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Sample records for light transport-heat diffusion

  1. Coupled light transport-heat diffusion model for laser dosimetry with dynamic optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Eder, D.C.; Jacques, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    The effect of dynamic optical properties on the spatial distribution of light in laser therapy is studied via numerical simulations. A two-dimensional, time dependent computer program called LATIS is used. Laser light transport is simulated with a Monte Carlo technique including anisotropic scattering and absorption. Thermal heat transport is calculated with a finite difference algorithm. Material properties are specified on a 2-D mesh and can be arbitrary functions of space and time. Arrhenius rate equations are solved for tissue damage caused by elevated temperatures. Optical properties are functions of tissue damage, as determined by previous measurements. Results are presented for the time variation of the light distribution and damage within the tissue as the optical properties of the tissue are altered.

  2. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  3. Imaging complex structures with diffuse light

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Panasyuk, George Y.; Lee, Kijoon; Markel, Vadim; Yodh, Arjun G.; Schotland, John C.

    2008-01-01

    We use diffuse optical tomography to quantitatively reconstruct images of complex phantoms with millimeter sized features located centimeters deep within a highly-scattering medium. A non-contact instrument was employed to collect large data sets consisting of greater than 107 source-detector pairs. Images were reconstructed using a fast image reconstruction algorithm based on an analytic solution to the inverse scattering problem for diffuse light. PMID:18542605

  4. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  5. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  6. Human vision is attuned to the diffuseness of natural light

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Geisler, Wilson S.; Murray, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    All images are highly ambiguous, and to perceive 3-D scenes, the human visual system relies on assumptions about what lighting conditions are most probable. Here we show that human observers' assumptions about lighting diffuseness are well matched to the diffuseness of lighting in real-world scenes. We use a novel multidirectional photometer to measure lighting in hundreds of environments, and we find that the diffuseness of natural lighting falls in the same range as previous psychophysical estimates of the visual system's assumptions about diffuseness. We also find that natural lighting is typically directional enough to override human observers' assumption that light comes from above. Furthermore, we find that, although human performance on some tasks is worse in diffuse light, this can be largely accounted for by intrinsic task difficulty. These findings suggest that human vision is attuned to the diffuseness levels of natural lighting conditions. PMID:25139864

  7. Quasiparticle Diffusion in CRESST Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Tanzke, A.; Strauss, R.; Kiefer, M.; Petricia, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Wüstrich, M.

    2016-07-01

    CRESST-II is a direct dark matter experiment that uses scintillating calorimeters to detect WIMP-induced nuclear scatter processes. Heat and light signals are read out with tungsten transition edge sensors (TESs) that are optimized toward their sensitivity to non-thermal phonons. The usage of superconducting thin film structures (e.g., aluminum) serving as phonon collectors to increase the collection area for this signal component is an approach to improve the sensitivity of the TES. The performance of the phonon collectors depends on the material properties and the quality achieved in the production process. We optimized the size of the phonon collectors for the given quality of CRESST-II light detectors. The diffusion lengths measured in this work are mathcal {O}(1 mm) and show a strong correlation to the Residual Resistivity Ratio of the respective films. First tests of CRESST-II light detectors with larger as well as thicker phonon collectors individually show improvements in the measured pulse height of 30 %.

  8. Quasiparticle Diffusion in CRESST Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Tanzke, A.; Strauss, R.; Kiefer, M.; Petricia, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Wüstrich, M.

    2016-02-01

    CRESST-II is a direct dark matter experiment that uses scintillating calorimeters to detect WIMP-induced nuclear scatter processes. Heat and light signals are read out with tungsten transition edge sensors (TESs) that are optimized toward their sensitivity to non-thermal phonons. The usage of superconducting thin film structures (e.g., aluminum) serving as phonon collectors to increase the collection area for this signal component is an approach to improve the sensitivity of the TES. The performance of the phonon collectors depends on the material properties and the quality achieved in the production process. We optimized the size of the phonon collectors for the given quality of CRESST-II light detectors. The diffusion lengths measured in this work are {O} (1 mm) and show a strong correlation to the Residual Resistivity Ratio of the respective films. First tests of CRESST-II light detectors with larger as well as thicker phonon collectors individually show improvements in the measured pulse height of 30 %.

  9. Quasiparticle Diffusion in CRESST Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Tanzke, A.; Strauss, R.; Kiefer, M.; Petricia, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Wüstrich, M.

    2016-07-01

    CRESST-II is a direct dark matter experiment that uses scintillating calorimeters to detect WIMP-induced nuclear scatter processes. Heat and light signals are read out with tungsten transition edge sensors (TESs) that are optimized toward their sensitivity to non-thermal phonons. The usage of superconducting thin film structures (e.g., aluminum) serving as phonon collectors to increase the collection area for this signal component is an approach to improve the sensitivity of the TES. The performance of the phonon collectors depends on the material properties and the quality achieved in the production process. We optimized the size of the phonon collectors for the given quality of CRESST-II light detectors. The diffusion lengths measured in this work are {O}(1 mm) and show a strong correlation to the Residual Resistivity Ratio of the respective films. First tests of CRESST-II light detectors with larger as well as thicker phonon collectors individually show improvements in the measured pulse height of 30 %.

  10. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape. PMID:21636475

  11. Use of diffusive optical fibers for plant lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, T.; Kitaya, Y.; Fujiwara, K.; Kino, S.; Kinowaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    Lighting is one of the most critical aspects in plant production and environmental research with plants. Much research has been repeated on the effect of light intensity, spectral distribution of light and lighting cycle, but comparatively little research done on the effect of lighting direction on the growth, development and morphology of plants. When plants are grown with lamps above, light is directed downward to the plants. Downward or overhead lighting is utilized in almost all cases. However, downward lighting does not always give the best result in terms of lighting efficiency, growth, development and morphology of plants. In the present study, a sideward lighting system was developed using diffusive optical fiber belts. More higher quality tissue-cultured transplants could be produced in a reduced space with the sideward lighting system than with a downward lighting system. An application of the sideward lighting system using diffusive optical fiber belts is described and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  12. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  13. The faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Shaun; Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Models of the faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light are presented, which are consistent with current data on faint galaxy number counts and redshifts. The autocorrelation function of surface brightness fluctuations in the extragalactic diffuse light is predicted, and the way in which these predictions depend on the cosmological model and assumptions of biasing is determined. It is confirmed that the recent deep infrared number counts are most compatible with a high density universe (Omega-0 is approximately equal to 1) and that the steep blue counts then require an extra population of rapidly evolving blue galaxies. The faintest presently detectable galaxies produce an interesting contribution to the extragalactic diffuse light, and still fainter galaxies may also produce a significant contribution. These faint galaxies still only produce a small fraction of the total optical diffuse background light, but on scales of a few arcminutes to a few degrees, they produce a substantial fraction of the fluctuations in the diffuse light.

  14. Invisibility cloaking in the diffusive-light limit (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Wegener, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Albert Einstein's theory of relativity imposes stringent limitations to making macroscopic objects invisible with respect to electromagnetic light waves propagating in vacuum. These limitations are not relevant though for propagation of light in diffusive media like fog or milk because the effective energy speed is significantly lower than in vacuum due to multiple scattering events. Here, by exploiting the close mathematical analogy between the electrostatic or near-field limit of optics on the one hand and light diffusion on the other hand, we design, fabricate, and characterize simple core-shell cloaking structures for diffusive light propagation in cylindrical and spherical geometry.

  15. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  16. Control of light diffusion in a disordered photonic waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Raktim; Cao, Hui; Golubev, Timofey; Yamilov, Alexey

    2014-07-28

    We control the diffusion of light in a disordered photonic waveguide by modulating the waveguide geometry. In a single waveguide of varying cross-section, the diffusion coefficient changes spatially in two dimensions due to localization effects. The intensity distribution inside the waveguide agrees with the prediction of the self-consistent theory of localization. Our work shows that wave diffusion can be efficiently manipulated without modifying the structural disorder.

  17. Light shaping diffusers{trademark} improve aircraft inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.; Shie, R.; Lerner, J.

    1994-11-01

    Physical Optical Corporation has introduced a Light Shaping Diffuser{trademark} (LSD) for the specialized illumination requirements of aircraft inspection. Attached to a handheld, battery-powered flashlight, this light-weight, holographic diffuser element provides bright, even illumination as aircraft inspectors perform the important task of visually examining aircraft for possible structural defects. Field trials conducted by the Aging Aircraft Program at Sandia National Laboratories confirm that the LSD-equipped flashlights are preferred by visual inspectors over stock flashlights.

  18. Polarization behavior of paints doped with silicone light diffusion agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Xie, Wei; Guo, Honggui; Wu, Jianye

    2016-02-01

    We report on the polarization behavior of painted samples doped with a silicone light diffusion agent and illuminated by linearly polarized laser light centered at 532 and 650 nm. Reflection spectra of the painted samples with dopant concentration of 0 and 12.2 wt.% were examined. The degree of depolarization increases from 0.35 to 0.8 under laser illumination at 650 nm and from 0.5 to 0.94 under laser illumination at 532 nm with an increasing concentration of light diffusion agent. The polarization behavior of painted samples was described, taking into account contribution of both surface scattering and volume scattering.

  19. Cathode diffusion and degradation mechanism of polymeric light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Min Chul; Chung, Ho Kyoon; Kim, Sang-Yeol; Kwon, Jang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2005-09-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diffusion of metals into polymeric light emitting layer by a continuous device operation. The change of substrate (indium/tin) signal as well as calcium penetration after device operation was conspicuous using pristine light emitting polymer, whereas annealed device above polymer's glass transition temperature indicated almost no migration of calcium. This can be a direct evidence of the molecular conformation and rigidity change of light emitting polymer, which affects the degradation behavior by the metal diffusion into organic thin film.

  20. Metamaterials. Invisibility cloaking in a diffusive light scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Wegener, Martin

    2014-07-25

    In vacuum, air, and other surroundings that support ballistic light propagation according to Maxwell's equations, invisibility cloaks that are macroscopic, three-dimensional, broadband, passive, and that work for all directions and polarizations of light are not consistent with the laws of physics. We show that the situation is different for surroundings leading to multiple light scattering, according to Fick's diffusion equation. We have fabricated cylindrical and spherical invisibility cloaks made of thin shells of polydimethylsiloxane doped with melamine-resin microparticles. The shells surround a diffusively reflecting hollow core, in which arbitrary objects can be hidden. We find good cloaking performance in a water-based diffusive surrounding throughout the entire visible spectrum and for all illumination conditions and incident polarizations of light. PMID:24903561

  1. System for diffusing light from an optical fiber or light guide

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J [Pleasant Hill, CA; Wilson, Thomas S [San Leandro, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Small, IV, Ward [

    2008-06-10

    A system for diffusing light from an optical fiber wherein the optical fiber is coupled to a light source, comprising forming a polymer element adapted to be connected to the optical fiber and incorporating a scattering element with the polymer element wherein the scattering element diffuses the light from the polymer element. The apparatus of the present invention comprises a polymer element operatively connected to the optical fiber and a scattering element operatively connected with the shape polymer element that diffuses the light from the polymer element.

  2. Novel light diffusing fiber for use in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klubben, W. Spencer; Logunov, Stephan L.; Fewkes, Edward J.; Mooney, Jeff; Then, Paul M.; Wigley, Peter G.; Schreiber, Horst; Matias, Kaitlyn; Wilson, Cynthia J.; Ocampo, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-based cylindrical light diffusers are often used in photodynamic therapy to illuminate a luminal organ, such as the esophagus. The diffusers are often made of plastic and suffer from short diffusion lengths and low transmission efficiencies over a broad spectrum. We have developed FibranceTM, a glass-based fiber optic cylindrical diffuser which can illuminate a fiber from 0.5 cm to 10 meters over a broad wavelength range. With these longer illumination lengths, a variety of other medical applications are possible beyond photodynamic therapy. We present a number of applications for Fibrance ranging from in situ controllable illumination for Photodynamic Therapy to light guided anatomy highlighting for minimally invasive surgery to mitigating hospital acquired infections and more.

  3. Crossover from superdiffusive to diffusive dynamics in fluctuating light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marqués, Manuel I.

    2016-06-01

    The expressions for the optical drag force, the equilibrium kinetic energy, and the diffusion constant of an electric dipole in a light field consisting of electromagnetic plane waves with polarizations randomly distributed and fluctuating phases are obtained. The drag force is proportional to the extinction cross section of the dipole and to the intensity. The diffusion constant does not depend on the amplitude of the electromagnetic field and is proportional to the time interval between fluctuations. Numerical simulations for the dynamics of a resonant dipole, initially at rest, show the crossover between the superdiffusive and the diffusive regimes theoretically predicted.

  4. LLNL SMP Light Diffuser Fabrication and Preliminary Data

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W

    2006-06-02

    We are developing a cylindrical light diffuser using shape memory polymer (SMP) whose diameter, length, stiffness, and diffusion profile can be tailored to suit a particular application. The cylindrical SMP diffuser is made by casting SMP around the end of a glass optical fiber using a teflon tube as the casting mold, and abrading the cured SMP surface to cause the light to leak radially outward. The inner diameter of the casting tube is slightly larger than the fiber diameter. A smaller teflon tube is positioned over the fiber (between the fiber and the casting tube) to approximately center the fiber tip in the casting tube. As the SMP cures, it bonds with the optical fiber, creating a strong joint without the need for additional adhesives or mechanical fixtures. A close-up of the SMP-fiber joint and the finished SMP diffuser are shown in Fig.1. The SMP formulation (developed in-house) was specifically designed to be optically transparent in the visible and near-infrared regions; the spectral absorption of the SMP is shown in Fig. 2. The low absorption is important because (1) it allows the light to travel the length of the diffuser without suffering excessive loss due to absorption and (2) it permits delivery of up to 7 W (300 {micro}m SMP rod on 100 {micro}m core multimode fiber) of laser power into the diffuser without damaging the diffuser. SMP is a good wave guiding material with a refractive index of approximately 1.5. Also, the SMP stiffness can be tailored from stiff (e.g. acrylic, Ea {approx} 10{sup 9} Pa) to very flexible (e.g. silicon rubber, Ea {approx} 10{sup 6} Pa). Finally, since SMP can self-actuate, the SMP diffuser could be designed to actuate into a shape other than a straight rod (e.g. 2D or 3D coil).

  5. Sol-Gel Glass Holographic Light-Shaping Diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kevin; Lee, Kang; Savant, Gajendra; Yin, Khin Swe (Lillian)

    2005-01-01

    Holographic glass light-shaping diffusers (GLSDs) are optical components for use in special-purpose illumination systems (see figure). When properly positioned with respect to lamps and areas to be illuminated, holographic GLSDs efficiently channel light from the lamps onto specified areas with specified distributions of illumination for example, uniform or nearly uniform irradiance can be concentrated with intensity confined to a peak a few degrees wide about normal incidence, over a circular or elliptical area. Holographic light diffusers were developed during the 1990s. The development of the present holographic GLSDs extends the prior development to incorporate sol-gel optical glass. To fabricate a holographic GLSD, one records a hologram on a sol-gel silica film formulated specially for this purpose. The hologram is a quasi-random, micro-sculpted pattern of smoothly varying changes in the index of refraction of the glass. The structures in this pattern act as an array of numerous miniature lenses that refract light passing through the GLSD, such that the transmitted light beam exhibits a precisely tailored energy distribution. In comparison with other light diffusers, holographic GLSDs function with remarkably high efficiency: they typically transmit 90 percent or more of the incident lamp light onto the designated areas. In addition, they can withstand temperatures in excess of 1,000 C. These characteristics make holographic GLSDs attractive for use in diverse lighting applications that involve high temperatures and/or requirements for high transmission efficiency for ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light. Examples include projectors, automobile headlights, aircraft landing lights, high-power laser illuminators, and industrial and scientific illuminators.

  6. Diffusion of interacting particles: light scattering study of microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazabat, A.M.; Langevin, D.

    1981-03-15

    The diffusion coefficient data obtained from light scattering experiments on water-in-oil microemulsions have been compared with existing theoretical treatments involving the interaction potential. The observed behavior deviates largely from hard sphere systems and independent information was obtained about the interaction potential to check the theories. This was achieved by measuring simultaneously the intensity and the correlation function of the scattered light. The intensity has been analyzed with a very simple model for interaction forces involving only 2 parameters: a hard sphere radius and the amplitude of a small perturbation added to hard sphere potential. This model allows for the variation of the diffusion coefficient at small volume fractions. Light scattering techniques are a very useful method for obtaining information about sizes and interactions in microemulsions. Some general conclusions have been made: droplet sizes depend mostly on the ratio of water to soap, and interactions on continuous phase polarity and alcohol chain length.

  7. Light scattering and optical diffusion from willemite spherulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Kevin M.; Butt, Haider; Batal, Afif; Sabouri, Aydin; Anthony, Carl J.

    2016-02-01

    Willemite is a zinc silicate mineral used in modern day pottery as a decorative feature within glazes. It is produced by controlled heat treatment of zinc oxide-containing ceramic glazes. The heat-treated glazes devitrify, producing thin nanoscale needle-like willemite crystals growing in spherulitic morphologies through branching of the needles. We show here that this resulting morphology of willemite crystals in an inorganic glass matrix has a previously unreported strong interaction with light, displaying remarkable optical diffraction patterns. Thin sections of such spherulites act as optical diffusers, enabling light beams to be spread up to 160° in width. Analysis of the interaction between the willemite spherulites and light suggests that the high density of willemite crystals in the spherulites and the length scales associated with both the thickness of the needles and the spacings between branches are together responsible for this optical diffusion behaviour.

  8. Light reflection visualization to determine solute diffusion into clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D.; Jawitz, James W.

    2014-06-01

    Light reflection visualization (LRV) experiments were performed to investigate solute diffusion in low-permeability porous media using a well-controlled two-dimensional flow chamber with a domain composed of two layers (one sand and one clay). Two different dye tracers (Brilliant Blue FCF and Ponceau 4R) and clay domains (kaolinite and montmorillonite) were used. The images obtained through the LRV technique were processed to monitor two-dimensional concentration distributions in the low-permeability zone by applying calibration curves that related light intensity to equilibrium concentrations for each dye tracer in the clay. One dimensional experimentally-measured LRV concentration profiles in the clay were found to be in very good agreement with those predicted from a one-dimensional analytical solution, with coefficient of efficiency values that exceeded 0.97. The retardation factors (R) for both dyes were relatively large, leading to slow diffusive penetration into the clays. At a relative concentration C/C0 = 0.1, Brilliant Blue FCF in kaolinite (R = 11) diffused approximately 10 mm after 21 days of source loading, and Ponceau 4R in montmorillonite (R = 7) diffused approximately 12 mm after 23 days of source loading. The LRV experimentally-measured two-dimensional concentration profiles in the clay were also well described by a simple analytical solution. The results from this study demonstrate that the LRV approach is an attractive non-invasive tool to investigate the concentration distribution of dye tracers in clays in laboratory experiments.

  9. Light reflection visualization to determine solute diffusion into clays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2014-06-01

    Light reflection visualization (LRV) experiments were performed to investigate solute diffusion in low-permeability porous media using a well-controlled two-dimensional flow chamber with a domain composed of two layers (one sand and one clay). Two different dye tracers (Brilliant Blue FCF and Ponceau 4R) and clay domains (kaolinite and montmorillonite) were used. The images obtained through the LRV technique were processed to monitor two-dimensional concentration distributions in the low-permeability zone by applying calibration curves that related light intensity to equilibrium concentrations for each dye tracer in the clay. One dimensional experimentally-measured LRV concentration profiles in the clay were found to be in very good agreement with those predicted from a one-dimensional analytical solution, with coefficient of efficiency values that exceeded 0.97. The retardation factors (R) for both dyes were relatively large, leading to slow diffusive penetration into the clays. At a relative concentration C/C0=0.1, Brilliant Blue FCF in kaolinite (R=11) diffused approximately 10 mm after 21 days of source loading, and Ponceau 4R in montmorillonite (R=7) diffused approximately 12 mm after 23 days of source loading. The LRV experimentally-measured two-dimensional concentration profiles in the clay were also well described by a simple analytical solution. The results from this study demonstrate that the LRV approach is an attractive non-invasive tool to investigate the concentration distribution of dye tracers in clays in laboratory experiments. PMID:24657742

  10. Morphologic tomography of nonspherical particles using multispectral diffusing light measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-01-01

    A series of phantom experiments are conducted to demonstrate the ability of a T-matrix–based inverse algorithm for tomographic recovery of morphologic characteristics of nonspherical particles embedded in heterogeneous turbid media. Diffusely scattered light at several wavelengths along the boundary of the phantom are collected and analyzed to allow for simultaneous extraction of the size, concentration, and aspect ratio of the spheroidal particles. PMID:22112119

  11. Diffuse-light all-solid-state invisibility cloak.

    PubMed

    Schittny, Robert; Niemeyer, Andreas; Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Naber, Andreas; Wegener, Martin

    2015-09-15

    An ideal invisibility cloak makes arbitrary macroscopic objects within the cloak indistinguishable from its surrounding—for all directions, illumination patterns, polarizations, and colors of visible light. Recently, we have approached such an ideal cloak for the diffusive regime of light propagation using a core-shell geometry and a mixture of water and white wall paint as the surrounding. Here, we present an all-solid-state version based on polydimethylsiloxane doped with titania nanoparticles for the surrounding/shell and on a high-reflectivity microporous ceramic for the core. By virtue of reduced effects of absorption, especially from the core, the cloaking performance and the overall light throughput are improved significantly. PMID:26371896

  12. Light Diffusion in the Tropical Dry Forest of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo-Rodriguez, S.; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) has been defined as the total leaf area (one-sided) in relation to the ground. LAI has an impact on tree growth and recruitment through the interception of light, which in turn affects primary productivity. Even though many instruments exist for estimating LAI from ground, they are often laborious and costly to run continuously. Measurements of LAI from the field using traditional sensors (e.g., LAI-2000) require multiple visits to the field under very specific sky conditions, making them unsuitable to operate in inaccessible areas and forests with dense vegetation, as well as areas where persistent sunny conditions are the norm like tropical dry forests. With this context, we proposed a methodology to characterize light diffusion based on NDVI and LAI measurements taken from the field in two successional stages in the tropical dry forest of Santa Rosa National Park in Costa Rica. We estimate a "K" coefficient to characterize light diffusion by the canopy, based on field NDVI measurements derived from optical phenology instruments and MODIS NDVI. From the coefficients determined, we estimated LAI values and compared them with ground measurements of LAI. In both successional stages ground measurements of LAI had no significant difference to the tower-derived LAI and the estimated LAI from MODIS NDVI.

  13. Diffuse optical imaging of the breast using structured-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Jessica; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Zheng, Jie; Li, Yifan; Chen, Jeon-hor; Su, Min-Ying; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical imaging with structured-light illumination and detection can provide rapid, wide-field anatomical and functional imaging of the breast with an application for breast cancer screening. Our aims for this study were to test the feasibility of structured-light, test our pattern set, and develop and optimize our image reconstruction algorithm. For our phantom studies, we created an agar phantom with dimensions similar to a compressed breast. A cubic inclusion of 30mm by 30mm by 25mm with twice the amount of absorption contrast than the background was placed at the center. Near-infrared light of eleven patterns including a full illumination and single stripes was illuminated onto the breast phantom and detected with a CCD camera, with integration of the signals according to the patterns performed post-data acquisition, with a total of 121 measurements. These measurements were then used in our reconstruction algorithm that iteratively minimized the difference between the collected data and the estimation from our FEM-based forward model of photon diffusion to calculate the absorption values. Reconstructions of the 3D absorption maps detect an inclusion at the center and indicate that our selected set of patterns may be sufficient for structured-light imaging. We are currently improving our instrumentation and testing with additional phantom studies, while also performing simulations of numerical breast phantoms created from MR images to test structured-light's ability to image complex and realistic breast tissue composition. We hope to use this technique as optical method to image molecular markers, such as hemoglobin, water and lipid, within the breast.

  14. Specular, diffuse, and polarized light scattered by two wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    Using polarization measurements, the reflectance factor of two wheat canopies is divided into components due to specularly and diffusely reflected light. The data show that two key angles may be predicted, the angle of the polarizer for minimum flux and the angle of incidence of sunlight specularly reflected by a leaf to a sensor. The results show that specular reflection is a key aspect to radiation transfer by two canopies. Results suggest that the advent of heading in wheat may be remotely sensed from polarization measurements of the canopy reflectance.

  15. Double-layer anisotropic light diffusion films fabricated using a two-step UV curing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusama, Kentaro; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Katagiri, Baku; Orui, Tomoo; Shoshi, Satoru; Fujikake, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel light diffusion film with a double diffusion layer structure for high reflectivity and a wide diffusion angle range. We demonstrated that the internal layer structure of the light diffusion film is controlled by the diffusion angle of the ultraviolet (UV) light used for photopolymerization. We successfully fabricated two different diffusion layers in a single polymer film using a two-step UV curing process and achieved a wide diffusion angle range and high reflectivity normal to the film surface. Our light diffusion film can control the distribution of diffused light, and should contribute to the development of future low-power reflective displays with high reflectivity similar to the white paper.

  16. Diffuse light tomography to detect blood vessels using Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanci, Huseyin O.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of blood vessels within light-scattering tissues involves detection of subtle shadows as blood absorbs light. These shadows are diffuse but measurable by a set of source-detector pairs in a spatial array of sources and detectors on the tissue surface. The measured shadows can reconstruct the internal position(s) of blood vessels. The tomographic method involves a set of Ns sources and Nd detectors such that Nsd = Ns x Nd source-detector pairs produce Nsd measurements, each interrogating the tissue with a unique perspective, i.e., a unique region of sensitivity to voxels within the tissue. This tutorial report describes the reconstruction of the image of a blood vessel within a soft tissue based on such source-detector measurements, by solving a matrix equation using Tikhonov regularization. This is not a novel contribution, but rather a simple introduction to a well-known method, demonstrating its use in mapping blood perfusion.

  17. The Photosynthetic Trade-off Between Direct and Diffuse Light, the Problem with Diffuse Fraction and a Proposed Solution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stine, A.; Swann, A. L. S.; Huybers, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in atmospheric scatterers change the light environment at the surface both by decreasing total solar illumination and by converting direct radiation to diffuse radiation. In general, diffuse light is more efficient at driving photosynthesis than direct light, leading to disagreements in the net effect of changes in scattering on terrestrial photosynthesis, particularly in the context of large explosive volcanic eruptions. Standard analytical approaches for treating the trade-off between direct and diffuse radiation compare the changes in light against the fraction of light which is diffuse. Here we show that use of diffuse fraction as the independent variable in light trade-off calculations leads to results that are generally biased because the dependent variable (be it direct, diffuse or total radiation) functionally covaries with the independent variable, irrespective of the physical relationship between direct and diffuse radiation. This bias appears to dominate the results of published calculations. We develop a new method for quantifying the trade-off between direct and diffuse radiation on photosynthesis that is not subject to this artifact and demonstrate its use at four Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites.

  18. Advantages of diffuse light for horticultural production and perspectives for further research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Yang, Qichang

    2015-01-01

    Plants use diffuse light more efficiently than direct light, which is well established due to diffuse light penetrates deeper into the canopy and photosynthetic rate of a single leaf shows a non-linear response to the light flux density. Diffuse light also results in a more even horizontal and temporal light distribution in the canopy, which plays substantial role for crop photosynthesis enhancement as well as production improvement. Here we show some of the recent findings about the effect of diffuse light on light distribution over the canopy and its direct and indirect effects on crop photosynthesis and plant growth, and suggest some perspectives for further research which could strengthen the scientific understanding of diffuse light modulate plant processes and its application in horticultural production. PMID:26388890

  19. Transforming a spatially coherent light beam into a diffused beam of small diffusion angle using suitable surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashtdar, M.; Tavassoly, M. T.

    2013-11-01

    Imposing a phase random distribution in an interval larger than 2π on a spatially coherent light beam transforms the beam into a diffuse one. However, if the required random phase distribution is imposed by a rough transparent plate immersed in a transparent liquid or covered by another transparent material of refractive index close to that of the plate, the diffused light is confined in a small cone around the light incident angle. This renders to fabricate diffusers with high transmission efficiency that has applications in computer displays, bar code scanners, and image forming systems including conventional optical microscopes.

  20. Portable multichannel multiwavelength near-infrared diffusive light imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan Guang; Xia, Hongjun; Piao, Daqing; Zhu, Quing

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a near infrared optical tomography system features fast optical switching, three-wavelength excitations, and avalanche photodiode (APD) detectors with a high dynamic range. Pigtailed laser diodes at 660, 780, and 830 nm are used as light sources and their outputs are distributed sequentially to one of nine source fibers. The crosstalk between source channels is around 65 dB, equivalent to 130 dB in opto-electrical signals. 10 Silicon APD"s detect diffusive photon density waves simultaneously. The dynamic range of an APD is several orders higher than that of a photomultiplier tube (PMT), which eliminates the need of multi-step system gain control. However, the internal gain of the APD we are using is about 3 orders lower than an ordinary PMT. Efforts have been made to suppress the feed through interferences from the transmission part to the reception part so as to reduce the errors in amplitude and phase measurements.

  1. Diffuse optical imaging using spatially and temporally modulated light

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Cuccia, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The authors describe the development of diffuse optical imaging (DOI) technologies, specifically the use of spatial and temporal modulation to control near infrared light propagation in thick tissues. We present theory and methods of DOI focusing on model-based techniques for quantitative, in vivo measurements of endogenous tissue absorption and scattering properties. We specifically emphasize the common conceptual framework of the scalar photon density wave for both temporal and spatial frequency-domain approaches. After presenting the history, theoretical foundation, and instrumentation related to these methods, we provide a brief review of clinical and preclinical applications from our research as well as our outlook on the future of DOI technology. PMID:22894472

  2. Diffusing light photography of solitons and capillary-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.; Budak, R.; Putterman, S. )

    1994-11-01

    The attenuation of light propagating through a slab of water (containing a dilute concentration of polyballs) is approximately proportional to its thickness. Application of this insight to the local elevation of a fluid surface has enabled us to use photography to determine the instantaneous global topography of the surface of a fluid in motion. Use of diffusing light enables us to obtain images that are free of the caustics which plague shadowgraphs. Applications include breather solitons and wave turbulence which results from the nonlinear interaction of a broadband spectrum of high amplitude surface ripples. Measurements indicate that as the amplitude of excitation of the surface of water is increased the wave number of the capillary motion displays a transition to a broadband spectrum. The temporal response of a single pixel yields the power spectrum of the surface height as a function of frequency [ital f].'' The numerous harmonics which can be seen at low amplitude merge at high amplitude into a broadband spectrum which goes as 1/[ital f][sup 3]. This technique should permit the measurement of turbulent parameters which go beyond the purported range of current theories. [Work supported by US DOE Division of Engineering and Geophysics and NASA Microgravity.

  3. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect on remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C.; Holben, B.

    1980-01-01

    The topographic effect is measured by the difference between the global radiance from inclined surfaces as a function of their orientation relative to the sensor position and light source. The short wave radiant energy incident on a surface is composed of direct sunlight, scattered skylight, and light reflected from surrounding terrain. The latter two components are commonly known as the diffuse component. The contribution of the diffuse light component to the topographic effect was examined and the significance of this diffuse component with respect to two direct radiance models was assessed. Diffuse and global spectral radiances were measured for a series of slopes and aspects of a uniform and surface in the red and photographic infrared parts of the spectrum, using a nadir pointing two channel handheld radiometer. The diffuse light was found to produce a topographic effect which varied from the topographic effect for direct light. The topographic effect caused by diffuse light was found to increase slightly with solar elevation and wavelength for the channels examined. The correlations between data derived from two simple direct radiance simulation models and the field data were not significantly affected when the diffuse component was removed from the radiances. Radiances from a 60 percent reflective surface, assuming no atmospheric path radiance, the diffuse light topographic effect contributed a maximum range of 3 pixel values in simulated LANDSAT data from all aspects with slopes up to 30 degrees.

  4. THE SPECTRUM OF THE DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT: THE MILKY WAY IN SCATTERED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Draine, B. T.

    2012-01-10

    We measure the optical spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL)-the local Milky Way in reflection-using 92,000 blank sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We correlate the SDSS optical intensity in regions of blank sky against 100 {mu}m intensity independently measured by the Cosmic Background Explorer and Infrared Astronomy satellites, which provides a measure of the dust column density times the intensity of illuminating starlight. The spectrum of scattered light is very blue and shows a clear 4000 A break and broad Mg b absorption. This is consistent with scattered starlight, and the continuum of the DGL is well reproduced by a simple radiative transfer model of the Galaxy. We also detect line emission in H{alpha}, H{beta}, [N II], and [S II], consistent with scattered light from the local interstellar medium. The strength of [N II] and [S II], combined with upper limits on [O III] and He I, indicates a relatively soft ionizing spectrum. We find that our measurements of the DGL can constrain dust models, favoring a grain size distribution with relatively few large grains. We also estimate the fraction of high-latitude H{alpha} which is scattered to be 19% {+-} 4%.

  5. Light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on OLED with microcavity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Doo-Hee; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jonghee; Park, Seung Koo; Moon, Jaehyun; Cho, Nam Sung; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-10-20

    We examined the light diffusing effects of nano and micro-structures on microcavity designed OLEDs. The results of FDTD simulations and experiments showed that the pillar shaped nano-structure was more effective than the concave micro-structure for light diffusing of microcavity OLEDs. The sharp luminance distribution of the microcavity OLED was changed to near Lambertian luminance distribution by the nano-structure, and light diffusing effects increased with the height of the nano-structure. Furthermore, the nano-structure has advantages including light extraction of the substrate mode, reproducibility of manufacturing process, and minimizing pixel blur problems in an OLED display panel. The nano-structure is a promising candidate for a light diffuser, resolving the viewing angle problems in microcavity OLEDs. PMID:25607307

  6. Modelling the effect of diffuse light on canopy photosynthesis in controlled environments.

    PubMed

    Cavazzoni, James; Volk, Tyler; Tubiello, Francesco; Monje, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    A layered canopy model was used to analyze the effects of diffuse light on canopy gross photosynthesis in controlled environment plant growth chambers, where, in contrast to the field, highly diffuse light can occur at high irradiance. The model suggests that high diffuse light fractions (approximately 0.7) and irradiance (1400 micromoles m-2 s-1) may enhance crop life-cycle canopy gross photosynthesis for hydroponic wheat by about 20% compared to direct light at the same irradiance. Our simulations suggest that high accuracy is not needed in specifying diffuse light fractions in chambers between approximately 0.7 and 1, because simulated photosynthesis for closed canopies plateau in this range. We also examined the effect of leaf angle distribution on canopy photosynthesis under growth chamber conditions, as these distributions determine canopy extinction coefficients for direct and diffuse light. We show that the spherical leaf angle distribution is not suitable for modeling photosynthesis of planophile canopies (e.g., soybean and peanut) in growth chambers. Also, the absorption of the light reflected from the surface below the canopy should generally be included in model simulations, as the corresponding albedo values in the photosynthetically active range may be quite high in growth chambers (e.g., approximately 0.5). In addition to the modeling implications, our results suggest that diffuse light conditions should be considered when drawing conclusions from experiments in controlled environments. PMID:12882223

  7. Modelling the effect of diffuse light on canopy photosynthesis in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavazzoni, James; Volk, Tyler; Tubiello, Francesco; Monje, Oscar; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A layered canopy model was used to analyze the effects of diffuse light on canopy gross photosynthesis in controlled environment plant growth chambers, where, in contrast to the field, highly diffuse light can occur at high irradiance. The model suggests that high diffuse light fractions (approximately 0.7) and irradiance (1400 micromoles m-2 s-1) may enhance crop life-cycle canopy gross photosynthesis for hydroponic wheat by about 20% compared to direct light at the same irradiance. Our simulations suggest that high accuracy is not needed in specifying diffuse light fractions in chambers between approximately 0.7 and 1, because simulated photosynthesis for closed canopies plateau in this range. We also examined the effect of leaf angle distribution on canopy photosynthesis under growth chamber conditions, as these distributions determine canopy extinction coefficients for direct and diffuse light. We show that the spherical leaf angle distribution is not suitable for modeling photosynthesis of planophile canopies (e.g., soybean and peanut) in growth chambers. Also, the absorption of the light reflected from the surface below the canopy should generally be included in model simulations, as the corresponding albedo values in the photosynthetically active range may be quite high in growth chambers (e.g., approximately 0.5). In addition to the modeling implications, our results suggest that diffuse light conditions should be considered when drawing conclusions from experiments in controlled environments.

  8. Light-element diffusion in Mg using first-principles calculations: Anisotropy and elastodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ravi; Trinkle, Dallas R.

    2016-08-01

    The light-elemental solutes B, C, N, and O can penetrate the surface of Mg alloys and diffuse during heat treatment or high temperature application, forming undesirable compounds. We investigate the diffusion of these solutes by determining their stable interstitial sites and the interpenetrating network formed by these sites. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the site energies, migration barriers, and attempt frequencies for these networks to inform our analytical model for bulk diffusion. Due to the nature of the networks, O diffuses isotropically, while B, C, and N diffuse anisotropically. We compute the elastodiffusion tensor which quantifies changes in diffusivity due to small strains that perturb the diffusion network geometry and the migration barriers. The DFT-computed elastic dipole tensor which quantifies the change in site energies and migration barriers due to small strains is used as an input to determine the elastodiffusion tensor. We employ the elastodiffusion tensor to determine the effect of thermal strains on interstitial diffusion and find that B, C, and N diffusivity increases on crystal expansion, while O diffusivity decreases. From the elastodiffusion and compliance tensors we calculate the activation volume of diffusion and find that it is positive and anisotropic for B, C, and N diffusion, whereas it is negative and isotropic for O diffusion.

  9. Stray light analysis of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breault, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The straylight analysis of the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) on the cosmic background explorer (COBE) mission is discussed. From the statement of work (SOW), the purpose of DIRBE is to measure, or set upper limits on, the spectral and spatial character of the diffuse extra galactic infrared radiation. Diffuse infrared sources within our own galaxy are measured. The required reduction of the unwanted radiation imposes severe design and operating restrictions on the DIRBE instrument. To accomplish its missions, it will operate at a multitude of wavelengths ranging from 1.25 um out to 200 to 300 microns. The operating bands and the required point source normalized irradiance transmittance (PSNIT) are shown. The important straylight concepts in the DIRBE design are reviewed. The model and assumptions used in APART analysis are explained. The limitations due to the scalar theory used in the analysis are outlined.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Cylindrical Light Diffusers Comprised of Shape Memory Polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Buckley, P R; Wilson, T S; Loge, J M; Maitland, K D; Maitland, D J

    2007-01-29

    We have developed a technique for constructing light diffusing devices comprised of a flexible shape memory polymer (SMP) cylindrical diffuser attached to the tip of an optical fiber. Devices were fabricated by casting an SMP rod over the cleaved tip of an optical fiber and media blasting the SMP rod to create a light diffusing surface. The axial and polar emission profiles and circumferential (azimuthal) uniformity were characterized for various blasting pressures, nozzle-to-sample distances, and nozzle translation speeds. The diffusers were generally strongly forward-directed and consistently withstood over 8 W of incident infrared laser light without suffering damage when immersed in water. These devices are suitable for various endoluminal and interstitial biomedical applications.

  11. Estimation of diffuse attenuation of ultraviolet light in optically shallow Florida Keys waters from MODIS measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse attenuation of solar light (Kd, m−1) determines the percentage of light penetrating the water column and available for benthic organisms. Therefore, Kd can be used as an index of water quality for coastal ecosystems that are dependent on photosynthesis, such as the coral ...

  12. Photosensitizer and light diffusion through dentin in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Ana C.; Graciano, Ariane X.; Nagata, Juliana Y.; Fujimaki, Mitsue; Terada, Raquel S. S.; Bento, Antonio C.; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L.

    2013-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been considered a potential antimicrobial modality against oral infections, including dental caries. A model to estimate the penetration of both photosensitizers and light through human dentin, a factor of interest in photodynamic therapy, is proposed. The photoacoustic spectroscopy technique was used to evaluate in vitro dentin permeability of three different photosensitizers. Using the dentin optical absorption and scattering coefficients, it was possible to propose a semi-quantitative model predicting both photosensitizer and light doses within dentin. The graphic illustrations obtained provided guidelines that may be useful in photodynamic therapy protocols used as antimicrobial tools in caries lesions.

  13. Silkworm Gut Fiber of Bombyx mori as an Implantable and Biocompatible Light-Diffusing Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Cenis, Jose Luis; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador D.; Lozano-Pérez, Antonio Abel; Rojo, Marta; Muñoz, Juan; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Arenas, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a new approach to the delivery of light in deeper tissues, through a silk filament that is implantable, biocompatible, and biodegradable. In the present work, silkworm gut fibers (SGFs) of Bombyx mori L., are made by stretching the silk glands. Morphological, structural, and optical properties of the fibers have been characterized and the stimulatory effect of red laser light diffused from the fiber was assayed in fibroblast cultures. SGFs are formed by silk fibroin (SF) mainly in a β-sheet conformation, a stable and non-soluble state in water or biological fluids. The fibers showed a high degree of transparency to visible and infrared radiation. Using a red laser (λ = 650 nm) as source, the light was efficiently diffused along the fiber wall, promoting a significant increment in the cell metabolism 5 h after the irradiation. SGFs have shown their excellent properties as light-diffusing optical fibers with a stimulatory effect on cells. PMID:27438824

  14. Silkworm Gut Fiber of Bombyx mori as an Implantable and Biocompatible Light-Diffusing Fiber.

    PubMed

    Cenis, Jose Luis; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador D; Lozano-Pérez, Antonio Abel; Rojo, Marta; Muñoz, Juan; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Arenas, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a new approach to the delivery of light in deeper tissues, through a silk filament that is implantable, biocompatible, and biodegradable. In the present work, silkworm gut fibers (SGFs) of Bombyx mori L., are made by stretching the silk glands. Morphological, structural, and optical properties of the fibers have been characterized and the stimulatory effect of red laser light diffused from the fiber was assayed in fibroblast cultures. SGFs are formed by silk fibroin (SF) mainly in a β-sheet conformation, a stable and non-soluble state in water or biological fluids. The fibers showed a high degree of transparency to visible and infrared radiation. Using a red laser (λ = 650 nm) as source, the light was efficiently diffused along the fiber wall, promoting a significant increment in the cell metabolism 5 h after the irradiation. SGFs have shown their excellent properties as light-diffusing optical fibers with a stimulatory effect on cells. PMID:27438824

  15. Searching for diffuse light in the M96 galaxy group

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Feldmeier, John J.

    2014-08-10

    We present deep, wide-field imaging of the M96 galaxy group (also known as the Leo I Group). Down to surface brightness limits of μ{sub B} = 30.1 and μ{sub V} = 29.5, we find no diffuse, large-scale optical counterpart to the 'Leo Ring', an extended H I ring surrounding the central elliptical M105 (NGC 3379). However, we do find a number of extremely low surface brightness (μ{sub B} ≳ 29) small-scale streamlike features, possibly tidal in origin, two of which may be associated with the Ring. In addition, we present detailed surface photometry of each of the group's most massive members—M105, NGC 3384, M96 (NGC 3368), and M95 (NGC 3351)—out to large radius and low surface brightness, where we search for signatures of interaction and accretion events. We find that the outer isophotes of both M105 and M95 appear almost completely undisturbed, in contrast to NGC 3384 which shows a system of diffuse shells indicative of a recent minor merger. We also find photometric evidence that M96 is accreting gas from the H I ring, in agreement with H I data. In general, however, interaction signatures in the M96 Group are extremely subtle for a group environment, and provide some tension with interaction scenarios for the formation of the Leo H I Ring. The lack of a significant component of diffuse intragroup starlight in the M96 Group is consistent with its status as a loose galaxy group in which encounters are relatively mild and infrequent.

  16. Anomalous behavior of the coherent light diffusion by a tilted translucent rough surface: part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollo, M. A.; Perez Quintian, F.; Hogert, Elsa N.; Landau, Monica R.; Gaggioli, Nestor G.

    1996-02-01

    When a translucent rough surface is illuminated, light is diffused in different directions. The envelope the intensity distribution is called diffusion curve. As the diffuser is rotated with respect to the incident beam, the diffuser curve changes its appearance: the maximum suffers a displacement and changes its shape. Some authors have studied this phenomenon, but none of them explained it properly. In this work we make an additional contribution to address the problem, showing experimentally that the maximum displacement depends on the incident angle and the diffuser ratio T/(sigma) . We compare our experimental results with those that can be calculated with the reformulated Beckmann's theory. We could observe important agreements and differences. For example, Beckmann's theory predicts that the diffusion results are asymmetric, while our measured results are indefectibly symmetric.

  17. Volume imaging with diffuse light: method, device, and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Schleicher, Eckhard; Freyer, Richard

    2000-11-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and tomography is of some interest in the diagnosis of testicular pathologies. For a clinical evaluation of 3D optical tomography a special laser scanning device as well as dedicated tomography algorithms have been developed. With the device we are able to obtain continuous- wave tomographic scans from an object under investigation using different laser wavelengths. Tomographic image reconstruction is based on the solution of the linearized inverse problem of optical absorption imaging for a three- dimensional volume. Priority is given to a spatial resolution adapted volume discretization and an efficient matrix solution algorithm based on singular value decomposition.

  18. Phosphorous Diffuser Diverged Blue Laser Diode for Indoor Lighting and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Huang, Chia-Yen; He, Jr-Hau; Ooi, Boon; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-01-01

    An advanced light-fidelity (Li-Fi) system based on the blue Gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) with a compact white-light phosphorous diffuser is demonstrated for fusing the indoor white-lighting and visible light communication (VLC). The phosphorous diffuser adhered blue GaN LD broadens luminescent spectrum and diverges beam spot to provide ample functionality including the completeness of Li-Fi feature and the quality of white-lighting. The phosphorous diffuser diverged white-light spot covers a radiant angle up to 120o with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37). On the other hand, the degradation on throughput frequency response of the blue LD is mainly attributed to the self-feedback caused by the reflection from the phosphor-air interface. It represents the current state-of-the-art performance on carrying 5.2-Gbit/s orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed 16-quadrature-amplitude modulation (16-QAM OFDM) data with a bit error rate (BER) of 3.1 × 10−3 over a 60-cm free-space link. This work aims to explore the plausibility of the phosphorous diffuser diverged blue GaN LD for future hybrid white-lighting and VLC systems. PMID:26687289

  19. Phosphorous Diffuser Diverged Blue Laser Diode for Indoor Lighting and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Huang, Chia-Yen; He-Hau, Jr.; Ooi, Boon; Denbaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-12-01

    An advanced light-fidelity (Li-Fi) system based on the blue Gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) with a compact white-light phosphorous diffuser is demonstrated for fusing the indoor white-lighting and visible light communication (VLC). The phosphorous diffuser adhered blue GaN LD broadens luminescent spectrum and diverges beam spot to provide ample functionality including the completeness of Li-Fi feature and the quality of white-lighting. The phosphorous diffuser diverged white-light spot covers a radiant angle up to 120o with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37). On the other hand, the degradation on throughput frequency response of the blue LD is mainly attributed to the self-feedback caused by the reflection from the phosphor-air interface. It represents the current state-of-the-art performance on carrying 5.2-Gbit/s orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed 16-quadrature-amplitude modulation (16-QAM OFDM) data with a bit error rate (BER) of 3.1 × 10-3 over a 60-cm free-space link. This work aims to explore the plausibility of the phosphorous diffuser diverged blue GaN LD for future hybrid white-lighting and VLC systems.

  20. Phosphorous Diffuser Diverged Blue Laser Diode for Indoor Lighting and Communication.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Huang, Chia-Yen; He, Jr-Hau; Ooi, Boon; DenBaars, Steven P; Nakamura, Shuji; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-01-01

    An advanced light-fidelity (Li-Fi) system based on the blue Gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) with a compact white-light phosphorous diffuser is demonstrated for fusing the indoor white-lighting and visible light communication (VLC). The phosphorous diffuser adhered blue GaN LD broadens luminescent spectrum and diverges beam spot to provide ample functionality including the completeness of Li-Fi feature and the quality of white-lighting. The phosphorous diffuser diverged white-light spot covers a radiant angle up to 120(o) with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37). On the other hand, the degradation on throughput frequency response of the blue LD is mainly attributed to the self-feedback caused by the reflection from the phosphor-air interface. It represents the current state-of-the-art performance on carrying 5.2-Gbit/s orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed 16-quadrature-amplitude modulation (16-QAM OFDM) data with a bit error rate (BER) of 3.1 × 10(-3) over a 60-cm free-space link. This work aims to explore the plausibility of the phosphorous diffuser diverged blue GaN LD for future hybrid white-lighting and VLC systems. PMID:26687289

  1. Influence of cloud optical thickness on surface diffuse light and carbon uptake in forests and croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S. J.; Steiner, A. L.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately modeling atmospheric CO2 removal by terrestrial ecosystems requires an understanding of how atmospheric conditions change the rate of photosynthesis across major vegetation types. Diffuse light, which is created from interactions between incident solar radiation and atmospheric aerosols and clouds, has been postulated to increase carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. To determine how cloud conditions affect carbon uptake through its influence on diffuse light, we quantify the relationship between cloud optical thickness, which indicates surface light attenuation by clouds, and surface diffuse light. We then examine the relationship between cloud optical thickness and gross primary productivity (GPP) to determine whether cloud properties could modulate GPP in temperate ecosystems. Surface diffuse light and GPP data are obtained from publically available Ameriflux data (Mead Crop sites, University of Michigan Biological Station, Morgan Monroe, and Howland Forest) and cloud optical thickness data over the Ameriflux sites are retrieved from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spetroradiometer. We compare the response of GPP to cloud optical thickness between croplands and forests, as well as within ecosystem types to determine ecosystem-specific responses and the role of plant community composition on ecosystem-level GPP under varying cloud conditions. By linking atmospheric cloud properties to surface light conditions and ecosystem carbon fluxes, we refine understanding of land-atmosphere carbon cycling and how changes in atmospheric cloud conditions may influence the future of the land carbon sink.

  2. Nanocellulose-based Translucent Diffuser for Optoelectronic Device Applications with Dramatic Improvement of Light Coupling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Tassi, Nancy G; Zhu, Hongli; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-12-01

    Nanocellulose is a biogenerated and biorenewable organic material. Using a process based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)/NaClO/NaBr system, a highly translucent and light-diffusive film consisting of many layers of nanocellulose fibers and wood pulp microfibers was made. The film demonstrates a combination of large optical transmittance of ∼90% and tunable diffuse transmission of up to ∼78% across the visible and near-infrared spectra. The detailed characterizations of the film indicate the combination of high optical transmittance and haze is due to the film's large packing density and microstructured surface. The superior optical properties make the film a translucent light diffuser and applicable for improving the efficiencies of optoelectronic devices such as thin-film silicon solar cells and organic light-emitting devices. PMID:26572592

  3. Measuring tissue blood flow using ultrasound modulated diffused light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, A.; Racheli, N.; Breskin, I.; Metzger, Y.; Silman, Z.; Kamar, M.; Nini, A.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of a novel device employing ultrasound modulation of near infrared light (referred as "Ultrasound tagged light" or UTL) to perform non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the microvascular level in tissue. Monitoring microcirculatory blood flow is critical in clinical situations affecting flow to different organs, such as the brain or the limbs. . However, currently there are no non-invasive devices that measure microcirculatory blood flow in deep tissue continuously. Our prototype device (Ornim Medical, Israel) was used to monitor tissue blood flow on anesthetized swine during controlled manipulations of increased and decreased blood flow. Measurements were done on the calf muscle and forehead of the animal and compared with Laser Doppler (LD). ROC analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for detecting an increase in blood flow on the calf muscle, demonstrated AUC = 0.951 for 23 systemic manipulations of cardiac output by Epinephrine injection, which is comparable to AUC = 0.943 using laser Doppler. Some examples of cerebral blood flow monitoring are presented, along with their individual ROC curves. UTL flowmetry is shown to be effective in detecting changes in cerebral and muscle blood flow in swine, and has merit in clinical applications.

  4. First derivative of NIR light diffuse reflectance spectra as an approach to analyze muscle tissue chromophores and light pathlength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussakovsky, Eugene

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance was applied to the biomedical studies (muscles, cardiac tissues etc.) in a form of either a direct pseudo-optical spectrum or its second derivative. The first derivative adopts advantages of both direct spectrum (high signal-to-noise ratio) and its second derivative (simplifying the consideration of light scattering contribution, S). In contrast to spectrophotometry of solutions, diffuse reflectance application to the analysis of turbid medium chromophores leads to non-trivial problems of contribution of light scattering, the choice of reference, and light pathlength. Under certain conditions, the first approximation of the Taylor series of S results in the known linear dependence of S on wavelength in the 650-1050 nm wavelength range. Then the light scattering contribution to the first derivative becomes a wavelength-independent offset. In contrast to the second derivative, the information on light scattering inside the tissue is not lost. Effect of reference on the measured spectra becomes negligible. Application of the first derivative allowed (i) determination of NIR light pathlength in muscle tissue, and (ii) quantification of hemoglobin + myoglobin absolute concentration (in mM) in cardiac tissue during open-heart surgery. The first derivative approach may in general be applied to any chromophores in turbid (biological) media.

  5. Improving the light quantification of near infrared (NIR) diffused light optical tomography with ultrasound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman

    According to the statistics published by the American Cancer Society, currently breast cancer is the second most common cancer after skin cancer and the second cause of cancer death after lung cancer in the female population. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared (NIR) light, guided by ultrasound localization, has shown great promise in distinguishing benign from malignant breast tumors and in assessing the response of breast cancer to chemotherapy. Our ultrasound-guided DOT system is based on reflection geometry, with patients scanned in supine position using a hand-held probe. For patients with chest-wall located at a depth shallower than 1 to 2cm, as in about 10% of our clinical cases, the semi-infinite imaging medium is not a valid assumption and the chest-wall effect needs to be considered in the imaging reconstruction procedure. In this dissertation, co-registered ultrasound images were used to model the breast-tissue and chest-wall as a two-layer medium. The effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction was systematically investigated. The performance of the two-layer model-based reconstruction, using the Finite Element Method, was evaluated by simulation, phantom experiments and clinical studies. The results show that the two-layer model can improve the accuracy of estimated background optical properties, the reconstructed absorption map and the total hemoglobin concentration of the lesion. For patients' data affected by chest wall, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at lesion and normal reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch between these two sites. Because the imaging reconstruction is based on the perturbation approach, the effect of this mismatch between the optical properties at the two sites on reconstructed optical absorption was studied and a guideline for imaging procedure was developed to reduce these effects during data capturing. To reduce the artifacts

  6. Sensing and enumerating rare circulating cells with diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Niedre, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Detection and quantification of circulating cells in live animals is a challenging and important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Current methods involve extraction of blood samples and counting of cells ex-vivo. Since only small blood volumes are analyzed at specific time points, monitoring of changes in cell populations over time is difficult and rare cells often escape detection. The goal of this research is to develop a method for enumerating very rare circulating cells in the bloodstream non-invasively. This would have many applications in biomedical research, including monitoring of cancer metastasis and tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. In this work we describe the optical configuration of our instrument which allows fluorescence detection of single cells in diffusive media at the mesoscopic scale. Our instrument design consists of two continuous wave laser diode sources and an 8-channel fiber coupled multi-anode photon counting PMT. Fluorescence detector fibers were arranged circularly around the target in a miniaturized ring configuration. Cell-simulating fluorescent microspheres and fluorescently-labeled cells were passed through a limb mimicking phantom with similar optical properties and background fluorescence as a limb of a mouse. Our data shows that we are able to successfully detect and count these with high quantitative accuracy. Future work includes characterization of our instrument using fluorescently labeled cells in-vivo. If successful, this technique would allow several orders of magnitude in vivo detection sensitivity improvement versus current approaches.

  7. Effect of diffusion of light on thin-film photovoltaic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Lipi; Wittkopf, Stephen K.

    A large fraction of the daylight incident on building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) laminates is diffuse irradiance. In this study, fabrics of various weaves were used to simulate combinations of direct and diffuse irradiance on façade-mounted PV. The scattering of light achieved with the fabrics at varying angles of incidence was measured with a goniophotometer. The transmittance distribution was used to quantify the percentage of diffusion created by the fabrics. A photovoltaic (PV) laminate was shaded with the fabrics to simulate diffuse irradiance and the short circuit current of the module was measured. The experimental results indicate fabrics of different porosity can be used to simulate various combinations of direct and diffuse irradiance. However, these fabrics can affect the module output. Preliminary results show that the proximity of the fabric to the thin-film PV laminate during the test skews the measured electrical parameters.

  8. METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Dole, M.

    1959-09-22

    An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

  9. Reflection of diffuse light from dielectric one-dimensional rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    González-Alcalde, Alma K; Méndez, Eugenio R; Terán, Emiliano; Cuppo, Fabio L S; Olivares, J A; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-03-01

    We study the reflection of diffuse light from 1D randomly rough dielectric interfaces. Results for the reflectance under diffuse illumination are obtained by rigorous numerical simulations and then contrasted with those obtained for flat surfaces. We also explore the possibility of using perturbation theories and conclude that they are limited for this type of study. Numerical techniques based on Kirchhoff approximation and reduced Rayleigh equations yield better results. We find that, depending on the refractive index contrast and nature of the irregularities, the roughness can increase or decrease the diffuse reflectance of the surface. PMID:26974906

  10. Fiberoptic Microneedles: Novel Optical Diffusers for Interstitial Delivery of Therapeutic Light

    PubMed Central

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A.; Hood, Robert L.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Grant, David C.; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L.; Rylander, M. Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area. This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. Materials and Methods A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper. Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1064 nm, (5 W CW) irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Results The acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. Conclusions We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target

  11. Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure

    SciTech Connect

    Riuttanen, L. Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M.; Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.

    2014-02-24

    The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

  12. Aquatic vision and the modulation transfer properties of unlighted and diffusely lighted natural waters.

    PubMed

    Jagger, W S; Muntz, W R

    1993-09-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of well-mixed unlighted and diffusely lighted samples of clear natural waters for path lengths up to 4 m was measured. The measuring conditions simulated the situation for horizontal aquatic vision. In unlighted water, the MTF decreased relatively slowly with increasing path length and spatial frequency up to 150 c/deg. We interpret this as the result of low-angle forward scattering of light from the target. For diffusely lighted water, the MTF fell much more rapidly with path length, but was nearly independent of spatial frequency. Here, scattering of ambient light into the light path contributes an additional veiling glare or path radiance, which is independent of spatial frequency but degrades the MTF strongly with increasing path length. These scattering processes are independent of wavelength in the visible spectrum. The modulation transfer properties of these waters do not preclude high aquatic visual acuity. However, the useful range of high acuity vision in diffusely lighted water is much less than for unlighted water. This places special requirements upon the design of high-acuity aquatic eyes. PMID:8266631

  13. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F. R.; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars (‘Pink Champion’ and ‘Royal Champion’) were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (gs) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in ‘Royal Champion,’ whereas it remained relatively constant in ‘Pink Champion.’ Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (Pn) in both cultivars approached steady state Pn in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in ‘Pink Champion.’ These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in ‘Royal Champion’ in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in ‘Pink Champion.’ We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent. PMID:26870071

  14. Effects of Diffuse Light on Radiation Use Efficiency of Two Anthurium Cultivars Depend on the Response of Stomatal Conductance to Dynamic Light Intensity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Kromdijk, Johannes; Heuvelink, Ep; van Noort, F R; Kaiser, Elias; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2016-01-01

    The stimulating effect of diffuse light on radiation use efficiency (RUE) of crops is often explained by the more homogeneous spatial light distribution, while rarely considering differences in temporal light distribution at leaf level. This study investigated whether diffuse light effects on crop RUE can be explained by dynamic responses of leaf photosynthesis to temporal changes of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). Two Anthurium andreanum cultivars ('Pink Champion' and 'Royal Champion') were grown in two glasshouses covered by clear (control) and diffuse glass, with similar light transmission. On clear days, diffusing the light resulted in less temporal fluctuations of PPFD. Stomatal conductance (g s) varied strongly in response to transient PPFD in 'Royal Champion,' whereas it remained relatively constant in 'Pink Champion.' Instantaneous net leaf photosynthesis (P n) in both cultivars approached steady state P n in diffuse light treatment. In control treatment this only occurred in 'Pink Champion.' These cultivar differences were reflected by a higher RUE (8%) in 'Royal Champion' in diffuse light treatment compared with control, whereas no effect on RUE was observed in 'Pink Champion.' We conclude that the stimulating effect of diffuse light on RUE depends on the stomatal response to temporal PPFD fluctuations, which response is cultivar dependent. PMID:26870071

  15. Using diffuse near-infrared light to characterize tissue optical and physiologic properties for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Hoai

    2001-05-01

    Methods based on near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance offer novel and functional approaches to medical diagnostics. NIR diffuse reflectance techniques are well suited for non-invasive, quantitative characterization of tissue optical properties, namely macroscopic absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (μs') coefficient. Tissue optical properties, in turn, provide unique and clinically relevant functional and structural information about tissues. Needless to say, understanding light- tissue interactions and light transport in multiply scattering (turbid) media is essential in order to fully capitalize on the useful features of NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. This thesis addresses the practical and, to a limited extent, the theoretical issues of NIR diffuse light spectroscopy. The goals of the thesis are two folds: (1)to investigate, from an instrumental and analytical perspectives, the accuracy and limitation of the various diffuse reflectance techniques in quantifying the optical properties of homogenous and layered turbid media, and (2)to evaluate the feasibility and applicability of using NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantify in vivo tissue optical and physiologic properties during pathophysiologic processes. With respect to the first objective, we conducted validation studies to assess the accuracy of the frequency-domain and spatially-resolved techniques in quantifying μa and μs' of homogenous turbid media. Similarly, frequency-domain and time-domain approaches were used to characterize the optical properties and thickness of two-layered turbid media. For the second objective, frequency-domain system was used to quantify the changes in the in vivo optical and physiologic properties secondary to cancerous transformation, cardiovascular dysfunction, and photodynamic therapy of tumors. In summary, studies results clearly indicate that NIR diffuse reflectance techniques accurately quantify the in vivo tissue optical and physiologic

  16. Induced dipole-dipole interactions in light diffusion from point dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherroret, Nicolas; Delande, Dominique; van Tiggelen, Bart A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a perturbative treatment of induced dipole-dipole interactions in the diffusive transport of electromagnetic waves through disordered atomic clouds. The approach is exact at order 2 in the atomic density and accounts for the vector character of light. It is applied to the calculations of the electromagnetic energy stored in the atomic cloud, which modifies the energy transport velocity, and of the light scattering and transport mean free paths. Results are compared to those obtained from a purely scalar model for light.

  17. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-01-01

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls.

  18. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Tadir, Y.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Tromberg, B.J.

    1995-12-26

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls. 5 figs.

  19. Study of CCT varying by volume scattering diffuser with moving and rotating white light LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Liang-Shiun; Huang, Wen-Chao

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the corrected color temperature (CCT) of white light, which originates from a white light LED (WLLED) and passes through a volume-scattering diffuser (VSD), is investigated. The VSD with thickness of 2mm is fabricated by mixing the 2um-sized PMMA scattering particles and the epoxy glue with different concentration values. Moreover, in order to understand the influences of the illuminated area and the scattering path of VSD on CCT values, the bulletheaded and lambertian-type WLLEDs are assembled for different positions and distinct orientations along the optical axis in a black cavity. A detailed comparison between results regarding the white light with and without passing through the VSD is offered. The results of this research will help to improve the colorful consistency of the LED lamps which use diffusers.

  20. Predicting diffuse light-enhancement of GPP from plant functional traits: A multi-site synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Barr, J. G.; Cook, B.; Goeckede, M.; Law, B. E.; Kueppers, L. M.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse light enhances canopy-scale photosynthesis because isotropic diffuse light penetrates deeper into the canopy, involves more leaf area in photosynthesis, and prevents the top of the canopy from becoming light saturated. However, the observational and modeling communities still have little understanding of how the 'Diffuse light Enhancement Effect' (DEE) varies across plant functional types or is constrained by factors such as nitrogen availability and plant structure. So far, variability in the strength of DEE across plant functional types (PFTs) remains poorly constrained, but canopy models indicate leaf area index (LAI) is a primary controller. While the very few existing multi-site, measurement-based syntheses of the DEE have provided valuable information on the variability of the DEE across a few plant functional types, no study has correlated measured metrics of DEE magnitude with direct measurements of canopy physical traits across a wide range of plant functional types. Here we report a new metric that is suitable for quantifying the DEE in both flux measurements and land surface models. We also present, for the first time, an examination of the relationship between the DEE metric and plant functional traits. Results from our 70+ site AmeriFlux and FLUXNET synthesis indicate that LAI is the strongest controller of the DEE across sites and PFTs, with less significant influences from foliar nitrogen, canopy height, and mean annual precipitation. Our results will enable direct evaluation and improvement of remote sensing algorithms and light use efficiency models (e.g. MODIS GPP), which to this point regard diffuse light fraction as a source of noise. Additionally, improving resolution of the DEE in prognostic land surface models, such as the Community Land Model (CLM), will greatly improve our ability to forecast future feedbacks to terrestrial carbon sequestration from changes in cloudiness and aerosol amount.

  1. Coupling of light into the fundamental diffusion mode of a scattering medium (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S.; Yılmaz, Hasan; Lagendijk, Ad; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion equation describes the energy density inside a scattering medium such as biological tissues and paint [1]. The solution of the diffusion equation is a sum over a complete set of eigensolutions that shows a characteristic linear decrease with depth in the medium. It is of particular interest if one could launch energy in the fundamental eigensolution, as this opens the opportunity to achieve a much greater internal energy density. For applications in optics, an enhanced energy density is vital for solid-state lighting, light harvesting in solar cells, low-threshold random lasers, and biomedical optics. Here we demonstrate the first ever selective coupling of optical energy into a diffusion eigensolution of a scattering medium of zinc oxide (ZnO) paint. To this end, we exploit wavefront shaping to selectively couple energy into the fundamental diffusion mode, employing fluorescence of nanoparticles randomly positioned inside the medium as a probe of the energy density. We observe an enhanced fluorescence in case of optimized incident wavefronts, and the enhancement increases with sample thickness, a typical mesoscopic control parameter. We interpret successfully our result by invoking the fundamental eigensolution of the diffusion equation, and we obtain excellent agreement with our observations, even in absence of adjustable parameters [2]. References [1] R. Pierrat, P. Ambichl, S. Gigan, A. Haber, R. Carminati, and R. Rotter, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 17765 (2014). [2] O. S. Ojambati, H. Yilmaz, A. Lagendijk, A. P. Mosk, and W. L. Vos, arXiv:1505.08103.

  2. Predictions of solar radiation distribution: Global, direct and diffuse light on horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabane, Foued; Moummi, Noureddine; Brima, Abdelhafid

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation models for predicting the average daily and hourly global radiation, direct and diffuse radiation are discussed in this paper. The average daily global radiation in Ghardaia (32.38 N latitude, 3.82 E longitude) is predicted. Estimations of monthly average hourly global radiation are considered. We have developed this correlation using the sunlight and global radiation data from one year location around the weather station in Ghardaia. Two predictions of solar radiation distribution: direct and diffuse light on a horizontal area models, are reviewed to predict the hourly irradiation of Ghardaia utilizing the approach such as regression models. Comparisons between model predictions with measured data are made.

  3. Characterization of highly scattering media by measurement of diffusely backscattered polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Mourant, Judith R.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for recording spatially dependent intensity patterns of polarized light that is diffusely backscattered from highly scattering media are described. These intensity patterns can be used to differentiate different turbid media, such as polystyrene-sphere and biological-cell suspensions. Polarized light from a He-Ne laser (.lambda.=543 nm) is focused onto the surface of the scattering medium, and a surface area of approximately 4.times.4 cm centered on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. A variety of intensity patterns may be observed by varying the polarization state of the incident laser light and changing the analyzer configuration to detect different polarization components of the backscattered light. Experimental results for polystyrene-sphere and Intralipid suspensions demonstrate that the radial and azimuthal variations of the observed pattern depend on the concentration, size, and anisotropy factor, g, of the particles constituting the scattering medium. Measurements performed on biological cell suspensions show that intensity patterns can be used to differentiate between suspensions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Introduction of the Mueller-matrix for diffusely backscattered light, permits the selection of a subset of measurements which comprehensively describes the optical properties of backscattering media.

  4. Hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with diffusion equation for light propagation in tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueli; Sun, Fangfang; Yang, Defu; Ren, Shenghan; Zhang, Qian; Liang, Jimin

    2015-08-21

    Aiming at the limitations of the simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN) and diffusion equation (DE) in describing the light propagation in tissues, a hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with diffusion equation (HSDE) based diffuse light transport model is proposed. In the HSDE model, the living body is first segmented into several major organs, and then the organs are divided into high scattering tissues and other tissues. DE and SPN are employed to describe the light propagation in these two kinds of tissues respectively, which are finally coupled using the established boundary coupling condition. The HSDE model makes full use of the advantages of SPN and DE, and abandons their disadvantages, so that it can provide a perfect balance between accuracy and computation time. Using the finite element method, the HSDE is solved for light flux density map on body surface. The accuracy and efficiency of the HSDE are validated with both regular geometries and digital mouse model based simulations. Corresponding results reveal that a comparable accuracy and much less computation time are achieved compared with the SPN model as well as a much better accuracy compared with the DE one. PMID:26237074

  5. Stimulated concentration (diffusion) light scattering on nanoparticles in a liquid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, I. S.; Krivokhizha, S. V.; Chaikov, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    A nonlinear growth of the light scattering intensity has been observed and the frequency shift of the spectral line of scattered light has been measured in light backscattered in suspensions of diamond and latex nanoparticles in water. The shift corresponds to the HWHM of the line of spontaneous scattering on particles. We may conclude that there exists stimulated concentration (diffusion) light scattering on variations of the particle concentration, which is also called the stimulated Mie scattering. In a fibre probe scheme, the growth of the shift of the scattered spectral line is observed with an increase in the exciting beam power. The variation of the frequency shift with an increase in the exciting power is explained by convection in liquid.

  6. Diffusely scattered femtosecond white-light examination of breast tissue in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    af Klinteberg, Claes; Berg, Roger; Lindquist, Charlotta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune

    1995-12-01

    Multispectral studies of light propagation in female breast tissue have been performed. Short pulses of white light were generated by using self-phase modulation of a high-power laser pulse focused into a cuvette filled with water. The white light pulses illuminated the tissue and the scattered light was recorded with time- and wavelength dispersion by a streak camera. Measurements were performed on breast mastectomies in vitro and measurements on healthy breast tissue in vivo. The reduced scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of breast tissue were obtained in different wavelength regions by fitting solutions of the diffusion equation to the experimental data. Significant variations in the magnitude of the optical properties could be seen between the different individuals. No characteristic spectral discrepancy for tumor tissue was found.

  7. Diffuse light scattering from a dense and cold microscopic 87Rb sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kasie; Roof, S. J.; Havey, M. D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Kupriyanov, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report investigation of near-resonance light scattering from a cold atomic sample of 87Rb. Measurements are made on the F = 2 -->F' = 3 nearly closed hyperfine transition for atomic densities ranging from ~1010 to ~1013 atoms/cm3. The sample, initially prepared in a magneto-optical trap, is loaded into a far-off-resonance trap (FORT) in which the ensemble has a temperature ~100 μK and initial Gaussian radii of ~3 μm and ~280 μm in the transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively. The experimental geometry consists of projecting a near-resonance collimated laser beam onto the entire volume of the FORT and detecting the diffusely scattered light. The measured scattered light intensity as a function of detuning, atomic density, and sample size suggests that collective light scattering plays an important role in the experimental results. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. NSF-PHY-1068159).

  8. Brownian motion in a speckle light field: tunable anomalous diffusion and selective optical manipulation.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The motion of particles in random potentials occurs in several natural phenomena ranging from the mobility of organelles within a biological cell to the diffusion of stars within a galaxy. A Brownian particle moving in the random optical potential associated to a speckle pattern, i.e., a complex interference pattern generated by the scattering of coherent light by a random medium, provides an ideal model system to study such phenomena. Here, we derive a theory for the motion of a Brownian particle in a speckle field and, in particular, we identify its universal characteristic timescale. Based on this theoretical insight, we show how speckle light fields can be used to control the anomalous diffusion of a Brownian particle and to perform some basic optical manipulation tasks such as guiding and sorting. Our results might broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications. PMID:24496461

  9. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  10. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  11. Brownian Motion in a Speckle Light Field: Tunable Anomalous Diffusion and Selective Optical Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giorgio; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-02-01

    The motion of particles in random potentials occurs in several natural phenomena ranging from the mobility of organelles within a biological cell to the diffusion of stars within a galaxy. A Brownian particle moving in the random optical potential associated to a speckle pattern, i.e., a complex interference pattern generated by the scattering of coherent light by a random medium, provides an ideal model system to study such phenomena. Here, we derive a theory for the motion of a Brownian particle in a speckle field and, in particular, we identify its universal characteristic timescale. Based on this theoretical insight, we show how speckle light fields can be used to control the anomalous diffusion of a Brownian particle and to perform some basic optical manipulation tasks such as guiding and sorting. Our results might broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications.

  12. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Å in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC 303.8-14.2. Aims. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered Hα and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. Methods. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Results. Spectra are presented separately for the bright rims and dark cores of the globules. The continuum spectral energy distributions and absorption line spectra can be well modelled with the synthetic integrated starlight spectra. Emission lines of Hα +[N II], Hβ, and [S II] are detected and are interpreted in terms of scattered light plus an in situ warm ionized medium component behind the globules. We detected an excess of emission over the wavelength range 5200-8000 Å in DC 303.8-14.2 but the nature of this emission remains open. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO No. 073.C-0239(A). Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org.

  13. Diffusion barriers for achieving controlled concentrations of luminescent dopants via diffusion for mask-less RGB color patterning of organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Kajiyama, Yoshitaka; Kajiyama, Koichi; Aziz, Hany

    2015-11-30

    Using molecular diffusion as an approach to introduce organic luminescent dopants for making organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) of different colors on one substrate has the potential to overcome the yield and resolution limitations of the current OLED display technology. In this work, diffusion barriers made of MoO3 and a hole transport material mixture are introduced. The barriers effectively confine the diffusion of the dopants to only the desired depths. With the use of these barriers, OLEDs with highly controlled doping concentrations and performance are fabricated. The barriers thus allow utilizing simple diffusion methods for RGB patterning in OLEDs. PMID:26698710

  14. Diffuse-light two-dimensional line-of-sight attenuation for soot concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Kevin A; Johnson, Matthew R; Snelling, David R; Smallwood, Gregory J

    2008-02-10

    A technique of diffuse-light two-dimensional line-of-sight attenuation (diffuse 2D-LOSA) is described and demonstrated that achieves very high levels of sensitivity in transmissivity measurements (optical thicknesses down to 0.001) while effectively mitigating interferences due to beam steering. An optical system is described in which an arc lamp coupled with an integrating sphere is used as a source of diffuse light that is imaged to the center of the particulate laden medium. The center of the medium is then imaged onto a CCD detector with 1:1 magnification. Comparative measurements with collimated 2D-LOSA in nonpremixed flames demonstrate the accuracy and improved optical noise rejection of the technique. Tests in weakly sooting, nonpremixed methane-air flames, and in high pressure methane-air flames, reveal the excellent sensitivity of diffuse 2D-LOSA, which is primarily limited by the shot noise of the lamp and CCD detector. PMID:18268781

  15. Highly transparent sapphire micro-grating structures with large diffuse light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Yu, Jae Su

    2011-08-01

    The highly transparent micro-grating structures (MGSs) of sapphire substrate with large diffuse light scattering were theoretically and experimentally studied. From the finite difference time domain simulation, it was found that the degree of diffuse light scattering is strongly dependent on the size of grating structures. For a highly transparent property, the sapphire MGSs were optimally designed by the theoretical calculations using the rigorous coupled wave analysis method. The order of taper, geometry (i.e., width and height), and pitch length of MGSs were optimized to maximize their average total transmittance over a wide wavelength range of 300-1800 nm. Additionally, the influence of the deposition of low-refractive index material such as SiO2 onto sapphire MGSs on the transmittance characteristics was investigated. To verify experimentally the feasibility, the sapphire MGSs were fabricated by the conventional lithography and dry etching processes. The SiO2 deposited sapphire MGS exhibited a further increase in the total transmittance due to its relatively more graded refractive index profile while maintaining a significantly enhanced diffuse light scattering. The experimental data were in a reasonable agreement with the theoretical results.

  16. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  17. The Role of Triplet Exciton Diffusion in Light-Upconverting Polymer Glasses.

    PubMed

    Raišys, Steponas; Kazlauskas, Karolis; Juršėnas, Saulius; Simon, Yoan C

    2016-06-22

    Light upconversion (UC) via triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) by using noncoherent photoexcitation at subsolar irradiance power densities is extremely attractive, particularly for enhanced solar energy harvesting. Unfortunately, practical TTA-UC application is hampered by low UC efficiency of upconverting polymer glasses, which is commonly attributed to poor exciton diffusion of the triplet excitons across emitter molecules. The present study addresses this issue by systematically evaluating triplet exciton diffusion coefficients and diffusion lengths (LD) in a UC model system based on platinum-octaethylporphyrin-sensitized poly(methyl methacrylate)/diphenylanthracene (emitter) films as a function of emitter concentration (15-40 wt %). For this evaluation time-resolved photoluminescence bulk-quenching technique followed by Stern-Volmer-type quenching analysis of experimental data was employed. The key finding is that although increasing emitter concentration in the disordered PMMA/DPA/PtOEP films improves triplet exciton diffusion, and thus LD, this does not result in enhanced UC quantum yield. Conversely, improved LD accompanied by the accelerated decay of UC intensity on millisecond time scale degrades TTA-UC performance at high emitter loadings (>25 wt %) and suggests that diffusion-enhanced nonradiative decay of triplet excitons is the major limiting factor. PMID:27219281

  18. A facile fabrication of light diffusing film with LDP/polyacrylates composites coating for anti-glare LED application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shisen; Sun, Yaojie; Lin, Yandan; You, Bo

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a facile coating technique to fabricate the light diffusing film with hemispherical surface convex micro-structure. The coating was prepared by different ratio of light-diffusing particles (LDP)/polyacrylates composites via in situ radical polymerization, with the H2SO4 and vinyl triethoxysilane (A-151) pretreatment made the LDP better dispersed and incorporated with polyacrylate polymer chains. When the mass ratio (LDP/polyacrylate) was 0.5, the film obtained the highest light-diffusing effect and more than 90% transmittance due to the formation of hemispherical surface convex micro-structure. The light diffusing films have excellent anti-glare property if applied to LED light system.

  19. A diffusion approximation model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulou, M.; Kaselouris, E.; Drakaki, E.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Sianoudis, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    In dermatology, biophotonic methods offer high sensitivity and non-invasive measurements of skin tissue optical properties, in various physiological and pathological conditions. There are numerous skin processes, which can be examined and characterized using diagnostic optical spectroscopy, as the monitoring of skin aging, diagnosis of benign and malignant cutaneous lesions, dosimetry in photodynamic therapy (PDT), etc. Several mathematical models have been used to calculate the tissue optical properties from experimental measurements and to predict the light propagation in soft tissues, like skin, based on transport theory or Monte Carlo modeling. This work analyses the phenomena which are observed experimentally during the irradiation of skin, such as the absorption, reflectance, scattering, fluorescence and transmission of laser light. The study was carried out on animal skin samples, extracted post-mortem. In this work we also tried to evaluate the utility of diffusion approximation modeling for measuring the light intensity distribution in the skin samples with cw visible laser beam (λ=632.8 nm). The diffusion theory model was tested for the simulation results of the spatial light distribution within a five-layer model of animal skin tissue. We have studied the dependence towards the depth and the radial distance of the photon density of the incident radiation.

  20. Mechanisms of ultrasonic modulation of multiply scattered incoherent light based on diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li-Li; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    An analytic equation interpreting the intensity of ultrasound-modulated scattering light is derived, based on diffusion theory and previous explanations of the intensity modulation mechanism. Furthermore, an experiment of ultrasonic modulation of incoherent light in a scattering medium is developed. This analytical model agrees well with experimental results, which confirms the validity of the proposed intensity modulation mechanism. The model supplements the existing research on the ultrasonic modulation mechanism of scattering light. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178089), the Key Program of Science and Technology of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2011Y0019), and the Educational Department of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JA13074).

  1. Development of image reconstruction algorithms for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using total light approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Miwa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) based on the total light approach is developed. The continuous wave light is used for excitation in this system. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the total light approach that reconstructs the absorption coefficients increased by the fluorophore. Additionally we propose noise reduction using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) incorporating the truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD). Numerical and phantom experiments show that the developed system successfully reconstructs the fluorophore concentration in the biological media, and the ART with TSVD alleviates the influence of noises. In vivo experiment demonstrated that the developed FDOT system localized the fluorescent agent which was concentrated in the cancer transplanted into a kidney in a mouse.

  2. Telecentric suppression of diffuse light in imaging of highly anisotropic scattering media.

    PubMed

    Visbal Onufrak, Michelle A; Konger, Raymond L; Kim, Young L

    2016-01-01

    The telecentric lens, which was originally used in the machine vision industry, has often been utilized in biomedical imaging systems due to its commonly known properties, such as large transverse field of view, constant magnification, and long working distance. However, its potential advantages in optical imaging of biological tissue, which is highly diffusive, have not been fully explored. We revisit the idea that a telecentric lens system can bring an alternative yet simple method for reducing unwanted scattering or diffuse light in biological tissue, owing to its highly anisotropic scattering properties. Using biological tissue and tissue phantoms, we demonstrate advantages attributed to the use of telecentric lens in tissue imaging compared with imaging using conventional nontelecentric optics. Directional or angular gating (or filtering) using a telecentric lens is beneficial for removing a portion of diffuse light in highly anisotropic scattering media with high values of the scattering anisotropy factor. We envision that a telecentric lens could be potentially incorporated into an instrument of modest design and cost, increasing rapid practical adoption. PMID:26696179

  3. Enhanced modulation rate in platinum-diffused resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. B.; Yeh, D. H.; Hsieh, L. Z.; Zeng, S. H.

    2005-11-01

    This study is focused on the modulation response of resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes (RCLEDs). Platinum (Pt) atoms are diffused into the 660 nm RCLED epitaxial layers to increase the concentration of recombination centers and to improve the modulation speed. The RCLED has an AlInGaP multi-quantum-well active layer which was embedded into AlGaAs-distributed Bragg reflectors to form a one-wavelength (1-λ) optical resonator. Afterwards, the deep-level Pt impurity was diffused into the RCLED and an improved average rise time, from 18.07 to 12.21 ns, was obtained. The corresponding modulation frequency can be increased from 19.54 to 30.21 MHz.

  4. GPU-Accelerated Finite Element Method for Modelling Light Transport in Diffuse Optical Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a GPU-accelerated finite element forward solver for the computation of light transport in scattering media. The forward model is the computationally most expensive component of iterative methods for image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography, and performance optimisation of the forward solver is therefore crucial for improving the efficiency of the solution of the inverse problem. The GPU forward solver uses a CUDA implementation that evaluates on the graphics hardware the sparse linear system arising in the finite element formulation of the diffusion equation. We present solutions for both time-domain and frequency-domain problems. A comparison with a CPU-based implementation shows significant performance gains of the graphics accelerated solution, with improvements of approximately a factor of 10 for double-precision computations, and factors beyond 20 for single-precision computations. The gains are also shown to be dependent on the mesh complexity, where the largest gains are achieved for high mesh resolutions. PMID:22013431

  5. Diffuse light and building history of the galaxy cluster Abell 2667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covone, G.; Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Slezak, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We searched for diffuse intracluster light in the galaxy cluster Abell 2667 (z=0.233) from HST images in three broad band-filters. Methods: .We applied an iterative multi-scale wavelet analysis and reconstruction technique to these images, which allows to subtract stars and galaxies from the original images. Results: .We detect a zone of diffuse emission southwest of the cluster center (DS1) and a second faint object (ComDif) within DS1. Another diffuse source (DS2) may be detected at lower confidence level northeast of the center. These sources of diffuse light contribute to 10-15% of the total visible light in the cluster. Whether they are independent entities or part of the very elliptical external envelope of the central galaxy remains unclear. Deep VLT VIMOS integral field spectroscopy reveals a faint continuum at the positions of DS1 and ComDif but do not allow a redshift to be computed, so we conclude if these sources are part of the central galaxy or not. A hierarchical substructure detection method reveals the presence of several galaxy pairs and groups defining a similar direction to the one drawn by the DS1 - central galaxy - DS2 axis. The analysis of archive XMM-Newton and Chandra observations shows X-ray emission elongated in the same direction. The X-ray temperature map shows the presence of a cool core, a broad cool zone stretching from north to south, and hotter regions towards the northeast, southwest, and northwest. This might suggest shock fronts along these directions produced by infalling material, even if uncertainties remain quite large on the temperature determination far from the center. Conclusions: .These various data are consistent with a picture in which diffuse sources are concentrations of tidal debris and harassed matter expelled from infalling galaxies by tidal stripping and undergoing an accretion process onto the central cluster galaxy; as such, they are expected to be found along the main infall directions. Note, however

  6. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues.

  7. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 2. Diffuse reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-10-31

    Based on the previously calculated luminance factors, we have investigated the integral characteristics of light reflection from a rough surface of the skin with large-scale inhomogeneities under various conditions of the skin illumination. Shadowing of incident and scattered beams by relief elements is taken into account. Diffuse reflectances by the Gaussian and the quasi-periodic surfaces are compared and, in general, both these roughness models are shown to give similar results. We have studied the effect of the angular structure of radiation multiply scattered deep in the tissue and the refraction of rays as they propagate from the dermis to the surface of the stratum corneum on the reflection characteristics of the skin surface. The importance of these factors is demonstrated. The algorithms constructed can be included in the schemes of calculation of the light fields inside and outside the medium in solving various direct and inverse problems of optics of biological tissues. (biophotonics)

  8. Light-emitting diode-based multiwavelength diffuse optical tomography system guided by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guangqian; Alqasemi, Umar; Chen, Aaron; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Quing

    2014-12-01

    Laser diodes are widely used in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems but are typically expensive and fragile, while light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are cheaper and are also available in the near-infrared (NIR) range with adequate output power for imaging deeply seated targets. In this study, we introduce a new low-cost DOT system using LEDs of four wavelengths in the NIR spectrum as light sources. The LEDs were modulated at 20 kHz to avoid ambient light. The LEDs were distributed on a hand-held probe and a printed circuit board was mounted at the back of the probe to separately provide switching and driving current to each LED. Ten optical fibers were used to couple the reflected light to 10 parallel photomultiplier tube detectors. A commercial ultrasound system provided simultaneous images of target location and size to guide the image reconstruction. A frequency-domain (FD) laser-diode-based system with ultrasound guidance was also used to compare the results obtained from those of the LED-based system. Results of absorbers embedded in intralipid and inhomogeneous tissue phantoms have demonstrated that the LED-based system provides a comparable quantification accuracy of targets to the FD system and has the potential to image deep targets such as breast lesions. PMID:25473884

  9. Light-emitting diode-based multiwavelength diffuse optical tomography system guided by ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guangqian; Alqasemi, Umar; Chen, Aaron; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Laser diodes are widely used in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems but are typically expensive and fragile, while light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are cheaper and are also available in the near-infrared (NIR) range with adequate output power for imaging deeply seated targets. In this study, we introduce a new low-cost DOT system using LEDs of four wavelengths in the NIR spectrum as light sources. The LEDs were modulated at 20 kHz to avoid ambient light. The LEDs were distributed on a hand-held probe and a printed circuit board was mounted at the back of the probe to separately provide switching and driving current to each LED. Ten optical fibers were used to couple the reflected light to 10 parallel photomultiplier tube detectors. A commercial ultrasound system provided simultaneous images of target location and size to guide the image reconstruction. A frequency-domain (FD) laser-diode-based system with ultrasound guidance was also used to compare the results obtained from those of the LED-based system. Results of absorbers embedded in intralipid and inhomogeneous tissue phantoms have demonstrated that the LED-based system provides a comparable quantification accuracy of targets to the FD system and has the potential to image deep targets such as breast lesions. PMID:25473884

  10. Hybrid model of light propagation in random media based on the time-dependent radiative transfer and diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    Numerical modeling of light propagation in random media has been an important issue for biomedical imaging, including diffuse optical tomography (DOT). For high resolution DOT, accurate and fast computation of light propagation in biological tissue is desirable. This paper proposes a space-time hybrid model for numerical modeling based on the radiative transfer and diffusion equations (RTE and DE, respectively) in random media under refractive-index mismatching. In the proposed model, the RTE and DE regions are separated into space and time by using a crossover length and the time from the ballistic regime to the diffusive regime, ρDA~10/μt‧ and tDA~20/vμt‧ where μt‧ and v represent a reduced transport coefficient and light velocity, respectively. The present model succeeds in describing light propagation accurately and reduces computational load by a quarter compared with full computation of the RTE.

  11. Accuracy of RGD approximation for computing light scattering properties of diffusing and motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotlarchyk, M; Chen, S H; Asano, S

    1979-07-15

    The quasi-elastic light scattering has become an established technique for a rapid and quantitative characterization of an average motility pattern of motile bacteria in suspensions. Essentially all interpretations of the measured light scattering intensities and spectra so far are based on the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) approximation. Since the range of sizes of bacteria of interest is generally larger than the wavelength of light used in the measurement, one is not certain of the justification for the use of the RGD approximation. In this paper we formulate a method by which both the scattering intensity and the quasi-elastic light scattering spectra can be calculated from a rigorous scattering theory. For a specific application we study the case of bacteria Escherichia coli (about 1 microm in size) by using numerical solutions of the scattering field amplitudes from a prolate spheroid, which is known to simulate optical properties of the bacteria well. We have computed (1) polarized scattered light intensity vs scattering angle for a randomly oriented bacteria population; (2) polarized scattered field correlation functions for both a freely diffusing bacterium and for a bacterium undergoing a straight line motion in random directions and with a Maxwellian speed distribution; and (3) the corresponding depolarized scattered intensity and field correlation functions. In each case sensitivity of the result to variations of the index of refraction and size of the bacterium is investigated. The conclusion is that within a reasonable range of parameters applicable to E. coli, the accuracy of the RGD is good to within 10% at all angles for the properties (1) and (2), and the depolarized contributions in (3) are generally very small. PMID:20212685

  12. DIFFUSE GALACTIC LIGHT IN THE FIELD OF THE TRANSLUCENT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE CLOUD MBM32

    SciTech Connect

    Ienaka, N.; Kawara, K.; Matsuoka, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Sameshima, H.; Tsujimoto, T.; Peterson, B. A.

    2013-04-10

    We have conducted B-, g-, V-, and R-band imaging in a 45' Multiplication-Sign 40' field containing part of the high Galactic latitude translucent cloud MBM32, and correlated the intensity of diffuse optical light S{sub {nu}}({lambda}) with that of 100 {mu}m emission S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m). A {chi}{sup 2} minimum analysis is applied to fit a linear function to the measured correlation and derive the slope parameter b({lambda}) = {Delta}S{sub {nu}}({lambda})/{Delta}S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) of the best-fit linear function. Compiling a sample by combining our b({lambda}) and published ones, we show that the b({lambda}) strength varies from cloud to cloud by a factor of four. Finding that b({lambda}) decreases as S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m) increases in the sample, we suggest that a nonlinear correlation including a quadratic term of S{sub {nu}}(100 {mu}m){sup 2} should be fitted to the measured correlation. The variation of optical depth, which is A{sub V} = 0.16-2.0 in the sample, can change b({lambda}) by a factor of 2-3. There would be some contribution to the large b({lambda}) variation from the forward-scattering characteristic of dust grains which is coupled to the non-isotropic interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Models of the scattering of diffuse Galactic light (DGL) underestimate the b({lambda}) values by a factor of two. This could be reconciled by deficiency in UV photons in the ISRF or by a moderate increase in dust albedo. Our b({lambda}) spectrum favors a contribution from extended red emission (ERE) to the diffuse optical light; b({lambda}) rises from B to V faster than the models, seems to peak around 6000 A and decreases toward long wavelengths. Such a characteristic is expected from the models in which the DGL is combined with ERE.

  13. Light-Modulated Intermittent Wave Groups in a Diffusively Fed Reactive Gel.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hainan; Wang, Chenlong; Ren, Lin; Gao, Qingyu; Pan, Changwei; Epstein, Irving R

    2016-04-11

    Inspired by the biological growth that takes place in time-varying external fields such as light or temperature, we design an open reaction-diffusion system in order to investigate growth dynamics. The system is composed of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillatory reaction coupled with a copolymer gel consisting of NIPAAm and a photosensitive ruthenium catalyst. When subject to a unidirectional flow of the BZ reactants, the system displays groups of chemical waves whose structure depends upon the period and amplitude of illumination. Simulations of a modified six-variable Oregonator model exhibit all the complex wave groups found in our experiments. Studying this growth structure may aid in understanding the influence of periodic environmental variation on complex growth processes in living systems. PMID:27079819

  14. Determination of polymer size distribution by combination of quasielastic light scattering and band transport: evaluation of the effect of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Wei, G J; Bloomfield, V A

    1979-01-01

    In this paper we report a computer simulation study of the effect of diffusion on the size distribution obtained by combining light scattering with isokinetic band sedimentation or electrophoresis. We find that, under typical experimental conditions, the method yields reasonably accurate size distributions for samples of particles greater than 10 nm radius. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting the results for smaller particles, for which the distortion due to diffusion can be considerable. PMID:16997189

  15. Instrument for fluorescence sensing of circulating cells with diffuse light in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Murthy, Shashi K.; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations in mice is important in many areas of preclinical biomedical research. Normally, this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or, more recently, by using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. We describe a new technological approach to this problem using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer (DFFC) uses a laser to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. We first demonstrate that the DFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD-labeled cells in a custom-made optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates, and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. We also present preliminary data demonstrating that the DFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with sensitivity improvement by several orders of magnitude compared to current approaches.

  16. Numerical optix: A time-domain simulator of fluorescent light diffusion in turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Delorme, Jean-François; Guilman, Olga; Leblond, Frédéric; Khayat, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence imaging has increased steadily in the last decade. Using fluorescence techniques, it is feasible to visualize and quantify the function of genes and the expression of enzymes and proteins deep inside tissues. When applied to small animal research, optical imaging based on fluorescent marker probes can provide valuable information on the specificity and efficacy of drugs at reduced cost and with greater efficiency. Meanwhile, fluorescence techniques represent an important class of optical methods being applied to in vitro and in vivo biomedical diagnostics, towards noninvasive clinical applications, such as detecting and monitoring specific pathological and physiological processes. ART has developed a time domain in vivo small animal fluorescence imaging system, eXplore Optix. Using the measured time-resolved fluorescence signal, fluorophore location and concentration can be quickly estimated. Furthermore, the 3D distribution of fluorophore can be obtained by fluorescent diffusion tomography. To accurately analyze and interpret the measured fluorescent signals from tissue, complex theoretical models and algorithms are employed. We present here a numerical simulator of eXplore Optix. It generates virtual data under well-controlled conditions that enable us to test, verify, and improve our models and algorithms piecewise separately. The theoretical frame of the simulator is an analytical solution of the fluorescence diffusion equation. Compared to existing models, the coupling of fluorophores with finite volume size is taken into consideration. Also, the influences of fluorescent inclusions to excitation and emission light are both accounted for. The output results are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations.

  17. Sunlight Transmission through Desert Dust and Marine Aerosols: Diffuse Light Corrections to Sun Photometry and Pyrheliometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Dubovik, O.; Ramirez, S. A.; Wang, J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Box, M.; Holben, B. N.

    2003-01-01

    Desert dust and marine aerosols are receiving increased scientific attention because of their prevalence on intercontinental scales and their potentially large effects on Earth radiation and climate, as well as on other aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The relatively large size of desert dust and marine aerosols produces scattering phase functions that are strongly forward- peaked. Hence, Sun photometry and pyrheliometry of these aerosols are more subject to diffuse-light errors than is the case for smaller aerosols. Here we quantify these diffuse-light effects for common Sun photometer and pyrheliometer fields of view (FOV), using a data base on dust and marine aerosols derived from (1) AERONET measurements of sky radiance and solar beam transmission and (2) in situ measurements of aerosol layer size distribution and chemical composition. Accounting for particle non-sphericity is important when deriving dust size distribution from both AERONET and in situ aerodynamic measurements. We express our results in terms of correction factors that can be applied to Sun photometer and pyrheliometer measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD). We find that the corrections are negligible (less than approximately 1% of AOD) for Sun photometers with narrow FOV (half-angle eta less than degree), but that they can be as large as 10% of AOD at 354 nm wavelength for Sun photometers with eta = 1.85 degrees. For pyrheliometers (which can have eta up to approximately 2.8 degrees), corrections can be as large as 16% at 354 nm. We find that AOD correction factors are well correlated with AOD wavelength dependence (hence Angstrom exponent). We provide best-fit equations for determining correction factors from Angstrom exponents of uncorrected AOD spectra, and we demonstrate their application to vertical profiles of multiwavelength AOD.

  18. Hybrid Monte Carlo-Diffusion Method For Light Propagation in Tissue With a Low-Scattering Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kashio, Yoshihiko; Okada, Eiji

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneity of the tissues in a head, especially the low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer surrounding the brain has previously been shown to strongly affect light propagation in the brain. The radiosity-diffusion method, in which the light propagation in the CSF layer is assumed to obey the radiosity theory, has been employed to predict the light propagation in head models. Although the CSF layer is assumed to be a nonscattering region in the radiosity-diffusion method, fine arachnoid trabeculae cause faint scattering in the CSF layer in real heads. A novel approach, the hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion method, is proposed to calculate the head models, including the low-scattering region in which the light propagation does not obey neither the diffusion approximation nor the radiosity theory. The light propagation in the high-scattering region is calculated by means of the diffusion approximation solved by the finite-element method and that in the low-scattering region is predicted by the Monte Carlo method. The intensity and mean time of flight of the detected light for the head model with a low-scattering CSF layer calculated by the hybrid method agreed well with those by the Monte Carlo method, whereas the results calculated by means of the diffusion approximation included considerable error caused by the effect of the CSF layer. In the hybrid method, the time-consuming Monte Carlo calculation is employed only for the thin CSF layer, and hence, the computation time of the hybrid method is dramatically shorter than that of the Monte Carlo method.

  19. Hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion method for light propagation in tissue with a low-scattering region.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kashio, Yoshihiko; Okada, Eiji

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneity of the tissues in a head, especially the low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer surrounding the brain has previously been shown to strongly affect light propagation in the brain. The radiosity-diffusion method, in which the light propagation in the CSF layer is assumed to obey the radiosity theory, has been employed to predict the light propagation in head models. Although the CSF layer is assumed to be a nonscattering region in the radiosity-diffusion method, fine arachnoid trabeculae cause faint scattering in the CSF layer in real heads. A novel approach, the hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion method, is proposed to calculate the head models, including the low-scattering region in which the light propagation does not obey neither the diffusion approximation nor the radiosity theory. The light propagation in the high-scattering region is calculated by means of the diffusion approximation solved by the finite-element method and that in the low-scattering region is predicted by the Monte Carlo method. The intensity and mean time of flight of the detected light for the head model with a low-scattering CSF layer calculated by the hybrid method agreed well with those by the Monte Carlo method, whereas the results calculated by means of the diffusion approximation included considerable error caused by the effect of the CSF layer. In the hybrid method, the time-consuming Monte Carlo calculation is employed only for the thin CSF layer, and hence, the computation time of the hybrid method is dramatically shorter than that of the Monte Carlo method. PMID:12790437

  20. Speckle-scale focusing in the diffusive regime with time reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Wang, Ying Min; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Mathy, Alexandre; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-04-01

    Focusing of light in the diffusive regime inside scattering media has long been considered impossible. Recently, this limitation has been overcome with time reversal of ultrasound-encoded light (TRUE), but the resolution of this approach is fundamentally limited by the large number of optical modes within the ultrasound focus. Here, we introduce a new approach, time reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE), which demixes these spatial modes by variance encoding to break the resolution barrier imposed by the ultrasound. By encoding individual spatial modes inside the scattering sample with unique variances, we effectively uncouple the system resolution from the size of the ultrasound focus. This enables us to demonstrate optical focusing and imaging with diffuse light at an unprecedented, speckle-scale lateral resolution of ~5 µm.

  1. Extraction of quasi-straightforward-propagating photons from diffused light transmitting through a scattering medium by polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinaka, Hiromichi; Hashimoto, Koji; Wada, Kenji; Cho, Yoshio; Osawa, Masahiko

    1995-07-01

    The utilization of light polarization is proposed to extract quasi-straightforward-propagating photons from diffused light transmitting through a scattering medium under continuously operating conditions. Removal of a floor level normally appearing on the dynamic range over which the extraction capability is maintained is demonstrated. By use of pulse-based observations this cw scheme of extraction of quasi-straightforward-propagating photons is directly shown to be equivalent to the use of a temporal gate in the pulse-based operation.

  2. Light-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in clinical diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Pavlova, E.; Kundurjiev, T.; Troyanova, P.; Genova, Ts.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated more than 500 clinical cases to receive the spectral properties of basal cell (136 patients) and squamous cell carcinoma (28), malignant melanoma (41) and different cutaneous dysplastic and benign cutaneous lesions. Excitation at 365, 385 and 405 nm using LEDs sources is applied to obtain autofluorescence spectra, and broad-band illumination in the region of 400-900 nm is used to detect diffuse reflectance spectra of all pathologies investigated. USB4000 microspectrometer (Ocean Optics Inc, USA) is applied as a detector and fiber-optic probe is used for delivery of the light. In the case of in vivo tumor measurements spectral shape and intensity changes are observed that are specific for a given type of lesion. Autofluorescence origins of the signals coming from skin tissues are mainly due to proteins, such as collagen, elastin, keratin, their cross-links, co-enzimes - NADH and flavins and endogenous porphyrins. Spectral features significant into diffuse spectroscopy diagnosis are related to the effects of re-absorption of hemoglobin and its forms, as well as melanin and its concentration in different pathologies. We developed significant database and revealed specific features for a large class of cutaneous neoplasia, using about 30 different spectral peculiarities to differentiate cutaneous tumors. Sensitivity and specificity obtained exceed 90%, which make optical biopsy very useful tool for clinical practice. These results are obtained in the frames of clinical investigations for development of significant "spectral features" database for the most common cutaneous malignant, dysplastic and benign lesions. In the forthcoming plans, our group tries to optimize the existing experimental system for optical biopsy of skin, and to introduce it and the diagnostic algorithms developed into clinical practice, based on the high diagnostic accuracy achieved.

  3. Sub-diffuse structured light imaging provides macroscopic maps of microscopic tissue structure (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    The onset and progression of cancer introduces changes to the intra-cellular ultrastructural components and to the morphology of the extracellular matrix. While previous work has shown that localized scatter imaging is sensitive to pathology-induced differences in these aspects of tissue microstructure, wide adaptation this knowledge for surgical guidance is limited by two factors. First, the time required to image with confocal-level localization of the remission signal can be substantial. Second, localized (i.e. sub-diffuse) scatter remission intensity is influenced interchangeably by parameters that define scattering frequency and anisotropy. This similarity relationship must be carefully considered in order to obtain unique estimates of biomarkers that define either the scatter density or features that describe the distribution (e.g. shape, size, and orientation) of scatterers. This study presents a novel approach that uses structured light imaging to address both of these limitations. Monte Carlo data were used to model the reflectance intensity over a wide range of spatial frequencies, reduced scattering coefficients, absorption coefficients, and a metric of the scattering phase function that directly maps to the fractal dimension of scatter sizes. The approach is validated in tissue-simulating phantoms constructed with user-tuned scattering phase functions. The validation analysis shows that the phase function can be described in the presence of different scatter densities or background absorptions. Preliminary data from clinical tissue specimens show quantitative images of both the scatter density and the tissue fractal dimension for various tissue types and pathologies. These data represent a novel wide-field quantitative approach to mapping microscopic structural biomarkers that cannot be obtained with standard diffuse imaging. Implications for the use of this approach to assess surgical margins will be discussed.

  4. Spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and phase-only spatial light modulator for constructing arbitrary complex fields.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2014-02-24

    We propose a spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM), by which arbitrary complex-amplitude fields can be generated with higher spatial resolution and diffraction efficiency than off-axis and double-phase computer-generated holograms. Our method encodes the original complex object as a phase-only diffusion image by scattering the complex object using a random diffuser. In addition, all incoming light to the SLM is consumed for a single diffraction order, making a diffraction efficiency of more than 90% possible. This method can be applied for holographic data storage, three-dimensional displays, and other such applications. PMID:24663718

  5. Diffuse optical tomography with structured-light patterns to quantify breast density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Jessica; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Zheng, Jie; Li, Yifan; Chen, Jeon-hor; Su, Min-Ying; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-02-01

    Breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer, where women with denser breasts are more likely to develop cancer. By identifying women at higher risk, healthcare providers can suggest screening at a younger age to effectively diagnose and treat breast cancer in its earlier stages. Clinical risk assessment models currently do not incorporate breast density, despite its strong correlation with breast cancer. Current methods to measure breast density rely on mammography and MRI, both of which may be difficult to use as a routine risk assessment tool. We propose to use diffuse optical tomography with structured-light to measure the dense, fibroglandular (FGT) tissue volume, which has a different chromophore signature than the surrounding adipose tissue. To test the ability of this technique, we performed simulations by creating numerical breast phantoms from segmented breast MR images. We looked at two different cases, one with a centralized FGT distribution and one with a dispersed distribution. As expected, the water and lipid volumes segmented at half-maximum were overestimated for the dispersed case. However, it was noticed that the recovered water and lipid concentrations were lower and higher, respectively, than the centralized case. This information may provide insight into the morphological distribution of the FGT and can be a correction in estimating the breast density.

  6. Investigation of calcium aluminates by IR spectroscopy in diffusely scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, A.S.; Borovkov, V.Yu.; Nissenbaum, V.D.; Yakerson, V.I.; Kazanskii, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    The hydroxyl covering and the adsorption sites for CO and H/sub 2/O on aluminum-calcium catalysts and supports with developed surfaces have been studied by IR spectroscopy in diffusely scattered light. The presence of several types of surface OH groups, viz., terminal groups bonded to calcium ions with different types of coordination, bridging OH groups, and groups appearing in (CaOH)/sup +/ groupings, which perform the role of compensating cations in the zeolite-like structure of calcium aluminates, has been established. The shifts of the bands of the OH groups upon the adsorption of C/sub 6/H/sub 6/ and cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 12/ point out their weakly acidic or basic character. When calcium aluminates are dehydroxylated, aprotic sites appear on their surfaces, and the rehydration of such surfaces is accompanied by the formation of OH groups and the weakening of the Al-O-M bonds (M = Al, Ca) with the appearance of additional sites for the strong adsorption of water.

  7. Light polarization measurements - A method to determine the specular and diffuse light-scattering properties of both leaves and plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1984-01-01

    The contributions of diffuse and specular reflection to the total canopy reflection of sunlight are determined experimentally for wheat at two stages of development using spectroradiometer measurements obtained at 13 wavelengths in the 480-720-nm range with a polarizing film in maximum and minimum signal-amplitude positions. The data and computation techniques are presented in tables, diagrams, and graphs, and the need to take specular reflection into account in constructing models of light/canopy interaction is stressed.

  8. Investigation of clusters of galaxies. I - Explanation of photometric scale errors by light diffusion in a photographic emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, F. W.; Ziener, R.

    The present paper is concerned with photometry studies in B and V for 326 galaxies in the central field of the Coma cluster. The results are employed as a basis for a reinvestigation of a controversy regarding the scale of different authors. An explanation is found for the systematic deviation between the results obtained by Rood and Baum (1968) and Godwin and Peach (1977) in the V pass band, taking into account a diffusion of light in the emulsion. It is concluded that the photometry provided by Rood and Baum is correct. The results reported by Fong et al. (1984) can also be explained on the basis of diffusion effects.

  9. Diffusivity measurement using compact low cost field portable device based on light deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhaniwal, Vani; Mahajan, Swapnil; Trivedi, Vismay; Anand, Arun

    2015-05-01

    Imaging and measurement of diffusion process in liquid solutions is a challenging and interesting problem. Especially the mixing of binary liquid solutions in real-time provides an insight into the physics of diffusion as well as leads to measurement of diffusion coefficient, which is the most important parameter of a diffusing liquid solution. Accurate measurement of diffusion coefficient is important in areas ranging from oil extraction to pollution control. Interferometric methods provides very accurate measurement of diffusion coefficients albeit they impose very stringent optical conditions. Here we describe the development of a compact, easy to implement, easy to use and inexpensive device for imaging and quantification of the diffusion process. This technique does not require the stringent optical conditions of interferometric techniques. It computes the diffusivity values by measuring the amount of deflection happening to a line pattern printed on a paper and projected through the sample cell. The measured diffusivity values varied by less than 1%, with the values of diffusivities reported in literature.

  10. Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Model of the Diffuse Galactic Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-02-01

    Monte-Carlo radiative models of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) in our Galaxy are calcu-lated using the dust radiative transfer code MoCafe, which is three-dimensional and takes full account of multiple scattering. The code is recently updated to use a fast voxel traversal algorithm, which has dramatically increased the computing speed. The radiative transfer models are calculated with the gen-erally accepted dust scale-height of 0.1 kpc. The stellar scale-heights are assumed to be 0.1 or 0.35 kpc, appropriate for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical wavelengths, respectively. The face-on optical depth, measured perpendicular to the Galactic plane, is also varied from 0.2 to 0.6, suitable to the optical to FUV wavelengths, respectively. We find that the DGL at high Galactic latitudes is mostly due to backward or large-angle scattering of starlight originating from the local stars within a radial distance of r < 0.5 kpc from the Earth. On the other hand, the DGL measured in the Galactic plane is mostly due to stars at a distance range that corresponds to an optical depth of -1 measured from the Earth. Therefore, the low-latitude DGL at the FUV wavelength band would be mostly caused by the stars located at a distance of r . 0.5 kpc and the optical DGL near the Galactic plane mainly originates from stars within a distance range of 1 . r . 2 kpc. We also calculate the radiative transfer models in a clumpy two-phase medium. The clumpy two-phase models provide lower intensities at high Galactic latitudes compared to the uniform density models, because of the lower effective optical depth in clumpy media. However, no significant difference in the intensity at the Galactic plane is found.

  11. Monitoring and Scoring Counter-Diffusion Protein Crystallization Experiments in Capillaries by in situ Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Oberthuer, Dominik; Melero-García, Emilio; Dierks, Karsten; Meyer, Arne; Betzel, Christian; Garcia-Caballero, Alfonso; Gavira, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using in situ Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to monitor counter-diffusion crystallization experiments in capillaries. Firstly, we have validated the quality of the DLS signal in thin capillaries, which is comparable to that obtained in standard quartz cuvettes. Then, we have carried out DLS measurements of a counter-diffusion crystallization experiment of glucose isomerase in capillaries of different diameters (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 mm) in order to follow the temporal evolution of protein supersaturation. Finally, we have compared DLS data with optical recordings of the progression of the crystallization front and with a simulation model of counter-diffusion in 1D. PMID:22675464

  12. Diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy by fiber optics for detecting and quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Conte, L.; Marega, M.; Cichelli, A.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.

    2010-09-01

    A fiber optic setup for diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy in the wide 400-1700 nm spectral range is experimented for detecting and quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil caused by lower-grade olive oils. Absorption measurements provide spectral fingerprints of authentic and adulterated oils. A multivariate processing of spectroscopic data is applied for discriminating the type of adulterant and for predicting its fraction.

  13. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K.; Carter, Michael S.; Alcala, Diego B.; Brown, Avery E.; Chattin, Amy M.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Walsh, Michael P.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot–labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto–myosin and MLCK–myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting “stuck” on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. PMID:26415568

  14. Enhanced blue light shielding property of light-diffusion polycarbonate composites by CeO2-coated silicate microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Shi, Liyi; Tang, Anjie; Song, Na; Tang, Shengfu; Ding, Peng

    2015-07-01

    The CeO2 coated silicate microspheres (SMSs) core-shell particles (SMS-CeO2) were synthesized for enhancing blue light shielding property of polycarbonate (PC) composites. The structure analysis showed that CeO2 particles were homogenously coated on SMS by Ce-O-Si bonds. The optical analysis indicated that the transmittance of PC/SMS-CeO2 composites were enhanced to 63.2% from 42.9% for PC/SMS/CeO2 composites when 0.6 wt.% fillers were loaded, while there was no obvious influence on the haze of the composites. UV-Vis analysis showed that the absorbance at 450-nm wavelength of blue-light increased from 24% of PC/SMS to 50% of PC/SMS-CeO2 composites, while the absorbance at 650-nm wavelength of red-light was unchanged. These results indicated that the PC/SMS-CeO2 composites had blue light shielding property and better performance on transmitting other visible lights.

  15. A compact, multi-wavelength, and high frequency response light source for diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsu; Lee, Minseok; Lee, Seung-ha; Cerussi, Albert E.; Chung, Phil-sang; Kim, Sehwan

    2015-03-01

    Many biomedical applications require an efficient combination and localization of multiple discrete light sources. In this paper, we present a compact six-channel combiner of optical sub-assembly type that couples the output of independent solid-state light sources into a single 400 μm diameter optical fiber. It is equipped with six discrete laser diodes, 658, 690, 705, 785, 830, and 850 nm for the measurement of the tissue optical properties from optical spectroscopy and imaging. We demonstrate coupling efficiencies ≥ 77% and output optical power ≥ 20 mW for each of the 6 laser diodes installed into the prototype. The design supports the use of continuous wave and intensity modulated laser diodes (with bandwidth ≥ 3 GHz). The developed light source could be used to construct custom multi-wavelength sources for tissue oximeters, diffuse optical imaging, and molecular imaging technologies.

  16. Spectral shape of a signal in light-induced diffusive pulling (pushing) of particles into a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically how the dependences of transport collision frequencies νi, collision broadening γ and collision shift Δ of the levels on the velocity v of resonant particles influence lightinduced diffusive pulling (pushing) (LDP) effects in the framework of a generalised model of strong collisions in the case of velocitydependent collision rates (so-called kangaroo model). It is found that allowance for the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v) does not change the spectral shape of an LDP signal. In particular, in the case of low-intensity radiation, the spectral dependence of the LDP signal coincides with the absorption line shape. It is shown that the magnitude of the LDP effect is proportional to the difference between the diffusion coefficients of particles in the excited and ground states. It is found that the spectral anomalies previously predicted in the LDP effect [Gel'mukhanov F.Kh. JETP Lett., 55, 214 (1992)] for an idealised model of the Lorentz gas (the limiting case of heavy buffer particles), which arise due to the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v), are typical only for this gas. At a realistic ratio of the masses of absorbing and buffer particles, spectral anomalies do not occur in the LDP effect.

  17. A new approach to evaluating the effects of pharmacologic vitreolysis on vitreous diffusion coefficients using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Sebag, J.

    2006-02-01

    PURPOSE: Pharmacologic vitreolysis is a new approach to improve vitreo-retinal surgery. Ultimately, the development of drugs to liquefy and detach vitreous from retina should prevent disease by mitigating the contribution of vitreous to retinopathy and eliminate the need for surgery. However, the mechanism of action of pharmacologic vitreolysis remains unclear. The technique of Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to evaluate the effects of microplasmin by following the diffusion coefficients of spherical polystyrene nano-particles injected with microplasmin into the vitreous. METHODS: Diffusion coefficients in dissected (n=9) porcine eyes were measured in vitro. DLS was performed on all specimens at 37°C as often as every 10 minutes for up to 6 hours following injections of human recombinant microplasmin at doses ranging from 0.125 mg to 0.8 mg, with 20 nm diameter tracer nanospheres. RESULTS: DLS findings in untreated porcine vitreous were similar to the previously described findings in bovine and human vitreous, demonstrating a fast (early) component, resulting from the flexible hyaluronan molecules, and a slow (late) component, resulting form the stiff collagen molecules. Microplasmin increased porcine vitreous diffusion coefficients. A new approach was developed to use DLS measurements of vitreous diffusion coefficients to evaluate the effects of microplasmin in intact eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacologic vitreolysis with human recombinant microplasmin increases vitreous diffusion coefficients in vitro. The results of these studies indicate that this new approach using DLS to measure vitreous diffusion coefficients can be used to study the effects of pharmacologic vitreolysis using microplasmin and other agents in intact eyes and ultimately in vivo.

  18. Impacts of Diffuse Radiation on Light Use Efficiency across Terrestrial Ecosystems Based on Eddy Covariance Observation in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; Wang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Junhui; Yan, Junhua; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yanfen; Shi, Peili

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE) is a key factor of production models for gross primary production (GPP) predictions. Previous studies revealed that ecosystem LUE could be significantly enhanced by an increase on diffuse radiation. Under large spatial heterogeneity and increasing annual diffuse radiation in China, eddy covariance flux data at 6 sites across different ecosystems from 2003 to 2007 were used to investigate the impacts of diffuse radiation indicated by the cloudiness index (CI) on ecosystem LUE in grassland and forest ecosystems. Our results showed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites was significantly correlated with the cloudiness variation (0.24≤R2≤0.85), especially at the Changbaishan temperate forest ecosystem (R2 = 0.85). Meanwhile, the CI values appeared more frequently between 0.8 and 1.0 in two subtropical forest ecosystems (Qianyanzhou and Dinghushan) and were much larger than those in temperate ecosystems. Besides, cloudiness thresholds which were favorable for enhancing ecosystem carbon sequestration existed at the three forest sites, respectively. Our research confirmed that the ecosystem LUE at the six sites in China was positively responsive to the diffuse radiation, and the cloudiness index could be used as an environmental regulator for LUE modeling in regional GPP prediction. PMID:25393629

  19. METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

    1957-11-19

    A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

  20. Measurement of nano-particle diffusion in the simulated dynamic light scattering by contrast of dynamic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaobin; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Han, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic Light Scattering is used for measuring particle size distribution of nano-particle under Brownian motion. Signal is detected through a photomultiplier and processed by correlation analysis, and results are inverted at last. Method by using CCD camera can record the procedure of motion. However, there are several weaknesses such as low refresh speed and noise from CCD camera, and this method depends on particle size and detecting angle. A simulation of nano-particle under Brownian motion is proposed to record dynamic images, studies contrast of dynamic images which can represent speed of diffusion, and its characteristic under different conditions. The results show that through contrast of dynamic images diffusion coefficient can be obtained, which is independent on density of scattering volume.

  1. Enhanced intensity variation for multiple-plane phase retrieval using a spatial light modulator as a convenient tunable diffuser.

    PubMed

    Almoro, Percival F; Pham, Quang Duc; Serrano-Garcia, David Ignacio; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Takeda, Mitsuo; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2016-05-15

    In the multiple-plane phase retrieval method, a tedious-to-fabricate phase diffuser plate is used to increase the axial intensity variation for a nonstagnating iterative reconstruction of a smooth object wavefront. Here we show that a spatial light modulator (SLM) can be used as an easily controllable diffuser for phase retrieval. The polarization modulation at the SLM facilitates independent formation of orthogonally polarized scattered and specularly reflected beams. Through an analyzer, the polarization states are filtered enabling beam interference, thereby efficiently encoding the phase information in the axially diverse speckle intensity measurements. The technique is described using wave propagation and Jones calculus, and demonstrated experimentally on technical and biological samples. PMID:27176952

  2. Light propagation through weakly scattering media: a study of Monte Carlo vs. diffusion theory with application to neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancora, Daniele; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-07-01

    One of the major challenges within Optical Imaging, photon propagation through clear layers embedded between scattering tissues, can be now efficiently modelled in real-time thanks to the Monte Carlo approach based on GPU. Because of its nature, the photon propagation problem can be very easily parallelized and ran on low cost hardware, avoiding the need for expensive Super Computers. A comparison between Diffusion and MC photon propagation theory is presented in this work with application to neuroimaging, investigating low scattering regions in a mouse-like phantom. Regions such as the Cerebral Spinal Fluid, are currently not taken into account in the classical computational models because of the impossibility to accurately simulate light propagation using fast Diffusive Equation approaches, leading to inaccuracies during the reconstruction process. The goal of the study presented here, is to reduce and further improve the computation accuracy of the reconstructed solution in a highly realistic scenario in the case of neuroimaging in preclinical mouse models.

  3. The Origin of the Excess Near-Infrared Diffuse Sky Brightness: Population III Stars or Zodiacal Light?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of the diffuse 1 to 5 micron sky emission from which solar system and Galactic foregrounds have been subtracted is in excess of that expected from energy released by galaxies and stars that formed during the z < 5 redshift interval. The spectral signature of this excess near-infrared background light (NIRBL) component is almost identical to that of reflected sunlight from the interplanetary dust cloud, and could therefore be the result of the incomplete subtraction of this foreground emission component from the diffuse sky maps. Alternatively, this emission component could be extragalactic. Its spectral signature is consistent with that of redshifted continuum and recombination line emission from H-II regions formed by the first generation of very massive stars. In this talk I will present the implications of this excess emission for our understanding of the zodiacal dust cloud, the formation rate of Pop III stars, and the TeV gamma-ray opacity to nearby blazars.

  4. Revealing the ultrafast light-to-matter energy conversion before heat diffusion in a layered Dirac semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Y.; Masuda, H.; Sakai, H.; Ishiwata, S.; Shin, S.

    2016-03-01

    There is still no general consensus on how one can describe the out-of-equilibrium phenomena in matter induced by an ultrashort light pulse. We investigate the pulse-induced dynamics in a layered Dirac semimetal SrMnBi2 by pump-and-probe photoemission spectroscopy. At ≲1 ps, the electronic recovery slowed upon increasing the pump power. Such a bottleneck-type slowing is expected in a two-temperature model (TTM) scheme, although opposite trends have been observed to date in graphite and in cuprates. Subsequently, an unconventional power-law cooling took place at ˜100 ps, indicating that spatial heat diffusion is still ill defined at ˜100 ps . We identify that the successive dynamics before the emergence of heat diffusion is a canonical realization of a TTM scheme. Criteria for the applicability of the scheme is also provided.

  5. Improved optical properties of silica/UV-cured polymer composite films made of hollow silica nanoparticles with a hierarchical structure for light diffuser film applications.

    PubMed

    Suthabanditpong, W; Takai, C; Fuji, M; Buntem, R; Shirai, T

    2016-06-28

    This study successfully improved the optical properties of silica/UV-cured polymer composite films made of hollow silica nanoparticles having a hierarchical structure. The particles were synthesized by an inorganic particle method, which involves two steps of sol-gel silica coating around the template and acid dissolution removal of the template. The pH of the acid was varied to achieve different hierarchical structures of the particles. The morphologies and surface properties of the obtained particles were characterized before dispersing in a UV-curable acrylate monomer solution to prepare dispersions for fabricating light diffuser films. The optical properties and the light diffusing ability of the fabricated films were studied. The results revealed that the increased pH of the acid provides the particles with a thinner shell, a larger hollow interior and a higher specific surface area. Moreover, the films with these particles exhibit a better light diffusing ability and a higher diffuse transmittance value when compared to those without particles. Therefore, the composite films can be used as light diffuser films, which is an essential part of optical diffusers in the back-light unit of LCDs. In addition, utilizing the hierarchical particles probably reduces the number of back-light units in the LCDs leading to energy-savings and subsequently lightweight LCDs. PMID:27254769

  6. Selective mode excitation in finite size plasma crystals by diffusely reflected laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar

    2015-02-15

    The possibility to use diffuse reflections of a laser beam to exert a force on levitating dust particles is studied experimentally. Measurements and theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement. Further, the method is applied to test the selective excitation of breathing-like modes in finite dust clusters.

  7. Highly energy-efficient agricultural lighting by B+R LEDs with beam shaping using micro-lens diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Xuan-Hao; Chang, Yu-Yu; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a high-performance LED agricultural luminaire that uses a beam-shaping diffuser to achieve high optical efficiency and energy saving. The agricultural luminaire performs an optical efficiency as high as 84.2%. The beam shaping effect also obtains irradiance uniformity of 1/2.56 and excellent spatial color uniformity. The enhancement ratio of optical utilization factor in the proposed agricultural luminaire is 360% in comparison with traditional lighting. Under the designed case, the total utilization factor, including optical utilization factor and spectral utilization factor, of the B+R LED lamp can save 86.1% of power consumption in comparison with compact fluorescent bulbs.

  8. Artificial Lighting as a Vector Attractant and Cause of Disease Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Barghini, Alessandro; de Medeiros, Bruno A. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditionally, epidemiologists have considered electrification to be a positive factor. In fact, electrification and plumbing are typical initiatives that represent the integration of an isolated population into modern society, ensuring the control of pathogens and promoting public health. Nonetheless, electrification is always accompanied by night lighting that attracts insect vectors and changes people’s behavior. Although this may lead to new modes of infection and increased transmission of insect-borne diseases, epidemiologists rarely consider the role of night lighting in their surveys. Objective We reviewed the epidemiological evidence concerning the role of lighting in the spread of vector-borne diseases to encourage other researchers to consider it in future studies. Discussion We present three infectious vector-borne diseases—Chagas, leishmaniasis, and malaria—and discuss evidence that suggests that the use of artificial lighting results in behavioral changes among human populations and changes in the prevalence of vector species and in the modes of transmission. Conclusion Despite a surprising lack of studies, existing evidence supports our hypothesis that artificial lighting leads to a higher risk of infection from vector-borne diseases. We believe that this is related not only to the simple attraction of traditional vectors to light sources but also to changes in the behavior of both humans and insects that result in new modes of disease transmission. Considering the ongoing expansion of night lighting in developing countries, additional research on this subject is urgently needed. PMID:20675268

  9. Diffuse reflection of light by cellulose pulp and optical absorption of aqueous residual lignin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. P.; Sherstobitova, A. S.; Yaskov, A. D.

    2011-03-01

    Within Kubelka-Munk theory using the Lorenz relations, we have determined the correlation between the optical diffuse reflectance spectra R(λ) of cellulose pulp in the visible range (380-760 nm) and ultraviolet absorption (λ = 200-400 nm) of aqueous solutions containing residual lignins. The data obtained can be used to monitor and predict the results of digestion and bleach plants in the paper and pulp industry.

  10. Anisotropic diffusion of concentrated hard-sphere colloids near a hard wall studied by evanescent wave dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidou, V. N.; Swan, J. W.; Brady, J. F.; Petekidis, G.

    2013-10-01

    Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering and Stokesian dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics of hard-sphere colloidal particles near a hard wall in concentrated suspensions. The evanescent wave averaged short-time diffusion coefficients were determined from experimental correlation functions over a range of scattering wave vectors and penetration depths. Stokesian dynamics simulations performed for similar conditions allow a direct comparison of both the short-time self- and collective diffusivity. As seen earlier [V. N. Michailidou, G. Petekidis, J. W. Swan, and J. F. Brady, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 068302 (2009)] while the near wall dynamics in the dilute regime slow down compared to the free bulk diffusion, the reduction is negligible at higher volume fractions due to an interplay between the particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions. Here, we provide a comprehensive comparison between experiments and simulations and discuss the interplay of particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamics in the self- and cooperative dynamics determined at different scattering wave vectors and penetration depths.

  11. Size and diffusion phenomena of AOT/alcohol/water system in the presence of morin by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ajaya; Wilczura-Wachnik, Hanna

    2015-01-30

    Presented paper is a continuation of our studies on morin interaction with AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) reversed micelles solutions in two solvents: ethanol and n-decanol. Now we focused on morin influence on size and diffusion phenomena in the system morin/solvent/AOT/water. In this paper precise measurements of dynamic light scattering (DLS) of the effects of temperature, solvents (alcohols), water on the size and diffusion of AOT reversed micelles in the morin/AOT/alcohol/water system are reported. The concentrations of AOT were varied from 0.51 to 0.78mol/L. Morin concentration in during auto-correlation function registration was not the same in each solvent because of its different solubility depending on the solvent. Water concentration in the studied systems was defined by R parameter according to relation: R=(H2O)/(AOT) and was equal 0 and 30 in ethanol, and 0 in n-decanol. DLS measurements were done at 298.15 and 308.15K. DLS experiment involved on detection two relaxation modes (fast and slow) in the systems containing AOT reversed micelles, water, morin and solvents (ethanol and n-decanol). The DLS data clearly show the solvent influence as well as morin presence on AOT reversed micelles size and consequently their diffusion coefficients. Contrary to n-decanol strong competition between morin and ethanol molecules in AOT reversed micelles palisade layer has been found. It suggests that morin molecules replaced ethanol in AOT reversed micelles and locate in their palisade layer strongly increasing AOT reversed micelles size. Furthermore, it was found a sharp increase in correlation radii of slow modes of AOT reversed micelles containing morin molecules and their diffusion coefficients diminishing. PMID:25448557

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Visible Light Diffuse Reflection in Neonatal Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodríguez, E. E.; Rodríguez, A. Cornejo; Rivas-Silva, J. F.

    2008-04-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition that happens commonly in newborns as result of desbalance between the production and the elimination of the bilirubin. Around 50% of newborns in term and something more of 60% of the near-term becomes jaundiced in the first week of life. This excess of bilirubin in the blood is exhibited in the skin, the sclera of the eyes and the mucous of mouth like a characteristic yellow coloration. In this work we make several numerical simulations of the spectral diffuse reflection for the skin of newborns that present different values of the biological parameters (bilirubin content, grade of pigmentation and content of blood) that characterize it. These simulations will allow us to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the experimental determination of bilirubin by noninvasive optical methods. The simulations are made in the spectral range of 400-700 nm using the Monte Carlo code MCML and two programs developed in LabVIEW by the authors. We simulated the diffuse reflection spectrum of neonatal skin for concentrations of bilirubin in skin that covers an ample range: from physiological to harmful numbers. We considered the influence of factors such as grade of pigmentation and content of blood.

  13. Holographic diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadle, Stephen; Wuest, Daniel; Cantalupo, John; Lakes, Roderic S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic diffusers are prepared using silver halide (Agfa 8E75 and Kodak 649F) and photopolymer (Polaroid DMP 128 and DuPont 600, 705, and 150 series) media. It is possible to control the diffusion angle in three ways: by selection of the properties of the source diffuser, by control of its subtended angle, and by selection of the holographic medium. Several conventional diffusers based on refraction or scattering of light are examined for comparison.

  14. Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion for temperature-dependent linear spectra of light harvesting aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Möbius, Sebastian; Eisfeld, Alexander; Suess, Daniel; Strunz, Walter T.

    2015-01-21

    Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion (NMQSD) has turned out to be an efficient method to calculate excitonic properties of aggregates composed of organic chromophores, taking into account the coupling of electronic transitions to vibrational modes of the chromophores. NMQSD is an open quantum system approach that incorporates environmental degrees of freedom (the vibrations in our case) in a stochastic way. We show in this paper that for linear optical spectra (absorption, circular dichroism), no stochastics is needed, even for finite temperatures. Thus, the spectra can be obtained by propagating a single trajectory. To this end, we map a finite temperature environment to the zero temperature case using the so-called thermofield method. The resulting equations can then be solved efficiently by standard integrators.

  15. Validation of a Device for Fluorescence Sensing of Rare Circulating Cells with Diffusive Light in an Optical Flow Phantom Model

    PubMed Central

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantification of rare circulating cells in biological tissues is an important problem and has many applications in biomedical research. Current methods normally involve extraction of blood samples and counting of cells ex vivo, or the use of microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry. The goal of this work is to develop an instrument for non-invasively enumerating very rare circulating cells in small animals with diffuse light with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement versus current approaches. In this work, we describe the design of our system and show that single, fluorescent microspheres can be detected in limb-mimicking optical flow phantoms with varying optical properties chosen to simulate in vivo conditions. Further, we demonstrate single cell counting capabilities using fluorescently (Vybrant-DiD) labeled Jurkat and Multiple Myeloma cells. Ongoing work includes in vivo testing and characterization of our system in mice. PMID:22254354

  16. Sub-diffusive scattering parameter maps recovered using wide-field high-frequency structured light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; McClatchy, David M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that structured light reflectance imaging with high spatial frequency patterns (fx) can be used to quantitatively map the anisotropic scattering phase function distribution (P(θs)) in turbid media. Monte Carlo simulations were used in part to establish a semi-empirical model of demodulated reflectance (Rd) in terms of dimensionless scattering (μs′fx−1) and γ, a metric of the first two moments of the P(θs) distribution. Experiments completed in tissue-simulating phantoms showed that simultaneous analysis of Rd spectra sampled at multiple fx in the frequency range [0.05-0.5] mm−1 allowed accurate estimation of both μs′(λ) in the relevant tissue range [0.4-1.8] mm−1, and γ(λ) in the range [1.4-1.75]. Pilot measurements of a healthy volunteer exhibited γ-based contrast between scar tissue and surrounding normal skin, which was not as apparent in wide field diffuse imaging. These results represent the first wide-field maps to quantify sub-diffuse scattering parameters, which are sensitive to sub-microscopic tissue structures and composition, and therefore, offer potential for fast diagnostic imaging of ultrastructure on a size scale that is relevant to surgical applications. PMID:25360357

  17. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures.

    PubMed

    Werts, Martinus H V; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R G

    2012-02-21

    A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three colour channels of the camera, a linear relation between the measured optical density and dye concentration is established under certain conditions. An optimised collection of dye solutions for the quantitative optical microscopic characterisation of microfluidic devices is proposed. Using the methodology for optical concentration measurement we then implement and validate a simplified and robust method for the microfluidic measurement of diffusion coefficients using an H-filter architecture. It consists of measuring the ratio of the concentrations of the two output channels of the H-filter. It enables facile determination of the diffusion coefficient, even for non-fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles, and is compatible with non-optical detection of the analyte. PMID:22228225

  18. How diffusivity, thermocline and incident light intensity modulate the dynamics of deep chlorophyll maximum in Tyrrhenian Sea.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Davide; Denaro, Giovanni; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Conversano, Fabio; Brunet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years theoretical works have shed new light and proposed new hypotheses on the mechanisms which regulate the spatio-temporal behaviour of phytoplankton communities in marine pelagic ecosystems. Despite this, relevant physical and biological issues, such as effects of the time-dependent mixing in the upper layer, competition between groups, and dynamics of non-stationary deep chlorophyll maxima, are still open questions. In this work, we analyze the spatio-temporal behaviour of five phytoplankton populations in a real marine ecosystem by using a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-taxis model. The study is performed, taking into account the seasonal variations of environmental variables, such as light intensity, thickness of upper mixed layer and profiles of vertical turbulent diffusivity, obtained starting from experimental findings. Theoretical distributions of phytoplankton cell concentration was converted in chlorophyll concentration, and compared with the experimental profiles measured in a site of the Tyrrhenian Sea at four different times (seasons) of the year, during four different oceanographic cruises. As a result we find a good agreement between theoretical and experimental distributions of chlorophyll concentration. In particular, theoretical results reveal that the seasonal changes of environmental variables play a key role in the phytoplankton distribution and determine the properties of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This study could be extended to other marine ecosystems to predict future changes in the phytoplankton biomass due to global warming, in view of devising strategies to prevent the decline of the primary production and the consequent decrease of fish species. PMID:25629963

  19. How Diffusivity, Thermocline and Incident Light Intensity Modulate the Dynamics of Deep Chlorophyll Maximum in Tyrrhenian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Davide; Denaro, Giovanni; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Conversano, Fabio; Brunet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years theoretical works have shed new light and proposed new hypotheses on the mechanisms which regulate the spatio-temporal behaviour of phytoplankton communities in marine pelagic ecosystems. Despite this, relevant physical and biological issues, such as effects of the time-dependent mixing in the upper layer, competition between groups, and dynamics of non-stationary deep chlorophyll maxima, are still open questions. In this work, we analyze the spatio-temporal behaviour of five phytoplankton populations in a real marine ecosystem by using a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-taxis model. The study is performed, taking into account the seasonal variations of environmental variables, such as light intensity, thickness of upper mixed layer and profiles of vertical turbulent diffusivity, obtained starting from experimental findings. Theoretical distributions of phytoplankton cell concentration was converted in chlorophyll concentration, and compared with the experimental profiles measured in a site of the Tyrrhenian Sea at four different times (seasons) of the year, during four different oceanographic cruises. As a result we find a good agreement between theoretical and experimental distributions of chlorophyll concentration. In particular, theoretical results reveal that the seasonal changes of environmental variables play a key role in the phytoplankton distribution and determine the properties of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This study could be extended to other marine ecosystems to predict future changes in the phytoplankton biomass due to global warming, in view of devising strategies to prevent the decline of the primary production and the consequent decrease of fish species. PMID:25629963

  20. Near-infrared background anisotropies from diffuse intrahalo light of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha; Smidt, Joseph; De Bernardis, Francesco; Gong, Yan; Stern, Daniel; Ashby, Matthew L N; Eisenhardt, Peter R; Frazer, Christopher C; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Kochanek, Christopher S; Kozłowski, Szymon; Wright, Edward L

    2012-10-25

    Unresolved anisotropies of the cosmic near-infrared background radiation are expected to have contributions from the earliest galaxies during the epoch of reionization and from faint, dwarf galaxies at intermediate redshifts. Previous measurements were unable to pinpoint conclusively the dominant origin because they did not sample spatial scales that were sufficiently large to distinguish between these two possibilities. Here we report a measurement of the anisotropy power spectrum from subarcminute to one-degree angular scales, and find the clustering amplitude to be larger than predicted by the models based on the two existing explanations. As the shot-noise level of the power spectrum is consistent with that expected from faint galaxies, a new source population on the sky is not necessary to explain the observations. However, a physical mechanism that increases the clustering amplitude is needed. Motivated by recent results related to the extended stellar light profile in dark-matter haloes, we consider the possibility that the fluctuations originate from intrahalo stars of all galaxies. We find that the measured power spectrum can be explained by an intrahalo light fraction of 0.07 to 0.2 per cent relative to the total luminosity in dark-matter haloes of 10(9) to 10(12) solar masses at redshifts of about 1 to 4. PMID:23099405

  1. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  2. Implementation of cost-effective diffuse light source mechanism to reduce specular reflection and halo effects for resistor-image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Wang, Jeng-Yau

    2015-09-01

    Light source plays a significant role to acquire a qualified image from objects for facilitating the image processing and pattern recognition. For objects possessing specular surface, the phenomena of reflection and halo appearing in the acquired image will increase the difficulty of information processing. Such a situation may be improved by the assistance of valuable diffuse light source. Consider reading resistor via computer vision, due to the resistor's specular reflective surface it will face with a severe non-uniform luminous intensity on image yielding a higher error rate in recognition without a well-controlled light source. A measurement system including mainly a digital microscope embedded in a replaceable diffuse cover, a ring-type LED embedded onto a small pad carrying a resistor for evaluation, and Arduino microcontrollers connected with PC, is presented in this paper. Several replaceable cost-effective diffuse covers made by paper bowl, cup and box inside pasted with white paper are presented for reducing specular reflection and halo effects and compared with a commercial diffuse some. The ring-type LED can be flexibly configured to be a full or partial lighting based on the application. For each self-made diffuse cover, a set of resistors with 4 or 5 color bands are captured via digital microscope for experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio from the segmented resistor-image is used for performance evaluation. The detected principal axis of resistor body is used for the partial LED configuration to further improve the lighting condition. Experimental results confirm that the proposed mechanism can not only evaluate the cost-effective diffuse light source but also be extended as an automatic recognition system for resistor reading.

  3. Experimental correlations for transient soot measurement in diesel exhaust aerosol with light extinction, electrical mobility and diffusion charger sensor techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Pastor, José V.; López, J. Javier; Campos, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A study of soot measurement deviation using a diffusion charger sensor with three dilution ratios was conducted in order to obtain an optimum setting that can be used to obtain accurate measurements in terms of soot mass emitted by a light-duty diesel engine under transient operating conditions. The paper includes three experimental phases: an experimental validation of the measurement settings in steady-state operating conditions; evaluation of the proposed setting under the New European Driving Cycle; and a study of correlations for different measurement techniques. These correlations provide a reliable tool for estimating soot emission from light extinction measurement or from accumulation particle mode concentration. There are several methods and correlations to estimate soot concentration in the literature but most of them were assessed for steady-state operating points. In this case, the correlations are obtained by more than 4000 points measured in transient conditions. The results of the new two correlations, with less than 4% deviation from the reference measurement, are presented in this paper.

  4. Mutual and Self-Diffusivities in Binary Mixtures of [EMIM][B(CN)4] with Dissolved Gases by Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Koller, Thomas M; Heller, Andreas; Rausch, Michael H; Wasserscheid, Peter; Economou, Ioannis G; Fröba, Andreas P

    2015-07-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are possible working fluids for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gases. For evaluating their performance in such processes, reliable mutual-diffusivity data are required for mixtures of ILs with relevant flue gas components. In the present study, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for the investigation of the molecular diffusion in binary mixtures of the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate ([EMIM][B(CN)4]) with the dissolved gases carbon dioxide, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen sulfide at temperatures from 298.15 to 363.15 K and pressures up to 63 bar. At conditions approaching infinite dilution of a gas, the Fick mutual diffusivity of the mixture measured by DLS and the self-diffusivity of the corresponding gas calculated by MD simulations match, which could be generally found within combined uncertainties. The obtained diffusivities are in agreement with literature data for the same or comparable systems as well as with the general trend of increasing diffusivities for decreasing IL viscosities. The DLS and MD results reveal distinctly larger molecular diffusivities for [EMIM][B(CN)4]-hydrogen mixtures compared to mixtures with all other gases. This behavior results in the failure of an empirical correlation with the molar volumes of the gases at their normal boiling points. The DLS experiments also showed that there is no noticeable influence of the dissolved gas and temperature on the thermal diffusivity of the studied systems. PMID:26075680

  5. Design and implementation of ultra-high resolution, large bandwidth, and compact diffuse light spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badieirostami, Majid

    such as finite difference time-domain or the finite element techniques is not possible due to the excessive requirement of memory and simulation time. Added to the complexity of the problem is the diffuse (or spatially incoherent) nature of the optical beams in the state-of-the-art spectroscopy applications. In my Ph.D. research, I developed new approximate modeling tools for both the modeling of incoherent sources in nanophotonics, and for the propagation of such optical beams inside the 3D nanophotonic structures of interest with several orders of magnitude improvement in the simulation speed for practical size devices without sacrificing accuracy. I believe the tools developed in my research enable us to look into new structures and functionalities that we were not able to analyze simply before. To enable new dispersive properties using a single nanophotonic structure, I have focused in my Ph.D. research into polymer-based 3D photonic crystals, which can be engineered using their geometrical features to demonstrate unique dispersive properties in three dimensions that cannot be matched by any bulk material even with orders of magnitude larger sizes. I have demonstrated the possibilities of using a very compact structure for wavelength demultiplexing and also for spectroscopy without adding any other device. The range of applications that can be enabled by having a material system with a wide range of 3D dispersive properties is very wide covering spectroscopy and sensing, dispersion management, diffraction compensation, pulse shaping, and many others. I am very interested in using this material platform and extend my current research into 3D heterostructures in which each portion of the structure is engineered to optimize a subset of optical functionalities. The simplest version of such heterostructures is the integration of interferometry and spectroscopy in a single structure. The most general view of such engineered nanostructures is to consider them as a 3D

  6. Practical and adequate approach to modeling light propagation in an adult head with low-scattering regions by use of diffusion theory.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Ogoshi, Yosuke; Okada, Eiji

    2005-04-10

    A practical and adequate approach to modeling light propagation in an adult head with a low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) region by use of diffusion theory was investigated. The diffusion approximation does not hold in a nonscattering or low-scattering regions. The hybrid radiosity-diffusion method was adopted to model the light propagation in the head with a nonscattering region. In the hybrid method the geometry of the nonscattering region is acquired as a priori information. In reality, low-level scattering occurs in the CSF region and may reduce the error caused by the diffusion approximation. The partial optical path length and the spatial sensitivity profile calculated by the finite-element method agree well with those calculated by the Monte Carlo method in the case in which the transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is greater than 0.3 mm(-1). Because it is feasible to assume that the transport scattering coefficient of a CSF layer is 0.3 mm(-1), it is practical to adopt diffusion theory to the modeling of light propagation in an adult head as an alternative to the hybrid method. PMID:15835358

  7. Practical and adequate approach to modeling light propagation in an adult head with low-scattering regions by use of diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Ogoshi, Yosuke; Okada, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    A practical and adequate approach to modeling light propagation in an adult head with a low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) region by use of diffusion theory was investigated. The diffusion approximation does not hold in a nonscattering or low-scattering regions. The hybrid radiosity-diffusion method was adopted to model the light propagation in the head with a nonscattering region. In the hybrid method the geometry of the nonscattering region is acquired as a priori information. In reality, low-level scattering occurs in the CSF region and may reduce the error caused by the diffusion approximation. The partial optical path length and the spatial sensitivity profile calculated by the finite-element method agree well with those calculated by the Monte Carlo method in the case in which the transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is greater than 0.3 mm^-1. Because it is feasible to assume that the transport scattering coefficient of a CSF layer is 0.3 mm^-1, it is practical to adopt diffusion theory to the modeling of light propagation in an adult head as an alternative to the hybrid method.

  8. Simple fabrication of a three-dimensional porous polymer film as a diffuser for organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Byung Wan; Suh, Min Chul

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated a simple and cost-effective fabrication method for a porous polymer film employing the spin-coating process during continuous supply of water droplets by an ultrasonic humidifier. The resulting porous polymer film showed ~40% optical haze, and this film could be used as a diffuser film for strong microcavity OLEDs. Specifically, we focused on controlling the surface morphology to give a three-dimensional (3D) multi-stacked nanocave structure because we had already learnt that two-dimensional nanoporous structures showed serious loss of luminance in the forward direction. As a result, we found that a 3D-ordered multi-stacked nanocave structure with a relatively small diameter and a distribution range of 300-500 nm can be obtained by precise control of the elastic bouncing behaviour of the supplied water droplets. Using this approach, we found that the 3D nanoporous polymer film can effectively reduce the viewing angle dependency of strong microcavity OLEDs without any considerable decrease in the total intensity of the out-coupled light.

  9. Characterization of light transport in scattering media at sub-diffusion length scales with Low-coherence Enhanced Backscattering

    PubMed Central

    Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) is a technique that has recently shown promise for tissue characterization and the detection of early pre-cancer. Although several Monte Carlo models of LEBS have been described, these models have not been accurate enough to predict all of the experimentally observed LEBS features. We present an appropriate Monte Carlo model to simulate LEBS peak properties from polystyrene microsphere suspensions in water. Results show that the choice of the phase function greatly impacts the accuracy of the simulation when the transport mean free path (ls*) is much greater than the spatial coherence length (LSC). When ls* < LSC, a diffusion approximation based model of LEBS is sufficiently accurate. We also use the Monte Carlo model to validate that LEBS can be used to measure the radial scattering probability distribution (radial point spread function), p(r), at small length scales and demonstrate LEBS measurements of p(r) from biological tissue. In particular, we show that pre-cancerous and benign mucosal tissues have different small length scale light transport properties. PMID:21037980

  10. Active optical remote sensing of dense clouds with diffusing light : Early results, present implementations, and the challenges ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.; Winker, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    We survey the rapid progress of 'off-beam' cloud lidar, from inception to validation via laboratory-scale simulations. Cloud observations from ground, aircraft and even space are covered. Finally, we describe future work in this instrument development effort born out of pure theory in the mid-1990s. We foresee a bright future for off-beam lidar which is, in essence, an atmospheric application of the general principles of optical diffuse-light tomography. The physical cloud-boundary information it delivers is, in principle, the same as given from ground or space (upcoming CloudSat mission) obtained by mm-radar. And mm-radar gives some information about internal variability. However, radar reflectivities quite often disagree with optical estimates of cloud base and optical thickness for well-understood reasons. So optical and microwave cloud probes are now considered as complimentary rather then competitive in our efforts to better understand cloud radiative properties in the context of climate research. We are confident that off-beam lidar will be a valuable and, ultimately, cost-effective source of information about cloud processes. In this, we include direct insight into the present issues in large-scale short-wave absorption based on unambiguous geometrical pathlength statistics, a unique capability of off-beam cloud lidar.

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of the diffuse transmission of light through highly concentrated absorbing and scattering materials. Part I: Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressel, L.; Reich, O.

    2014-10-01

    In many technical materials and commercial products like sunscreen or paint high particle and absorber concentrations are present. An important parameter for slabs of these materials is the diffuse transmission of light, which quantifies the total amount of directly and diffusely transmitted light. Due to the high content of scattering particles not only multiple scattering but also additional dependent scattering occurs. Hence, simple analytical models cannot be applied to calculate the diffuse transmission. In this work a Monte-Carlo program for the calculation of the diffuse transmission of light through dispersions in slab-like geometry containing high concentrations of scattering particles and absorbers is presented and discussed in detail. Mie theory is applied for the calculation of the scattering properties of the samples. Additionally, dependent scattering is considered in two different models, the well-known hard sphere model in the Percus-Yevick approximation (HSPYA) and the Yukawa model in the Mean Spherical Approximation (YMSA). Comparative experiments will show the accurateness of the program as well as its applicability to real samples [1].

  12. Hazard analysis of long term viewing of visible laser light off of fluorescent diffuse reflective surfaces (post-it).

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-10-01

    A laser hazard analysis is performed to evaluate if the use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors to view incident laser beams (Coherent Verdi 10W) present a hazard based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. The use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors in the alignment process does not pose an increased hazard because of the fluorescence at a different wavelength than that of the incident laser.

  13. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Canyonlands National Park using organic particulate material concentrations obtained with a multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Delbert J.; Eatough, David A.; Lewis, Laura; Lewis, Edwin A.

    1996-08-01

    The concentration of fine particulate carbonaceous material has been measured over a 1-year period at the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) Canyonlands National Park, Utah sampling site using a Brigham Young University organic sampling system (BOSS) multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler. Samples were collected on the IMPROVE schedule of a 24-hour sample every Wednesday and Saturday. The concentrations of particulate C, determined using only a quartz filter pack sampling system, were low by an average of 39%, as a result of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds from the particles collected on quartz filters during sampling. The loss was higher during the summer than during the winter sampling periods. The BOSS and IMPROVE quartz filter carbon measurements were in agreement except for a few samples collected during the summer. The fine particulate carbonaceous material concentrations determined using the BOSS have been combined with concentrations of particulate elemental C (soot), sulfate, nitrate, crustal material, and fine and coarse particulate mass from the IMPROVE sampling system, as well as relative humidity, light absorption, and transmissometer measurements of light extinction from IMPROVE. Extinction budgets have been calculated using multilinear regression analyses of the data set. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass extinction coefficients for the measured species as a function of relative humidity. The results show carbonaceous material to be the principal contributor to light extinction due to particles during the study period, with the major contributor to light extinction being light-absorbing carbonaceous material. However, the periods of maximum light extinction are associated with high humidity and the associated increased scattering of light due to particulate sulfate during the winter. The effect of particulate organic compounds on light extinction is greatest in the

  14. Origin of Enhanced Hole Injection in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with an Electron-Acceptor Doping Layer: p-Type Doping or Interfacial Diffusion?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Deng, Ya-Li; Igbari, Femi; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2015-06-10

    The electrical doping nature of a strong electron acceptor, 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN), is investigated by doping it in a typical hole-transport material, N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (NPB). A better device performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was achieved by doping NPB with HATCN. The improved performance could, in principle, arise from a p-type doping effect in the codeposited thin films. However, physical characteristics evaluations including UV-vis absorption, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that there was no obvious evidence of charge transfer in the NPB:HATCN composite. The performance improvement in NPB:HATCN-based OLEDs is mainly attributed to an interfacial modification effect owing to the diffusion of HATCN small molecules. The interfacial diffusion effect of the HATCN molecules was verified by the in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy evaluations. PMID:25970499

  15. Diagnosing isopycnal diffusivity in an eddying, idealized midlatitude ocean basin via Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Ringler, Todd D.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Petersen, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Isopycnal diffusivity due to stirring by mesoscale eddies in an idealized, wind-forced, eddying, midlatitude ocean basin is computed using Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT). Simulation is performed via LIGHT within the Model for Prediction across Scales Ocean (MPAS-O). Simulations are performed at 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-km resolution, where the first Rossby radius of deformation (RRD) is approximately 30 km. Scalar and tensor diffusivities are estimated at each resolution based on 30 ensemble members using particle cluster statistics. Each ensemble member is composed of 303 665 particles distributed across five potential density surfaces. Diffusivity dependence upon modelmore » resolution, velocity spatial scale, and buoyancy surface is quantified and compared with mixing length theory. The spatial structure of diffusivity ranges over approximately two orders of magnitude with values of O(105) m2 s–1 in the region of western boundary current separation to O(103) m2 s–1 in the eastern region of the basin. Dominant mixing occurs at scales twice the size of the first RRD. Model resolution at scales finer than the RRD is necessary to obtain sufficient model fidelity at scales between one and four RRD to accurately represent mixing. Mixing length scaling with eddy kinetic energy and the Lagrangian time scale yield mixing efficiencies that typically range between 0.4 and 0.8. In conclusion, a reduced mixing length in the eastern region of the domain relative to the west suggests there are different mixing regimes outside the baroclinic jet region.« less

  16. Diagnosing isopycnal diffusivity in an eddying, idealized midlatitude ocean basin via Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Ringler, Todd D.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Petersen, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Isopycnal diffusivity due to stirring by mesoscale eddies in an idealized, wind-forced, eddying, midlatitude ocean basin is computed using Lagrangian, in Situ, Global, High-Performance Particle Tracking (LIGHT). Simulation is performed via LIGHT within the Model for Prediction across Scales Ocean (MPAS-O). Simulations are performed at 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-km resolution, where the first Rossby radius of deformation (RRD) is approximately 30 km. Scalar and tensor diffusivities are estimated at each resolution based on 30 ensemble members using particle cluster statistics. Each ensemble member is composed of 303 665 particles distributed across five potential density surfaces. Diffusivity dependence upon model resolution, velocity spatial scale, and buoyancy surface is quantified and compared with mixing length theory. The spatial structure of diffusivity ranges over approximately two orders of magnitude with values of O(105) m2 s–1 in the region of western boundary current separation to O(103) m2 s–1 in the eastern region of the basin. Dominant mixing occurs at scales twice the size of the first RRD. Model resolution at scales finer than the RRD is necessary to obtain sufficient model fidelity at scales between one and four RRD to accurately represent mixing. Mixing length scaling with eddy kinetic energy and the Lagrangian time scale yield mixing efficiencies that typically range between 0.4 and 0.8. In conclusion, a reduced mixing length in the eastern region of the domain relative to the west suggests there are different mixing regimes outside the baroclinic jet region.

  17. Maskless direct laser writing with visible light: Breaking through the optical resolving limit with cooperative manipulations of nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Rui

    2014-03-28

    In this work, the resolving limit of maskless direct laser writing is overcome by cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion, where the nonlinear reverse saturation absorption can induce the formation of below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot, and the thermal diffusion manipulation can make the heat quantity at the central region of energy absorption spot propagate along the thin film thickness direction. The temperature at the central region of energy absorption spot transiently reaches up to melting point and realizes nanolithography. The sample “glass substrate/AgInSbTe” is prepared, where AgInSbTe is taken as nonlinear reverse saturation absorption thin film. The below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot is simulated theoretically and verified experimentally by near-field spot scanning method. The “glass substrate/Al/AgInSbTe” sample is prepared, where the Al is used as thermal conductive layer to manipulate the thermal diffusion channel because the thermal diffusivity coefficient of Al is much larger than that of AgInSbTe. The direct laser writing is conducted by a setup with a laser wavelength of 650 nm and a converging lens of NA=0.85, the lithographic marks with a size of about 100 nm are obtained, and the size is only about 1/10 the incident focused spot. The experimental results indicate that the cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion is a good method to realize nanolithography in maskless direct laser writing with visible light.

  18. A nanoporous polymer film as a diffuser as well as a light extraction component for top emitting organic light emitting diodes with a strong microcavity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Beom; Joo, Chul Woong; Kim, Hyung Suk; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Lee, Jonghee; Suh, Min Chul

    2016-04-01

    To improve the viewing angle characteristic as well as the light extraction effect of strong microcavity devices, we fabricated a nanoporous polymer film (NPF) as a scattering medium as well as a light extraction component. We designed two types of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a strong microcavity effect by changing the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL; e.g. 30 nm and 60 nm) to investigate two different scattering effects of the NPF. Very interestingly, we could observe a significant enhancement of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) for each device (30 nm thick HTL: 18.0%, 60 nm thick HTL: 31.6%) when we attached a NPF formed on a 125 μm thick PET film coated with the NPF. Furthermore, the NPF successfully suppressed the viewing angle dependence to realize ideal angular emission even in the two extreme microcavity conditions although they are still different from that of a Lambertian distribution.To improve the viewing angle characteristic as well as the light extraction effect of strong microcavity devices, we fabricated a nanoporous polymer film (NPF) as a scattering medium as well as a light extraction component. We designed two types of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with a strong microcavity effect by changing the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL; e.g. 30 nm and 60 nm) to investigate two different scattering effects of the NPF. Very interestingly, we could observe a significant enhancement of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) for each device (30 nm thick HTL: 18.0%, 60 nm thick HTL: 31.6%) when we attached a NPF formed on a 125 μm thick PET film coated with the NPF. Furthermore, the NPF successfully suppressed the viewing angle dependence to realize ideal angular emission even in the two extreme microcavity conditions although they are still different from that of a Lambertian distribution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The theoretical backgrounds associated with designing of microcavity

  19. Accuracy of RGD approximation for computing light scattering properties of diffusing and motile bacteria. [Rayleigh-Gans-Debye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottarchyk, M.; Chen, S.-H.; Asano, S.

    1979-01-01

    The study tests the accuracy of the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) approximation against a rigorous scattering theory calculation for a simplified model of E. coli (about 1 micron in size) - a solid spheroid. A general procedure is formulated whereby the scattered field amplitude correlation function, for both polarized and depolarized contributions, can be computed for a collection of particles. An explicit formula is presented for the scattered intensity, both polarized and depolarized, for a collection of randomly diffusing or moving particles. Two specific cases for the intermediate scattering functions are considered: diffusing particles and freely moving particles with a Maxwellian speed distribution. The formalism is applied to microorganisms suspended in a liquid medium. Sensitivity studies revealed that for values of the relative index of refraction greater than 1.03, RGD could be in serious error in computing the intensity as well as correlation functions.

  20. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (second report): sensitivity improvement of Fourier-spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Hosono, Satsuki; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone that was mentioned in 1st. report in this conference. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. Furthermore, it is well known that the spectral absorption of mid-infrared lights or Raman spectroscopy especially in long wavelength region is effective to distinguish specific biomedical components quantitatively, such as glucose concentration. But the main issue was that photon energies of middle infrared lights and light intensities of Raman scattering are extremely weak. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. Our line spectroscopic imager introduced a single slit for field stop on the conjugate objective plane. Obviously to increase detected light intensities, the wider slit width of the field stop makes light intensities higher, regardless of deterioration of spatial resolutions. Because our method is based on wavefront-division interferometry, it becomes problems that the wider width of single slit makes the diffraction angle narrower. This means that the narrower diameter of collimated objective beams deteriorates visibilities of interferograms. By installing the relative inclined phaseshifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems, the collimated half flux of objective beams derived from single-bright points on objective surface penetrate through the wedge prism and the cuboid glass respectively. These two beams interfere each other and form the infererogram as spatial fringe patterns. Thus, we installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from

  1. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  2. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: I. Measurement and reduction strategies with planar diffuse source.

    PubMed

    Granton, Patrick V; Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanning of 3D radiochromic dosimeters may provide a practical method for 3D dose verification in radiation therapy. However, in cone-beam geometry stray light contaminates the projection images, degrading the accuracy of reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients. Stray light was measured using a beam pass aperture array (BPA) and structured illumination methods. The stray-to-primary ray ratio (SPR) along the central axis was found to be 0.24 for a 5% gelatin hydrogel, representative of radiochromic hydrogels. The scanner was modified by moving the spectral filter from the detector to the source, changing the light's spatial fluence pattern and lowering the acceptance angle by extending distance between the source and object. These modifications reduced the SPR significantly from 0.24 to 0.06. The accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients for uniform carbon black liquids was compared to independent spectrometer measurements. Reducing the stray light increased the range of accurate transmission readings. In order to evaluate scanner performance for the more challenging application to small field dosimetry, a carbon black finger gel phantom was prepared. Reconstructions of the phantom from CBCT and fan-beam CT scans were compared. The modified source resulted in improved agreement. Subtraction of residual stray light, measured with BPA or structured illumination from each projection further improved agreement. Structured illumination was superior to BPA for measuring stray light for the smaller 1.2 and 0.5 cm diameter phantom fingers. At the costs of doubling the scanner size and tripling the number of scans, CBCT reconstructions of low-scattering hydrogel dosimeters agreed with those of fan-beam CT scans. PMID:26988028

  3. Bone Fragment Detection in Chicken Breast Fillets using Diffuse Scattering Patterns of Back-Illuminated Structured Light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the detection of bone fragments embedded in de-boned skinless chicken breast fillets by modeling images made by back-lighting and embedded bone fragments. Imaging of chicken fillets is often dominated by strongly multiple scattering properties of the fillets. Thus, res...

  4. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: I. Measurement and reduction strategies with planar diffuse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanning of 3D radiochromic dosimeters may provide a practical method for 3D dose verification in radiation therapy. However, in cone-beam geometry stray light contaminates the projection images, degrading the accuracy of reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients. Stray light was measured using a beam pass aperture array (BPA) and structured illumination methods. The stray-to-primary ray ratio (SPR) along the central axis was found to be 0.24 for a 5% gelatin hydrogel, representative of radiochromic hydrogels. The scanner was modified by moving the spectral filter from the detector to the source, changing the light’s spatial fluence pattern and lowering the acceptance angle by extending distance between the source and object. These modifications reduced the SPR significantly from 0.24 to 0.06. The accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients for uniform carbon black liquids was compared to independent spectrometer measurements. Reducing the stray light increased the range of accurate transmission readings. In order to evaluate scanner performance for the more challenging application to small field dosimetry, a carbon black finger gel phantom was prepared. Reconstructions of the phantom from CBCT and fan-beam CT scans were compared. The modified source resulted in improved agreement. Subtraction of residual stray light, measured with BPA or structured illumination from each projection further improved agreement. Structured illumination was superior to BPA for measuring stray light for the smaller 1.2 and 0.5 cm diameter phantom fingers. At the costs of doubling the scanner size and tripling the number of scans, CBCT reconstructions of low-scattering hydrogel dosimeters agreed with those of fan-beam CT scans.

  5. Efficient second harmonic generation of double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser producing 7.9 W yellow light.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Chenghui; Wei, Yong; Shen, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Lingxiong; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2009-11-23

    A high power and efficient 588 nm yellow light is demonstrated through intracavity frequency doubling of an acousto-optic Q-switched self-frequency Raman laser. A 30-mm-length double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal was utilized for efficient self-Raman laser operation by reducing the thermal effects and increasing the interaction length for the stimulated Raman scattering. A 15-mm-length LBO with non-critical phase matching (theta = 90 degrees, phi = 0 degrees) cut was adopted for efficient second-harmonic generation. The focus position of incident pump light and both the repetition rate and the duty cycle of the Q-switch have been optimized. At a repetition rate of 110 kHz and a duty cycle of 5%, the average power of 588 nm light is up to 7.93 W while the incident pump power is 26.5 W, corresponding to an overall diode-yellow conversion efficiency of 30% and a slope efficiency of 43%. PMID:19997395

  6. Random media characterization using the analysis of diffusing light data on the basis of an effective medium model.

    PubMed

    Zimnyakov, Dmitry A; Pravdin, Alexander B; Kuznetsova, Liana V; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I; Tuchin, Valery V; Wang, Ruikang K; Ushakova, Olga V

    2007-03-01

    The transport properties of dense random media such as rutile powder layers and polyball suspensions are analyzed in visible and near infrared on the basis of experimental data on coherent backscattering, diffuse transmittance, and low-coherence interferometry. The developed technique of retrieval of the transport parameters of examined scattering media allows the evaluation of the transport mean free path l* and the effective refractive index n(ef) of the medium without a priori knowledge of the optical properties of the scattering particles. It is found that with decreasing wavelength lambda(0) the value of localization parameter 2pin(ef)l*/lambda(0) of the studied rutile samples abruptly drops and approaches approximately 2.6 at 473 nm. This peculiarity is caused by the very large scattering efficiency of scatterers in the vicinity of the first Mie resonance. PMID:17301861

  7. LIGHT SCATTERING: Axial and diffusion models of the laser pulse propagation in a highly-scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Danilov, Arsenii A.; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M.; Vorob'ev, Nikolai S.

    2004-06-01

    The propagation of laser radiation through a layer of a highly-scattering medium (HSM) is considered on the basis of two theoretical models: a nonstationary axial (two-flux) model and a nonstationary diffusion model. Analytic expressions for the temporal distributions of the photons of an ultrashort laser pulse transmitted through the HSM are presented. Experimental temporal distributions are used to obtain the parameters of models corresponding to an HSM, to determine the theoretical temporal distributions, and to compare them with the experimental curves. These two theoretical models are compared quantitatively for the first time. Their advantages and drawbacks that must be considered in the development of HSM transmission optical tomography are pointed out.

  8. Museum lighting for golden artifacts, with low correlated color temperature, high color uniformity and high color rendering index, using diffusing color mixing of red, cyan, and white-light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, Anders; Corell, Dennis D.; Poulsen, Peter B.; Hansen, Søren S.; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2012-03-01

    Museum lighting present challenges due to the demand for a high color rendering index (CRI), color uniformity and the damaging effects of both visible and invisible radiation. Golden objects are furthermore normally displayed with illumination which has a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2200 K, a CCT that is not commercially available from single LEDs. An LED system that conforms with these requirements has been developed and implemented at The Royal Danish Collection at Rosenborg Castle. Color mixing of commercial LEDs (red, cyan, and white) was employed to achieve the spectral power distribution needed for the CCT and a CRI above 90, for all CRI test color samples. Replacing the traditional low voltage incandescent lighting has shown energy saving above 70 %. Harmful IR radiation was reduced by 99 %. Temperature fluctuations in the display cases were reduced from several degrees Celsius to below one, despite the fact that the lighting units were placed within the display case. Spatial color uniformity of the illumination and uniformly colored shadows was achieved by use of a highly diffusing reflector dish which avoids direct illumination from the LEDs.

  9. Specific features of diffuse reflection of human face skin for laser and non-laser sources of visible and near-IR light

    SciTech Connect

    Dolotov, L E; Sinichkin, Yu P; Tuchin, Valerii V; Al'tshuler, G B; Yaroslavskii, I V

    2011-04-30

    The specific features of diffuse reflection from different areas of human face skin for laser and non-laser sources of visible and near-IR light have been investigated to localise the closed-eye (eyelid) region. In the visible spectral range the reflection from the eyelid skin surface can be differentiated by measuring the slope of the spectral dependence of the effective optical density of skin in the wavelength range from 650 to 700nm. In the near-IR spectral range the reflectances of the skin surface at certain wavelengths, normalised to the forehead skin reflectance, can be used as a criterion for differentiating the eyelid skin. In this case, a maximum discrimination is obtained when measuring the skin reflectances at laser wavelengths of 1310 and 1470nm, which correspond to the spectral ranges of maximum and minimum water absorption. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  10. The Impact of Diffuse Sunlight and Shortwave Dimming on Canopy Light-use Efficiency and net Carbon Exchange in 3 Forest Biomes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P.; North, P.; Los, S.

    2006-05-01

    The latter half of the 20th century has seen a 5-10% fall in mean global insolation with reductions of up to 20% regionally (Stanhill & Cohen 2001). Anthropogenic aerosols, by their propensity to increase the optical depth of clouds, are cited as the major factor in this trend (Liepert 2002). By evaluating observed carbon flow, we estimate the impact of reduced downwelling shortwave radiation (SW) on 3 forest biomes (sparse Boreal needleleaf, temperate deciduous broadleaf and dense tropical broadleaf). We are careful to account for the increased proportion of diffuse sky radiation that accompanies obscuration by cloud (Roderick et al 2001). We find that canopy light-use efficiency (LUE) is enhanced at all 3 study sites when diffuse rather than direct sunlight predominates. The increase spans 6-33%. Intepretation with the land-surface model JULES, modified to take account of sunfleck penetration, indicates that increased sharing of the radiation-load across the foliage is the primary factor responsible for this LUE-enhancement. The increase in LUE, however, is insufficient to offset the reduction in GPP associated with attenuated SW. Greatest sensitivity is exhibited by the Boreal site, Zotino, where net ecosystem exchange (NEE) falls by 12±6% for a reduction of 20% in SW. (Part of this work has just appeared in JGR (110, D23209) and was accorded very favourable reviews.)

  11. Non-invasive measurements of hemoglobin + myoglobin, their oxygenation and NIR light pathlength in heart in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussakovsky, Eugene; Jilkina, Olga; Yang, Yanmin; Kupriyanov, Valery

    2009-02-01

    The existing non-invasive optical methods of the hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) estimation in cardiac tissues imply knowledge of the light pathlength (L) when various modifications of Lambert-Beer law for either spectrophotometry or light diffuse reflectance is applied. For Hb and/or Mb quantification in tissue, a few invasive (biochemical) approaches were applied. For L (differential pathlength factor; DPF) determination in tissue, special optical methods were used. No approaches have been proposed to simultaneously and non-invasively determine Hb/Mb and L in cardiac or other muscle tissues. In the present study, the first derivative of the NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum is shown to be effective in simultaneous determination of Hb+Mb concentration (in mM) and L (in mm) in cardiac tissue in vivo. The results showed that measured in a few minutes in a normal pig heart in vivo the total Hb+Mb concentration was 0.9-1.2 mM of heme, tissue oxygen saturation parameter (OSP) was approximately 65%, and DPF at 700-965 nm was of 2.7-2.8. At the experimental ischemia, total [Hb+Mb] decreased by 25%, OSP reduced to zero, while DPF did not change. These results correlated with the previously published. The method may be applied during open-heart surgery, heart studies ex vivo or to any muscle tissue to continuously and non-invasively monitor the [Hb+Mb] content and oxygenation as well as L, which may reflect the changes in tissue structure.

  12. Barrier performance optimization of atomic layer deposited diffusion barriers for organic light emitting diodes using x-ray reflectivity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Aarti Schröder, Uwe; Klumbies, Hannes; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl; Geidel, Marion; Knaut, Martin; Hoßbach, Christoph; Albert, Matthias; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2013-12-02

    The importance of O{sub 3} pulse duration for encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with ultra thin inorganic atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers is demonstrated for deposition temperatures of 50 °C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements show that O{sub 3} pulse durations longer than 15 s produce dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Correspondingly, black spot growth is not observed in OLEDs encapsulated with such layers during 91 days of aging under ambient conditions. This implies that XRR can be used as a tool for process optimization of OLED encapsulation layers leading to devices with long lifetimes.

  13. Evaluation of light scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue based on diffuse reflectance signals at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, Takumi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a method to evaluate light-scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in human skin tissue through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using the reflectance signals acquired at isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin (420, 450, 500, and 585 nm). In the proposed method, Monte Carlo simulation-based empirical formulas are used to specify the scattering parameters of skin tissue, such as the scattering amplitude a and the scattering power b, as well as the concentration of melanin C m and the total blood concentration C tb. The use of isosbestic wavelengths of hemoglobin enables the values of C m, C tb, a, and b to be estimated independently of the oxygenation of hemoglobin. The spectrum of the reduced scattering coefficient is reconstructed from the scattering parameters. Experiments using in vivo human skin tissues were performed to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method for evaluating the changes in scattering properties and chromophore concentrations in skin tissue. The experimental results revealed that light scattering is significantly reduced by the application of a glycerol solution, which indicates an optical clearing effect due to osmotic dehydration and the matching of the refractive indices of scatterers in the epidermis.

  14. Quantificaion of ion diffusion in gallium arsenide-based spintronic Light-Emitting Diode devices using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, Jeffrey Ryan

    Depth profiling using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a direct method to measure diffusion of atomic or molecular species that have migrated distances of nanometers/micrometers in a specific material. For this research, the diffusion of Mn, sequentially Ga ions, in Gallium Arsenide (GaAs)-based spin Light Emitting Diode (LED) devices is studied by quantitative Time-of-Flight (ToF) SIMS. The goal is to prove conclusively the driving force and mechanism behind Mn diffusion in GaAs by quantifying the diffusion of these ions in each device. Previous work has identified two competing processes for the movement of Mn in GaAs: diffusion and phase separation. The process is dependent on the temperature the sample is exposed to, either by post-annealing, or during the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth process. The hypothesis is that Manganese Arsenide (MnAs) is thermodynamically more stable than randomly distributed Mn ions in GaAs, and that by annealing at a certain temperature, a pure MnAs layer can be produced from a GaMnAs layer in a working spin LED device. Secondly, the spin efficiencies will be measured and the difference will be related to the formation of a pure MnAs layer. The first chapter of this dissertation discusses the history of spintronic devices, including details on the established methods for characterization, the importance for potential application to the semiconductor industry, and the requirements for the full implementation of spintronic devices in modern-day computers. MnAs and GaMnAs devices are studied, their preparation and properties are described, and the study's experimental design is covered in the latter part of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 includes a review of diffusion in semiconductors, including the types of diffusion, mechanisms they follow, and the different established experimental methods for studying diffusion. The later sections include summaries of Mn diffusion and previous studies investigating Mn diffusion in different

  15. Diffusion behavior of lysozyme in aqueous ammonium sulfate solutions under varying solution conditions as determined by dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fornefeld, U.M.; Kuehner, D.E.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA . Chemical Sciences Div.)

    1994-12-01

    As proteins gain significance in commercial applications such as pharmaceuticals, detergents, organic waste management and cosmetics, efficient and economical recovery of these valuable biomolecules is of increasing importance. the salting-out process has found widespread application in the area of protein separations. To date, salt-induced precipitation of proteins from complex aqueous solutions remains largely an empirical process; no comprehensive model exists to predict salting-out phase equilibria in protein solutions. Rational predictive models for salt-induced precipitation will therefore be of great value in protein purification, both on the preparative and the analytical scale. Any attempt to model theoretically salt-induced protein precipitation must include the known physics of protein interactions in aqueous solution. With this in mind, it is crucial to acknowledge that protein precipitation is fundamentally an aggregation process. In order to incorporate aggregation effects into ongoing efforts to model salting out of proteins, it is necessary to quantify the degree of aggregation as a function of solution conditions. Therefore, dynamic light scattering measurements were performed with a well-studied protein, hen-egg-white lysozyme, under several solution conditions.

  16. Structure and phase diagram of an adhesive colloidal dispersion under high pressure: A small angle neutron scattering, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrin, R.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Wilk, A.; Ratajczyk, M.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.

    2009-04-01

    We have applied small angle neutron scattering (SANS), diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) to investigate the phase diagram of a sterically stabilized colloidal system consisting of octadecyl grafted silica particles dispersed in toluene. This system is known to exhibit gas-liquid phase separation and percolation, depending on temperature T, pressure P, and concentration φ. We have determined by DLS the pressure dependence of the coexistence temperature and the spinodal temperature to be dP /dT=77 bar/K. The gel line or percolation limit was measured by DWS under high pressure using the condition that the system became nonergodic when crossing it and we determined the coexistence line at higher volume fractions from the DWS limit of turbid samples. From SANS measurements we determined the stickiness parameter τB(P,T,φ) of the Baxter model, characterizing a polydisperse adhesive hard sphere, using a global fit routine on all curves in the homogenous regime at various temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. The phase coexistence and percolation line as predicted from τB(P,T,φ) correspond with the determinations by DWS and were used to construct an experimental phase diagram for a polydisperse sticky hard sphere model system. A comparison with theory shows good agreement especially concerning the predictions for the percolation threshold. From the analysis of the forward scattering we find a critical scaling law for the susceptibility corresponding to mean field behavior. This finding is also supported by the critical scaling properties of the collective diffusion.

  17. The edge of the M 87 halo and the kinematics of the diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, M.; Arnaboldi, M.; Das, P.; Gerhard, O.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Ciardullo, R.; Feldmeier, J. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Jacoby, G. H.; Murante, G.

    2009-08-01

    Aims: We study the kinematics and dynamics of the extreme outer halo of M 87, the central galaxy in the Virgo cluster, and its transition to the intracluster light (ICL). Methods: We present high resolution FLAMES/VLT spectroscopy of intracluster planetary nebula (PN) candidates, targeting three new fields in the Virgo cluster core with surface brightness down to μB = 28.5. Based on the projected phase space information (sky positions and line-of-sight velocities) we separate galaxy and cluster components in the confirmed PN sample. We then use the spherical Jeans equation and the total gravitational potential as traced by the X-ray emission to derive the orbital distribution in the outer stellar halo of M 87. We determine the luminosity-specific PN number for the M 87 halo and the ICL from the photometric PN catalogs and sampled luminosities, and discuss the origin of the ICL in Virgo based on its measured PN velocities. Results: We confirm a further 12 PNs in Virgo, five of which are bound to the halo of M 87, and the remainder are true intracluster planetary nebulas (ICPNs). The M 87 PNs are confined to the extended stellar envelope of M 87, within a projected radius of ~160 kpc, while the ICPNs are scattered across the whole surveyed region between M 87 and M 86, supporting a truncation of M 87's luminous outer halo at a 2σ level. The line-of-sight velocity distribution of the M 87 PNs at projected radii of 60 kpc and 144 kpc shows (i) no evidence for rotation of the halo along the photometric major axis; and (ii) that the velocity dispersion decreases in the outer halo, down to σ_last = 78±25 km s-1 at 144 kpc. The Jeans model for the M 87 halo stars fits the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile only if the stellar orbits are strongly radially anisotropic (β ≃ 0.4 at r ≃ 10 kpc increasing to 0.8 at the outer edge), and if additionally the stellar halo is truncated at ≃ 150 kpc average elliptical radius. The α-parameters for the M 87

  18. Low-Resolution Spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light and 3.3 μm PAH Emission with the AKARI InfraRed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Sakon, Itsuki; Tanaka, Masahiro; Wada, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    We first obtained the spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) at general interstellar space in the 1.8-5.3μm wavelength region with the low-resolution prism spectroscopy mode of the AKARI Infra-Red Camera (IRC) NIR channel. The 3.3μm m PAH band is detected in the DGL spectrum at Galactic latitude |b| < 15˚, and its correlations with the Galactic dust and gas are confirmed. The correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust is expressed not by a simple linear correlation, but by a relation with extinction. Using this correlation, the spectral shape of DGL at an optically thin region (5˚ < |b| < 15˚) was derived as a template spectrum. Assuming that the spectral shape of this template spectrum is uniform at any position, the DGL spectrum can be estimated by scaling this template spectrum using the correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust.

  19. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  20. Diffuse Optical Intracluster Light as a Measure of Stellar Tidal Stripping: The Cluster CL0024+17 at z ~ 0.4 Observed at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Gallozzi, S.; Castellano, M.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Boutsia, K.; Paris, D.; Speziali, R.; Testa, V.

    2014-01-01

    We have evaluated the diffuse intracluster light (ICL) in the central core of the galaxy cluster CL0024+17 at z ~ 0.4 observed with the prime focus camera (Large Binocular Camera) at the Large Binocular Telescope. The measure required an accurate removal of the galaxies' light within ~200 kpc from the center. The residual background intensity has then been integrated in circular apertures to derive the average ICL intensity profile. The latter shows an approximate exponential decline as expected from theoretical cold dark matter models where the ICL is due to the integrated contribution of light from stars that are tidally stripped from the halo of their host galaxies due to encounters with other galaxies in the cluster cold dark matter (CDM) potential. The radial profile of the ICL over the galaxies intensity ratio (ICL fraction) is increasing with decreasing radius, but near the cluster center it starts to bend and then decreases where the overlap of the halos of the brightest cluster galaxies becomes dominant. Theoretical expectations in a simplified CDM scenario show that the ICL fraction profile can be estimated from the stripped over galaxy stellar mass ratio in the cluster. It is possible to show that the latter quantity is almost independent of the properties of the individual host galaxies but mainly depends on the average cluster properties. The predicted ICL fraction profile is thus very sensitive to the assumed CDM profile, total mass, and concentration parameter of the cluster. Adopting values very similar to those derived from the most recent lensing analysis in CL0024+17, we find a good agreement with the observed ICL fraction profile. The galaxy counts in the cluster core have then been compared with that derived from composite cluster samples in larger volumes, up to the clusters virial radius. The galaxy counts in the CL0024+17 core appear flatter and the amount of bending with respect to the average cluster galaxy counts imply a loss of total

  1. Monoclonal and polyclonal gammopathy measured by serum free light chain and immunofixation subdivide the clinical outcomes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to molecular classification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Yundeok; Jang, Ji Eun; Lee, Jung Yeon; Min, Yoo Hong; Song, Jae-Woo; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Jin Seok

    2014-11-01

    Elevated serum free light chain (FLC) is known to be an adverse prognostic factor for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We hypothesized that monoclonal gammopathy (MG; elevated kappa [κ] or lambda [λ] FLC with an abnormal κ/λ ratio or a positive IF [immunofixation]) and polyclonal gammopathy (PG; elevated κ and/or λ FLC with a normal κ/λ ratio and a negative IF) would have different clinical outcome according to the molecular classification of DLBCL. In addition, MG would be a poor prognostic factor in patients with activated B-cell like type of DLBCL. Molecular classification of DLBCL, such as germinal center B-cell (GCB) type and non-GCB type, was performed according to the Hans algorithm. Among 175 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients, 96 (54.9 %) patients had an elevated FLC. MG and PG were observed in 34 and 68 patients, respectively. The 2-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 79.0 % and 71.6 %, respectively. In multivariate analysis, high-intermediate/high International Prognostic Index score and elevated FLC were significant for the OS (P = 0.002, P = 0.005, respectively) and EFS (P < 0.002, P = 0.010, respectively). MG and PG were also associated with inferior OS (P = 0.002, P = 0.011, respectively) and EFS (P = 0.002, P = 0.013, respectively). Ninety-six patients from a total 133 evaluable patients were classified to the non-GCB type. Patients with PG showed inferior clinical outcome for OS and EFS in patients with the GCB type (P = 0.006, P = 0.035, respectively). MG was a significant poor prognostic factor for OS and EFS in patients with the non-GCB type (P = 0.017, P = 0.004, respectively). MG was a poor prognostic maker in patients with the non-GCB type and PG was a poor prognostic indicator for the GCB type of DLBCL who were treated with R-CHOP. PMID:24947797

  2. An analysis of diffuse light attenuation in the northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone using the SeaWiFS satellite data record

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water column diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) of the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) was examined during ten years to characterize the spatial and temporal variations on monthly scales from 1998 to 2007. This region is well-known for summer hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < 2...

  3. Diffusion-Barrier Contacts For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Pool, Frederick S.; Nicolet, Marc; Iles, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrically conductive diffusion barriers of TaSiN prevent diffusion of metal from overlying metal contacts into underlying silicon during processing at high temperature, improving performance during subsequent use in low-intensity light at low temperature.

  4. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  5. Designing Au Surface-Modified Nanoporous-Single-Crystalline SrTiO3 to Optimize Diffusion of Surface Plasmon Resonance-Induce Photoelectron toward Enhanced Visible-Light Photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Da; Ouyang, Shuxin; Xu, Hua; Li, Dewang; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Yunxiang; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-04-13

    Nanoporous single-crystalline SrTiO3 is fabricated at a low temperature of 60 °C via a novel approach of sol-gel alkali-dissolution-exothermal reaction. The plasmon-active metal Au is loaded on the nanoporous single-crystalline SrTiO3 material to construct a new kind of plasmonic photocatalyst. Due to the single-crystalline nature and the space confinement effect of pores for Au growing, not only the promoted diffusion efficiency of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-induce photoelectron is achieved, but also the diffusion region are well optimized via changing the loading amount of Au. Therefore, an optimal sample with 4.8 wt % Au loading exhibits a more than 40-fold photoactivity enhancement under visible-light irradiation compared to the common nanosized SrTiO3 (a commercially available sample) loaded with 5.3 wt % Au which was prepared under the same condition. Furthermore, combining the special nanostructure of Au surface-modified nanoporous-single-crystalline SrTiO3 with photocatalytic properties, estimation of the diffusion mean free path of SPR-induce photoelectron can be achieved. This study proposes an alternative approach to enhance the photoactivity of plasmonic photocatalyst via fine designing the semiconductor substrate. PMID:27007490

  6. Diffusion of polyelectrolytes in polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahalkar, Anand; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we have investigated the diffusion coefficient of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) in a matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylate) gels. The diffusion coefficient of the probe polyelectrolyte exhibits a crossover behavior from a particle-diffusion to entropic-barrier dominated diffusion, as the molecular weight is increased. The effect of electrostatics, by varying the charge density of the matrix, on probe diffusion constant will be presented.

  7. Combination Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Rayovac TANDEM is an advanced technology combination work light and general purpose flashlight that incorporates several NASA technologies. The TANDEM functions as two lights in one. It features a long range spotlight and wide angle floodlight; simple one-hand electrical switching changes the beam from spot to flood. TANDEM developers made particular use of NASA's extensive research in ergonomics in the TANDEM's angled handle, convenient shape and different orientations. The shatterproof, water resistant plastic casing also draws on NASA technology, as does the shape and beam distance of the square diffused flood. TANDEM's heavy duty magnet that permits the light to be affixed to any metal object borrows from NASA research on rare earth magnets that combine strong magnetic capability with low cost. Developers used a NASA-developed ultrasonic welding technique in the light's interior.

  8. Light-Induced Increase of Electron Diffusion Length in a p-n Junction Type CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Kedem, Nir; Brenner, Thomas M; Kulbak, Michael; Schaefer, Norbert; Levcenko, Sergiu; Levine, Igal; Abou-Ras, Daniel; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2015-07-01

    High band gap, high open-circuit voltage solar cells with methylammonium lead tribromide (MAPbBr3) perovskite absorbers are of interest for spectral splitting and photoelectrochemical applications, because of their good performance and ease of processing. The physical origin of high performance in these and similar perovskite-based devices remains only partially understood. Using cross-sectional electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements, we find an increase in carrier diffusion length in MAPbBr3(Cl)-based solar cells upon low intensity (a few percent of 1 sun intensity) blue laser illumination. Comparing dark and illuminated conditions, the minority carrier (electron) diffusion length increases about 3.5 times from Ln = 100 ± 50 nm to 360 ± 22 nm. The EBIC cross section profile indicates a p-n structure between the n-FTO/TiO2 and p-perovskite, rather than the p-i-n structure, reported for the iodide derivative. On the basis of the variation in space-charge region width with varying bias, measured by EBIC and capacitance-voltage measurements, we estimate the net-doping concentration in MAPbBr3(Cl) to be 3-6 × 10(17) cm(-3). PMID:26266721

  9. An Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux Turbulence Parameterization: Application to Dust Convection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witek, M. L.; Teixeira, J.; Richardson, M. I.; Mischna, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Eddy-diffusivity/Mass-flux (EDMF) parameterization has been extremely successful in simulating the evolution of terrestrial atmospheric boundary layers. It is particularly suited for representing strong and moderate convection, where turbulence organizes in coherent structures and transports heat, humidity and pollution throughout the extent of the boundary layer. The EDMF's ability to explicitly represent turbulent updrafts and associated fluxes is key to a proper depiction of the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. It is the most appropriate tool currently available to address the outstanding issues in the Mars atmosphere and dust modeling on a global and regional scale. Dust is one of the most important moderators of the Martian climate. Basic theoretical arguments and observations such as high-altitude dust maxima, dust layering, and transport in plumes during dust storm onset—none of which are currently captured in general circulation models (GCMs)—all demonstrate the vital importance of representing dust vertical mixing by plumes. Most GCMs, however, only consider local, Mellor-Yamada-type diffusion, which is insufficient to capture the evolving dust distribution and hence the Martian climate system correctly. Here, we developed an EDMF parameterization for the Martian convective boundary layer. We report on details of the parameterization and its performance as compared against large-eddy simulations. We investigate a downdraft contribution to turbulent fluxes and the importance of mass-flux transport of TKE. Furthermore, we investigate the role of plume heating—through absorption of solar radiation by uplifted dust particles—on the plume evolution (a mechanisms that could act as a surrogate of the latent heat release in terrestrial clouds). Our results shed light on the reasons behind the presence of elevated dust layers in the Martian atmosphere.

  10. Determining Photosynthetic Parameters from Leaf CO2 Exchange and Chlorophyll Fluorescence (Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Specificity Factor, Dark Respiration in the Light, Excitation Distribution between Photosystems, Alternative Electron Transport Rate, and Mesophyll Diffusion Resistance.

    PubMed

    Laisk, A.; Loreto, F.

    1996-03-01

    Using simultaneous measurements of leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence, we determined the excitation partitioning to photosystem II (PSII), the CO2/O2 specificity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the dark respiration in the light, and the alternative electron transport rate to acceptors other than bisphosphoglycerate, and the transport resistance for CO2 in the mesophyll cells for individual leaves of herbaceous and tree species. The specificity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase for CO2 was determined from the slope of the O2 dependence of the CO2 compensation point between 1.5 and 21% O2. Its value, on the basis of dissolved CO2 and O2 concentrations at 25.5[deg]C, varied between 86 and 89. Dark respiration in the light, estimated from the difference between the CO2 compensation point and the CO2 photocompensation point, was about 20 to 50% of the respiration rate in the dark. The excitation distribution to PSII was estimated from the extrapolation of the dependence of the PSII quantum yield on F/Fm to F = 0, where F is steady-state and Fm is pulse-satuarated fluorescence, and varied between 0.45 and 0.6. The alternative electron transport rate was found as the difference between the electron transport rates calculated from fluorescence and from gas exchange, and at low CO2 concentrations and 10 to 21% O2, it was 25 to 30% of the maximum electron transport. The calculated mesophyll diffusion resistance accounted for about 20 to 30% of the total mesophyll resistance, which also includes carboxylation resistance. Whole-leaf photosynthesis is limited by gas phase, mesophyll diffusion, and carboxylation resistances in nearly the same proportion in both herbaceous species and trees. PMID:12226229

  11. Diffuse Optics for Tissue Monitoring and Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, T; Choe, R; Baker, W B; Yodh, A G

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the diffusion model for light transport in tissues and the medical applications of diffuse light. Diffuse optics is particularly useful for measurement of tissue hemodynamics, wherein quantitative assessment of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations and blood flow are desired. The theoretical basis for near-infrared or diffuse optical spectroscopy (NIRS or DOS, respectively) is developed, and the basic elements of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) are outlined. We also discuss diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a technique whereby temporal correlation functions of diffusing light are transported through tissue and are used to measure blood flow. Essential instrumentation is described, and representative brain and breast functional imaging and monitoring results illustrate the workings of these new tissue diagnostics. PMID:26120204

  12. Devitrite-based optical diffusers.

    PubMed

    Butt, Haider; Knowles, Kevin M; Montelongo, Yunuen; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2014-03-25

    Devitrite is a novel material produced by heat treatment of commercial soda-lime-silica glass. It consists of fans of needle-like crystals which can extend up to several millimeters and have interspacings of up to a few hundred nanometers. To date, only the material properties of devitrite have been reported, and there has been a distinct lack of research on using it for optical applications. In this study, we demonstrate that randomly oriented fans of devitrite crystals can act as highly efficient diffusers for visible light. Devitrite crystals produce phase modulation of light because of their relatively high anisotropy. The nanoscale spacings between these needles enable light to be diffused to large scattering angles. Experimentally measured results suggest that light diffusion patterns with beam widths of up to 120° are produced. Since devitrite is an inexpensive material to produce, it has the potential to be used in a variety of commercial applications. PMID:24559189

  13. Diffuse light reflectance signals as potential indicators of loss of viability in brain tissue due to hypoxia: charge-coupled-device-based imaging and fiber-based measurement.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue is highly vulnerable to ischemia/hypoxia, and real-time monitoring of its viability is important. By fiber-based measurements for rat brain, we previously observed a unique triphasic reflectance change (TRC) after a certain period of time after hypoxia. After TRC, rats could not be rescued, suggesting that TRC can be used as an indicator of loss of brain tissue viability. In this study, we investigated this diffuse-reflectance change due to hypoxia in three parts. First, we developed and validated a theoretical method to quantify changes in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients involved in TRC. Second, we performed charge-coupled-device-based reflectance imaging of the rat brain during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation to examine spatiotemporal characteristics of the reflectance and its correlation with reversibility of brain tissue damage. Third, we made simultaneous imaging and fiber-based measurement of the reflectance for the rat to compare signals obtained by these two modalities. We observed a nontriphasic reflectance change by the imaging, and it was associated with brain tissue viability. We found that TRC measured by the fibers preceded the reflectance-signal change captured by the imaging. This time difference is attributable to the different observation depths in the brain with these two methods. PMID:23291715

  14. Diffuse light reflectance signals as potential indicators of loss of viability in brain tissue due to hypoxia: charge-coupled-device-based imaging and fiber-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue is highly vulnerable to ischemia/hypoxia, and real-time monitoring of its viability is important. By fiber-based measurements for rat brain, we previously observed a unique triphasic reflectance change (TRC) after a certain period of time after hypoxia. After TRC, rats could not be rescued, suggesting that TRC can be used as an indicator of loss of brain tissue viability. In this study, we investigated this diffuse-reflectance change due to hypoxia in three parts. First, we developed and validated a theoretical method to quantify changes in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients involved in TRC. Second, we performed charge-coupled-device-based reflectance imaging of the rat brain during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation to examine spatiotemporal characteristics of the reflectance and its correlation with reversibility of brain tissue damage. Third, we made simultaneous imaging and fiber-based measurement of the reflectance for the rat to compare signals obtained by these two modalities. We observed a nontriphasic reflectance change by the imaging, and it was associated with brain tissue viability. We found that TRC measured by the fibers preceded the reflectance-signal change captured by the imaging. This time difference is attributable to the different observation depths in the brain with these two methods.

  15. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  16. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  17. Monitoring hemodynamic and morphologic responses to closed head injury in a mouse model using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2013-04-01

    The authors' aim is to assess and quantitatively measure brain hemodynamic and morphological variations during closed-head injury (CHI) in mice using orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS). CHI is a type of injury to the head that does not penetrate the skull. Usually, it is caused by mechanical blows to the head and frequently occurs in traffic accidents, falls, and assaults. Measurements of brain optical properties, namely absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distance and locations to provide depth sensitivity on an intact scalp over the duration of the whole experiment. Furthermore, alteration in both cortical hemodynamics and morphologic markers, i.e., scattering power and amplitude properties were derived. CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by a weight-drop model using ˜50 g cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp producing an impact of 4500 g cm. With respect to baseline, difference in brain physiological properties was observed following injury up to 1 h post-trauma. Additionally, the reduced scattering spectral shapes followed Mie scattering theory was quantified and clearly shows changes in both scattering amplitude and power from baseline indicating structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema during CHI. We further demonstrate high correlation between scattering amplitude and scattering power, with more than 20% difference in slope in comparison to preinjury. This result indicates the possibility of using the slope also as a marker for detection of structural changes. Finally, experiments investigating brain function during the first 20 min postinjury were conducted and changes in chromophore concentrations and scattering were observed. Overall, our experiments demonstrate the potential of using the proposed technique as a valuable quantitative noninvasive tool for

  18. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  19. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  20. DiffuseModel: Modeling the diffuse ultraviolet background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2015-12-01

    DiffuseModel calculates the scattered radiation from dust scattering in the Milky Way based on stars from the Hipparcos catalog. It uses Monte Carlo to implement multiple scattering and assumes a user-supplied grid for the dust distribution. The output is a FITS file with the diffuse light over the Galaxy. It is intended for use in the UV (900 - 3000 A) but may be modified for use in other wavelengths and galaxies.

  1. Fetomaternal attachment and anchorage in the early diffuse epitheliochorial placenta of the camel (Camelus dromedarius). Light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elnaeim, M M; Pfarrer, C; Saber, A S; Abou-Elmagd, A; Jones, C J; Leiser, R

    1999-01-01

    Placentae of 22 one-humped camel concepti with crown-rump lengths (CRL) ranging from 2.5 to 26 cm were studied. The placentae were processed for light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy of exposed surfaces and microvascular corrosion casts. In very early stages of pregnancy (2.5-4.5 cm CRL) three froms of fetomaternal interrelationship are described. (1) Precontact, where the mononuclear trophoblast cells are still separated from the uterine epithelium by a gap containing interareolar histotroph. Both fetal and maternal epithelia develop apical ectoplasmic pads in this location. (2) Apposition, where microvilli of the apical cell membrane of the trophoblast contact the uterine epithelium focally. Multinuclear trophoblast giant cells develop beside the population of already present mononuclear trophoblast cells. Uterine ectoplasmic pads can be observed. (3) Adhesion occurs when apical cell membranes of fetal and maternal epithelia adhere to each other closely, thus forming a 'normal' intercellular space of 20 nm width, without any intervening uterine luminal space. Microvillous interdigitation in this location varies from a non-microvillous 'smooth adhesion', to a distinctly villiform 'rough adhesion', and a 'semismooth adhesion' is achieved when trophoblastic microvilli make intimate contact with the non-microvillous uterine apical cell membranes of ectoplasmic pads. This fetomaternal attachment process is sufficient until the conceptus reaches approximately 9 cm CRL. Then, from 10 to 13 cm CRL, additional anchorage of the placenta to the endometrium is accomplished by the growth of temporary grooves and ridges of the allantochorion and the endometrium, which indent each other in a complementary fashion. The height of these groove-ridge structures increases gradually in 14 to 18 cm CRL fetuses, and they also widen at about 25 cm CRL, thus forming globular fetal troughs and irregular, thick maternal ridges. These together create units responsible for

  2. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  3. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  4. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  5. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed. PMID:19391727

  6. Diffuse optical intracluster light as a measure of stellar tidal stripping: The cluster CL0024+17 at z ∼ 0.4 observed at the large binocular telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Gallozzi, S.; Castellano, M.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L.; Boutsia, K.; Paris, D.; Speziali, R.; Testa, V.

    2014-01-20

    We have evaluated the diffuse intracluster light (ICL) in the central core of the galaxy cluster CL0024+17 at z ∼ 0.4 observed with the prime focus camera (Large Binocular Camera) at the Large Binocular Telescope. The measure required an accurate removal of the galaxies' light within ∼200 kpc from the center. The residual background intensity has then been integrated in circular apertures to derive the average ICL intensity profile. The latter shows an approximate exponential decline as expected from theoretical cold dark matter models where the ICL is due to the integrated contribution of light from stars that are tidally stripped from the halo of their host galaxies due to encounters with other galaxies in the cluster cold dark matter (CDM) potential. The radial profile of the ICL over the galaxies intensity ratio (ICL fraction) is increasing with decreasing radius, but near the cluster center it starts to bend and then decreases where the overlap of the halos of the brightest cluster galaxies becomes dominant. Theoretical expectations in a simplified CDM scenario show that the ICL fraction profile can be estimated from the stripped over galaxy stellar mass ratio in the cluster. It is possible to show that the latter quantity is almost independent of the properties of the individual host galaxies but mainly depends on the average cluster properties. The predicted ICL fraction profile is thus very sensitive to the assumed CDM profile, total mass, and concentration parameter of the cluster. Adopting values very similar to those derived from the most recent lensing analysis in CL0024+17, we find a good agreement with the observed ICL fraction profile. The galaxy counts in the cluster core have then been compared with that derived from composite cluster samples in larger volumes, up to the clusters virial radius. The galaxy counts in the CL0024+17 core appear flatter and the amount of bending with respect to the average cluster galaxy counts imply a loss of total

  7. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  8. 46 CFR 129.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 129.410 Section 129.410 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each globe, lens, or diffuser of a lighting... lighting fixture may be used as a connection box for a circuit other than the branch circuit supplying...

  9. 46 CFR 129.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 129.410 Section 129.410 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each globe, lens, or diffuser of a lighting... lighting fixture may be used as a connection box for a circuit other than the branch circuit supplying...

  10. 46 CFR 129.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 129.410 Section 129.410 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each globe, lens, or diffuser of a lighting... lighting fixture may be used as a connection box for a circuit other than the branch circuit supplying...

  11. 46 CFR 129.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 129.410 Section 129.410 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each globe, lens, or diffuser of a lighting... lighting fixture may be used as a connection box for a circuit other than the branch circuit supplying...

  12. 46 CFR 129.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 129.410 Section 129.410 Shipping... INSTALLATIONS Lighting Systems § 129.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each globe, lens, or diffuser of a lighting... lighting fixture may be used as a connection box for a circuit other than the branch circuit supplying...

  13. Flexible textile light diffuser for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selm, Barbel; Camenzind, Martin

    2005-03-01

    In this article a new medical application is introduced using textile production techniques to deliver a defined radiation dose. The advantage for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is that a flat luminous textile structure can homogeneously illuminate unequal body surfaces. The optical properties of this two-dimensional luminous pad are characterized with a set of bench-scale tests. In vitro investigations on petri dishes with cultivated cells and first clinical tests on animal patients are promising. In addition first measurement results are presented together with an outlook to future developments.

  14. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1988-01-01

    Work performed during the first six months of the project duration for NASA Grant (NAG-1-861) is reported. An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies attempted so far are described.

  15. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  16. Quantum diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, S.

    1994-10-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ``quantum diffusion`` terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source.

  17. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  18. Device structure for OLED light device having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Antoniadis; Homer , Krummacher; Benjamin Claus

    2008-01-22

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  19. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Antoniadis, Homer

    2010-11-16

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  20. How to distinguish elastically scattered light from Stokes shifted light for solid-state lighting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meretska, M. L.; Lagendijk, A.; Thyrrestrup, H.; Mosk, A. P.; IJzerman, W. L.; Vos, W. L.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the transport of light through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3 phosphor particles that both elastically scatter and Stokes shift light in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm). We excite the phosphor with a narrowband light source and measure spectra of the outgoing light. The Stokes shifted light is spectrally separated from the elastically scattered light in the measured spectra, and using this technique, we isolate the elastic transmission of the plates. This result allows us to extract the transport mean free path ltr over the full wavelength range by employing diffusion theory. Simultaneously, we determine the absorption mean free path labs in the wavelength range 400 to 530 nm where YAG:Ce+3 absorbs. The diffuse absorption (μa=1/labs ) spectrum is qualitatively similar to the absorption coefficient of YAG:Ce+3 in powder, with the diffuse spectrum being wider than the absorption coefficient. We propose a design rule for the solid-state lighting diffuser plates.

  1. Perturbative thermal diffusivity from partial sawtooth crashes in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creely, A. J.; White, A. E.; Edlund, E. M.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Perturbative thermal diffusivity has been measured on Alcator C-Mod via the use of the extended-time-to-peak method on heat pulses generated by partial sawtooth crashes. Perturbative thermal diffusivity governs the propagation of heat pulses through a plasma. It differs from power balance thermal diffusivity, which governs steady state thermal transport. Heat pulses generated by sawtooth crashes have been used extensively in the past to study heat pulse thermal diffusivity (Lopes Cardozo 1995 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 37 799), but the details of the sawtooth event typically lead to non-diffusive ‘ballistic’ transport, making them an unreliable measure of perturbative diffusivity on many tokamaks (Fredrickson et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 5051). Partial sawteeth are common on numerous tokamaks, and generate a heat pulse without the ‘ballistic’ transport that often accompanies full sawteeth (Fredrickson et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 5051). This is the first application of the extended-time-to-peak method of diffusivity calculation (Tubbing et al 1987 Nucl. Fusion 27 1843) to partial sawtooth crashes. This analysis was applied to over 50 C-Mod shots containing both L- and I-Mode. Results indicate correlations between perturbative diffusivity and confinement regime (L- versus I-mode), as well as correlations with local temperature, density, the associated gradients, and gradient scale lengths (a/L Te and a/L n ). In addition, diffusivities calculated from partial sawteeth are compared to perturbative diffusivities calculated with the nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO. We find that standard ion-scale simulations (ITG/TEM turbulence) under-predict the perturbative thermal diffusivity, but new multi-scale (ITG/TEM coupled with ETG) simulations can match the experimental perturbative diffusivity within error bars for an Alcator C-Mod L-mode plasma. Perturbative diffusivities extracted from heat pulses due to partial sawteeth provide a new constraint that can be used to

  2. 46 CFR 120.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 120.410 Section 120.410 Shipping... PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 120.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each lighting fixture globe, lens, or diffuser must have a...

  3. 46 CFR 120.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 120.410 Section 120.410 Shipping... PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 120.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each lighting fixture globe, lens, or diffuser must have a...

  4. 46 CFR 120.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 120.410 Section 120.410 Shipping... PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 120.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each lighting fixture globe, lens, or diffuser must have a...

  5. 46 CFR 120.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 120.410 Section 120.410 Shipping... PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 120.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each lighting fixture globe, lens, or diffuser must have a...

  6. 46 CFR 120.410 - Lighting fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lighting fixtures. 120.410 Section 120.410 Shipping... PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Lighting Systems § 120.410 Lighting fixtures. (a) Each lighting fixture globe, lens, or diffuser must have a...

  7. A fluorescent laser-diffuser arrangement for uniform backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Saransh; Somasundaram, S.; Anand, T. N. C.

    2016-02-01

    Laser-light diffusers are used in conjunction with pulsed lasers to generate bright, spatially uniform background illumination for imaging and particle sizing applications. The present paper describes a cost effective way of fabricating a fluorescent laser-light diffuser. The procedure to obtain a uniform background using laser illumination is explained. To characterize the diffuser, images are acquired using a CCD camera with the illumination provided using the diffuser and the variations of pixel intensity values along the centerline of the images are plotted. It is observed that the standard deviation of pixel intensity values is fairly small. Hence, these diffusers are suitable for experiments that need a uniform background.

  8. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1996-01-01

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

  9. Lighting: Green Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  10. Absorption effects in diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-07-20

    The effect of absorption in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) was studied using an absorption-dependent diffusive equation for describing the light propagation within a turbid liquid where dielectric microspheres have been embedded. Here, we propose an expression for the time-averaged light intensity autocorrelation function that correctly describes the time fluctuations for the scattered light, in the regime where the diffusion approximation accurately describes the light propagation. This correction was suspected previously, but it was not formally derived from a light diffusive equation. As in the case of no absorption, we obtained that time fluctuations of the scattered light can be related to the mean square displacement of the embedded particles. However, if a correction for absorption is not taken into account, the colloidal dynamics can be misinterpreted. Experimental results show that this new formulation correctly describes the time fluctuations of scattered light. This new procedure extends the applicability of DWS, and it opens the possibility of doing microrheology with this optical method in systems where absorption cannot be avoided. PMID:25090203