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Sample records for light sheet-based fluorescence

  1. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy for three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Swoger, Jim; Pampaloni, Francesco; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-01-01

    In modern biology, most optical imaging technologies are applied to two-dimensional cell culture systems; that is, they are used in a cellular context that is defined by hard and flat surfaces. However, a physiological context is not found in single cells cultivated on coverslips. It requires the complex three-dimensional (3D) relationship of cells cultivated in extracellular matrix (ECM) gels, tissue sections, or in naturally developing organisms. In fact, the number of applications of 3D cell cultures in basic research as well as in drug discovery and toxicity testing has been increasing over the past few years. Unfortunately, the imaging of highly scattering multicellular specimens is still challenging. The main issues are the limited optical penetration depth, the phototoxicity, and the fluorophore bleaching. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) overcomes many drawbacks of conventional fluorescence microscopy by using an orthogonal/azimuthal fluorescence arrangement with independent sets of lenses for illumination and detection. The basic idea is to illuminate the specimen from the side with a thin light sheet that overlaps with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Optical sectioning and minimal phototoxic damage or photobleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties of LSFM. We discuss the basic principles of LSFM and methods for the preparation, embedding, and imaging of 3D specimens used in the life sciences in an implementation of LSFM known as the single (or selective) plane illumination microscope (SPIM). PMID:24371323

  2. The performance of 2D array detectors for light sheet based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand Pratap; Krieger, Jan Wolfgang; Buchholz, Jan; Charbon, Edoardo; Langowski, Jörg; Wohland, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    Single plane illumination microscopy based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SPIM-FCS) is a new method for imaging FCS in 3D samples, providing diffusion coefficients, transport, flow velocities and concentrations in an imaging mode. SPIM-FCS records correlation functions over a whole plane in a sample, which requires array detectors for recording the fluorescence signal. Several types of image sensors are suitable for FCS. They differ in properties such as effective area per pixel, quantum efficiency, noise level and read-out speed. Here we compare the performance of several low light array detectors based on three different technologies: (1) Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays, (2) passive-pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and (3) active-pixel scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras (sCMOS). We discuss the influence of the detector characteristics on the effective FCS observation volume, and demonstrate that light sheet based SPIM-FCS provides absolute diffusion coefficients. This is verified by parallel measurements with confocal FCS, single particle tracking (SPT), and the determination of concentration gradients in space and time. While EMCCD cameras have a temporal resolution in the millisecond range, sCMOS cameras and SPAD arrays can extend the time resolution of SPIM-FCS down to 10 μs or lower. PMID:23571955

  3. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) reduces phototoxic effects and provides new means for the modern life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Ansari, Nari; Girard, Philippe; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2011-07-01

    Most optical technologies are applied to flat, basically two-dimensional cellular systems. However, physiological meaningful information relies on the morphology, the mechanical properties and the biochemistry of a cell's context. A cell requires the complex three-dimensional relationship to other cells. However, the observation of multi-cellular biological specimens remains a challenge. Specimens scatter and absorb light, thus, the delivery of the probing light and the collection of the signal light become inefficient; many endogenous biochemical compounds also absorb light and suffer degradation of some sort (photo-toxicity), which induces malfunction of a specimen. In conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, whenever a single plane, the entire specimen is illuminated. Recording stacks of images along the optical Z-axis thus illuminates the entire specimen once for each plane. Hence, cells are illuminated 10-20 and fish 100-300 times more often than they are observed. This can be avoided by changing the optical arrangement. The basic idea is to use light sheets, which are fed into the specimen from the side and overlap with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. In contrast to an epi-fluorescence arrangement, such an azimuthal fluorescence arrangement uses two independently operated lenses for illumination and detection. Optical sectioning and no photo-toxic damage or photo-bleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) takes advantage of modern camera technologies. LSFM can be operated with laser cutters and for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. During the last few years, LSFM was used to record zebrafish development from the early 32-cell stage until late neurulation with sub-cellular resolution and short sampling periods (60-90 sec/stack). The recording speed was five 4-Megapixel large frames/sec with a dynamic range of 12-14 bit. We followed

  4. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  5. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Emilio J; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  6. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  7. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  8. Monitoring of Apoptosis in 3D Cell Cultures by FRET and Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Petra; Schickinger, Sarah; Wagner, Michael; Angres, Brigitte; Bruns, Thomas; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-radiative cell membrane associated Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is used for detection of apoptosis in 3-dimensional cell cultures. FRET is visualized in multi-cellular tumor spheroids by light sheet based fluorescence microscopy in combination with microspectral analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Upon application of staurosporine and to some extent after treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a specific activator of protein kinase c, the caspase-3 sensitive peptide linker DEVD is cleaved. This results in a reduction of acceptor (EYFP) fluorescence as well as a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetime of the donor (ECFP). Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes may, therefore, be used for monitoring of apoptosis in a realistic 3-dimensional system, while light sheet based microscopy appears appropriate for 3D imaging at low light exposure. PMID:25761242

  9. Fast, high-contrast imaging of animal development with scanned light sheet-based structured-illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Keller, Philipp J; Schmidt, Annette D; Santella, Anthony; Khairy, Khaled; Bao, Zhirong; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2010-08-01

    Recording light-microscopy images of large, nontransparent specimens, such as developing multicellular organisms, is complicated by decreased contrast resulting from light scattering. Early zebrafish development can be captured by standard light-sheet microscopy, but new imaging strategies are required to obtain high-quality data of late development or of less transparent organisms. We combined digital scanned laser light-sheet fluorescence microscopy with incoherent structured-illumination microscopy (DSLM-SI) and created structured-illumination patterns with continuously adjustable frequencies. Our method discriminates the specimen-related scattered background from signal fluorescence, thereby removing out-of-focus light and optimizing the contrast of in-focus structures. DSLM-SI provides rapid control of the illumination pattern, exceptional imaging quality and high imaging speeds. We performed long-term imaging of zebrafish development for 58 h and fast multiple-view imaging of early Drosophila melanogaster development. We reconstructed cell positions over time from the Drosophila DSLM-SI data and created a fly digital embryo. PMID:20601950

  10. High resolution light-sheet based high-throughput imaging cytometry system enables visualization of intra-cellular organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Raju; Mohan, Kavya; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-09-01

    Visualization of intracellular organelles is achieved using a newly developed high throughput imaging cytometry system. This system interrogates the microfluidic channel using a sheet of light rather than the existing point-based scanning techniques. The advantages of the developed system are many, including, single-shot scanning of specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel at flow rate ranging from micro- to nano- lit./min. Moreover, this opens-up in-vivo imaging of sub-cellular structures and simultaneous cell counting in an imaging cytometry system. We recorded a maximum count of 2400 cells/min at a flow-rate of 700 nl/min, and simultaneous visualization of fluorescently-labeled mitochondrial network in HeLa cells during flow. The developed imaging cytometry system may find immediate application in biotechnology, fluorescence microscopy and nano-medicine.

  11. Scattered Light And Fluorescent Photomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourney, M. E.; Chang, Ban W.

    1987-02-01

    A new technique for determining the stress state in a three-dimensional transparent body is described. This method involves cast-ing dye molecules into a model material and using the fluorescent light to analysis the stress state. The techniques of scattered light photoelasticity and speckle interferometry are considered and the enhancement of these techniques by the use of fluorescent is reported. The amount of illumination is greatly increased and the wavelength red-shifted, which eliminates the undesirable boundary halo; however, at the expense of a loss of coherence and a degree of depolarization of the light. Rhodamine 6G dye molecules are cast into gelatin, epoxy resin (PLM-4) and urethane rubber (Solithane 113) model materials. The light scattering, fluorescent, and fringe formation processes of each material is investigated. It is observed that even for the standard scattered light photoelastic materials without dye molecules the scattering is not Rayleigh, but rather has a large amount of wavelength broadening, the center wavelength, is red-shifted, and a high degree of depolarization occurs. A theory of photoelastic fringe formation for fluorescent materials is proposed. Experimental results are presented and the use of digital image processor in filtering background illumination is shown to greatly enhance fringe visibility.

  12. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  13. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  14. Modeling fluorescent light distributions in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    It is hoped that the non-invasive optical characterization of physiological features of normal and diseased epithelia can be assessed through the fluorescent emission of such tissues. With a high percentage of cancers arising in the epithelium, the characterization of carcinogenesis in such tissues is imperative. Fluorescent emission from the epithelium, e.g. oral mucosa, has been shown to be sensitive to physiological features, such as cellular morphology, and the amount and types of biochemical agents present in the tissue. Efforts to distinguish the spectral signatures of diseased and healthy states of tissues from fluorescence have been confounded by the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescent signature as a result of wavelength dependent absorption and scattering within the tissue. Theoretical models of light propagation in biological media are required for understanding the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence arising from compromised tissues. In this work we model the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence emitted from a tissue with wavelength dependent optical properties, arising from varying blood and water content, using the radiative transport equation. As an example, we demonstrate the ability of blood and water content to distort the signal of a white light source as it is embedded deeper into a tissue.

  15. An optical microsensor to measure fluorescent light intensity in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Beyenal, Haluk; Yakymyshyn, Chris; Hyungnak, Jeon; Davis, Catherine C; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-09-01

    We have developed an optical microsensor to quantify fluorescent light intensity distribution in biofilms. The optical system consisted of a beam splitter, light couplers, filters and a spectrophotometer able to accept the fiberoptic cable to measure fluorescent light intensity. The emitted light, fluorescence from the biofilm, was collected at the tip of the optical microsensor and was transferred to a spectrophotometer via a fiberoptic cable. The total fluorescent light intensity was evaluated from the emission spectrum by numerical integration. The newly developed fiberoptic microsensor was tested using a Staphylococcus aureus strain producing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) grown as biofilm. We used a 405-nm violet laser diode for excitation, and measured the emission intensity between 480 nm and 540 nm. The optical microsensor that quantifies fluorescent light intensity is a promising tool in biofilm research which often requires detection and quantification of fluorescent light intensity distribution generated by various fluorescent proteins. PMID:15279941

  16. NEXT GENERATION ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT LIGHTING PRODUCT

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivastava; Anant Setlur

    2003-04-01

    This is the Final Report of the Next-Generation Energy Efficient Fluorescent Lighting Products program, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program was to develop novel phosphors to improve the color rendition and efficiency of compact and linear fluorescent lamps. The prime technical approach was the development of quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) to further increase the efficiency of conventional linear fluorescent lamps and the development of new high color rendering phosphor blends for compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) as potential replacements for the energy-hungry and short-lived incandescent lamps in market segments that demand high color rendering light sources. We determined early in the project that the previously developed oxide QSP, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+}, did not exhibit an quantum efficiency higher than unity under excitation by 185 nm radiation, and we therefore worked to determine the physical reasons for this observation. From our investigations we concluded that the achievement of quantum efficiency exceeding unity in SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}:Pr{sup 3+} was not possible due to interaction of the Pr{sup 3+} 5d level with the conduction band of the solid. The interaction which gives rise to an additional nonradiative decay path for the excitation energy is responsible for the low quantum efficiency of the phosphor. Our work has led to the development of a novel spectroscopic method for determining photoionzation threshold of luminescent centers in solids. This has resulted in further quantification of the requirements for host phosphor lattice materials to optimize quantum efficiency. Because of the low quantum efficiency of the QSP, we were unable to demonstrate a linear fluorescent lamp with overall performance exceeding that of existing mercury-based fluorescent lamps. Our work on the high color rendering CFLs has been very successful. We have demonstrated CFLs that satisfies the EnergyStar requirement with color

  17. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are

  18. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  19. Light-induced fluorescence for pulpal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.

    2001-04-01

    A direct non-histological means of pulpal diagnosis remains elusive to clinical practice. Clinical vitality testing remains limited to electric, thermal criteria, or laser Doppler flowmetry. The goal of these investigations was to determine the feasibility of using light-induced fluorescence as a non-invasive modality for pulpal evaluation. Such a capability would, for example, permit expanded use of pulpotomy/pulpectomy techniques. Clinically healthy and diseased human extirpated pulpal tissues were used in this study. After excision, they were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections prepared. Measurement of tissue excitation/emission characteristics was performed using spectrographic analysis. A low-light level fluorescence microscopy system was then used to image autofluorescence localization and intensity at optimal excitation/detection parameters. Excitation/detection parameters used in this study included 405/605, 405/635, 405/670, 440/550, and 440/635. Autofluorescence intensities in healthy tissues were significantly stronger than those in diseased tissues at optimal parameters. It is postulated that autofluorescence characteristics are related to pathology- related structural changes in the pulp. This work provides the basis for further investigation into the relation between autofluorescence, histology and clinical symptoms.

  20. Fluorescent light bulbs - energy saver or environmental hazard?

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Businesses and homeowners have installed millions of fluorescent light bulbs in buildings around the country in the last few decades. Because fluorescent light bulbs are energy efficient and save electricity, environmentalists and governmental officials - including U.S. EPA - have promoted their use. Yet, fluorescent bulbs raise environmental concerns of their own. When these bulbs burn out, environmental and facility managers face complex issues about whether the old bulbs are regulated as hazardous waste.

  1. Fluorescent Photochromic Diarylethene That Turns on with Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Takaki; Kaburagi, Tomohiro; Morimoto, Masakazu; Une, Kanako; Sotome, Hikaru; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Irie, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    A new fluorescent photochromic diarylethene that can be activated by irradiation with 405 nm light was synthesized. The turn-on mode switching of fluorescence with visible light is favorable for application to biological systems. The fluorescence quantum yield of the photogenerated closed-ring isomer was as high as 0.8 in less or medium polar solvents, and even in polar acetonitrile the yield was higher than 0.6. PMID:26376422

  2. Multimodal light-sheet microscopy for fluorescence live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Y.; Kajiura-Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-sheet microscopy, it is known as single plane illumination microscope (SPIM), is a fluorescence imaging technique which can avoid phototoxic effects to living cells and gives high contrast and high spatial resolution by optical sectioning with light-sheet illumination in developmental biology. We have been developed a multifunctional light-sheet fluorescence microscopy system with a near infrared femto-second fiber laser, a high sensitive image sensor and a high throughput spectrometer. We performed that multiphoton fluorescence images of a transgenic fish and a mouse embryo were observed on the light-sheet microscope. As the results, two photon images with high contrast and high spatial resolution were successfully obtained in the microscopy system. The system has multimodality, not only mutiphoton fluorescence imaging, but also hyperspectral imaging, which can be applicable to fluorescence unmixing analysis and Raman imaging. It enables to obtain high specific and high throughput molecular imaging in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of window treatment, suspended radiators, and fluorescent lights, prop shop. View to east. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Light emission from compound eye with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-03-01

    Compound eyes of insects are attractive biological systems for engineered biomimicry as artificial sources of light, given their characteristic wide angular field of view. A blowfly eye was coated with a thin conformal fluorescent film, with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. Experimental results showed that the coated eye emitted visible light and that the intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  5. Organimetallic Fluorescent Complex Polymers For Light Emitting Applications

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Song Q.; So, Franky

    1997-10-28

    A fluorescent complex polymer with fluorescent organometallic complexes connected by organic chain spacers is utilized in the fabrication of light emitting devices on a substantially transparent planar substrate by depositing a first conductive layer having p-type conductivity on the planar surface of the substrate, depositing a layer of a hole transporting and electron blocking material on the first conductive layer, depositing a layer of the fluorescent complex polymer on the layer of hole transporting and electron blocking material as an electron transporting emissive layer and depositing a second conductive layer having n-type conductivity on the layer of fluorescent complex polymer.

  6. New method of acne disease fluorescent diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light and treatment control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimova, L. N.; Berezin, A. N.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, S. S.; Kusmin, S. G.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2005-08-01

    In the given research the new method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) control of acne disease is submitted. Method is based on simultaneous diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light. PDT was based on using 5-ALA (5- aminolevulinic acid) preparation and 600-730 nanometers radiation. If the examined site of a skin possessed a high endogenous porphyrin fluorescence level, PDT was carried out without 5-ALA. For FD and treatment control a dot spectroscopy and the fluorescent imaging of the affected skin were used.

  7. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  8. RNA Fluorescence with Light-Up Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Seeing is not only believing; it also includes understanding. Cellular imaging with GFP in live cells has been transformative in many research fields. Modulation of cellular regulation is tightly regulated and innovative imaging technologies contribute to further understand cellular signaling and physiology. New types of genetically encoded biosensors have been developed over the last decade. They are RNA aptamers that bind with their cognate fluorogen ligands and activate their fluorescence. The emergence and the evolution of these RNA aptamers as well as their conversion into a wide spectrum of applications are examined in a global way. PMID:27446908

  9. The photosensitizing potential of compact fluorescent vs incandescent light bulbs.

    PubMed

    Chignell, Colin F; Sik, Robert H; Bilski, Piotr J

    2008-01-01

    Recently an article about the new energy-saving compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs appeared in Parade magazine [Rosenfeld, I. (2008) Parade Feb 3, 22]. Under the heading "Bright Lights, Bad Headache?" the writer states that "new research suggests some dangers" involving these lights because they are fluorescent and "can aggravate skin rashes in people with lups, eczema, dermatitis or porphyria." We measured the emission spectrum of a 14 W compact fluorescent bulb (with the same luminous flux as a 60 W incandescent bulb) and compared it to 60 W soft white incandescent and cool white fluorescent (CWF) bulbs. Our results clearly show that the spectral irradiance of the compact fluorescent bulb is similar to that of the CWF bulb; both exhibit sharp Hg emission lines at 365 nm (very weak), 404 nm (weak), 435 nm (moderate) and 543 nm (strong). In contrast, the emission of the incandescent bulb begins at 375 nm and then increases monotonically to above 750 nm. From their respective absorption spectra we calculated the potential photosensitization indices of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX; a prototypic porphyria skin photosensitizer) and riboflavin (a putative lens photosensitizer) vs 14 W compact fluorescent, CWF and 60 W incandescent bulbs. A higher photosensitization index would indicate a greater chance that the light/photosensitizer combination would cause photosensitization of the skin or eyes. We found that for PPIX and riboflavin the photosensitization index of the compact fluorescent bulb is less than half that of the 60 W incandescent bulb. These results suggest that substitution of a compact fluorescent bulb for an incandescent bulb of the same luminous flux should not increase the phototoxicity of skin porphyrins or lens riboflavin. PMID:18494761

  10. Acrodynia: exposure to mercury from fluorescent light bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnessen, W.W. Jr.; McMahon, K.J.; Baser, M.

    1987-05-01

    Medical attention was sought for a 23-month-old toddler because of anorexia, weight loss, irritability, profuse sweating, peeling and redness of his fingers and toes, and a miliarial rash. The diagnosis was mercury poisoning, and an investigation of his environment disclosed that he had been exposed to mercury from broken fluorescent light bulbs. Acrodynia resulting from fluorescent bulbs has not been previously reported.

  11. Benefits and Costs of Ultraviolet Fluorescent Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Lestina, Diane C.; Miller, Ted R.; Knoblauch, Richard; Nitzburg, Marcia

    1999-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the improvements in detection and recognition distances using fluorescent roadway delineation and auxiliary ultra-violet (UVA) headlights and determine the reduction in crashes needed to recover increased costs of the UVA/flourescent technology. Methods Field study comparisons with and without UVA headlights. Crash types potentially reduced by UVA/flourescent technology were estimated using annual crash and injury incidence data from the General Estimates System (1995–1996) and the 1996 Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Crash costs were computed based on body region and threat-to-life injury severity. Results Significant improvements in detection and recognition distances for pedestrian scenarios, ranging from 34% to 117%. A 19% reduction in nighttime motor vehicle crashes involving pedestrians or pedal-cycles will pay for the additional UVA headlight costs. Alternatively, a 5.5% reduction in all relevant nighttime crashes will pay for the additional costs of UVA headlights and fluorescent highway paint combined. Conclusions If the increased detection and recognition distances resulting from using UVA/flourescent technology as shown in this field study reduce relevant crashes by even small percentages, the benefit cost ratios will still be greater than 2; thus, the UVA/flourescent technology is very cost-effective and a definite priority for crash reductions.

  12. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  13. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  14. High Hats, Swiss Cheese, and Fluorescent Lighting?

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2002-08-30

    For DOE, PNNL is conducting a competitive procurement to promote market introduction of new residential recessed downlights (also known as ''recessed cans'' or ''high hats'') that are airtight, rated for insulated ceilings, and hard-wired for CFLs. This paper discusses the potential energy savings of new high-efficiency downlights, and the results of product testing to date. Recessed downlights are the most popular residential lighting fixtures in the United States, with 21.7 million fixtures sold in 2000. An estimated 350 million are currently installed in American homes. Recessed cans are relatively inexpensive, and provide an unobtrusive, directed source of light for kitchens, hallways, and living rooms. Recessed cans are energy-intensive in three ways. First, virtually all recessed cans currently installed in the residential sector use incandescent light sources, typically reflector-type lamps drawing 65-150 watts. Second, heat from incandescent lamps adds to air-conditioning loads. Third, most installed recessed cans are not airtight, so they allow conditioned air to escape from the living area into unconditioned spaces such as attics. Addressing both lighting energy use and air leakage in recessed cans has proven challenging. Lighting energy efficiency is greatly improved by using CFLs. Air leakage can be addressed by making fixtures airtight. But when CFLs are used in an airtight recessed can, heat generated by the lamp and ballast is trapped within the fixture. Excessive heat causes reduced light output and shorter lifespan of the CFL. The procurement was designed to overcome these technical challenges and make new products available in the marketplace.

  15. NOTE: Fluorescent light effects on FWT-60 radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2005-08-01

    FWT-60 radiochromic film has been tested for colouration effects from fluorescent light sources and shown to produce a marked colouration when exposed to office fluorescent light sources showing an approximate 1 OD unit per 0.5 J m-2 exposure to a broad ultraviolet (UV) UVA + UVB spectrum at the peak absorption wavelength. This produces a measurable and quantifiable response to UV exposure. By choosing an appropriate wavelength of readout or band pass, the level of sensitivity can be changed to match the application or exposure level measurement required. These levels of UV response are significantly higher in sensitivity than other radiochromic films such as Gafchromic MD-55 by an order of magnitude. This feature may be of use for measurement of integrated UV exposure from fluorescent lights when required and produces a quantifiable history of total exposure.

  16. Fluorescence enhancement in visible light: dielectric or noble metal?

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Wu, L; Bai, P; Png, C E

    2016-07-28

    A high permittivity dielectric gives the impression of outperforming plasmonic noble metal in visible light fluorescence enhancement primarily because of its small loss. Nonetheless, the performances of these two platforms in various situations remain obscure due to the different optical confinement mechanisms as well as the complexity in the fluorescence enhancement process. This study presents a comprehensive comparison between these two platforms based on nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their capability and applicability in fluorescence enhancement by taking into account the fluorescence excitation rate, the quantum yield, the fluorophore wavelengths and Stokes shifts as well as the far field intensity. In a low permittivity sensing medium (e.g. air), the dielectric NP can achieve comparable or higher fluorescence enhancement than the metal NP due to its decent NP-enhanced excitation rate and larger quantum yield. In a relatively high permittivity sensing medium (e.g. water), however, there is a significant decrement of the excitation rate of the dielectric NP as the permittivity contrast decreases, leading to a smaller fluorescence enhancement compared to the metallic counterpart. Combining the fluorescence enhancement and the far field intensity studies, we further conclude that for both dielectric and plasmonic NPs, the optimal situation occurs when the fluorescence excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP (or the plasmonic resonance of the metal NP) are the same and all fall in the low conductivity region of the NP material. We also find that the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP performs better than the magnetic-dipole-mode for fluorescence enhancement applications because only the electric-dipole-mode can be strongly excited by the routinely used fluorescent dyes and quantum dots, which behave as electric dipoles by nature. PMID:27374052

  17. Evaluation of premalignant and malignant lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope)

    PubMed Central

    Sawan, Dania; Mashlah, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was the early detection of premalignant and malignant oral soft lesions by fluorescent light (VELscope). Materials and Methods: A total of 748 patients were evaluated through clinical and fluorescent light analysis of the entire oral cavity. Any lesion that was detected underwent a surgical excision biopsy as the golden standard for the detection of the lesion's histology; then a comparison was made between the results to assure the efficacy of the fluorescent light analysis outcome. Results: About 9.4% of the lesions detected were abnormal lesions and 83.09% had loss of fluorescent light effect. Based on the use of surgical biopsy, the machine had a sensitivity of 74.1% and a specificity of 96.3%. According to the statistical analysis, the P value was much lower than 0.05, so we can conclude that at 95% confidence level, there was significant agreement between VELscope results and biopsy results. Kappa coefficient value was approximately 0.5, which means that the strength of the agreement was medium. Conclusion: VELscope can be used as a clinical diagnostic aid in the detection of premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity. In addition, it helps in the detection of the borders in both surgical biopsy and surgical excision. PMID:26236687

  18. Delayed light emission and fluorescence responses of plants to chilling

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Campbell, T.A.; Massie, D.R. . Agricultural Research Service)

    1994-01-01

    Delayed light emission (DLE) of chlorophyll has the same excitation and emission spectra as chlorophyll fluorescence and was formerly called delayed fluorescence. DLE has a much longer time response than true chlorophyll fluorescence and is detectable for times ranging from milliseconds to many minutes. DLE is induced by back reactions of the photosynthetic pathway and therefore requires functional chloroplasts. It is detectable only in the dark following light excitation, yields very low energy, and decays very rapidly. DLE repetitively excited over time, which they term refreshed DLE (RDLE), shows a shoulder and broad peak in the measurements, indicating participation of at least two energy pools. DLE is altered by physiological stresses that affect chloroplasts or photosynthesis, and as illustration, plant species known to be very susceptible or very tolerant to chilling were exposed to chilling temperatures for varying times. RDLE at 0.3 s (the initial shoulder on the curves) rose in response to chilling damage in the susceptible species. The major RDLE peak was greatly inhibited in the susceptible species and showed only small changes in the tolerant species. Fluorescence measurements made on the chilling-tolerant species indicated similar responses and similar coefficients of determination were derived. These results indicate that measurement of precisely timed delayed light emission or of refreshed delayed light emission at a less precisely controlled time can be used to detect chilling stress.

  19. Fluorescent photography of spray droplets using a laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J.; Hiroyasu, H.; Sowls, R.

    1969-01-01

    Monochromatic laser emission transformed by a fluorescent process into droplet emission over a wavelength band provides high light intensities for obtaining adequate time resolution to stop droplet motion in photographic spray studies. Experiments showed that the Q-switched laser-optical harmonic generator combination produced sharp, well-exposed droplet images.

  20. Three Dimensional Fluorescence Imaging Using Multiple Light-Sheet Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Kavya; Purnapatra, Subhajit B.; Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiple light-sheet microscopy (MLSM) system capable of 3D fluorescence imaging. Employing spatial filter in the excitation arm of a SPIM system, we successfully generated multiple light-sheets. This improves upon the existing SPIM system and is capable of 3D volume imaging by simultaneously illuminating multiple planes in the sample. Theta detection geometry is employed for data acquisition from multiple specimen layers. This detection scheme inherits many advantages including, background reduction, cross-talk free fluorescence detection and high-resolution at long working distance. Using this technique, we generated equi-intense light-sheets of thickness approximately with an inter-sheet separation of . Moreover, the light-sheets generated by MLSM is found to be 2 times thinner than the state-of-art SPIM system. Imaging of fluorescently coated yeast cells of size (encaged in Agarose gel-matrix) is achieved. Proposed imaging technique may accelerate the field of fluorescence microscopy, cell biology and biophotonics. PMID:24911061

  1. High-intensity xenon pulse light source for fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Ueno, Kazuo

    1997-05-01

    A newly developed 60W xenon flash lamp, L6604 and L6605, achieves the goals of longer operating life, higher output, and improved light stability. It operates at 2 Joules per flash input energy with approximately a 4 microsecond flash duration. The stability achieved is 2-3 percent peak-to-peak during a lifetime of 5 X 10e7 flashes, which is almost double that of conventional xenon flash lamps. This newly developed xenon flashlamp should serve as an excellent light source for analytical cytology and other fluorescence instruments. It can function as a high output, stable excitation light source for conventional fluorescence or delayed luminescence with a CCD. Besides providing powerful and stable illumination for absorption analysis of cells on slides, this lamp eliminates the optical artifacts associated with vibration of the stage which often limit throughput. This paper will describe in detail performance improvements obtained from this newly developed xenon flash lamp.

  2. Host Engineering for High Quantum Efficiency Blue and White Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wook; Lee, Inho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-08-01

    High quantum efficiency in blue and white fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes is achieved by developing a novel device architecture with fluorescent emitters doped in a thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter as a host material. PMID:26078193

  3. Make caffeine visible: a fluorescent caffeine "traffic light" detector.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  4. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  5. Affective and cognitive reactions to subliminal flicker from fluorescent lighting.

    PubMed

    Knez, Igor

    2014-05-01

    This study renews the classical concept of subliminal perception (Peirce & Jastrow, 1884) by investigating the impact of subliminal flicker from fluorescent lighting on affect and cognitive performance. It was predicted that low compared to high frequency lighting (latter compared to former emits non-flickering light) would evoke larger changes in affective states and also impair cognitive performance. Subjects reported high rather than low frequency lighting to be more pleasant, which, in turn, enhanced their problem solving performance. This suggests that sensory processing can take place outside of conscious awareness resulting in conscious emotional consequences; indicating a role of affect in subliminal/implicit perception, and that positive affect may facilitate cognitive task performance. PMID:24685568

  6. Spectroscopic Analysis of Today's Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward

    2012-03-01

    In today's consumer market, there are many different light bulbs that claim to produce `natural' light. In my research, I both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed this claim. First, utilizing a spectroscope, I compared the spectra emitted by different brands and types of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs to the spectra emitted by the Sun. Once the bulbs were quantitatively analyzed, I proceeded to qualitatively analyze them by exposing subjects to the different bulbs. The subjects were asked to rate the quality of color in different pictures illuminated by each type of CFL. From these tests, I was able to determine the ``best'' CFL bulbs, and conclude whether the health risks associated with CFL bulbs outweigh the cost savings, longevity of the bulbs, and/or quality of light benefits.

  7. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluskin, Emanuel; Topalis, Frangiskos V.; Kateri, Ifigenia; Bisketzis, Nikolas

    2006-05-01

    Using some simple physics and “system” considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function ψ(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50 60 Hz line is argued to be ψ(t)=ψ+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of ψ(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is ψ. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain ψ(t), in particular ψ, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that ψ has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps.

  8. Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-30

    This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

  9. Infrared imaging of LED lighting tubes and fluorescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siikanen, Sami; Kivi, Sini; Kauppinen, Timo; Juuti, Mikko

    2011-05-01

    The low energy efficiency of conventional light sources is mainly caused by generation of waste heat. We used infrared (IR) imaging in order to monitor the heating of both LED tube luminaires and ordinary T8 fluorescent tubes. The IR images showed clearly how the surface temperatures of the fluorescent tube ends quickly rose up to about +50...+70°C, whereas the highest surface temperatures seen on the LED tubes were only about +30...+40°C. The IR images demonstrated how the heat produced by the individual LED chips can be efficiently guided to the supporting structure in order to keep the LED emitters cool and hence maintain efficient operation. The consumed electrical power and produced illuminance were also recorded during 24 hour measurements. In order to assess the total luminous efficacy of the luminaires, separate luminous flux measurements were made in a large integrating sphere. The currently available LED tubes showed efficacies of up to 88 lm/W, whereas a standard "cool white" T8 fluorescent tube produced ca. 75 lm/W. Both lamp types gave ca. 110 - 130 lx right below the ceiling-mounted luminaire, but the LED tubes consume only 40 - 55% of the electric power compared to fluorescent tubes.

  10. Structured light illumination for extended resolution in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, R.; Belyaev, Y.; Frohn, J.; Stemmer, A.

    2005-03-01

    During the last two decades fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful experimental tool in modern biology. Resolution of optical microscopes is limited by the diffraction nature of light and amounts to approximately 200 nm for point objects imaged with green light and high-NA objectives. Recently, several successful attempts have been made to break the resolution limit of microscopes. One of them is the so-called harmonic excitation light microscopy. 2D structured illumination produced by four interfering laser beams improves the lateral resolution by a factor of 2 to reach 100 nm. Structured illumination extends optical resolution since spatial frequencies beyond the classical cut-off frequency are brought into the passband of the optical microscope by frequency mixing. The extended passband is reconstructed computationally from several images acquired with shifted illumination patterns. Here we discuss an extension towards high resolution imaging of thick specimens by combining 2D structured illumination with deconvolution techniques.

  11. Spectral conversion with fluorescent microspheres for light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Hui, K N; Lai, P T; Choi, H W

    2008-01-01

    An innovative spectral conversion scheme for light emitting diodes using fluorescent microspheres has been demonstrated. An optimally mixed proportion of green and red fluorescent microspheres were coated onto a high-extraction-efficiency GaN micro-LED with emission centred at 470 nm. The microspheres self-assemble into ordered hexagonally arrays, forming regular and uniform coating layers. Devices with cool and warm white emission were achieved. The bluish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 27.3 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.26, 0.28) and 8500K CCT, while the yellowish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 26.67 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.36, 0.43) and 13000K CCT. PMID:18521128

  12. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Joohyun; Choi, Hong Kyw; Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-10-15

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  13. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM): past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Lim, John; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Yu, Weimiao; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-10-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) has emerged as an important imaging modality to follow biology in live 3D samples over time with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In particular, LSFM has been instrumental in revealing the detail of early embryonic development of Zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans. Open access projects, DIY-SPIM, OpenSPIM, and OpenSPIN, now allow LSFM to be set-up easily and at low cost. The aim of this paper is to facilitate the set-up and use of LSFM by reviewing and comparing open access projects, image processing tools and future challenges. PMID:25118817

  14. Diagnosis of dental caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-10-01

    Current dental diagnostic methods can detect caries but cannot quantify the mineral status of the lesion. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) measures the percentage fluorescence radiance change of demineralised enamel with respect to surround sound enamel, and related it directly to the amount of mineral lost during demineralisation. Demineralisation of teeth to produce caries-like lesions and the subsequent remineralisation of the lesions were monitored quantitatively and longitudinally with QLF. The influence of factors such as presence of plaque or saliva, lesion staining, lesion magnification, tooth thickness and developmental hypomineralisation, on the reproducibility of QLF imaging and analysis were investigated, Results showed that the integrated fluorescence change (hence the mineral loss) increased linearly with demineralisation time and decreased with increasing remineralisation time. Caries detection was limited by saliva or plaque, but enhanced by staining. QLF could not discriminate between developmental hypomineralisation and caries. Neither the variation in tooth thickness nor lesion magnification within the limit of a sharp image made a significant difference in QLF analysis. It was concluded that QLF could detect and quantitatively monitor the mineral changes in an incipient caries on a longitudinal basis, however detection may be limited by the presence of saliva or plaque or enhanced by staining.

  15. Shedding light on azopolymer brush dynamics by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kollarigowda, R H; De Santo, I; Rianna, C; Fedele, C; Manikas, A C; Cavalli, S; Netti, P A

    2016-09-14

    Understanding the response to illumination at a molecular level as well as characterising polymer brush dynamics are key features that guide the engineering of new light-stimuli responsive materials. Here, we report on the use of a confocal microscopy technique that was exploited to discern how a single molecular event such as the photoinduced isomerisation of azobenzene can affect an entire polymeric material at a macroscopic level leading to photodriven mass-migration. For this reason, a set of polymer brushes, containing azobenzene (Disperse Red 1, DR) on the side chains of poly(methacrylic acid), was synthesised and the influence of DR on the polymer brush dynamics was investigated for the first time by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Briefly, two dynamics were observed, a short one coming from the isomerisation of DR and a long one related to the brush main chain. Interestingly, photoinduced polymer aggregation in the confocal volume was observed. PMID:27491890

  16. Engineering light-emitting diode surgical light for near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgical systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signal in the 700 to 900 nm from molecular probes used in fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is usually weak compared to the NIR component from white light-emitting diode surgical light, which is typically switched off during FIGS to enhance the molecular fluorescence contrast of the image. We propose a simple solution to this critical issue in FIGS by removing NIR light from surgical light with a low cost commercial 3M cool mirror film 330. PMID:25057962

  17. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development.

    PubMed

    Icha, Jaroslav; Schmied, Christopher; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  18. Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Zebrafish Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Tomancak, Pavel; Preibisch, Stephan; Norden, Caren

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is gaining more and more popularity as a method to image embryonic development. The main advantages of LSFM compared to confocal systems are its low phototoxicity, gentle mounting strategies, fast acquisition with high signal to noise ratio and the possibility of imaging samples from various angles (views) for long periods of time. Imaging from multiple views unleashes the full potential of LSFM, but at the same time it can create terabyte-sized datasets. Processing such datasets is the biggest challenge of using LSFM. In this protocol we outline some solutions to this problem. Until recently, LSFM was mostly performed in laboratories that had the expertise to build and operate their own light sheet microscopes. However, in the last three years several commercial implementations of LSFM became available, which are multipurpose and easy to use for any developmental biologist. This article is primarily directed to those researchers, who are not LSFM technology developers, but want to employ LSFM as a tool to answer specific developmental biology questions. Here, we use imaging of zebrafish eye development as an example to introduce the reader to LSFM technology and we demonstrate applications of LSFM across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This article describes a complete experimental protocol starting with the mounting of zebrafish embryos for LSFM. We then outline the options for imaging using the commercially available light sheet microscope. Importantly, we also explain a pipeline for subsequent registration and fusion of multiview datasets using an open source solution implemented as a Fiji plugin. While this protocol focuses on imaging the developing zebrafish eye and processing data from a particular imaging setup, most of the insights and troubleshooting suggestions presented here are of general use and the protocol can be adapted to a variety of light sheet microscopy experiments. PMID:27167079

  19. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  20. Understanding the Fluorescence of TADF Light-Emitting Dyes.

    PubMed

    Valchanov, Georgi; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia; Chercka, Dennis; Baumgarten, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In order to afford in a controlled fashion fine-tuning of the color and the intensity of the emitted light of potential fluorophores for organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), directed molecular design based on a donor-spacer-acceptor model is undertaken. One way of increasing emission efficiency is triplet harvesting. This can be achieved by thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) when triplet and singlet excited states are quasi degenerate. Molecular building units are selected and bound in a specific pattern to allow for increase in emission performance, also due to TADF. Using time-dependent density functional theory, the relevant singlet-singlet and triplet-singlet energy gaps corresponding to absorption or emission transitions of the compounds are computed to simulate the electroluminescent spectrum. The results are analyzed in depth and relations between some spectral and structural properties are proposed. The best suited molecules are delineated as potential OLED building blocks. Guidelines for systematic improvement of the molecular characteristics are outlined. PMID:27529727

  1. Light emitting diode-based nanosecond ultraviolet light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    1995-12-01

    A compact pulsed-light source is devised from an InGaN/AlGaN double heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED). The LED emits a 450-nm (blue) light under conventional dc operation below 30 mA. When a current larger than 50 mA is applied, the intensity of the 450-nm light saturates, but that of the 380-nm light due to the InGaN component continues to increase. This phenomenon is utilized to realize a nanosecond ultraviolet (UV) light source. Under repetitive, large current pulsing (frequency=10 kHz, pulse width=4 ns, peak current=2 A), the peak LED emission shifts from 450 to 380 nm. Intense light pulses (peak value=40 mW) of 4-ns duration were generated. To evaluate the potential of the pulsed LED as an excitation source, the fluorescence lifetime of a quinine-sulfate solution was measured. The observed lifetime characteristics agreed well with the generally accepted behavior.

  2. Comparison of milk oxidation by exposure to LED and fluorescent light.

    PubMed

    Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J; Legako, J; Martini, S

    2016-04-01

    Light-induced oxidation of milk has been well studied. Exposure of milk to UV light facilitates the oxidation of fats to aldehydes, and the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids, both of which contribute to off-flavors. In addition, vitamin A and riboflavin are easily degraded by UV light. These reactions occur rapidly and are exacerbated by bright fluorescent lights in retail dairy cases. The invention of white light-emitting diodes (LED) may provide a solution to this oxidation problem. In this study, fresh milk containing 1% fat and fortified with vitamin A and riboflavin was exposed to LED at 4,000 lx, or fluorescent light at 2,200 lx for 24 h. Milk samples exposed to LED or fluorescent light, as well as milk protected from light, were analyzed by a consumer acceptance panel, and a trained flavor panel. In addition, vitamin A, riboflavin, and the production of volatile compounds were quantified. Exposure to light resulted in a reduction of cooked/sweet, milkfat, and sweet flavors and increased the intensity of butterscotch, cardboard, and astringency. In general, exposure to fluorescent light resulted in greater changes in the milk than exposure to LED even though the LED was at higher intensity. Consumers were able detect off-flavors in milk exposed to fluorescent light after 12 h and LED after 24 h of exposure. The riboflavin and vitamin A content was reduced by exposure to fluorescent light, whereas there was no significant reduction caused by LED compared with the non-light-exposed control. Production of hexanal, heptanal, 2-heptanal, octanal, 2-octanal nonanal, dimethyl sulfide, and caproic acid vinyl ester from the light-induced degradation of fats was significantly higher with fluorescent than LED. Production of these compounds was significantly higher with both light treatments than in the control milk. This study indicates that LED is less destructive to milk than fluorescent light. PMID:26874418

  3. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. Results We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. AMS subject classification Modelling and simulation PMID:26329404

  4. High-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Higuchi, Takahiro; Furukawa, Taro; Masui, Kensuke; Morimoto, Kei; Numata, Masaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sagara, Yuta; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes have continued to attract interest because of their long operational lifetimes, high colour purity of electroluminescence and potential to be manufactured at low cost in next-generation full-colour display and lighting applications. In fluorescent molecules, however, the exciton production efficiency is limited to 25% due to the deactivation of triplet excitons. Here we report fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes that realize external quantum efficiencies as high as 13.4-18% for blue, green, yellow and red emission, indicating that the exciton production efficiency reached nearly 100%. The high performance is enabled by utilization of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as assistant dopants that permit efficient transfer of all electrically generated singlet and triplet excitons from the assistant dopants to the fluorescent emitters. Organic light-emitting diodes employing this exciton harvesting process provide freedom for the selection of emitters from a wide variety of conventional fluorescent molecules.

  5. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue.

    PubMed

    Lyndby, Niclas H; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  6. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  7. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating. PMID:27225857

  8. Fluorescent property of indocyanine green (ICG) rubber ring using LED and laser light sources.

    PubMed

    Hong, Nha Young; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent properties of ICG depends on solvent. Fluorescent characteristics of ICG rubber rings and optimized detection system condition were identified. The fluorescent rubber rings are produced by drying mixture of ICG solution and liquid rubber. LED and laser light sources were used to test differences between them. Other variables are ICG molar concentration (100, 80, 60, 40, 20, 10μM), excitation light spectrum (740, 760, 785nm) and angle of view (0~80°). We observed that ICG ring emitted fluorescence at longer wavelength than in blood and aqueous state. Observation angle between 0 and 50 provided similar brightness of images, while others are significantly less luminous. Excitation light between 740~760nm ensured non-overlapping spectrums of excitation light and fluorescence emission. PMID:27280060

  9. Fluorescent property of indocyanine green (ICG) rubber ring using LED and laser light sources

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nha Young; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent properties of ICG depends on solvent. Fluorescent characteristics of ICG rubber rings and optimized detection system condition were identified. The fluorescent rubber rings are produced by drying mixture of ICG solution and liquid rubber. LED and laser light sources were used to test differences between them. Other variables are ICG molar concentration (100, 80, 60, 40, 20, 10μM), excitation light spectrum (740, 760, 785nm) and angle of view (0~80°). We observed that ICG ring emitted fluorescence at longer wavelength than in blood and aqueous state. Observation angle between 0 and 50 provided similar brightness of images, while others are significantly less luminous. Excitation light between 740~760nm ensured non-overlapping spectrums of excitation light and fluorescence emission. PMID:27280060

  10. Ultraviolet light output of compact fluorescent lamps: comparison to conventional incandescent and halogen residential lighting sources.

    PubMed

    Nuzum-Keim, A D; Sontheimer, R D

    2009-05-01

    Patients with photosensitive dermatologic and systemic diseases often question the ultraviolet light (UVL) output of household lighting sources. Such individuals have increasing concern about potential UVL exposure from energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), as little data have been presented concerning their UVL output. The objective was to compare, via pilot study, the levels of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) leak between residential lighting sources. Equivalent wattage CFL, incandescent and halogen bulbs were purchased from local retailers in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. The UVA and UVB outputs of these sources were measured under controlled conditions at 10, 25, 50, 100 and 150 cm away from the light source using an IL-1700 research radiometer equipped with UVA and UVB detectors. Negligible UVB and UVA was detected at 100 and 150 cm. Therefore, data were analysed from measurements at 10, 25 and 50 cm only. The results demonstrated UVA leak highest from incandescent and halogen bulbs, and UVB leak highest from CFL. The overall UVA/UVB leak was lowest from CFL shielded during the manufacturing process. In conclusion, patients with photosensitivity have choices depending on their relative risk from different UVL wavelength spectra. UVB exposure risk may be reduced the greatest by utilising CFL with manufacturer-provided shields. PMID:19395458

  11. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence-Excitation of Molecules by Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent issue of "TPT," Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1 ("Fun with Fluorescence in Olive Oil,"…

  12. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  13. Strong antenna-enhanced fluorescence of a single light-harvesting complex shows photon antibunching

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Curto, Alberto G.; Cogdell, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the highly efficient energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes is a subject of intense research. Unfortunately, the low fluorescence efficiency and limited photostability hampers the study of individual light-harvesting complexes at ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an over 500-fold fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) at the single-molecule level by coupling to a gold nanoantenna. The resonant antenna produces an excitation enhancement of circa 100 times and a fluorescence lifetime shortening to ~\

  14. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  15. Volume shrinkage of bone, brain and muscle tissue in sample preparation for micro-CT and light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan; Goyens, Jana; De Greef, Daniel; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-08-01

    Two methods are especially suited for tomographic imaging with histological detail of macroscopic samples that consist of multiple tissue types (bone, muscle, nerve or fat): Light sheet (based) fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT requires staining with heavy chemical elements (and thus fixation and sometimes dehydration) in order to make soft tissue imageable when measured alongside denser structures. LSMF requires fixation, decalcification, dehydration, clearing and staining with a fluorescent dye. The specimen preparation of both imaging methods is prone to shrinkage, which is often not mentioned, let alone quantified. In this paper the presence and degree of shrinkage are quantitatively identified for the selected preparation methods/stains. LSFM delivers a volume shrinkage of 17% for bone, 56% for muscle and 62% for brain tissue. The three most popular micro-CT stains (phosphotungstic acid, iodine with potassium iodide, and iodine in absolute ethanol) deliver a volume shrinkage ranging from 10 to 56% for muscle and 27-66% for brain, while bone does not shrink in micro-CT preparation. PMID:24963987

  16. Fluorescence properties of light-sensitive chromones used in archival polymer recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, I. Yu.; Barachevsky, V. A.; Ayt, A. O.; Kobeleva, O. I.; Valova, T. M.; Levchenko, K. S.; Yarovenko, V. N.; Krayushkin, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    The fluorescence properties of compounds formed upon irreversible photochemical transformation of some chromone derivatives in toluene were studied. At the first time, the quantum yields of the photoproducts were measured. The relationship between the fluorescence properties and the structure of these photoproducts was elucidated. It was shown that the properties of some chromones make them suitable for the design of light-sensitive recording media for optical discs with non-destructive fluorescence readout of optical information.

  17. Fixation-resistant photoactivatable fluorescent proteins for correlative light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Paez Segala, Maria G.; Sun, Mei G.; Shtengel, Gleb; Viswanathan, Sarada; Baird, Michelle A.; Macklin, John J.; Patel, Ronak; Allen, John R.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Yalin; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins facilitate a variety of imaging paradigms in live and fixed samples. However, they cease to function following heavy fixation, hindering advanced applications such as correlative light and electron microscopy. Here we report engineered variants of the photoconvertible Eos fluorescent protein that function normally in heavily fixed (0.5–1% OsO4), plastic resin-embedded samples, enabling correlative super-resolution fluorescence imaging and high-quality electron microscopy. PMID:25581799

  18. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner. PMID:26619309

  19. Organic Light Emitting Device as a fluorescence spectroscopy's light source : one step towards the lab-on-a-chip device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camou, S.; Kitamura, M.; Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-02-01

    Many papers were recently dedicated to the lab-on-a-chip applications, where all the basic elements should be integrated directly onto the microchip. The fluorescence spectroscopy is mostly used as a detection method due to its high reliability and sensitivity, but requires light source and photo-detector. For the first time, we then propose to use Organic material Light Emitting Diode (OLED) to supply a light source for the optical detection based on fluorescence spectroscopy. By combining this OLED with micro-fluidic channels patterned in PDMS layer, the integration of light source on the chip is then achieved. First, the ability of Organic Material to excite fluorescent response from dye is demonstrated. Then, some configurations are described in order to decrease the major drawbacks that have to be solved before applying such kind of devices.

  20. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  1. Energy Conservation Using Scotopically Enhanced Fluorescent Lighting In An Office Environment

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    This study was conducted in a recently built and occupied office building to determine whether the energy savings benefits of scotopically enhanced fluorescent lighting can be achieved while maintaining user acceptability.

  2. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. PMID:26351155

  3. Organic light-emitting device with a phosphor-sensitized fluorescent emission layer

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Kanno, Hiroshi

    2009-08-25

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters. The emissive region of the devices of the present invention comprise at least one phosphor-sensitized layer which has a combined emission from a phosphorescent emitter and a fluorescent emitter. In preferred embodiments, the invention relates to white-emitting OLEDS (WOLEDs).

  4. Regulation of red fluorescent light emission in a cryptic marine fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Animal colouration is a trade-off between being seen by intended, intra- or inter-specific receivers while not being seen by the unintended. Many fishes solve this problem by adaptive colouration. Here, we investigate whether this also holds for fluorescent pigments. In those aquatic environments in which the ambient light is dominated by bluish light, red fluorescence can generate high-contrast signals. The marine, cryptic fish Tripterygion delaisi inhabits such environments and has a bright red-fluorescent iris that can be rapidly up- and down-regulated. Here, we described the physiological and cellular mechanism of this phenomenon using a neurostimulation treatment with KCl and histology. Results KCl-treatment revealed that eye fluorescence regulation is achieved through dispersal and aggregation of black-pigmented melanosomes within melanophores. Histology showed that globular, fluorescent iridophores on the anterior side of the iris are grouped and each group is encased by finger-like extensions of a single posterior melanophore. Together they form a so-called chromatophore unit. By dispersal and aggregation of melanosomes into and out of the peripheral membranous extensions of the melanophore, the fluorescent iridophores are covered or revealed on the anterior (outside) of the iris. Conclusion T. delaisi possesses a well-developed mechanism to control the fluorescent emission from its eyes, which may be advantageous given its cryptic lifestyle. This is the first time chromatophore units are found to control fluorescent emission in marine teleost fishes. We expect other fluorescent fish species to use similar mechanisms in the iris or elsewhere in the body. In contrast to a previously described mechanism based on dendritic fluorescent chromatophores, chromatophore units control fluorescent emission through the cooperation between two chromatophore types: an emitting and an occluding type. The discovery of a second mechanism for fluorescence

  5. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-06-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects.

  6. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects. PMID:26083081

  7. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  8. Implantable biosensors: analysis of fluorescent light propagation through skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, D. P.; McShane, Michael J.; Pishko, Michael V.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2001-06-01

    Progress towards a painless and hygienic glucose monitoring procedure for diabetics continues as the growth of diabetes mellitus reaches epidemic proportions in the American population. Utilizing an implantable fluorescence based glucose assay, the minimally invasive approach presented here has previously shown promise towards this goal in terms of glucose specificity and quantification for in vitro environments. However, in realistic physiological circumstances the depth of the implant can vary and optical properties of skin can change due to normal physiological conditions. Additionally, naturally occurring auto-fluorescence can obscure the sensor signal. An important concern under these conditions is that variations of fluorescent intensity due to these or other causes might be mistaken for glucose concentration fluctuations. New data shows that fluorescence-based glucose assays can be probed and interpreted in terms of glucose concentrations through pig skin at depths of up to 700 mm when immobilized in a bio-compatible polymer. When a combination of two fluorophores are employed as demonstrated here, reasonable changes in skin thickness and the confounding effects of the variations inherent in skin can be overcome for this glucose sensing application.

  9. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence--Excitation of Molecules by Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent issue of TPT, Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1.

  10. Numerical optix: A time-domain simulator of fluorescent light diffusion in turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Delorme, Jean-François; Guilman, Olga; Leblond, Frédéric; Khayat, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence imaging has increased steadily in the last decade. Using fluorescence techniques, it is feasible to visualize and quantify the function of genes and the expression of enzymes and proteins deep inside tissues. When applied to small animal research, optical imaging based on fluorescent marker probes can provide valuable information on the specificity and efficacy of drugs at reduced cost and with greater efficiency. Meanwhile, fluorescence techniques represent an important class of optical methods being applied to in vitro and in vivo biomedical diagnostics, towards noninvasive clinical applications, such as detecting and monitoring specific pathological and physiological processes. ART has developed a time domain in vivo small animal fluorescence imaging system, eXplore Optix. Using the measured time-resolved fluorescence signal, fluorophore location and concentration can be quickly estimated. Furthermore, the 3D distribution of fluorophore can be obtained by fluorescent diffusion tomography. To accurately analyze and interpret the measured fluorescent signals from tissue, complex theoretical models and algorithms are employed. We present here a numerical simulator of eXplore Optix. It generates virtual data under well-controlled conditions that enable us to test, verify, and improve our models and algorithms piecewise separately. The theoretical frame of the simulator is an analytical solution of the fluorescence diffusion equation. Compared to existing models, the coupling of fluorophores with finite volume size is taken into consideration. Also, the influences of fluorescent inclusions to excitation and emission light are both accounted for. The output results are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations.

  11. Angular distribution of light emission from compound-eye cornea with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-09-01

    The complex morphology of the apposition compound eyes of insects of many species provides them a wide angular field of view. This characteristic makes these eyes attractive for bioreplication as artificial sources of light. The cornea of a blowfly eye was conformally coated with a fluorescent thin film with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. On illumination by shortwave-ultraviolet light, the conformally coated eye emitted visible light whose intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  12. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ryan; Taormina, Michael; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-03-01

    We present a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides high speed three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one microscope. To demonstrate the instrument's utility, we provide several examples which focus on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish. We show that DICM can sometimes circumvent the need for fluorescent based techniques, augmenting the number of parameters obtainable per experiment when used alongside LSFM, and that DICM can be used to augment each experiment by imaging complementary features, such as non-fluorescent local environments near fluorescent samples (e.g. fluorescent enteric neurons imaged alongside the non-fluorescent gut wall), interactions between fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples (e.g. bacteria), and more. NSF Award 0922951, NIH Award 1P50 GM098911

  13. Manipulation of cellular light from green fluorescent protein by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Wang, Shaoyang; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2012-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in biochemistry and cell biology. It emits fluorescence following optical excitation, which is usually provided by a laser. Here, we report that fluorescence from enhanced GFP can be `turned off' by exposing cells to laser light. A short flash of femtosecond laser light is shown to deplete calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. Calcium-release-activated calcium channels are then activated by stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). The rise in intracellular Ca2+ depolarizes mitochondria and increases the leakage of reactive oxygen species, which then permanently bleach the GFP. This controllable optical scheme for reactive oxygen species generation can also be used to modulate the photoconversion of GFP fluorescence from green to red emission and provide a mechanism for influencing cellular molecular dynamics.

  14. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  15. Fluorescent Brighteners as Visible LED-Light Sensitive Photoinitiators for Free Radical Photopolymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaoling; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Graff, Bernadette; Blanchard, Nicolas; Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Lalevée, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    The photochemical and electrochemical investigations of commercially available, safe, and cheap fluorescent brighteners, namely, triazinylstilbene (commercial name: fluorescent brightener 28) and 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-benzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene, as well as their original use as photoinitiators of polymerization upon light emitting diode (LED) irradiation are reported. Remarkably, their excellent near-UV-visible absorption properties combined with outstanding fluorescent properties allow them to act as high-performance photoinitiators when used in combination with diaryliodonium salt. These two-component photoinitiating systems can be employed for free radical polymerizations of acrylate. In addition, this brightener-initiated photopolymerization is able to overcome oxygen inhibition even upon irradiation with low LED light intensity. The underlying photochemical mechanisms are investigated by electron-spin resonance-spin trapping, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, and steady-state photolysis techniques. PMID:27072016

  16. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  17. Whole-body Fluorescent Optical Imaging Based on Power Light Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    With complex configuration, the general whole-body fluorescence optical imaging system is power-consuming for it is mainly composed of laser or mercury lamp, filter and fiber-optic cable. In this paper we aimed at setting up a compact imaging system based on power light emitting diode (LED). We first discussed fluorescence excitation efficiency of mercury lamp and LED. Then we developed a compact prototype whole-body fluorescence optical imaging system based on power LED. With the prototype, we monitored the dynamic course of green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing tumors in the same intact nude mice. We also recorded the temporal behavior of the infectious process of GFP-expressing bacteria from outside intact infected animals. This study puts forward a platform for monitoring tumor growth. The experiment reveals that it is doable to substitute power LED for mercury lamp for whole-body fluorescence optical imaging. PMID:17282471

  18. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Ł.; Czechowski, N.; Piatkowski, D.; Litvin, R.; Mackowski, S.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Pichler, S.; Cogdell, R. J.; Heiss, W.

    2011-10-24

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  19. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, Ł.; Czechowski, N.; Piatkowski, D.; Litvin, R.; Mackowski, S.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Cogdell, R. J.; Pichler, S.; Heiss, W.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  20. Up-converted fluorescence from photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes linearly dependent on excitation intensity.

    PubMed

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi

    2016-01-01

    Weak up-converted fluorescence related to bacteriochlorophyll a was recorded from various detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes as well as from the functional membranes of photosynthetic purple bacteria under continuous-wave infrared laser excitation at 1064 nm, far outside the optically allowed singlet absorption bands of the chromophore. The fluorescence increases linearly with the excitation power, distinguishing it from the previously observed two-photon excited fluorescence upon femtosecond pulse excitation. Possible mechanisms of this excitation are discussed. PMID:25764015

  1. A compact multi-channel fluorescence sensor with ambient light suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egly, Dominik; Geörg, Daniel; Rädle, Matthias; Beuermann, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    A multi-channel fluorescence sensor has been developed for process monitoring and fluorescence diagnostics. It comprises a fiber-optic set-up with an immersion probe and an intensity-modulated high power ultraviolet light-emitting diode as a light source for fluorescence excitation. By applying an electronic lock-in procedure, fluorescence signals are selectively detectable at ambient light levels of 1000 000 times higher intensity. The sensor was designed to be compact, low cost and easily adaptable to a wide field of application. The set-up was used to simultaneously monitor three important metabolic fluorophores: NAD(P)H, flavins and porphyrins during the cultivation of a baker's yeast. Moreover, the accumulation and degradation kinetics of protoporphyrin IX induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid on the skin could be recorded by the sensor. The detection limit for protoporphyrin IX was determined to be 4 × 10-11 mol L-1. The linear signal amplification of the sensor and time courses of fluorescence signals monitored during yeast fermentations were validated using a commercial CCD spectrometer. The robust and flexible set-up of the fiber-optic measurement system promises easy implementation of this non-invasive analytical tool to fluorescence monitoring and diagnostics in R&D and production.

  2. Investigation of Relative Illuminance as a Function of Distance between Reflector and Fluorescent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Softic, Amela

    2007-04-01

    Although fluorescent lighting is considerably more efficient then incandescent, and is in wide use, manufacturers find new ways to improve its configuration and reduce energy use. Based on the fundamentals of ``Non-imaging Optics'', was experimentally investigated the dependence of illumination of a point in the space on the distance between the reflection and fluorescent light source. Monitoring of changes in illumination is performed by optical sensor and corresponding computer software. Investigation of the influence of the distance between the fluorescent light and the reflector on the relative illumination has shown, for the tested geometries, that by reducing the distance between them the illumination increased, even though the distance among the source and the measuring point got greater.

  3. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed. PMID:25577254

  4. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  5. Mechanistic Studies of the Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Protein Voltage Probe ArcLight

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Chen, Fuyi; Loturco, Joseph J.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    ArcLight, a genetically encoded fluorescent protein voltage probe with a large ΔF/ΔV, is a fusion between the voltage sensing domain of the Ciona instestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase and super ecliptic pHluorin carrying a single mutation (A227D in the fluorescent protein). Without this mutation the probe produces only a very small change in fluorescence in response to voltage deflections (∼1%). The large signal afforded by this mutation allows optical detection of action potentials and sub-threshold electrical events in single-trials in vitro and in vivo. However, it is unclear how this single mutation produces a probe with such a large modulation of its fluorescence output with changes in membrane potential. In this study, we identified which residues in super ecliptic pHluorin (vs eGFP) are critical for the ArcLight response, as a similarly constructed probe based on eGFP also exhibits large response amplitude if it carries these critical residues. We found that D147 is responsible for determining the pH sensitivity of the fluorescent protein used in these probes but by itself does not result in a voltage probe with a large signal. We also provide evidence that the voltage dependent signal of ArcLight is not simply sensing environmental pH changes. A two-photon polarization microscopy study showed that ArcLight's response to changes in membrane potential includes a reorientation of the super ecliptic pHluorin. We also explored different changes including modification of linker length, deletion of non-essential amino acids in the super ecliptic pHluorin, adding a farnesylation site, using tandem fluorescent proteins and other pH sensitive fluorescent proteins. PMID:25419571

  6. Biocidal activity of a light-absorbing fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liangde; Rininsland, Frauke H; Wittenburg, Shannon K; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; McBranch, Duncan W; Whitten, David G

    2005-10-25

    Herein we describe studies that indicate a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte shows biocidal activity against gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, E. coli, BL21, with plasmids for Azurin and ampicillin resistance) and gram-positive bacterial spores (Bacillus anthracis, Sterne, B. anthracis, Sterne). These studies were carried out with aqueous suspensions of the conjugated polyelectrolyte, with the polyelectrolyte in supported formats and with samples in which the conjugated polyelectrolyte was coated on the bacteria. The results are interesting in that the biocidal activity is light-induced and appears effective due to the ability of the conjugated polyelectrolyte to form a surface coating on both types of bacteria. The effects observed here should be general and suggest that a range of conjugated polyelectrolytes in different formulations may provide a useful new class of biocides for both dark and light-activated applications. PMID:16229539

  7. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  8. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y.; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M. M. T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel (‘non-diffracting’) light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  9. Multicolor 4D Fluorescence Microscopy using Ultrathin Bessel Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Teng; Lau, Sze Cheung; Wang, Ying; Su, Yumian; Wang, Hao; Cheng, Aifang; Herrup, Karl; Ip, Nancy Y; Du, Shengwang; Loy, M M T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and efficient method for producing ultrathin Bessel ('non-diffracting') light sheets of any color using a line-shaped beam and an annulus filter. With this robust and cost-effective technology, we obtained two-color, 3D images of biological samples with lateral/axial resolution of 250 nm/400 nm, and high-speed, 4D volume imaging of 20 μm sized live sample at 1 Hz temporal resolution. PMID:27189786

  10. Development of a noninvasive diabetes screening device using the ratio of fluorescence to Rayleigh scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nai-Teng; Krantz, Brian S.; Eppstein, Jonathan A.; Ignotz, Keith D.; Samuels, Mark A.; Long, James R.; Price, John

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a new lens measurement system that simultaneously measures the intensities of fluorescence and Rayleigh components at various distances into the lens along the optical axis. The noninvasive measurement is performed through an undilated pupil, and with the assistance of a pupil tracking system that facilitates maintaining the x and y positions of the sample volume to within +/- 100 micrometers of any programmed 'lock' position. The intensity of the Rayleigh component that is used to normalize the measured fluorescent signal serves to correct the attenuation effects due to absorption and lens light scatter. This report, resulting from a SpectRx Site L clinical study using a refined instrumentation, presents analysis of fluorescence and Rayleigh data from the lenses of 923 controls and 239 diabetic subjects ranging from 23 to 75 years old. Fluorescence and Rayleigh data have been obtained via confocal mode from various locations nominally along the lens optical axis for controls and diabetics, at different ages, using three pairs of excitation and collection wavelengths: 364/495 nm, 434/495 nm, and 485/515 nm. For control subjects, there exists a strong, almost linear relationship between age and fluorescence, while diabetic subjects tend to deviate from this age-fluorescence relationship. Our data show that the lenses of diabetic patients are subject to an accelerated aging process, presumably due to an elevated level of brown and fluorescence protein adducts and crosslinks from nonenzymatic glycosylation. We have also shown that by using the measured Rayleigh profiles to normalize the measured fluorescence, most of the absorption effects are removed and therefore the separation between the fluorescence of diabetics and controls is greatly improved. Thus, the device for measuring fluorescence/Rayleigh ratios can be used to noninvasively screen populations for possible undiagnosed diabetes.

  11. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    PubMed

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  12. The impact of algal fluorescence on the underwater polarized light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonizzo, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2010-04-01

    Multiangular, hyperspectral measurements of the underwater polarization light field, as well as comprehensive measurements of IOPs were collected in several cruise campaigns in the Chesapeake/Virginia area and New York Harbor/Hudson River areas. The waters examined were mostly eutropic water with Chlorophyll a concentration up to approximately 57 μg/L. It is found that Chlorophyll a fluorescence markedly impacts (reduces) the underwater degree of polarization (DOP) in the 650 - 700 nm spectral region. By taking note of the unpolarized nature of algal fluorescence and the partially polarized properties of elastic scattering, particularly by non-algal particles, we were able to separate the Chlorophyll a fluorescence signal from the total radiance. The analysis is based on comparisons of the underwater multiangular, hyperspectral polarization measurements which include fluorescence, compared with adding - doubling polarized radiative transfer simulations of elastic scattering which use measured IOPs as input, and which do not include fluorescence. The difference between the two shows the impact of fluorescence. These relationships are examined in detail, and the efficacy of using DOP measurements for underwater fluorescence retrieval is evaluated for different scattering geometries and water conditions.

  13. Cutaneous melanin exhibiting fluorescence emission under near-infrared light excitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Alajlan, Abdulmajeed; Tan, Eileen; McLean, David I; Lui, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    Under ultraviolet and visible light excitation, melanin is essentially a nonfluorescent substance. This work reports our study on near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence properties of melanins, and explores potential applications of NIR fluorescence techniques for evaluating skin disorders involving melanin. The NIR fluorescence spectrum is obtained using a fiber optic NIR spectrometer under 785-nm laser excitation. In vitro measurements are performed on synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin, melanin extracted from Sepia ink sacs, human hair, animal fur, and bird feathers. Paired spectral comparisons of white and black skin appendages show that melanization of hair, fur, or feathers more than doubles the NIR fluorescence. In vivo NIR autofluorescence of normal dorsal and volar forearm skin of 52 volunteers is measured. Dorsal forearm skin, which is darker than volar skin, exhibits significantly greater NIR fluorescence. Patients with vitiligo (n=4), compound nevus (n=3), nevus of Ota (n=1), superficial spreading melanoma (n=3), and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (n=1) are also evaluated. NIR fluorescence is greater within the lesion than the surrounding normal skin for all these conditions except vitiligo, where the converse was true. The observed melanin NIR fluorescence provides a new approach to in vitro and in vivo melanin detection and quantification that may be particularly useful for evaluating pigmented skin lesions. PMID:16822060

  14. Fluorescent light irradiation and its mutagenic potential in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, K.; Thilager, A.

    1994-12-31

    The photobiological effect of light is characterized by its energy emission at different wave lengths. Therefore by studying the energy emission spectra at different light sources and their photobiological activities, one can relate wavelength range(s) of the spectrum to a particular photobiological effect. We studied the potential of light irradiation from standard fluorescent bulbs (Sylvania 34WT-12) used in offices and laboratories to induce unscheduled DNA Synthesis (UDS) and mutations in cultured mammalian cells. The energy emission spectrum of the bulbs was determined at every 10 nanometers from 300nM to 700nM. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were used to study the induction of mutations at the Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HGPRT) locus. Primary rat hepatocyte cultures were used to study the effect of light irradiation on UDS. The CHO cells were cultured in tissue culture flasks in minimum light conditions (.02mw/cm{sup 2}) and exposed to light irradiations with durations from 0 to 40 minutes. The cultures were maintained in darkness during the expression period and evaluated for HGPRT mutant frequencies. Similarly, the primary rat hepatocyte cultures were cultured on cover slips under minimal light conditions except for light irradiation and evaluated for UDS using 3H-thymidine labelled auto-radiography. The results of the study indicate that irradiation from fluorescent lights caused a slight elevation in the HGPRT mutant frequency in CHO cells. However a significant increase in UDS was not observed even at the maximum light irradiation dose. These results were compared to data obtained from similar experiments conducted with fluorescent bulbs with different energy emission spectra.

  15. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    PubMed

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements. PMID:26715516

  16. [Derivative fluorescence probe recognition results of the light physical mechanism of metal ions].

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu-mei; Hu, Xiao-jun; Li, Fu-jun; Xie, Yu-meng; Zhao, Yang-yang; Zhou, Qiao

    2015-02-01

    As people deeply study the electronic spectra of fluorescent compounds and photophysical behavior, enormous progress has been made in the aspect of changes and states of different systems in the use of fluorescent molecules as probes. PTC-DA is a kind of typical fluorescent molecular probe that is highly sensitive and selective in water environment. This paper makes a research on the physical mechanism of light of PTCDA by TDF (Density Functional Theory), calculates the optimal configuration the charge population and excitation spectra of PTCDA molecules under ideal condition and acquires PTCDA fluorescence emission spectra then analyses that PTCDA is a kind of quenching and dual colorimetric signal probe response. Its optical signal response mechanism belongs to ICT (Intramolecular Charge Transfer) mechanism. According to the results, this perylene derivatives is fitted with Cu2+ excited state absorption spectra. Before and after the combination with Cu2+, the peak shape of absorption spectrum is similar. When copper is added, the overall absorption peak position occurred redshift, quenching discoloration happens. By comparing with experimental values, the calculated molecular configuration is reasonable and effective and the peak of excitation spectra is realistic. Analysis shows that: PTCDA molecules divalent copper ions have better fluorescence detection activity, the optical signal response mechanisms are intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanisms. When a molecule receives divalent copper ions, the absorption spectrum peak position redshifts, intramolecular charge transfer direction and intensity changes. There occur both quenching signal and discoloration signal. It is a kind of fluorescent probe material with double quenching and discoloration fluorescent signal, which has great potential for development. This paper makes an early-stage exploration of the physical mechanism of light response mechanism analysis in molecular fluorescent probe field and

  17. White polymer light emitting diode using blend of fluorescent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Asit; Katiyar, Monica

    2012-10-01

    White polymer light emitting diodes (WPLEDs) are fabricated using poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) (PFO) as host and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)]-1,4-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) as guest material having structure ITO(150nm)/PEDOT:PSS(40nm)/PFO:MEH-PPV(75-90nm)/Ca(20nm)/Al(120nm). Photoluminescence spectra of blends with different MEH-PPV concentration reveal that at low doping level of MEH-PPV, blue emission from PFO and yellow emission from MEH-PPV co-exist due to incomplete energy transfer from PFO to MEH-PPV. Surface morphology of the spin coated blend films with different concentrations of MEH-PPV were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It shows segregation/agglomeration of polymers at higher concentration of MEH-PPV (~2.0 wt %). Finally, WPLEDs, having MEH-PPV in the range of 0.8-2.0 wt%, were fabricated. We obtained best device at 0.8 wt% of MEH-PPV, it shows white light with Commission Internationale de l'Enclairage (CIE) coordinate of (0.30, 0.38). Electroluminescence turn-on voltage of the device was 4.0 V and maximum luminance reaches 1234 cd/m2 at 8.5 V. The luminous current and power efficiency at current density of 22 mA/cm2 were found to be 2.3 cd/A and 1.1 lm/W, respectively.

  18. The Effects of Fluorescent and Incandescent Lighting on the Repetitive Behaviours of Autistic and Intellectually Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, D. M.; Penney, R.

    1985-01-01

    Repetitive behaviors of five autistic and five intellectually disabled children were observed under both fluorescent and incandescent lighting conditions. Findings supported the hypothesis that autistic children engage in a significantly greater frequency of stereotypes under fluorescent lighting, while there is no significant difference among…

  19. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter combined with green and red fluorescent emitters.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-03-25

    A new device architecture for highly efficient white organic light-emitting diodes is proposed, using a molecule exhibiting blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence as a common source of singlet excitons for molecules emitting red and green light based on conventional fluorescence. The device, with an optimum combination of materials, shows a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 12% without using phosphorescent emitters. PMID:25664428

  20. Flexible fluorescent white organic light emitting diodes with ALD encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Chittawanij, Apisit; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lin, Pen-Chu; Hong, Lin-Ann; Tsai, Feng-Yu; Tseng, Ming-Hong; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Lin, Kung-Liang; Chen, Szu-Hao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the flexible white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLED) was fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) with structure of ITO/EHI608 (75 nm)/HTG-1 (10 nm)/3% EB502:0.8% EY53 (5 nm)/3% EB502 (35 nm)/Alq3 (10 nm)/LiF (0.8 nm)/Al (150 nm) and was compared with glass substrate the same structure. It was seen that the performances of flexible and glass substrate are almost the same. The luminance, current efficiency, and CIE coordinates of flexible device is 6351 cd/m2, 12.7 cd/A, and (0.31, 0.38) at 50 mA/cm2, respectively. Then, an Al2O3/HfO2 film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a thin film encapsulation layer have been described and compared, such as the characteristics of water permeability and lifetime of flexible WOLED. The results show that the PET/ALD film low value of about 0.04 g/m2d, and the PET film shows WVTR of about 3.8 g/m2/d. The lifetimes of PET/ALD and PET encapsulations are 840 min and 140 min, respectively. Simultaneous deposition of ALD film on PET film gave the lifetime of flexible WOLED is six times longer than device without ALD encapsulation.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurement via a radionuclide-scintillation light source and analog cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Burden, D L; Hobbs, S E; Hieftje, G M

    1997-05-15

    beta-Emitting 90Sr is used with a plastic scintillator to produce excitation-light pulses for fluorescence lifetime analysis. This light source is less expensive, more compact, and much more reliable than traditionally employed excitation sources such as lasers or pulsed flash lamps. The pulse train from this light source varies randomly in amplitude and time. Cross-correlation signal analysis is ideal for such a source because, unlike other time domain techniques, cross correlation takes complete advantage of its random nature. Here we report on the construction of an instrument and the methods employed to make fluorescence lifetime measurements via the new source and an analog correlation processor. Although the light intensity of the scintillator-based excitation source is comparatively low, an adequate signal level can be generated. The fluorescence lifetimes of three fluorophores are measured with a 1-mCi radionuclide to demonstrate a lifetime range from less than 1.5 to 28 ns. Long-lifetime measurements require an extra calibration step in order to compensate for delay cable energy loss. The light collection efficiency of the current instrument was found to be undesirably low; improvements in the instrument optics are suggested that will increase the collection efficiency and enhance the detection capability. PMID:9164162

  2. A compact fluorescence and white light imaging system for intraoperative visualization of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dan; Kim, Evgenia; Cotero, Victoria; Staudinger, Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Tan Hehir, Cristina

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence image guided surgery (FIGS) allows intraoperative visualization of critical structures, with applications spanning neurology, cardiology and oncology. An unmet clinical need is prevention of iatrogenic nerve damage, a major cause of post-surgical morbidity. Here we describe the advancement of FIGS imaging hardware, coupled with a custom nerve-labeling fluorophore (GE3082), to bring FIGS nerve imaging closer to clinical translation. The instrument is comprised of a 405nm laser and a white light LED source for excitation and illumination. A single 90 gram color CCD camera is coupled to a 10mm surgical laparoscope for image acquisition. Synchronization of the light source and camera allows for simultaneous visualization of reflected white light and fluorescence using only a single camera. The imaging hardware and contrast agent were evaluated in rats during in situ surgical procedures.

  3. Compact fluorescence and white-light imaging system for intraoperative visualization of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dan; Kim, Evgenia; Cotero, Victoria; Staudinger, Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash; tan Hehir, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence image guided surgery (FIGS) allows intraoperative visualization of critical structures, with applications spanning neurology, cardiology and oncology. An unmet clinical need is prevention of iatrogenic nerve damage, a major cause of post-surgical morbidity. Here we describe the advancement of FIGS imaging hardware, coupled with a custom nerve-labeling fluorophore (GE3082), to bring FIGS nerve imaging closer to clinical translation. The instrument is comprised of a 405nm laser and a white light LED source for excitation and illumination. A single 90 gram color CCD camera is coupled to a 10mm surgical laparoscope for image acquisition. Synchronization of the light source and camera allows for simultaneous visualization of reflected white light and fluorescence using only a single camera. The imaging hardware and contrast agent were evaluated in rats during in situ surgical procedures.

  4. Development of image reconstruction algorithms for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using total light approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Miwa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) based on the total light approach is developed. The continuous wave light is used for excitation in this system. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the total light approach that reconstructs the absorption coefficients increased by the fluorophore. Additionally we propose noise reduction using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) incorporating the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD). Numerical and phantom experiments show that the developed system successfully reconstructs the fluorophore concentration in the biological media, and the ART with TSVD alleviates the influence of noises. In vivo experiment demonstrated that the developed FDOT system localized the fluorescent agent which was concentrated in the cancer transplanted into a kidney in a mouse.

  5. Calibration of a wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy system using light emitting diodes as light sources.

    PubMed

    Elder, A D; Frank, J H; Swartling, J; Dai, X; Kaminski, C F

    2006-11-01

    High brightness light emitting diodes are an inexpensive and versatile light source for wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In this paper a full calibration of an LED based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is presented for the first time. A radio-frequency generator was used for simultaneous modulation of light emitting diode (LED) intensity and the gain of an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) camera. A homodyne detection scheme was employed to measure the demodulation and phase shift of the emitted fluorescence, from which phase and modulation lifetimes were determined at each image pixel. The system was characterized both in terms of its sensitivity to measure short lifetimes (500 ps to 4 ns), and its capability to distinguish image features with small lifetime differences. Calibration measurements were performed in quenched solutions containing Rhodamine 6G dye and the results compared to several independent measurements performed with other measurement methodologies, including time correlated single photon counting, time gated detection, and acousto optical modulator (AOM) based modulation of excitation sources. Results are presented from measurements and simulations. The effects of limited signal-to-noise ratios, baseline drifts and calibration errors are discussed in detail. The implications of limited modulation bandwidth of high brightness, large area LED devices ( approximately 40 MHz for devices used here) are presented. The results show that phase lifetime measurements are robust down to sub ns levels, whereas modulation lifetimes are prone to errors even at large signal-to-noise ratios. Strategies for optimizing measurement fidelity are discussed. Application of the fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system is illustrated with examples from studies of molecular mixing in microfluidic devices and targeted drug delivery research. PMID:17204064

  6. Fluorescent Carbon Quantum Dots as Single Light Converter for White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yaling; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-06-01

    Synthesis of fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as single light converter and their application in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported. CQDs were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method using glucose and polyethylene glycol 200 as precursors. The structural and optical properties of the CQDs were investigated. The CQDs with uniform size of 4 nm possessed typical excitation-dependent emission wavelength and quantum yield of 3.5%. Under ultraviolet illumination, the CQDs in deionized water emitted bright blue fluorescence and produced broad visible-light emission with high red, green, and blue spectral component ratio of 63.5% (red-to-blue intensity to total intensity), suggesting great potential as single light converter for white LEDs. To demonstrate their potential, a white LED using CQDs as a single light converter was built. The device exhibited cool white light with corresponding color temperature of 5584 K and color coordinates of (0.32, 0.37), belonging to the white gamut. This research suggests that CQDs could be a promising candidate single light converter for white LEDs.

  7. Far-red light photoactivatable near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from a bacterial phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2013-01-01

    Ability to modulate fluorescence of optical probes can be used to enhance signal-to-noise ratio for imaging within highly autofluorescent environments, such as intact tissues and living organisms. Here we report two phytochrome-based photoactivatable near-infrared fluorescent proteins, named PAiRFP1 and PAiRFP2. PAiRFPs utilize heme-derived biliverdin, ubiquitous in mammalian tissues, as the chromophore. Initially weakly fluorescent PAiRFPs undergo photoconversion into a highly fluorescent state with excitation/emission at 690 nm/717 nm following a brief irradiation with far-red light. After photoactivation, PAiRFPs slowly revert back to initial state, enabling multiple photoactivation-relaxation cycles. Low-temperature optical spectroscopy reveals several intermediates involved in PAiRFP photocycles, which all differ from that of the bacteriophytochrome precursor. PAiRFPs can be photoactivated in a spatially selective manner in mouse tissues, and optical modulation of their fluorescence allows for substantial contrast enhancement, making PAiRFPs advantageous over permanently fluorescent probes for in vivo imaging conditions of high autofluorescence and low signal levels. PMID:23842578

  8. [Normal light and fluorescence microscopy for authentication of Delphinii Brunoniani Herba of Tibet].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Qiong; Xu, Fu-Chun; Dongzhi, Zhuo-Ma; Liu, E-Hu; Xu, Luo-Shan; Liu, Hui-Juan; Li, Ping

    2012-11-01

    Dried herb of Delphinium brunonianum Royle (Ranunculaceae) has long been used under the herbal name "Xiaguobei" (Delphinii Brunoniani Herba) in traditional Tibetan medicine and prescribed for the treatment of influenza, itchy skin rash and snake bites. In order to find a useful and convenient method for the identification of microscopic features, the technique of fluorescence microscopy was applied to authenticate "Xiaguobei" of Tibet. The transverse sections of stem and leaf, as well as the powder of "Xiaguobei" were observed to seek for typical microscopic features by normal light and fluorescence microscopy. A style-like, single-cell glandular hair containing yellow secretions on the leaf, young stem and sepal of "Xiaguobei" was found. Under the fluorescence microscope, the xylem and pericycle fiber group emitted significant fluorescence. This work indicated that fluorescence microscopy could be an useful additional method for the authentication work. Without the traditional dyeing methods, the main microscopic features could be easily found by fluorescence microscopy. The results provided reliable references for the authentication of "Xiaguobei". PMID:23387092

  9. Image-guided surgery using near-infrared fluorescent light: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Handgraaf, Henricus J. M.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its relatively high tissue penetration, near-infrared (NIR; 700-900 nm) fluorescent light has the potential to visualize structures that need to be resected (e.g. tumors, lymph nodes) and structures that need to be spared (e.g. nerves, ureters, bile ducts). Until now, most clinical trials have focused on suboptimal, non-targeted dyes. Although successful, a new era in image-guided surgery has begun by the introduction of tumor-targeted agents. In this paper, we will describe how tumor-targeted NIR fluorescent imaging can be applied in a clinical setting.

  10. Comparison of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) and Fluorescent Light on Suppression of Pineal Melatonin in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, Charles M.; Heeke, D. S.; Holley, D. C.; Mele, G.; Brainard, G. C.; Hanifin, J. P.; Rollag, M. D.; Savage, Paul D. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    To validate a novel LED array for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool-white fluorescent (CWF) lighting in suppressing pineal gland melatonin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 175-200 g, were maintained under control conditions for 2 weeks (food and water ad lib, 12L: 12D CWF, 18 uW/square cm). Dark adapted animals (animals before lights on) were exposed to 5 min of LED or CWF light of similar spectral power distribution. Two groups of rats (LED vs. CWF) were compared at 5 light intensities (100, 40, 1, 1.0, and 0. 1 lux). A control group was placed into the exposure apparatus but not exposed to light. After exposure, pineal glands were rapidly removed and assayed for melatonin by RIA. Results. The dark-exposed control groups matched with the 5 intensity groups (100, 40, 10, 1.0, and 0.1 lux) showed mean + SEM pineal melatonin values of 1167 +/- 136, 1569 +/- 126, 353 +/- 34, 650 +/- 124, and 464 +/- 85, pg/ml respectively. The corresponding CWF exposure data were 393 1 41, 365 +34, 257 +/- 13, 218 +/- 42, and 239 +/- 71 pg/ml, respectively. Corresponding LED exposure data were 439 +/- 25, 462 +/- 50, 231 +/- 6, 164 +/- 12, and 158 +/- 12 pg/ml, respectively. Rats exposed to both experimental light conditions at all illuminances studied showed significant melatonin suppression (p less than 0.01, ANOVA). In no case was the melatonin suppression induced by LED illuminance significantly different from the melatonin suppression elicited by the same intensity of CWF light. The results show that a novel LED light source can suppress pineal melatonin equal to that of a conventional CWF light source.

  11. Life History Changes in Coral Fluorescence and the Effects of Light Intensity on Larval Physiology and Settlement in Seriatopora hystrix

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Melissa S.; Fan, Tung-Yung; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence is common in both coral adult and larval stages, and is produced by fluorescent proteins that absorb higher energy light and emit lower energy light. This study investigated the changes of coral fluorescence in different life history stages and the effects of parental light environment on larval fluorescence, larval endosymbiotic dinoflagellate abundance, larval size and settlement in the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix. Data showed that coral fluorescence changed during development from green in larvae to cyan in adult colonies. In larvae, two green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) co-occur where the peak emission of one GFP overlaps with the peak excitation of the second GFP allowing the potential for energy transfer. Coral larvae showed great variation in GFP fluorescence, dinoflagellate abundance, and size. There was no obvious relationship between green fluorescence intensity and dinoflagellate abundance, green fluorescence intensity and larval size, or dinoflagellate abundance and larval size. Larvae of parents from high and low light treatments showed similar green fluorescence intensity, yet small but significant differences in size, dinoflagellate abundance, and settlement. The large variation in larval physiology combined with subtle effects of parental environment on larval characteristics seem to indicate that even though adult corals produce larvae with a wide range of physiological capacities, these larvae can still show small preferences for settling in similar habitats as their parents. These data highlight the importance of environmental conditions at the onset of life history and parent colony effects on coral larvae. PMID:23544072

  12. Malignant melanoma in relation to moles, pigmentation, and exposure to fluorescent and other lighting sources.

    PubMed Central

    Elwood, J. M.; Williamson, C.; Stapleton, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Interviews were performed on 83 patients with malignant melanoma, being 74% of all new NHS patients over a 33 month period who were resident in a defined area of Nottingham, and on age and sex matched controls chosen from all outpatients and inpatients of the same hospitals with the same area of residence. Significantly increased risks of melanoma were found in subjects with 3 or more raised moles on the upper arms (relative risk = 17.0), in association with heavy freckling of the face and arms, and with a tendency to sunburn easily and tan poorly, these factors having independent effects. While no significant and consistent association with exposure to fluorescent light was seen, the observed risks were higher in subjects with greater exposure, and higher in association with exposure to undiffused than to diffused light. Cases had a significantly greater number of hours' exposure to undiffused light than did controls. The associations with fluorescent light exposure were stronger when based on interview data than on a subsequent postal questionnaire. Twenty-one cases and 11 controls reported exposure to unusual occupational lighting sources which may have had an ultraviolet component; these included various intense lighting sources and lamps used in printing and dyeline copying. PMID:3947517

  13. Quantified light-induced fluorescence, review of a diagnostic tool in prevention of oral disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.; Smith, Philip W.; van Daelen, Catherina J.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2009-05-01

    Diagnostic methods for the use in preventive dentistry are being developed continuously. Few of these find their way into general practice. Although the general trend in medicine is to focus on disease prevention and early diagnostics, in dentistry this is still not the case. Nevertheless, in dental research some of these methods seem to be promising for near future use by the general dental professional. In this paper an overview is given of a method called quantitative light-induced fluorescence or (QLF) in which visible and harmless light excites the teeth in the patient's mouth to produce fluorescent images, which can be stored on disk and computer analyzed. White spots (early dental caries) are detected and quantified as well as bacterial metabolites on and in the teeth. An overview of research to validate the technique and modeling to further the understanding of the technique by Monte Carlo simulation is given and it is shown that the fluorescence phenomena can be described by the simulation model in a qualitative way. A model describing the visibility of red fluorescence from within the dental tissue is added, as this was still lacking in current literature. An overview is given of the clinical images made with the system and of the extensive research which has been done. The QLF™ technology has been shown to be of importance when used in clinical trials with respect to the testing of toothpastes and preventive treatments. It is expected that the QLF™ technology will soon find its way into the general dental practice.

  14. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  15. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  16. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  17. Simultaneous light scattering and intrinsic fluorescence measurement for the classification of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Kaye, P H; Barton, J E; Hirst, E; Clark, J M

    2000-07-20

    We describe a prototype laboratory light-scattering instrument that integrates two approaches to airborne particle characterization: spatial light-scattering analysis and intrinsic fluorescence measurement, with the aim of providing an effective means of classifying biological particles within an ambient aerosol. The system uses a single continuous-wave 266-nm ultraviolet laser to generate both the spatial elastic scatter data (from which an assessment of particle size and shape is made) and the particle intrinsic fluorescence data from particles in the approximate size range of 1-10-mum diameter carried in a sample airflow through the laser beam. Preliminary results suggest that this multiparameter measurement approach can provide an effective means of classifying different particle types and can reduce occurrences of false-positive detection of biological aerosols. PMID:18349949

  18. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  19. Instrument for fluorescence sensing of circulating cells with diffuse light in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations in mice is important in many areas of preclinical biomedical research. Normally, this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or, more recently, by using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. We describe a new technological approach to this problem using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer (DFFC) uses a laser to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. We first demonstrate that the DFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD-labeled cells in a custom-made optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates, and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. We also present preliminary data demonstrating that the DFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with sensitivity improvement by several orders of magnitude compared to current approaches.

  20. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunctioning fluorescent lighting fixture.

    PubMed Central

    Tavris, D R; Field, L; Brumback, C L

    1984-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts , which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt . Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks. PMID:6721022

  1. Outbreak of illness due to volatilized asphalt coming from a malfunction fluorescent lighting fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Tavris, D.R.; Field, L.; Brumback, C.L.

    1984-06-01

    An investigation was made of an outbreak of headache, eye irritation, sore throat, nasal congestion, and nausea in an office complex, ongoing for three months and regularly resolved upon leaving the building. Investigation suggested that the etiology of the illness was malfunctioning fluorescent light ballasts, which overheated and resulted in melting and volatilization of contained asphalt. Correction of the problem resulted in almost complete disappearance of symptoms within two weeks.

  2. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  3. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  4. Artifactual formation of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine: role of fluorescent light and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arif, Jamal M; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2003-01-01

    The pro-mutagenic oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) has been a subject of numerous studies. However, the absolute 8-oxodG levels in tissue DNA reported by various methods have been debated due to its artifactual production during DNA isolation and/or the DNA processing. We have investigated factors that may result in such artifacts during isolation and analysis of DNA as well as means for its prevention. 8-OxodG content was measured by a recently described TLC enrichment-mediated 32P-postlabeling. Liver DNA from 3 month-old, female Sprague-Dawley rats was isolated by a standard solvent-extraction procedure (phenol, phenol:Sevag, and Sevag; 23 degrees C), a modified solvent-extraction procedure (phenol:Sevag, and Sevag; 4 degrees C; KCl-SDS-protein precipitation) or sodium iodide extraction procedure. 8-OxodG was analyzed in the DNA by the 32P-postlabeling assay using a fluorescent light box during the workup, as well as in its absence. The 8-oxodG levels, when the fluorescent light box was used, were in similar range irrespective of the DNA isolation procedure (16.4+/-1.6 to 28.7+/-6 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides). However, the values were significantly lower (3.1+/-0.4 to 3.4+/-0.2 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides) in the absence of fluorescence light box, room fluorescent light (suspended through the ceiling) and natural room light did not alter the 8-oxodG levels. Further, the addition of 0.3 mM of PBN (N-t-butyl-alpha-phenyl nitrone) or TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl), or 6.8 mM 8-hydroxy-quinoline during the DNA isolation resulted in still lower values (0.8+/-0.1 to 1.8+/-0.5 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides) although this reduction was not consistently observed in different experiments. These results suggest that fluorescent light is the major 'culprit' in artifactual production and variability reported in the 8-oxodG levels. PMID:14534745

  5. Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography using total light approach

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Shinpei; Yano, Akira; Uchida, Kazuki; Mitsui, Yohei; Yoshida, Masaki; Takekoshi, Masashi; Marjono, Andhi; Gao, Feng; Hoshi, Yoko; Kida, Ikuhiro; Masamoto, Kazuto; Yamada, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography were conducted to demonstrate the total light approach which was previously proposed by authors. The total light approach reduces the computation time to solve the forward model for light propagation. Time-resolved temporal profiles were acquired for cylindrical phantoms having single or double targets containing indocyanine green (ICG) solutions. The reconstructed images of ICG concentration reflected the true distributions of ICG concentration with a spatial resolution of about 10 mm. In vivo experiments were conducted using a mouse in which an ICG capsule was embedded beneath the skin in the abdomen. The reconstructed image of the ICG concentration again reflected the true distribution of ICG although artifacts due to autofluorescence appeared in the vicinity of the skin. The effectiveness of the total light approach was demonstrated by the phantom and mouse experiments. PMID:23577297

  6. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. PMID:27155416

  7. Theory of light quenching: effects of fluorescence polarization, intensity, and anisotropy decays.

    PubMed Central

    Kuśba, J; Bogdanov, V; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have recently demonstrated that fluorescence emission can be quenched by laser light pulses from modern high repetition rate lasers, a phenomenon we call "light quenching." We now describe the theory of light quenching and some of its effects on the steady-state and time-resolved intensity and anisotropy decays of fluorophores. Light quenching can decrease or increase the steady-state or time-zero anisotropy. Remarkably, the light quenching can break the usual z axis symmetry of the excited-state population, and the emission polarization can range from -1 to +1 under selected conditions. The measured anisotropy (or polarization) depends upon whether the observation axis is parallel or perpendicular to the propagation direction of the light quenching beam. The effects of light quenching are different for a single pulse, which results in both excitation and quenching, as compared with a time-delayed quenching pulse. Time-delayed light quenching pulses can result in step-like changes in the time-dependent intensity or anisotropy and are predicted to cause oscillations in the frequency-domain intensity and anisotropy decays. The increasing availability of pulsed laser sources offers the opportunity for a new class of two-pulse or multiple-pulse experiments where the sample is prepared by an excitation pulse, the excited state population is modified by the quenching pulse(s), followed by time- or frequency-domain measurements of the resulting emission. PMID:7858140

  8. Stable blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes with three times longer lifetime than phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mounggon; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-04-17

    High quantum efficiency above 18% and extended lifetime three times longer than that of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated in blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent OLEDs. PMID:25757226

  9. Synthesis of polymeric fluorescent brightener based on coumarin and its performances on paper as light stabilizer, fluorescent brightener and surface sizing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanghua; Zheng, Hua; Guo, Mingyuan; Du, Lun; Liu, Guojun; Wang, Peng

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a novel polymeric fluorescent brightener based on coumarin (PFBC) was synthesized, using three-step synthetic route, from 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, coumarin monomer (FBC), Acrylamide (AM) and methacrylatoethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (DMC). The structure of PFBC was characterized by FT-IR, 1HNMR and GPC. PFBC was applied to paper fiber as light stabilizer, fluorescent brightener and surface sizing agent and its performances were evaluated by measuring the UV-vis, fluorescence, thermal stability, the cationic degree, surface strength and smoothness of paper, the brightness degree of paper and the PC value of paper. Results showed that PFBC had better solubility in water than that of FBC, by measuring the optical properties. Through the surface sizing experiment and UV aging experiment, PFBC not only enhanced the surface strength and smoothness of paper as a surface sizing agent, but also had better effect on anti-UV aging than that of FBC as light stabilizer and fluorescent brightener.

  10. A method for tuning the excitation wavelength of an LED light source during fluorescence-based cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermannn, Gregers G.

    2016-02-01

    In clinical applications of fluorescence-guided endoscopy of the bladder (cystoscopy) it can be observed that the contrast in light from autofluorescence and from photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) varies from patient to patient. To compensate for this effect, a new method is presented for tuning the wavelength of a LED-based light source during fluorescence guided endoscopy of the bladder i.e. photodynamic diagnosis of bladder tumours. In the present embodiment, the wavelength of the LED source, developed in our laboratory, can be tuned to vary the excitation wavelength of both the sensitised fluorescence in the tumours (PDD) as well as the native fluorescence of the bladder mucosa and blood vessels. The contrast of the image observed through the CCD-camera attached to the cystoscope is thereby increased. In this way, patient to patient variations in autofluorescence and in sensitised fluorescence of tumours can be compensated for during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy in the clinic.

  11. Filter-less fluorescence sensor with high separation ability achieved by the suppression of forward-scattered light in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Joon; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Motoharu; Hizawa, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Yu; Dasai, Fumihiro; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Akita, Ippei; Iwata, Tatsuya; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of a filter-less fluorescence sensor, by suppressing forward scattering in silicon by surface planarization is presented. A fluorescence microscope has been widely used in biochemical fields. However, it is difficult to miniaturize because optical filters and other parts are necessary. We previously developed a filter-less fluorescence sensor. The separation ability of excitation light and fluorescence in the previous device was 550:1. It is necessary to improve the separation ability. This study focuses on the suppression of forward-scattered incident light in silicon, through the enhanced surface planarization of polysilicon, which is the gate electrode material. The separation ability of the filter-less fluorescence sensor was increased from 550:1 to 1250:1 by the suppression of forward-scattered light.

  12. Development of a High Output Fluorescent Light Module for the Commercial Plant Biotechnology Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Zhou, Wei-Jia; Doty, Laura (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To maximize the use of available resources provided onboard the International Space Station, the development of an efficient lighting 1 system is critical to the overall performance of the CPBF. Not only is it important to efficiently generate photon energy, but thermal loads on the CPBF Temperature and Humidity Control System must be minimized. By utilizing optical coatings designed to produce highly diffuse reflectance in the visible wavelengths while minimizing reflectance in the infrared region, the design of the fluorescent light module for the CPBF is optimized for maximum photon flux, spatial uniformity and energy efficiency. Since the Fluorescent Light Module must be fully enclosed to meet (ISS) requirements for containment of particulates and toxic materials, heat removal from the lights presented some unique design challenges. By using the Express Rack moderate C, temperature-cooling loop, heat is rejected by means of a liquid/air coolant manifold. Heat transfer to the manifold is performed by conduction using copper fins, by forced air convection using miniature fans, and by radiation using optically selective coatings that absorb in the infrared wavelengths. Using this combination of heat transfer mechanisms builds in redundancy to prevent thermal build up and premature bulb failure.

  13. Low Light CMOS Contact Imager with an Integrated Poly-Acrylic Emission Filter for Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dattner, Yonathan; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA) based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm) was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert’s law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented. PMID:22399920

  14. The role of plasmonic resonance in enhancement of interaction of light and silver nanostructures in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shy-Haugh

    -coated silicon substrates and oxide-coated noble-metallic films. In analyzing these results we applied both the discrete dipole approximation (DDA)and finite difference time domain (FDTD)methods, calculating the electromagnetic field response of our arrays to incident light. Comparison between these calculations and experiment provides physical insight as to the mechanisms of nano-metal particle-enhanced fluorescence: our results indicate local field enhancement from silver nanoparticles is crucial in nMEF.

  15. Quantitative Light Fluorescence (QLF) and Polarized White Light (PWL) assessments of dental fluorosis in an epidemiological setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine if a novel dual camera imaging system employing both polarized white light (PWL) and quantitative light induced fluorescence imaging (QLF) is appropriate for measuring enamel fluorosis in an epidemiological setting. The use of remote and objective scoring systems is of importance in fluorosis assessments due to the potential risk of examiner bias using clinical methods. Methods Subjects were recruited from a panel previously characterized for fluorosis and caries to ensure a range of fluorosis presentation. A total of 164 children, aged 11 years (±1.3) participated following consent. Each child was examined using the novel imaging system, a traditional digital SLR camera, and clinically using the Dean’s and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) Indices on the upper central and lateral incisors. Polarized white light and SLR images were scored for both Dean’s and TF indices by raters and fluorescence images were automatically scored using software. Results Data from 164 children were available with a good distribution of fluorosis severity. The automated software analysis of QLF images demonstrated significant correlations with the clinical examinations for both Dean’s and TF index. Agreement (measured by weighted Kappa’s) between examiners scoring clinically, from polarized photographs and from SLR images ranged from 0.56 to 0.92. Conclusions The study suggests that the use of a digital imaging system to capture images for either automated software analysis, or remote assessment by raters is suitable for epidemiological work. The use of recorded images enables study archiving, assessment by multiple examiners, remote assessment and objectivity due to the blinding of subject status. PMID:22607363

  16. Light-scattering submicroscopic particles as highly fluorescent analogs and their use as tracer labels in clinical and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Yguerabide, J; Yguerabide, E E

    1998-09-10

    Submicroscopic gold particle suspensions scatter colored light when illuminated with white light, and we have observed that a light-scattering gold particle suspension has the same appearance as a fluorescing solution. Thus, when illuminated by a narrow beam of white light, a 40-nm gold sol displays a clear (not cloudy), green scattered light (Tyndall) beam and has the same appearance as a fluorescing fluorescein solution. These, as well as other, observations have suggested to us that, in general, light-scattering particles can be treated as fluorescent analogs and used as fluorescent analog tracers in immuno- and DNA probe assays as well as in cell and molecular biology studies. Light-scattering particles are advantageous in these applications because particles such as gold and silver have very high light-scattering powers, which allows these particles to be easily detected, by light-scattering, at particle concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. The scattered light can be detected by the unaided eye for qualitative measurements or with a simple light-sensitive detector for quantitative measurements. Moreover, individual particles can be easily detected by eye or a video camera using a simple light microscope with a proper illuminating system. In addition, submicroscopic particles which scatter blue, green, yellow, orange, or red light can be readily synthesized. Antibodies, DNA probes, and other tracer substances can be readily attached to gold and other particles without altering their light-scattering properties. In this article we present the theory which allows one to predict the light-scattering properties of particles of different sizes and compositions and identify those particle sizes and compositions which appear most adequate for particular applications. Furthermore, we calculate molar extinction coefficients and emission efficiencies for particles of different sizes and compositions which allows us to compare the light-producing powers of these particles

  17. Spectral signatures of fluorescence and light absorption to identify crude oils found in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baszanowska, E.; Otremba, Z.

    2014-08-01

    To protect the natural marine ecosystem, it is necessary to continuously enhance knowledge of environmental contamination, including oil pollution. Therefore, to properly track the qualitative and quantitative changes in the natural components of seawater, a description of the essential spectral features describing petroleum products is necessary. This study characterises two optically-different types of crude oils (Petrobaltic and Romashkino) - substances belonging to multi-fluorophoric systems. To obtain the spectral features of crude oils, the excitation-emission spectroscopy technique was applied. The fluorescence and light absorption properties for various concentrations of oils at a stabilised temperature are described. Both excitation-emission spectra (EEMs) and absorption spectra of crude oils are discussed. Based on the EEM spectra, both excitation end emission peaks for the wavelengthindependent fluorescence maximum (Exmax/ Emmax) - characteristic points for each type of oil - were identified and compared with the literature data concerning typical marine chemical structures.

  18. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P.; Taormina, Michael J.; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for DICM and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behavior of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  19. Imaging green fluorescent protein-labeled neurons using light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Knott, Graham W

    2013-06-01

    The ability to observe axons and dendrites with transmission electron microscopy (EM) after they have been previously imaged live with laser-scanning microscopy is a useful technique to study their synaptic connectivity. This protocol provides a detailed method by which neurons that were imaged in a live brain or slice culture can be reimaged using EM. First, brain tissue expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) is chemically fixed. Then, an immunocytochemistry process is used to render the fluorescent protein electron dense so that it can first be located using light microscopy and then serial thin-sectioned for EM so that the ultrastructure of specific parts of neurites can be analyzed in three dimensions. Patterns of blood vessels observed in the live brain are used to locate the previously imaged neurons. The method described here allows for a complete three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction to be made of the imaged structures from serial electron micrographs. PMID:23734023

  20. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-07-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Teaching about photosynthesis with simple equipment: analysis of light-induced changes in fluorescence and reflectance of plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2013-10-01

    Solar energy absorbed by plants results in either reflection or absorption. The latter results in photosynthesis, fluorescence, or heat. Measurements of fluorescence changes have been used for monitoring processes associated with photosynthesis. A simple method to follow changes in leaf fluorescence and leaf reflectance associated with nonphotochemical quenching and light acclimation of leaves is described. The main equipment needed consists of a green-light emitting laser pointer, a digital camera, and a personal computer equipped with the camera acquisition software and the programs ImageJ and Excel. Otherwise, only commonly available cheap materials are required. PMID:23728512

  2. Two-photon fluorescence and confocal reflected light imaging of thick tissue structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki H.; So, Peter T. C.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Masters, Barry R.; Gratton, Enrico

    1998-04-01

    The technology of two-photon excitation has opened a window of opportunity for developing non-invasive medical diagnostic tools capable of monitoring thick tissue biochemical states. Using cellular endogenous chromophores, (beta) -nicotinamide- adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H], the cellular metabolic rates in living human skin were determined. Although important functional information can be obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy of endogenous chromophores, these chromophores are rather poor contrast enhancing agent for mapping cellular morphology. First, most endogenous chromophores are confined to the cellular cytoplasm which prevents the visualization of other cellular organelles. Second, there is significant variability in the distribution and the quantum yield of endogenous chromophores which depends on tissue biochemistry but prevents consistent comparison of cellular morphology. On the other hand, the deep tissue cellular morphology has been imaged with excellent resolution using reflected light confocal microscopy. In reflected light microscopy, the image contrast originates from the index of refraction differences of the cellular structures. The organelle boundaries with significant index differences such as the plasma membrane and the nucleus envelope can be consistently visualized. A combination of morphological and functional information is required for a thorough tissue study. This presentation describes the development of a new microscope which is capable of simultaneously collecting both two-photon fluorescence and confocal reflected light signals. Promising biomedical applications include the non-invasive diagnosis of skin cancer and the study of wound healing.

  3. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  4. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. PMID:23242824

  5. MUTATION SPECTRA IN SALMONELLA OF SUNLIGHT, WHITE FLUORESCENT LIGHT, AND LIGHT FROM TANNING SALON BEDS: INDUCTION OF TANDEM MUTATIONS AND ROLE OF DNA REPAIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the mutagenicity of sunlight (SUN), uncovered cool white fluorescent light (FLR), and light from a tanning salon bed (TAN) at the base-substitution allele hisG46 of Salmonella in four DNA repair backgrounds (wild type, uvrB, pKM101, and uvrB+pKM101). Approximately 80...

  6. Integrated OLED as excitation light source in fluorescent lateral flow immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vishak; Steckl, Andrew J

    2015-12-15

    The integration of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation light sources for quantum dot-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay systems (LFIA) was investigated. This approach has the potential to deliver a sensitive visible detection scheme for low-cost, disposable lab-on-chip point-of-care (POC) diagnosis system. Thin film phosphorescent green OLEDs fabricated on plastic substrates were integrated on-chip to excite the test line of a quantum dot-based LFIA (QD-LFIA). OLEDs were fabricated by sequential deposition of organic thin films (total of ~100 nm) onto ITO-coated PET substrates. CdSe/ZnS QDs emitting at 655 nm and Au nanoparticles (NP - 10 nm size) conjugated antibodies were used for the fluorescence QD-LFIA and conventional reflection-mode Au NP-LFIA, respectively. Thin plastic color light filters were integrated for filtering the excitation light source and, thereby, increasing the contrast of the emitted light for optimized visual detection. Integration of the OLED and color filters with the analytical membrane was achieved using adhesive techniques facilitated by the planar nature of the layers, which suggests possible large scale manufacturing using roll-to-roll processing. Gray scale analysis from digital images captured with a digital camera was used to quantify the visual sensitivity. The signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit of detection (LOD) of OLED integrated QD-LFIAs were compared to Au NP LFIAs. OLED QD-LFIA exhibited superior performance in all signal aspects: 7-8× higher signal intensity and SNR, and a 7× lower LOD of 3 nM (measured at S/N=3). These results demonstrate the potential of OLED-integrated in LFIA devices for obtaining sensitive, fast and low-cost POC diagnostics. PMID:26134292

  7. The Effect of Time on Bone Fluorescence: Implications for Using Alternate Light Sources to Search for Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Swaraldahab, Mohamed A H; Christensen, Angi M

    2016-03-01

    Bones fluoresce when exposed to certain wavelengths of shortwave light, and this property can be useful in locating and sorting skeletal remains in forensic contexts. The proteins in bone collagen are largely responsible for its fluorescent properties, but these proteins degrade and denature over time. This study examined the fluorescence of bones from four temporal groups (recent, semi-recent, ancient, and historic) ranging from 0 to 1064 years before present. Specimens were photographed under 490 nm wavelength light, and fluorescence was quantified by converting intensity to a gray scale value based on the RGB color model using ImageJ(®) software. Significant (p < 0.05) differences were found in mean fluorescence between all four temporal groups, and a 0.324 coefficient of correlation indicates a significant (inverse) relationship between fluorescence and time. Bone fluorescence decreases with time, but some fluorescence is retained even in older samples. Fluorescence can therefore be reliably used in many modern skeletal remains searches. PMID:27404617

  8. Light-assisted non-Poissonian fluorescence blinking from bosonic composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Budini, Adrian A.

    2007-08-15

    Single fluorophore systems attached to complex hosting molecules may exhibit a light-assisted fluorescence blinking phenomenon between two or more different intensity states whose sojourn statistic depends on the pumping laser intensity and also may depart from an exponential law. In contrast with standard phenomenological models, here we demonstrate that such kind of radiation patterns can be microscopically derived and characterized by describing the fluorophore decay through a composite reservoir where quantum degrees of freedom associated to the host molecule mediate the interaction between the fluorophore and a bosonic bath associated to its natural decay.

  9. Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid-state-electronic fluorescent-lighting ballast

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Marcus, A.A.; Campbell, R.S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

    1981-10-01

    The Solid State Ballast (SSB) Program, aimed at improving the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts has been developed and the technology has been transferred to the private sector. This report examines the opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace. It includes a description of product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high-leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process. (MCW)

  10. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, D. P.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source (90Sr+90Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed.

  11. Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Steward, Heidi E.; Calwell, Chris

    2006-05-22

    This report describes the history of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in America. CFLs were introduced in the 1970s; however, it has taken more than 20 years for them to gain widespread recognition in the U.S. residential lighting market. This report reviews the development of CFLs, efforts to increase market acceptance of them, and barriers to that acceptance. Lessons to be learned from this study of CFLs are identified in hopes of assisting future market introduction efforts for other promising energy-efficient technologies. This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Building Technologies, Emerging Technologies Program.

  12. Fluorescence molecular tomography on animal model by means of multiple views structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducros, N.; Bassi, A.; Valentini, G.; Canti, G.; Arridge, S.; D'Andrea, C.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is quite demanding in terms of acquisition/computational times due to the huge amount of data. Different research groups have proposed compression approaches regarding both illumination (wide field structured light instead of raster point scanning) and detection (compression of the acquired images). The authors have previously proposed a fast FMT reconstruction method based on the combination of a multiple-view approach with a full compression scheme. This method had been successfully tested on a cylindrical phantom and is being generalized in this paper to samples of arbitrary shape. The devised procedure and algorithms have been tested on an ex-vivo mouse.

  13. Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid state electronic fluorescent lighting ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Marcus, A. A.; Campbell, R. S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

    1981-10-01

    A solid state ballast (SSB), which improves the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts was developed and the technology was transferred to the private sector. The opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace is examined. Product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process are included.

  14. Shelf life of fresh meat products under LED or fluorescent lighting.

    PubMed

    Steele, K S; Weber, M J; Boyle, E A E; Hunt, M C; Lobaton-Sulabo, A S; Cundith, C; Hiebert, Y H; Abrolat, K A; Attey, J M; Clark, S D; Johnson, D E; Roenbaugh, T L

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced pork loin chops, beef longissimus lumborum steaks, semimembranosus steaks (superficial and deep portions), ground beef, and ground turkey were displayed under light emitting diode (LED) and fluorescent (FLS) lighting in two multi-shelf, retail display cases with identical operating parameters. Visual and instrumental color, internal product temperature, case temperature, case cycling, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and Enterobacteriaceae and aerobic plate counts were evaluated. Under LED, beef products (except the deep portion of beef semimembranosus steaks) showed less (P<0.05) visual discoloration. Pork loin chops had higher (P<0.05) L* values for LED lighting. Other than beef longissimus lumborum steaks, products displayed under LED lights had colder internal temperatures than products under FLS lights (P<0.05). Under LED, pork loin chops, ground turkey, and beef semimembranosus steaks had higher (P<0.05) values for TBARS. LED provides colder case and product temperatures, more case efficiency, and extended color life by at least 0.5d for longissimus and semimembranosus steaks; however, some LED cuts showed increased lipid oxidation. PMID:26950612

  15. Efficient White-Light Generation from Ionically Self-Assembled Triply-Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Das, Susmita; Debnath, Tanay; Basu, Amrita; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit Kumar; Baker, Gary A; Patra, Amitava

    2016-06-20

    Low cost, simple, and environmentally friendly strategies for white-light generation which do not require rare-earth phosphors or other toxic or elementally scare species remain an essentially unmet challenge. Progress in the area of all-organic approaches is highly sought, single molecular systems remaining a particular challenge. Taking inspiration from the designer nature of ionic-liquid chemistry, we now introduce a new strategy toward white-light emission based on the facile generation of nanoparticles comprising three different fluorophores assembled in a well-defined stoichiometry purely through electrostatic interactions. The building blocks consist of the fluorophores aminopyrene, fluorescein, and rhodamine 6G which represent blue, green, and red-emitting species, respectively. Spherical nanoparticles 16(±5) nm in size were prepared which display bright white-light emission with high fluorescence quantum efficiency (26 %) and color coordinate at (0.29, 0.38) which lie in close proximity to pure white light (0.33, 0.33). It is noteworthy that this same fluorophore mixture in free solution yields only blue emission. Density functional theory calculations reveal H-bond and ground-state proton transfer mediated absolute non-parallel orientation of the constituent units which result in frustrated energy transfer, giving rise to emission from the individual centers and concomitant white-light emission. PMID:27219524

  16. UV-A emission from fluorescent energy-saving light bulbs alters local retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Heuser, Isabella; Regen, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide bans on incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) drive the use of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Potential health issues of these light sources have already been discussed, including speculation about the putative biological effects on light exposed tissues, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized photoisomerization of all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), a highly light sensitive morphogen, into biologically less active isomers, as a mechanism mediating biological effects of CFLs. Local at-RA is anti-carcinogenic, entrains molecular rhythms and is crucial for skin homeostasis. Therefore, we quantified the impact of CFL irradiation on extra- and intracellular levels of RA isomers using an epidermal cell culture model. Moreover, a biologically relevant impact of CFL irradiation was assessed using highly at-RA-sensitive human neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent conversion of extra- and intracellular at-RA into the biologically less active 13-cis-isomer was significantly higher in CFL vs. ILB exposure and completely preventable by employing a UV-filter. Moreover, pre-irradiation of culture media by CFL attenuated at-RA-specific effects on cell viability in human at-RA-sensitive cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings point towards a biological relevance of CFL-induced at-RA decomposition, providing a mechanism for CFL-mediated effects on environmental health. PMID:24135972

  17. The health risks associated with energy efficient fluorescent, LEDs, and artificial lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2014-09-01

    With the phasing out of incandescent lamps in many countries, the introduction of new LED based light sources and luminaries sometimes raise the question of whether the spectral characteristics of the LED and other energy savings Fluorescent lights including the popular CFLs are suitable to replace the traditional incandescent lamps. These concerns are sometimes raised particularly for radiation emissions in the UV and Blue parts of the spectrum. This paper aims to address such concerns for the common `white light' sources typically used in household and other general lighting used in the work place. Recent studies have shown that women working the night shift have an increased probability of developing breast cancer. We like to report on the findings of many studies done by medical professionals, in particular the recent announcement of AMA in the US and many studies conducted in the UK, as well as the European community to increase public awareness on the long term health risks of the optical and opto-biological effects on the human health caused by artificial lighting.

  18. Light-dependent regulation of structural flexibility in a photochromic fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Mal, Tapas Kumar; Wälchli, Markus; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Fukano, Takashi; Ando, Ryoko; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Taka, Junichiro; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The structural basis for the photochromism in the fluorescent protein Dronpa is poorly understood, because the crystal structures of the bright state of the protein did not provide an answer to the mechanism of the photochromism, and structural determination of the dark state has been elusive. We performed NMR analyses of Dronpa in solution at ambient temperatures to find structural flexibility of the protein in the dark state. Light-induced changes in interactions between the chromophore and β-barrel are responsible for switching between the two states. In the bright state, the apex of the chromophore tethers to the barrel by a hydrogen bond, and an imidazole ring protruding from the barrel stabilizes the plane of the chromophore. These interactions are disrupted by strong illumination with blue light, and the chromophore, together with a part of the β-barrel, becomes flexible, leading to a nonradiative decay process. PMID:18574155

  19. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.; Brito, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The development of three dimensional (3D) cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex 3D matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such 3D biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment. PMID:25161607

  20. Effects of fluorescent lighting on in vitro micropropagation of Lemna minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsri, Kollawat; Pinyopich, Pataradawn; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    The vegetative in vitro propagation of Lemna minor stain SING-4 exposed to two different types of fluorescent light sources, Philips TLD 36W/54 and Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36, was studied. The liquid culture medium contained 4.43gl-1 phytohormone-free full-strength Murashige & Skoog (MS) basal medium with vitamins, 30gl-1 sucrose, and 1gl-1 MES. The results showed that both plant cultures had undergone normal asexual reproduction with an exponential increase trend. Cultures exposed to Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36 reproduced at a slightly faster rate while expressing significantly greener foliage (leaf color chart shade No.8), which indicates the presence of more chlorophyll, than cultures exposed to Philips TLD 36W/54 (leaf color chart shade No.4). The data obtained from our experiment reveals that light emitted from Toshiba FL40T8BRF/36 produces healthier and higher quality cultures.

  1. Modeling of fluorescence quenching by lutein in the plant light-harvesting complex LHCII.

    PubMed

    Duffy, C D P; Chmeliov, J; Macernis, M; Sulskus, J; Valkunas, L; Ruban, A V

    2013-09-26

    Photoprotective non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in higher plants is the result of the formation of energy quenching traps in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). It has been proposed that this quenching trap is a lutein molecule closely associated with the chlorophyll terminal emitter of the major light-harvesting complex LHCII. We have used a combination of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and the semiempirical MNDO-CAS-CI method to model the chlorophyll-lutein energy transfer dynamics of the highly quenched crystal structure of LHCII. Our calculations reveal that the incoherent "hopping" of energy from Chla612 to the short-lived, dipole forbidden 2(1)A(g)(-) state of lutein620 accounts for the strong fluorescence quenching observed in these crystals. This adds weight to the argument that the same dissipative pathway is responsible for in vivo NPQ. PMID:23234311

  2. Oligomeric state of lipocalin-1 (LCN1) by multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Merschak, Petra; Redl, Bernhard; Glasgow, Ben J

    2007-10-01

    Multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements clarified the oligomeric states of native and recombinant tear lipocalin (lipocalin-1, TL). Native TL is monomeric. Recombinant TL (5-68 microM) with or without the histidine tag shows less than 7% dimer formation that is not in equilibrium with the monomeric form. Fluorescence anisotropy decay showed a correlation time of 9-10 ns for TL (10 microM-1 mM). Hydrodynamic calculations based on the crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant closely concur with the observed correlation time. The solution properties calculated with HYDROPRO and SOLPRO programs from the available crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant concur closely with the observed fluorescence anisotropy decay. The resulting model shows that protein topology is the major determinant of rotational correlation time and accounts for deviation from the Stokes-Einstein relation. The data challenge previous gel filtration studies to show that native TL exists predominantly as a monomer in solution rather than as a dimer. Delipidation of TL results in a formation of a complex oligomeric state (up to 25%). These findings are important as the dynamic processes in the tear film are limited by diffusional, translational as well as rotational, properties of the protein. PMID:17869594

  3. Oligomeric State of Lipocalin-1 (LCN1) by Multiangle Laser Light Scattering and Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Merschak, Petra; Redl, Bernhard; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiangle laser light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements clarified the oligomeric states of native and recombinant tear lipocalin (lipocalin-1, TL). Native TL is monomeric. Recombinant TL (5-68 μM) with or without the histidine tag shows less than 7% dimer formation that is not in equilibrium with the monomeric form. Fluorescence anisotropy decay showed a correlation time of 9-10 ns for TL (10 μM- 1mM). Hydrodynamic calculations based on the crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant closely concur with the observed correlation time. The solution properties calculated with HYDROPRO and SOLPRO programs from the available crystallographic structure of a monomeric TL mutant concur closely with the observed fluorescence anisotropy decay. The resulting model shows that protein topology is the major determinant of rotational correlation time and accounts for deviation from the Stokes-Einstein relation. The data challenge previous gel filtration studies to show that native TL exists predominantly as a monomer in solution rather than as a dimer. Delipidation of TL results in a formation of a complex oligomeric state (up to 25%). These findings are important as the dynamic processes in the tear film are limited by diffusional, translational as well as rotational, properties of the protein. PMID:17869594

  4. MACROscopic imaging of tumor xenografts using fluorescence, phase contrast, and transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Paul; Nicklee, Trudey; Hedley, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.; Damaskinos, Savvas

    2004-10-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology have contributed greatly to biological science. Confocal fluorescence microscopes (CFM) can acquire 2D and 3D images of biological samples such as live or fixed cells and tissues. Specimens that are large (e.g., a 10 mm x 10 mm tissue section) and overfill the field of view (FOV) of typical microscope objectives require use of image tiling to cover the entire specimen. This can be time consuming and cause artefacts in the composite image. The MACROscope system (Biomedical Photometrics Inc, Waterloo, Canada), is a confocal device with a 22 mm x 70 mm FOV; ideal for imaging large tissue sections in a single frame. The system used here is a prototype capable of simultaneous acquisition from up to three detection channels. Fluorescence images of SiHa mouse tumour xenografts stained with CD31-Cy3, showing blood vessel location, and EF5-Cy5, showing areas of tissue hypoxia, were collected. Differential phase contrast (DPC) images of the same section were also recorded to show tissue morphology. Finally, RGB transmitted light images of human tongue and pancreas tissues were obtained. This new device avoids the need for image tiling and provides simultaneous imaging of multiple fluorescently-labeled tissue specific markers in large biological samples. This enables time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening of (immuno)histopathological samples. This device may also serve in the imaging of high-throughput DNA and tissue arrays.

  5. Use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to monitor tooth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-04-01

    The changing of tooth shade by whitening agents occurs gradually. Apart from being subjective and affected by the conditions of the surroundings, visual observation cannot detect a very slight change in tooth color. An electronic method, which can communicate the color change quantitatively, would be more reliable. Quantitative Light- induced Fluorescence (QLF) was developed to detect and assess dental caries based on the phenomenon of change of autofluorescence of a tooth by demineralization. However, stains on the tooth surface exhibit the same phenomenon, and therefore QLF can be used to measure the percentage fluorescence change of stained enamel with respect to surrounding unstained enamel. The present study described a technique of assessing the effect of a tooth-whitening agent using QLF. This was demonstrated in two experiments in which either wholly or partially stained teeth were whitened by intermittent immersion in sodium hypochlorite. Following each immersion, the integrated fluorescence change due to the stain was quantified using QLF. In either situation, the value of (Delta) Q decreased linearly as the tooth regained its natural shade. It was concluded that gradual changing of the shade of discolored teeth by a whitening agent could be quantified using QLF.

  6. Lighting Up Clostridium Difficile: Reporting Gene Expression Using Fluorescent Lov Domains

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Anthony M.; Jukes, Caitlin; Candlish, Denise; Irvine, June J.; Spencer, Janice; Fagan, Robert P.; Roe, Andrew J.; Christie, John M.; Fairweather, Neil F.; Douce, Gillian R.

    2016-01-01

    The uses of fluorescent reporters derived from green fluorescent protein have proved invaluable for the visualisation of biological processes in bacteria grown under aerobic conditions. However, their requirement for oxygen has limited their application in obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium difficile. Fluorescent proteins derived from Light, Oxygen or Voltage sensing (LOV) domains have been shown to bridge this limitation, but their utility as translational fusions to monitor protein expression and localisation in a strict anaerobic bacterium has not been reported. Here we demonstrate the utility of phiLOV in three species of Clostridium and its application as a marker of real-time protein translation and dynamics through genetic fusion with the cell division protein, FtsZ. Time lapse microscopy of dividing cells suggests that Z ring assembly arises through the extension of the FtsZ arc starting from one point on the circumference. Furthermore, through incorporation of phiLOV into the flagella subunit, FliC, we show the potential of bacterial LOV-based fusion proteins to be successfully exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:26996606

  7. Polychromatic light-emitting diodes with a fluorescent nanosphere opal coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, K. N.; Fu, W. Y.; Ng, W. N.; Leung, C. H.; Lai, P. T.; Wong, K. K. Y.; Choi, H. W.

    2008-09-01

    A hexagonally close-packed array consisting of fluorescent nanospheres was coated onto short-wavelength GaN light-emitting diodes to demonstrate polychromatic white light emission. The spherical particles self-assemble into ordered three-dimensional opal structures, performing the role of color conversion to generate a polychromatic spectrum with smooth and uniform emission patterns. Different ratios of green and orange-red fluorescent nanospheres were mixed and coated onto high-extraction-efficiency micro-LEDs. Four devices with different shades of white emission were demonstrated. Device A, with a high content of orange-red nanospheres, offers the highest CRI value of 80, whereas device C with a well-balanced ratio of green and orange-red nanospheres exhibits color characteristics closest to ideal white with CIE coordinate at (0.34, 0.34). At 20 mA driving current, the luminous efficacy of the devices A, B, C, and D are 40.5 lm W-1, 57.7 lm W-1, 63.1 lm W-1, and 67.2 lm W-1 respectively, while the correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of the corresponding devices are 3587, 4778, 5271, and 13 000 K.

  8. Improved micro x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for light element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smolek, Stephan; Streli, Christina; Zoeger, Norbert; Wobrauschek, Peter

    2010-05-15

    Since most available micro x-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) spectrometers operate in air, which does not allow the analysis of low-Z elements (Z{<=}14), a special micro-XRF spectrometer has been designed to extend the analytical range down to light elements (Z{>=}6). It offers improved excitation and detection conditions necessary for light element analysis. To eliminate absorption of the exciting and fluorescent radiation, the system operates under vacuum condition. Sample mapping is automated and controlled by specialized computer software developed for this spectrometer. Several different samples were measured to test and characterize the spectrometer. The spot size has been determined by scans across a 10 {mu}m Cu wire which resulted in a full width at half maximum of 31 {mu}m for Mo K{alpha} line (17.44 keV) and 44 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu K edge and 71 {mu}m effective beam size for the Cu L edge. Lower limits of detection in the picogram range for each spot (or {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) were obtained by measuring various thin metal foils under different conditions. Furthermore, detection limits in the parts per million range were found measuring NIST621 standard reference material. Area scans of a microscopic laser print and NaF droplet were performed to show mapping capabilities.

  9. Highly efficient white organic light-emitting diodes based on fluorescent blue emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenow, Thomas C.; Furno, Mauro; Reineke, Sebastian; Olthof, Selina; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Beside inorganic LEDs and fluorescent lamps, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are evolving into a serious alternative to incandescent lamps. Up to now, it was assumed that all-phosphorescent OLEDs are required for reaching sufficiently high efficiencies. However, the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is a major challenge. We present a novel approach to achieve highly efficient (up to 90 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using a macroextractor) white light emission from OLEDs. The here presented combination of a fluorescent blue and a phosphorescent red emitter simultaneously allows for a strong blue emission and efficient triplet transfer to the phosphor. The spectrum is extended in the green and yellow region by a full phosphorescent unit stacked on top of the triplet harvesting device. This superposition of four different emitters results in color coordinates close to illuminant A and a color rendering index of 80. Furthermore, color stability is given with respect to varying driving conditions and estimations of the electrical and optical efficiencies are provided.

  10. Intraoperative Localization of Insulinoma and Normal Pancreas using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Joshua; Choi, Hak Soo; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Colson, Yolonda L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, such as insulinoma, are difficult to localize and complete resection is essential for cure. Our hypothesis is that a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore exhibiting uptake in insulinoma could provide high sensitivity detection intraoperatively. Methods: The optical properties of methylene blue (MB) were measured in vitro in 100% serum at 37°C, and in vivo after tissue uptake. MB was injected as a rapid intravenous bolus at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/kg into wildtype rats and pigs, and into insulinoma-bearing transgenic mice. The FLARE™ imaging system was used to acquire color video and NIR fluorescence images simultaneously, and in real-time. The signal-to-background ratios (SBR) of tissues and tumors were quantified using FLARE™ software. Results: When appropriately diluted, MB exhibits moderate NIR fluorescence emission peaking at 688 nm. At doses ≥ 1 mg/kg, certain normal tissues, such as pancreas, accumulate MB and remain NIR fluorescent for up to 1 hr with an SBR ≥ 1.6. MB spectral properties are maintained after uptake into tissue. Interestingly, insulinoma exhibits even higher uptake for MB than normal pancreas, resulting in insulinoma-to-pancreas ratios of 3.7 and insulinoma-to-muscle ratios of 16.2. MB permitted high-sensitivity, real-time localization of primary, multi-centric, and metastatic insulinoma, and permitted differentiation among tumor, normal pancreas, and other abdominal structures. Conclusion: A single intravenous injection of a clinically available, commonly used NIR fluorophore provides prolonged intraoperative localization of normal pancreas and insulinoma using invisible NIR fluorescent light. PMID:20033320

  11. Compact fluorescent lighting in Wisconsin: elevated atmospheric emission and landfill deposition post-EISA implementation.

    PubMed

    Arendt, John D; Katers, John F

    2013-07-01

    The majority of states in the USA, including Wisconsin, have been affected by elevated air, soil and waterborne mercury levels. Health risks associated with mercury increase from the consumption of larger fish species, such as Walleye or Pike, which bio-accumulate mercury in muscle tissue. Federal legislation with the 2011 Mercury and Air Toxics Standards and the Wisconsin legislation on mercury, 2009 Wisconsin Act 44, continue to aim at lowering allowable levels of mercury emissions. Meanwhile, mercury-containing compact fluorescent lights (CFL) sales continue to grow as businesses and consumers move away from energy intensive incandescent light bulbs. An exchange in pollution media is occurring as airborne mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, the largest anthropogenic source of mercury, are being reduced by lower energy demand and standards, while more universal solid waste containing mercury is generated each time a CFL is disposed. The treatment of CFLs as a 'universal waste' by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to the banning of non-household fluorescent bulbs from most municipal solid waste. Although the EPA encourages recycling of bulbs, industry currently recycles fluorescent lamps and CFLs at a rate of only 29%. Monitoring programs at the federal and state level have had only marginal success with industrial and business CFL recycling. The consumer recycling rate is even lower at only 2%. A projected increase in residential CFL use in Wisconsin owing to the ramifications of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 will lead to elevated atmospheric mercury and landfill deposition in Wisconsin. PMID:23635464

  12. Light-Induced Conformational Changes of Rhodopsin Probed by Fluorescent Alexa594 Immobilized on the Cytoplasmic Surface†

    PubMed Central

    Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Tokunaga, Fumio; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    A novel fluorescence method has been developed for detecting the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin and for monitoring the interaction between photolyzed rhodopsin and G-protein or arrestin. Rhodopsin in native membranes was selectively modified with fluorescent Alexa594–maleimide at the Cys316 position, with a large excess of the reagent Cys140 that was also derivatized. Modification with Alexa594 allowed the monitoring of fluorescence changes at a red excitation light wavelength of 605 nm, thus avoiding significant rhodopsin bleaching. Upon absorption of a photon by rhodopsin, the fluorescence intensity increased as much as 20% at acidic pH with an apparent pKa of ∼6.8 at 4 °C, and was sensitive to the presence of hydroxylamine. These findings indicated that the increase in fluorescence is specific for metarhodopsin II. In the presence of transducin, a significant increase in fluorescence was observed. This increase of fluorescence emission intensity was reduced by addition of GTP, in agreement with the fact that transducin enhances the formation of metarhodopsin II. Under conditions that favored the formation of a metarhodopsin II–Alexa594 complex, transducin slightly decreased the fluorescence. In the presence of arrestin, under conditions that favored the formation of metarhodopsin I or II, a phosphorylated, photolyzed rhodopsin–Alexa594 complex only slightly decreased the fluorescence intensity, suggesting that the cytoplasmic surface structure of metarhodopsin II is different in the complex with arrestin and transducin. These results demonstrate the application of Alexa594-modified rhodopsin (Alexa594–rhodopsin) to continuously monitor the conformational changes in rhodopsin during light-induced transformations and its interactions with other proteins. PMID:11106502

  13. Developing methods based on light sheet fluorescence microscopy for biophysical investigations of larval zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Michael J.

    Adapting the tools of optical microscopy to the large-scale dynamic systems encountered in the development of multicellular organisms provides a path toward understanding the physical processes necessary for complex life to form and function. Obtaining quantitatively meaningful results from such systems has been challenging due to difficulty spanning the spatial and temporal scales representative of the whole, while also observing the many individual members from which complex and collective behavior emerges. A three-dimensional imaging technique known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides a number of significant benefits for surmounting these challenges and studying developmental systems. A thin plane of fluorescence excitation light is produced such that it coincides with the focal plane of an imaging system, providing rapid acquisition of optically sectioned images that can be used to construct a three-dimensional rendition of a sample. I discuss the implementation of this technique for use in larva of the model vertebrate Danio rerio (zebrafish). The nature of light sheet imaging makes it especially well suited to the study of large systems while maintaining good spatial resolution and minimizing damage to the specimen from excessive exposure to excitation light. I show the results from a comparative study that demonstrates the ability to image certain developmental processes non-destructively, while in contrast confocal microscopy results in abnormal growth due to phototoxicity. I develop the application of light sheet microscopy to the study of a previously inaccessible system: the bacterial colonization of a host organism. Using the technique, we are able to obtain a survey of the intestinal tract of a larval zebrafish and observe the location of microbes as they grow and establish a stable population in an initially germ free fish. Finally, I describe a new technique to measure the fluid viscosity of this intestinal environment in vivo using

  14. Energy transfer and light tolerance studies in a fluorescent tandem phycobiliprotein conjugate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pappas, Dimitri

    2011-09-01

    Light harvesting and energy transfer between allophycocyanin (APC) and a tandem conjugate dye was investigated using single-molecule recrossings in the probe volume. By comparing saturation irradiance and recrossing events of APC and the tandem conjugate Streptavidin Allophycocyanin-AlexaFluor-680 (APC-680), it was demonstrated that the light tolerance and photostability of APC-680 were improved over APC. This improvement was due to conjugating a tandem dye to APC, which provided an alternative pathway for energy transfer. This additional pathway decreases photobleaching and triplet-state conversion. In this study, the average fluorescence intensity at different laser powers was calculated from extracted signal peaks. Saturation irradiance was determined by interpolating the average intensity as a function of excitation power. By comparing the saturation irradiance of APC and APC-680, it was demonstrated that light tolerance was not significantly increased by having a small fluorophore covalently linked to the protein. The molecular recrossing method was used to determine triplet-state conversion and photobleaching effects. The number of molecules that were detected within 2 ms of each other was defined as the number of recrossing events (N(r)). The total number of molecules detected was defined as N(t). The normalized number of recrossings events (N(r)/N(t)) showed that energy transfer between APC and AlexaFluor-680 could reduce triplet-state formation of phycobiliproteins. In this case, the saturation irradiance was not improved, but the resistance to photobleaching and triplet-state conversion was improved. PMID:21929852

  15. Highly Efficient Sky-Blue Fluorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Based on Mixed Cohost System for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter (2CzPN).

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin Won; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-04-20

    The mixed cohosts of 1,3-bis(N-carbazolyl)benzene and 2,8-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene have been developed for a highly efficient blue fluorescent oragnic light emitting diode (OLED) doped with a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter [4,5-di (9H-carbazol-9-yl) phthalonitrile (2CzPN)]. We have demonstrated one of the highest external quantum efficiency of 21.8% in blue fluorescent OLEDs, which is identical to the theoretically achievable maximum electroluminescence efficiency using the emitter. Interestingly, the efficiency roll-off is large even under the excellent charge balance in the device and almost the same as the single host based devices, indicating that the efficiency roll-off in 2CzPN based TADF host is related to the material characteristics, such as low reverse intesystem crossing rate rather than charge imbalance. PMID:27019330

  16. Light-Emitting Diodes and Cool White Fluorescent Light Similarly Suppress Pineal Gland Melatonin and Maintain Retinal Function and Morphology in the Rat. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the light sources most commonly used in animal habitat lighting are cool white fluorescent or incandescent lamps. We evaluated a novel light-emitting diode (LED) light source for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool white fluorescent light (CWF) in suppressing pineal gland melatonin and maintaining normal retinal physiology and morphology in the rat. Results of pineal melatonin suppression experiments showed equal suppression of pineal melatonin concentrations for LED light and CWF light at five different light illuminances (100, 40, 10, 1 and 0.1 lux). There were no significant differences in melatonin suppression between LED and CWF light when compared to unexposed controls. Retinal physiology was evaluated using electroretinography. Results show no differences in a-wave implicit times and amplitudes or b-wave implicit times and amplitudes between 100-lux LED-exposed rats and 100-lux CWF-exposed rats. Results of retinal histology assessment show no differences in retinal thickness rod outer segment length and number of rod nuclei between rats exposed to 100-lux LED and 100-lux CWF for days. Furthermore, the retinal pigmented epithelium and rod outer segments of all eyes observed were in good condition and of normal thickness. This study indicates that LED light does not cause retinal damage and can suppress pineal melatonin at similar intensities as a conventional CWF light source. These data suggest that LED light sources may be suitable replacements for conventional light sources used in the lighting of rodent vivariums while providing many mechanical and economical advantages.

  17. Efficient near-infrared organic light-emitting devices based on low-gap fluorescent oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixing; Farley, Richard T.; Steckler, Timothy T.; Eom, Sang-Hyun; Reynolds, John R.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2009-08-01

    We report efficient near-infrared (NIR) organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on fluorescent donor-acceptor-donor conjugated oligomers. The energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of these oligomers are controlled by the donor and acceptor components, respectively; hence the energy gap and therefore the emission wavelength can be tuned by changing the strengths of the donor and acceptor components. External quantum efficiencies (EQEs) up to 1.6% and power efficiencies up to 7.0 mW/W are achieved in NIR OLEDs based on 4,9-bis(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)-6,7-dimethyl-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-g]-quinoxaline (BEDOT-TQMe2), in which the electroluminescence peaks at a wavelength of 692 nm but extends to well above 800 nm. With a stronger acceptor in the oligomer, 4,8-bis(2,3-dihydrothieno-[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-5-yl)benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c']bis [1,2,5]thiadiazole (BEDOT-BBT) based devices show longer wavelength emission peaked at 815 nm, although the maximum EQE is reduced to 0.51% due to the lower fluorescent quantum yield of the NIR emitter. The efficiencies of these NIR OLEDs are further increased by two to three times by using the sensitized fluorescent device structure, leading to a maximum EQE of 3.1% for BEDOT-TQMe2 and 1.6% for BEDOT-BBT based devices.

  18. UV-Light-Induced Improvement of Fluorescence Quantum Yield of DNA-Templated Gold Nanoclusters: Application to Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensing of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Yu; Wu, Yun-Tse; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-10-28

    The use of DNA as a template has been demonstrated as an effective method for synthesizing different-sized silver nanoclusters. Although DNA-templated silver nanoclusters show outstanding performance as fluorescent probes for chemical sensing and cellular imaging, the synthesis of DNA-stabilized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with high fluorescence intensity remains a challenge. Here a facile, reproducible, scalable, NaBH4-free, UV-light-assisted method was developed to prepare AuNCs using repeats of 30 adenosine nucleotides (A30). The maximal fluorescence of A30-stabilized AuNCs appeared at 475 nm with moderate quantum yield, two fluorescence lifetimes, and a small amount of Au(+) on the surface of the Au core. Results of size-exclusion chromatography revealed that A30-stabilized AuNCs were more compact than A30. A series of control experiments showed that UV light played a dual role in the reduction of gold-ion precursors and the decomposition of citrate ions. A30 also acted as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of AuNCs. In addition, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of an AuNC-nucleation sequence and a hybridization sequence was utilized to develop a AuNC-based ratiometric fluorescent probe in the presence of the double-strand-chelating dye SYBR Green I (SG). Under conditions of single-wavelength excitation, the combination of AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA and perfectly matched DNA emitted fluorescence at 475 and 525 nm, respectively. The formed AuNC/SG-bearing ssDNA enabled the sensitive, selective, and ratiometric detection of specific nucleic acid targets. Finally, the AuNC-based ratiometric probes were successfully applied to determine specific nucleic acid targets in human serum. PMID:26443919

  19. Polarized fluorescence and absorption of macroscopically aligned Light Harvesting Complex II.

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H; Kwa, S L; van Bolhuis, B M; van Grondelle, R

    1994-01-01

    Polarized absorption and fluorescence measurements have been performed at 77 K on isotropic and anisotropic preparations of trimeric Light Harvesting Complex II (LHC-II) from spinach. The results enable a decomposition of the absorption spectrum into components parallel and perpendicular to the trimeric plane. For the first time, it is shown quantitatively that the strong absorption band around 676 nm is polarized essentially parallel to the plane of the trimer, i.e., the average angle between the corresponding transition dipole moments and this plane is at most 12 degrees. The different absorption bands for LHC-II should not be considered as corresponding to individual pigments but to collective excitations of different pigments. Nevertheless, the average angle between the Qy transition dipole moments of all chlorophyll a pigments in LHC-II and the trimeric plane could be determined and was found to be 17.5 degrees +/- 2.5 degrees. For the chlorophyll b pigments, this angle is significantly larger (close to 35 degrees). At 77 K, most of the fluorescence stems from a weak band above 676 nm and the corresponding transition dipole moments are oriented further out of plane than the dipole moments corresponding to the 676-nm band. The results are shown to be of crucial significance for understanding the relation between the LHC-II structure and its spectroscopy. PMID:7948696

  20. Eyecup scope—optical recordings of light stimulus-evoked fluorescence signals in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Hausselt, Susanne E.; Breuninger, Tobias; Castell, Xavier; Denk, Winfried; Margolis, David J.; Detwiler, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic signals play an essential role in processing visual information in the retina. To study them in neurites too small for electrical recording, we developed an instrument that combines a multi-photon (MP) microscope with a through-the-objective high-resolution visual stimulator. An upright microscope was designed that uses the objective lens for both MP imaging and delivery of visual stimuli to functionally intact retinal explants or eyecup preparations. The stimulator consists of a miniature liquid-crystal-on-silicon display coupled into the optical path of an infrared-excitation laser-scanning microscope. A pair of custom-made dichroic filters allows light from the excitation laser and three spectral bands (‘colors’) from the stimulator to reach the retina, leaving two intermediate bands for fluorescence imaging. Special optics allow displacement of the stimulator focus relative to the imaging focus. Spatially resolved changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence in response to visual stimuli were recorded in dendrites of different types of mammalian retinal neurons. PMID:19023590

  1. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-14

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (∼2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ∼90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn(2+) can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn(2+). Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD. PMID:27364882

  2. Robust incremental compensation of the light attenuation with depth in 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kervrann, C; Legland, D; Pardini, L

    2004-06-01

    Summary Fluorescent signal intensities from confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM) suffer from several distortions inherent to the method. Namely, layers which lie deeper within the specimen are relatively dark due to absorption and scattering of both excitation and fluorescent light, photobleaching and/or other factors. Because of these effects, a quantitative analysis of images is not always possible without correction. Under certain assumptions, the decay of intensities can be estimated and used for a partial depth intensity correction. In this paper we propose an original robust incremental method for compensating the attenuation of intensity signals. Most previous correction methods are more or less empirical and based on fitting a decreasing parametric function to the section mean intensity curve computed by summing all pixel values in each section. The fitted curve is then used for the calculation of correction factors for each section and a new compensated sections series is computed. However, these methods do not perfectly correct the images. Hence, the algorithm we propose for the automatic correction of intensities relies on robust estimation, which automatically ignores pixels where measurements deviate from the decay model. It is based on techniques adopted from the computer vision literature for image motion estimation. The resulting algorithm is used to correct volumes acquired in CLSM. An implementation of such a restoration filter is discussed and examples of successful restorations are given. PMID:15157197

  3. Light-emitting diode and laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Jonas A.; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of two light-emitting diode (LED)- and two laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries in vitro. Ninety-seven permanent molars were assessed twice by two examiners using two LED- (Midwest Caries - MID and VistaProof - VP) and two laser fluorescence-based (DIAGNOdent 2095 - LF and DIAGNOdent pen 2190 - LFpen) devices. After measuring, the teeth were histologically prepared and classified according to lesion extension. At D1 the specificities were 0.76 (LF and LFpen), 0.94 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.70 (LF), 0.62 (LFpen), 0.31 (MID), and 0.75 (VP). At D3 threshold the specificities were 0.88 (LF), 0.87 (LFpen), 0.90 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.63 (LF and LFpen), 0.70 (MID), and 0.96 (VP). Spearman's rank correlations with histology were 0.56 (LF), 0.51 (LFpen), 0.55 (MID), and 0.58 (VP). Inter- and intraexaminer ICC values were high and varied from 0.83 to 0.90. Both LF devices seemed to be useful auxiliary tools to the conventional methods, presenting good reproducibility and better accuracy at D3 threshold. MID was not able to differentiate sound surfaces from enamel caries and VP still needs improvement on the cut-off limits for its use.

  4. Above 30% external quantum efficiency in green delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Kim, Bo Seong; Lee, Chil Won; Im, Yirang; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-05-13

    Highly efficient green thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes with an external quantum efficiency of 31.2% were investigated by using 3-(3-(carbazole-9-yl)phenyl) pyrido[3',2':4,5]furo[2,3-b]pyridine (3CzPFP) derived from carbazole and pyrido[3',2':4,5]furo[2,3-b]pyridine. The host material showed well-matched photoluminescence emission with absorption of the green dopant material, (4s,6s)-2,4,5,6-tetra(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (4CzIPN) and harvested all excitons of 4CzIPN. The 3CzPFP:4CzIPN film exhibited high photoluminescence quantum yield of 100%, and the green delayed fluorescence device employing the 3CzPFP host showed high maximum quantum efficiency of 31.2 ± 0.5% at 1% doping after optimization of the device structure. PMID:25924007

  5. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  6. Triarylboron-Based Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with External Quantum Efficiencies Exceeding 20 .

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kubo, Shosei; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Adachi, Chihaya; Kaji, Hironori

    2015-12-01

    Triarylboron compounds have attracted much attention, and found wide use as functional materials because of their electron-accepting properties arising from the vacant p orbitals on the boron atoms. In this study, we design and synthesize new donor-acceptor triarylboron emitters that show thermally activated delayed fluorescence. These emitters display sky-blue to green emission and high photoluminescence quantum yields of 87-100 % in host matrices. Organic light-emitting diodes using these emitting molecules as dopants exhibit high external quantum efficiencies of 14.0-22.8 %, which originate from efficient up-conversion from triplet to singlet states and subsequent efficient radiative decay from singlet to ground states. PMID:26563845

  7. A wide field fluorescence lifetime imaging system using a light sheet microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Phil M.; Moore, Lamar; Li, Xiaofei; Phillips, Roger; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has allowed scientists to discern information about the chemical properties of biological processes and has become a vital tool in the life sciences and medical research communities. Measuring the spatial lifetime distribution of the fluorophores as well as the intensity distribution enables users to discern vital information about the chemical environment. It however, remains challenging and often involves slow scanning. We present a new microscope system based on light sheet illumination that uses a micro channel plate (MCP) device called a Capacitive Division Imaging Readout (CDIR) which has been developed by Photek Ltd. The device uses an array of capacitors to move the charge site from the MCP to four pre-amplifiers and time-over-threshold discriminators. This camera has the ability to image photons as well as measure the arrival time, enabling high speed FLIM imaging of biological samples.

  8. High-efficiency fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes enabled by triplet-triplet annihilation and horizontal emitter orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Christian Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2014-11-03

    A green organic light-emitting diode with the fluorescent emitter Coumarin 545T shows an external quantum efficiency (η{sub EQE}) of 6.9%, clearly exceeding the classical limit of 5% for fluorescent emitters. The analysis of the angular dependent photoluminescence spectrum of the emission layer reveals that 86% of the transition dipole moments are horizontally oriented. Furthermore, transient electroluminescence measurements demonstrate the presence of a delayed emission originating from triplet-triplet annihilation. A simulation based efficiency analysis reveals quantitatively the origin for the high η{sub EQE}: a radiative exciton fraction higher than 25% and a light-outcoupling efficiency of nearly 30%.

  9. Protein oxidative changes in whole and skim milk after ultraviolet or fluorescent light exposure.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, D; Pecora, R P; Radici, P M; Kivatinitz, S C

    2010-11-01

    We investigated how protein changes occur, at the primary or higher structural levels, when proteins are exposed to UV or fluorescent (FL) light while in the complex matrix, milk. Whole milk (WM) or skim milk (SM) samples were exposed to FL or UV light from 0 to 24h at 4°C. Protein oxidation was evaluated by the formation of protein carbonyls (PC), dityrosine bond (DiTyr), and changes in molecular weight (protein fragmentation and polymerization). Oxidative changes in AA residues were measured by PC. Dityrosine and N'-formylkynurenine (NFK), a carbonylation derivative of Trp, were measured by fluorometry. Protein carbonyls increased as a function of irradiation time for both WM and SM. The initial rate for PC formation by exposure to FL light (0.25 or 0.27 nmol/h for WM and SM, respectively) was slower than that following exposure to UV light (1.95 or 1.20 nmol/h, respectively). The time course of NFK formation resembled that of PC. After 24h of UV exposure, SM had significantly higher levels of NFK than did WM. In contrast, WM samples irradiated with UV had higher levels of DiTyr than did SM samples, indicating different molecular pathways. The formation of intra- or intermolecular DiTyr bonds could be indicative of changes in the tertiary structure or oligomerization of proteins. The existence of NFK suggests the occurrence of protein fragmentation. Thus, proteolysis and oligomerization were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. After 24h of exposing WM to UV or FL light, all the proteins were affected by both types of light, as evidenced by loss of material in most of the bands. Aggregates were produced only by UV irradiation. Hydrolysis by pepsin and enzyme-induced coagulation by rennet were performed to evaluate altered biological properties of the oxidized proteins. No effect on pepsin digestion or rennet coagulation was found in irradiated SM or WM. The oxidative status of proteins in milk and dairy products is of interest to the dairy industry and

  10. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J.; DeLaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-01-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. (A) Schematic: Light sheet microscopy of zebrafish embryos. Opercle-forming osteoblasts following twenty-four hours of (B) light sheet imaging, showing normal growth, and (C) spinning disk confocal imaging, showing aberrant growth. PMID:23242824

  11. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn2+ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ~90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn2+ can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn2+. Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD.Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range

  12. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  13. Efficient stray-light suppression for resonance fluorescence in quantum dot micropillars using self-aligned metal apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfmann, Caspar; Musiał, Anna; Maier, Sebastian; Emmerling, Monika; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Within this work we propose and demonstrate a technological approach to efficiently suppress excitation laser stray-light in resonance fluorescence experiments on quantum dot micropillars. To ensure efficient stray-light suppression, their fabrication process includes a planarization step and subsequent covering with a titanium mask to fabricate self-aligned apertures at the micropillar positions. These apertures aim to limit laser stray-light in the side-excitation vertical-detection configuration, while enabling detection of the optical signal through the top facet of the micropillars. The beneficial effects of these apertures are proven and quantitatively evaluated within a statistical study in which we determine and compare the stray-light suppression of 48 micropillars with and without metal apertures. Actual resonance fluorescence experiments on single quantum dots coupled to the cavity mode prove the relevance of the proposed approach and demonstrate that it will foster further studies on cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena under coherent optical excitation.

  14. Fluorescent all-fiber light source based on micro-capillaries and on microstructured optical fibers terminated with a microbulb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko; Bock, Wojtek

    2015-12-01

    An integrated fiber-optic fluorescent light source compatible with photonic-crystal and hollow-core fibers is presented in this paper. We have studied the dependence of the fluorescence spectra on the length of a micro-capillary filled with Rhodamine 6G dissolved in glycerin. As the capillary, we used a standard fiber-optic glass ferrule with two parallel holes having an inner diameter of 125 μm. One of the holes was filled with fluorescing solution, while an SMF-28 fiber polished at 45° with aluminum coating was placed in the second hole to serve as a pumping fiber. As the solution was pumped by continuous-wave laser light at 532 nm, the fluorescence was captured by a microstructured optical fiber immersed in the filled hole. To prevent the solution from penetrating into this receiving fiber, its end was capped by molten borosilicate glass forming a ball lens. Combining the spectra of several fluorescent organic dyes can create a broadband light source compatible with optical fibers that could be used for the development of compact photonic-crystal and hollow-core fiber sensors.

  15. Virtual unfolding of light sheet fluorescence microscopy dataset for quantitative analysis of the mouse intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeo, Alessia; Sana, Ilenia; Ferrari, Eleonora; Maiuri, Luigi; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.

  16. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peddie, Christopher J; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. PMID:24637200

  17. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O׳Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. PMID:24637200

  18. High-Efficiency Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from Phenoxaphosphine and Phenoxathiin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Youn; Adachi, Chihaya; Yasuda, Takuma

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecules, consisting of phenoxaphosphine oxide and phenoxathiin dioxide as acceptor units and 9,9-dimethylacridan as a donor unit, are reported. Maximum external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to 20.5% are achieved in blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by employing these materials as TADF emitters. PMID:27059783

  19. Using peel fluorescence in black light rooms to identify navel oranges with shorter storage life and poor rind quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this project is to minimize postharvest decay losses of fresh citrus fruits. Among the approaches recently examined was peel fluorescence under ultraviolet light. In addition to its usual application to identify fruit with developing decay lesions (“blister” or “clear” rot) in black...

  20. Zinc complexes exhibiting highly efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence and their application to organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yumi; Sagara, Yuta; Nomura, Hiroko; Nakamura, Nozomi; Suzuki, Yoshitake; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-02-21

    Metal complexes emitting thermally activated delayed fluorescence based on intra-ligand charge transfer and enhanced by metallization were synthesized. Organic light-emitting diodes using a thermally stable zinc complex processed by vacuum vapor deposition achieved an external quantum efficiency of nearly 20%. PMID:25605520

  1. Elemental mercury emission in the indoor environment due to broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs--paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs contain a few milligrams (mg) of elemental mercury. When a CFL breaks, some of the mercury is immediately released as elemental mercury vapor and the remainder is deposited on indoor surfaces with the bulb debris. In a controlled study design...

  2. Dynamic Response of Plant Chlorophyll Fluorescence to Light, Water and Nutrient Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendrero Mateo, M. D. P.; Moran, S. M.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Carmo-Silva, A. E.; Papuga, S. A.; Matveeva, M.; Wieneke, S.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important exchange process of CO2 between the atmosphere and the land-surface. Spatial and temporal patterns of photosynthesis depend on dynamic plant-specific adaptation strategies to highly variable environmental conditions e.g. light, water, and nutrient availability. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChF) has been proposed as a direct indicator of photosynthesis, and several studies have demonstrated its relationship with vegetation functioning at leaf and canopy level. In this study, two overarching questions about ChF were addressed: Q1) How water, nutrient and ambient light conditions determine the relationships between photosynthesis and ChF? Which is the optimum irradiance level for detecting water and nutrient deficit conditions with ChF?; Q2) What is the seasonal relationship between photosynthesis and ChF when nitrogen is the limiting factor? The results of this study indicated that when the differences between treatments (water or nitrogen) drive the relationship between photosynthesis and ChF, ChF has a direct relationship with photosynthesis. This study demonstrates that the light level at which plants were grown was optimum for detecting water and nutrient deficit with ChF. Further, the seasonal relation between photosynthesis and ChF with nitrogen stress was not a simple linear function due to the complex physiological relation between photosynthesis and ChF. Our study showed that at times in the season when nitrogen was sufficient and photosynthesis was highest, ChF decreased because these two processes compete for available energy. The results from this study demonstrated that ChF is a reliable indicator of plant stress and has great potential as a tool for better understand where, when, and how CO2 is exchanged between the land and atmosphere.

  3. Comparative Mutagenesis Studies of Retinal Release in Light-Activated Zebrafish Rhodopsin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J M; Chang, B S W

    2015-07-28

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating scotopic (dim-light) vision in vetebrates. Once activated by light, release of all-trans-retinal from rhodopsin involves hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage, followed by dissociation of retinal from the protein moiety. This kinetic process has been well studied in model systems such as bovine rhodopsin, but not in rhodopsins from cold-blooded animals, where physiological temperatures can vary considerably. Here, we characterize the rate of retinal release from light-activated rhodopsin in an ectotherm, zebrafish (Danio rerio), demonstrating in a fluorescence assay that this process occurs more than twice as fast as bovine rhodopsin at similar temperatures in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that differences in retinal release rates can be attributed to a series of variable residues lining the retinal channel in three key structural motifs: an opening in metarhodopsin II between transmembrane helix 5 (TM5) and TM6, in TM3 near E122, and in the "retinal plug" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2). The majority of these sites are more proximal to the β-ionone ring of retinal than the Schiff base, indicating their influence on retinal release is more likely due to steric effects during retinal dissociation, rather than alterations to Schiff base stability. An Arrhenius plot of zebrafish rhodopsin was consistent with this model, inferring that the activation energy for Schiff base hydrolysis is similar to that of bovine rhodopsin. Functional variation at key sites identified in this study is consistent with the idea that retinal release might be an adaptive property of rhodopsin in vertebrates. Our study is one of the few investigating a nonmammalian rhodopsin, which will help establish a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to vision in cold-blooded vertebrates. PMID:26098991

  4. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  5. Investigating the light absorption in a single pass through the photoreceptor layer by means of the lipofuscin fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pedro M; McLellan, James S; Burns, Stephen A

    2005-07-01

    Reflection densitometry has been widely used to measure the density difference of the bleachable cone photopigments in human eyes. Most such measurements make a series of assumptions concerning the amount of scattered light to derive an estimate of the true cone photopigment density from the density difference measurements. The current study made three types of measurements of the light returning from the eye before and after bleaching: the amount of light returning in the "directed" reflection, which is a double-pass estimate of the cone photopigment density; the amount of light in undirected or diffuse reflection; and the amount of fluorescence from lipofuscin in the RPE, which provides a single-pass measurement of optical density difference. For a 1 deg foveally fixated field, the density difference estimates for the three measurements were 0.68, 0.21, and 0.22 respectively. The lipofuscin fluorescence was found to be unguided. The background density difference was non-negligible and very close to the single pass estimate from fluorescence. These measurements each involve potentially different pathways of light through the retina, and therefore place different constraints on models of these pathways. A simple model comparing the directional and the fluorescence optical densities produced retinal coverage estimates around 70-75%. Estimates of the shape factor of the single pass optical Stiles-Crawford effect were evaluated from the dark-adapted and bleached fluorescence measurements. The values were closer to those obtained from psychophysical methods than to the double pass optical Stiles-Crawford shape factors obtained directly from retinal reflectometry. PMID:15820514

  6. Numerical evaluation of droplet sizing based on the ratio of fluorescent and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique)

    SciTech Connect

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2011-03-20

    The dependence of fluorescent and scattered light intensities from spherical droplets on droplet diameter was evaluated using Mie theory. The emphasis is on the evaluation of droplet sizing, based on the ratio of laser-induced fluorescence and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique). A parametric study is presented, which includes the effects of scattering angle, the real part of the refractive index and the dye concentration in the liquid (determining the imaginary part of the refractive index). The assumption that the fluorescent and scattered light intensities are proportional to the volume and surface area of the droplets for accurate sizing measurements is not generally valid. More accurate sizing measurements can be performed with minimal dye concentration in the liquid and by collecting light at a scattering angle of 60 deg. rather than the commonly used angle of 90 deg. Unfavorable to the sizing accuracy are oscillations of the scattered light intensity with droplet diameter that are profound at the sidescatter direction (90 deg.) and for droplets with refractive indices around 1.4.

  7. Daylighting with Mirror Light Pipes and with Fluorescent Planar Concentrators. First Results from the Demonstration Project Stuttgart-Hohenheim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, Armin; Wittwer, Volker

    1987-02-01

    Efficient daylighting systems have recently attracted increasing interest due to their potential for saving a condiderable amount of electrical energy used for lighting purposes. In this paper we discuss the properties of daylighting systems based on either fluorescent planar concentrators (FPC's) and transparent light guiding plates or light pipes coated with a highly reflective silver coated plastic film (3M Silverlux film). First results on daylighting systems in the students' living quarters in Stuttgart-Hohenheim will be presented. This is a demonstration project which is supported by the Commission of the European Communities.

  8. High-light stress and photoprotection in Umbilicaria antarctica monitored by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and changes in zeaxanthin and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Barták, M; Hájek, J; Vráblíková, H; Dubová, J

    2004-05-01

    The effect of high light on spatial distribution of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence parameters over a lichen thallus (Umbilicaria antarctica) was investigated by imaging of Chl fluorescence parameters before and after exposure to high light (1500 micro mol m (-2) s (-1), 30 min at 5 degrees C). False colour images of F (V)/F (M) and Phi (II) distribution, taken over thallus with 0.1 mm (2) resolution, showed that maximum F (V)/F (M) and Phi (II) values were located close to the thallus centre. Minimum values were typical for thallus margins. After exposure to high light, a differential response of F (V)/F (M) and Phi (II) was found. The marginal thallus part exhibited a loss of photosynthetic activity, manifested as a lack of Chl fluorescence signal, and close-to-centre parts showed a different extent of F (V)/F (M) and Phi (II) decrease. Subsequent recovery in the dark led to a gradual return of F (V)/F (M) and Phi (II) to their initial values. Fast (30 min) and slow (1 - 22 h) phase of recovery were distinguished, suggesting a sufficient capacity of photoprotective mechanisms in U. antarctica to cope with low-temperature photoinhibition. Glutathione and xanthophyll cycle pigments were analyzed by HPLC. High light led to an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and a conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin, expressed as their de-epoxidation state (DEPS). The responses of GSSG and DEPS were reversible during subsequent recovery in the dark. GSSG and DEPS were highly correlated to non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), indicating involvement of these antioxidants in the resistance of U. antarctica to high-light stress. Heterogeneity of Chl fluorescence parameters over the thallus and differential response to high light are discussed in relation to thallus anatomy and intrathalline distribution of the symbiotic alga Trebouxia sp. PMID:15143442

  9. Peptide-Induced AIEgen Self-Assembly: A New Strategy to Realize Highly Sensitive Fluorescent Light-Up Probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Aitian; Wang, Huaimin; Kwok, Ryan T K; Ji, Shenglu; Li, Jun; Kong, Deling; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescent light-up probes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics have recently attracted great research interest due to their intelligent fluorescence activation mechanism and excellent photobleaching resistance. In this work, we report a new, simple, and generic strategy to design and prepare highly sensitive AIE fluorescent light-up bioprobe through facile incorporation of a self-assembling peptide sequence GFFY between the recognition element and the AIE luminogen (AIEgen). After the bioprobes respond to the targets, the peptide GFFY is capable of inducing the ordered self-assembly of AIEgens, yielding close and tight intermolecular steric interactions to restrict the intramolecular motions of AIEgens for excellent signal output. Using two proof-of-concepts, we have demonstrated that self-assembling peptide-incorporating AIE light-up probes show much higher sensitivity in sensing the corresponding targets in both solutions and cancer cells as compared to those without GFFY induced self-assembly. Taking the probe TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac), for example, a detection limit as low as 0.54 pM can be achieved for TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac) in caspase-3 detection, which is much lower than that of TPE-K(DVED-Ac) (3.50 pM). This study may inspire new insights into the design of advanced fluorescent molecular probes. PMID:26948051

  10. Nonperturbative theory for the optical response to strong light of the light harvesting complex II of plants: Saturation of the fluorescence quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, M.; Renger, Th.; Renger, G.; Knorr, A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent progress in resolution of the structure of the light harvesting complex II provides the basis for theoretical predictions on nonlinear optical properties from microscopic calculations. An approach to absorption and fluorescence is presented within the framework of Bloch equations using a correlation expansion of relevant many particle interactions. The equations derived within the framework of this theory are applied to describe fluorescence saturation phenomena. The experimentally observed decrease of the normalized fluorescence quantum yield from 1 to 0.0001 upon increasing the intensity of laser pulse excitation at 645nm by five orders of magnitude [R Schödel et al., Biophys. J. 71, 3370 (1996)] is explained by Pauli blocking effects of optical excitation and excitation energy transfer.

  11. Quantification of Canine Dental Plaque Using Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Corrin; Gill, Yadvinder; Colyer, Alison; Davis, Ian; Allsopp, Judi; Komarov, Gleb; Higham, Susan; Harris, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) as an alternative to the established Logan and Boyce method for determining plaque coverage of dogs' teeth. In a series of studies in conscious and anesthetized dogs, QLF showed good intra-photographer repeatability (coefficient of variation [CV] of 7.5% for undisclosed teeth) and inter-photographer reproducibility (CV of 3.2% for undisclosed teeth and 8.5% for disclosed teeth). The QLF software accurately identifies areas of plaque as demonstrated by comparison to the variability of 5 human scorers, manually marking plaque on QLF-acquired images (P = 0.1). There was good agreement with the modified Logan and Boyce method in the percentage reduction in plaque accumulation measured when dogs were fed an oral care chew versus no chew. To see a 15% difference in plaque accumulation, which is considered sufficient by the Veterinary Oral Health Council to differentiate between 2 treatments, a retrospective power analysis (90%) of the data established that only 7 dogs would be required, compared to 19 dogs for the modified Logan and Boyce method. QLF is a reliable method for measuring dental plaque in dogs with the added advantage that it is not subjective and requires fewer animals. PMID:27487653

  12. Photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and light scattering of eye-lens proteins at moderate concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Andries, C; Guedens, W; Clauwaert, J; Geerts, H

    1983-01-01

    The bovine eye-lens protein, alpha L-crystallin, has been studied with photon correlation spectroscopy to obtain the mutual diffusion coefficient, Dm, with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to determine the tracer diffusion coefficient, DT, and with light scattering to get the isothermal osmotic compressibility (delta pi/delta c) P,T. The concentration dependence of Dm, DT, and (delta pi/delta c) P,T up to a volume fraction phi of the protein of 2.5 x 10(-2) has been interpreted on the basis of four different interaction potentials: (a) an extended hard-sphere potential; (b) a shielded Coulomb potential; (c) a shielded Coulomb interaction where the effect of counterions is included; (d) a simple mixed potential. The three parameters Dm, DT, and (delta pi/delta c) P,T have also been combined in the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation, Dm = [(delta pi/delta c)P,T . (1--phi) . (DT)]/(kappa B . T). Our results indicate that, in the case that photon correlation spectroscopy gives the mutual diffusion coefficient Dm, the applicability of the Stokes-Einstein equation can be questioned; or that, when one assumes the Stokes-Einstein equation to be valid, there is significant discrepancy between the result of photon correlation spectroscopy and Dm. PMID:6626672

  13. 3D Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy of Cranial Neurons and Vasculature during Zebrafish Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ok Kyu; Kwak, Jina; Jung, Yoo Jung; Kim, Young Ho; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Kee, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Precise 3D spatial mapping of cells and their connections within living tissues is required to fully understand developmental processes and neural activities. Zebrafish embryos are relatively small and optically transparent, making them the vertebrate model of choice for live in vivo imaging. However, embryonic brains cannot be imaged in their entirety by confocal or two-photon microscopy due to limitations in optical range and scanning speed. Here, we use light-sheet fluorescence microscopy to overcome these limitations and image the entire head of live transgenic zebrafish embryos. We simultaneously imaged cranial neurons and blood vessels during embryogenesis, generating comprehensive 3D maps that provide insight into the coordinated morphogenesis of the nervous system and vasculature during early development. In addition, blood cells circulating through the entire head, vagal and cardiac vasculature were also visualized at high resolution in a 3D movie. These data provide the foundation for the construction of a complete 4D atlas of zebrafish embryogenesis and neural activity. PMID:26429501

  14. Efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes employing thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qisheng; Li, Bo; Huang, Shuping; Nomura, Hiroko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-04-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) have emerged as cheaper alternatives to high-performance phosphorescent OLEDs with noble-metal-based dopants. However, the efficiencies of blue TADF OLEDs are still low at high luminance, limiting full-colour display. Here, we report a blue OLED containing a 9,10-dihydroacridine/diphenylsulphone derivative that has a comparable performance to today's best phosphorescent OLEDs. The device offers an external quantum efficiency of 19.5% and reduced efficiency roll-off characteristics at high luminance. Through computational simulation, we identified six pretwisted intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) molecules with small singlet-triplet CT state splitting but different energy relationships between 3CT and locally excited triplet (3LE) states. Systematic comparison of their excited-state dynamics revealed that CT molecules with a large twist angle can emit efficient and short-lifetime (a few microseconds) TADF when the emission peak energy is high enough and the 3LE state is higher than the 3CT state.

  15. Multicolor fluorescent light-emitting diodes based on cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Bai, Xue; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    High quantum yield, narrow full width at half-maximum and tunable emission color of perovskite quantum dots (QDs) make this kind of material good prospects for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the relatively poor stability under high temperature and air condition limits the device performance. To overcome this issue, the liquid-type packaging structure in combination with blue LED chip was employed to fabricate the fluorescent perovskite quantum dot-based LEDs. A variety of monochromatic LEDs with green, yellow, reddish-orange, and red emission were fabricated by utilizing the inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots as the color-conversion layer, which exhibited the narrow full width at half-maximum (<35 nm), the relatively high luminous efficiency (reaching 75.5 lm/W), and the relatively high external quantum efficiency (14.6%), making it the best-performing perovskite LEDs so far. Compared to the solid state LED device, the liquid-type LED devices exhibited excellent color stability against the various working currents. Furthermore, we demonstrated the potential prospects of all-inorganic perovskite QDs for the liquid-type warm white LEDs.

  16. Endolymph movement visualized with light sheet fluorescence microscopy in an acute hydrops model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel J; Pastras, Christopher J; Curthoys, Ian S; Southwell, Cassandra S; Van Roon, Lieke

    2016-09-01

    There are a variety of techniques available to investigate endolymph dynamics, primarily seeking to understand the cause of endolymphatic hydrops. Here we have taken the novel approach of injecting, via a glass micropipette, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and artificial endolymph into scala media of anaesthetized guinea pigs, with subsequent imaging of the inner ear using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) as a means to obtain highly resolved 3D visualization of fluid movements. Our results demonstrate endolymph movement into the utricle, semicircular canals and endolymphatic duct and sac when more than 2.5 μl of fluid had been injected into scala media, with no apparent movement of fluid into the perilymphatic compartments. There was no movement of endolymph into these compartments when less than 2.5 μl was injected. The remarkable uptake of the FITC-dex into the endolymphatic duct, including an absorption into the periductal channels surrounding the endolymphatic duct, highlights the functional role this structure plays in endolymph volume regulation. PMID:27377233

  17. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  18. Levels of Visual Stress in Proficient Readers: Effects of Spectral Filtering of Fluorescent Lighting on Reading Discomfort.

    PubMed

    Loew, Stephen J; Rodríguez, Celestino; Marsh, Nigel V; Jones, Graham L; Núñez, Jose Carlos; Watson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Visual stress (VS) affects reading in 5-12% of the general population and 31-36% of children with reading disorders. Symptoms include print distortions and visual discomfort when reading, and are exacerbated by fluorescent lighting. Prior research has indicated that VS can also affect proficient readers. We therefore examined levels of visual discomfort in a group of expert readers (n = 24) under both standard and spectrally-filtered fluorescent lighting. Participants rated their awareness of six symptoms of VS under each lighting condition. Under the standard condition, 4(16.7%) of the group recorded moderate to high levels of VS. Differences in symptom levels and reading speed between conditions were analysed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Under the filter condition, the group reported less discomfort regarding all six symptoms of VS surveyed. The differences were significant with respect to three of the symptoms (p = .029 - p < .001), with a medium effect size in all of them (r = .31 - r = .46) and total score (p = .007; r = .39). Variations in reading proficiency included significantly fewer self-corrections (p = .019) and total errors (p = .004). Here we present evidence that VS-type symptoms of reading discomfort are not confined to populations with reading difficulties and may also occur in proficient readers, and that simple adaptations to fluorescent lighting may alleviate such symptoms. PMID:26255657

  19. Time-Resolved Light Scattering and Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Biomedical and Model Random Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bidyut Baran

    Optical spectroscopy, light scattering and ultrafast time-gated imaging have been shown to offer novel approaches to study the optical characteristics of various biomedical and other random media. Fluorescence spectra from human malignant and nonmalignant breast tissues were measured at 300 nm excitation and a significant spectral difference was found between the two tissue types by using the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 340 and 440 nm. Optical density measurements on thin breast tissues show that the scattering cross-sections of breast tissues are relatively constant over the visible and the uv region. Transport mean free paths and the absorption lengths for various tissues and model random media were measured using time-resolved transmission. The scattering coefficients for human breast and chicken tissues were found to remain relatively constant in 570-630 nm wavelength region while they change significantly at 1064 nm. Chicken breast and fat tissues were found to be good models for human breast tissues as the values of the optical parameters of the two tissue types are about the same. The less scattering observed at 1064 nm makes tissues more transparent in the NIR region making it easier to image in thick tissues. Time-resolved backscattering measurements show that the scattering and the absorption parameters of a random medium can be obtained accurately in a two-fiber configuration as long as the radial distance is more than about seven times the transport mean free path of the sample. The single point source-detection configuration provides a tool to diagnose breast malignancy though it fails to give accurate values of the optical parameters of tissues. This failure is attributed to the invalidity of the diffusion approximation in this experimental configuration. A 2.5 mm thin chicken fat strip was imaged inside a 40 mm thick chicken breast tissue using snake photons at 625 nm with ultrafast time-gated detection. A simple model to describe the effect

  20. Steady state emission of the fluorescent intermediate of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as a function of light adaptation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheminal, A.; Léonard, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Jung, K.-H.; Kandori, H.; Haacke, S.

    2013-11-01

    Steady-state fluorescence measurements of the first excited state of the anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), and Bacteriorhodopsin are reported for different light stabilization conditions, including the dark-adapted state. We determine the fluorescence spectra of both all-trans (AT), and 13-cis (13C) protonated Schiff base of retinal, and compare the effect of the proteins. Referenced against the fluorescence quantum yield of AT-bR (2.5 × 10-4) we find for AT-ASR, 13C-ASR, and 13C-bR the values of 3.3 × 10-4, 0.8 × 10-4, and 1.7 × 10-4, respectively. Using reported excited state lifetimes, the radiative rates are deduced, and their differences discussed on the basis of a configuration-dependent oscillator strength.

  1. Validation of a Device for Fluorescence Sensing of Rare Circulating Cells with Diffusive Light in an Optical Flow Phantom Model

    PubMed Central

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantification of rare circulating cells in biological tissues is an important problem and has many applications in biomedical research. Current methods normally involve extraction of blood samples and counting of cells ex vivo, or the use of microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry. The goal of this work is to develop an instrument for non-invasively enumerating very rare circulating cells in small animals with diffuse light with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement versus current approaches. In this work, we describe the design of our system and show that single, fluorescent microspheres can be detected in limb-mimicking optical flow phantoms with varying optical properties chosen to simulate in vivo conditions. Further, we demonstrate single cell counting capabilities using fluorescently (Vybrant-DiD) labeled Jurkat and Multiple Myeloma cells. Ongoing work includes in vivo testing and characterization of our system in mice. PMID:22254354

  2. Effect of Triplet Harvesting on the Lifetime Based on Fluorescence and Phosphorescence in Hybrid White Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun; Lee, Ho Won; Yang, Hyung Jin; Sun, Yong; Lee, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kyo Min; Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Kwan

    2016-03-01

    We investigated efficient hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) apply to triplet harvesting (TH) concept based on three complementary colors by mixing containing blue fluorescent emitter with phosphorescent emitters. The TH is to transfer these triplet excitons from a fluorescence to a phosphorescence, where they can decay radiatively. We fabricated several hybrid WOLEDs, having various emitting layer structures with blue fluorescent emitter and red, green phosphorescent emitter. The WOLED exhibited maximum luminous efficiency of 9.02 cd/A, and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 4.17%. The WOLED showed a highly color-stable white emission with the Commission International de L'Éclairage chromaticity of (0.38, 0.36) at 1,000 cd/m2. PMID:27455693

  3. Cobalt phosphide nanowires: efficient nanostructures for fluorescence sensing of biomolecules and photocatalytic evolution of dihydrogen from water under visible light.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Cheng, Ningyan; Liu, Qian; Xing, Wei; Sun, Xuping

    2015-04-27

    The detection of specific DNA sequences plays an important role in the identification of disease-causing pathogens and genetic diseases, and photochemical water splitting offers a promising avenue to sustainable, environmentally friendly hydrogen production. Cobalt-phosphorus nanowires (CoP NWs) show a high fluorescence quenching ability and different affinity toward single- versus double-stranded DNA. Based on this result, the utilization of CoP NWs as fluorescent DNA nanosensors with a detection limit of 100 pM and a selectivity down to single-base mismatch was demonstrated. The use of a thrombin-specific DNA aptamer also enabled the selective detection of thrombin. The photoinduced electron transfer from the excited dye that labels the oligonucleotide probe to the CoP semiconductor led to efficient fluorescence quenching, and largely enhanced the photocatalytic evolution of hydrogen from water under visible light. PMID:25721096

  4. Valinomycin sensitivity proves that light-induced thylakoid voltages result in millisecond phase of chlorophyll fluorescence transients.

    PubMed

    Pospísil, Pavel; Dau, Holger

    2002-04-22

    Upon sudden exposure of plants to an actinic light of saturating intensity, the yield of chlorophyll fluorescence increases typically by 200-400% of the initial O-level. At least three distinct phases of these O-J-I-P transients can be resolved: O-J (0.05-5 ms), J-I (5-50 ms), and I-P (50-1000 ms). In thylakoid membranes, the J-I increase accounts for approximately 30% of the total fluorescence increase; in Photosystem II membranes, the J-I phase is always lacking. In the presence of the ionophore valinomycin, which is known to inhibit specifically the formation of membrane voltages, the magnitude of the J-I phase is clearly diminished; in the presence of valinomycin supplemented by potassium, the J-I phase is fully suppressed. We conclude that the light-driven formation of the thylakoid-membrane voltage results in an increase of the chlorophyll excited-state lifetime, a phenomenon explainable by the electric-field-induced shift of the free-energy level of the primary radical pair [Dau and Sauer, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1102 (1992) 91]. The assignment of the J-I increase in the fluorescence yield enhances the potential of using O-J-I-P fluorescence transients for investigations on photosynthesis in intact organisms. A putative role of thylakoid voltages in protection of PSII against photoinhibitory damage is discussed. PMID:12034474

  5. Color-stable and efficient stacked white organic light-emitting devices comprising blue fluorescent and orange phosphorescent emissive units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Xue, Qin; Xie, Wenfa; Duan, Yu; Xie, Guohua; Zhao, Yi; Hou, Jingying; Liu, Shiyong; Zhang, Liying; Li, Bin

    2008-10-01

    We have demonstrated two kinds of stacked white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) employing tri(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum:20 wt %Mg/MoO3 as charge generation layer. White light emission can be obtained by mixing blue fluorescence and orange phosphorescence. Stacked WOLED with individual blue fluorescent and orange phosphorescent emissive units has better color stability and higher efficiency than that with double white emissive units, which is attributed to the avoidance of the movement of charges recombination zone and elimination of the Dexter energy transfer between blue and orange emission layers occurring in the latter. The efficiency of the stacked WOLED is 35.9 cd/A at 1000 cd/m2.

  6. High-efficiency yellow double-doped organic light-emitting devices based on phosphor-sensitized fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrade, Brian W.; Baldo, Marc A.; Adachi, Chihaya; Brooks, Jason; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2001-08-13

    We demonstrate high-efficiency yellow organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) employing [2-methyl-6-[2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1H,5H-benzo[ij]quinolizin-9-yl-ethenyl]-4H-pyran-4-ylidene] propane-dinitrile (Dcm{sup 2}) as a fluorescent lumophore, with a green electrophospho- rescent sensitizer, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy){sub 3}] co-doped into a 4,4{prime}-N,N{prime}dicarbazole-biphenyl host. The devices exhibit peak external fluorescent quantum and power efficiencies of 9%{+-}1% (25 cd/A) and 17{+-}2 lm/W at 0.01 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. At 10 mA/cm{sup 2}, the efficiencies are 4.1%{+-}0.5% (11 cd/A) and 3.1{+-}0.3 lm/W. We show that this exceptionally high performance for a fluorescent dye is due to the {approx}100% efficient transfer of both singlet and triplet excited states in the doubly doped host to the fluorescent material using Ir(ppy){sub 3} as a sensitizing agent. These results suggest that 100% internal quantum efficiency fluorescent OLEDs employing this sensitization process are within reach. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Halide ion controlled shape dependent gold nanoparticle synthesis with tryptophan as reducing agent: Enhanced fluorescent properties and white light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasture, Manasi; Sastry, Murali; Prasad, B. L. V.

    2010-01-01

    We report the synthesis of Au nanoparticles in presence of two surfactants cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) by reducing Au 3+ ions with tryptophan. Interestingly, triangular shaped particles were seen to form in presence of CTAB, while spherical nanoparticles resulted with CTAC. The highlight of this result is the white light emission from the Au triangles obtained when CTAB is used. These results are supported by lifetime measurements and fluorescence.

  8. Elimination of light scatter interference in dual-laser flow cytometry by synchronous detection of emitted fluorescence: theory and demonstration using simulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Keij, Jan F.

    1999-06-01

    Light scatter is often a source of interference in dual-laser excitation experiments by flow cytometry. If the two laser beams are not adequately separated or optical masking is not used, and if gated sequential fluorescence signal detection is not employed, light scatter from particles/cells as they pass across one beam can interfere in the fluorescence measurement channel of the other laser excitation beam. In this study we discuss the problem and present the theory for improving fluorescence measurements in dual-laser flow cytometry by use of modulated laser excitation and synchronous (phase- sensitive) detection of the resulting fluorescence emission to eliminate light scatter interference from particles/cells. Fluorescence emission from particles/cells generated by the first laser beam (unmodulated cw) is measured using conventional means (detection channel no. 1). Light scatter interference from particles/cells as they pass across the first laser excitation beam, whose wavelength lies in the fluorescence measurement region of detection channel no. 2, is rejected by the synchronously tuned phase-sensitive channel no. 2 detector, whereas the fluorescence emission corresponding to laser no. 2 excitation is detected and measured. The efficacy of the technology in relation to analytical cytology measurements is demonstrated using simulated fluorescence and light scatter signals.

  9. Review of organic light-emitting diodes with thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters for energy-efficient sustainable light sources and displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) is an emerging hot topic. Even though this photophysical mechanism itself has been described more than 50 years ago and optoelectronic devices with organic matter have been studied, improved, and even commercialized for decades now, the realization of the potential of TADF organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) happened only recently. TADF has been proven to be an attractive and very efficient alternative for phosphorescent materials, such as dopants in OLEDs, light-emitting electrochemical cells as well as potent emitters for chemiluminescence. In this review, the TADF concept is introduced in terms that are also understandable for nonchemists. The basic concepts behind this mechanism as well as state-of-the-art examples are discussed. In addition, the future economic impact, especially for the lighting and display market, is addressed here. We conclude that TADF materials are especially helpful to realize efficient, durable deep blue and white displays.

  10. Effects of water stress and light intensity on chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and pigments of Aloe vera L.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Saeid; Tahmasebi-Sarvestani, Zeinolabedin; Modarres-Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Mokhtassi-Bidgoli, Ali; Nicola, Silvana

    2016-09-01

    Aloe vera L. is one of the most important medicinal plants in the world. In order to determine the effects of light intensity and water deficit stress on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and pigments of A. vera, a split-plot in time experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications in a research greenhouse. The factorial combination of three light intensities (50, 75 and 100% of sunlight) and four irrigation regimes (irrigation after depleting 20, 40, 60 and 80% of soil water content) were considered as main factors. Sampling time was considered as sub factor. The first, second and third samplings were performed 90, 180 and 270 days after imposing the treatments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the highest light intensity and the severe water stress decreased maximum fluorescence (Fm), variable fluorescence (Fv)/Fm, quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ФPSII), Chl and photochemical quenching (qP) but increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), minimum fluorescence (F0) and Anthocyanin (Anth). Additionally, the highest Fm, Fv/Fm, ФPSII and qP and the lowest NPQ and F0 were observed when 50% of sunlight was blocked and irrigation was done after 40% soil water depletion. Irradiance of full sunlight and water deficit stress let to the photoinhibition of photosynthesis, as indicated by a reduced quantum yield of PSII, ФPSII, and qP, as well as higher NPQ. Thus, chlorophyll florescence measurements provide valuable physiological data. Close to half of total solar radiation and irrigation after depleting 40% of soil water content were selected as the most efficient treatments. PMID:27161580

  11. PsbS is required for systemic acquired acclimation and post-excess-light-stress optimization of chlorophyll fluorescence decay times in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ciszak, Kamil; Kulasek, Milena; Barczak, Anna; Grzelak, Justyna; Maćkowski, Sebastian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) is an important light acclimatory mechanism that depends on the global adjustments of non-photochemical quenching and chloroplast retrograde signaling. As the exact regulation of these processes is not known, we measured time-resolved fluorescence of chlorophyll a in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves exposed to excess light, in leaves undergoing SAA, and in leaves after excess light episode. We compare the behavior induced in wild-type plants with null mutant of non-photochemical quenching (npq4–1). The wild type rosettes exhibit a small reduction of fluorescence decay times in leaves directly exposed to excess light and in leaves undergoing SAA in ambient low light. However in npq4–1 exposition to excess light results in much faster fluorescence decay, which is insensitive to excitation power. At the same time npq4–1 leaves undergoing SAA displayed intermediate fluorescence decay. The npq4–1 plants also lost the ability to optimize florescence decay, and thus chlorophyll a dynamics up to 2 h after excess light episode. The fluorescence decay dynamics in both WT and npq4–1 can be described by a set of 3 maximum decay times. Based on the results, we concluded that functional PsbS is required for optimization of absorbed photon fate and optimal light acclimatory responses such as SAA or after excess light stress. PMID:25654166

  12. Light-sheet generation in inhomogeneous media using self-reconstructing beams and the STED-principle.

    PubMed

    Gohn-Kreuz, Cristian; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Self-reconstruction of Bessel beams in inhomogeneous media is beneficial in light-sheet based microscopy. Although the beam's ring system enables propagation stability, the resulting image contrast is reduced. Here, we show that by a combination of two self-reconstructing beams with different orbital angular momenta it is possible to inhibit fluorescence from the ring system by using stimulated emission depletion (STED) even in strongly scattering media. Our theoretical study shows that the remaining fluorescence γ depends non-linearly on the beams' relative radial and orbital angular momenta. For various scattering media we demonstrate that γ remains remarkably stable over long beam propagation distances. PMID:27136782

  13. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for hyaluronidase detection via hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2016-05-15

    Hyaluronidase (HAase), which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, can selectively degrade hyaluronan (HA) into small fragments, and it has been reported as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for bladder cancer. Herein, a facile ratiometric fluorescent sensing system for HAase has been developed, which is based on hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers and can realize sensitive detection of HAase with a detection limit of 0.007 U/mL. A positively-charged pyrene analog (N-Py) has been synthesized and then mixed with the negatively-charged HA, due to electrostatic interaction between the two components, aggregation along with the N-Py excimers readily form which emits red light. While in the presence of HAase, the enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of HA into small fragments, which in turn triggers disassembly of excimers; consequently the N-Py excimer emission turns into monomer emission. The emission ratio resulted from the excimer-monomer transition can be used as the sensing signal for detecting HAase. The probe features visible-light excitation and red light emission (excimer), which is conducive to reducing possible interference from autofluorescence of biological samples. Furthermore, the assay system can be successfully used to determine HAase in human urine samples with satisfactory accuracy. This strategy may provide a suitable sensitive and accurate assay for HAase as well as an effective approach for developing fluorescent ratiometric assays for other enzymes. PMID:26774093

  14. Effect of light-emitting diode (LED) vs. fluorescent (FL) lighting on laying hens in aviary hen houses: Part 2 - Egg quality, shelf-life and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Long, H; Zhao, Y; Xin, H; Hansen, H; Ning, Z; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    In this 60-wk study, egg quality, egg shelf-life, egg cholesterol content, total yolk lipids, and yolk fatty acid composition of eggs produced by Dekalb white laying hens in commercial aviary houses with either light-emitting diode (LED) or fluorescent (FL) lighting were compared. All parameters were measured at 27, 40, and 60 wk of age, except for egg shelf-life, which was compared at 50 wk of age. The results showed that, compared to the FL regimen, the LED regimen resulted in higher egg weight, albumen height, and albumen weight at 27 wk of age, thicker shells at 40 wk of age, but lower egg weight at 60 wk of age. Egg quality change was similar between the lighting regimens during the 62-d egg storage study, indicating that LED lighting did not influence egg shelf-life. Eggs from both lighting regimens had similar cholesterol content. However, cholesterol concentration of the yolk (15.9 to 21.0 mg cholesterol/g wet weight yolk) observed in this study was higher than that of United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) database (10.85 mg/g). No significant differences in total lipids or fatty acid composition of the yolks were detected between the two lighting regimens. PMID:26574027

  15. Light induced fluorescence in differentiation of endometrial pathology: multivariate statistical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, Aurelija; Auksorius, E.; Gavryushin, V.; Vaitkus, Juozas V.

    2001-10-01

    The detailed statistical analysis of the tissue fluorescence spectra was proposed for the investigation of tissue biochemical changes. The method is based on the decomposition of the autofluorescence spectrum into the spectra of natural components of cells. The human tissues with different physiological activity or affected by sickness were investigated. The tissue spectra changes are grouped by the histology data. The observed correlation of fluorescence spectra structure changes for cancer and other 'normal' phases of the tissue are observed from multivariate statistical analysis.

  16. High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes using double hole-transporting-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Shen, Shih-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chung, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Chun-Jan; Hsu, Mao-Feng; Wang, Wei-Ben; Wu, Ming-Hsuan; Yang, Chih-Jie; Liu, Chi-Ping

    2008-04-01

    High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) were fabricated by using double holetransporting- layers (HTLs), poly(3,4-ethylene- dioxythiophene)-poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT) and N,N'-bis-(1- naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,10-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine (NPB). The diodes were composed of a single emissive-layer (EML), with 0.5 wt% red 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tbutyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran doped in a mixed-host of 25% trans-1,2-bis(6-(N,N-di-p-tolylamino)-Naphthalene-2-yl)ethene and 75% 1-butyl-9,10-naphthaleneanthracene. The device structure comprised a 125 nm anode layer of indium tin oxide, a 25 nm first HTL of PEDOT, a 0 to 10 nm second HTL of NPB, a 30 nm EML, a 40 nm electron-transporting-layer of 2,2',2"-(1,3,5-benzenetriyl)-tris(1- phenyl-1-H-benzimidazole), a 1 nm electron-injection-layer of lithium fluoride and a 150 nm cathode layer of aluminum. With the addition of a 7.5 nm second HTL (NPB), the resultant power-efficiency at 100 cd/m2, for example, was increased from 11.9 to 18.9 lm/W, an improvement of 59%. The improvement was even more marked at 1,000 cd/m2, i.e. that the power-efficiency was increased from 9.1 to 16.5 lm/W, an improvement of 81%. The marked efficiency improvement may be attributed to a better balance of carrier-injection in the desired emissive zone since the addition of the NPB layer in between the first HTL and the EML may have effectively reduced the injection of excessive holes into the EML due to the relatively high energy-barrier to hole, which was 0.5 eV, at the interface of the two HTLs. The resultant hole-blocking function was plausibly more effective at higher voltage so that comparatively much less holes would be injected into the EML, leading to a much better balanced carrier-injection and consequently a higher efficiency-improvement at the higher brightness.

  17. A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2008-05-19

    This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped

  18. Organic Fluorescent Dyes Supported on Activated Boron Nitride: A Promising Blue Light Excited Phosphors for High-Performance White Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Zhenya; Xue, Yanming; Ding, Xiaoxia; Luo, Han; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2015-01-01

    We report an effective and rare-earth free light conversion material synthesized via a facile fabrication route, in which organic fluorescent dyes, i.e. Rhodamine B (RhB) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are embedded into activated boron nitride (αBN) to form a composite phosphor. The composite phosphor shows highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer and greatly improved thermal stability, and can emit at broad visible wavelengths of 500–650 nm under the 466 nm blue-light excitation. By packaging of the composite phosphors and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) chip with transparent epoxy resin, white LED with excellent thermal conductivity, current stability and optical performance can be realized, i.e. a thermal conductivity of 0.36 W/mk, a Commission Internationale de 1'Eclairage color coordinates of (0.32, 0.34), and a luminous efficiency of 21.6 lm·W−1. Our research opens the door toward to the practical long-life organic fluorescent dyes-based white LEDs. PMID:25682730

  19. Organic Fluorescent Dyes Supported on Activated Boron Nitride: A Promising Blue Light Excited Phosphors for High-Performance White Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Zhenya; Xue, Yanming; Ding, Xiaoxia; Luo, Han; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2015-02-01

    We report an effective and rare-earth free light conversion material synthesized via a facile fabrication route, in which organic fluorescent dyes, i.e. Rhodamine B (RhB) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) are embedded into activated boron nitride (αBN) to form a composite phosphor. The composite phosphor shows highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer and greatly improved thermal stability, and can emit at broad visible wavelengths of 500-650 nm under the 466 nm blue-light excitation. By packaging of the composite phosphors and a blue light-emitting diode (LED) chip with transparent epoxy resin, white LED with excellent thermal conductivity, current stability and optical performance can be realized, i.e. a thermal conductivity of 0.36 W/mk, a Commission Internationale de 1'Eclairage color coordinates of (0.32, 0.34), and a luminous efficiency of 21.6 lm.W-1. Our research opens the door toward to the practical long-life organic fluorescent dyes-based white LEDs.

  20. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  1. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude. PMID:25086872

  2. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of fluorescence light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-06-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of photon energy of incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed, especially for the 1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Ji=1 /2 +γ1→(1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 →1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Jf=1 /2 +γ2 photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the γ2 fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate (1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 overlapping resonances owing to their finite lifetime (linewidth). We therefore suggest that accurate measurements of the angular distribution and linear polarization might help identify the sequence and small splittings of closely spaced energy levels, even if they cannot be spectroscopically resolved.

  3. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  4. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  5. DNA and RNA "traffic lights": synthetic wavelength-shifting fluorescent probes based on nucleic acid base substitutes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Carolin; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-08-01

    The DNA base substitute approach by the (S)-3-amino-1,2-propanediol linker allows placing two fluorophores in a precise way inside a given DNA framework. The double helical architecture around the fluorophores, especially the DNA-induced twist, is crucial for the desired photophysical interactions. Excitonic, excimer, and energy transfer interactions yield fluorescent DNA and RNA probes with dual emission color readout. Especially, our DNA and RNA "traffic light" that combines the green emission of TO with the red emission of TR represents an important tool for molecular imaging and can be applied as aptasensors and as probes to monitor the siRNA delivery into cells. The concept can be extended to the synthetically easier to access postsynthetic 2'-modifications and the NIR range. Thereby, the pool of tailor-made fluorescent nucleic acid conjugates can be extended. PMID:23796243

  6. Multi-channel LED light source for fluorescent agent aided minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiacheng; Venugopalan, Janani; Xu, Jian; Kairdolf, Brad; Durfee, Robert; Wang, May D

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common and deadly diseases around the world. Amongst all the different treatments of cancer such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, surgical resection is the most effective. Successful surgeries greatly rely on the detection of the accurate tumor size and location, which can be enhanced by contrast agents. Commercial endoscope light sources, however, offer only white light illumination. In this paper, we present the development of a LED endoscope light source that provides 2 light channels plus white light to help surgeons to detect a clear tumor margin during minimally invasive surgeries. By exciting indocyanine green (ICG) and 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), the light source is intended to give the user a visible image of the tumor margin. This light source is also portable, easy to use and costs less than $300 to build. PMID:25571589

  7. Multi-Channel LED Light Source for Fluorescent Agent Aided Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiacheng; Venugopalan, Janani; Xu, Jian; Kairdolf, Brad; Durfee, Robert; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common and deadly diseases around the world. Amongst all the different treatments of cancer such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, surgical resection is the most effective. Successful surgeries greatly rely on the detection of the accurate tumor size and location, which can be enhanced by contrast agents. Commercial endoscope light sources, however, offer only white light illumination. In this paper, we present the development of a LED endoscope light source that provides 2 light channels plus white light to help surgeons to detect a clear tumor margin during minimally invasive surgeries. By exciting indocyanine green (ICG) and 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), the light source is intended to give the user a visible image of the tumor margin. This light source is also portable, easy to use and costs less than $300 to build. PMID:25571589

  8. Leaf Morphology, Photosynthetic Performance, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Stomatal Development of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Exposed to Different Ratios of Red Light to Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Tong, Yuxin; Yang, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B) provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were exposed to 200 μmol⋅m−2⋅s−1 irradiance for a 16 h⋅d−1 photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R), monochromatic blue light (B) and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (Amax) and photosynthetic rate (Pn) increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. Pn and Amax under B treatment had 7.6 and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B = 1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. However, shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B = 12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B = 12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between Pn and shoot dry weight accumulation. PMID:27014285

  9. Fibre coupled micro-light emitting diode array light source with integrated band-pass filter for fluorescence detection in miniaturised analytical systems.

    PubMed

    Vaculovičová, Markéta; Akther, Mahbub; Maaskant, Pleun; Brabazon, Dermot; Macka, Mirek

    2015-04-29

    In this work, a new type of miniaturized fibre-coupled solid-state light source is demonstrated as an excitation source for fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis. It is based on a parabolically shaped micro-light emitting diode (μ-LED) array with a custom band-pass optical interference filter (IF) deposited at the back of the LED substrate. The GaN μ-LED array consisted of 270 individual μ-LED elements with a peak emission at 470 nm, each about 14 μm in diameter and operated as a single unit. Light was extracted through the transparent substrate material, and coupled to an optical fibre (OF, 400 μm in diameter, numerical aperture NA=0.37), to form an integrated μ-LED-IF-OF light source component. This packaged μ-LED-IF-OF light source emitted approximately 225 μW of optical power at a bias current of 20 mA. The bandpass IF filter was designed to reduce undesirable LED light emissions in the wavelength range above 490 nm. Devices with and without IF were compared in terms of the optical power output, spectral characteristics as well as LOD values. While the IF consisted of only 7.5 pairs (15 layers) of SiO2/HfO2 layers, it resulted in an improvement of the baseline noise as well as the detection limit measured using fluorescein as test analyte, both by approximately one order of magnitude, with a LOD of 1×10(-8) mol L(-1) obtained under optimised conditions. The μ-LED-IF-OF light source was then demonstrated for use in capillary electrophoresis with fluorimetric detection. The limits of detection obtained by this device were compared to those obtained with a commercial fibre coupled LED device. PMID:25847165

  10. Leaf Morphology, Photosynthetic Performance, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Stomatal Development of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Exposed to Different Ratios of Red Light to Blue Light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Tong, Yuxin; Yang, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B) provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were exposed to 200 μmol⋅m(-2)⋅s(-1) irradiance for a 16 h⋅d(-1) photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R), monochromatic blue light (B) and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (A max) and photosynthetic rate (P n) increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. P n and A max under B treatment had 7.6 and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B = 1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. However, shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B = 12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B = 12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between P n and shoot dry weight accumulation. PMID:27014285

  11. Improving efficiency roll-off in organic light emitting devices with a fluorescence-interlayer-phosphorescence emission architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Tianhang; Choy, Wallace C. H.; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2009-09-01

    Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with a fluorescence-interlayer-phosphorescence emission layer structure (FIP EML) has been proposed to solve the efficiency roll-off issue effectively. Efficient green OLED based on FIP EML exhibiting only 26% roll-off in the luminance efficiency, which is lower than the typical roll-off of 51% for conventional phosphorescent OLEDs with single EML operated at 5-150 mA/cm2 range, has been demonstrated. Such enhancement should be attributed to the improved carrier balance, the exciton redistribution in recombination zone, the suppression of nonradiative exciton quenching processes, and the elimination of energy transfer loss offered by the FIP EML structure.

  12. Magnetic field effects in singlet-polaron quenching in molecularly doped fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Ma, Dongge

    2014-08-01

    The magnetic field effects of electroluminescence (MEL) in 4-[dicyanomethylene]-2-t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran(DCJTB) doped tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes were investigated. A linear decrease in MEL with the increase of magnetic field was observed at high magnetic field (>20 mT) in this doping devices, which has been attributed to the singlet-polaron quenching effect. It was found that the singlet-polaron quenching is magnetic field dependent. Our results showed that singlet-polaron quenching commonly exists in fluorescence OLEDs and induces the linear decrease in MEL.

  13. Mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes in compact fluorescent light bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, C.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, J. R.; Johnson, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs) are a growing source of Hg pollution. The high-energy environment of the CFLs combined with the known partitioning of Hg into the bulb walls could provide an environment for unusual isotope fractionation that could be used to trace pollution from improper bulb disposal. To investigate this possibility, we analyzed the isotope composition of Hg in CFL glass, phosphor powder, and whole bulbs from CFLs of known ages. We observed large, mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes between Hg embedded in the bulb wall and Hg in the liquid and vapor phases, which are the initial reservoir of Hg in the bulb. This fractionation results in the bulb wall showing enrichment of 198Hg, 199Hg, 200Hg, 201Hg, and 204Hg relative to 202Hg, the most abundant isotope. Both the amount of Hg embedded in the glass and the magnitude of the isotope enrichment were found to increase with the number of hours of light bulb use. For a CFL used for 3600 hours (with a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours), the isotopic composition of the Hg in the glass was enriched by 34.5‰, 4.1‰, 6.3‰, 21.1‰, and 12.1‰ for 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg, and 204Hg/202Hg, respectively, compared to NIST SRM-3133. This pattern of isotope enrichments is not correlated with mass differences for any of the isotope ratios. In contrast, the other mass-independent effects that have recently been observed in Hg isotopes (i.e., the nuclear volume and magnetic isotope effects) resemble mass-dependent fractionation for the even mass isotopes and are anomalous only for the odd mass isotopes, 199Hg and 201Hg. First order theoretical calculations using Hg absorption and emission data for each of the hyperfine components of the 253.7 nm line have shown that similar fractionation can be produced through an optical self-shielding effect. This effect occurs because each Hg isotope has a different degree of optical saturation at their respective absorption wavelength

  14. Dynamic response of plant chlorophyll fluorescence to light, water and nutrient availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water deficit limits net photosynthesis (Anet) and decreases crop yields. An important challenge for basic and applied research is to establish a rigorous landscape-scale indicator of Anet. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChF) can be used at the field scale as an indirect measure of Anet in both healthy a...

  15. Fluorescent Proteins as Biomarkers and Biosensors: Throwing Color Lights on Molecular and Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Turoverov, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea victoria is the most extensively studied and widely used in cell biology protein. GFP-like proteins constitute a fast growing family as several naturally occurring GFP-like proteins have been discovered and enhanced mutants of Aequorea GFP have been created. These mutants differ from wild-type GFP by conformational stability, quantum yield, spectroscopic properties (positions of absorption and fluorescence spectra) and by photochemical properties. GFP-like proteins are very diverse, as they can be not only green, but also blue, orange-red, far-red, cyan, and yellow. They also can have dual-color fluorescence (e.g., green and red) or be non-fluorescent. Some of them possess kindling property, some are photoactivatable, and some are photoswitchable. This review is an attempt to characterize the main color groups of GFP-like proteins, describe their structure and mechanisms of chromophore formation, systemize data on their conformational stability and summarize the main trends of their utilization as markers and biosensors in cell and molecular biology. PMID:18691124

  16. Real-time endoscopic guidance using near-infrared fluorescent light for thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidharta P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for 28% of all cancer deaths. Standard of care for potentially curable lung cancer involves preoperative radiographic or invasive staging, followed by surgical resection. With recent adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation studies showing a survival advantage in nodepositive patients, it is crucial to accurately stage these patients surgically in order to identify those who may benefit. However, lymphadenectomy in lung cancer is currently performed without guidance, mainly due to the lack of tools permitting real-time, intraoperative identification of lymph nodes. In this study we report the design and validation of a novel, clinically compatible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence thoracoscope for real-time intraoperative guidance during lymphadenectomy. A novel, NIR-compatible, clinical rigid endoscope has been designed and fabricated, and coupled to a custom source and a dual channel camera to provide simultaneous color and NIR fluorescence information to the surgeon. The device has been successfully used in conjunction with a safe, FDA-approved fluorescent tracer to detect and resect mediastinal lymph nodes during thoracic surgery on Yorkshire pigs. Taken together, this study lays the foundation for the clinical translation of endoscopic NIR fluorescence intraoperative guidance and has the potential to profoundly impact the management of lung cancer patients.

  17. Subtle spectral effects accompanying the assembly of bacteriochlorophylls into cyclic light harvesting complexes revealed by high-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rätsep, Margus Pajusalu, Mihkel Linnanto, Juha Matti; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-21

    We have observed that an assembly of the bacteriochloropyll a molecules into B850 and B875 groups of cyclic bacterial light-harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1, respectively, results an almost total loss of the intra-molecular vibronic structure in the fluorescence spectrum, and simultaneously, an essential enhancement of its phonon sideband due to electron-phonon coupling. While the suppression of the vibronic coupling in delocalized (excitonic) molecular systems is predictable, as also confirmed by our model calculations, a boost of the electron-phonon coupling is rather unexpected. The latter phenomenon is explained by exciton self-trapping, promoted by mixing the molecular exciton states with charge transfer states between the adjacent chromophores in the tightly packed B850 and B875 arrangements. Similar, although less dramatic trends were noted for the light-harvesting complexes containing chlorophyll pigments.

  18. Identification of two quenching sites active in the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting studied by time-resolved fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, Alfred R.; Miloslavina, Yuliya; Nilkens, Manuela; Jahns, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The regulation of light-harvesting (called non-photochemical quenching, NPQ) is an essential photoprotective mechanism active in plants. Total NPQ is dependent on PsbS, a pH-sensing protein, and on the action of the xanthophyll carotenoid zeaxanthin (Zx). Using ultrafast fluorescence on intact leaves we demonstrate two independent NPQ quenching sites in vivo which depend differently on the actions of PsbS and Zx. The first site is formed in the functionally detached major light-harvesting complex of PS II and depends strictly on PsbS. The second site is in the minor antennae of photosystem (PS) II and quenching depends on the presence of Zx.

  19. Promising operational stability of high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Masui, Kensuke; Nishide, Junichi; Shibata, Takumi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2013-07-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are attractive for next-generation displays and lighting applications because of their potential for high electroluminescence (EL) efficiency, flexibility and low-cost manufacture. Although phosphorescent emitters containing rare metals such as iridium or platinum produce devices with high EL efficiency, these metals are expensive and their blue emission remains unreliable for practical applications. Recently, a new route to high EL efficiency using materials that emit through thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) was demonstrated. However, it is unclear whether devices that emit through TADF, which originates from the contributions of triplet excitons, are reliable. Here we demonstrate highly efficient, stable OLEDs that emit via TADF by controlling the position of the carrier recombination zone, resulting in projected lifetimes comparable to those of tris(2-phenylpyridinato)iridium(III)-based reference OLEDs. Our results indicate that TADF is intrinsically stable under electrical excitation and optimization of the surrounding materials will enhance device reliability.

  20. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    PubMed

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film. PMID:12080141

  1. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. PMID:25786567

  2. Detection system of acid rain pollution using light-induced delayed fluorescence of plant leaf in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lizhang; Xing, Da

    2006-09-01

    Photosynthetic apparatus is susceptible to environmental stress. Light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) in plant is an intrinsic label of the efficiency of charge separation at P680 in photosystem II (PS II). In this investigation, we have developed a biosensor that can accurately inspect acid rain pollution by means of DF in vivo. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed technique can continuously monitor environmental changes, making fast, real-time and noninvasive inspection possible. The biosensor is an all-weather measuring instrument; it has its own illumination power and utilizes intrinsic DF as the measurement marker. With soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedling as a testing model, which is sensitive to acid rain pollution, the relationship that delayed fluorescence properties and capability of photosynthetic apparatus after being affected by simulated acid rain with different pH value was studied. The current investigation has revealed that the changes of delayed fluorescence (equation available in paper) can probably characterize the pollution degree of simulated acid rain, Inspecting the changes in DF characteristics (φ i) of plant leaf in vivo may be a new approach for the detection of acid rain pollution and its impact on the ecosystem.

  3. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    HÖHN, K.; FUCHS, J.; FRÖBER, A.; KIRMSE, R.; GLASS, B.; ANDERS‐ÖSSWEIN, M.; WALTHER, P.; KRÄUSSLICH, H.‐G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV‐pulsed mature human dendritic cells. PMID:25786567

  4. Rewiring Multidomain Protein Switches: Transforming a Fluorescent Zn(2+) Sensor into a Light-Responsive Zn(2+) Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Aper, Stijn J A; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-07-15

    Protein-based sensors and switches provide attractive tools for the real-time monitoring and control of molecular processes in complex biological environments. Fluorescent sensor proteins have been developed for a wide variety of small molecules, but the construction of genetically encoded light-responsive ligand binding proteins remains mostly unexplored. Here we present a generic approach to reengineer a previously developed FRET-based Zn(2+) sensor into a light-activatable Zn(2+) binding protein using a design strategy based on mutually exclusive domain interactions. These so-called VividZn proteins consist of two light-responsive Vivid domains that homodimerize upon illumination with blue light, thus preventing the binding of Zn(2+) between two Zn(2+) binding domains, Atox1 and WD4. Following optimization of the linker between WD4 and the N-terminus of one of the Vivid domains, VividZn variants were obtained that show a 9- to 55-fold decrease in Zn(2+) affinity upon illumination, which is fully reversible following dark adaptation. The Zn(2+) affinities of the switch could be rationally tuned between 1 pM and 2 nM by systematic variation of linker length and mutation of one of the Zn(2+) binding residues. Similarly, introduction of mutations in the Vivid domains allowed tuning of the switching kinetics between 10 min and 7 h. Low expression levels in mammalian cells precluded the demonstration of light-induced perturbation of cytosolic Zn(2+) levels. Nonetheless, our results firmly establish the use of intramolecular Vivid dimerization as an attractive light-sensitive input module to rationally engineer light-responsive protein switches based on mutually exclusive domain interactions. PMID:27031076

  5. The Effects on Visually Impaired Children of Viewing Fluorescent Stimuli under Black-Light Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGrow, S. J.; Leung, J-P.; Leung, S.; Yeung, P.

    1998-01-01

    This study compared effects of four visual conditions of stimuli and light on the visual performance of 30 children with low vision (divided into high, and low, visual-acuity groups). Orange stimuli viewed under black light resulted in the best overall performance, benefitted the low-acuity group more than the high-acuity group, and was the…

  6. Genetically Encoded Optochemical Probes for Simultaneous Fluorescence Reporting and Light Activation of Protein Function with Two-Photon Excitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of three new coumarin lysine analogues into proteins was achieved in bacterial and mammalian cells using an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase system. The genetically encoded coumarin lysines were successfully applied as fluorescent cellular probes for protein localization and for the optical activation of protein function. As a proof-of-principle, photoregulation of firefly luciferase was achieved in live cells by caging a key lysine residue, and excellent OFF to ON light-switching ratios were observed. Furthermore, two-photon and single-photon optochemical control of EGFP maturation was demonstrated, enabling the use of different, potentially orthogonal excitation wavelengths (365, 405, and 760 nm) for the sequential activation of protein function in live cells. These results demonstrate that coumarin lysines are a new and valuable class of optical probes that can be used for the investigation and regulation of protein structure, dynamics, function, and localization in live cells. The small size of coumarin, the site-specific incorporation, the application as both a light-activated caging group and as a fluorescent probe, and the broad range of excitation wavelengths are advantageous over other genetically encoded photocontrol systems and provide a precise and multifunctional tool for cellular biology. PMID:25341086

  7. Postcolumn reactor using a laser-drilled capillary for light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection in CE.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaneta, Takashi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2007-11-01

    This study investigated a novel postcolumn reactor for fluorescence detection in CE. A laser-drilled capillary, with an aperture made by laser ablation, was used for mixing derivatization reagents with the analytes separated by CZE. The derivatization reagents, o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA), and 2-mercaptoethanol, were introduced into the capillary through the aperture and reacted with the analytes after CZE separation. High voltages were applied to both the inlet reservoir and the reservoir filled with the derivatization reagents. Thus, the flow rate of the derivatization reagents was controlled by the electric potential that was applied to the reservoir of the derivatization reagents. A UV light-emitting diode was used as an excitation light source for the fluorescence detection of OPA derivatives. A commercially available tee connector was compared with the laser-drilled capillary. The results implied that the dead volume of the laser-drilled capillary was less than that of the tee connector, since the laser-drilled capillary suppressed band broadening more efficiently. The LODs for amino acids were determined to be approximately 5 microM. The method was applied to the determination of amino acids in a Japanese beverage. PMID:17948271

  8. A facile light-emitting-diode induced fluorescence detector coupled to an integrated microfluidic device for microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Xin-chun; Zhang, Wen; Pan, Jian-bin; Chen, Zuan-guang

    2011-05-30

    In this paper, a compact and inexpensive light emitting diode induced fluorescence (LED-IF) detector with simplified optical configuration was developed and assembled in an integrated microfluidic device for microscale electrophoresis. The facile detector mainly consisted of an LED, a focusing pinhole, an emission filter and a photodiode, and was encapsulated in the upper layer of an aluminum alloy device with two layers. At the bottom layer, integrated circuit (IC) was assembled to manipulate the voltage for sample injection and separation, LED emission and signal amplifying. A high-power LED with fan-shaped heat sink was used as excitation source. The excitation light was focused by a 1.1mm diameter pinhole fabricated in a thin piece of silver foil, and the obtained sensitivity was about 3 times as high as that using electrode plate. Other important parameters including LED driven current, fluorescence collection angle and detection distance have also been investigated. Under optimal conditions, considerable high-response of 0.09 fmol and 0.18 fmol mass detection limits at 0.37 nL injection volume for sodium fluorescein (SF) and FITC was achieved, respectively. This device has been successfully employed to separate penicillamine (PA) enantiomers. Due to such significant features as low-cost, integration, miniaturization, and ease of commercialization, the presented microfluidic device may hold great promise for clinical diagnostics and bioanalytical applications. PMID:21530784

  9. Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Polymers for Efficient Solution-Processed Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Youn; Yasuda, Takuma; Komiyama, Hideaki; Lee, Jiyoung; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) π-conjugated polymers are developed for solution-processed TADF-OLEDs. Benzophenone-based alternating donor-acceptor structures contribute to the small ∆EST , enabling efficient exciton-harvesting through TADF. Solution-processed OLEDs using the TADF polymers as emitters can achieve high maximum external electroluminescence efficiencies of up to 9.3%. PMID:27001891

  10. Green fluorescent protein: new light to visualize metastasis and angiogenesis in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Chishima, Takashi; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1999-07-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing cell-lines have been established by our laboratory that permit the visualization and imaging of primary tumors and micrometastases in live tissue and live animals. Hamster and human cancer cell-lines were transfected with vectors containing the humanized GFP cDNA. Stable high-level expression of GFP was maintained in subcutaneously and orthotopically growing tumors in nude or SCID mice. Subsequent micro-metastases were visualized by GFP fluorescence in live tissue of systematic organs down to the single-cell level. GFP-expressing lung and prostate cancer were visualized to metastasize widely throughout the skeleton when implanted orthotopically in nude mice. With these GFP-cell lines, we have developed models that closely mimic the clinic situation. We have now developed a mean to visualize the onset and progression of angiogenesis of growing and spreading tumors by injecting a fluorescent rhodamine dye to the GFP-tumor-bearing mice indicate that the onset and extent of tumor angiogenesis depends on the site and type of tumor growing in the animal. These models are ideal for studying the mechanisms of cancer metastasis and for discovery of angiogenesis and metastasis inhibitors.

  11. Light emitting diode, photodiode-based fluorescence detection system for DNA analysis with microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gordon H; Glerum, D Moira; Backhouse, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic separation of fluorescently end-labeled DNA after a PCR serves as a gold standard in genetic diagnostics. Because of their size and cost, instruments for this type of analysis have had limited market uptake, particularly for point-of-care applications. This might be changed through a higher level of system integration and lower instrument costs that can be realized through the use of LEDs for excitation and photodiodes for detection--if they provide sufficient sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate an optimized microchip electrophoresis instrument using polymeric fluidic chips with fluorescence detection of end-labeled DNA with a LOD of 0.15 nM of Alexa Fluor 532. This represents orders of magnitude improvement over previously reported instruments of this type. We demonstrate the system with an electrophoretic separation of two PCR products and their respective primers. We believe that this is the first LED-induced fluorescence microchip electrophoresis system with photodiode-based detection that could be used for standard applications of PCR and electrophoresis. PMID:26412502

  12. Resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots coupled to slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Mann, Nishan; Manson, Ross; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Using a polaron master equation approach, we investigate the resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots (QDs) coupled to an acoustic phonon bath and photonic crystal waveguides with a rich local density of photon states (LDOS). Resonance fluorescence spectra from QDs in semiconductor crystals are known to show strong signatures of electron-phonon interactions, but when coupled to a structured photonic reservoir, the QD emission properties are also determined by the frequency dependence of the LDOS of the photon reservoir. Here, we investigate the simultaneous role of coupled photon and phonon baths on the characteristic Mollow triplet spectra from a strongly driven QD. As an example structured photonic reservoir, we first study a photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide, and find that photons and phonons have counterinteracting effects near the upper mode edge of the coupled-cavity waveguide, thus establishing the importance of their separate roles in determining the emission spectra. The general theory is developed for arbitrary photonic reservoirs and is further applied to determine the resonance fluorescence spectra from a realistic, disordered W1 photonic crystal waveguide showing important photon-phonon interaction effects that are directly relevant to emerging experiments and theoretical proposals.

  13. Chlorophyll fluorescence and the polarized underwater light field: comparison of vector radiative transfer simulations and multi-angular hyperspectral polarization field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-habashi, Ahmed; Ahmed, Samir

    2016-05-01

    Previous partial simulations and field measurements by us, had demonstrated the impact of the un-polarized nature of algal chlorophyll fluorescence to reduce the observed degree of polarization of the underwater light field in the spectral vicinity of fluorescence. (Polarization otherwise existing as a result of non-algal particulate (NAP) and molecular elastic scattering). The magnitude of this fluorescence driven dip in the observed degree of polarization was also seen to be theoretically related to the fluorescence magnitude. The recent availability to us of the RayXP vector radiative transfer code (VRTE) for the coupled atmosphere ocean system now permits us to make complete simulations of the underwater polarized light field, using measured inherent optical properties (IOPs) as inputs. Based on these simulations, a much more comprehensive analysis of the fluorescence impact is now possible. Combining the results of these new simulations with underwater field measurements in eutrophic waters using our hyperspectral multi angle polarimeter, we verified the theoretical relationship. In addition, comparisons of VRTE simulations and hyperspectral polarized field measurements for various coastal water conditions permit retrieval of fluorescence magnitudes. Comparisons of these polarization based fluorescence retrievals with retrievals obtained using fluorescence height over baseline or Hydrolight scalar simulations, together with total unpolarized radiance measurements, show good agreement.

  14. Two-photon light-sheet nanoscopy by fluorescence fluctuation correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuanze; Zong, Weijian; Li, Rongqin; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhao, Jia; Xi, Peng; Chen, Liangyi; Sun, Yujie

    2016-05-01

    Advances in light-sheet microscopy have enabled the fast three-dimensional (3D) imaging of live cells and bulk specimens with low photodamage and phototoxicity. Combining light-sheet illumination with super-resolution imaging is expected to resolve subcellular structures. Actually, such kind of super-resolution light-sheet microscopy was recently demonstrated using a single-molecule localization algorithm. However, the imaging depth and temporal resolution of this method are limited owing to the requirements of precise single molecule localization and reconstruction. In this work, we present two-photon super-resolution light-sheet imaging via stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (2PLS-SOFI), which acquires high spatiotemporal resolution and excellent optical sectioning ability. 2PLS-SOFI is based on non-linear excitation of fluctuation/blinking probes using our recently developed fast two-photon three-axis digital scanned light-sheet microscope (2P3A-DSLM), which enables both deep penetration and thin sheet of light. Overall, 2PLS-SOFI demonstrates up to 3-fold spatial resolution enhancement compared with conventional two-photon light-sheet (2PLS) microscopy and about 40-fold temporal resolution enhancement compared with individual molecule localization-selective plane illumination microscopy (IML-SPIM). Therefore, 2PLS-SOFI is promising for 3D long-term, deep-tissue imaging with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  15. Two-photon light-sheet nanoscopy by fluorescence fluctuation correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanze; Zong, Weijian; Li, Rongqin; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhao, Jia; Xi, Peng; Chen, Liangyi; Sun, Yujie

    2016-05-21

    Advances in light-sheet microscopy have enabled the fast three-dimensional (3D) imaging of live cells and bulk specimens with low photodamage and phototoxicity. Combining light-sheet illumination with super-resolution imaging is expected to resolve subcellular structures. Actually, such kind of super-resolution light-sheet microscopy was recently demonstrated using a single-molecule localization algorithm. However, the imaging depth and temporal resolution of this method are limited owing to the requirements of precise single molecule localization and reconstruction. In this work, we present two-photon super-resolution light-sheet imaging via stochastic optical fluctuation imaging (2PLS-SOFI), which acquires high spatiotemporal resolution and excellent optical sectioning ability. 2PLS-SOFI is based on non-linear excitation of fluctuation/blinking probes using our recently developed fast two-photon three-axis digital scanned light-sheet microscope (2P3A-DSLM), which enables both deep penetration and thin sheet of light. Overall, 2PLS-SOFI demonstrates up to 3-fold spatial resolution enhancement compared with conventional two-photon light-sheet (2PLS) microscopy and about 40-fold temporal resolution enhancement compared with individual molecule localization-selective plane illumination microscopy (IML-SPIM). Therefore, 2PLS-SOFI is promising for 3D long-term, deep-tissue imaging with high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:27121341

  16. Prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for high-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sing; Li, Fan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-04-01

    High-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes based on exciplex emitters are demonstrated. The best device, based on a TAPC:DPTPCz emitter, shows a high external quantum efficiency of 15.4%. Strategies for predicting and designing efficient exciplex emitters are also provided. This approach allow prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for achieving high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes, for future use in displays and lighting applications. PMID:25712786

  17. Daytime Cognitive Performance in Response to Sunlight or Fluorescent Light Controlling for Sleep Duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, Jhanic; Zamos, Adela; Rao, Rohit; Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Light is the primary synchronizer of the human circadian rhythm and also has acute alerting effects. Our study involves and comparing the alertness, performance and sleep of participants in the NASA Ames Sustainability Base, which uses sunlight as its primary light source, to in a traditional office building which uses overhead florescent lighting and varying exposure to natural light. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of natural lighting as a primary light source improves daytime cognitive function and promotes nighttime sleep. Participants from the Sustainability Base will be matched by gender and age to individuals working in other NASA buildings. In a prior study we found no differences in performance between those working in the Sustainability Base and those working in other buildings. Unexpectedly, we found that the average sleep duration among participants in both buildings was short, which likely obscured our ability to detect a difference the effect of light exposure on alertness. Given that such sleep deprivation has negative effects on cognitive performance, in this iteration of the study we are asking the participants to maintain a regular schedule with eight hours in bed each night in order to control for the effect of self-selected sleep restriction. Over the course of one week, we will ask the participants to wear actiwatches continuously, complete a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and digit symbol substitution task (DSST) three times per day, and keep daily sleepwork diaries. We hope that this study will provide data to support the idea that natural lighting and green architectural design are optimal to enhance healthy nighttime sleep patterns and daytime cognitive performance.

  18. Influence of the light-curing unit, storage time and shade of a dental composite resin on the fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Gaiao, U.; Cuin, A.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of three light-curing units, storage times and colors of the dental composite resin on the fluorescence. The specimens (diameter 10.0 ± 0.1 mm, thickness 1.0 ± 0.1 mm) were made using a stainless steel mold. The mold was filled with the microhybrid composite resin and a polyethylene film covered each side of the mold. After this, a glass slide was placed on the top of the mold. To standardize the top surface of the specimens a circular weight (1 kg) with an orifice to pass the light tip of the LCU was placed on the top surface and photo-activated during 40 s. Five specimens were made for each group. The groups were divided into 9 groups following the LCUs (one QTH and two LEDs), storage times (immediately after curing, 24 hours, 7 and 30 days) and colors (shades: A2E, A2D, and TC) of the composite resin. After photo-activation, the specimens were storage in artificial saliva during the storage times proposed to each group at 37°C and 100% humidity. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s posthoc tests showed no significant difference between storage times (immediately, 24 hours and 30 days) ( P > 0.05). The means of fluorescence had difference significant to color and light-curing unit used to all period of storage ( P < 0.05). The colors had difference significant between them (shades: A2D < A2E < TC) ( P < 0.05). The Ultraled (LED) and Ultralux (QTH) when used the TC shade showed higher than Radii (LED), however to A2E shade and A2D shade any difference were found ( P > 0.05).

  19. In-vacuum scattered light reduction with black cupric oxide surfaces for sensitive fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Norrgard, E B; Sitaraman, N; Barry, J F; McCarron, D J; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and easy method for producing low-reflectivity surfaces that are ultra-high vacuum compatible, may be baked to high temperatures, and are easily applied even on complex surface geometries. Black cupric oxide (CuO) surfaces are chemically grown in minutes on any copper surface, allowing for low-cost, rapid prototyping, and production. The reflective properties are measured to be comparable to commercially available products for creating optically black surfaces. We describe a vacuum apparatus which uses multiple blackened copper surfaces for sensitive, low-background detection of molecules using laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:27250404

  20. Broadband Antireflection and Light Extraction Enhancement in Fluorescent SiC with Nanodome Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yakimova, Rositza; Mortensen, N. Asger; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Xiao, Sanshui; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a time-efficient and low-cost approach to fabricate Si3N4 coated nanodome structures in fluorescent SiC. Nanosphere lithography is used as the nanopatterning method and SiC nanodome structures with Si3N4 coating are formed via dry etching and thin film deposition process. By using this method, a significant broadband surface antireflection and a considerable omnidirectional luminescence enhancement are obtained. The experimental observations are then supported by numerical simulations. It is believed that our fabrication method will be well suitable for large-scale production in the future. PMID:24722521

  1. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  2. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  3. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    PubMed Central

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1–3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013–2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  4. Ultracompact alignment-free single molecule fluorescence device with a foldable light path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Singh, Niraj; Chacko, Jenu V.; Sreenivasan, Varun K. A.; Nag, Suman; Maiti, Sudipta

    2011-02-01

    Instruments with single-molecule level detection capabilities can potentially benefit a wide variety of fields, including medical diagnostics. However, the size, cost, and complexity of such devices have prevented their widespread use outside sophisticated research laboratories. Fiber-only devices have recently been suggested as smaller and simpler alternatives, but thus far, they have lacked the resolution and sensitivity of a full-fledged system, and accurate alignment remains a critical requirement. Here we show that through-space reciprocal optical coupling between a fiber and a microscope objective, combined with wavelength division multiplexing in optical fibers, allows a drastic reduction of the size and complexity of such an instrument while retaining its resolution. We demonstrate a 4×4×18 cm3 sized fluorescence correlation spectrometer, which requires no alignment, can analyze kinetics at the single-molecule level, and has an optical resolution similar to that of much larger microscope based devices. The sensitivity can also be similar in principle, though in practice it is limited by the large background fluorescence of the commonly available optical fibers. We propose this as a portable and field deployable single molecule device with practical diagnostic applications.

  5. Trimodal detection of early childhood caries using laser light scanning and fluorescence spectroscopy: clinical prototype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Amy S.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early stages of childhood caries. A multimodal optical clinical prototype for diagnosing caries demineralization in vivo has been developed. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and high-contrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. When a suspicious region of demineralization is located, the device also performs dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405- and 532-nm laser excitation. An autofluorescence ratio of the two excitation lasers is computed and used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device was tested on five patients in vivo as well as on 28 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images that highlighted the lesions identified by the clinicians. The autofluorescence spectroscopic ratios obtained from the extracted teeth successfully quantitatively discriminated between sound and demineralized enamel. PMID:23986369

  6. Ultracompact alignment-free single molecule fluorescence device with a foldable light path.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Chacko, Jenu V; Sreenivasan, Varun K A; Nag, Suman; Maiti, Sudipta

    2011-02-01

    Instruments with single-molecule level detection capabilities can potentially benefit a wide variety of fields, including medical diagnostics. However, the size, cost, and complexity of such devices have prevented their widespread use outside sophisticated research laboratories. Fiber-only devices have recently been suggested as smaller and simpler alternatives, but thus far, they have lacked the resolution and sensitivity of a full-fledged system, and accurate alignment remains a critical requirement. Here we show that through-space reciprocal optical coupling between a fiber and a microscope objective, combined with wavelength division multiplexing in optical fibers, allows a drastic reduction of the size and complexity of such an instrument while retaining its resolution. We demonstrate a 4 × 4 × 18 cm(3) sized fluorescence correlation spectrometer, which requires no alignment, can analyze kinetics at the single-molecule level, and has an optical resolution similar to that of much larger microscope based devices. The sensitivity can also be similar in principle, though in practice it is limited by the large background fluorescence of the commonly available optical fibers. We propose this as a portable and field deployable single molecule device with practical diagnostic applications. PMID:21361684

  7. Modification of energy-transfer processes in the cyanobacterium, Arthrospira platensis, to adapt to light conditions, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-11-01

    In cyanobacteria, the interactions among pigment-protein complexes are modified in response to changes in light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed excitation energy transfer from the phycobilisome and photosystem II to photosystem I in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis. The cells were grown under lights with different spectral profiles and under different light intensities, and the energy-transfer characteristics were evaluated using steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence rise and decay curves were analyzed by global analysis to obtain fluorescence decay-associated spectra. The direct energy transfer from the phycobilisome to photosystem I and energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I were modified depending on the light quality, light quantity, and cultivation period. However, the total amount of energy transferred to photosystem I remained constant under the different growth conditions. We discuss the differences in energy-transfer processes under different cultivation and light conditions. PMID:23605291

  8. Limited-view light sheet fluorescence microscopy for three dimensional volume imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmi, C. K.; Mohan, Kavya; Madhangi, M.; Rajan, K.; Nongthomba, U.; Mondal, Partha P.

    2015-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a limited-view light sheet microscopy (LV-LSM) for three dimensional (3D) volume imaging. Realizing that longer and frequent image acquisition results in significant photobleaching, we have taken limited angular views (18 views) of the macroscopic specimen and integrated with maximum likelihood (ML) technique for reconstructing high quality 3D volume images. Existing variants of light-sheet microscopy require both rotation and translation with a total of approximately 10-fold more views to render a 3D volume image. Comparatively, LV-LSM technique reduces data acquisition time and consequently minimizes light-exposure by many-folds. Since ML is a post-processing technique and highly parallelizable, this does not cost precious imaging time. Results show noise-free and high contrast volume images when compared to the state-of-the-art selective plane illumination microscopy.

  9. THE IMPACT OF NONPHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING OF FLUORESCENCE ON THE PHOTON BALANCE IN DIATOMS UNDER DYNAMIC LIGHT CONDITIONS(1).

    PubMed

    Su, Wanwen; Jakob, Torsten; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of fluorescence is an important photoprotective mechanism in particular under dynamic light conditions. Its photoprotective potential was suggested to be a functional trait of algal diversity. In the present study, the influence of the photoprotective capacity on the growth balance was investigated in two diatoms, which possess different NPQ characteristics. It was hypothesized that under fluctuating light conditions Cyclotella meneghiniana Kütz. would benefit from its large and flexible NPQ potential, whereas the comparably small NPQ capacity in Skeletonema costatum (Grev.) Cleve should exert an unfavorable impact on growth. The results of the study clearly falsify this hypothesis. Although C. meneghiniana possesses a fast NPQ component, this diatom was not able to recover its full NPQ capacity under fluctuating light. On the other hand, the induction of NPQ at relatively low irradiance in S. costatum resulted in rather small differences in the fraction of energy dissipation by the NPQ mechanism in the comparison of both diatoms. Larger differences were found in the metabolic characteristics. Both diatoms differed in their biomass composition, with a higher content of lipids in C. meneghiniana but higher amounts of carbohydrates in S. costatum. Finally, the lower degree of reduction in the biomass compensated for the higher respiration rates in S. costatum and resulted in a higher quantum efficiency of biomass production. An indirect correlation between the photoprotective and the metabolic capacity is discussed. PMID:27009723

  10. The effects of UV emission from compact fluorescent light exposure on human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2012-01-01

    Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs can provide the same amount of lumens as incandescent light bulbs, using one quarter of the energy. Recently, CFL exposure was found to exacerbate existing skin conditions; however, the effects of CFL exposure on healthy skin tissue have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we studied the effects of exposure to CFL illumination on healthy human skin tissue cells (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). Cells exposed to CFLs exhibited a decrease in the proliferation rate, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species, and a decrease in their ability to contract collagen. Measurements of UV emissions from these bulbs found significant levels of UVC and UVA (mercury [Hg] emission lines), which appeared to originate from cracks in the phosphor coatings, present in all bulbs studied. The response of the cells to the CFLs was consistent with damage from UV radiation, which was further enhanced when low dosages of TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs), normally used for UV absorption, were added prior to exposure. No effect on cells, with or without TiO(2) NPs, was observed when they were exposed to incandescent light of the same intensity. PMID:22724459

  11. Monitoring human neutrophil granule secretion by flow cytometry: secretion and membrane potential changes assessed by light scatter and a fluorescent probe of membrane potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, M.P.; Seligmann, B.E.

    1985-04-01

    Purified human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were incubated at 37 degrees C with the fluorescent membrane potential sensitive cyanine dye di-O-C(5)(3) and exposed to a number of stimulatory agents (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), cytochalasin B (cyto B) + FMLP, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Flow cytometry was utilized to measure changes in forward light scatter (FS), orthogonal light scatter (90 degrees-SC), and fluorescence intensity of individual cells over time. A saturating (10(-6) M) dose of FMLP lead to a significant increase in the cells' FS without a change in 90 degrees-SC as well as a heterogeneous loss of di-O-C(5)(3) fluorescence. PMA (100 ng/ml) also caused an increase in FS but a uniform loss of dye fluorescence by all cells (apparent depolarization). Cyto B + FMLP produced an increase in FS, a marked loss of 90 degrees-SC, and a uniform loss of fluorescence. Secretion experiments under identical incubation conditions indicated a significantly positive relationship between loss of enzyme markers or cell granularity and orthogonal light scatter (r . 0.959, 0.998, and 0.989 for loss of 90 degrees-SC vs lysozyme, beta-glucuronidase, and granularity index, respectively). Flow cytometric light scatter measurements may yield important information on the extent of prior cell degranulation or activation.

  12. Effect of imaging geometry on evaluating natural white-spot lesions using quantitative light-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masatoshi; Eckert, George J; Stookey, George K; Zero, Domenick T

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of imaging geometry on evaluating natural white-spot lesions with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). A total of 34 specimens were prepared from extracted human premolars and permanent molars with white spots on the interproximal surface. The specimens were each adjusted to a final thickness of 3.0 mm. Images were acquired with the QLF system perpendicular to the white spots and at 5 degrees intervals up to 30 degrees above and below the perpendicular. The specimens were rotated around the buccolingual axis of the tooth (pitch angle) and around the long axis of the tooth (roll angle). The averages of fluorescence loss (DeltaF, %) and lesion size (mm2) were determined with QLF. Another variable, DeltaQ, which was defined as the fluorescence loss integrated over the lesion size (% x mm2), was also calculated. DeltaF was smaller when lesions were viewed from the cervical direction (angles less than 90 degrees ), and became bigger when viewed from the coronal direction. Roll angle did not significantly affect DeltaF. Apparent lesion size diminished with deviations from 90 degrees in both directions for pitch and roll angles. DeltaQ was affected by pitch and roll angles with the largest value at 90 degrees and values decreasing in both directions from 90 degrees. In general, there were significant differences for angles larger than 20 degrees from the perpendicular for all three QLF variables. This study suggests that angle is an important factor to control when performing QLF studies; however, small changes (deviations within 20 degrees ) have a minimal effect on QLF variables. PMID:14684976

  13. Analysis of complex samples using a portable multi-wavelength light emitting diode (LED) fluorescence spectrometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectroscopic analysis of chemically complex samples often requires an increase n the dimensionality of the measured response surface. This often involves the measurement of emitted light intensities as functions of both wavelengths of excitation and emission resulting in the generation of an excita...

  14. Enhanced visualization of the bile duct via parallel white light and indocyanine green fluorescence laparoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Urayama, Shiro

    2014-03-01

    Despite best efforts, bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a major potential complication. Precise detection method of extrahepatic bile duct during laparoscopic procedures would minimize the risk of injury. Towards this goal, we have developed a compact imaging instrumentation designed to enable simultaneous acquisition of conventional white color and NIR fluorescence endoscopic/laparoscopic imaging using ICG as contrast agent. The capabilities of this system, which offers optimized sensitivity and functionality, are demonstrated for the detection of the bile duct in an animal model. This design could also provide a low-cost real-time surgical navigation capability to enhance the efficacy of a variety of other image-guided minimally invasive procedures.

  15. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  16. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Ahmet E.; Webb, Andrew G.; Spees, William M.; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies.

  17. Highly sensitive analysis of flavonoids by zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography coupled with light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wan; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Xing-Ying; Pang, Xiao-Qing; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Dai, Han-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Da, Jian-Hua; Chu, Chu

    2014-09-01

    A rapid zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (ZI-MEEKC) approach coupled with light-emitting-diode-induced fluorescence (LED-IF, 480nm) detection was proposed for the analysis of flavonoids. In the optimization process, we systematically investigated the separation conditions, including the surfactants, cosurfactants, pH, buffers and fluorescence parameters. It was found that the baseline separation of the seven flavonoids was obtained in less than 5min with a running buffer consisting of 92.9% (v/v) 5mM sodium borate, 0.6% (w/v) ZI surfactant, 0.5% (w/v) ethyl acetate and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol. High sensitivity was obtained by the application of LED-IF detection. The limits of detection for seven flavonoids were in the range of 3.30×10(-8) to 2.15×10(-6)molL(-1) without derivatization. Ultimately, the detection method was successfully applied to the analysis of flavonoids in hawthorn plant and food products with satisfactory results. PMID:25047822

  18. A New Molecular Design Based on Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence for Highly Efficient Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Rajamalli, Pachaiyappan; Senthilkumar, Natarajan; Gandeepan, Parthasarathy; Huang, Pei-Yun; Huang, Min-Jie; Ren-Wu, Chen-Zheng; Yang, Chi-Yu; Chiu, Ming-Jui; Chu, Li-Kang; Lin, Hao-Wu; Cheng, Chien-Hong

    2016-01-20

    Two benzoylpyridine-carbazole based fluorescence materials DCBPy and DTCBPy, bearing two carbazolyl and 4-(t-butyl)carbazolyl groups, respectively, at the meta and ortho carbons of the benzoyl ring, were synthesized. These molecules show very small ΔEST of 0.03 and 0.04 eV and transient PL characteristics indicating that they are thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials. In addition, they show extremely different photoluminescent quantum yields in solution and in the solid state: in cyclohexane the value are 14 and 36%, but in the thin films, the value increase to 88.0 and 91.4%, respectively. The OLEDs using DCBPy and DTCBPy as dopants emit blue and green light with EQEs of 24.0 and 27.2%, respectively, and with low efficiency roll-off at practical brightness level. The crystal structure of DTCBPy reveals a substantial interaction between the ortho donor (carbazolyl) and acceptor (4-pyridylcarbonyl) unit. This interaction between donor and acceptor substituents likely play a key role to achieve very small ΔEST with high photoluminescence quantum yield. PMID:26709617

  19. Highly Efficient Nondoped Organic Light Emitting Diodes Based on Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter with Quantum-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingqiang; Wang, Hui; Wei, Xiaofang; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Yongzhen; Kong, Xiangbin; Lv, Xiaopeng; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Ying

    2016-08-17

    Highly efficiency nondoped thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with multiquantum wells structure were demonstrated. By using an emitting layer with seven quantum wells, the nondoped TADF OLEDs exhibit high efficiency with EQE of 22.6%, a current efficiency of 69 cd/A, and a power efficiency of 50 lm/W, which are higher than those of the conventional doped OLED and among the best of the TADF OLEDs. The high performance of the devices can be ascribed to effective confinement of the charges and excitons in the emission layer by the quantum well structure. The emission layer with multiquantum well structure is demonstrated to be cost effective for highly efficient nondoped TADF OLEDs and holds great potential for organic electronics. PMID:27452075

  20. Triplet exciton confinement for enhanced fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes using a co-host system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Han Kyu; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Song Eun; Kim, Young Kwan; Kim, Se Hyun; Yoon, Seung Soo; Park, Jaehoon

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the co-host system within an emitting layer (EML) consists of the host and triplet managing (TM) host materials. A set of EML structures was fabricated with various concentrations of the TM host (0, 10, 30, 50, and 70%). The TM host triplet energy level is lower than the energy levels of the host and the guest, which leads to a reduction in the triplet exciton density and the singlet-triplet annihilation of the guest. Blue fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes exhibit a maximum luminous efficiency (LE) and an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 9.74 cd/A and 4.92%, respectively. In addition, the efficiency roll-off ratios of the LE and the EQE are 14.25 and 13.16%, respectively.

  1. Pyridyl Pyrrolide Boron Complexes: The Facile Generation of Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence and Preparation of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Yi-Jiun; Cheng, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Wei-Lung; Wu, Chung-Chih; Chao, Chun-Tien; Lu, Chin-Wei; Chi, Yun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-02-01

    The electron positive boron atom usually does not contribute to the frontier orbitals for several lower-lying electronic transitions, and thus is ideal to serve as a hub for the spiro linker of light-emitting molecules, such that the electron donor (HOMO) and acceptor (LUMO) moieties can be spatially separated with orthogonal orientation. On this basis, we prepared a series of novel boron complexes bearing electron deficient pyridyl pyrrolide and electron donating phenylcarbazolyl fragments or triphenylamine. The new boron complexes show strong solvent-polarity dependent charge-transfer emission accompanied by a small, non-negligible normal emission. The slim orbital overlap between HOMO and LUMO and hence the lack of electron correlation lead to a significant reduction of the energy gap between the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states (ΔET-S ) and thereby the generation of thermally activated delay fluorescence (TADF). PMID:26822378

  2. Fluorometric flow-immunoassay for alkylphenol polyethoxylates on a microchip containing a fluorescence detector comprised of an organic light emitting diode and an organic photodiode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    A compact fluorescence detector was constructed on a microchip from an organic light emitting diode (OLED) as the light source and an organic photodiode (OPD) as the photo-detector and was used in an immunoassay for alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APE). The OLED based on a terbium complex emitted a sharp light at the main wavelength of 546 nm with a full width at half maximum of 9 nm. The incident photo-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) of the OPD fabricated with Fullerene 70 (C70) and tris[4-(5-phenylthiopen-2-yl)phenyl]-amine (TPTPA) was approximately 44% for light at a wavelength of 586 nm. The performance of the fluorescence detector was evaluated for the determination of resorufin (λ(em)=586 nm) and the photocurrent of the OPD due to the fluorescence of resorufin was proportional to the concentration of resorufin in the range from 0 to 18 µM with a detection limit (S/N=3) of 0.6 µM. The fluorescence detector was successfully utilized in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for APE, where an anti-APE antibody was immobilized on the surface of the channel of the Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchip or on the surface of magnetic microbeads. After an immunoreaction with a sample solution of APE containing a horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled APE, the fluorescence of resorufin generated just after introduction of a mixed solution of Amplex Red and H2O2 was measured using the fluorescence detector. The calibration curve for the photocurrent signals of the OPD due to the fluorescence of resorufin against the logarithmic concentration of APE was sigmoidal in shape. The detection limits defined as IC80 were ca. 1 ppb and ca. 2 ppb, respectively, for the methods using the anti-APE antibody immobilized on the surface of the microchannel and in the case where the antibody was immobilized on the surface of magnetic microbeads. PMID:25618638

  3. Light-induced dynamic changes of NADPH fluorescence in Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its ndhB-defective mutant M55.

    PubMed

    Mi, H; Klughammer, C; Schreiber, U

    2000-10-01

    Blue-green fluorescence emission of intact cells of Synechocystis PCC6803 and of its ndhB-defective mutant M55 was measured with a standard pulse-amplitude-modulation chlorophyll fluorometer equipped with a new type of emitter-detector unit featuring pulse-modulated UV-A measuring light and a photomultiplier detector. A special illumination program of repetitive saturating light pulses with intermittent dark periods (10 s light, 40 s dark) was applied to elicit dynamic fluorescence changes under conditions of quasi-stationary illumination. The observed effects of artificial electron acceptors and inhibitors on the responses of wild-type and mutant M55 cells lead to the conclusion that changes of NAD(P)H fluorescence are measured. In control samples, a rapid phase of light-driven NADP reduction is overlapped by a somewhat slower phase of NADPH oxidation which is suppressed by iodoacetic acid and, hence, appears to reflect NADPH oxidation by the Calvin cycle. Mercury chloride transforms the light-driven positive response into a negative one, suggesting that inhibition of NADP reduction at the acceptor side of PSI leads to reduction of molecular oxygen, with the hydrogen peroxide formed (via superoxide) causing rapid oxidation of NADPH. The new fluorescence approach opens the way for new insights into the complex interactions between photosynthetic and respiratory pathways in cyanobacteria. PMID:11148271

  4. Magnetic and fluorescent graphene for dual modal imaging and single light induced photothermal and photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gollavelli, Ganesh; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2014-05-01

    Developing a simple and cost-effective strategy to diagnose and treat cancer with single and minimal dosage through noninvasive strategies are highly challenging. To make the theranostic strategy effective, single light induced photothermal and photodynamic reagent with dual modal imaging capability is highly desired. Herein, a simple non-covalent approach was adopted to immobilize hydrophobic silicon napthalocyanine bis (trihexylsilyloxide) (SiNc4) photosensitizer onto water dispersible magnetic and fluorescent graphene (MFG) via π-π stacking to yield MFG-SiNc4 functioned as a theranostic nanocarrier. Taking the advantage of broad near infra-red absorption (600-1200 nm) by graphene, photosensitizer of any wavelength within this range will facilitate the single light induced phototherapy. Phosphorescence spectra, singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG) experiments, and 1,3-diphenyl isobenzofuran quenching studies confirm the generation of singlet (1)O2 upon photoirradiation. Confocal microscopic images reveal successful internalization of MFG-SiNc4 in HeLa cells; whereas T2-weighted magnetic resonance images of MFG reveal a significant concentration dependent darkening effect. In vitro photodynamic/photothermal therapeutic studies on HeLa cells have demonstrated that the killing efficacy of MFG-SiNc4 using a single light source is ∼97.9%, presumably owing to the combined effects of generating reactive oxygen species, local heating, and induction of apoptosis. The developed MFG-SiNc4 may thus be utilized as a potential theranostic nanocarrier for dual modal imaging and phototherapy of cancer cells with single light source for time and cost effective treatments with a minimal therapy dose. PMID:24602568

  5. Numerical modelling and in vivo analysis of fluorescent and laser light backscattered from glial brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Kalyagina, Nina A.; Kholodtsova, Maria N.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Goryainov, Sergey A.; Potapov, Aleksander A.

    2012-03-01

    Brain glial tumors have peculiar features of the perifocal region extension, characterized by its indistinct area, which complicates determination of the borders for tissue resection. In the present study filter-reduced back-scattered laser light signals, compared to the data from mathematical modeling, were used for description of the brain white matter. The simulations of the scattered light distributions were performed in a Monte Carlo program using scattering and absorption parameters of the different grades of the brain glial tumors. The parameters were obtained by the Mie calculations for three main types of scatterers: myelinated axon fibers, cell nuclei and mitochondria. It was revealed that diffuse-reflected light, measured at the perifocal areas of the glial brain tumors, shows a significant difference relative to the signal, measured at the normal tissue, which signifies the possibility to provide diagnostically useful information on the tissue state, and to determine the borders of the tumor, thus to reduce the recurrence appearance. Differences in the values of ratios of diffuse reflectance from active growth parts of tumors and normal white matter can be useful for determination of the degree of tumor progress during the spectroscopic analysis.

  6. Lighting Up the Force: Investigating Mechanisms of Mechanotransduction Using Fluorescent Tension Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jurchenko, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense the physical nature of their surroundings is critical to the survival of multicellular organisms. Cellular response to physical cues from adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix leads to a dynamic cycle in which cells respond by remodeling their local microenvironment, fine-tuning cell stiffness, polarity, and shape. Mechanical regulation is important in cellular development, normal morphogenesis, and wound healing. The mechanisms by which these finely balanced mechanotransduction events occur, however, are not well understood. In large part, this is due to the limited availability of tools to study molecular mechanotransduction events in live cells. Several classes of molecular tension probes have been recently developed which are rapidly transforming the study of mechanotransduction. Molecular tension probes are primarily based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and report on piconewton scale tension events in live cells. In this minireview, we describe the two main classes of tension probes, genetically encoded tension sensors and immobilized tension sensors, and discuss the advantages and limitations of each type. We discuss future opportunities to address major biological questions and outline the challenges facing the next generation of molecular tension probes. PMID:26031334

  7. Fluorescent minerals - A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  8. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    PubMed

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. PMID:26256632

  9. Autoregressive-model-based fluorescence-lifetime measurements by phase-modulation fluorometry using a pulsed-excitation light source and a high-gain photomultiplier tube.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Ito, Ritsuki; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2009-11-01

    We propose a novel method for measuring fluorescence lifetimes by use of a pulsed-excitation light source and an ordinary or a high-gain photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a high-load resistor. In order to obtain the values of fluorescence lifetimes, we adopt a normal data-processing procedure used in phase-modulation fluorometry. We apply an autoregressive (AR)-model-based data-analysis technique to fluorescence- and reference-response time-series data obtained from the PMT in order to derive plural values of phase differences at a repetition frequency of the pulsed-excitation light source and its harmonic ones. The connection of the high-load resistor enhances sensitivity in signal detection in a certain condition. Introduction of the AR-model-based data-analysis technique improves precision in estimating the values of fluorescence lifetimes. Depending on the value of the load resistor and that of the repetition frequency, plural values of fluorescence lifetimes are obtained at one time by utilizing the phase information of harmonic frequencies. Because the proposed measurement system is simple to construct, it might be effective when we need to know approximate values of fluorescence lifetimes readily, such as in the field of biochemistry for a screening purpose. PMID:19891834

  10. Linearly polarized photons from Compton backscattering of laser light for nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Mikado, T.; Chiwaki, M.; Yamada, K.; Suzuki, R.; Sei, N.

    1994-12-01

    Elastically scattered photons from 208Pb(γ pol, γ) have been measured with completely polarized photons. The polarized photons (laser Compton photons) can be generated by Compton backscattering of laser light. The energy of the polarized LCPs ranges from 1 to 10 MeV by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and the storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We can rotate the polarization axis of the LCPs by using the laser polarization controller to diminish the systematic error in the measurement system. Parities of J = 1 levels in 208Pb, Ex = 5.514 and 4.841 MeV, were clearly determined to be negative.

  11. Highly efficient exciplex organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters as donor and acceptor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sang Kyu; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient exciplex type organic light-emitting diodes were developed using thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters as donors and acceptors of an exciplex. Blue emitting bis[4-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine)phenyl]sulfone (DMAC-DPS) was a donor and 9,9‧-(5-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (DDCzTrz) and 9,9‧,9″-(5-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)benzene-1,2,3-triyl)tris(9H-carbazole) (TCzTrz) were acceptor materials. The exciplexes of DMAC-DPS:TCzTrz and DMAC-DPS:DDCzTrz resulted in high photoluminescence quantum yield and high quantum efficiency in the green exciplex organic light-emitting diodes. High quantum efficiencies of 13.4% and 15.3% were obtained in the DMAC-DPS:DDCzTrz and DMAC-DPS:TCzTrz exciplex devices.

  12. Highly efficient exciplex organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters as donor and acceptor materials.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang Kyu; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient exciplex type organic light-emitting diodes were developed using thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters as donors and acceptors of an exciplex. Blue emitting bis[4-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine)phenyl]sulfone (DMAC-DPS) was a donor and 9,9'-(5-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (DDCzTrz) and 9,9',9″-(5-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)benzene-1,2,3-triyl)tris(9H-carbazole) (TCzTrz) were acceptor materials. The exciplexes of DMAC-DPS:TCzTrz and DMAC-DPS:DDCzTrz resulted in high photoluminescence quantum yield and high quantum efficiency in the green exciplex organic light-emitting diodes. High quantum efficiencies of 13.4% and 15.3% were obtained in the DMAC-DPS:DDCzTrz and DMAC-DPS:TCzTrz exciplex devices. PMID:27098231

  13. Light up ClO(-) in live cells using an aza-coumarin based fluorescent probe with fast response and high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiangli; Mu, Huiying; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Jingyun; Peng, Xiaojun

    2015-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HClO)/hypochlorite (ClO(-)), one of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a key microbicidal agent used for natural defense; however, HClO is also responsible for some human diseases. Although much effort has been made to develop HClO-selective fluorescent probes, many of them display a delayed response time and nanomole-sensitive probes are rare. In this study, we designed and synthesized an aza-coumarin based fluorescent probe AC-ClO for ClO(-) determination with fast response (completed within 2 min) and high sensitivity (detection limit is 25 nM). AC-ClO displayed a color change from pink to light yellow and a remarkable "turn-on" fluorescence response towards ClO(-). Confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated that the probe could be applied for the live-cell imaging of exogenous and endogenous ClO(-). PMID:25997521

  14. Photosynthetic Light Utilization Efficiency, Photosystem II Heterogeneity, and Fluorescence Quenching in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during the Induction of the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism 1

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Stefan; Palmqvist, Kristin

    1992-01-01

    The photosynthetic light-response curve, the relative amounts of the different photosystem II (PSII) units, and fluorescence quenching were altered in an adaptive manner when CO2-enriched wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were transferred to low levels of CO2. This treatment is known to result in the induction of an energy-dependent CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that increases the internal inorganic carbon concentration and thus the photosynthetic CO2 utilization efficiency. After 3 to 6 h of low inorganic carbon treatment, several changes in the photosynthetic energy-transducing reactions appeared and proceeded for about 12 h. After this time, the fluorescence parameter variable/maximal fluorescence yield and the amounts of both PSIIα and PSIIβ (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII-reducing) centers had decreased, whereas the amount of PSIIβ (secondary quinone electron acceptor of PSII-nonreducing) centers had increased. The yield of noncyclic electron transport also decreased during the induction of the CCM, whereas both photochemical and nonphotochemical quenching of PSII fluorescence increased. Concurrent with these changes, the photosynthetic light-utilization efficiency also decreased significantly, largely attributed to a decline in the curvature parameter θ, the convexity of the photosynthetic light-response curve. Thus, it is concluded that the increased CO2 utilization efficiency in algal cells possessing the CCM is maintained at the cost of a reduced light utilization efficiency, most probably due to the reduced energy flow through PSII. PMID:16653047

  15. Localization of the human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to chromosome 14q32.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Marsh, S.; Carter, N.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to human chromosome 14q32.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Further studies will need to be conducted to see whether mutations in the KNS2 gene are associated with hereditary diseases. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Dark-to-light transition in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 cells studied by fluorescence kinetics assesses plastoquinone redox poise in the dark and photosystem II fluorescence component and dynamics during state 2 to state 1 transition.

    PubMed

    Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Stamatakis, Kostas; Papageorgiou, George C

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the dark-to-light transition in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 cells by a detailed analysis of fluorescence transients induced by strong red light. The transients, recorded with high data-acquisition, revealed all the steps of the fast (OJIP; 10(-5)-1 s) and slow phase (PSM(T); 1-10(3) s), kinetically distinguished with precision. Focusing on the OJIP-rise, we show, for the first time, how the variable to initial fluorescence ratio and the relative height of J-level can serve as indexes of the plastoquinone redox poise and the established state in the dark; hence, differences among cyanobacteria can be recognised in a simple way. Applying intermittent illumination (20-s light pulses separated by 10-s dark intervals) to induce dark-to-light transition and analysing the individual transients, we establish a method by which we determine the fluorescence component not originating from photosystem (PS) II and we assess PSII dynamics during state 2 to state 1 transition. The development of photochemical and non-photochemical quenching is also discussed, as well as evidences favouring the mobile antenna model. PMID:19205920

  17. Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution and its Correction for Estimates of Gross Ecosystem Productivity and Photosynthetic Light-Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangyun; Liu, Xinjie

    2015-04-01

    Passive measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) presents a new way for directly estimating the photosynthetic activities. In this study, one diurnal multi-angular spectral experiment and three independent diurnal flux experiments were carried out on winter wheat and maize to assess directional emission of SIF for estimating photosynthesis activities. Firstly, the Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution Function (BFDF) of SIF was investigated. A BFDF shape similar to the red Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) was observed for the directional SIF emissions at 688 nm. Secondly, the relationship between the directional emission of canopy SIF and BRDF reflectance was examined, finding a strict linear correlation between SIF and reflectance at 688 nm, with an R2> 0.80 for all seven BRDF observations on winter wheat. Then, a BFDF correction model for the canopy SIF at 688 nm was presented by dividing by the canopy reflectance, and about 65.3% of the directional variation was successfully removed. Finally, the BFDF-corrected SIF signals were linked to photosynthetic activities, including gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), and the determination coefficients between photosynthetic activities and the BFDF-corrected SIF increased for most cases. For GEP, the determination coefficients were slightly improved from 0.563, 0.382, and 0.613 (for raw SIF signals) to 0.592, 0.473, and 0.640 for all three diurnal experiments. For LUE, the determination coefficients increased from 0.393, and 0.358 to 0.517, and 0.528 for two experiments, while deceased slightly from 0.695 to 0.607 for one experiment. Therefore, according to the above preliminary results, the canopy SIF cannot be regarded as isotropic, and the directional emission SIF may be an important uncertainty in estimates of GEP and LUE.

  18. Green light-emitting polyepinephrine-based fluorescent organic dots and its application in intracellular metal ions sensing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Ting Ting; Xu, Xiao Lei; Liu, Yi Yao; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we present a class of bio-dots, polyepinephrine (PEP)-based fluorescent organic dots (PEP-FODs) for selective and sensitive detection of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+). The PEP-FODs were derived from epinephrine via self-polymerization at relatively low temperature down to 60°C with low cytotoxicity and relative long lifetime (7.24ns). The surface morphology and optical properties of the synthesized PEP-FODs were characterized. We found that the diameters of PEP-FODs were mainly distributed in the narrow range of 2-4nm with an average diameter of 2.9nm. An optimal emission peak located at 490nm was observed when the green light-emitting PEP-FODs were excited at 400nm. It is discovered that Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)can strongly quench the fluorescence of PEP-FODs through the nonradiative electron-transfer. The detection limit of 0.16, 0.67, and 0.15μM was obtained for Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+), respectively. The independent sensing platform of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)could be established by using NaF as a complexing agent and by regulating the reaction time between NaF and metal ions. Cell viability studies reveal that the as-prepared PEP-FODs possess good solubility and biocompatibility, making it as excellent imaging nanoprobes for intracellular Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)sensing. The developed PEP-FODs might hold great promise to broaden applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. PMID:27108256

  19. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed. PMID:24043132

  20. Synthesis of fluorescent core-shell nanomaterials and strategies to generate white light

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amandeep; Kaur, Ramanjot; Pandey, O. P.; Wei, Xueyong; Sharma, Manoj E-mail: manojsharma@bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-07-28

    In this work, cadmium free core-shell ZnS:X/ZnS (X = Mn, Cu) nanoparticles have been synthesized and used for white light generation. First, the doping concentration of Manganese (Mn) was varied from 1% to 4% to optimize the dopant related emission and its optimal value was found to be 1%. Then, ZnS shell was grown over ZnS:Mn(1%) core to passivate the surface defects. Similarly, the optimal concentration of Copper (Cu) was found to be 0.8% in the range varied from 0.6% to 1.2%. In order to obtain an emission in the whole visible spectrum, dual doping of Mn and Cu was done in the core and the shell, respectively. A solid-solid mixing in different ratios of separately doped quantum dots (QDs) emitting in the blue green and the orange region was performed. Results show that the optimum mixture of QDs excited at 300 nm gives Commission Internationale del'Éclairage color coordinates of (0.35, 0.36), high color rendering index of 88, and correlated color temperature of 4704 K with minimum self-absorption.

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli on anatase and rutile nanoparticles using UV and fluorescent light

    SciTech Connect

    Caratto, V.; Aliakbarian, B.; Casazza, A.A.; Setti, L.; Bernini, C.; Perego, P.; Ferretti, M.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Photocatalytic deactivation of Escherichia coli in presence of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles ► The presence of catalyst is less important when the radiation is in the UV range ► Rutile has an higher efficiency respect to anatase under visible light. - Abstract: The photocatalytic deactivation of Escherichia coli HB101 by two different structures of TiO{sub 2}, rutile and anatase (used separately and in a 1:1 mixture), was examined. The microorganism was deposited on a filter membrane containing 520 mg/m{sup 2} of TiO{sub 2} and then irradiated by a neon lamp. In order to study the rate of deactivation of the microorganism we studied four different exposure times: 20, 40, 60 and 90 min. The results showed that rutile has an antimicrobial activity higher than anatase, while the mixture had values near to the average between them in every condition. The highest difference in the inactivation capacity of the two structures is observable at shorter times. The effect of the different crystal phases was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  2. Electrophoretic deposition of fluorescent Cu and Au sheets for light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiale; Wu, Zhennan; Li, Tingting; Zhou, Ding; Zhang, Kai; Sheng, Yu; Cui, Jianli; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a conventional method for fabricating film materials from nanometer-sized building blocks, and exhibits the advantages of low-cost, high-efficiency, wide-range thickness adjustment, and uniform deposition. Inspired by the interest in the application of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, the EPD technique has been recently extended to building blocks with 2D features. However, the studies are mainly focused on simplex building blocks. The utilization of multiplex building blocks is rarely reported. In this work, we demonstrate a controlled EPD of Cu and Au sheets, which are 2D assemblies of luminescent Cu and Au nanoclusters. Systematic investigations reveal that both the deposition efficiency and the thickness are determined by the lateral size of the sheets. For Cu sheets with a large lateral size, a high ζ-potential and strong face-to-face van der Waals interactions facilitate the deposition with high efficiency. However, for Au sheets, the small lateral size and ζ-potential limit the formation of a thick film. To solve this problem, the deposition dynamics are controlled by increasing the concentration of the Au sheets and adding acetone. This understanding permits the fabrication of a binary EPD film by the stepwise deposition of Cu and Au sheets, thus producing a luminescent film with both Cu green emission and Au red emission. A white light-emitting diode prototype with color coordinates (x, y) = (0.31, 0.36) is fabricated by employing the EPD film as a color conversion layer on a 365 nm GaN clip and further tuning the amount of deposited Cu and Au sheets.Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a conventional method for fabricating film materials from nanometer-sized building blocks, and exhibits the advantages of low-cost, high-efficiency, wide-range thickness adjustment, and uniform deposition. Inspired by the interest in the application of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, the EPD technique has been recently extended to

  3. Potential environmental impacts from the metals in incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-01-15

    Artificial lighting systems are transitioning from incandescent to compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs in response to the U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act and the EU Ecodesign Directive, which leads to energy savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Although CFLs and LEDs are more energy-efficient than incandescent bulbs, they require more metal-containing components. There is uncertainty about the potential environmental impacts of these components and whether special provisions must be made for their disposal at the end of useful life. Therefore, the objective of this study is to analyze the resource depletion and toxicity potentials from the metals in incandescent, CFL, and LED bulbs to complement the development of sustainable energy policy. We assessed the potentials by examining whether the lighting products are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing U.S. federal and California state regulations and by applying life cycle impact-based and hazard-based assessment methods (note that "life cycle impact-based method" does not mean a general life cycle assessment (LCA) but rather the elements in LCA used to quantify toxicity potentials). We discovered that both CFL and LED bulbs are categorized as hazardous, due to excessive levels of lead (Pb) leachability (132 and 44 mg/L, respectively; regulatory limit: 5) and the high contents of copper (111,000 and 31,600 mg/kg, respectively; limit: 2500), lead (3860 mg/kg for the CFL bulb; limit: 1000), and zinc (34,500 mg/kg for the CFL bulb; limit: 5000), while the incandescent bulb is not hazardous (note that the results for CFL bulbs excluded mercury vapor not captured during sample preparation). The CFLs and LEDs have higher resource depletion and toxicity potentials than the incandescent bulb due primarily to their high aluminum, copper, gold, lead, silver, and zinc. Comparing the bulbs on an equivalent quantity basis with respect to the expected lifetimes of

  4. Prostate cancer detection using combined auto-fluorescence and light reflectance spectroscopy: ex vivo study of human prostates

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikrant; Olweny, Ephrem O.; Kapur, Payal; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Roehrborn, Claus G.; Liu, Hanli

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using auto-fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy (AFLS) and light reflectance spectroscopy (LRS). AFLS used excitation at 447 nm with four emission wavelengths (532, 562, 632, and 684 nm), where their lifetimes and weights were analyzed using a double exponent model. LRS was measured between 500 and 840 nm and analyzed by a quantitative model to determine hemoglobin concentrations and light scattering. Both AFLS and LRS were taken on n = 724 distinct locations from both prostate capsular (nc = 185) and parenchymal (np = 539) tissues, including PCa tissue, benign peripheral zone tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), of fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens from 37 patients with high volume, intermediate-to-high-grade PCa (Gleason score, GS ≥7). AFLS and LRS parameters from parenchymal tissues were analyzed for statistical testing and classification. A feature selection algorithm based on multinomial logistic regression was implemented to identify critical parameters in order to classify high-grade PCa tissue. The regression model was in turn used to classify PCa tissue at the individual aggressive level of GS = 7,8,9. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated and used to determine classification accuracy for each tissue type. We show that our dual-modal technique resulted in accuracies of 87.9%, 90.1%, and 85.1% for PCa classification at GS = 7, 8, 9 within parenchymal tissues, and up to 91.1%, 91.9%, and 94.3% if capsular tissues were included for detection. Possible biochemical and physiological mechanisms causing signal differences in AFLS and LRS between PCa and benign tissues were also discussed. PMID:24877012

  5. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function.

    PubMed

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C-C Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2016-01-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases. PMID:26935567

  6. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R. Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-03-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases.

  7. Correlated light and electron microscopy observations of the uterine epithelial cell actin cytoskeleton using fluorescently labeled resin-embedded sections.

    PubMed

    Moore, Chad L; Cheng, Delfine; Shami, Gerald J; Murphy, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    In order to perform correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) more precisely, we have modified existing specimen preparation protocols allowing fluorescence retention within embedded and sectioned tissue, facilitating direct observation across length scales. We detail a protocol which provides a precise correlation accuracy using accessible techniques in biological specimen preparation. By combining a pre-embedding uranyl acetate staining step with the progressive lowering of temperature (PLT) technique, a methacrylate embedded tissue specimen is ultrathin sectioned and mounted onto a TEM finder grid for immediate viewing in the confocal and electron microscope. In this study, the protocol is applied to rat uterine epithelial cells in vivo during early pregnancy. Correlative overlay data was used to track changes in filamentous actin that occurs in these cells from fertilization (Day 1) to implantation on Day 6 as part of the plasma membrane transformation, a process essential in the development of uterine receptivity in the rat. CLEM confirmed that the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted as apical microvilli are progressively lost toward implantation, and revealed the thick and continuous terminal web is replaced by a thinner and irregular actin band, with individually distinguishable filaments connecting actin meshworks which correspond with remaining plasma membrane protrusions. PMID:26930006

  8. Cardiac Light-Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy for Multi-Scale and Rapid Imaging of Architecture and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Peng; Lee, Juhyun; Packard, René R. Sevag; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Xu, Hao; Ma, Jianguo; Ding, Yichen; Kang, Hanul; Chen, Harrison; Sung, Kevin; Kulkarni, Rajan; Ardehali, Reza; Kuo, C.-C. Jay; Xu, Xiaolei; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-01-01

    Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) enables multi-dimensional and multi-scale imaging via illuminating specimens with a separate thin sheet of laser. It allows rapid plane illumination for reduced photo-damage and superior axial resolution and contrast. We hereby demonstrate cardiac LSFM (c-LSFM) imaging to assess the functional architecture of zebrafish embryos with a retrospective cardiac synchronization algorithm for four-dimensional reconstruction (3-D space + time). By combining our approach with tissue clearing techniques, we reveal the entire cardiac structures and hypertrabeculation of adult zebrafish hearts in response to doxorubicin treatment. By integrating the resolution enhancement technique with c-LSFM to increase the resolving power under a large field-of-view, we demonstrate the use of low power objective to resolve the entire architecture of large-scale neonatal mouse hearts, revealing the helical orientation of individual myocardial fibers. Therefore, our c-LSFM imaging approach provides multi-scale visualization of architecture and function to drive cardiovascular research with translational implication in congenital heart diseases. PMID:26935567

  9. Acoustic waves from mechanical impulses due to fluorescence resonant energy (Förster) transfer: Blowing a whistle with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita-Sánchez, J. R.; Henkel, C.

    2012-02-01

    We present a momentum transfer mechanism mediated by electromagnetic fields that originates in a system of two nearby molecules: one excited (donor D*) and the other in ground state (acceptor A). An intermolecular force related to fluorescence resonant energy or Förster transfer (FRET) arises in the unstable D*A molecular system, which differs from the equilibrium van der Waals interaction. Due to the its finite lifetime, a mechanical impulse is imparted to the relative motion in the system. We analyze the FRET impulse when the molecules are embedded in free space and find that its magnitude can be much greater than the single recoil photon momentum, getting comparable with the thermal momentum (Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution) at room temperature. In addition, we propose that this FRET impulse can be exploited in the generation of acoustic waves inside a film containing layers of donor and acceptor molecules, when a picosecond laser pulse excites the donors. This acoustic transient is distinguishable from that produced by thermal stress due to laser absorption, and may therefore play a role in photoacoustic spectroscopy. The effect can be seen as exciting a vibrating system like a string or organ pipe with light; it may be used as an opto-mechanical transducer.

  10. Use of invisible near infrared light fluorescence with indocyanine green and methylene blue in urology. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Markuszewski, Marcin; Rho, Young Soo; Matuszewski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the second part of this paper, concerning the use of invisible near infrared light (NIR) fluorescence with indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) in urology, other possible uses of this new technique will be presented. In kidney transplantation, this concerns allograft perfusion and real time NIR–guided angiography; moreover, perfusion angiography of tissue flaps, NIRF visualization of ureters, NIR–guided visualization of urinary calcifications, NIRF in male infertility and semen quality assessment. In this part, we have also analysed cancer targeting and imaging fluorophores as well as cost benefits associated with the use of these new techniques. Material and methods PubMed and Medline databases were searched for ICG and MB use in urological settings, along with data published in abstracts of urological conferences. Results Although NIR–guided ICG and MB are still in their initial phases, there have been significant developments in a few more major domains of urology, including 1) kidney transplantation: kidney allograft perfusion and vessel reconstruction; 2) angiography perfusion of tissue flaps; 3) visualization of ureters; 4) visualization of urinary calcifications; and 5) NIRF in male infertility and semen quality assessment. Conclusions Near infrared technology in urology is at its early stages. More studies are needed to assess the true potential and limitations of the technology. Initial studies show that this pioneering tool may influence various aspects of urology. PMID:25247093

  11. Highly Efficient Near-Infrared Delayed Fluorescence Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using a Phenanthrene-Based Charge-Transfer Compound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shipan; Yan, Xianju; Cheng, Zong; Zhang, Hongyu; Liu, Yu; Wang, Yue

    2015-10-26

    Significant efforts have been made to develop high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters with blue, green, yellow, and orange-red colors. However, efficient TADF materials with colors ranging from red, to deep-red, to near-infrared (NIR) have been rarely reported owing to the difficulty in molecular design. Herein, we report the first NIR TADF molecule TPA-DCPP (TPA=triphenylamine; DCPP=2,3-dicyanopyrazino phenanthrene) which has a small singlet-triplet splitting (ΔEST ) of 0.13 eV. Its nondoped OLED device exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 2.1 % with a Commission International de L'Éclairage (CIE) coordinate of (0.70, 0.29). Moreover, an extremely high EQE of nearly 10 % with an emission band at λ=668 nm has been achieved in the doped device, which is comparable to the most-efficient deep-red/NIR phosphorescent OLEDs with similar electroluminescent spectra. PMID:26480338

  12. Non-rigid contour-to-pixel registration of photographic and quantitative light-induced fluorescence imaging of decalcified teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas; Ehrlich, Eva E.; Fritz, Ulrike B.; Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Tatano, Rosalia

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) is widely used to assess the damage of a tooth due to decalcification. In digital photographs, decalcification appears as white spot lesions, i.e. white spots on the tooth surface. We propose a novel multimodal registration approach for the matching of digital photographs and QLF images of decalcified teeth. The registration is based on the idea of contour-to-pixel matching. Here, the curve, which represents the shape of the tooth, is extracted from the QLF image using a contour segmentation by binarization and morphological processing. This curve is aligned to the photo with a non-rigid variational registration approach. Thus, the registration problem is formulated as minimization problem with an objective function that consists of a data term and a regularizer for the deformation. To construct the data term, the photo is pointwise classified into tooth and non-tooth regions. Then, the signed distance function of the tooth region allows to measure the mismatch between curve and photo. As regularizer a higher order, linear elastic prior is used. The resulting minimization problem is solved numerically using bilinear Finite Elements for the spatial discretization and the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The evaluation is based on 150 image pairs, where an average of 5 teeth have been captured from 32 subjects. All registrations have been confirmed correctly by a dental expert. The contour-to-pixel methods can directly be used in 3D for surface-to-voxel tasks.

  13. The role of cerebral spinal fluid in light propagation through the mouse head: improving fluorescence tomography with Monte Carlo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancora, Daniele; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2016-03-01

    Optical Neuroimaging is a highly dynamical field of research owing to the combination of many advanced imaging techniques and computational tools that uncovered unexplored paths through the functioning of the brain. Light propagation modelling through such complicated structures has always played a crucial role as the basis for a high resolution and quantitative imaging where even the slightest improvement could lead to significant results. Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (fDOT), a widely used technique for three dimensional imaging of small animals and tissues, has been proved to be inaccurate for neuroimaging the mouse head without the knowledge of a-priori anatomical information of the subject. Commonly a normalized Born approximation model is used in fDOT reconstruction based on forward photon propagation using Diffusive Equation (DE) which has strong limitations in the optically clear regime. The presence of the Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF) instead, a thin optically clear layer surrounding the brain, can be more accurately taken into account using Monte Carlo approaches which nowadays is becoming more usable thanks to parallelized GPU algorithms. In this work we discuss the results of a synthetic experimental comparison, resulting to the increase of the accuracy for the Born approximation by introducing the CSF layer in a realistic mouse head structure with respect to the current model. We point out the importance of such clear layer for complex geometrical models, while for simple slab phantoms neglecting it does not introduce a significant error.

  14. Analysis of the effects of blue light on morphofunctional status of in vitro cultured blastocysts from mice carrying gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP).

    PubMed

    Sakharova, N Yu; Mezhevikina, L M; Smirnov, A A; Vikhlyantseva, E F

    2014-05-01

    We studied the effect of blue light (440-490 nm) on the development of late blastocysts of mice carrying the gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Exposure to blue light for 20 min reduced adhesive properties of blastocysts and their capacity to form primary colonies consisting of the cells of inner cell mass, trophoblast, and extraembryonic endoderm. The negative effects of blue light manifested in morphological changes in the primary colonies and impairment of differentiation and migration of cells of the trophoblast and extraembryonic endoderm. The problems of cell-cell interaction and inductive influences of the inner cell mass on other cell subpopulations are discussed. EGFP blastocysts were proposed as the model for evaluation of the mechanisms underlying the effects of blue light as the major negative factor of visible light used in in vitro experiments on mammalian embryos. PMID:24913583

  15. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration. PMID:26150714

  16. The fluorescence detection of glutathione by ∙OH radicals' elimination with catalyst of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ma, Weiguang; Han, Dongxue; Wang, Lingnan; Wu, Tongshun; Niu, Li

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new method for the detection of glutathione (GSH) was designed based on the ∙OH radicals' elimination system due to the reducing ability of GSH for the first time. Fluorescence method with terephthalic acid (TA) as the probe was employed for the quantification of ∙OH radicals' production and elimination. Experimental conditions of ∙OH radicals' production were optimized in detail, and ∙OH radicals were found to be efficiently produced by the excellent catalysis performance of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation. The introduction of GSH make fluorescent intensity decrease due to the elimination of ∙OH radicals. For the present fluorescence based GSH sensor, a wide detection range of 60.0-700.0 µM and excellent selectivity have been achieved. Furthermore, it has been successfully employed for the determination of GSH in commercial drug tablets and human serum. PMID:26452861

  17. Hazard analysis of long term viewing of visible laser light off of fluorescent diffuse reflective surfaces (post-it).

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-10-01

    A laser hazard analysis is performed to evaluate if the use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors to view incident laser beams (Coherent Verdi 10W) present a hazard based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. The use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors in the alignment process does not pose an increased hazard because of the fluorescence at a different wavelength than that of the incident laser.

  18. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  19. Transfer of ultraviolet photon energy into fluorescent light in the visible path represents a new and efficient protection mechanism of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Vergou, Theognosia; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Schanzer, Sabine; Zastrow, Leonhard; Golz, Karin; Doucet, Olivier; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-10-01

    The development of sunscreens with high sun protection factor (SPF) values but low filter concentrations is the ultimate goal. The purpose of the present study was to investigate why a sunscreen spray and cream with different concentrations of the same UV-filters provided the same SPF. Therefore, the homogeneity of the distribution of both sunscreens was investigated by laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and tape stripping (TS). Additionally, the energy transfer mechanisms of the sunscreens on the skin were analyzed. The TS and LSM showed a better homogeneity of the distribution of the spray. With Wood's light, a total absorption of the irradiation was detected in the spray area. In contrast, after cream treatment, an intensive fluorescent signal was observed. It was demonstrated that this fluorescent signal was caused by nonthermal energy transferred from the UV-filters to one compound of the cream releasing its excitation energy by fluorescence. This nonthermal energy transfer seemed to be the reason for the high efficiency of the cream, which is subjected to thermal relaxation. The transfer of UV photon energy into fluorescent light represents a new approach to increase the efficiency of sunscreens and could form the basis for a new generation of sunscreens. PMID:22029345

  20. Transfer of ultraviolet photon energy into fluorescent light in the visible path represents a new and efficient protection mechanism of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergou, Theognosia; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Schanzer, Sabine; Zastrow, Leonhard; Golz, Karin; Doucet, Olivier; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-10-01

    The development of sunscreens with high sun protection factor (SPF) values but low filter concentrations is the ultimate goal. The purpose of the present study was to investigate why a sunscreen spray and cream with different concentrations of the same UV-filters provided the same SPF. Therefore, the homogeneity of the distribution of both sunscreens was investigated by laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and tape stripping (TS). Additionally, the energy transfer mechanisms of the sunscreens on the skin were analyzed. The TS and LSM showed a better homogeneity of the distribution of the spray. With Wood's light, a total absorption of the irradiation was detected in the spray area. In contrast, after cream treatment, an intensive fluorescent signal was observed. It was demonstrated that this fluorescent signal was caused by nonthermal energy transferred from the UV-filters to one compound of the cream releasing its excitation energy by fluorescence. This nonthermal energy transfer seemed to be the reason for the high efficiency of the cream, which is subjected to thermal relaxation. The transfer of UV photon energy into fluorescent light represents a new approach to increase the efficiency of sunscreens and could form the basis for a new generation of sunscreens.

  1. Detection of Steel Fatigue Cracks with Strain Sensing Sheets Based on Large Area Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-01-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous monitoring over large areas of structure, and with sensors of high spatial resolution. Technologies based on Large Area Electronics (LAE) can enable direct sensing and can be scaled to the level required for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of civil structures and infrastructure. Sensing sheets based on LAE contain dense arrangements of thin-film strain sensors, associated electronics and various control circuits deposited and integrated on a flexible polyimide substrate that can cover large areas of structures. This paper presents the development stage of a prototype strain sensing sheet based on LAE for crack detection and localization. Two types of sensing-sheet arrangements with size 6 × 6 inch (152 × 152 mm) were designed and manufactured, one with a very dense arrangement of sensors and the other with a less dense arrangement of sensors. The sensing sheets were bonded to steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary, so the fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The sensors within the sensing sheet that were close to the notch tip successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The sensors that were away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue cracks based on the time history of the measured strain. The results of the tests have validated the general principles of the proposed sensing sheets for crack detection and identified advantages and challenges of the two tested designs. PMID:25853407

  2. A dual-mode colorimetric and fluorometric "light on" sensor for thiocyanate based on fluorescent carbon dots and unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Chen, Chuanxia; Lu, Lixia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-12-21

    A novel, highly sensitive and selective dual-readout (colorimetric and fluorometric) sensor based on fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) and unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the detection of thiocyanate (SCN(-)) was proposed. Amino-functionalized CDs could be readily adsorbed onto the surface of citrate-stabilized AuNPs through Au-N interactions, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs and the nonfluorescent off-state of CDs arising from potential fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). However, SCN(-) had a stronger affinity toward AuNPs and could compete with CDs to bind onto the surface of AuNPs in priority, which prevented the aggregation of AuNPs and fluorescence quenching of CDs. Correspondingly, both the colorimetric and fluorometric signals remained "light-on". The color of the sensing solution remained red and the fluorescence remained unquenched. A distinguishable change in the color was observed at a SCN(-) concentration of 1 μM by the naked eye and a detection limit as low as 0.036 μM was obtained by virtue of fluorescence spectroscopy. Both colorimetric and fluorometric sensors exhibited excellent selectivity toward SCN(-) over other common metallic ions and anions. In addition, such a sensing assay featured simplicity, rapidity, cost-effectiveness and ease of operation without further modification. The accuracy and precision were evaluated based on the quantitative detection of SCN(-) in tap water and saliva samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26567774

  3. Cold-induced sudden reversible lowering of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence after saturating light pulses : a sensitive marker for chilling susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Larcher, W; Neuner, G

    1989-03-01

    In chilling-sensitive plants (Glycine max, Saintpaulia ionantha, Saccharum officinarum) a sudden reversible drop in chlorophyll fluorescence occurs during photosynthetic induction immediately following saturating light pulses at low temperatures in the range 4 to 8 degrees C. A comparison of two soybean cultivars of different chilling sensitivities revealed that this phenomenon, termed lowwave, indicates specific thresholds of low temperature stress. Its occurrence under controlled chilling can be regarded as a quantitative marker for screening chilling susceptibility in angiosperms. PMID:16666615

  4. Remanagement of Singlet and Triplet Excitons in Single-Emissive-Layer Hybrid White Organic Light-Emitting Devices Using Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Blue Exciplex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Qing, Jian; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Wu, Bo; Tam, Hoi Lam; Zhu, Furong; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-11-25

    A high-performance hybrid white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) is demonstrated based on an efficient novel thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) blue exciplex system. This device shows a low turn-on voltage of 2.5 V and maximum forward-viewing external quantum efficiency of 25.5%, which opens a new avenue for achieving high-performance hybrid WOLEDs with simple structures. PMID:26436730

  5. Highly Efficient Orange and Red Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Low Roll-Off of Efficiency using a Novel Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Material as Host.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Meng, Lingqiang; Shen, Xingxing; Wei, Xiaofang; Zheng, Xiuli; Lv, Xiaopeng; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-07-15

    MTXSFCz with thermally activated delayed fluorescence is synthesized. Orange and red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) with low efficiency roll-off exhibit external quantum efficiencies (EQE) up to 11.8% and 15.6%. The efficient upconversion from triplet to singlet of the host reduces the triplet density and thus affords a low efficiency roll-off of PHOLEDs. PMID:26033526

  6. Predicting caries by measuring its activity using quantitative light-induced fluorescence in vivo: a 2-year caries increment analysis.

    PubMed

    Meller, C; Santamaria, R M; Connert, T; Splieth, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the predictive power of several clinical baseline parameters and the de-/remineralisation properties of in vivo etched sites measured with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) for subsequent 2-year caries increment. At baseline, in 44 children (8.23 ± 1.5 years) two areas (diameter 2 mm) of the buccal surface of a primary posterior tooth were etched with 36% phosphoric acid gel for 1 and 4 min, respectively. The etched sites were analysed immediately after etching (ΔQ1) and 24 h (ΔQ2) later by QLF. Additionally, caries status (deft/DMFT and initial caries), approximal plaque, bleeding on probing, and the patient's current use of fluorides were recorded. In the 2-year follow-up, 29 children were re-assessed. After clinical examination, the caries increment was calculated (ΔDMFT) and correlated with the baseline clinical variables and the QLF readings. Results showed a significant positive correlation between ΔQ(1 min) and the ΔDMFT (r = 0.44, p = 0.02). The ΔDMFT was significantly correlated with the baseline deft (r = 0.56, p = 0.002), cavitated active caries lesions (r = 0.52, p = 0.003), and filled teeth (r = 0.53, p = 0.003). In a regression analysis the use of fluoridated salt (SC = -0.10) and fluoride gel (SC = -0.14) were negatively associated with ΔDMFT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the demineralisation properties of the etched sites and the outcome of the 24-hour measurements with QLF are significantly associated with caries increment. Previous caries experience strongly correlated with caries increment in this group of children. PMID:22614242

  7. Understanding growth kinetics of nanorods in microemulsion: a combined fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Soma; Pal, Nibedita; Chowdhury, Pramit K; Sen, Sobhan; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2012-12-01

    Even though nanostructures of various shapes and sizes can be controlled by microemulsions, there is substantial difficulty in understanding their growth mechanism. The evolution of nanostructures from the time of mixing of reactants to their final stage is a heterogeneous process involving a variety of intermediates. To obtain a deeper insight into these kinetic steps, we studied the slow growth kinetics (extending over eight days) of iron oxalate nanorods inside the polar core of water-in-oil microemulsion droplets made of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide/1-butanol/isooctane. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed to monitor the nanostructure growth at (near) the single-droplet level and in an ensemble. Analyzing FCS data with suitable kinetic model we obtain transient dimer lifetime (28 μs) and the droplet fusion rates (and fusion tendency) on each day as the reaction proceeds. The droplet fusion rate is found to directly control the nanorod growth in microemulsion solution and attains its maximum value (3.55 × 10(4) s(-1)) on day 6, when long nanorods are found in TEM data, implying that more and more reactants are fed into the growing system at this stage. Combining FCS, DLS, and TEM results, we find three distinct periods in the entire growth process: a long nucleation-dominant nanoparticle growth period which forms nanoparticles of critical (average) size of ∼53 nm, followed by a short period where isotropic nanoparticles switch to anisotropic growth to form nanorods, and finally elongation of nanorods and growth (and shrinking) of nanoparticles. PMID:23140268

  8. Ultrasensitive and universal fluorescent aptasensor for the detection of biomolecules (ATP, adenosine and thrombin) based on DNA/Ag nanoclusters fluorescence light-up system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Hu, Xiao-Chun; Shi, Shuo; Gao, Ru-Ru; Huang, Hai-Liang; Zhu, Yan-Yan; Lv, Xiao-Yan; Yao, Tian-Ming

    2016-05-15

    We report here an ultrasensitive strategy based on the recognition-induced conformational alteration of aptamer and fluorescence turn-on abilities of guanine-rich (G-rich) DNA sequence in proximity to silver nanoclusters for adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine (A) and thrombin (TB) detection. Herein, we designed two tailored DNA sequences noted as complementary DNA (abbreviated as c-DNA) and signal probe DNA (abbreviated as s-DNA), respectively. c-DNA is designed as a special structure consisting of a sequence complementary to aptamer at the 3'-end and a guanine-rich DNA sequence at the 5'-end; s-DNA contains a cytosine-rich sequence responsible for Ag NCs templated synthesis at the 3'-end and a link sequence (part of aptamer) complementary to partial of the c-DNA at the 5'-end. In the presence of target, the aptamer associated with the target, resulting in the formation of duplex DNA (dsDNA), the DNA-Ag NCs thereafter could close to the guanine-rich sequence, leading to enhanced fluorescence signal readout. The widespread application of the sensing system is achieved success in the detection of three biomolecules. ATP, adenosine and thrombin in the range of 0.5-8.0 μM, 0.5-7.0 μM and 50-900 nM could be linearly detected with the detection limits of 91.6 nM, 103.4 nM and 8.4 nM, respectively. This label-free and turn-on fluorescent sensing system employing the mechanism proposed here turns out to be sensitive, selective, and convenient for the detection of biomolecules without washing and separation steps. PMID:26706942

  9. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought. PMID:25496144

  10. Fluorescent blue lights, injecting drug use and related health risk in public conveniences: findings from a qualitative study of micro-injecting environments.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Stephen; Coomber, Ross

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents findings relating to injecting drug users' experiences and opinions of public toilets illuminated with fluorescent blue lights and presents an empirical assessment of the intended deterrent effect of such installations. Data analysis identified that blue lights deterred less than half the sample interviewed. Furthermore over half (18/31) of the sample were prepared to inject in conditions specifically designed to deter injecting practice. Of these, 11 respondents were completely undeterred and 7 individuals were only partially deterred by blue light environments. These findings are discussed within the interpretative frameworks of Pierre Bourdieu's theory of habitus and symbolic violence. The authors conclude that fluorescent blue lights contribute towards the development of situated resistance by injecting drug users within a public injecting habitus; a resistance that produces and reproduces drug-related harm and is a behaviour that opposes the symbolic violence of harm reduction intervention. The paper concludes with suggestions for theory-driven practical intervention that may seek to disrupt the harmful elements of the public injecting habitus. PMID:20167527

  11. Abundance and Night Hourly Dispersal of the Vesicating Beetles of the Genus Paederus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) Attracted to Fluorescent, Incandescent, and Black Light Sources in the Brazilian Savanna.

    PubMed

    Lima, D C B; Costa, A A V; Silva, F S

    2015-01-01

    Paederus beetles are cosmopolitan medically important insects that cause dermatitis linearis to humans. In Brazil, despite the medical importance of these beetles, no studies focusing directly on the abundance and ecological features of harmful species exist. Therefore, this study aims at determining the abundance and the nocturnal hourly dispersal of Paederus species attracted to fluorescent, incandescent, and black light sources in the Brazilian savanna. Paederus species were captured from May to September for three consecutive years, between 2011 and 2013. The specimens were caught hourly, from 1800 to 0600 hours. Paederus beetles were attracted to incandescent, fluorescent, and black light lamps as light sources. A total of 959 individuals of five species were collected. The collected species were Paederus protensus Sharp (59.85%), Paederus columbinus Laporte de Castelnau (29.20%), Paederus mutans Sharp (7.09%), Paederus brasiliensis Erichson (3.34%), and Paederus ferus Erichson (0.52%). The black light was the most attractive source, and the darkest collecting point was the most representative for the number of individuals. The lowest catches were captured at full moon, and the highest catches were between 2200 and 0100 hours. Future investigations are needed to better understand the role of night temperature and soil humidity affecting the seasonal growth of Paederus beetle populations of northeastern Brazil. PMID:26336279

  12. ICPBC and C12-ICPBC: two new red emitting, fluorescent Ca2+ indicators excited with visible light.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Emmanuel; Liepouri, Fotini; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Castanas, Elias; Deligeorgiev, Todor G; Katerinopoulos, Haralambos E

    2006-01-01

    Two new, visible-excited and red-emitting fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators were synthesized and the spectral profiles of their free and Ca(2+) bound forms were studied. The fluorescent properties of these probes are due to the extended conjugation of the chromeno[3',2':3,4]pyrido[1,2a][1,3]benzimidazole chromophore incorporated in their BAPTA-type, Ca(2+) chelating structure. The compounds, namely ICPBC and its N-dodecyl analog C12-ICPBC exhibit Ca(2+) dissociation constants of 7.7 and 18.0 microM, respectively. The fluorescence spectra of the probes showed a clear shift in excitation wavelength maxima upon Ca(2+) binding along with a large Stokes shift and changes in fluorescence intensity, indicating their potential use as Ca(2+) indicators. The ability of ICPBC to trace high calcium spikes was tested in the human HepG2 cell line with positive results. PMID:16236357

  13. Comparison of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, light-use efficiency, and process-based GPP models in maize.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Pradeep; Zhang, Yongguang; Jin, Cui; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-06-01

    Accurately quantifying cropland gross primary production (GPP) is of great importance to monitor cropland status and carbon budgets. Satellite-based light-use efficiency (LUE) models and process-based terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have been widely used to quantify cropland GPP at different scales in past decades. However, model estimates of GPP are still subject to large uncertainties, especially for croplands. More recently, space-borne solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has shown the ability to monitor photosynthesis from space, providing new insights into actual photosynthesis monitoring. In this study, we examined the potential of SIF data to describe maize phenology and evaluated three GPP modeling approaches (space-borne SIF retrievals, a LUE-based vegetation photosynthesis model [VPM], and a process-based soil canopy observation of photochemistry and energy flux [SCOPE] model constrained by SIF) at a maize (Zea mays L.) site in Mead, Nebraska, USA. The result shows that SIF captured the seasonal variations (particularly during the early and late growing season) of tower-derived GPP (GPP_EC) much better than did satellite-based vegetation indices (enhanced vegetation index [EVI] and land surface water index [LSWI]). Consequently, SIF was strongly correlated with GPP_EC than were EVI and LSWI. Evaluation of GPP estimates against GPP_EC during the growing season demonstrated that all three modeling approaches provided reasonable estimates of maize GPP, with Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) of 0.97, 0.94, and 0.93 for the SCOPE, VPM, and SIF models, respectively. The SCOPE model provided the best simulation of maize GPP when SIF observations were incorporated through optimizing the key parameter of maximum carboxylation capacity (Vcmax). Our results illustrate the potential of SIF data to offer an additional way to investigate the seasonality of photosynthetic activity, to constrain process-based models for improving GPP estimates, and to

  14. Shedding new light on historical metal samples using micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolimund, D.; Senn, M.; Trottmann, M.; Janousch, M.; Bonhoure, I.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Marcus, M.

    2004-10-01

    Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS) were used in the present study to obtain spatially resolved micro-scale information on elemental composition, trace element distribution, chemical speciation and oxidation state and/or mineral phase distribution within historical iron artefacts dating from the Iron Age to early Medieval Times. Large area two-dimensional trace element distribution maps and oxidation state maps with micrometer spatial resolution were required to answer open archaeological questions in the context of ancient metal processing. The first set of examples was focusing on historical weapons and included two ancient iron sword blades. The micro-XRF maps revealed a distinct, highly correlated distribution pattern of trace elements such as As, Ni, Cu and Zn. Accordingly, the number of used raw materials could be determined unambiguously and key information concerning the used ancient smithing technique were gained. Further, the ability to record—in a fast manner—large area maps with high spatial resolution ('elemental screening') led to the discovery of a hitherto unknown enhanced occurrence of selected trace elements (Cu, Zn, and Au) at the blade surface. Complementary investigations by high resolution scanning electron microscopy were able to localize these trace metals within a carbon-rich matrix may be pointing towards an artifact induced during preservation. A second set of investigated artefacts is dealing with smithing waste products and related historical processing techniques and conditions. Synchrotron-based micro-XRF and micro-XAS were used to determine the structural composition as well as the spatial variation of the predominant Fe oxidation state and corresponding crystallographic phases. The study revealed the presence of distinct domains of Fe 0, Fe IIO (wustite), and α-Fe IIIOOH (goethite), separated by sharp domain boundaries. These findings help to gain new

  15. Image-Guided Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping and Nanotechnology-Based Nodal Treatment in Lung Cancer using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Khullar, Onkar; Frangioni, John V.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and nodal treatment in lung cancer remain inadequate for routine clinical use. Here we discuss the potential for using the combination of invisible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent light and nanotechnology for these applications. NIR fluorescence imaging has recently received significant attention for in vivo imaging applications because of its low tissue autofluorescence, high photon penetration into living tissue, and high signal-to-background ratio. Our large animal in vivo studies have been able to successfully identify sentinel lymph nodes in lung tissue and several clinical studies have examined the use of NIR fluorescence imaging systems for SLN mapping in breast and gastric cancer. Promising new nanoparticle technologies, when combined with NIR fluorescence imaging, offer the potential for image-guided treatment of lymph nodes at high risk for tumor recurrence. This review provides a theoretical and empirical framework for developing the next-generation of diagnostic and therapeutic agents for lung cancer. PMID:20226343

  16. Postcolumn fluorescence as an alternative to evaporative light scattering detection for ceramide analysis with gradient elution in non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J Y; Chaminade, P; Gaudin, K; Prognon, P; Baillet, A; Ferrier, D

    1999-10-22

    Ceramide analysis was developed with gradient elution in non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) or postcolumn fluorescence detection. Fluorescence detection (excitation, 360 nm; emission, 425 nm) after postcolumn formation of mixed assemblies between eluted ceramides and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was developed. In comparison with ELSD, fluorescence detection allows a better detection of the minor species ceramide from ceramide type III (commercial mixture of non-hydroxy fatty acid-sphingosine) and appears to be more sensitive for quantitation of ceramides at low concentrations. The fluorescence response is linear over a wide range of injected amount of ceramide III (expressed as stearoyl-phytosphingosine): 10 ng to 1000 ng. The response of ELSD is non linear but can be linearized in double logarithmic coordinates for calculations over a narrow range, e.g. between 10 to 350 ng ceramide III injected. The lower quantitation limits of these two detectors are similar: 5 ng ceramide III was injected. PMID:10563420

  17. Near-Infrared Light and pH-Responsive Polypyrrole@Polyacrylic acid/Fluorescent Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Imaging and Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manjie; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Lingyu; Li, Lu; Wang, Chungang

    2015-11-01

    We have rationally designed a new theranostic agent by coating near-infrared (NIR) light-absorbing polypyrrole (PPY) with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), in which PAA acts as a nanoreactor and template, followed by growing small fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fSiO2 NPs) inside the PAA networks, resulting in the formation of polypyrrole@polyacrylic acid/fluorescent mesoporous silica (PPY@PAA/fmSiO2 ) core-shell NPs. Meanwhile, DOX-loaded PPY@PAA/fmSiO2 NPs as pH and NIR dual-sensitive drug delivery vehicles were employed for fluorescence imaging and chemo-photothermal synergetic therapy in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrate that the PPY@PAA/fmSiO2 NPs show high in vivo tumor uptake by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect after intravenous injection as revealed by in vivo fluorescence imaging, which is very helpful for visualizing the location of the tumor. Moreover, the obtained NPs inhibit tumor growth (95.6 % of tumors were eliminated) because of the combination of chemo-photothermal therapy, which offers a synergistically improved therapeutic outcome compared with the use of either therapy alone. Therefore, the present study provides new insights into developing NIR and pH-stimuli responsive PPY-based multifunctional platform for cancer theranostics. PMID:26494031

  18. Far-red/near-infrared fluorescence light-up probes for specific in vitro and in vivo imaging of a tumour-related protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Hua, Yongquan; Hu, Yawen; Fang, Yuan; Ji, Shenglu; Yang, Zhimou; Ou, Caiwen; Kong, Deling; Ding, Dan

    2016-03-01

    As lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an important biomarker for many solid tumours, development of small-molecule fluorescence light-up probes for detection and imaging of LAPTM4B proteins is particularly valuable. In this work, we reported the design and synthesis of a far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) fluorescence light-up probe DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG, which could specifically visualize LAPTM4B proteins in cancer cells and tumour-bearing live mice. DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG was synthesized by the conjugation of two LAPTM4B-binding peptide ligands (EEGIHGHHIISVG) with one environment-sensitive fluorogen, 4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (DBT). Owing to the intramolecular charge transfer character of DBT, DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG is weakly emissive in aqueous solution, but switches to fluoresce upon LAPTM4B proteins specifically bind to the peptide ligand of the probe, which provide the DBT with hydrophobic microenvironment, greatly reducing its charge transfer effect with water. It is found that DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG can achieve targeted imaging of LAPTM4B proteins in HepG2 cancer cells and visualize LAPTM4B protein-expressed tumour tissues of live mice in a selective and high-contrast manner.

  19. Far-red/near-infrared fluorescence light-up probes for specific in vitro and in vivo imaging of a tumour-related protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Hua, Yongquan; Hu, Yawen; Fang, Yuan; Ji, Shenglu; Yang, Zhimou; Ou, Caiwen; Kong, Deling; Ding, Dan

    2016-01-01

    As lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an important biomarker for many solid tumours, development of small-molecule fluorescence light-up probes for detection and imaging of LAPTM4B proteins is particularly valuable. In this work, we reported the design and synthesis of a far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) fluorescence light-up probe DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG, which could specifically visualize LAPTM4B proteins in cancer cells and tumour-bearing live mice. DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG was synthesized by the conjugation of two LAPTM4B-binding peptide ligands (EEGIHGHHIISVG) with one environment-sensitive fluorogen, 4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (DBT). Owing to the intramolecular charge transfer character of DBT, DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG is weakly emissive in aqueous solution, but switches to fluoresce upon LAPTM4B proteins specifically bind to the peptide ligand of the probe, which provide the DBT with hydrophobic microenvironment, greatly reducing its charge transfer effect with water. It is found that DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG can achieve targeted imaging of LAPTM4B proteins in HepG2 cancer cells and visualize LAPTM4B protein-expressed tumour tissues of live mice in a selective and high-contrast manner. PMID:26984064

  20. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  1. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  2. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  3. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years. PMID:23955041

  4. Development of a multivariate light-induced fluorescence (LIF) PAT tool for in-line quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical granules in a V-blender.

    PubMed

    Guay, Jean-Maxime; Lapointe-Garant, Pierre-Philippe; Gosselin, Ryan; Simard, Jean-Sébastien; Abatzoglou, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    Process analytical technologies (PAT) enable process insight, process control and real-time testing. Light-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is especially well suited for low-concentration ingredients as, in many cases, it is the most sensitive probe of the in-line PAT toolbox. This study is aimed at verifying the applicability of a multivariate LIF analyzer to monitor granulated powder blends in industrial settings. Its targets are to: (1) evaluate the critical parameters of powders to obtain robust, precise and accurate concentration predictions and (2) assess technology performance for in-line monitoring of blending operations. Varying dye properties, moisture levels and particle sizes have been shown to have the most significant impact on fluorescence emission. Reliable quantitative models can be obtained by controlling and/or mitigating these factors. PMID:24373731

  5. Daily light use efficiency in a cornfield can be related to the canopy red/far-red fluorescence ratio and leaf light use efficiency across a growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In multiple years (2008-2013), we collected canopy and leaf fluorescence, photosynthesis, hyperspectral reflectance spectra, and biophysical measurements along transects within a USDA/Beltsville experimental cornfield treated with optimal nitrogen application (100%N) and which has an eddy covariance...

  6. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. PMID:24881520

  7. Determination of free amino acids in African gourd seed milks by capillary electrophoresis with light-emitting diode induced fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Enzonga, Josiane; Ong-Meang, Varravaddheay; Couderc, François; Boutonnet, Audrey; Poinsot, Véréna; Tsieri, Michel Mvoula; Silou, Thomas; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-09-01

    A CE technique coupled to LIF detection (488 nm) or LED-induced fluorescence detection (470 nm) has been evaluated to acquire a cheap way to analyze amino acids (AAs) whilst maintaining the best sensitivity. To quantitate AAs in milk of Cucurbitaceae of Sub-Saharan Africa, they were labeled with FITC. We used an optimized separation buffer composed of 30 mM boric acid buffer adjusted to pH 9.3 with NaOH (1 M) containing 12 mM SDS and 5% ethylene glycol v/v; prior to the injections, the derivatized samples are diluted 100 times. The LOQs in the sample are Arg: 1.1 μM, Ala: 3.5 μM, and Glu 8.9 μM. Cucumeropsis mannii (CM) Naudin and Citrullus lanatus (CL) are vegetable sources rich in proteins and AAs of high quality. Our analyses have led to the identification of 11 AAs in CL and CM milks. Phe, Trp, and Ala are predominant in the two types of lyophilized milks, while Asp and Val demonstrate very low contents. Six essential AAs (Phe, Thr, Val, Trp, Ile, and Leu) are present in both types of extracts, but lysine was not detected, indicating that this AA is missing in gourd milk. These results should be useful in efforts to complement or replace very expensive cow milk or the less-appreciated soya milk with milk from available local agroressources. PMID:23857426

  8. High-power-efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes with a single emitting layer doped with blue delayed fluorescent and yellow phosphorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wook; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-09-01

    High-efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (HWOLEDs) with a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitter and a yellow phosphorescent emitter doped in a single emitting layer were developed. Exciton harvesting by the blue TADF and yellow phosphorescent emitters rendered both singlet and triplet excitons to contribute to the white emission, which leads to a high quantum efficiency of 22.4% and a power efficiency of 60.3 lm W-1 in the HWOLEDs. In addition, the electroluminescence spectra of the HWOLEDs were kept stable from 100 cd m-2 to 5, 000 cd m-2.

  9. Above 20% external quantum efficiency in novel hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes having green thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bo Seong; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2014-08-01

    High efficiency hybrid type white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) combining a green thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitting material with red/blue phosphorescent emitting materials were developed by manipulating the device architecture of WOLEDs. Energy transfer between a blue phosphorescent emitting material and a green TADF emitter was efficient and could be managed by controlling the doping concentration of emitters. A high quantum efficiency above 20% was achieved in the hybrid WOLEDs by optimizing the device structure of the hybrid type WOLEDs for the first time and the device performances of the hybrid WOLEDs were comparable to those of all phosphorescent WOLEDs.

  10. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Cells by Flow Cytometry Using Light Scattering and Far-red Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cellular uptake of different sized silver nanoparticles (l0 nm, 50 nm, and 75nm) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate in ARPE-19 cells following 24 hour incubation was detected by side scatter through the use of a flow cytometer. A large far red fluorescence sign...

  11. Bladder cancer detection by fluorescence imaging with Hexvix: optimization of the excitation light during high magnification cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovisa, Blaise; Jichlinski, Patrice; Aymon, Daniela; Weber, Bernd-Claus; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence cystoscopy has been recently acknowledged as a useful method to detect early superficial bladder cancer, even flat lesions. After the instillation of hexaminolevulinic acid (Hexvix®) in the bladder for about an hour, photoactivable porphyrins (PaP), mainly protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulate in the cancerous cells. Although we observe a selective production of PpIX and an outstanding sensitivity of this method, false positive (FP) lesions negatively impact its specificity. Carcinogenesis often combines with angiogenesis, and thus changes in vascular architecture. Therefore, the visualization of the vascular modifications on the fluorescence positive sites is likely to differentiate false and true positive (TP). New methods including high magnification (HM) cystoscopy are being investigated by our group, and will yield a reduced number of biopsies and a better characterization of the fluorescence positive sites. In this study, we are using a dedicated rigid cystoscope, allowing conventional magnification during "macroscopic" observation, as well as image acquisition with HM when the endoscope is in contact with the tissue. Each observed site is biopsied and described by histopathological analysis. The vascular organization (tortuosity, vascular loops, vascular area and diameter) of the fluorescence positive sites was characterized in situ. Intrinsic contrast between the vessels and the tissue was enhanced with an optimization of the spectral design. Preliminary results are presented here.

  12. A versatile thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter for both highly efficient doped and non-doped organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Lung; Huang, Ming-Hao; Lee, Wei-Kai; Hsu, Yi-Jiun; Pan, Kuan-Chung; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Ting, Hao-Chun; Sarma, Monima; Ho, Yu-Yi; Hu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chung-Chia; Lee, Meng-Ting; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2015-09-14

    A thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitter (DMAC-TRZ) was reported either as the emitting dopant in a host or as the non-doped (neat) emitting layer to achieve high EL EQEs of up to 26.5% and 20% in OLEDs, respectively. PMID:26226072

  13. A high performance fluorescent white organic light-emitting device and its optimization for full-colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang; Duan, Yu; Zhao, Yi; Li, Xinhong; Li, Chuannan; Hou, Jingying; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-02-01

    A white organic light emitting diode (OLED) was fabricated in which blue emission host 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (ADN) doped with an orange emission dye (rubrene) was used to generate bright, high efficiency white light. A large amount of work was done to study the emission mechanism of a rubrene-doped device. Finally, to get optimized EL spectra, we introduced a green light which is emitted from tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminium (Alq3), the electron transport material, into the emission of white light.

  14. Light Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ultra Sales, Inc.'s fluorescent lighting fixture gets a boost in reflectivity through installation of Lightdriver, a thin tough thermoplastic film plated with aluminum, capable of reflecting 95 percent of visible light striking it. Lightdriver increases brightness without adding bulbs, and allows energy savings by removing some bulbs because the mirrorlike surface cuts light loss generally occasioned by conventional low reflectivity white painted surface above the bulbs in many fluorescent fixtures. Forty-five percent reduction in lighting electricity is attainable.

  15. Effect of different solvents on the performance of organic light-emitting device based on red-fluorescent ACY dye by spin coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuangjiang; Yu, Junsheng; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    A small-molecular red-fluorescent dye of [7-diethylamino-3-(2-thienyl)chronmen-2-ylidene]-2,2-dicyanoviny-lamine (ACY) has been blended into blue-emitting poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) by using different solvents of chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. Photoluminescence characteristic of solvent effects were investigated mainly from the aspect of solvent polarity. To demonstrate the solvent effects in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), devices with a structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/PVK: ACY (x wt %)/tris(8-quinolinolato) aluminum (Alq3)/Mg: Ag were fabricated, in which the weight doping ratios are x = 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7. Using spin coating method, a blending system of PVK: ACY is dissolved in both chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane with various doping concentrations. As a result, by choosing chloroform as solvent, a high electroluminescent (EL) performance device with a maximum luminance of 7698 cd/m2 at a driving voltage of 15.5 V was obtained, with a concentration proportion of PVK: ACY at 1000: 7. In the EL spectra of the OLEDs, red and green fluorescence of ACY and Alq3 were detected. It was found that by using 1,2-dichloroethane as a solvent, fluorescent quenching emerged with the enhancement of doping concentration. Energy transfer and Alq3 cations quencher theories were used to discuss different solvent effects on OLEDs.

  16. Use of fluorescence signals generated by elastic scattering under monochromatic incident light for determining the scattering efficiencies of various plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji Eun; Park, Ji Hoon; La, Ju A; Park, Seyeon; Jeong, Min Kuk; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-01

    We present a route that estimates the scattering/absorption characteristics of plasmonic nanoparticles by using fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopy. Because elastic scattering of nanoparticles caused by a monochromatic incident light is reflected in fluorescence emission spectra when recording at the excitation wavelength, the scattering intensities at the excitation wavelength during fluorescence emission scans are used to compare the scattering characteristics of various plasmonic nanoparticles under conditions where the extinction values of all of the nanoparticles are kept constant at this wavelength. For the two excitation wavelengths (519 and 560 nm) we investigated, the scattering intensities of spherical gold nanoparticles increase with increasing size (15, 33, 51, 73, and 103 nm in diameter). These results are correlated with the nanoparticles' scattering efficiencies (the ratios of scattering to the extinction cross-sections), which are theoretically calculated in the literature using Mie theory. Then, linear calibration equations at each wavelength are derived to estimate the scattering efficiencies of two Au nanorods, Au nanocages, and spherical Ag nanoparticles (15, 25, 37, and 62 nm). The values are very comparable with literature values. For various purposes such as biomedicine and optoelectronics, the present method could be beneficial to those who wish to easily compare and determine the scattering characteristics of various plasmonic nanoparticles at a certain wavelength by using commercially-available spectroscopic techniques. PMID:27215291

  17. Effects of sodium and magnesium cations on the "dark-" and light-induced chlorophyll a fluorescence yields in sucrose-washed spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Wydrzynski, T; Gross, E L; Govindjee

    1975-01-31

    The effects of Na plus and Mg-2 plus on the "dark" level (O level) and light-induced (P level) fluorescence in sucrose-washed spinach clhoroplasts were studied. Low concentrations of NaCl (2-10 mM) cause a significant decrease in both the O and P levels in the chlorophyll fluorescence transient. The effect on the O level may reflect changes in the bulk chlorophyll a. At 77 degrees K NaCl increases the F735/F685 emission peak ratio in dark-adapted and preilluminated chloroplasts, but has no significant effect on this ratio in sucrose-washed Photosystem II particles. This evidence is consistent with a sodium-induced excitation-energy distribution in favor of Photosystem I. In the presence of MgCl2, with or without NaCl, there is a slight decrease in the O and P level fluorescence as compared with the salt-free control, but an increase as compared with the NaCl-treated sample. Magnesium appears to override the sodium-induced changes. At low temperatures in chloroplasts and Photosystem II particles, MgCl2 has different effects on the F735/F685 ratio apparently depending on the state of the membrane. Magnesium, however, always induces an increase in the F695/F685 ratio. These results suggest that magnesium may influence Photosystem II reaction centers as well as energy distribution between the two photosystems. PMID:1125217

  18. Global spectral-kinetic analysis of room temperature chlorophyll a fluorescence from light-harvesting antenna mutants of barley.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmor, A M; Itoh, S; Govindjee

    2000-01-01

    This study presents a novel measurement, and simulation, of the time-resolved room temperature chlorophyll a fluorescence emission spectra from leaves of the barley wild-type and chlorophyll-b-deficient chlorina (clo) f2 and f104 mutants. The primary data were collected with a streak-camera-based picosecond-pulsed fluorometer that simultaneously records the spectral distribution and time dependence of the fluorescence decay. A new global spectral-kinetic analysis programme method, termed the double convolution integral (DCI) method, was developed to convolve the exciting laser pulse shape with a multimodal-distributed decay profile function that is again convolved with the spectral emission band amplitude functions. We report several key results obtained by the simultaneous spectral-kinetic acquisition and DCI methods. First, under conditions of dark-level fluorescence, when photosystem II (PS II) photochemistry is at a maximum at room temperature, both the clo f2 and clo f104 mutants exhibit very similar PS II spectral-decay contours as the wild-type (wt), with the main band centred around 685 nm. Second, dark-level fluorescence is strongly influenced beyond 700 nm by broad emission bands from PS I, and its associated antennae proteins, which exhibit much more rapid decay kinetics and strong integrated amplitudes. In particular a 705-720 nm band is present in all three samples, with a 710 nm band predominating in the clo f2 leaves. When the PS II photochemistry becomes inhibited, maximizing the fluorescence yield, both the clo f104 mutant and the wt exhibit lifetime increases for their major distribution modes from the minimal 205-500 ps range to the maximal 1500-2500 ps range for both the 685 nm and 740 nm bands. The clo f2 mutant, however, exhibits several unique spectral-kinetic properties, attributed to its unique PS I antennae and thylakoid structure, indicating changes in both PS II fluorescence reabsorption and PS II to PS I energy transfer pathways

  19. High-throughput profiling of tissue and tissue model microarrays: Combined transmitted light and 3-color fluorescence digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Michel; Watanabe, Shigeo; Burnip, Bill; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For many years pathologists have used Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E), single marker immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization with manual analysis by microscopy or at best simple digital imaging. There is a growing trend to update pathology to a digital workflow to improve objectivity and productivity, as has been done in radiology. There is also a need for tissue-based multivariate biomarker assays to improve the accuracy of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive testing. Multivariate tests are not compatible with the traditional single marker, manual analysis pathology methods but instead require a digital platform with brightfield and fluorescence imaging, quantitative image analysis, and informatics. Here we describe the use of the Hamamatsu NanoZoomer Digital Pathology slide scanner with HCImage software for combined brightfield and multiplexed fluorescence biomarker analysis and highlight its applications in biomarker research and pathology testing. This combined approach will be an important aid to pathologists in making critical diagnoses. PMID:22200032

  20. A rapidly photo-activatable light-up fluorescent nucleoside and its application in DNA base variation sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyong; Chen, Yuqi; Wang, Yafen; Wang, Jiaqi; Mo, Jing; Fu, Boshi; Wang, Zijing; Du, Yuhao; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-30

    A new DNA building block (d(Tet)U) bearing a tetrazole and allyloxy group at N-phenyl ring linked through an aminopropynyl linker to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine was synthesized. The modified DNA can be lit up via a photoinduced intramolecular tetrazole-alkene cycloaddition reaction, but quenched when the fully-matched double strand is formed. This conspicuous difference in fluorescence could open a door for DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. PMID:27315545

  1. Reaction dynamics during pulsed light activation of ATX-S10 Na(II)-sensitized cell cultures: analysis based on fluorescence-oxygen diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2005-04-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of photosensitization with pulsed light excitation, we previously introduced fluorescence-oxygen diagram that shows the correlation between photochemical oxygen consumption and photobleaching during a treatment (Kawauchi et al., Photochem. Photobiol., 80, 216-223, 2004). In pulsed photodynamic treatment of A549 cells with ATX-S10"Na(II), the diagrams for treatments at relatively high repetition rates of 10 and 30 Hz showed the complex behaviors of photochemical reaction; photobleaching initially occurred with oxygen consumption but it was switched to oxygen-independent photobleaching, which was followed by a secondary oxygen-consuming regime. In this study, fluorescence microscopy revealed that for treatments at 10 and 30 Hz, subcellular fluorescence distribution of ATX-S10×Na(II) changed drastically from the high-intensity spotty patterns showing lysosomal accumulation to the diffusive patterns within the cytosol during certain ranges of total light dose. These ranges were found to coincide with those in which oxygen-independent reaction appeared. These findings suggest that the sensitizer started to be redistributed from lysosomes to the cytosol during the oxygen-independent reaction regime. On the other hand, at 5 Hz, such reaction switching was not clearly seen during whole irradiation period in the diagram; this was consistent with the observation that sensitizer redistribution efficiently occurred even in the early phase of irradiation. The appearance of oxygen-independent reaction at the higher repetition rates may be caused by high local concentration of the sensitizer and the resultant low concentration of oxygen in the reaction sites due to the shorter pulse-to-pulse time intervals. In pulsed photodynamic treatment, pulse frequency is an important parameter that affects the intracellular kinetics of the sensitizer and hence the photochemical reaction dynamics.

  2. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Whole column fluorescence imaging on a microchip by using a programmed organic light emitting diode array as a spatial-scanning light source and a single photomultiplier tube as detector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Liang, Qionglin; Yao, Bo; Luo, Guoan; Wang, Liduo; Gao, Yudi; Wang, Yiming; Qiu, Yong

    2007-11-01

    A novel miniaturized, integrated whole-column imaging detection (WCID) system on a microchip is presented. In this system, a program controlled organic light emitting diode (OLED) array was used as a spatial-scanning light source, to achieve imaging by the time sequence of the excited fluorescence. By this mechanism, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) instead of a charge coupled detector (CCD) can be applied to the imaging. Unlike conventional systems, no lenses, fibers or any mechanical components are required either. The novel flat light source provides uniform excitation light without size limitations and outputs a stronger power by pulse driving. The scanning mode greatly reduced the power consumption of the light source, which is valuable for a portable system. Meanwhile, this novel simplified system has a broader linear range, higher sensitivity and higher efficiency in data collection. Isoelectric focusing of R-phycoerythrin (PE) and monitoring of the overall process with WCID were performed on this system. The limit of detection (LOD) was 38 ng mL(-1) or 3.2 pg at 85 nL per column injection of PE. The system provides a technique for WCID capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) on chip and can be used for throughput analysis. PMID:17960288

  4. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  5. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: White organic light-emitting device with both phosphorescent and fluorescent emissive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Hua, Yu-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yu; Yin, Shou-Geng

    2008-08-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of novel white organic light-emitting device(WOLED) by using a high efficiency blue fluorescent dye N-(4-((E)-2-(6-((E)-4-(diphenylamino)styryl)naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl)phenyl)-N-phenylbenzenamine (N-BDAVBi) and a red phosphoresecent dye bis (1-(phenyl) isoquinoline) iridium (III) acetylanetonate (Ir(piq)2(acac)). The configuration of the device was ITO/PVK:TPD/CBP:N-BDAVBi /CBP/ BALq: Ir(piq)2(acac)/BCP/Alq3/LiF:AL. By adjusting the proportion of the dopants (N-BDAVBi, Ir(piq)2(acac)) in the light-emitting layer, white light with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.35, 0.35) and a maximum luminance of 25350cd/m2 were obtained at an applied voltage of 22V. The WOLED exhibits maximum external quantum and current efficiency of 6.78% and 12cd/A respectively. By placing an undoped spacer CBP layer between the two light-emitting layers and using BCP as hole blocking layer, the colour stabilization slightly changed when the driving voltage increased from 6 to 22 V.

  7. Leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and pigment indexes of Eugenia uniflora L. in response to changes in light intensity and soil flooding.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Marcelo S; Schaffer, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The interactive effects of changing light intensity and soil flooding on the photosynthetic performance of Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae) seedlings in containers were examined. Two hypotheses were tested: (i) the photosynthetic apparatus of shade-adapted leaves can be rapidly acclimated to high light after transfer from shade to full sun, and (ii) photosynthetic acclimation to changing light intensity may be influenced by soil flooding. Seedlings cultivated in a shade house (40% of full sun, approximately 12 mol m(-)(2) day(-)(1)) for 6 months were transferred to full sun (20-40 mol m(-2) day(-1)) or shade (30% of full sun, approximately 8 mol m(-2) day(-1)) and subjected to soil flooding for 23 days or not flooded. Chlorophyll content index (CCI), chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf weight per area (LWA), photosynthetic light-response curves and leaf reflectance indexes were measured during soil flooding and after plants were unflooded. The CCI values increased throughout the experiment in leaves of shaded plants and decreased in leaves of plants transferred to full sun. There were no significant interactions between light intensity and flooding treatments for most of the variables analyzed, with the exception of Fv/Fm 22 days after plants were flooded and 5 days after flooded plants were unflooded. The light environment significantly affected LWA, and light environment and soil flooding significantly affected the light-saturated gross CO(2) assimilation rate expressed on area and dry weight bases (A(max-area) and A(max-wt), respectively), stomatal conductance of water vapor (g(ssat)) and intrinsic water use efficiency (A/g(s)). Five days after flooded plants were unflooded, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the scaled photochemical reflectance index (sPRI) were significantly higher in shade than in sun leaves. Thirty days after transferring plants from the shade house to the light treatment, LWA was 30% higher in sun than in shade leaves, and A

  8. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging

  9. Near-Infrared Light Triggered ROS-activated Theranostic Platform based on Ce6-CPT-UCNPs for Simultaneous Fluorescence Imaging and Chemo-Photodynamic Combined Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yang, Yao; Jiang, Xinquan; Yang, Yuming; Pan, Fei; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many drug controlled release methods have been integrated in multifunctional nanoparticles, such as pH-, redox-, temperature-, enzyme-, and light-responsive release. However, few report is associated with the ROS responsive drug controlled release. Herein, a thioketal linker-based ROS responsive drug (camptothecin conjugated with thioketal linker, abbreviated as TL-CPT) was prepared and the thioketal linker could be cleaved by ROS(reactive oxygen species). To achieve cancer simultaneous optical imaging, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy, the photosensitizer Chlorin e6(Ce6), TL-CPT and carboxyl-mPEG were loaded on the upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which were named as Ce6-CPT-UCNPs. Under 980 nm laser irradiation, Ce6-CPT-UCNPs emitted a narrow emission band at 645-675 nm which was overlapped with Ce6 absorption peak. Ce6 absorbed the light to produce ROS, which was used for photodynamic therapy and to cleave the thioketal linker in Ce6-CPT-UCNPs to release camptothecin for chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Ce6 absorbed the light, was used for near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo biodistribution studies showed that the prepared nanoparticles had high orthotopic lung cancer targeting efficiency. The in vivo therapeutic results demonstrated that NCI-H460 lung cancers could be completely eliminated by combining chemo- and photodynamic therapy under 980 nm laser irradiation. The prepared multifunctional Ce6-CPT-UCNPs have great potential in applications such as cancer targeted fluorescent imaging, simultaneous ROS activated chemo- and photodynamic therapy in near future. PMID:26941840

  10. Sensing sheets based on large area electronics for fatigue crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Glisic, Branko

    2015-03-01

    Reliable early-stage damage detection requires continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) over large areas of structure, and with high spatial resolution of sensors. This paper presents the development stage of prototype strain sensing sheets based on Large Area Electronics (LAE), in which thin-film strain gauges and control circuits are integrated on the flexible electronics and deposited on a polyimide sheet that can cover large areas. These sensing sheets were applied for fatigue crack detection on small-scale steel plates. Two types of sensing-sheet interconnects were designed and manufactured, and dense arrays of strain gauge sensors were assembled onto the interconnects. In total, four (two for each design type) strain sensing sheets were created and tested, which were sensitive to strain at virtually every point over the whole sensing sheet area. The sensing sheets were bonded to small-scale steel plates, which had a notch on the boundary so that fatigue cracks could be generated under cyclic loading. The fatigue tests were carried out at the Carleton Laboratory of Columbia University, and the steel plates were attached through a fixture to the loading machine that applied cyclic fatigue load. Fatigue cracks then occurred and propagated across the steel plates, leading to the failure of these test samples. The strain sensor that was close to the notch successfully detected the initialization of fatigue crack and localized the damage on the plate. The strain sensor that was away from the crack successfully detected the propagation of fatigue crack based on the time history of measured strain. Overall, the results of the fatigue tests validated general principles of the strain sensing sheets for crack detection.

  11. Defects in leaf carbohydrate metabolism compromise acclimation to high light and lead to a high chlorophyll fluorescence phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We have studied the impact of carbohydrate-starvation on the acclimation response to high light using Arabidopsis thaliana double mutants strongly impaired in the day- and night path of photoassimilate export from the chloroplast. A complete knock-out mutant of the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (TPT; tpt-2 mutant) was crossed to mutants defective in (i) starch biosynthesis (adg1-1, pgm1 and pgi1-1; knock-outs of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, plastidial phosphoglucomutase and phosphoglucose isomerase) or (ii) starch mobilization (sex1-3, knock-out of glucan water dikinase) as well as in (iii) maltose export from the chloroplast (mex1-2). Results All double mutants were viable and indistinguishable from the wild type when grown under low light conditions, but - except for sex1-3/tpt-2 - developed a high chlorophyll fluorescence (HCF) phenotype and growth retardation when grown in high light. Immunoblots of thylakoid proteins, Blue-Native gel electrophoresis and chlorophyll fluorescence emission analyses at 77 Kelvin with the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant revealed that HCF was linked to a specific decrease in plastome-encoded core proteins of both photosystems (with the exception of the PSII component cytochrome b559), whereas nuclear-encoded antennae (LHCs) accumulated normally, but were predominantly not attached to their photosystems. Uncoupled antennae are the major cause for HCF of dark-adapted plants. Feeding of sucrose or glucose to high light-grown adg1-1/tpt-2 plants rescued the HCF- and growth phenotypes. Elevated sugar levels induce the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator2 (GPT2), which in principle could compensate for the deficiency in the TPT. A triple mutant with an additional defect in GPT2 (adg1-1/tpt-2/gpt2-1) exhibited an identical rescue of the HCF- and growth phenotype in response to sugar feeding as the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant, indicating that this rescue is independent from the sugar

  12. Changes in the Xanthophyll Cycle and Fluorescence Quenching Indicate Light-Dependent Early Events in the Action of Paraquat and the Mechanism of Resistance to Paraquat in Erigeron canadensis (L.) Cronq1

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, Gyula; Darkó, Éva; Lehoczki, Endre

    2000-01-01

    Violaxanthin de-epoxidation, chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, and photosynthetic O2 evolution in the presence of paraquat (Pq) were studied in intact attached leaves of Pq-susceptible, and Pq-resistant (PqR) biotypes of Erigeron canadensis under different light conditions. Initially, similar changes were induced in the two biotypes, but the effects relaxed only in the PqR plants, indicating a Pq elimination process. The penetration of Pq into the chloroplasts of PqR plants proved to be somewhat restricted and highly light-dependent, as revealed by both the light response curves of violaxanthin de-epoxidation and fluorescence quenching and the short-term high-light pre-illumination experiments. An irregular down-regulation of the non-photochemical fluorescence quenching processes was observed, reflected by lower steady-state zeaxanthin and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching levels as compared with the corresponding non-treated high-light controls. It is concluded that light is essential not only for the initiation of the mechanism of resistance to Pq, but also for the penetration of Pq into the chloroplasts in the PqR E. canadensis. Also, the Pq elimination process may cause a modification to the regulation of the non-radiative energy dissipation in PqR plants in the presence of Pq. PMID:10938362

  13. Seeing the light: the effects of particles, dissolved materials, and temperature on in situ measurements of DOM fluorescence in rivers and streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Pellerin, Brian A.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Saraceno, John Franco; Kraus, Tamara E.C.

    2012-01-01

    Field-deployable sensors designed to continuously measure the fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in situ are of growing interest. However, the ability to make FDOM measurements that are comparable across sites and over time requires a clear understanding of how instrument characteristics and environmental conditions affect the measurements. In particular, the effects of water temperature and light attenuation by both colored dissolved material and suspended particles may be significant in settings such as rivers and streams. Using natural standard reference materials, we characterized the performance of four commercially-available FDOM sensors under controlled laboratory conditions over ranges of temperature, dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations, and turbidity that spanned typical environmental ranges. We also examined field data from several major rivers to assess how often attenuation artifacts or temperature effects might be important. We found that raw (uncorrected) FDOM values were strongly affected by the light attenuation that results from dissolved substances and suspended particles as well as by water temperature. Observed effects of light attenuation and temperature agreed well with theory. Our results show that correction of measured FDOM values to account for these effects is necessary and feasible over much of the range of temperature, DOM concentration, and turbidity commonly encountered in surface waters. In most cases, collecting high-quality FDOM measurements that are comparable through time and between sites will require concurrent measurements of temperature and turbidity, and periodic discrete sample collection for laboratory measurement of DOM.

  14. Rate Constants of PSII Photoinhibition and its Repair, and PSII Fluorescence Parameters in Field Plants in Relation to their Growth Light Environments.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kazunori; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nakaji, Masayoshi; Kanel, Dhana Raj; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The extent of photoinhibition of PSII is determined by a balance between the rate of photodamage to PSII and that of repair of the damaged PSII. It has already been indicated that the rate constants of photodamage (kpi) and repair (krec) of the leaves differ depending on their growth light environment. However, there are no studies using plants in the field. We examined these rate constants and fluorescence parameters of several field-grown plants to determine inter-relationships between these values and the growth environment. The kpi values were strongly related to the excess energy, EY, of the puddle model and non-regulated energy dissipation, Y(NO), of the lake model, both multiplied by the photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) level during the photoinhibitory treatment. In contrast, the krec values corrected against in situ air temperature were very strongly related to the daily PPFD level. The plants from the fields showed higher NPQ than the chamber-grown plants, probably because these field plants acclimated to stronger lightflecks than the averaged growth PPFD. Comparing chamber-grown plants and the field plants, we showed that kpi is determined by the incident light level and the photosynthetic capacities such as in situ rate of PSII electron transport and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) [e.g. Y(NO)×PPFD] and that krec is mostly determined by the growth light and temperature levels. PMID:26203120

  15. Efficient fluorescence/phosphorescence white organic light-emitting diodes with ultra high color stability and mild efficiency roll-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoyang; Tao, Silu; Huang, Yun; Yang, Xiaoxia; Ding, Xulin; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    Efficient fluorescence/phosphorescence hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with single doped co-host structure have been fabricated. Device using 9-Naphthyl-10 -(4-triphenylamine)anthrancene as the fluorescent dopant and Ir(ppy)3 and Ir(2-phq)3 as the green and orange phosphorescent dopants show the luminous efficiency of 12.4% (17.6 lm/W, 27.5 cd/A) at 1000 cd/m2. Most important to note that the efficiency-brightness roll-off of the device was very mild. With the brightness rising up to 5000 and 10 000 cd/m2, the efficiency could be kept at 11.8% (14.0 lm/W, 26.5 cd/A) and 11.0% (11.8 lm/W, 25.0 cd/A). The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates and color rending index (CRI) were measured to be (0.45, 0.48) and 65, respectively, and remained the same in a large range of brightness (1000-10 000 cd/m2), which is scarce in the reported white OLEDs. The performance of the device at high luminance (5000 and 10 000 cd/m2) was among the best reported results including fluorescence/phosphorescence hybrid and all-phosphorescent white OLEDs. Moreover, the CRI of the white OLED can be improved to 83 by using a yellow-green emitter (Ir(ppy)2bop) in the device.

  16. Photodynamic cancer therapy: fluorescence localization and light absorption spectra of chlorophyll-derived photosensitizers inside cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Rueck, Angelika C.; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Westphal-Frosch, Christel

    1992-07-01

    The first prerequisite for an optimum effect of photodynamic therapy with chlorophyll- derived photosensitizers is irradiation at the S1 absorption maximum in the red spectral region. This absorption maximum changes its position due to molecular association by 20 to 100 nm depending on the subcellular environment, and must be determined by direct absorption spectrometry in the region of subcellular sensitizer localization. Fluorescence- intensifying video microscopy allows for localization of the sensitizer storage site at or near the Galgi apparatus of OAT 75 small-cell lung carcinoma cells. The absorption maximum at 760 nm taken from spectra of single cells and cell layers determines the postulated optimum condition for dye laser irradiation with bacteriopheophorbide-a-methyl-ester as the sensitizer.

  17. Lights, camera, action! Capturing the spliceosome and pre-mRNA splicing with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, Alexander C; Norden, Ian S; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    The process of removing intronic sequences from a precursor to messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) to yield a mature mRNA transcript via splicing is an integral step in eukaryotic gene expression. Splicing is carried out by a cellular nanomachine called the spliceosome that is composed of RNA components and dozens of proteins. Despite decades of study, many fundamentals of spliceosome function have remained elusive. Recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy have afforded new tools to better probe the spliceosome and the complex, dynamic process of splicing by direct observation of single molecules. These cutting-edge technologies enable investigators to monitor the dynamics of specific splicing components, whole spliceosomes, and even cotranscriptional splicing within living cells. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:683-701. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1358 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27198613

  18. Lighting the Way to Protein-Protein Interactions: Recommendations on Best Practices for Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Analyses.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Jörg; Bock, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Techniques to detect and verify interactions between proteins in vivo have become invaluable tools in functional genomic research. While many of the initially developed interaction assays (e.g., yeast two-hybrid system and split-ubiquitin assay) usually are conducted in heterologous systems, assays relying on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC; also referred to as split-YFP assays) are applicable to the analysis of protein-protein interactions in most native systems, including plant cells. Like all protein-protein interaction assays, BiFC can produce false positive and false negative results. The purpose of this commentary is to (1) highlight shortcomings of and potential pitfalls in BiFC assays, (2) provide guidelines for avoiding artifactual interactions, and (3) suggest suitable approaches to scrutinize potential interactions and validate them by independent methods. PMID:27099259

  19. Lighting the Way to Protein-Protein Interactions: Recommendations on Best Practices for Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation Analyses[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to detect and verify interactions between proteins in vivo have become invaluable tools in functional genomic research. While many of the initially developed interaction assays (e.g., yeast two-hybrid system and split-ubiquitin assay) usually are conducted in heterologous systems, assays relying on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC; also referred to as split-YFP assays) are applicable to the analysis of protein-protein interactions in most native systems, including plant cells. Like all protein-protein interaction assays, BiFC can produce false positive and false negative results. The purpose of this commentary is to (1) highlight shortcomings of and potential pitfalls in BiFC assays, (2) provide guidelines for avoiding artifactual interactions, and (3) suggest suitable approaches to scrutinize potential interactions and validate them by independent methods. PMID:27099259

  20. Organic light-emitting diodes: multiscale charge transport simulation and fabrication of new thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Hironori; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Suzuki, Furitsu; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-09-01

    Charge transports in amorphous thin films with 100 nm thickness are investigated in silico by explicitly considering organic molecules. The amorphous layer of organic molecules was constructed using molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants for charge hopping between two organic molecules, extracted from the amorphous layers, were calculated based on quantum chemical calculations. The hopping transport in amorphous layers was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The hole mobility was calculated to be several times larger than the electron mobility, which was consistent with the experimental results. The Monte Carlo simulation also shows that diffusion transport is dominant at low applied electric fields and that contribution of drift transport increases at high electric fields. The simulation in this study enables us to reveal molecular origin of charge transport. In the presentation, we will show the results on recently-developed new thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials and the device performances.

  1. Highly Improved Efficiency of Deep-Blue Fluorescent Polymer Light-Emitting Device Based on a Novel Hole Interface Modifier with 1,3,5-Triazine Core.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lianpeng; Xue, Yuyuan; Xiong, Kang; Cai, Chaosheng; Peng, Zuosheng; Wu, Ying; Li, Yuan; Miao, Jingsheng; Chen, Dongcheng; Hu, Zhanhao; Wang, Jianbin; Peng, Xiaobin; Mo, Yueqi; Hou, Lintao

    2015-12-01

    We present an investigation of deep-blue fluorescent polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) with a novel functional 1,3,5-triazine core material (HQTZ) sandwiched between poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) layer and poly(vinylcarbazole) layer as a hole injection layer (HIL) without interface intermixing. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and Kelvin probe measurements were carried out to determine the change of anode work function influenced by the HQTZ modifier. The thin HQTZ layer can efficiently maximize the charge injection from anode to blue emitter and simultaneously enhance the hole mobility of HILs. The deep-blue device performance is remarkably improved with the maximum luminous efficiency of 4.50 cd/A enhanced by 80% and the maximum quantum efficiency of 4.93%, which is 1.8-fold higher than that of the conventional device without HQTZ layer, including a lower turn-on voltage of 3.7 V and comparable Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.16, 0.09). It is the highest efficiency ever reported to date for solution-processed deep-blue PLEDs based on the device structure of ITO/HILs/poly(9,9-dialkoxyphenyl-2,7-silafluorene)/CsF/AL. The results indicate that HQTZ based on 1,3,5-triazine core can be a promising candidate of interfacial materials for deep-blue fluorescent PLEDs. PMID:26422296

  2. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dancheva, Y.; Biancalana, V.; Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F.

    2013-06-15

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}{yields}6p{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2} transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}{yields}6p[3]{sub 5/2}{sup o} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

  3. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dancheva, Y; Biancalana, V; Pagano, D; Scortecci, F

    2013-06-01

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s(2)[3/2]2(o)→6p(2)[3/2]2 transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]7/2→6p[3]5/2(o) transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm. PMID:23822384

  4. Effect of Percent Relative Humidity, Moisture Content, and Compression Force on Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Response as a Process Analytical Tool.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ishan G; Stagner, William C

    2016-08-01

    The effect of percent relative humidity (16-84% RH), moisture content (4.2-6.5% w/w MC), and compression force (4.9-44.1 kN CF) on the light-induced fluorescence (LIF) response of 10% w/w active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) compacts is reported. The fluorescent response was evaluated using two separate central composite designs of experiments. The effect of % RH and CF on the LIF signal was highly significant with an adjusted R (2)  = 0.9436 and p < 0.0001. Percent relative humidity (p = 0.0022), CF (p < 0.0001), and % RH(2) (p = 0.0237) were statistically significant factors affecting the LIF response. The effects of MC and CF on LIF response were also statistically significant with a p value <0.0001 and adjusted R (2) value of 0.9874. The LIF response was highly impacted by MC (p < 0.0001), CF (p < 0.0001), and MC(2) (p = 0022). At 10% w/w API, increased % RH, MC, and CF led to a nonlinear decrease in LIF response. The derived quadratic model equations explained more than 94% of the data. Awareness of these effects on LIF response is critical when implementing LIF as a process analytical tool. PMID:27435199

  5. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy. PMID:26819828

  6. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancheva, Y.; Biancalana, V.; Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F.

    2013-06-01

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s ^2[3/2]^o_2rArr 6p ^2[3/2]_2 transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d [4]_{7/2}rArr 6p [3]^o_{5/2} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

  7. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence from {sup 3}nπ* to {sup 1}nπ* up-conversion and its application to organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Qisheng; Nomura, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-07-07

    Intense nπ* fluorescence from a nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compound, 2,5,8-tris(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)-1,3,4,6,7,9,9b-heptaazaphenalene (HAP-3MF), is demonstrated. The overlap-forbidden nature of the nπ* transition and the higher energy of the {sup 3}ππ* state than the {sup 3}nπ* one lead to a small energy difference between the lowest singlet (S{sub 1}) and triplet (T{sub 1}) excited states of HAP-3MF. Green-emitting HAP-3MF has a moderate photoluminescence quantum yield of 0.26 in both toluene and doped film. However, an organic light-emitting diode containing HAP-3MF achieved a high external quantum efficiency of 6.0%, indicating that HAP-3MF harvests singlet excitons through a thermally activated T{sub 1} → S{sub 1} pathway in the electroluminescent process.

  8. Application of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to determine the depth of demineralization of dental fluorosis in enamel microabrasion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Young; Choi, Han-Sol; Ku, Hee-Won; Kim, Hyun-Su; Lee, Yoo-Jin; Min, Jeong-Bum

    2016-08-01

    Enamel microabrasion has become accepted as a conservative, nonrestorative method of removing intrinsic and superficial dysmineralization defects from dental fluorosis, restoring esthetics with minimal loss of enamel. However, it can be difficult to determine if restoration is necessary in dental fluorosis, because the lesion depth is often not easily recognized. This case report presents a method for analysis of enamel hypoplasia that uses quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) followed by a combination of enamel microabrasion with carbamide peroxide home bleaching. We describe the utility of QLF when selecting a conservative treatment plan and confirming treatment efficacy. In this case, the treatment plan was based on QLF analysis, and the selected combination treatment of microabrasion and bleaching had good results. PMID:27508165

  9. Application of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to determine the depth of demineralization of dental fluorosis in enamel microabrasion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Young; Choi, Han-Sol; Ku, Hee-Won; Kim, Hyun-Su; Lee, Yoo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion has become accepted as a conservative, nonrestorative method of removing intrinsic and superficial dysmineralization defects from dental fluorosis, restoring esthetics with minimal loss of enamel. However, it can be difficult to determine if restoration is necessary in dental fluorosis, because the lesion depth is often not easily recognized. This case report presents a method for analysis of enamel hypoplasia that uses quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) followed by a combination of enamel microabrasion with carbamide peroxide home bleaching. We describe the utility of QLF when selecting a conservative treatment plan and confirming treatment efficacy. In this case, the treatment plan was based on QLF analysis, and the selected combination treatment of microabrasion and bleaching had good results. PMID:27508165

  10. Benzimidazobenzothiazole-Based Bipolar Hosts to Harvest Nearly All of the Excitons from Blue Delayed Fluorescence and Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin-Song; Kim, Jong Uk; Nomura, Hiroko; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    Much effort has been devoted to developing highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) that function through phosphorescence or thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). However, efficient host materials for blue TADF and phosphorescent guest emitters are limited because of their requirement of high triplet energy levels. Herein, we report the rigid acceptor unit benzimidazobenzothiazole (BID-BT), which is suitable for use in bipolar hosts in blue OLEDs. The designed host materials, based on BID-BT, possess high triplet energy and bipolar carrier transport ability. Both blue TADF and phosphorescent OLEDs containing BID-BT-based derivatives exhibit external quantum efficiencies as high as 20 %, indicating that these hosts allow efficient triplet exciton confinement appropriate for blue TADF and phosphorescent guest emitters. PMID:27101424

  11. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  12. Synthesis and photophysical properties of 1,2-diphenylindolizine derivatives: fluorescent blue-emitting materials for organic light-emitting device.

    PubMed

    Song, Yeong Ran; Lim, Choon Woo; Kim, Tae Woo

    2016-03-01

    New blue-emitting materials based on 1,2-diphenylindolizine were designed and synthesized through a microwave-assisted Suzuki coupling reaction. The photophysical, electrochemical, and thermal properties of the 1,2-diphenylindolizine derivatives were investigated using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The 1,2-diphenylindolizine derivatives had band gaps of 3.1-3.4 eV and indicated proper emission of around 450 nm without significant difference between in solution and thin solid film. The indolizine derivatives show an enhanced thermal stability (∆Tm  > 100 °C), compared with 1,2-diphenylindolizine. These results suggest the 1,2-diphenylindolizine derivatives are suitable for blue-emitting materials in organic light-emitting devices. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26192394

  13. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  14. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer.

  15. High-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence from triazine-based donor-acceptor hybrid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn Lee, Sae; Yasuda, Takuma; Nomura, Hiroko; Adachi, Chihaya

    2012-08-01

    We have designed and synthesized a high-efficiency purely organic luminescent material, 2,4-bis{3-(9 H-carbazol-9-yl)-9 H-carbazol-9-yl}-6-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine (CC2TA) comprising the bicarbazole donor and phenyltriazine acceptor units, which is capable of emitting thermally activated delayed fluorescence. The molecular design of CC2TA allows spatial separation of HOMO and LUMO on the donor and acceptor fragments, respectively, leading to an exceptionally small singlet-triplet exchange energy (ΔEST = 0.06 eV) together with a high triplet energy. Furthermore, a high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency as high as 11% ± 1% has been achieved in the sky-blue organic light-emitting diodes employing CC2TA as an emitter.

  16. Highly efficient solution-processed host-free organic light-emitting diodes showing an external quantum efficiency of nearly 18% with a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshimasa; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Kubo, Shosei; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Miwa, Takuya; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Kaji, Hironori

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate solution-processed host-free organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter 10-[4-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]-9,9-dimethylacridan (DMAC-TRZ). A spin-coated neat DMAC-TRZ film shows weak concentration quenching, leading to a high photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 84%. OLEDs containing a neat film of DMAC-TRZ display a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 17.6%. Both the PLQY and EQE are the highest reported for solution-processed host-free films and OLEDs, respectively. In addition, the OLEDs exhibit an EQE of 16.8% at high luminance (over 400 cd m-2).

  17. Effect of reverse intersystem crossing rate to suppress efficiency roll-off in organic light-emitting diodes with thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Munetomo; Serevičius, Tomas; Nakanotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Kou; Matsushima, Toshinori; Juršėnas, Saulius; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Electroluminescence efficiency roll-off in organic light-emitting diodes with thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters 1,2-bis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,5-dicyanobenzene (2CzPN) and 3-(9,9-dimethylacridin-10(9H)-yl)-9H-xanthen-9-one (ACRXTN) is investigated by considering intramolecular exciton relaxation processes. Electroluminescence efficiency roll-off at high current density is dramatically suppressed using ACRXTN as an emitter instead of 2CzPN because of suppressed bimolecular exciton annihilation processes such as singlet-triplet and triplet-triplet annihilation. The rate constant of reverse intersystem crossing from triplet to singlet excited states of ACRXTN is about 300 times higher than that of 2CzPN, decreasing triplet exciton density and suppressing exciton annihilation processes under optical and electrical excitation.

  18. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence from 3nπ* to 1nπ* up-conversion and its application to organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Qisheng; Nomura, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-07-01

    Intense nπ* fluorescence from a nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compound, 2,5,8-tris(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)-1,3,4,6,7,9,9b-heptaazaphenalene (HAP-3MF), is demonstrated. The overlap-forbidden nature of the nπ* transition and the higher energy of the 3ππ* state than the 3nπ* one lead to a small energy difference between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) excited states of HAP-3MF. Green-emitting HAP-3MF has a moderate photoluminescence quantum yield of 0.26 in both toluene and doped film. However, an organic light-emitting diode containing HAP-3MF achieved a high external quantum efficiency of 6.0%, indicating that HAP-3MF harvests singlet excitons through a thermally activated T1 → S1 pathway in the electroluminescent process.

  19. Conformational States of the Rapana thomasiana Hemocyanin and Its Substructures Studied by Dynamic Light Scattering and Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Dessislava; Schwark, Daniel; Nikolov, Peter; Idakieva, Krassimira; Parvanova, Katja; Dierks, Karsten; Genov, Nicolay; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Hemocyanins are dioxygen-transporting proteins freely dissolved in the hemolymph of mollusks and arthropods. Dynamic light scattering and time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the oxygenated and apo-forms of the Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin, its structural subunits RtH1 and RtH2, and those of the functional unit RtH2e, exist in different conformations. The oxygenated respiratory proteins are less compact and more asymmetric than the respective apo-forms. Different conformational states were also observed for the R. thomasiana hemocyanin in the absence and presence of an allosteric regulator. The results are in agreement with a molecular mechanism for cooperative dioxygen binding in molluscan hemocyanins including transfer of conformational changes from one functional unit to another. PMID:15533921

  20. A Convenient Lecture Demonstration of Fluorescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Hugh D.; Axtell, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes fluorescence experiments demonstrating that emitted light is at longer wavelengths than absorbed light and that fluorescence decays rapidly when the source of excitation is removed. Systems whose acidic and basic forms have different fluorescent characteristics are used to demonstrate fluorescence visible and invisible to the naked eye.…

  1. Botany: floral fluorescence effect.

    PubMed

    Gandía-Herrero, Fernando; García-Carmona, Francisco; Escribano, Josefa

    2005-09-15

    The way flowers appear to insects is crucial for pollination. Here we describe an internal light-filtering effect in the flowers of Mirabilis jalapa, in which the visible fluorescence emitted by one pigment, a yellow betaxanthin, is absorbed by another, a violet betacyanin, to create a contrasting fluorescent pattern on the flower's petals. This finding opens up new possibilities for pollinator perception as fluorescence has not previously been considered as a potential signal in flowers. PMID:16163341

  2. Synthesis of highly white-fluorescent Cu-Ga-S quantum dots for solid-state lighting devices.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae-Yeon; Yang, Heesun

    2016-01-14

    The synthesis of highly efficient, white-emitting Cu-Ga-S quantum dots (QDs), which possess not only sufficiently wide spectral coverage of blue-to-red but an exceptional quantum yield as high as 75%, is demonstrated. These QDs are further applied as down-converters with a near-UV light-emitting diode (LED) for the fabrication of white QD-LEDs. PMID:26579551

  3. Nearly 100% triplet harvesting in conventional fluorescent dopant-based organic light-emitting devices through energy transfer from exciplex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Chen, Miao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-03-25

    Nearly 100% triplet harvesting in conventional fluorophor-based organic light-emitting devices is realized through energy transfer from exciplex. The best C545T-doped device using the exciplex host exhibits a maximum current efficiency of 44.0 cd A(-1) , a maximum power efficiency of 46.1 lm W(-1) , and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 14.5%. PMID:25676085

  4. Discrimination of fluorescence light-up effects induced by pH and metal ion chelation on a spirocyclic derivative of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andreia; Silva, Ana M G; Cunha-Silva, Luís; de Castro, Baltazar; Gameiro, Paula; Rangel, Maria

    2013-05-01

    In the present work we describe the structure and the spectroscopic characterization of a spirocyclic derivative of a rhodamine B ligand whose properties allow discrimination of light-up effects induced by metal ion chelation and variation of pH. Distinction of the two effects is important for the use of this type of ligand to detect and monitor metal ions in aqueous solutions. The synthesis of the ligand was performed in two steps, which involve the reaction of rhodamine B with hydrazine hydrate to form rhodamine B hydrazide followed by condensation with 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and was successfully optimized using a solvent free approach under microwave irradiation. The ligand was obtained in the expected spirolactam form and was characterized in the solid state by EA, MS and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The ligand was characterized in solution by NMR and absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies and its properties were found to be sensitive to pH and concentration of iron(III). The study of the fluorescence properties at variable pH shows that the compound is fluorescent in the range 2 < pH < 4 with maximum intensity at pH 3 and allowed the determination of two pK(a) values (pK(a1) = 2.98, pK(a2) = 2.89) and establishment of the corresponding distribution diagram. The very low pK(a) values guarantee that above pH equal to 4 the ligand is mostly present in the fully non-protonated and non-fluorescent form L. The study of the interaction of the ligand with iron(iii) was performed in DMSO and DMSO-H(2)O to exclude the influence of pH and due to the low solubility of the compound. The results indicate that the presence of iron(III) triggers the opening of the spirolactam form of the ligand and the maximum intensity obtained at a metal : ligand ratio of 1 : 2 is consistent with the formation of an iron(III) complex with the tridentate ligand. PMID:23299402

  5. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  6. Highly Efficient Cuprous Complexes with Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence for Solution-Processed Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Chen, Xu-Lin; Liao, Jian-Zhen; Hu, Jin-Yu; Jia, Ji-Hui; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Two mononuclear cuprous complexes [Cu(PNNA)(POP)]BF4 (1) and [Cu(PNNA)(Xantphos)]BF4 (2) (PNNA = 9,9-dimethyl-10-(6-(3-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl)-9,10-dihydroacridine, POP = bis[2-(dipenylphosphino)phenyl]ether, Xantphos =4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-9,9-dimethylxanthene), with intense bluish-green luminescence based on a new diimine ligand were designed and synthesized. Their structural, electrochemical, and photophysical properties were characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, cyclic voltammetry, temperature dependence of spectroscopy, time-dependent emission spectroscopy, etc. The complexes exhibit high photoluminescence quantum yields in doped films (up to 74.6%) at room temperature. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence based on intraligand charge transfer was observed by grafting a strong electron-donor moiety, 9,9-dimethylacridan, on the diimine ligand, which is supported by the density functional theory calculations on two complexes. Highly efficient solution-processed OLEDs based on these two complexes were fabricated, among which the electroluminescent device using 2 as dopant shows a peak external quantum efficiency of 7.42%, a peak current efficiency of 20.24 cd/A, and a maximum brightness of 5579 cd/m(2). PMID:27404980

  7. Isomeric Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters for Color Purity-Improved Emission in Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Yang; Liu, Wei; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Wang, Kai; Li, Fan; Tao, Si Lu; Ou, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2016-07-01

    To improve the color purity of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters, two isomeric compounds, oPTC (5'-(phenoxazin-10-yl)-[1,1':3',1″-terphenyl]-2'-carbonitrile) and mPTC (2'-(phenoxazin-10-yl)-[1,1':3',1″-terphenyl]-5'-carbonitrile), were designed and synthesized with same skeleton but different molecular restrictions. Both compounds exhibit similar highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital distributions and energy levels, photophysical properties in nonpolar cyclohexane solution, and high external quantum efficiencies (19.9% for oPTC and 17.4% for mPTC) in the devices. With the increased molecular space restriction induced by the additional phenyl substitutions at meta-position of the cyano group from mPTC to oPTC, much weaker positive solvatochromic effect is observed for mPTC. And the color purity of emission from mPTC (full width at half-maximum (fwhm) of 86 nm) is also improved contrasted with that of oPTC (fwhm of 97 nm) in the devices. These results prove that increased restriction of the molecular structure is a simple and effective method to improve the color purity of the TADF emitters. PMID:27296853

  8. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  9. High-Throughput Growth Prediction for Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Moriyuki, Shogo; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Poorly grown plants that result from differences in individuals lead to large profit losses for plant factories that use large electric power sources for cultivation. Thus, identifying and culling the low-grade plants at an early stage, using so-called seedlings diagnosis technology, plays an important role in avoiding large losses in plant factories. In this study, we developed a high-throughput diagnosis system using the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) in a commercial large-scale plant factory, which produces about 5000 lettuce plants every day. At an early stage (6 days after sowing), a CF image of 7200 seedlings was captured every 4 h on the final greening day by a high-sensitivity CCD camera and an automatic transferring machine, and biological indices were extracted. Using machine learning, plant growth can be predicted with a high degree of accuracy based on biological indices including leaf size, amount of CF, and circadian rhythms in CF. Growth prediction was improved by addition of temporal information on CF. The present data also provide new insights into the relationships between growth and temporal information regulated by the inherent biological clock. PMID:27242805

  10. High-Throughput Growth Prediction for Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting.

    PubMed

    Moriyuki, Shogo; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Poorly grown plants that result from differences in individuals lead to large profit losses for plant factories that use large electric power sources for cultivation. Thus, identifying and culling the low-grade plants at an early stage, using so-called seedlings diagnosis technology, plays an important role in avoiding large losses in plant factories. In this study, we developed a high-throughput diagnosis system using the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) in a commercial large-scale plant factory, which produces about 5000 lettuce plants every day. At an early stage (6 days after sowing), a CF image of 7200 seedlings was captured every 4 h on the final greening day by a high-sensitivity CCD camera and an automatic transferring machine, and biological indices were extracted. Using machine learning, plant growth can be predicted with a high degree of accuracy based on biological indices including leaf size, amount of CF, and circadian rhythms in CF. Growth prediction was improved by addition of temporal information on CF. The present data also provide new insights into the relationships between growth and temporal information regulated by the inherent biological clock. PMID:27242805

  11. Fluorescence-guided surgery, but not bright-light surgery, prevents local recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC)

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CEA-positive tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS + NAC; FGS only; and FGS + NAC. An anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via tail vein of mice with a pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was clearly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. Only one out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS only group and zero out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS + NAC which was significantly lower than BLS only or BLS +NAC mice, where local disease recurred in 6 out of 8 mice in each treatment group (p = 0.041 and p = 0.007, respectively). NAC did not significantly reduce recurrence rates when combined with either FGS or BLS. These results indicate that FGS can significantly reduce local recurrence compared to BLS in pancreatic cancer resistant to NAC. PMID:25800176

  12. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  13. Effect of CPP-ACP Paste on Enamel Carious Lesion of Primary Upper Anterior Teeth Assessed by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence: A One-Year Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sitthisettapong, Thanya; Doi, Takashi; Nishida, Yuhei; Kambara, Masaki; Phantumvanit, Prathip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of 1 year of daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate) paste in addition to regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste on the remineralization of enamel carious lesions in preschool children using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). A total of 103 Thai children (aged 2(1)/2-3(1)/2 years) with high caries risk who had at least 1 enamel carious lesion (ICDAS 1-3) on the labial surface of the upper anterior teeth were assigned to receive either CPP-ACP paste (n = 53) or placebo control (n = 50) following toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste after lunch at school. QLF measurement was performed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year. At 1 year, a significant reduction in fluorescence loss (ΔF), lesion area and lesion volume (ΔQ; p ≤ 0.001) of the lesions were found over time in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed between the groups (p = 0.79, 0.98 and 0.88, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the odds of ΔQ transition to a stage of regression or arrest compared with progression from baseline to 1 year between the two groups (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.31-3.39). The daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP paste on a school day for 1 year resulted in no improvement of enamel carious lesion remineralization in the primary upper anterior teeth as assessed by QLF. The lesion improvement was not superior to remineralization from regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste alone in these children. PMID:26228178

  14. Distinct roles of the photosystem II protein PsbS and zeaxanthin in the regulation of light harvesting in plants revealed by fluorescence lifetime snapshots

    SciTech Connect

    Sylak-Glassman, Emily J.; Malnoë, Alizée; De Re, Eleonora; Brooks, Matthew D.; Fischer, Alexandra Lee; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-10-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) protein PsbS and the enzyme violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) are known to influence the dynamics of energy-dependent quenching (qE), the component of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) that allows plants to respond to fast fluctuations in light intensity. Although the absence of PsbS and VDE has been shown to change the amount of quenching, there have not been any measurements that can detect whether the presence of these proteins alters the type of quenching that occurs. The chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime probes the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics and can be used to determine the amount of quenching as well as whether two different genotypes with the same amount of NPQ have similar dynamics of excited-state chlorophyll relaxation. We measured the fluorescence lifetimes on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana throughout the induction and relaxation of NPQ for wild type and the qE mutants, npq4, which lacks PsbS; npq1, which lacks VDE and cannot convert violaxanthin to zeaxanthin; and npq1 npq4, which lacks both VDE and PsbS. These measurements show that although PsbS changes the amount of quenching and the rate at which quenching turns on, it does not affect the relaxation dynamics of excited chlorophyll during quenching. In addition, the data suggest that PsbS responds not only to ΔpH but also to the Δψ across the thylakoid membrane. In contrast, the presence of VDE, which is necessary for the accumulation of zeaxanthin, affects the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics.

  15. Two-photon excitation spectrum of light-harvesting complex II and fluorescence upconversion after one- and two-photon excitation of the carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Walla, P.J.; Yom, J.; Krueger, B.P.; Fleming, G.R.

    2000-05-18

    The two-photon excitation (TPE) spectrum of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has been measured in the spectral region of 1,000--1,600 nm, corresponding to one-photon wavelengths of 500--800 nm. The authors observed a band with an origin at {approximately}2 x 660 nm (ca. 15,100 {+-} 300 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a maximum at {approximately}2 x 600 nm. The line shape and origin of this band strongly suggest that the observed signal is due to the two-photon-allowed S{sub 1} state of the energy-transferring carotenoids (Car ) in LHC II. The authors also report the time dependence of the upconverted chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence after TPE at the maximum of the observed band. Surprisingly, a fast rise of 250 {+-} 50 fs followed by a multiexponential decay on the picosecond time scale was observed. This result provides strong indication that there is a fast energy transfer even from the dipole-forbidden Car S{sub 1} state to the Chl's. The sub picosecond energy transfer from the Car S{sub 1} state is likely a consequence of the large number of energy-accepting Chls in van der Waals contact with the central Car's in LHC II. They also present upconversion data of the Car S{sub 2}, Chl a, and Chl b fluorescence observed after one-photon excitation into the dipole-allowed Car S{sub 2} state. The lifetime of the Car S{sub 2} state is {approximately}120 {+-} 30 fs. With the observed time constants they are able to calculate quantum yields for the different possible pathways contributing to the overall Car to Chl energy transfer in LHC II.

  16. Distinct roles of the photosystem II protein PsbS and zeaxanthin in the regulation of light harvesting in plants revealed by fluorescence lifetime snapshots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sylak-Glassman, Emily J.; Malnoë, Alizée; De Re, Eleonora; Brooks, Matthew D.; Fischer, Alexandra Lee; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2014-10-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) protein PsbS and the enzyme violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) are known to influence the dynamics of energy-dependent quenching (qE), the component of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) that allows plants to respond to fast fluctuations in light intensity. Although the absence of PsbS and VDE has been shown to change the amount of quenching, there have not been any measurements that can detect whether the presence of these proteins alters the type of quenching that occurs. The chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime probes the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics and can be used to determine the amount of quenching as well asmore » whether two different genotypes with the same amount of NPQ have similar dynamics of excited-state chlorophyll relaxation. We measured the fluorescence lifetimes on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana throughout the induction and relaxation of NPQ for wild type and the qE mutants, npq4, which lacks PsbS; npq1, which lacks VDE and cannot convert violaxanthin to zeaxanthin; and npq1 npq4, which lacks both VDE and PsbS. These measurements show that although PsbS changes the amount of quenching and the rate at which quenching turns on, it does not affect the relaxation dynamics of excited chlorophyll during quenching. In addition, the data suggest that PsbS responds not only to ΔpH but also to the Δψ across the thylakoid membrane. In contrast, the presence of VDE, which is necessary for the accumulation of zeaxanthin, affects the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics.« less

  17. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  18. Analysis of signal processing in vestibular circuits with a novel light-emitting diodes-based fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Direnberger, Stephan; Banchi, Roberto; Brosel, Sonja; Seebacher, Christian; Laimgruber, Stefan; Uhl, Rainer; Felmy, Felix; Straka, Hans; Kunz, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Optical visualization of neural network activity is limited by imaging system-dependent technical tradeoffs. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a powerful low-cost and flexible imaging system with high spectral variability and unique spatio-temporal precision for simultaneous optical recording and manipulation of neural activity of large cell groups. The system comprises eight high-power light-emitting diodes, a camera with a large metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor and a high numerical aperture water-dipping objective. It allows fast and precise control of excitation and simultaneous low noise imaging at high resolution. Adjustable apertures generated two independent areas of variable size and position for simultaneous optical activation and image capture. The experimental applicability of this system was explored in semi-isolated preparations of larval axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) with intact inner ear organs and central nervous circuits. Cyclic galvanic stimulation of semicircular canals together with glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-uncaging caused a corresponding modulation of Ca(2+) transients in central vestibular neurons. These experiments revealed specific cellular properties as well as synaptic interactions between excitatory and inhibitory inputs, responsible for spatio-temporal-specific sensory signal processing. Location-specific GABA-uncaging revealed a potent inhibitory shunt of vestibular nerve afferent input in the predominating population of tonic vestibular neurons, indicating a considerable impact of local and commissural inhibitory circuits on the processing of head/body motion-related signals. The discovery of these previously unknown properties of vestibular computations demonstrates the merits of our novel microscope system for experimental applications in the field of neurobiology. PMID:25847143

  19. Species-specific and seasonal differences in chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic light response among three evergreen species in a Madrean sky island mixed conifer forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, D. L.; Minor, R. L.; Braun, Z.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Unlike the snowmelt-dominated hydroclimate of more northern mountainous regions, the hydroclimate of the Madrean sky islands is characterized by snowmelt and convective storms associated with the North American Monsoon. These mid-summer storms trigger biological activity and are important drivers of primary productivity. For example, at the highest elevations where mixed conifer forests occur, ecosystem carbon balance is influenced by monsoon rains. Whereas these storms' significance is increasingly recognized at the ecosystem scale, species-specific physiological responses to the monsoon are poorly known. Prior to and following monsoon onset, we measured pre-dawn and light-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence as well as photosynthetic light response in southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Madrean sky island mixed conifer forest near Tucson, Arizona. Photochemical quenching (qp), an indicator of the proportion of open PSII reaction centers, was greatest in P. strobiformis and least in P. menziesii and increased in response to monsoon rains (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,14 = 6.17, P = 0.012; time, F2,14= 8.17, P = 0.013). In contrast, non-photochemical quenching (qN), an indicator of heat dissipation ability, was greatest in P. ponderosa and least in P. menziesii, but was not influenced by monsoon onset (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,12 = 4.18, P = 0.042). Estimated from leaf area-adjusted photosynthetic light response curves, maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax) was greatest in P. ponderosa and least in P. menziesii (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,8= 40.8, P = 0.001). Surprisingly, while the monsoon positively influenced Amax among P. ponderosa and P. strobiformis, Amax of P. menziesii declined with monsoon onset (repeated-measures ANOVA; species x time, F2,8 = 13.8, P = 0.002). Calculated as the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response curve, light

  20. Real-Time Intraoperative Assessment of the Extrahepatic Bile Ducts in Rats and Pigs Using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Choi, Hak Soo; Humblet, Valerie; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Laurence, Rita G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2008-01-01

    Background Currently, only x-ray fluoroscopy is available for visualization of the extrahepatic bile ducts intraoperatively. We hypothesized that with an appropriate fluorophore and imaging system, invisible near-infrared (NIR) light could be used for image-guided procedures on the extrahepatic bile ducts. Methods We quantified the performance of three 800 nm NIR fluorophores, differing primarily in their degree of hydrophilicity, for real-time imaging of the extrahepatic bile ducts in rats and pigs: IR-786, indocyanine green (ICG), and the carboxylic form of IRDye™ 800CW (CW800-CA). The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of the CBD relative to liver and pancreas was measured as a function of the dose of contrast agent, injection site, and kinetics using a previously described intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging system. Bile samples were examined by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) to determine the chemical form of fluorophores in bile. Results Non-sulfonated (IR-786) and di-sulfonated (ICG) NIR fluorophores had poor efficiency and kinetics of excretion into bile. Tetra-sulfonated CW800-CA, however, provided sensitive, specific, and real-time visualization of the extrahepatic bile ducts after a single low-dose given either intraportally or intravenously via systemic vein. A SBR ≥2 provided sensitive assessment of extrahepatic bile duct anatomy and function, including the detection of millimeter-sized, radiolucent inclusions in pigs, for over 30 min post-injection. CW800-CA remained chemically intact after secretion into bile. Conclusion The combination of invisible NIR light and an IV injection of CW800-CA provides prolonged, real-time visualization of the extrahepatic bile ducts, without ionizing radiation, and without changing the look of the surgical field. PMID:18571583

  1. Fluorescent Gage Indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barns, C. E.; Gilbaugh, B. L.; Gin, B.; Holt, W. L.; Lesak, P.; Mancini, R.; Spencer, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of dye shows quality of contact between two mating parts. Mating parts checked for fit by spreading fluorescent dye on one, making brief light contact with other, and looking (under UV light) for transferred dye. Dye offers greater visibility under ultraviolet illumination, allowing better indication of how precisely parts match and what areas interfere.

  2. Labelling of living mammalian spermatozoa with the fluorescent thiol alkylating agent, monobromobimane (MB): immobilization upon exposure to ultraviolet light and analysis of acrosomal status

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.M.; Fleming, A.D.; Crozet, N.; Kuehl, T.J.; Kosower, N.S.; Yanagimachi, R.

    1986-03-01

    Living spermatozoa of seven mammalian species were treated with the thiol-alkylating fluorescent labelling compound, monobromobimane (MBBR). MB-labelling alone had no effect on sperm motility, nor on the time course or ability of golden hamster spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction when capacitated in vitro. Exposure of MB-labelled spermatozoa to ultraviolet (UV) light and excitation of the MB fluorochrome resulted in virtually immediate immobilization of the spermatozoa without affecting acrosomal status. UV exposure of unlabelled spermatozoa for up to 30 sec had no effect upon motility. Immobilization of MB-labelled spermatozoa depended on the midpiece being irradiated, as irradiation of the head alone, or of the more distal parts of the principal piece, had little or no effect upon motility. Labelling with MB followed by immobilization of individually selected spermatozoa was most useful for detailing the course and site of occurrence of the acrosome reaction during penetration of the cumulus oophorus by golden hamster spermatozoa in vitro. In these often hyperactivated spermatozoa, precise determination of the acrosomal status could not often otherwise be made due to the difficulty in visualizing the acrosomal region of a vigorously thrashing, hyperactivated spermatozoon. This technique should prove valuable in a variety of studies on sperm motility, capacitation and fertilization, and could also be extended to other cell systems.

  3. Synthesis of fluorescent C2-bridged teraryls and quateraryls for blue, sky-blue, and green color light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Sharma, Ashutosh; Rawat, Madhu; Anand, R S; Kant, Ruchir

    2014-11-21

    A series of fluorescent teraryls and quateraryls were prepared from a ketene-S,S-acetal under mild conditions. These compounds exhibited blue, sky-blue and green color emissions both in the solid state and in a solution with good quantum yields, positive solvatochromic behavior, and reversible oxidation and reduction properties. The electronic characteristics of teraryl 6a and quateraryls 9a,b were examined by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Light-emitting devices were fabricated from teraryl 6a and quateraryls 9a,b as dyes and the configuration of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (40 nm)/NPB (20 nm)/ dye (50 nm)/BCP (7 nm)/ LiF (0.7 nm)/Al (200 nm), which exhibited electroluminescence maxima of 455, 480, and 525 nm, respectively. These devices operated at a substantially low turn-on voltage (3 and 4 V) and exhibited maximum luminance efficiencies of 0.62, 0.57, and 1.9 cd/A and brightnesses of 59, 160, and 1284 cd/m(2), respectively. PMID:25340860

  4. Novel Carbazol-Pyridine-Carbonitrile Derivative as Excellent Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter for Highly Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhan; Chen, Dong-Yang; Li, Fan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Dong, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-09-01

    A novel blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter, CPC (2,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)-4-phenylpyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile), was designed and synthesized. By directly linking carbazole (to serve as electron-donor) and pyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile (to serve as electron-acceptor), and distributing cyanogroups and carbazole groups at the para-position of pyridine core, CPC successfully achieves an extremely small singlet-triplet splitting and fairish photoluminescence quantum yield, thus can act as the highly efficient blue TADF emitter. The optimized organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on 13 wt % CPC doped in mCP (1,3-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)benzene) host exhibits maximum current efficiency, power efficiency, and external quantum efficiency of 47.7 cd A(-1), 42.8 lm W(-1), and 21.2%, respectively, which are the best results in reported blue TADF-based devices up to date and even comparable with the best reported blue phosphorescent OLEDs. PMID:26289611

  5. Enhanced optical properties of heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal method: Fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption and visible light transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Geping; Fan, Huiqing; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-12-01

    Many researchers investigated the properties of either discrete metal oxide CeO2 or ZnO materials. However, less attention has been paid to the various nanostructure and performances of CeO2 and ZnO nanocomposite up to now. In this paper, a facile and low cost one-pot hydrothermal synthesis method has been adopted to obtained directly precursors of CeCO3OH and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 with different Ce atom molar ratios to Zn, which are transformed into their corresponding metal oxide to form the ZnO/CeO2 heterostructure nanocomposites (HSNCs) by pyrolysis. The heterostructure is composed of ZnO and CeO2 monocrystals, simultaneously, CeO2 monocrystals are well dispersed on the surface of ZnO monocrystal for cosmetics. Bing dependent on the analysis results of XRD and TEM for the obtained precursors before and after pyrolysis, the formation mechanism of HSNCs was proposed. To the best of our knowledge, the paper first reported heterostructured ZnO/CeO2 nanocomposite grown in one-pot mixed aqueous solution of cerium nitrate, zinc acetate and urea without other extra surfactant. Additionally, the influence of various Ce/Zn molar ratios on the heterostructure, fluorescence emission and UV-visible absorption properties of HSNCs was investigated in detail. ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs display higher fluorescence emission with the increasing Ce/Zn molar ratio. Meanwhile, the larger Ce/Zn molar ratio of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs, the stronger transparency in the visible light region and the weaker UV absorption. The results are due to the fact that the band gap of ZnO/CeO2 HSNCs will decrease from 3.25 to 3.08 eV when Ce/Zn atom molar ratio is increased from 0 to 0.08. By the comprehensive analysis on the optical performances of HSNCs with the different Ce/Zn atom molar ratios, ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs could become UV absorber materials and transparent material in the visible region. ZnO/CeO2-0.04 HSNCs with the UV-filtering and Vis-transparent properties is appropriate for personal-care cosmetics.

  6. Kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing produced by alpha-sarcin on phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine vesicles: stopped-flow light scattering and fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Mancheño, J. M.; Gasset, M.; Lacadena, J.; Ramón, F.; Martínez del Pozo, A.; Oñaderra, M.; Gavilanes, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    alpha-Sarcin is a fungal cytotoxic protein that inactivates the eukaryotic ribosomes. A kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing promoted by this protein on phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles has been performed. Egg yolk PG, bovine brain PS, dimyristoyl-PG (DMPG) and dimyristoyl-PS (DMPS) vesicles have been considered. The initial rates of the vesicle aggregation induced by the protein have been measured by stopped-flow 90 degrees light scattering. The formation of a vesicle dimer as the initial step of this process was deduced from the second-order dependence of the initial rates on phospholipid concentration. The highest alpha-sarcin concentration studied did not inhibit the vesicle aggregation, indicating that many protein molecules are involved in the vesicle cross-linking. These are common characteristics of the initial steps of the aggregation produced by alpha-sarcin in the four types of phospholipid vesicles considered. However, the kinetics of the scattering values revealed that more complex changes occurred in the later steps of the aggregation process of egg PG and brain PS vesicles than in those of their synthetic counterparts. alpha-Sarcin produced lipid mixing in vesicles composed of DMPG or DMPS, which was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. A delay in the onset of the process, dependent on the protein concentration, was observed. Measurement of the rates of lipid mixing revealed that the process is first order on phospholipid concentration. Egg PG and brain PS vesicles did not show lipid mixing, although they avidly aggregated. However, alpha-sarcin was able to promote lipid mixing in heterogeneous systems composed of egg PG+DMPG or brain PS+DMPS vesicles. The dilution of the fluorescence probes was faster when these were incorporated into the bilayers made of synthetic phospholipids than were present in those made of natural phospholipids. The bilayer destabilization produced by the

  7. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  8. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  9. Fluorescence changes accompanying short-term light adaptations in photosystem I and photosystem II of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and phycobiliprotein-impaired mutants: State 1/State 2 transitions and carotenoid-induced quenching of phycobilisomes.

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, Igor N; Lukashev, Evgeny P; Elanskaya, Irina V

    2009-03-01

    The features of the two types of short-term light-adaptations of photosynthetic apparatus, State 1/State 2 transitions, and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching of phycobilisomes (PBS) by orange carotene-protein (OCP) were compared in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type, CK pigment mutant lacking phycocyanin, and PAL mutant totally devoid of phycobiliproteins. The permanent presence of PBS-specific peaks in the in situ action spectra of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), as well as in the 77 K fluorescence excitation spectra for chlorophyll emission at 690 nm (PSII) and 725 nm (PSI) showed that PBS are constitutive antenna complexes of both photosystems. The mutant strains compensated the lack of phycobiliproteins by higher PSII content and by intensification of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. The detectable changes of energy migration from PBS to the PSI and PSII in the Synechocystis wild type and the CK mutant in State 1 and State 2 according to the fluorescence excitation spectra measurements were not registered. The constant level of fluorescence emission of PSI during State 1/State 2 transitions and simultaneous increase of chlorophyll fluorescence emission of PSII in State 1 in Synechocystis PAL mutant allowed to propose that spillover is an unlikely mechanism of state transitions. Blue-green light absorbed by OCP diminished the rout of energy from PBS to PSI while energy migration from PBS to PSII was less influenced. Therefore, the main role of OCP-induced quenching of PBS is the limitation of PSI activity and cyclic electron transport under relatively high light conditions. PMID:19169839

  10. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  11. Fluorescence endoscopic video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Kang, Uk

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a fluorescence endoscopic video system intended for the diagnosis of diseases of the internal organs. The system operates on the basis of two-channel recording of the video fluxes from a fluorescence channel and a reflected-light channel by means of a high-sensitivity monochrome television camera and a color camera, respectively. Examples are given of the application of the device in gastroenterology.

  12. Let them fly or light them up: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Moter, Annette; Lefmann, Michael; Göbel, Ulf B

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on clinical bacteriology and by and large does not cover the detection of fungi, viruses or parasites. It discusses two completely different but complementary approaches that may either supplement or replace classic culture-based bacteriology. The latter view may appear provocative in the light of the actual market penetration of molecular genetic testing in clinical bacteriology. Despite its elegance, high specificity and sensitivity, molecular genetic diagnostics has not yet reached the majority of clinical laboratories. The reasons for this are manifold: Many microbiologists and medical technologists are more familiar with classical microbiological methods than with molecular biology techniques. Culture-based methods still represent the work horse of everyday routine. The number of available FDA-approved molecular genetic tests is limited and external quality control is still under development. Finally, it appears difficult to incorporate genetic testing in the routine laboratory setting due to the limited number of samples received or the lack of appropriate resources. However, financial and time constraints, particularly in hospitals as a consequence of budget cuts and reduced length of stay, lead to a demand for significantly shorter turnaround times that cannot be met by culture-dependent diagnosis. As a consequence, smaller laboratories that do not have the technical and personal equipment required for molecular genetic amplification techniques may adopt alternative methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that combines easy-to-perform molecular hybridization with microscopy, a technique familiar to every microbiologist. FISH is hence one of the technologies presented here. For large hospital or reference laboratories with a high sample volume requiring massive parallel high-throughput testing we discuss matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of nucleic acids, a

  13. Measuring Size, Size Distribution, and Polydispersity of Water-in-Oil Microemulsion Droplets using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-02-11

    Water-in-oil microemulsion droplets (MEDs) are thermodynamically stable supramolecular structures formed in a mixture of water and oil, stabilized by surfactant layer. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure the diffusion, and the size, size distribution, and polydispersity of MEDs prepared in ternary mixtures of water/oil/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in heptane, isooctane, and nonane at (near) single droplet level. We compare FCS data directly to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data, which shows that the optical matching point (OMP) conditions of MEDs in different oils (where excess optical polarizability of droplets vanish) severely influence DLS data, while FCS extracts the accurate size, size distribution, and polydispersity of AOT-MEDs in all three oils. This suggests that extreme precaution must be taken in acquiring and explaining DLS data of MEDs in solution. FCS data show nearly identical W0-dependent (peak) size variations of AOT-MEDs in all three oils, though a subtle increase in (average) polydispersity of droplets is observed with increase in carbon chain length of oils. Establishing the accuracy of FCS data for AOT-MEDs, we further apply FCS to measure the size parameters of MEDs prepared in a quaternary mixture of water/oil/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/1-butanol in hexane, heptane, and isooctane. Unlike AOT-MEDs, FCS data show substantial effect of added cosurfactant (1-butanol) and external oil on size, size distribution and polydispersity of quaternary CTAB-MEDs. Analysis of size distributions reveals large variation of polydispersity which possibly indicates the existence of larger shape heterogeneity, together with size heterogeneity, of CTAB-MEDs compared to AOT-MEDs in solution. PMID:26784288

  14. Application of three-coordinate copper(I) complexes with halide ligands in organic light-emitting diodes that exhibit delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Masahisa; Hoshino, Mikio; Hashimoto, Masashi; Kawata, Isao; Igawa, Satoshi; Yashima, Masataka

    2015-05-14

    A series of three-coordinate copper(I) complexes (L(Me))CuX [X = Cl (1), Br (2), I (3)], (L(Et))CuBr (4), and (L(iPr))CuBr (5) [L(Me) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-methylphenyl)phosphino]benzene, L(Et) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-ethylphenyl)phosphino]benzene, and L(iPr) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-isopropylphenyl)phosphino]benzene] exhibit efficient blue-green emission in the solid state at ambient temperature with peak wavelengths between 473 and 517 nm. The emission quantum yields were 0.38-0.95. The emission lifetimes were measured in the temperature range of 77-295 K using a nanosecond laser technique. The temperature dependence of the emission lifetimes was explained using a model with two excited states: a singlet and a triplet state. The small energy gaps (<830 cm(-1)) between the two states suggest that efficient emission from 1-5 was thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). Alkyl substituents at ortho positions of peripheral phenyl groups were found to have little effect on the electronic excited states. Because the origin of the emission of complexes 2, 4, and 5 was thought to be a (σ + Br)→π* transition, photoluminescence characteristics of these complexes were dominated by the diphosphine ligands. Complexes 2, 4, and 5 had similar emission properties. Complexes 1-5 had efficient green TADF in amorphous films at 293 K with maximum emission wavelengths of 508-520 nm and quantum yields of 0.61-0.71. Organic light-emitting devices that contained complexes 1-5 and exhibited TADF exhibit bright green luminescence with current efficiencies of 55.6-69.4 cd A(-1) and maximum external quantum efficiencies of 18.6-22.5%. PMID:25470470

  15. New Benzimidazole-Based Bipolar Hosts: Highly Efficient Phosphorescent and Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Employing the Same Device Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yali; Wu, Chao; Qiu, Panlong; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of the thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters makes it necessary to produce new versatile host materials for both phosphorescent and TADF emitters. Three new bipolar host materials, 9,9'-(2'-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3,5-diyl)bis(9H-carbazole) (o-mCPBI), 9,9'-(3'-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3,5-diyl)bis(9H-carbazole) (m-mCPBI), and 9,9'-(4'-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3,5-diyl)bis(9H-carbazole) (p-mCPBI), are designed and synthesized by integrating mCP with benzimidazole moiety via the ortho-, meta-, and para-positions of N-phenyl. The influence of different linking modes on the thermal, photophysical, electrochemical, and charge transport properties of the compounds is studied. By employing the same device structure except the emitting layer, the device performances of the blue, green, yellow, red, white phosphorescent and blue, green TADF organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on the three hosts are investigated. Among these three hosts, o-mCPBI exhibits the best device performance with external quantum efficiencies of over 20% for phosphorescent OLEDs and enhanced efficiencies for TADF devices. All these devices show relatively low efficiency roll-offs at high brightness. The versatility of the benzimidazole-based bipolar host o-mCPBI, such as an extremely high triplet energy level, suitable molecular orbital energy levels, improved thermal and charge transport properties, and excellent device performances for various colors, makes it a universal host material for highly efficient both phosphorescent and TADF OLEDs. PMID:26731494

  16. Stoke's and anti-Stoke's characteristics of anaerobic and aerobic bacterias at excitation of fluorescence by low-intensity red light: I. Research of anaerobic bacterias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-04-01

    Biopsy or photo dynamic therapy of tumors are usually investigated by fluorescent diagnostics methods. Information on modified method of fluorescence diagnostics of inflammatory diseases is represented in this research. Anaerobic micro organisms are often the cause of these pathological processes. These micro organisms also accompany disbiotic processes in intestines.

  17. Investigation of Fluorescence Lifetime Quenching of Ru(bpy)[subscript 3][superscript 2+] by Oxygen Using a Pulsed Light-Emitting Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusak, David A.; James, William H., III; Ferzola, Maria J.; Stefanski, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment related to the measurement of fluorescence lifetime for an undergraduate instrumental analysis or physical chemistry laboratory that highlights relative rates of electronic transitions in molecules and introduces students to data collection of a pulsed signal is illustrated. The experiment of the long fluorescence lifetime of…

  18. A Constitutive Model of 6111-T4 Aluminum Alloy Sheet Based on the Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lin; Meng, Fanzhi; Song, Yanli; Liu, Jianing; Qin, Xunpeng; Suo, Lianbing

    2014-03-01

    As main light-weight material, aluminum alloy sheets have been widely applied to produce auto body panels. In order to predict the formability and springback of aluminum alloy sheets, a precise constitutive model is a necessity. In this article, a series of warm tensile tests were conducted on Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator for 6111-T4 aluminum alloy sheets. The corresponding strain rate ranged from 0.015 to 1.5 s-1, and the temperature ranged from 25 to 350 °C. The relationship between the temperature, the strain rate, and the flow stress were discussed. A constitutive model based on the updated Fields-Backofen equation was established to describe the flow behavior of 6111-T4 aluminum alloy during the warm tensile tests. Subsequently, the average absolute relative error (AARE) was introduced to verify the predictability of the constitutive model. The value of AARE at the uniform plastic deformation stage was calculated to be 1.677%, which demonstrates that the predicted flow stress values were in accordance with the experimental ones. The constitutive model was validated by the fact that the simulated results of the warm tensile tests coincided with the experimental ones.

  19. Magnetic and fluorescent carbon-based nanohybrids for multi-modal imaging and magnetic field/NIR light responsive drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2016-07-21

    Carbon nanomaterials have gained significant momentum as promising candidate materials for biomedical applications due to their unique structure and properties. After functionalization with magnetic and fluorescent components, the resultant carbon-based nanohybrids can serve not only as magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging contrast agents, but also as photothermally/magneto-thermally responsive drug carriers for combined photothermo/chemotherapy. This mini-review summarizes the latest developments and applications and addresses the future perspectives of carbon-based magnetic and fluorescent nanohybrids in the biomedical field. PMID:27184106

  20. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  1. Confocal light sheet microscopy: micron-scale neuroanatomy of the entire mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, L; Bria, A; Sacconi, L; Iannello, G; Pavone, F S

    2012-08-27

    Elucidating the neural pathways that underlie brain function is one of the greatest challenges in neuroscience. Light sheet based microscopy is a cutting edge method to map cerebral circuitry through optical sectioning of cleared mouse brains. However, the image contrast provided by this method is not sufficient to resolve and reconstruct the entire neuronal network. Here we combined the advantages of light sheet illumination and confocal slit detection to increase the image contrast in real time, with a frame rate of 10 Hz. In fact, in confocal light sheet microscopy (CLSM), the out-of-focus and scattered light is filtered out before detection, without multiple acquisitions or any post-processing of the acquired data. The background rejection capabilities of CLSM were validated in cleared mouse brains by comparison with a structured illumination approach. We show that CLSM allows reconstructing macroscopic brain volumes with sub-cellular resolution. We obtained a comprehensive map of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of L7-GFP transgenic mice. Further, we were able to trace neuronal projections across brain of thy1-GFP-M transgenic mice. The whole-brain high-resolution fluorescence imaging assured by CLSM may represent a powerful tool to navigate the brain through neuronal pathways. Although this work is focused on brain imaging, the macro-scale high-resolution tomographies affordable with CLSM are ideally suited to explore, at micron-scale resolution, the anatomy of different specimens like murine organs, embryos or flies. PMID:23037106

  2. Fluorescence photodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, K; Stringer, M R; Dixon, Kate

    2008-12-01

    Fluorescence diagnosis has become an important method of investigation in clinical practice particularly in identification and localisation of pre and early cancerous lesions as well as image guided therapy. The method relies on the principle of differential fluorescence emission between abnormal and normal tissues in response to excitation by a specific wavelength of light within the visible spectrum range. In clinical practice two types of fluorescence diagnostic methods are used, namely autofluorescence and drug-induced fluorescence. The former relies on the differential fluorescence of "native" fluorophores whereas the latter requires a photosensitiser which enhances the differential fluorescence emission of the normal versus the abnormal tissues. Development and advances in fibreoptic, endoscopic instrumentation currently permit fluorescence endoscopy to be carried out in a number of situations. PMID:19356662

  3. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time. PMID:21950929

  4. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-09-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time.

  5. Disulfide-Based Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels: A Wholly-Synthetic Thermoreversible 3D Matrix for Sheet-Based Cultures.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Warren, Nicholas J; Mosadegh, Bobak; Mohammady, Marym R; Whitesides, George M; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-14

    It is well-known that 3D in vitro cell cultures provide a much better model than 2D cell cultures for understanding the in vivo microenvironment of cells. However, significant technical challenges in handling and analyzing 3D cell cultures remain, which currently limits their widespread application. Herein, we demonstrate the application of wholly synthetic thermoresponsive block copolymer worms in sheet-based 3D cell culture. These worms form a soft, free-standing gel reversibly at 20-37 °C, which can be rapidly converted into a free-flowing dispersion of spheres on cooling to 5 °C. Functionalization of the worms with disulfide groups was found to be essential for ensuring sufficient mechanical stability of these hydrogels to enable long-term cell culture. These disulfide groups are conveniently introduced via statistical copolymerization of a disulfide-based dimethacrylate under conditions that favor intramolecular cyclization and subsequent thiol/disulfide exchange leads to the formation of reversible covalent bonds between adjacent worms within the gel. This new approach enables cells to be embedded within micrometer-thick slabs of gel with good viability, permits cell culture for at least 12 days, and facilitates recovery of viable cells from the gel simply by incubating the culture in buffer at 4 °C (thus, avoiding the enzymatic degradation required for cell harvesting when using commercial protein-based gels, such as Matrigel). PMID:26509930

  6. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  7. Rapid Quantification of Drug Resistance Gene Expression in Candida albicans by Reverse Transcriptase LightCycler PCR and Fluorescent Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Joao P.; Warnock, David W.; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible assay to quantify Candida albicans ACT1, CDR1, CDR2, ERG11, and MDR1 mRNA using a two-step reverse transcription and LightCycler real-time PCR (RT-LightCycler PCR) method with sequence-specific hybridization probes. We compared RT-LightCycler PCR with Northern hybridization for quantitative analysis of gene expression in isolates with various fluconazole susceptibilities. Specificity of each LightCycler PCR was verified by LightCycler melting curve analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified products. Correlation of quantification results between RT-LightCycler PCR and Northern hybridization yielded correlation coefficients of ≥0.91 for all genes except MDR1 (0.74). In this case, reduced correlation was due to the inability of Northern hybridization to accurately quantify the high MDR1 expression in a susceptible dose-dependent isolate which was shown by RT-LightCycler PCR to overexpress MDR1 >200-fold relative to the other isolates tested. In four isolates, low levels of CDR2 mRNA were detected by RT-LightCycler PCR but were undetectable by Northern hybridization. mRNA quantification by RT-LightCycler PCR correlates with Northern hybridization and offers additional advantages, including increased sensitivity and speed of analysis, along with lower RNA concentration requirements and an increased dynamic range of signal detection. PMID:15131174

  8. Temperature dependence of protein fluorescence in Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers frozen to 80 K in the dark or on the actinic light as the indicator of protein conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Knox, P P; Korvatovsky, B N; Krasilnikov, P M; Paschenko, V Z; Seifullina, N H; Grishanova, N P; Rubin, A B

    2016-03-01

    The differences in the average fluorescence lifetime (τav) of tryptophanyls in photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of the purple bacteria Rb. sphaeroides frozen to 80 K in the dark or on the actinic light was found. This difference disappeared during subsequent heating at the temperatures above 250 K. The computer-based calculation of vibration spectra of the tryptophan molecule was performed. As a result, the normal vibrational modes associated with deformational vibrations of the aromatic ring of the tryptophan molecule were found. These deformational vibrations may be active during the nonradiative transition of the molecule from the excited to the ground state. We assume that the differences in τav may be associated with the change in the activity of these vibration modes due to local variations in the microenvironment of tryptophanyls during the light activation. PMID:27193710

  9. A new visible-light-excitable ICT-CHEF-mediated fluorescence 'turn-on' probe for the selective detection of Cd(2+) in a mixed aqueous system with live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Aich, Krishnendu; Das, Sangita; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Sarkar, Deblina; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-28

    A new quinoline based sensor was developed and applied for the selective detection of Cd(2+) both in vitro and in vivo. The designed probe displays a straightforward approach for the selective detection of Cd(2+) with a prominent fluorescence enhancement along with a large red shift (∼38 nm), which may be because of the CHEF (chelation-enhanced fluorescence) and ICT (internal charge transfer) processes after interaction with Cd(2+). The interference from other biologically important competing metal ions, particularly Zn(2+), has not been observed. The visible-light excitability of the probe merits in the viewpoint of its biological application. The probe enables the detection of intracellular Cd(2+) with non-cytotoxic effects, which was demonstrated with the live RAW cells. The experimentally observed change in the structure and electronic properties of the sensor after the addition of Cd(2+) were modelled by the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computational calculations, respectively. Moreover, the test strip experiment with this sensor exhibits both absorption and fluorescence color changes when exposed to Cd(2+) in a mixed aqueous solution, which also makes the probe more useful. The minimum limit of detection of Cd(2+) by the probe was in the range of 9.9 × 10(-8) M level. PMID:25714669

  10. Fast fluorescence holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Qu, Xinghua; Yao, Hai; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2015-01-01

    FINCHSCOPE is a new technology of fluorescence holographic microscopy. It has been successfully applied to recording high-resolution three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens without the need for scanning. In this study, we revealed and analyzed an intrinsic phenomenon, called ghost lens effect, on spatial light modulator which is the core element enabling the incoherent correlation in the FINCHSCOPE. The ghost lens effect can degrade the imaging quality by introducing multiple spherical waves with different focal lengths into the correlation and thus increasing the noise in the recorded holograms. PMID:25767693

  11. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  12. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Targeting polymeric fluorescent nanodiamond-gold/silver multi-functional nanoparticles as a light-transforming hyperthermia reagent for cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liang-Chien; Chen, Hao Ming; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Chan, Yung-Chieh; Liu, Ru-Shi; Sung, James C.; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Her, Li-Jane; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    This work demonstrates a simple route for synthesizing multi-functional fluorescent nanodiamond-gold/silver nanoparticles. The fluorescent nanodiamond is formed by the surface passivation of poly(ethylene glycol) bis(3-aminopropyl) terminated. Urchin-like gold/silver nanoparticles can be obtained via one-pot synthesis, and combined with each other via further thiolation of nanodiamond. The morphology of the nanodiamond-gold/silver nanoparticles thus formed was identified herein by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and clarified using diffraction patterns. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy clearly revealed the surface functionalization of the nanoparticles. The fluorescence of the materials with high photo stability was examined by high power laser irradiation and long-term storage at room temperature. To develop the bio-recognition of fluorescent nanodiamond-gold/silver nanoparticles, pre-modified transferrin was conjugated with the gold/silver nanoparticles, and the specificity and activity were confirmed in vitro using human hepatoma cell line (J5). The cellular uptake analysis that was conducted using flow cytometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry exhibited that twice as many transferrin-modified nanoparticles as bare nanoparticles were engulfed, revealing the targeting and ease of internalization of the human hepatoma cell. Additionally, the in situ monitoring of photothermal therapeutic behavior reveals that the nanodiamond-gold/silver nanoparticles conjugated with transferrin was more therapeutic than the bare nanodiamond-gold/silver materials, even when exposed to a less energetic laser source. Ultimately, this multi-functional material has great potential for application in simple synthesis. It is non-cytotoxic, supports long-term tracing and can be used in highly efficient photothermal therapy against cancer cells.This work demonstrates a simple route for synthesizing multi-functional fluorescent nanodiamond

  14. Solid-state, ambient-operation thermally activated delayed fluorescence from flexible, non-toxic gold-nanocluster thin films: towards the development of biocompatible light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Talite, M J A; Lin, H T; Jiang, Z C; Lin, T N; Huang, H Y; Heredia, E; Flores, A; Chao, Y C; Shen, J L; Lin, C A J; Yuan, C T

    2016-08-26

    Luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with good biocompatibility have gained much attention in bio-photonics. In addition, they also exhibit a unique photo-physical property, namely thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF), by which both singlet and triplet excitons can be harvested. The combination of their non-toxic material property and unique TADF behavior makes AuNCs biocompatible nano-emitters for bio-related light-emitting devices. Unfortunately, the TADF emission is quenched when colloidal AuNCs are transferred to solid states under ambient environment. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method was used to generate efficient and stable TADF emissions from solid AuNCs under ambient environment using polyvinyl alcohol as a solid matrix. To unravel the underlying mechanism, temperature-dependent static and transient photoluminescence measurements were performed and we found that two factors are crucial for solid TADF emission: small energy splitting between singlet and triplet states and the stabilization of the triplet states. Solid TADF films were also deposited on the flexible plastic substrate with patterned structures, thus mitigating the waveguide-mode losses. In addition, we also demonstrated that warm white light can be generated based on a co-doped single emissive layer, consisting of non-toxic, solution-processed TADF AuNCs and fluorescent carbon dots under UV excitation. PMID:27405350

  15. Solid-state, ambient-operation thermally activated delayed fluorescence from flexible, non-toxic gold-nanocluster thin films: towards the development of biocompatible light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talite, M. J. A.; Lin, H. T.; Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Huang, H. Y.; Heredia, E.; Flores, A.; Chao, Y. C.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A. J.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    Luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with good biocompatibility have gained much attention in bio-photonics. In addition, they also exhibit a unique photo-physical property, namely thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF), by which both singlet and triplet excitons can be harvested. The combination of their non-toxic material property and unique TADF behavior makes AuNCs biocompatible nano-emitters for bio-related light-emitting devices. Unfortunately, the TADF emission is quenched when colloidal AuNCs are transferred to solid states under ambient environment. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method was used to generate efficient and stable TADF emissions from solid AuNCs under ambient environment using polyvinyl alcohol as a solid matrix. To unravel the underlying mechanism, temperature-dependent static and transient photoluminescence measurements were performed and we found that two factors are crucial for solid TADF emission: small energy splitting between singlet and triplet states and the stabilization of the triplet states. Solid TADF films were also deposited on the flexible plastic substrate with patterned structures, thus mitigating the waveguide-mode losses. In addition, we also demonstrated that warm white light can be generated based on a co-doped single emissive layer, consisting of non-toxic, solution-processed TADF AuNCs and fluorescent carbon dots under UV excitation.

  16. Fluorescent Applications to Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    By covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and tests with model proteins have shown that labeling u to 5 percent of the protein molecules does not affect the X-ray data quality obtained . The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages. Since the label is covalently attached to the protein molecules, it "tracks" the protein s response to the crystallization conditions. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a darker background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, do not show up under fluorescent illumination. Crystals have the highest protein concentration and are readily observed against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. Preliminary tests, using model proteins, indicates that we can use high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that more rapid amorphous precipitation kinetics may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Experiments are now being carried out to test this approach using a wider range, of proteins. The trace fluorescently labeled crystals will also

  17. Sky-Blue Organic Light Emitting Diode with 37% External Quantum Efficiency Using Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from Spiroacridine-Triazine Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-An; Chatterjee, Tanmay; Tsai, Wei-Lung; Lee, Wei-Kai; Wu, Meng-Jung; Jiao, Min; Pan, Kuan-Chung; Yi, Chih-Lung; Chung, Chin-Lung; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2016-08-01

    Extremely efficient sky-blue organic electroluminescence with external quantum efficiency of ≈37% is achieved in a conventional planar device structure, using a highly efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter based on the spiroacridine-triazine hybrid and simultaneously possessing nearly unitary (100%) photoluminescence quantum yield, excellent thermal stability, and strongly horizontally oriented emitting dipoles (with a horizontal dipole ratio of 83%). PMID:27271917

  18. An effective host material with thermally activated delayed fluorescence formed by confined conjugation for red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Liang, Feng; Yuan, Yi; Cui, Lin-Song; Jiang, Zuo-Quan; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-06-21

    A thermally activated delayed fluorescence material 2,6-bis(9,9-diphenylacridin-10(9H)-yl)pyrazine was designed and synthesized. The twisted configuration made it possesses very small singlet-triplet splitting. A red electroluminescent device based on this new host material is able to achieve ∼26% external quantum efficiency and relatively flat efficiency roll-off. PMID:27276277

  19. Blue Oleds: High-Efficiency Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from Phenoxaphosphine and Phenoxathiin Derivatives (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Youn; Adachi, Chihaya; Yasuda, Takuma

    2016-06-01

    High-performance blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters containing a phenoxaphosphine oxide or phenoxathiin dioxide acceptor unit coupled with a dimethylacridan donor unit are developed by T. Yasuda and co-workers, as desribed on page 4626. These emitters can allow efficient up-conversion of triplet excitons into singlet excitons, leading to both photoluminescence and internal electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to nearly 100%. PMID:27281046

  20. Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes: fluorescent and absorption spectroscopy under two-photon (1200-1500 nm) and one-photon (600-750 nm) excitation by laser femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Il'ya A.; Kompanets, Viktor O.; Chekalin, Sergey V.; Makhneva, Zoya K.; Moskalenko, Andrey A.; Razjivin, Andrei P.

    2010-09-01

    The pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) via pigments of the light-harvesting antenna are still in discussion. The bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence of peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from purple bacteria can be observed upon two-photon excitation (TPE) within 1200-1500 nm spectral range (a broad band near 1300 nm). Earlier the occurrence of this band was taken as an evidence for the participation of "dark" carotenoid S1 state in EET processes (see [Walla et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 10808-10813 (2000)] and references in it). However we showed that TPE spectrum of LH2 fluorescence within 1200-1500 nm is not associated with carotenoids [Stepanenko et al., J. Phys. Chem. B. 113(34), 11720-11723 (2009)]. Here we present TPE spectra of fluorescence for chromatophores and lightharvesting complexes LH2 and LH1 from wild-type cells and from carotenoid-depleted or carotenoidless mutant cells of several purple bacteria. The broad band within 1300-1400 nm was found for all preparations. Absorption pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy applied to LH2 complex from Rb. sphaeroides revealed the similar spectral and kinetic patterns for TPE at 1350 nm and one-photon excitation at 675 nm. Analysis of pigment composition of this complex by high-pressure liquid chromatography showed that even under mild isolation conditions some bacteriochlorophyll molecules were oxidized to 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules having the long-wavelength absorption peak in the 650-700 nm range. It is proposed that these 3-acetyl-chlorophyll molecules are responsible for the broad band in TPE spectra within the 1200-1500 nm region.