (Cherenkov radiation). Regions of the nonstationary DW motion are observed wherein scattering spectra have complicated character. The inelastic light scattering directly by the excited sound soliton (or phonons) has been observed. The space and time spreading of this soliton was investigated.3 The mean free path l of the acoustic phonons was determined. For YFeO3 at T=2 K l≂300 μm for transversal sound with ν≂12 GHz. The temperature dependence of the DW mobility was studied.

  13. [Light scattering extinction properties of atmospheric particle and pollution characteristics in hazy weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Ye, Hui; Shen, Jian-Dong; Sun, Hong-Liang; Hong, Sheng-Mao; Jiao, Li; Huang, Kan

    2014-12-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of particle scattering on visibility, light scattering coefficient, particle concentrations and meteorological factor were simultaneously monitored from July 2011 to June 2012 in Hangzhou. Daily scattering coefficients ranged from 108.4 to 1 098.1 Mm(-1), with an annual average concentration of 428.6 Mm(-1) ± 200.2 Mm(-1). Seasonal variation of scattering coefficients was significant, with the highest concentrations observed in autumn and winter and the lowest in summer. It was found there were two peaks for the average diurnal variations of the scattering coefficient, which could be observed at 08:00 and 21:00. The scattering efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM10 were 7.6 m2 x g(-1) and 4.4 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The particle scattering was about 90.2 percent of the total light extinction. The scattering coefficients were 684.4 Mm(-1) ± 218.1 Mm(-1) and 1 095.4 Mm(-1) ± 397.7 Mm(-1) in hazy and heavy hazy days, respectively, which were 2.6 and 4.2 times as high as in non-hazy weather, indicating that particle scattering is the main factor for visibility degradation and the occurrence of hazy weather in Hangzhou. PMID:25826909

  14. What can we learn about cosmic Dust Grains from light scattering measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    Irregular dust particles exist in a wide variety of space environments ranging from planetary and cometary atmospheres in the Solar System and beyond, interplanetary medium, reflection nebulae, circumstellar disks, etc.. Those dust particles play an important role in the radiative balance of the body under study. Light scattering properties of spherical particles can be easily computed from Lorenz-Mie theory. However, in the majority of the mentioned cases, the assumption of spherical particles is highly unrealistic for light scattering computations. Nowadays, even with ever-increasing computer power and sophistication of algorithms, the characterization of small dust particles from the observed scattered light remains an extremely difficult task due to the complicated morphology of those particles. Consequently, controlled experimental studies of light scattering by irregular dust particles, remain an important tool for interpreting space- and ground-based observations. For that purpose, in the last few decades a significant number of experimental scattering matrices as functions of the scattering angle have been produced in Amsterdam. After the closing down of the Dutch scattering apparatus, we have constructed a modernized and improved descendant, the IAA Cosmic Dust Laboratory (CoDuLab), at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA) in Granada, Spain. With the experimental setups in Amsterdam and Granada all elements of the scattering matrix could be measured and not just one or two. This has several advantages. For example, it is then possible to identify experimental errors by using all theoretical relationships valid for the elements of the scattering matrix. Moreover, the experimental data can be used to perform multiple scattering calculations in thick scattering media or to to check the validity of advanced computational techniques for scattering by ensembles of small irregular particles. The samples of small irregular particles studied in Amsterdam

  15. A Novel Effect of Scattered-Light Interference in Misted Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, N. James

    2005-01-01

    Interference rings can be observed in mirrors clouded by condensation, even in diffuse lighting. The effect depends on individual droplets acting as point sources by refracting light into the mirror, so producing coherent wave-trains which are reflected and then scattered again by diffraction round the same source droplet. The secondary wave-train…

  16. Phase unwrapping method for three-dimensional stress analysis by scattered-light photoelasticity with unpolarized light.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Toshiki

    2006-12-10

    In scattered-light photoelasticity with unpolarized light, the secondary principal stress direction psi and the relative phase retardation rho in a three-dimensional stressed model with rotation of the principal stress axes can be obtained by use of Stokes parameters. For completely automated stress analysis, measurements of the total relative phase retardation and the secondary principal stress direction over the entire field are required, and it is necessary to unwrap psi and rho. A phase unwrapping method is thus proposed for the determination of these values based on scattered-light photoelasticity. The values are easily obtained via an arctangent function, overcoming the error associated with the quarter-wave plate by employing an incident light of different wavelengths. The proposed technique provides automated and nondestructive determination of the total relative phase retardation and the secondary principal stress direction in a model exhibiting rotation of the principal stress axes. PMID:17119582

  17. Analytical {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude and the light scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Achasov, N. N.; Kiselev, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we construct the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude T{sub 0}{sup 0} with regular analytical properties in the s complex plane, which describes simultaneously the data on the {pi}{pi} scattering, {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}0{gamma} decay, and {pi}{pi}{yields}KK reaction. The chiral shielding of the {sigma}(600) meson and its mixing with the f{sub 0}(980) meson are also taken into account. The data agrees with the four-quark nature of the {sigma}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) mesons. The amplitude in the range -5m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}

  18. Impact of polishing on the light scattering at aerogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Danilyuk, A. F.; Katcin, A. A.; Kononov, S. A.; Kirilenko, P. S.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Ovtin, I. V.; Predein, A. Yu.; Protsenko, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Particle identification power of modern aerogel RICH detectors strongly depends on optical quality of radiators. It was shown that wavelength dependence of aerogel tile transparency after polishing cannot be described by the standard Hunt formula. The Hunt formula has been modified to describe scattering in a thin layer of silica dust on the surface of aerogel tile. Several procedures of polishing of aerogel tile have been tested. The best result has been achieved while using natural silk tissue. The resulting block has optical smooth surfaces. The measured decrease of aerogel transparency due to surface scattering is about few percent. This result could be used for production of radiators for the Focusing Aerogel RICH detectors.

  19. Scattering of light from metamaterial gratings with finite length.

    PubMed

    Grünhut, Vivian; Cuevas, Mauro; Depine, Ricardo A

    2012-06-01

    Using an integral equation approach based on the Rayleigh hypothesis, we investigate the scattering of a plane wave at the rough surface of a metamaterial with a finite number of sinusoidal grooves. To show the adequacy of the model, we present results that are in agreement with the predictions of physical optics and that quantitatively reproduce the polarization and angular dependences predicted by the C-formalism for metamaterial gratings with an infinite number of grooves. PMID:22695585

  20. Effect of scattering albedo on attenuation and polarization of light underwater.

    PubMed

    Cochenour, Brandon; Mullen, Linda; Muth, John

    2010-06-15

    Recent work on underwater laser communication links uses polarization discrimination to improve system performance [Appl. Opt.48, 328 (2009)] [in Proceedings of IEEE Oceans 2009 (IEEE, 2009), pp. 1-4]. In the laboratory, Maalox antacid is commonly used as a scattering agent. While its scattering function closely mimics that of natural seawaters, its scattering albedo can be much higher, as Maalox particles tend to be less absorbing. We present a series of experiments where Nigrosin dye is added to Maalox in order to more accurately recreate real-world absorption and scattering properties. We consider the effect that scattering albedo has on received power and the degree of depolarization of forward-scattered light in the context of underwater laser communication links. PMID:20548395

  1. Light scattering by randomly oriented cubes and parallelepipeds. [for interpretation of observed data from planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K. N.; Cai, Q.; Pollack, J. B.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the geometric ray tracing theory for the scattering of light by hexagonal cylinders to cubes and parallelepipeds has been modified. Effects of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index and aspect ratio of the particle on the scattering phase function and the degree of linear polarization are investigated. Causes of the physical features in the scattering polarization patterns are identified in terms of the scattering contribution due to geometric reflections and refractions. The single-scattering phase function and polarization data presented in this paper should be of some use for the interpretation of observed scattering and polarization data from planetary atmospheres and for the physical understanding of the transfer of radiation in an atmosphere containing nonspherical particles.

  2. Observation of multiple scattering of laser radiation from a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrat'ev, Andrei V

    2004-06-30

    Variation in the correlation function of light multiply scattered by a random medium was observed with increasing the incident beam power. The light-induced motion of microparticles in suspension, caused by a high-power laser radiation, serves as an additional factor in the decorrelation of the scattered light. The experimental data are in good agreement with the results of theoretical analysis. (light scattering)

  3. Polarization from Thomson scattering of the light of a spherical, limb-darkened star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The polarized flux produced by the Thomson scattering of the light of a spherical, limb-darkened star by optically thin, extrastellar regions of electrons is calculated and contrasted to previous models which treated the star as a point source. The point-source approximation is found to be valid for scattering by particles more than a stellar radius from the surface of the star but is inappropriate for those lying closer. The specific effect of limb darkening on the fractional polarization of the total light of a system is explored. If the principal source of light is the unpolarized flux of the star, the polarization is nearly independent of limb darkening.

  4. Method for measuring changes in light absorption of highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Mourant, Judith R.

    2002-01-01

    The noninvasive measurement of variations in absorption that are due to changes in concentrations of biochemically relevant compounds in tissue is important in many clinical settings. One problem with such measurements is that the pathlength traveled by the collected light through the tissue depends on the scattering properties of the tissue. It is demonstrated, using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, that for an appropriate separation between light-delivery and light-collection fibers, the pathlength of the collected photons is insensitive to scattering parameters for the range of parameters typically found in tissue. This is important for developing rapid, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate methods for measuring absorption changes in tissue.

  5. Study of light-scattering by ferro-nematic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrych, A. L.; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2007-05-01

    At present time a liquid crystals using in engineering are based on their optical properties such as strong anisotropy, specific equilibrium of molecular skeleton, sensitivity to external action, appearance of compound and involute structure which selectively respond to the light with adjusted frequency and polarization, etc. This behaviour make them are perspective environment for application in optical devices like mesomorphic active components (electrooptic shutters, spherical and cylindrical lenses, optical filters, light-induced time and space grids, nonlinear mirrors).

  6. Mid-infrared (λ = 8.4-9.9 μm) light scattering from porcine tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakat, Sabbir; Michel, Anna P. M.; Bors, Kevin A.; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2012-08-01

    Back-scattering of mid-infrared light from porcine skin is studied versus wavelength and angle for a Quantum Cascade laser and a broadband infrared light source. Scattering is detected over 30° away from the specular angle for both sources, and modulation patterns with angle are seen when using the laser. A nonlinear increase in scattered light intensity versus input power indicates that directional scattering from within the skin is dominant. Collagen fibers in the dermis layer, over 200 μm deep into the skin, are conducive to such scattering. We conclude that mid-infrared light penetrates deep enough for potential glucose detection in dermal interstitial fluid.

  7. Determination of molecular weight distributions of large water soluble macromolecules using dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mettille, M.J.; Hester, R.D.

    1988-05-01

    Characterization of polymer molecular weight is an extremely important aspect of polymer research, and a vast number of analytical techniques has been used to determine molecular weights. One method is dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS is also referred to as photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS), and may other appellations. The phenomenon that gives rise to the DLS technique was first observed in the early 1930's. In the mid 1950's, measurement techniques similar to modern dynamic light scattering were developed. Two major technical developments have greatly enhanced the use of DLS. The first was the development of the laser. This provided a light source with very high intensity at a single frequency. Also, major advances in digital electronics have allowed better data acquisition and faster data analysis than were previously available.

  8. Angular scattering of light by a homogeneous spherical particle in a zeroth-order Bessel beam and its relationship to plane wave scattering.

    PubMed

    Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2015-06-01

    The angular scattering of light from a homogeneous spherical particle in a zeroth-order Bessel beam is calculated using a generalized Lorenz-Mie theory. We investigate the dependence of the angular scattering on the semi-apex angle of the Bessel beam and discuss the major features of the resulting scattering plots. We also compare Bessel beam scattering to plane wave scattering and provide criterion for when the difference between the two cases can be considered negligible. Finally, we discuss a method for characterizing spherical particles using angular light scattering. This work is useful to researchers who are interested in characterizing particles trapped in optical beams using angular dependent light scattering measurements. PMID:26367038

  9. Intensity and polarization of light scattered by size distributions of randomly oriented nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Travis, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of light scattering by small particles are important in many diverse fields of science and engineering. In many cases of practical interest, scattering particles are nonspherical and are distributed over sizes and orientations. However, accurate light scattering computations for ensembles of nonspherical particles are difficult and time-consuming, and the literature in which such calculations are reported is rather scarce. In this paper, the T-matrix approach, as extended recently to randomly oriented particles, is used to calculate rigorously light scattering by size distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles. To model the variation of particle sizes in real ensembles, we use a power law distribution typical of some terrestrial aerosols. Contour plots of intensity and degree of linear polarization for polydisperse prolate and oblate spheroids of different aspect ratios and effective equivalent-sphere size parameters from 0 to 10 are calculated and compared with calculations for equivalent spheres. The angular scattering behavior of nonspherical polydispersions is found to be greatly different from that of spheres, while the scattering properties of oblate and prolate spheroids of the same aspect ratio are similar. With increasing particle size, both intensity and polarization become more shape-dependent. In general, nonspherical particles are stronger side scatterers and weaker backscatterers than equivalent spheres. With increasing aspect ratio of nonspherical particles polarization tends to be predominantly positive. Possible effects of particle nonsphericity on optical remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  10. Light scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices as an optical probe of quantum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-11-15

    We study off-resonant collective light scattering from ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the spatial intensity distribution, quadrature variances, photon statistics, or spectral measurements. In particular, angle-resolved intensity measurements reflect global statistics of atoms (total number of radiating atoms) as well as local statistical quantities (single-site statistics even without optical access to a single site) and pair correlations between different sites. As a striking example we consider scattering from transversally illuminated atoms into an optical cavity mode. For the Mott-insulator state, similar to classical diffraction, the number of photons scattered into a cavity is zero due to destructive interference, while for the superfluid state it is nonzero and proportional to the number of atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that light scattering into a standing-wave cavity has a nontrivial angle dependence, including the appearance of narrow features at angles, where classical diffraction predicts zero. The measurement procedure corresponds to the quantum nondemolition measurement of various atomic variables by observing light.

  11. Slow dynamics in dense oil-water emulsions studied using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medebach, Martin; Dulle, Martin; Glatter, Otto

    2009-12-01

    The 3D-echo-DLS (dynamic light scattering) flat cell light scattering instrument (3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI) presents the possibility of measuring slow dynamics of turbid and concentrated colloidal systems. It combines a modified 3D-DLS component and an echo-DLS component with the flat cell light scattering instrument. While the 3D-DLS suppresses multiple scattering, the echo-DLS allows measurements of slow dynamics or even on non-ergodic systems. The advantage of the thin flat cell is that it increases the transmission and reduces multiple scattering; i.e., singly scattered light that is required by the 3D-DLS is still available from dense turbid systems. In the first part of this contribution the 3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI is introduced and the instrumental performance is presented. The second part of the paper is concerned with the ageing behavior of dense fluids in a flat cell, and with confinement effects. Here, we show that ageing is strongly influenced by the process of filling of the flat cell. In some cases complementary methods can be utilized to measure special properties of the system; e.g., the multispeckle method is most appropriate for measuring heterogeneity effects. In the last part of the paper we compare glass transition measurements of an index-matched emulsion carried out using the 3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI and using the multispeckle instrument. We still find an α-relaxation in the glassy state.

  12. Light Scattering by Gaussian Particles: A Solution with Finite-Difference Time Domain Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Nousiainen, T.; Fu, Q.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Muinonen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of single-scattering properties of complex ice crystals has significance in atmospheric radiative transfer and remote-sensing applications. In this work, light scattering by irregularly shaped Gaussian ice crystals is studied with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For given sample particle shapes and size parameters in the resonance region, the scattering phase matrices and asymmetry factors are calculated. It is found that the deformation of the particle surface can significantly smooth the scattering phase functions and slightly reduce the asymmetry factors. The polarization properties of irregular ice crystals are also significantly different from those of spherical cloud particles. These FDTD results could provide a reference for approximate light-scattering models developed for irregular particle shapes and can have potential applications in developing a much simpler practical light scattering model for ice clouds angular-distribution models and for remote sensing of ice clouds and aerosols using polarized light. (copyright) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polarized light scattering by aerosols in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.; Erskine, Lael L.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1997-07-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered from marine aerosols affect visibility and contrast in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). The polarization properties of scattered light in the MABL vary with size, refractive index, number distributions, and environmental conditions. Laboratory measurements were used to determine the characteristics and variability of the polarization of light scattered by aerosols similar to those in the MABL. Scattering from laboratory-generated sea-salt-containing (SSC) NaCl, (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , and seawater components of marine aerosols was measured with a scanning polarization-modulated nephelometer. Mie theory with Gaussian and log normal size distributions of spheres was used to calculate the polarized light scattering from various aerosol composition models and from experimentally determined distributions of aerosols in the marine boundary layer. The modeling was verified by comparison with scattering from distilled water aerosols. The study suggests that polarimetric techniques can be used to enhance techniques for improving visibility and remote imaging for various aerosol types, Sun angles, and viewing conditions.

  14. Electrically Switchable and Permanently Stable Light Scattering Modes by Dynamic Fingerprint Chiral Textures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ko-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Qasim, Malik M; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Cheng, Wen-Fa; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-04-27

    Negative dielectric nematic liquid crystals (LCs) doped with two azobenzene materials provide electrically switchable and permanently stable scattering mode light modulators based on dynamic fingerprint chiral textures (DFCT) with inhomogeneously helical axes. These light modulators can be switched between transparent (stable large domains of DFCT) states and scattering (stable small domains of DFCT) states by applying electric fields with different frequencies. The generation of DFCT results from the long flexible side chains of the doped chiral dopant. That is, if the DFCT can be obtained, then the large domains of DFCT reflect an intrinsically stable state. Moreover, the stabilization of the small domains of DFCT are caused by the terminal rigid restricted side chains of the other doped chiral dopant. Experimentally, the required amplitude to switch the light modulator from a scattering (transparent) state to a transparent (scattering) state decreases as the frequency of the applied electric field increases (decreases) within the set limits. This study is the first report on the advantages of the light scattering mode of DFCT, including low operating voltage, permanently stable transmission, wide viewing angle, high contrast, and polarization-independent scattering and transparency. PMID:27035635

  15. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems. PMID:26606898

  16. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-11-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems.

  17. Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy for detection of dysplastic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkçeken, Tuba; Akman, Ayşe.; Alpsoy, Erkan; Tuncer, Recai; Akyüz, Mahmut; Baykara, Mehmet; Yücel, Selçuk; Başsorgun, Ibrahim; ćiftçioǧlu, M. Akif; Gökhan, Güzide Ayşe.; Gürer, ElifInanç; Peştereli, Elif; Karaveli, Šeyda

    2013-11-01

    Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) system has been developed and tested in diagnosis of cancerous tissues of different organs. ELSSS system consists of a miniature visible light spectrometer, a single fiber optical probe, a halogen tungsten light source and a laptop. Measurements were performed on excised brain, skin, cervix and prostate tumor specimens and surrounding normal tissues. Single fiber optical probe with a core diameter of 100 μm was used to deliver white light to and from tissue. Single optical fiber probe mostly detects singly scattered light from tissue rather than diffused light. Therefore, measured spectra are sensitive to size of scatters in tissue such as cells, nuclei, mitochondria and other organelles of cells. Usually, nuclei of tumor cells are larger than nuclei of normal cells. Therefore, spectrum of singly scattered light of tumor tissue is different than normal tissue. The spectral slopes were shown to be positive for normal brain, skin and prostate and cervix tissues and negative for the tumors of the same tissues. Signs of the spectral slopes were used as a discrimination parameter to differentiate tumor from normal tissues for the three organ tissues. Sensitivity and specificity of the system in differentiation between tumors from normal tissues were 93% and %100 for brain, 87% and 85% for skin, 93.7% and 46.1% for cervix and 98% and 100% for prostate.

  18. Enhancing Localized Evaporation through Separated Light Absorbing Centers and Scattering Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dengwu; Duan, Haoze; Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jiaqing; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the enhancement of localized evaporation via separated light absorbing particles (plasmonic absorbers) and scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles). Evaporation has been considered as one of the most important phase-change processes in modern industries. To improve the efficiency of evaporation, one of the most feasible methods is to localize heat at the top water layer rather than heating the bulk water. In this work, the mixture of purely light absorptive plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles and purely scattering particles (polystyrene nanoparticles) are employed to confine the incident light at the top of the solution and convert light to heat. Different concentrations of both the light absorbing centers and the light scattering centers were evaluated and the evaporation performance can be largely enhanced with the balance between absorbing centers and scattering centers. The findings in this study not only provide a new way to improve evaporation efficiency in plasmonic particle-based solution, but also shed lights on the design of new solar-driven localized evaporation systems. PMID:26606898

  19. Influence of optical polarization on the improvement of light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, J. J. Allerman, A. A.; Montaño, I.; Moseley, M. W.

    2014-08-11

    The improvement in light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) emitting at ∼270 nm is shown to be influenced by optical polarization. Three UVLEDs with different reflective scattering structures are investigated and compared to standard UVLEDs without scattering structures. The optical polarization and therefore the direction of light propagation within the various UVLEDs are altered by changes in the quantum well (QW) thickness. The improvement in light extraction efficiency of the UVLEDs with reflective scattering structures increases, compared to the UVLEDs without scattering structures, as the fraction of emitted light propagating parallel to the QW plane increases. Additionally, the light extraction efficiency increases as the average distance to the reflective scattering structures decreases.

  20. Enhanced angular domain optical imaging by background scattered light subtraction from a deviated laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Chapman, Glenn H.; Chan, Paulman; Kaminska, Bozena; Pfeiffer, Nick

    2008-02-01

    Imaging structures within a turbid medium using Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs angular filter array aligned to a laser source to separate ballistic and quasi-ballistic photons from the highly scattered light by means of angular filtration. The angular filter consists of a high aspect ratio linear array of silicon micromachined tunnels, 51 micron wide by 10mm long with a 0.29 degree acceptance angle. At heavy scattering ratios of >1E7 image detectability declines due to the non-uniform scattered background light fraction still within the acceptance angle. This scattered signal can be separated out by introducing a wedge prism to deviate the laser source where it enters the medium by an angle slightly larger than the acceptance angle. This creates a second image consisting of pure scattering photons with the filtration characteristics of the angular filter, and a pixel by pixel correspondence to the fully scattered illumination emitted from the medium. Experiments used an 808 nm laser diode, collimated to an 8×1 mm line of light, entering a 5cm thick medium with a scattering ratio of > 1E6, with a wedge prism creating a 0.44 degree deviation. Digitally subtracting the deviated scattered signal from the original image significantly reduced the scattered background and enhanced image contrast. We can have about images at least 40 times more of our previous scattering limits. Depending on test phantom object location, the contrast level can be increased from 4% of the total dynamic range to over 50% which results in higher definition and visibility of our micro-scale test structures in the turbid medium.

  1. Q-space analysis of light scattering by Gaussian Random Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, Justin B.; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    2016-05-01

    Q-space analysis is applied to the scattered intensity from Gaussian Random Spheres (GRSs). Q-space analysis involves plotting the scattered intensity vs. the magnitude of the scattering wave vector q = 2 k sin θ/2 where k = 2 π / λ with λ the wavelength and θ is the scattering angle, on a log-log plot. The light scattering properties of GRSs were calculated using a discrete dipole approximation algorithm. The GRSs had σ=0.2 and ν=3, where σ is the relative standard deviation in the radial direction, and ν describes fluctuations in the angular direction. Calculations were systematically performed with size parameters ranging from 10 to 30, and with a relative index of refraction, m, ranging from 1.01 to 1.5. The results show quantifiable, power law descriptions of the scattered intensity and a Rayleigh functionality of the forward scattered intensity that depend upon the phase shift parameter ρ = 2 k Req | m - 1 | where Req is an equivalent radius. Similar functionalities have been observed in both spheres and other irregularly shaped particles. These results continue the implication that there is a comprehensive description of light scattering for all particles that can be uncovered with the application of Q-space.

  2. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  3. Technique to reduce scattered light in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    In this patent application, in order to reduce the amount of internally scattered radiant energy in an optical system having a collecting optical chamber and a secondary optical chamber, a moving aperture device is positioned in a first focal plane between the chambers; the aperture device has a continuous moving metal band that has staggered slits therein. The band is sprocket driven and cryogenically cooled to reduce thermal emission. The band can be synced with other scanning detectors in the optical system such as one might find in an infrared telescope used in outer space.

  4. Light scattering and dynamics of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative motions of interacting Brownian particles in liquids may be described as radial diffusion in an effective potential of the mean force. By using a harmonic approximation for the effective potential, the intermediate scattering function may also be evaluated. For polystyrene spheres of 250 A mean radius in aqueous environment at 0.00125 g/cu cm concentration, the results for the calculated mean square displacement are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from photon correlation spectroscopy. Because of the interactions, the functions deviate considerably from the exponential forms for the free particles.

  5. Quasi-elastic light scattering from structured particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Holz, M; Tartaglia, P

    1977-01-01

    We present a formulation by which the scattered field correlation function of a nonstationary structured particle can be calculated. Specifically, we consider the case of micron-size bacteria, where the Rayleigh- Gans-Debye approximation may be used to evaluate the correlation function. We show that the width of the intensity correlation spectrum (as measured, for example, by the photon correlation technique) exhibits I an oscillatory behavior which is characteristic of the interference pattern produced by the internal structure. Two cases are of interest: diffusion and motility are considered in detail, and some evidence of the predicted behavior is shown from the photon correlation measurement of E. coli bacteria. PMID:20168450

  6. Light scattering and optical diffusion from willemite spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Kevin M.; Butt, Haider; Batal, Afif; Sabouri, Aydin; Anthony, Carl J.

    2016-02-01

    Willemite is a zinc silicate mineral used in modern day pottery as a decorative feature within glazes. It is produced by controlled heat treatment of zinc oxide-containing ceramic glazes. The heat-treated glazes devitrify, producing thin nanoscale needle-like willemite crystals growing in spherulitic morphologies through branching of the needles. We show here that this resulting morphology of willemite crystals in an inorganic glass matrix has a previously unreported strong interaction with light, displaying remarkable optical diffraction patterns. Thin sections of such spherulites act as optical diffusers, enabling light beams to be spread up to 160° in width. Analysis of the interaction between the willemite spherulites and light suggests that the high density of willemite crystals in the spherulites and the length scales associated with both the thickness of the needles and the spacings between branches are together responsible for this optical diffusion behaviour.

  7. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the particle density detectability and particle size detectivity of our fiber-optic light-scattering measurement system. In order to prevent the multiple pregnancy on current in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer, we have aimed to develop a new quantitative and non- invasive method to select a single viable human embryo. We employed the measurement of mitochondria localization in an embryo, which may have the correlation with development ability. We applied the angular distribution measurement of the light-scattering intensity from the embryo to obtain the information originated from the mitochondria. The latex spheres with a diameter of 1.0 micrometers were used to simulate the scattering intensity of the mitochondria. The measurement probes of our system consisted of two fibers for illumination and sensing. They were arranged at a right angle to a microscope optical axis to measure the angular distribution of the light-scattering intensity. We observed that the light-scattering intensity increased monotonically in the range from 106 to 1010 particles per ml. Since the mitochondria density in a human embryo corresponded to 2.5 X 107 per ml in the measurement chamber, we may measure the mitochondria density in the human embryo. The angular dependence of light-scattering intensity changed with the sphere diameters. This result showed the possibility of the selective measurement of the mitochondria density in the embryo in spite of the presence of the other cell organelle. We think that our light-scattering measurement system might be applicable to the evaluation method for the embryo viability.

  8. The ATP-binding cassette subunit of the maltose transporter MalK antagonizes MalT, the activator of the Escherichia coli mal regulon.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, C H; Boos, W; Shuman, H A

    1998-11-01

    Transcription of the mal regulon of Escherichia coli K-12 is regulated by the positive activator, MalT. In the presence of ATP and maltotriose, MalT binds to decanucleotide MalT boxes that are found upstream of mal promoters and activates transcription at these sites. The earliest studies of the mal regulon, however, suggested a negative role for the MalK protein, the ATP-binding cassette subunit of the maltose transporter, in regulating mal gene expression. More recently, it was found that overexpression of the MalK protein resulted in very low levels of mal gene transcription. In this report we describe the use of tagged versions of MalT to provide evidence that it physically interacts with the MalK protein both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that a novel malK mutation, malK941, results in an increased ability of MalK to down-modulate MalT activity in vivo. The fact that the MalK941 protein binds but does not hydrolyse ATP suggests that the MalK941 mutant protein mimics the inactive, ATP-bound form of the normal MalK protein. In contrast, cells with high levels of MalK ATPase show a reduced ability to down-modulate MalT and express several mal genes constitutively. These results are consistent with a model in which the inactive form of MalK down-modulates MalT and decreases transcription, whereas the active form of MalK does not. This model suggests that bacteria may be able to couple information about extracellular substrate availability to the transcriptional apparatus via the levels of ATP hydrolysis associated with transport. PMID:9822819

  9. Janus magneto-electric nanosphere dimers exhibiting unidirectional visible light scattering and strong electromagnetic field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Pu; Ke, Yanlin; Su, Yunkun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Ningsheng; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Huanjun

    2015-01-27

    Steering incident light into specific directions at the nanoscale is very important for future nanophotonics applications of signal transmission and detection. A prerequisite for such a purpose is the development of nanostructures with high-efficiency unidirectional light scattering properties. Here, from both theoretical and experimental sides, we conceived and demonstrated the unidirectional visible light scattering behaviors of a heterostructure, Janus dimer composed of gold and silicon nanospheres. By carefully adjusting the sizes and spacings of the two nanospheres, the Janus dimer can support both electric and magnetic dipole modes with spectral overlaps and comparable strengths. The interference of these two modes gives rise to the narrow-band unidirectional scattering behaviors with enhanced forward scattering and suppressed backward scattering. The directionality can further be improved by arranging the dimers into one-dimensional chain structures. In addition, the dimers also show remarkable electromagnetic field enhancements. These results will be important not only for applications of light emitting devices, solar cells, optical filters, and various surface enhanced spectroscopies but also for furthering our understanding on the light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. PMID:25554917

  10. Rigorous modelling of light scattering in solar cells based on finite element method and Huygens' expansion.

    PubMed

    Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Čampa, Andrej; Topič, Marko

    2015-11-30

    Finite element method is coupled with Huygens' expansion to determine light intensity distribution of scattered light in solar cells and other optoelectronic devices. The rigorous foundation of the modelling enables calculation of the light intensity distribution at a chosen distance and surface of observation in chosen material in reflection or in transmission for given wavelength of the incident light. The calculation of scattering or anti-reflection properties is not limited to a single textured interface, but can be done above more complex structures with several scattering interfaces or even with particles involved. Both scattering at periodic and at random textures can be efficiently handled with the modelling approach. A procedure for minimisation of the effect of small-area sample, which is considered in the finite element method calculation, is proposed and implemented into the modelling. Angular distribution function, total transmission and total reflection of the scattering interface or structure can be determined using the model. Furthermore, a method for calculation of the haze parameter of reflected or transmitted light is proposed. The modelling approach is applied to periodic and random nano-textured samples for photovoltaic applications, showing good agreement with measured data. PMID:26698803

  11. Fiber optic probes for laser light scattering: Ground based evaluation for micgrogravity flight experimentation. Integrated coherent imaging fiber optic systems for laser light scattering and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1994-01-01

    The research work presented in this report has established a new class of backscatter fiber optics probes for remote dynamic light scattering capability over a range of scattering angles from 94 degrees to 175 degrees. The fiber optic probes provide remote access to scattering systems, and can be utilized in either a noninvasive or invasive configuration. The fiber optics create an interference free data channel to inaccessible and harsh environments. Results from several studies of concentrated suspension, microemulsions, and protein systems are presented. The second part of the report describes the development of a new technology of wavefront processing within the optical fiber, that is, integrated fiber optics. Results have been very encouraging and the technology promises to have significant impact on the development of fiber optic sensors in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to optical recording, from biomedical sensing to photolithography.

  12. Measuring Spatially- and Directionally-varying Light Scattering from Biological Material

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S.; Marschner, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Light interacts with an organism's integument on a variety of spatial scales. For example in an iridescent bird: nano-scale structures produce color; the milli-scale structure of barbs and barbules largely determines the directional pattern of reflected light; and through the macro-scale spatial structure of overlapping, curved feathers, these directional effects create the visual texture. Milli-scale and macro-scale effects determine where on the organism's body, and from what viewpoints and under what illumination, the iridescent colors are seen. Thus, the highly directional flash of brilliant color from the iridescent throat of a hummingbird is inadequately explained by its nano-scale structure alone and questions remain. From a given observation point, which milli-scale elements of the feather are oriented to reflect strongly? Do some species produce broader "windows" for observation of iridescence than others? These and similar questions may be asked about any organisms that have evolved a particular surface appearance for signaling, camouflage, or other reasons. In order to study the directional patterns of light scattering from feathers, and their relationship to the bird's milli-scale morphology, we developed a protocol for measuring light scattered from biological materials using many high-resolution photographs taken with varying illumination and viewing directions. Since we measure scattered light as a function of direction, we can observe the characteristic features in the directional distribution of light scattered from that particular feather, and because barbs and barbules are resolved in our images, we can clearly attribute the directional features to these different milli-scale structures. Keeping the specimen intact preserves the gross-scale scattering behavior seen in nature. The method described here presents a generalized protocol for analyzing spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from complex biological materials at multiple

  13. High-angle light scattering to determine the optical fiber core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świrniak, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the possibility of non-invasive sizing of a step-index optical fiber with the use of a beam of light of low temporal coherence. For this purpose we examine the angular profile of light scattered from the fiber at a high angle. The scattered pattern comprises chiefly two coupled, twin rainbows and depends on the fiber physical characteristics, i.e. its dimensions, shape, and refractive index profile. In order to find a causal link between the scattering pattern and the fiber morphology, a spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT) is performed over the scattering intensity. From the spectral data, the core diameter of a step-index optical fiber is extracted inversely.

  14. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) of Aqueous C60 Aggregates with Dynamic Light Scattering Size and LC-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for the size determination of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension include dynamic or static light scattering and electron or atomic force microscopy techniques. Light scattering techniques are limited by poor resolution and the scattering intensity dependence on p...

  15. A new dump system design for stray light reduction of Thomson scattering diagnostic system on EAST.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shumei; Zang, Qing; Han, Xiaofeng; Wang, Tengfei; Yu, Jin; Zhao, Junyu

    2016-07-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic is an important diagnostic for measuring electron temperature and density during plasma discharge. However, the measurement of Thomson scattering signal is disturbed by the stray light easily. The stray light sources in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) TS diagnostic system were analyzed by a simulation model of the diagnostic system, and simulation results show that the dump system is the primary stray light source. Based on the optics theory and the simulation analysis, a novel dump system including an improved beam trap was proposed and installed. The measurement results indicate that the new dump system can reduce more than 60% of the stray light for the diagnostic system, and the influence of stray light on the error of measured density decreases. PMID:27475558

  16. A new dump system design for stray light reduction of Thomson scattering diagnostic system on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shumei; Zang, Qing; Han, Xiaofeng; Wang, Tengfei; Yu, Jin; Zhao, Junyu

    2016-07-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic is an important diagnostic for measuring electron temperature and density during plasma discharge. However, the measurement of Thomson scattering signal is disturbed by the stray light easily. The stray light sources in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) TS diagnostic system were analyzed by a simulation model of the diagnostic system, and simulation results show that the dump system is the primary stray light source. Based on the optics theory and the simulation analysis, a novel dump system including an improved beam trap was proposed and installed. The measurement results indicate that the new dump system can reduce more than 60% of the stray light for the diagnostic system, and the influence of stray light on the error of measured density decreases.

  17. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    PubMed

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated. PMID:27557199

  18. A semiclassical method in the theory of light scattering by semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, I. G.; Korovin, L. I. Pavlov, S. T.

    2008-06-15

    A semiclassical method is proposed for the theoretical description of elastic light scattering by arbitrary semiconductor quantum dots under conditions of size quantization. This method involves retarded potentials and allows one to dispense with boundary conditions for electric and magnetic fields. Exact results for the Umov-Poynting vector at large distances from quantum dots in the case of monochromatic and pulsed irradiation and formulas for differential scattering cross sections are obtained.

  19. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Schott, Sam; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-05-18

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues and therefore grants access to superficial brain layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations ('angular memory effect') are of a very short range and should theoretically be only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range and thus the possible field-of-view by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for ∼1 mm thick tissue layers. PMID:26074598

  20. A Stopped-Flow Apparatus with Light-Scattering Detection and Its Application to Biochemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Riesner, Detlev; Buenemann, Hans

    1973-01-01

    A stopped-flow apparatus utilizing light-scattering for following the progress of a reaction is described. The method is applicable to all reactions that result in a significant change of the average molecular weight. It was possible due to several modifications of a conventional stopped-flow system to obtain a sensitivity comparable to that of commercial instruments for static light-scattering measurements. Experiments on three reactions are reported: association and dissociation of mercury ligands with DNA, dissociation of the dimers of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and complex formation of tRNASer (yeast) with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The changes in the intensities of the scattered light are calculated and compared with the measured amplitudes. PMID:4577138

  1. A Scattered Light Correction to Color Images Taken of Europa by the Galileo Spacecraft: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. B.; Valenti, M.

    2009-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa likely possesses an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy surface, but estimates of the thickness of the surface ice shell vary from a few kilometers to tens of kilometers. Color images of Europa reveal the existence of a reddish, non-ice component associated with a variety of geological features. The composition and origin of this material is uncertain, as is its relationship to Europa's various landforms. Published analyses of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations indicate the presence of highly hydrated sulfate compounds. This non-ice material may also bear biosignatures or other signs of biotic material. Additional spectral information from the Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) could further elucidate the nature of the surface deposits, particularly when combined with information from the NIMS. However, little effort has been focused on this approach because proper calibration of the color image data is challenging, requiring both skill and patience to process the data and incorporate the appropriate scattered light correction. We are currently working to properly calibrate the color SSI data. The most important and most difficult issue to address in the analysis of multispectral SSI data entails using thorough calibrations and a correction for scattered light. Early in the Galileo mission, studies of the Galileo SSI data for the moon revealed discrepancies of up to 10% in relative reflectance between images containing scattered light and images corrected for scattered light. Scattered light adds a wavelength-dependent low-intensity brightness factor to pixels across an image. For example, a large bright geological feature located just outside the field of view of an image will scatter extra light onto neighboring pixels within the field of view. Scattered light can be seen as a dim halo surrounding an image that includes a bright limb, and can also come from light scattered inside the camera by dirt, edges, and the

  2. Determination of liquid-liquid critical point composition using 90∘ laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, J. Charles; Brown, Allison M.; Helvie, Elise N.; Dean, Kevin M.

    2016-04-01

    Despite over a century of characterization efforts, liquid-liquid critical point compositions are difficult to identify with good accuracy. Reported values vary up to 10% for even well-studied systems. Here, a technique is presented for high-precision determination of the critical composition of a partially miscible binary liquid system. Ninety-degree laser light-scattering intensities from single-phase samples are analyzed using an equation derived from nonclassical power laws and the pseudospinodal approximation. Results are reported for four liquid-liquid systems (aniline + hexane, isobutyric acid + water, methanol + cyclohexane, and methanol + carbon disulfide). Compared to other methods, the 90∘ light-scattering approach has a strong dependence on composition near the critical point, is less affected by temperature fluctuations, and is insensitive to the presence of trace impurities in the samples. Critical compositions found with 90∘ light scattering are precise to the parts-per-thousand level and show long-term reproducibility.

  3. Mechanisms of ultrasonic modulation of multiply scattered incoherent light based on diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li-Li; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    An analytic equation interpreting the intensity of ultrasound-modulated scattering light is derived, based on diffusion theory and previous explanations of the intensity modulation mechanism. Furthermore, an experiment of ultrasonic modulation of incoherent light in a scattering medium is developed. This analytical model agrees well with experimental results, which confirms the validity of the proposed intensity modulation mechanism. The model supplements the existing research on the ultrasonic modulation mechanism of scattering light. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178089), the Key Program of Science and Technology of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2011Y0019), and the Educational Department of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JA13074).

  4. Beam-splitting code for light scattering by ice crystal particles within geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source beam-splitting code is described which implements the geometric-optics approximation to light scattering by convex faceted particles. This code is written in C++ as a library which can be easy applied to a particular light scattering problem. The code uses only standard components, that makes it to be a cross-platform solution and provides its compatibility to popular Integrated Development Environments (IDE's). The included example of solving the light scattering by a randomly oriented ice crystal is written using Qt 5.1, consequently it is a cross-platform solution, too. Both physical and computational aspects of the beam-splitting algorithm are discussed. Computational speed of the beam-splitting code is obviously higher compared to the conventional ray-tracing codes. A comparison of the phase matrix as computed by our code with the ray-tracing code by A. Macke shows excellent agreement.

  5. A preview of a modular surface light scattering instrument with autotracking optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tin, Padetha; Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Cheung, H. Michael; Rogers, Richard B.; Lading, Lars

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program is sponsoring the development of a new generation of surface light scattering hardware. This instrument is designed to non-invasively measure the surface response function of liquids over a wide range of operating conditions while automatically compensating for a sloshing surface. The surface response function can be used to compute surface tension, properties of monolayers present, viscosity, surface tension gradient and surface temperature. The instrument uses optical and electronic building blocks developed for the laser light scattering program at NASA Lewis along with several unique surface light scattering components. The emphasis of this paper is the compensation for bulk surface motion (slosh). Some data processing background information is also included.

  6. Study of CCT varying by volume scattering diffuser with moving and rotating white light LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Liang-Shiun; Huang, Wen-Chao

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the corrected color temperature (CCT) of white light, which originates from a white light LED (WLLED) and passes through a volume-scattering diffuser (VSD), is investigated. The VSD with thickness of 2mm is fabricated by mixing the 2um-sized PMMA scattering particles and the epoxy glue with different concentration values. Moreover, in order to understand the influences of the illuminated area and the scattering path of VSD on CCT values, the bulletheaded and lambertian-type WLLEDs are assembled for different positions and distinct orientations along the optical axis in a black cavity. A detailed comparison between results regarding the white light with and without passing through the VSD is offered. The results of this research will help to improve the colorful consistency of the LED lamps which use diffusers.

  7. Correlated analysis of cellular DNA, membrane antigens and light scatter of human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Braylan, R.C.; Benson, N.A.; Nourse, V.; Kruth, H.S.

    1982-03-01

    Flow cytometric correlated analysis of membrane antigens, DNA, and light scatter was performed on human lymphoid cells using fluorescein (FITC)-conjugated antibodies to label B- and T-cell antigens and propidium iodide (PI) to stain DNA after ethanol fixation and RNase treatment. A FACS II flow cytometer was modified to obtain digitized measurements of two color fluorescence and light scatter emissions, simultaneously. Software was written to allow single parameter analysis or correlated analysis of any two of the three parameters acquired. Ethanol fixation preserved FITC surface labeling for at least 15 weeks, but produced marked changes in light scatter. No changes in FITC distributions were observed after RNase treatment and PI staining, and the presence of FITC labeling did not affect DNA distributions. Within heterogeneous cell populations, the DNA distribution of cell subpopulations identified by a membrane antigen was clearly demonstrated.

  8. Optical characteristics of LGP depending on the scattering pattern orientation for flat-type LED lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sohee; Shin, Yongjin; Oh, Kwanghwan; Bang, Taehwan

    2016-04-01

    In flat-type light-emitting-diode (LED) lighting systems, a planar light is formed using a luminance source positioned on the side of the system and light guide panel (LGP) or reflecting plates. Thus, such systems are favorable for their thinness, which allows a relatively small number of LEDs to be used. However, the application of a high-power LED light to a large-area lighting system yields Lambertian luminaires; therefore, a point or a discomfort glare is produced, which generally causes degradation of the luminance efficiency and uniformity. In this study, we solved the problems of luminance non-uniformity and inefficiency by adjusting the orientation of an applied LGP scattered pattern and removing the remaining glare. Through computer simulation, optical characteristics that increase the efficiency even in the case of low-output LEDs were found. Specifically, a scattered pattern vertically oriented relative to the direction of the incident light improves the luminance uniformity at the side of the system, while a scattered pattern oriented parallel to the direction of the incident light plays the role of a waveguide. We implemented a flat-type LED lighting system by fabricating a large-area LGP based on the computer-simulation results and using an extremely sensitive laser. The optical characteristics observed using the laser-processed LGP were identical to those obtained in the computer simulation. Therefore, for large-area flat-type LED lighting systems, we confirmed that adjusting the orientation of the LGP scattered pattern can increase the luminance efficiency and uniformity.

  9. Spatio-temporal imaging of light transport in scattering media using white light illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badon, Amaury; Li, Dayan; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Boccara, Claude; Fink, Mathias; Aubry, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We recently showed how the correlations of a broadband and incoherent wave-field can directly yield the time-dependent Green's functions between scatterers of a complex medium [Badon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2015]. In this study, we apply this approach to the imaging of optical transport properties in complex media. A parallel measurement of millions of Green's functions at the surface of several strongly scattering samples (ZnO, TiO2, Teflon tape) is performed. A statistical analysis of this Green's matrix allows to investigate locally the spatio-temporal evolution of the diffusive halo within the scattering sample. An image of diffusion tensor is then obtained. It allows to map quantitatively the local concentration of scatterers and their anisotropy within the scattering medium. The next step of this work is to test this approach on biological tissues and illustrate how it can provide an elegant and powerful alternative to diffuse optical imaging techniques.

  10. Effect of corneal light scatter on vision: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Maraone, Giorgia; Verboschi, Francesca; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Tognetto, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is the transparent connective tissue window at the front of the eye. The physiological role of the cornea is to conduct external light into the eye, focus it, together with the lens, onto the retina, and to provide rigidity to the entire eyeball. Therefore, good vision requires maintenance of the transparency and proper refractive shape of the cornea. The surface structures irregularities can be associated with wavefront aberrations and scattering errors. Light scattering in the human cornea causes a reduction of visual quality. In fact, the cornea must be transparent and maintain a smooth and stable curvature since it contributes to the major part of the focusing power of the eye. In most cases, a simple examination of visual acuity cannot demonstrate the reduction of visual quality secondary light scattering. In fact, clinical techniques for examining the human cornea in vivo have greatly expanded over the last few decades. The measurement of corneal back scattering qualifies the degree of corneal transparency. The measurement of corneal forward-scattering quantifies the amount of visual impairment that is produced by the alteration of transparency. The aim of this study was to review scattering in the human cornea and methods of measuring it. PMID:27158621

  11. Effect of corneal light scatter on vision: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Maraone, Giorgia; Verboschi, Francesca; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Tognetto, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is the transparent connective tissue window at the front of the eye. The physiological role of the cornea is to conduct external light into the eye, focus it, together with the lens, onto the retina, and to provide rigidity to the entire eyeball. Therefore, good vision requires maintenance of the transparency and proper refractive shape of the cornea. The surface structures irregularities can be associated with wavefront aberrations and scattering errors. Light scattering in the human cornea causes a reduction of visual quality. In fact, the cornea must be transparent and maintain a smooth and stable curvature since it contributes to the major part of the focusing power of the eye. In most cases, a simple examination of visual acuity cannot demonstrate the reduction of visual quality secondary light scattering. In fact, clinical techniques for examining the human cornea in vivo have greatly expanded over the last few decades. The measurement of corneal back scattering qualifies the degree of corneal transparency. The measurement of corneal forward-scattering quantifies the amount of visual impairment that is produced by the alteration of transparency. The aim of this study was to review scattering in the human cornea and methods of measuring it. PMID:27158621

  12. Importance of light scattering properties of cloud particles on calculating the earth energy cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letu, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishimoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth is an open system, and the energy cycle of the Earth is not always a certain amount. In other words, the energy cycle in the nature is imbalance. A better understanding of the earth energy cycle is very important to study global climate change. the IPCC-AR4 reported that the cloud in the atmosphere are still characterized by large uncertainties in the estimation of their effects on energy sysle of the Earth's atmosphere. There are two types of cloud in the atmosphere, which are Cirrus and warm water cloud. In order to strongly reflect visible wavelength from sun light, thick water cloud has the effect of cooling the earth surface. When Cirrus is compared to water cloud, temperature is almost lower. Thus, there is a feature that Cirrus is easy to absorb long-wave radiation than warm water cloud. However, in order to quantitatively evaluate the reflection and absorption characteristics of cloud on remote senssing application and energy cycle of the imbalance of nature, it is necessary to obtain the scattering properties of cloud particles. Since the shapes of the water cloud particle are close to spherical, scattering properties of the particles can be calculated accurately by the Mie theory. However, Cirrus particles have a complex shape, including hexagonal, plate, and other non- spherical shapes. Different from warm water cloud partical, it is required to use several different light scattering methods when calculating the light scattering properties of the non-spherical Cirrus cloud particals. Ishimoto et al. [2010, 2012] and Masuda et al. [2012] developed the Finite-Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and Improved Geometrical-Optics Method (IGOM) for the solution of light scattering by non-spherical particles. Nakajima et al [1997,2009] developed the LIght Scattering solver for Arbitral Shape particle (Lisas)-Geometrical-Optics Method (GOM) and Surface Integral Equations Method of Müller-type (SIEMM) to calculate the light scattering properties for

  13. Endogenous light scattering as an optical signature of circulating tumor cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Joe; Polmear, Michael; Mineva, Nora D.; Romagnoli, Mathilde; Sonenshein, Gail E.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell clusters (CTCCs) are significantly more likely to form metastases than single tumor cells. We demonstrate the potential of backscatter-based flow cytometry (BSFC) to detect unique light scattering signatures of CTCCs in the blood of mice orthotopically implanted with breast cancer cells and treated with an anti-ADAM8 or a control antibody. Based on scattering detected at 405, 488, and 633 nm from blood samples flowing through microfluidic devices, we identified 14 CTCCs with large scattering peak widths and intensities, whose presence correlated strongly with metastasis. These initial studies demonstrate the potential to detect CTCCs via label-free BSFC. PMID:27231606

  14. An autonomous underwater telescope for measuring the scattering of light in the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasi, K. G.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Maragos, N.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-05-01

    The KM3NeT research infrastructure will be a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory in the Mediterranean Sea housing a neutrino telescope. Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the sea water is important for the performance evaluation of the telescope. In this work we describe the deployment of the equipment that we had previously examined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulationsl, in the context of the scattering experiment in order to evaluate the parameters describing the scattering characteristics of the sea water. Four photomultipliers (PMTs) were used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted by six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum.

  15. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  16. Mathematical methods for restricted domain ternary liquid mixture free energy determination using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Chris W.; Ross, David S.; Thurston, George M.

    2013-09-01

    We extend methods of solution of a light scattering partial differential equation for the free energy of mixing to apply to connected, isotropic ternary liquid composition domains that do not touch all three binary axes. To do so we mathematically analyze the problem of inferring needed Dirichlet boundary data, and solving for the free energy, with use of hypothetical static light scattering measurements that correspond to dielectric composition gradient vectors that have distinct directions. The physical idea behind the technique is that contrasting absorption properties of mixture components can result in such distinctly directed dielectric composition gradient vectors, due to their differing wavelength dependences of dielectric response. At suitably chosen wavelengths, contrasting light scattering efficiency patterns in the ternary composition triangle can then correspond to the same underlying free energy, and enlarge the scope of available information about the free energy, as shown here. We show how to use distinctly directed dielectric gradients to measure the free energy on both straight lines and curves within the ternary composition triangle, so as to provide needed Dirichlet conditions for light scattering partial differential equation solution. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of noisy light scattering data, we provide estimates of the overall system measurement time and sample spacing needed to determine the free energy to a desired degree of accuracy, for various angles between the assumed dielectric gradient vectors, and indicate how the measurement time depends on instrumental throughput parameters. The present analysis methods provide a way to use static light scattering to measure, directly, mixing free energies of many systems that contain such restricted liquid domains, including aqueous solutions of biological macromolecules, micellar mixtures and microemulsions, and many small molecule systems that are important in separation technology.

  17. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  18. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  19. Protein dynamics in Brillouin light scattering: Termal denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanidze, A. V.; Lushnikov, S. G.; Kojima, S.

    2009-09-01

    Thermal denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme has been investigated by Brillouin light scattering in the temperature range from 297 to 350 K. Anomalies in the temperature dependences of velocity and damping of hypersound and also in the behavior of the intensity of Brillouin components for the lysozyme solution at thermal denaturation have been revealed. These anomalies are attributable to phase transformations of the protein in the high-temperature region. It has been shown that Brillouin light scattering is a suitable tool for studying the structural evolution of proteins.

  20. The impact of organic coatings on light scattering by sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2011-08-01

    Light scattering by airborne particles plays a major role in visibility degradation and climate change. The composition and structure of particles in air can be complex, so that predictions of light scattering a priori have significant uncertainties. We report here studies of light scattering by NaCl, a model for airborne salt particles from the ocean and alkaline lakes, with and without an organic coating formed from the low volatility products of the reaction of α-pinene with ozone at room temperature at 1 atm in air. Light scattering at 450, 550 and 700 nm was measured using an integrating nephelometer on particles whose size distribution was independently determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For comparison, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) of a known size and dioctylphthalate (DOP) particles generated with a narrow size distribution were also studied. The measured values were compared to those calculated using Mie theory. Although excellent agreement between experiment and theory was found for the PSL and DOP particles, there were large discrepancies for a polydisperse NaCl sample. These were traced to errors in the size distribution measurements. Despite the use of 85Kr neutralizers, the Boltzmann charge equilibrium distribution assumption used to derive particle size distributions from SMPS data was shown not to be valid, leading to an overestimate of the concentration of larger particles and their contribution to light scattering. Correcting for this, the combination of experiments and theory show that as salt takes up low volatility organics in the atmosphere and the geometric mean diameter increases, the effect on light scattering may be reasonably approximated from the change in size distribution under conditions where the organic coating is small relative to the core size. However, for a given particle diameter, light scattering decreases as the relative contribution of the organic component increases. Thus, light scattering by

  1. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  2. Study of colloidal particle Brownian aggregation by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Pang, Ru Yi; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Cai Xia; Wu, Xiao Yun; Hou, Xue Shun; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-06-15

    The aggregation kinetics of particles in dense polystyrene latex suspensions is studied by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering. Low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering is used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates. The aggregation kinetics data obtained can be fitted into a single exponential function, which is the characteristic of slow aggregation. It is found that the aggregation rate of particles increased with higher electrolyte levels and with larger particle concentrations. The experimental results can be explained by use of the Derjaruin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeer (DLVO) theory. PMID:22446146

  3. Enhanced light scattering in Si nanostructures produced by pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sberna, P. M.; Scapellato, G. G.; Boninelli, S.; Miritello, M.; Crupi, I.; Bruno, E.; Privitera, V.; Simone, F.; Mirabella, S.; Piluso, N.

    2013-11-25

    An innovative method for Si nanostructures (NS) fabrication is proposed, through nanosecond laser irradiation (λ = 532 nm) of thin Si film (120 nm) on quartz. Varying the laser energy fluences (425–1130 mJ/cm{sup 2}) distinct morphologies of Si NS appear, going from interconnected structures to isolated clusters. Film breaking occurs through a laser-induced dewetting process. Raman scattering is enhanced in all the obtained Si NS, with the largest enhancement in interconnected Si structures, pointing out an increased trapping of light due to multiple scattering. The reported method is fast, scalable and cheap, and can be applied for light management in photovoltaics.

  4. Dipole-octopole polarizability of sulfur hexafluoride from isotropic and anisotropic light scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Bancewicz, T.

    2013-05-01

    The higher order dipole-octopole polarizability E of sulfur hexafluoride has been determined from isotropic and anisotropic collision-induced light scattering (CILS) experiments of pure SF6 gas and from anisotropic light scattering of its mixture with inert gases. The CILS spectra are analyzed by using the new updated and different intermolecular potentials. Our final estimates for this property is |E| = 96.405 ± 12.045 a.u. which is in excellent agreement with the ab initio theoretical value.

  5. A new parameter to describe light scattering by an arbitrary sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinson, William R.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider light scattering by uniform spheres of arbitrary size R and refractive index m. A new internal coupling parameterρ' = 2 kR | (m2 - 1) / (m2 + 2) | where k = 2 π / λ and λ is the wavelength is proposed that has a superior ability to determine the asymptotic regimes of small size, weakly refractive and large size, refractive than the parameter ρ = 2 kR (m - 1) . It also has superior ability as a parameter to organize patterns in light scattering from spheres.

  6. Noninvasive evaluation of corneal abnormalities using static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-06-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  7. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Corneal Abnormalities Using Static and Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-01-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  8. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  9. A New Robust Estimator of Polydispersity from Dynamic Light Scattering Data.

    PubMed

    Roger, Valentin; Cottet, Hervé; Cipelletti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new estimator of particle size polydispersity for dynamic light scattering data, which quantifies the relative width of the intensity-weighted distribution of diffusion coefficients. Simulated dynamic light scattering data are analyzed to (i) compare the accuracy and precision of the new polydispersity indicator to polydispersity measurements from standard cumulant and moment analysis (MA) fits and (ii) establish for each method the optimum data range for fitting. Although MA is preferable at low polydispersity, the new estimator is the most accurate and precise at intermediate and large polydispersities. Finally, we successfully apply the method proposed here to real data from colloidal particles, microgels, and polymer solutions. PMID:26845502

  10. Impact of upconverted scattered light on advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, David J; Fritschel, Peter; Waldman, Samuel J

    2012-04-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors are being installed in a number of locations globally. These long-baseline, Michelson interferometers increase the sensitivity between 10 and 40 Hz by many orders of magnitude compared with first generation instruments. Control of non-linear noise coupling from scattered light fields is critical to achieve low frequency performance. In this paper we investigate the requirements on the attenuation of scattered light using a novel time-domain analysis and two years of seismic data from the LIGO Livingston Observatory. PMID:22513544

  11. Light scattering from metal sol labels on high-density DNA probe arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trulson, Mark O.; Walton, Ian D.; Suseno, Audrey D.; Matsuzaki, Hajime; Stern, David

    1998-04-01

    We have been exploring the use of light scattering as a means to detect the binding of nucleic acids to high density DNA probe arrays. Initial work has concentrated on the use of 100 nanometer gold particles conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A probe array scanner that utilizes an arc lamp source and a `photocopier grade' linear CCD detector has been developed. The optical configuration of the scanner maximizes dynamic range and minimizes optical backgrounds. Initial development of light scattering detection for the p53 cancer gene application shows that functional performance may be obtained that is essentially equivalent to existing fluorescence detection methodology.

  12. HSI colour-coded analysis of scattered light of single plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Lei, Gang; Zheng, Lin Ling; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) analysis with dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) has attracted much attention in recent years. The ability for quantitative analysis of iDFM is critical, but cumbersome, for characterizing and analyzing the scattered light of single PNPs. Here, a simple automatic HSI colour coding method is established for coding dark-field microscopic (DFM) images of single PNPs with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattered light, showing that hue value in the HSI system can realize accurate quantitative analysis of iDFM and providing a novel approach for quantitative chemical and biochemical imaging at the single nanoparticle level. PMID:27194457

  13. Rod-like cholesterol micelles in aqueous solution studied using polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Castanho, M A; Brown, W; Prieto, M J

    1992-01-01

    Micelles of cholesterol in aqueous solution have been investigated using polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering. They are shown to be highly extended and characterized by a narrow size distribution. It is shown that a rod-like model is applicable with length, L = 580 nm. Determination of the rotational diffusion coefficient by analysis of the autocorrelation function gave a value of theta = 150 s-1, which is close to the calculated value for the rod with this dimension. Depolarized dynamic light scattering measurements as a function of angle gave a value of 110 s-1. PMID:1489905

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring micro structures, anisotropy and birefringence in polymers using laser scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Grek, Boris; Bartolick, Joseph; Kennedy, Alan D.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring microstructures, anistropy and birefringence in polymers using laser scattered light includes a laser which provides a beam that can be conditioned and is directed at a fiber or film which causes the beam to scatter. Backscatter light is received and processed with detectors and beam splitters to obtain data. The data is directed to a computer where it is processed to obtain information about the fiber or film, such as the birefringence and diameter. This information provides a basis for modifications to the production process to enhance the process.

  15. Dynamic light scattering measurements of reverse micelle phases in liquid and supercritical ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Blitz, J.P.; Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1988-05-19

    Dynamic light scattering of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in liquid and supercritical ethane provides the first direct evidence of reverse micelles in a supercritical fluid (dense gas). Micellar hydrodynamic diameters are only slightly larger in ethane than in liquid isooctane at the same concentrations and temperature, but diffusion coefficients are more than 10 times greater. Measurements of micelle diffusion coefficient and hydrodynamic diameter versus pressure in liquid and supercritical ethane show that density has a strong effect on hydrodynamic size and suggest that micelle clustering may be significant and highly sensitive to pressure. The utility of dynamic light scattering for studying reverse micelle phases in a dense gas is demonstrated.

  16. Specular, diffuse, and polarized light scattered by two wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    Using polarization measurements, the reflectance factor of two wheat canopies is divided into components due to specularly and diffusely reflected light. The data show that two key angles may be predicted, the angle of the polarizer for minimum flux and the angle of incidence of sunlight specularly reflected by a leaf to a sensor. The results show that specular reflection is a key aspect to radiation transfer by two canopies. Results suggest that the advent of heading in wheat may be remotely sensed from polarization measurements of the canopy reflectance.

  17. Scattered-Light Echoes from the Historical Galactic Supernovae Cassiopeia A and Tycho (SN 1572)

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Welch, D L; Suntzeff, N B; Oaster, L; Lanning, H; Olsen, K; Smith, R C; Becker, A C; Bergmann, M; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Cook, K H; Damke, G; Garg, A; Huber, M E; Matheson, T; Minniti, D; Prieto, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2008-05-06

    We report the discovery of an extensive system of scattered light echo arclets associated with the recent supernovae in the local neighborhood of the Milky Way: Tycho (SN 1572) and Cassiopeia A. Existing work suggests that the Tycho SN was a thermonuclear explosion while the Cas A supernova was a core collapse explosion. Precise classifications according to modern nomenclature require spectra of the outburst light. In the case of ancient SNe, this can only be done with spectroscopy of their light echo, where the discovery of the light echoes from the outburst light is the first step. Adjacent light echo positions suggest that Cas A and Tycho may share common scattering dust structures. If so, it is possible to measure precise distances between historical Galactic supernovae. On-going surveys that alert on the development of bright scattered-light echo features have the potential to reveal detailed spectroscopic information for many recent Galactic supernovae, both directly visible and obscured by dust in the Galactic plane.

  18. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berginc, G

    2013-11-30

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell – Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength. (coherent light scattering)

  19. Electron scattering disintegration processes on light nuclei in covariant approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsov, P. E.; Kasatkin, Yu. A.; Klepikov, V. F.

    2016-07-01

    We provide general analysis of electro-break up process of compound scalar system. We use covariant approach with conserved EM current, which gives the ability to include strong interaction into QED. Therefore, we receive the ability to describe disintegration processes on nonlocal matter fields applying standard Feynman rules of QED. Inclusion of phase exponent into wave function receives a physical sense while we deal with the dominance of strong interaction in the process. We apply Green's function (GF) formalism to describe disintegration processes. Generalized gauge invariant electro-break up process amplitude is considered. One is a sum of traditional pole series and the regular part. We explore the deposits of regular part of amplitude, and its physical sense. A transition from virtual to real photon considered in photon point limit. The general analysis for electro-break up process of component scalar system is given. Precisely conserved nuclear electromagnetic currents at arbitrary square of transited momentum are received. The only undefined quantity in theory is vertex function. Therefore, we have the opportunity to describe electron scattering processes taking into account minimal necessary set of parameters.

  20. Light scattering on a single dust grain in the ultrasonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Petr; Pavlu, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Light scattering by dust grains is a complex phenomenon playing an important role in all dust-light interactions. This includes light passing through dense dusty clouds in space as well as in the upper atmosphere, dust charging by photoemission, etc. When the size of the grain is close to the wavelength of the incident light, the Mie theory is often used to characterize the scattering process. However, our knowledge of necessary material constants for most of the space-related materials is limited. Moreover, solutions of Mie equations for general grain shapes is difficult and often not known. Objective of our work is development of an apparatus for observations of light scattering on small (micrometer-sized) arbitrary shaped dust grains. We measure scattering directly by levitating grains in the field created by the standing-wave ultrasonic trap. Such setup allows us to study single grains or small grain clusters. The experiment is performed at atmosphere - unlike other experiments, where grains were measured in water or other liquids, thus, the background effects are significantly reduced. Currently, the trap is under development and first tests are carried out. In this paper, we also focus on theoretical computation of the ultrasonic field of the selected trap.