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Sample records for light-emitting diode treatment

  1. Light-emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  2. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  3. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  4. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  5. Effect of surface treatment of GaN based light emitting diode wafers on the leakage current of light emitting diode devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Ji; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Zhao, De-Gang; Liu, Zong-Shun; Jiang, De-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Tian; Yang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    To form low-resistance Ohmic contact to p-type GaN, InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diode wafers are treated with boiled aqua regia prior to Ni/Au (5 nm/5 nm) film deposition. The surface morphology of wafers and the current-voltage characteristics of fabricated light emitting diode devices are investigated. It is shown that surface treatment with boiled aqua regia could effectively remove oxide from the surface of the p-GaN layer, and reveal defect-pits whose density is almost the same as the screw dislocation density estimated by x-ray rocking curve measurement. It suggests that the metal atoms of the Ni/Au transparent electrode of light emitting diode devices may diffuse into the p-GaN layer along threading dislocation lines and form additional leakage current channels. Therefore, the surface treatment time with boiled aqua regia should not be too long so as to avoid the increase of threading dislocation-induced leakage current and the degradation of electrical properties of light emitting diodes.

  6. Light-Emitting Diode Versus Sham in the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul E.; Hews, Katherine; Windon, Lowell; Chasse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this preliminary study was to compare the application of the light emitting diode (LED) to sham LED in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods Eighteen subjects met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned into 2 groups: light emitting diode or sham LED. The subjects received either the LED at 12 J/cm2 or sham LED along 2 points of the plantar fascia. Subjects in both groups received a 10 minute transverse friction massage and participated in 4 plantar fascia stretching exercises. All subjects received a total of 6 treatments over 3 weeks. Progress was assessed using the lower extremity functional and analog pain scale. Results No significant difference was found between treatment groups (P = .845). There was a significant difference in pain and outcome scores over time within both groups (P < .35). Conclusion Among patients with plantar fasciitis, the use of LED did not result in greater improvement in function or pain compared with sham treatment. The findings suggest that manual intervention and passive stretching activities may have provided significant pain relief and improvement in functional outcome scores. PMID:26644784

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper provided…

  8. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published…

  9. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1998-07-14

    A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

  10. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Klem, John F.; Hafich, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

  11. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Kahen

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m2, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  12. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    SciTech Connect

    Kahen, Keith

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m{sup 2}, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  13. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. PMID:25222335

  14. Electroluminescence dependence of the simplified green light organic light emitting diodes on in situ thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Haichuan; Rao, Lu; Li, Weiling; Wei, Bin; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen

    2015-12-01

    Simplified multilayer green light phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (PHOLED) with the structure of ITO/MoO3(1 nm)/CBP(20 nm)/CBP:Ir(ppy)3 (1 wt%) (15 nm)/TPBi(60 nm)/LiF(0.5 nm)/Al were fabricated via thermal evaporation and in situ thermal treatment (heating the OLED substrates to certain temperatures during the thermal evaporation of the organic materials) was performed. The effect of the in situ thermal treatment on the electroluminescence (EL) performance of the PHOLED was investigated. It was found that the OLED exhibited strong EL dependence on the thermal treatment temperatures, and their current efficiency was improved with the increasing temperature from room temperature (RT) to 69 °C and deteriorated with the further increasing temperature to 105 °C. At the brightness of 1000 cd/m2, over 80% improvement of the current efficiency at the optimal thermal treatment temperature of 69 °C (64 cd/A) was demonstrated compared to that at RT (35 cd/A). Meanwhile, the tremendous influences of the in situ thermal treatment on the morphology of the multilayer CBP/CBP:Ir(ppy)3/TPBi were also observed. At the optimal thermal treatment temperature of 69 °C, the improvement of the EL performance could be ascribed to the enhancement of the electron and hole transporting in the CBP:Ir(ppy)3 emitting layer, which suppressed the triplets self-quenching interactions and promoted the charge balance and excitons formation. The working mechanism responsible for such EL dependence was discussed in detail.

  15. Photochemistry of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2007-12-26

    The optical properties and excited-state geometries of some organic light-emitting diodes have been investigated by the SAC-CI method. The absorption and emission spectra have been predicted in high accuracy and the chain-length dependence of transition energies has been precisely reproduced. The present study provides the useful basis for the theoretical design predicting the photo-physical properties of the organic light-emitting diodes.

  16. NASA sponsored Light Emitting Diode (LED) development helps in cancer treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    What started out as an attempt to develop a light which would allow for the growth of plants in space led to a remarkable discovery: The Light Emitting Diode (LED). This device through extensive study and experimentation has developed into a tool used by surgeons in the fight against brain cancer in children. Pictured is a mock-up of brain surgery being performed. By encapsulating the end of the LED with a balloon, light is diffused over a larger area of the brain allowing the surgeon a better view. This is one of many programs that begin as research for the space program, and through extensive study end up benefitting all of mankind.

  17. Demonstrating the Light-Emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple inexpensive circuit which can be used to quickly demonstrate the basic function and versatility of the solid state diode. Can be used to demonstrate the light-emitting diode (LED) as a light emitter, temperature sensor, light detector with both a linear and logarithmic response, and charge storage device. (JRH)

  18. Anode modification of polymer light-emitting diode using graphene oxide interfacial layer: The role of ultraviolet-ozone treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Chen; Li, Yan-Qing; Deng, Yan-Hong; Zhuo, Qi-Qi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2013-08-01

    A simple and efficient method has been developed to modify the anode interface of polymer light-emitting diode by incorporating solution-processable graphene oxide as hole transport layer. Interface engineering of ultraviolet-ozone treatment on graphene oxide is demonstrated to dramatically enhance the electrical properties, leading to 15% increase in efficiency compared to that with a traditionally used poly(styrenesulfonate)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) layer. As determined by photoelectron spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy, an optimized ultraviolet-ozone treatment results in a more favorable energy level alignment and a decrease in series resistance, which can subsequently facilitate charge injection at the anodic interface.

  19. Efficiency enhancement of organic light emitting diodes by NaOH surface treatment of the ITO anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, P.

    2009-09-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on tris-(8-idroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3) with enhanced efficiency are reported here. This is obtained by improving the charge carrier balance, through a preliminary NaOH surface treatment of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, in order to decrease its work function and, consequently, reduce the hole injection. The obtained devices exhibit a 1.36% external quantum efficiency and a 1.2 lm/W power efficiency at a current density of 60 mA/cm 2. These values are more than double as compared with those of identical reference devices fabricated without the preliminary NaOH surface treatment.

  20. Proton degradation of light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.H.; Rax, B.G.; Selva, L.E.; Barnes, C.E.

    1999-12-01

    Proton degradation is investigated for several types of light-emitting diodes with wavelengths in the near infrared region. Several basic light-emitting diode (LED) technologies are compared, including homojunction and double-heterojunction devices. Homojunction LEDs fabricated with amphoteric dopants are far more sensitive to displacement damage than double-heterojunction LEDs, and are strongly affected by injection-enhanced annealing. Unit-to-unit variability remains an important issue for all LED technologies. For some technologies, degradation of the forward voltage characteristics appears to be more significant than degradation of light output.

  1. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  2. Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    Devices utilizing an entirely new class of earth abundant, inexpensive phosphorescent emitters based on metal-halide nanoclusters are reported. Light-emitting diodes with tunable performance are demonstrated by varying cation substitution to these nanoclusters. Theoretical calculations provide insight about the nature of the phosphorescent emitting states, which involves a strong pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:26568044

  3. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinšic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general…

  4. Afterglow Organic Light-Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Kabe, Ryota; Notsuka, Naoto; Yoshida, Kou; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-27

    An afterglow organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that displays electroluminescence with long transient decay after it is turned off is demonstrated. This OLED exhibits blue and green dual emission originating from fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively. A phosphorescence lifetime of 4.3 s is achieved. PMID:26599764

  5. Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Cheng, Chuan Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying; Tong Du, Guo

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup −} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2 eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91 cd/A, 102 lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

  6. Bioinspired Hybrid White Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael D; Niklaus, Lukas; Pröschel, Marlene; Coto, Pedro B; Sonnewald, Uwe; Costa, Rubén D

    2015-10-01

    The first bioinspired hybrid white-light-emitting diodes (bio-HLEDs) featuring protein cascade coatings are presented. For easy fabrication a new strategy to stabilize proteins in rubber-like material was developed. The synergy between the excellent features of fluorescent proteins and the easily processed rubber produces bio-HLEDs with less than 10% loss in luminous efficiency over 100 hours. PMID:26271025

  7. Light-Emitting Diodes: Solving Complex Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-05-01

    This is the fourth paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide readers with the description of experiments and the pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper1 provided an overview of possible uses of LEDs in physics courses. The second paper2 discussed how one could help students learn the foundational aspects of LED physics through a scaf-folded inquiry approach, specifically the ISLE cycle. The third paper3 showed how the physics inherent in the functioning of LEDs could help students deepen their understanding of sources of electric power and the temperature dependence of resistivity, and explore the phenomenon of fluorescence also using the ISLE cycle.4 The goal of this fourth paper is to use LEDs as black boxes that allow students to study certain properties of a system of interest, specifically mechanical, electric, electromagnetic, and light properties. The term "black box" means that we use a device without knowing the mechanism behind its operation.

  8. Light-Emitting Diodes: Learning New Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-04-01

    This is the third paper in our Light-Emitting Diodes series. The series aims to create a systematic library of LED-based materials and to provide the readers with the description of experiments and pedagogical treatment that would help their students construct, test, and apply physics concepts and mathematical relations. The first paper, published in the February 2014 issue of TPT,1 provided an overview of possible uses of LEDs in a physics course. The second paper2 discussed how one could help students learn the foundational aspects of LED physics through a scaffolded inquiry approach, specifically the ISLE cycle. The goals of this paper are to show how the activities described in our second paper help to deepen student understanding of physics and to broaden student knowledge by exploring new phenomena such as fluorescence. Activities described in this paper are suitable for advanced high school courses, introductory courses for physics and engineering majors, courses for prospective physics teachers, and professional development programs.

  9. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  10. NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT VIA LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE TREATMENT IS THERAPEUTIC AGAINST ROTENONE- AND MPP+-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Huan Ling; Whelan, Harry T; Eells, Janis T; Wong-Riley, Margaret TT

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Thus, therapeutic approaches that improve mitochondrial function may prove to be beneficial. Previously, we have documented that near-infrared light via light-emitting diode (LED) treatment was therapeutic to neurons functionally inactivated by tetrodotoxin, potassium cyanide (KCN), or methanol intoxication, and LED pretreatment rescued neurons from KCN-induced apoptotic cell death. The current study tested our hypothesis that LED treatment can protect neurons from both rotenone- and MPP+-induced neurotoxicity. Primary cultures of postnatal rat striatal and cortical neurons served as models, and the optimal frequency of LED treatment per day was also determined. Results indicated that LED treatments twice a day significantly increased cellular ATP content, decreased the number of neurons undergoing cell death, and significantly reduced the expressions of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in rotenone- or MPP+-exposed neurons as compared to untreated ones. These results strongly suggest that LED treatment may be therapeutic to neurons damaged by neurotoxins linked to Parkinson’s disease by energizing the cells and increasing their viability. PMID:18440709

  11. Color control of nanowire InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes by post-growth treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hezhi; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Neplokh, Vladimir; Largeau, Ludovic; Julien, François H.; Kryliouk, Olga; Tchernycheva, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Core/shell InGaN/GaN nanowire light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on vertically standing single nanowires and nanowire arrays were fabricated and extensively characterized. The emission of single wire LEDs with the same conformal contact geometry as the array device exhibits the same broadening as the array LED electroluminescence, which proves an excellent wire-to-wire homogeneity. The electroluminescence spectra present two peaks corresponding to the m-plane InGaN quantum well (blue emission) and to an In-rich region at the m-plane-semipolar plane junction (green emission), in agreement with structural characterizations. Modification of the contact layout and a post-growth plasma treatment enable strongly suppressing the unwanted green electroluminescence while increasing the intensity in the blue spectral range for the same injected electrical power. Electron beam induced current mapping proves the inhibition of the electrical activity of the top part of the nanowire after plasma treatment. Inductively coupled plasma etching of the In-rich region permits one to completely remove the green emission for all injection currents, but loss of intensity in the blue spectral range is observed. Selectively contacting the m-plane and plasma treatment of the top part of the nanowire appear as a viable solution for controlling the color of core/shell nanowire LEDs with an inhomogeneous indium composition.

  12. Color control of nanowire InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes by post-growth treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hezhi; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Neplokh, Vladimir; Largeau, Ludovic; Julien, François H; Kryliouk, Olga; Tchernycheva, Maria

    2015-11-20

    Core/shell InGaN/GaN nanowire light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on vertically standing single nanowires and nanowire arrays were fabricated and extensively characterized. The emission of single wire LEDs with the same conformal contact geometry as the array device exhibits the same broadening as the array LED electroluminescence, which proves an excellent wire-to-wire homogeneity. The electroluminescence spectra present two peaks corresponding to the m-plane InGaN quantum well (blue emission) and to an In-rich region at the m-plane-semipolar plane junction (green emission), in agreement with structural characterizations. Modification of the contact layout and a post-growth plasma treatment enable strongly suppressing the unwanted green electroluminescence while increasing the intensity in the blue spectral range for the same injected electrical power. Electron beam induced current mapping proves the inhibition of the electrical activity of the top part of the nanowire after plasma treatment. Inductively coupled plasma etching of the In-rich region permits one to completely remove the green emission for all injection currents, but loss of intensity in the blue spectral range is observed. Selectively contacting the m-plane and plasma treatment of the top part of the nanowire appear as a viable solution for controlling the color of core/shell nanowire LEDs with an inhomogeneous indium composition. PMID:26508299

  13. Study on the O2 Plasma Treatment of Indium Tin Oxide for Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Chang Hyun; Lee, June Hee; Lim, Jong Hyeuk; Lim, Jong Tae; Yeom, Geun Young

    2006-04-01

    In this study, the effect of O2 inductively coupled plasma (ICP) conditions for the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface treatment on the organic light emitting diode (OLED) device performances were investigated. By the O2 plasma treatment of ITO glass, better OLED device performances such as a lower turn-on voltage, a higher luminescence, and a higher power efficiency could be obtained and the use of lower oxygen pressure and higher ICP power improved the device properties further. DC-biasing of the ITO glass substrate degraded the device properties. The use of lower oxygen pressure and higher ICP power increased the densities of O2+ and O* in the plasma, and the plasma-treated ITO surface showed a lower carbon, a higher O/(Sn+In), and a higher Sn4+/In for the condition of lower oxygen pressure and higher ICP power. The improved OLED device properties with the ITO treated at the higher ICP power and the lower pressure appear to be from the increased hole injection to the OLED materials by decreasing the resistance of ITO and by increasing the work function of the ITO.

  14. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are presented. Background: Significant benefits have been reported following application of transcranial, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to humans with acute stroke and mice with acute TBI. These are the first case reports documenting improved cognitive function in chronic, TBI patients treated with transcranial LED. Methods: Treatments were applied bilaterally and to midline sagittal areas using LED cluster heads [2.1″ diameter, 61 diodes (9 × 633 nm, 52 × 870 nm); 12–15 mW per diode; total power: 500 mW; 22.2 mW/cm2; 13.3 J/cm2 at scalp (estimated 0.4 J/cm2 to cortex)]. Results: Seven years after closed-head TBI from a motor vehicle accident, Patient 1 began transcranial LED treatments. Pre-LED, her ability for sustained attention (computer work) lasted 20 min. After eight weekly LED treatments, her sustained attention time increased to 3 h. The patient performs nightly home treatments (5 years); if she stops treating for more than 2 weeks, she regresses. Patient 2 had a history of closed-head trauma (sports/military, and recent fall), and magnetic resonance imaging showed frontoparietal atrophy. Pre-LED, she was on medical disability for 5 months. After 4 months of nightly LED treatments at home, medical disability discontinued; she returned to working full-time as an executive consultant with an international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing after 9 months of transcranial LED indicated significant improvement (+1, +2SD) in executive function (inhibition, inhibition accuracy) and memory, as well as reduction in post-traumatic stress disorder. If she stops treating for more than 1 week, she regresses. At the time of this report, both patients are continuing treatment. Conclusions: Transcranial

  15. Light-Emitting Diodes and Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, J. D.

    Semiconductors have become highly relevant to modern electronics, first with the transistor (Ge), then with Si for efficient electronic conduction.With the discovery of GaAs as an infrared light-emitter, efforts to develop other III-V semiconductors were targeted for colored light-emitting diodes, such as GaAs1 - x P x . It is now possible to produce light-emitting visible semiconducting materials, including a variety of III-V materials. One now has various light-emitters throughout the visible region of the spectrum, with automobile tail-lights and traffic lights being red, yellow, or green found in a variety of optical devices. Now there are many different optical devices, with materials optimized for their color, and for various other properties.In addition to developing colored semiconductors, it is clear that devices are needed with no color, for transparent optical fibers. Such ultra-transparent optical fibers have been developed over the years.

  16. Light-Emitting Diodes for Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2014-06-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  17. Light-Emitting Diodes: A Hidden Treasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2014-02-01

    LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are cheap, easy to purchase, and thus commonly used in physics instruction as indicators of electric current or as sources of light (Fig. 1). In our opinion LEDs represent a unique piece of equipment that can be used to collect experimental evidence, and construct and test new ideas in almost every unit of a general physics course (and in many advanced courses) either (I) as "black boxes" that allow students to study certain properties of a system of interest, (II) as physical systems that allow students to learn an astonishing amount of physics that they usually do not encounter in a regular introductory physics course, and (III) as non-traditional devices that allow students to construct concepts that are traditionally a part of a general physics course.

  18. A single blue nanorod light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y; Bai, J; Smith, R; Wang, T

    2016-05-20

    We report a light emitting diode (LED) consisting of a single InGaN/GaN nanorod fabricated by a cost-effective top-down approach from a standard LED wafer. The device demonstrates high performance with a reduced quantum confined Stark effect compared with a standard planar counterpart fabricated from the same wafer, confirmed by optical and electrical characterization. Current density as high as 5414 A cm(-2) is achieved without significant damage to the device due to the high internal quantum efficiency. The efficiency droop is mainly ascribed to Auger recombination, which was studied by an ABC model. Our work provides a potential method for fabricating compact light sources for advanced photonic integrated circuits without involving expensive or time-consuming fabrication facilities. PMID:27070200

  19. A single blue nanorod light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Bai, J.; Smith, R.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report a light emitting diode (LED) consisting of a single InGaN/GaN nanorod fabricated by a cost-effective top-down approach from a standard LED wafer. The device demonstrates high performance with a reduced quantum confined Stark effect compared with a standard planar counterpart fabricated from the same wafer, confirmed by optical and electrical characterization. Current density as high as 5414 A cm‑2 is achieved without significant damage to the device due to the high internal quantum efficiency. The efficiency droop is mainly ascribed to Auger recombination, which was studied by an ABC model. Our work provides a potential method for fabricating compact light sources for advanced photonic integrated circuits without involving expensive or time-consuming fabrication facilities.

  20. Proton Degradation of Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Rax, B. G.; Selva, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    The severe degradation of optocouplers in space has been shown to be mainly due to proton displacement damage in the light-emitting diodes that are used within the optocouplers. However, a variety of LED technologies can be used in optocouplers and their sensitivity to proton displacement damage varies by about two orders of magnitude. Optocouplers are very simple hybrid devices, and the type of LED can be readily changed by the manufacturers with little cost impact. many optocoupler manufacturers purchase LEDs from outside sources with little knowledge or control of the manufacturing process used for the LED, leading to the possibility of very dramatic differences in radiation response (JPL has observed such differences for one type of optocoupler that is used in a hybrid power converter).

  1. An entangled-light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Salter, C L; Stevenson, R M; Farrer, I; Nicoll, C A; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2010-06-01

    An optical quantum computer, powerful enough to solve problems so far intractable using conventional digital logic, requires a large number of entangled photons. At present, entangled-light sources are optically driven with lasers, which are impractical for quantum computing owing to the bulk and complexity of the optics required for large-scale applications. Parametric down-conversion is the most widely used source of entangled light, and has been used to implement non-destructive quantum logic gates. However, these sources are Poissonian and probabilistically emit zero or multiple entangled photon pairs in most cycles, fundamentally limiting the success probability of quantum computational operations. These complications can be overcome by using an electrically driven on-demand source of entangled photon pairs, but so far such a source has not been produced. Here we report the realization of an electrically driven source of entangled photon pairs, consisting of a quantum dot embedded in a semiconductor light-emitting diode (LED) structure. We show that the device emits entangled photon pairs under d.c. and a.c. injection, the latter achieving an entanglement fidelity of up to 0.82. Entangled light with such high fidelity is sufficient for application in quantum relays, in core components of quantum computing such as teleportation, and in entanglement swapping. The a.c. operation of the entangled-light-emitting diode (ELED) indicates its potential function as an on-demand source without the need for a complicated laser driving system; consequently, the ELED is at present the best source on which to base future scalable quantum information applications. PMID:20520709

  2. Light-Emitting Diodes: Phosphorescent Nanocluster Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 2/2016).

    PubMed

    Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S; Zhao, Yimu; Traverse, Christopher J; Staples, Richard J; Levine, Benjamin G; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-01-13

    On page 320, R. R. Lunt and co-workers demonstrate electroluminescence from earth-abundant phosphorescent metal halide nanoclusters. These inorganic emitters, which exhibit rich photophysics combined with a high phosphorescence quantum yield, are employed in red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes, providing a new platform of phosphorescent emitters for low-cost and high-performance light-emission applications. PMID:26749470

  3. Proton displacement damage in light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of proton displacement damage on light-emitting diodes and laser diodes are discussed, comparing the radiation sensitivity of current technology devices with older devices for which data exists in the literature.

  4. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  5. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications. PMID:27014918

  6. Thermally enhanced blue light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jin; Zhao, Yuji; Oh, Sang-Ho; Herrington, William F.; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate thermoelectric pumping in wide-bandgap GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to take advantage of high junction temperature rather than avoiding the problem of temperature-induced efficiency droop through external cooling. We experimentally demonstrate a thermally enhanced 450 nm GaN LED, in which nearly fourfold light output power is achieved at 615 K (compared to 295 K room temperature operation), with nearly no reduction in the wall-plug efficiency (i.e., electrical-optical energy conversion efficiency) at bias V <ℏω/q . The LED is shown to work in a mode similar to a thermodynamic heat engine operating with charged carriers pumped into the active region by a combination of electrical work and Peltier heat (phonons) drawn from the lattice. In this optimal operating regime at 615 K, the LED injection current (3.26 A/cm2) is of similar magnitude to the operating point of common high power GaN based LEDs (5-35 A/cm2). This result suggests the possibility of removing bulky heat sinks in current high power LED products thus realizing a significant cost reduction for solid-state lighting.

  7. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Patanè, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  8. Determining Planck's Constant Using a Light-emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievers, Dennis; Wilson, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes a method for making a simple, inexpensive apparatus which can be used to determine Planck's constant. Provides illustrations of a circuit diagram using one or more light-emitting diodes and a BASIC computer program for simplifying calculations. (RT)

  9. Plant Growth Under Light Emitting Diode Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennessen, Daniel John

    Plant growth under light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated to determine if LEDs would be useful to provide radiant energy for two plant processes, photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. Photosynthesis of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and Kudzu (Pueraria lobata (Willd) Ohwi.) was measured using photons from LEDs to answer the following: (1) Are leaves able to use red LED light for photosynthesis? and (2) Is the efficiency of photosynthesis in pulsed light equal to that of continuous light? In 175 Pa CO _2, or in response to changes in CO _2,<=af photosynthesis and ATP status were the same in LED as in white xenon arc light. In 35 Pa CO_2, photosynthesis was 10% lower in LED than in xenon arc light due to lowered stomatal conductance. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in pulsed light was equal to continuous light, even when pulses were twice as bright as sunlight. Xanthophyll pigments were not affected by these bright pulses. Photomorphogenesis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and transformed tobacco and tomato (expressing oat phytochrome-A) was assessed by growing plants under red LED lamps in an attempt to answer the following: (1) What is the developmental response of non-transformed and transformed tobacco to red LED light? and (2) Can tomato plants that grow tall and spindly in red LED light be made to grow short by increasing the amount of phytochrome-A? The short phenotype of transformed tobacco was not evident when plants were grown in LED light. Addition of photons of far-red or blue light to red light resulted in short transformed tobacco. Tomato plants grew three times as tall and lacked leaf development in LED versus white light, but transformed tomato remained short and produced fruit under LED light. I have determined that the LED photons are useful for photosynthesis and that the photon efficiency of photosynthesis is the same in pulsed as in continuous light. From responses of tobacco, I

  10. Encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visweswaran, Bhadri

    Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) are extremely attractive candidates for flexible display and lighting panels due to their high contrast ratio, light weight and flexible nature. However, the materials in an OLED get oxidized by extremely small quantities of atmospheric moisture and oxygen. To obtain a flexible OLED device, a flexible thin-film barrier encapsulation with low permeability for water is necessary. Water permeates through a thin-film barrier by 4 modes: microcracks, contaminant particles, along interfaces, and through the bulk of the material. We have developed a flexible barrier film made by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) that is devoid of any microcracks. In this work we have systematically reduced the permeation from the other three modes to come up with a barrier film design for an operating lifetime of over 10 years. To provide quantitative feedback during barrier material development, techniques for measuring low diffusion coefficient and solubility of water in a barrier material have been developed. The mechanism of water diffusion in the barrier has been identified. From the measurements, we have created a model for predicting the operating lifetime from accelerated tests when the lifetime is limited by bulk diffusion. To prevent the particle induced water permeation, we have encapsulated artificial particles and have studied their cross section. A three layer thin-film that can coat a particle at thicknesses smaller than the particle diameter is identified. It is demonstrated to protect a bottom emission OLED device that was contaminated with standard sized glass beads. The photoresist and the organic layers below the barrier film causes sideways permeation that can reduce the lifetime set by permeation through the bulk of the barrier. To prevent the sideways permeation, an impermeable inorganic grid made of the same barrier material is designed. The reduction in sideways permeation due to the impermeable inorganic grid

  11. Film Properties and Polycrystallization of Organic Dyes on ITOs with Surface Treatment for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwama, Yuki; Mori, Tatsuo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi

    ITO(Indium-Tin-Oxide) has been now widely used as the transparent anode for organic light-emitting devices(OLEDs). We used various methods of ITO surface treatment and examined the effects of them by measuring contact angle and calculating surface energy. We also prepared OLEDs with ITO treated by each method, and estimated their characteristics. The surface of ITO treated by UV-O3 or O2-plasma was more hydrophilic than that treated by only organic rinse or no treatment, and consequently the characteristic of the OLED was improved. We suppose these treatments affect the hole injection from ITO into organic layer, due to ionization potential or surface cleanness. We also investigated time degradation of NPD films on the ITO substrates. The films deposited with high deposition rate porycrystallized faster.

  12. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. PMID:27214091

  13. Reshaping Light-Emitting Diodes To Increase External Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert; Egalon, Claudio

    1995-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) reshaped, according to proposal, increasing amount of light emitted by decreasing fraction of light trapped via total internal reflection. Results in greater luminous output power for same electrical input power; greater external efficiency. Furthermore, light emitted by reshaped LEDs more nearly collimated (less diffuse). Concept potentially advantageous for conventional red-emitting LEDs. More advantageous for new "blue" LEDs, because luminous outputs and efficiencies of these devices very low. Another advantage, proposed conical shapes achieved relatively easily by chemical etching of semiconductor surfaces.

  14. Adjunctive dental therapy via tooth plaque reduction and gingivitis treatment by blue light-emitting diodes tooth brushing.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Titorenko, Vladimir A; Belikov, Andrey V; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of blue light-emitting toothbrushes (B-LETBs) (405 to 420 nm, power density 2  mW/cm(2)) for reduction of dental plaques and gingival inflammation has been evaluated. Microbiological study has shown the multifactor therapeutic action of the B-LETBs on oral pathological microflora: in addition to partial mechanical removal of bacteria, photodynamic action suppresses them up to 97.5%. In the pilot clinical studies, subjects with mild to moderate gingivitis have been randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group that used the B-LETBs and a control group that used standard toothbrushes. Indices of plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation have been evaluated. A significant improvement of all dental indices in comparison with the baseline (by 59%, 66%, and 82% for plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation, respectively) has been found. The treatment group has demonstrated up to 50% improvement relative to the control group. We have proposed the B-LETBs to serve for prevention of gingivitis or as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment of this disease due to their effectiveness and the absence of drug side effects and bacterial resistance. PMID:26720884

  15. Adjunctive dental therapy via tooth plaque reduction and gingivitis treatment by blue light-emitting diodes tooth brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Titorenko, Vladimir A.; Belikov, Andrey V.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of blue light-emitting toothbrushes (B-LETBs) (405 to 420 nm, power density 2 mW/cm2) for reduction of dental plaques and gingival inflammation has been evaluated. Microbiological study has shown the multifactor therapeutic action of the B-LETBs on oral pathological microflora: in addition to partial mechanical removal of bacteria, photodynamic action suppresses them up to 97.5%. In the pilot clinical studies, subjects with mild to moderate gingivitis have been randomly divided into two groups: a treatment group that used the B-LETBs and a control group that used standard toothbrushes. Indices of plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation have been evaluated. A significant improvement of all dental indices in comparison with the baseline (by 59%, 66%, and 82% for plaque, gingival bleeding, and inflammation, respectively) has been found. The treatment group has demonstrated up to 50% improvement relative to the control group. We have proposed the B-LETBs to serve for prevention of gingivitis or as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment of this disease due to their effectiveness and the absence of drug side effects and bacterial resistance.

  16. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current(AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For…

  17. High Brightness GaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ya-Ju; Lu, Tien-Chang; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Wang, Shing-Chung

    2007-06-01

    This paper reviews our recent progress of GaN-based high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Firstly, by adopting chemical wet etching patterned sapphire substrates in GaN-based LEDs, not only could increase the extraction quantum efficiency, but also improve the internal quantum efficiency. Secondly, we present a high light-extraction 465-nm GaN-based vertical light-emitting diode structure with double diffuse surfaces. The external quantum efficiency was demonstrated to be about 40%. The high performance LED was achieved mainly due to the strong guided-light scattering efficiency while employing double diffuse surfaces.

  18. Carbon nanotube-based organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Malti; Srivastava, Ritu; Lal, C.; Kamalasanan, M. N.; Tanwar, L. S.

    2009-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes; revolutionary and fascinating from the materials point of view and exceedingly sensational from a research point of view; are standing today at the threshold between inorganic electronics and organic electronics and posing a serious challenge to the big daddies of these two domains in electronics i.e., silicon and indium tin oxide (ITO). In the field of inorganic electronics, carbon nanotubes offer advantages such as high current carrying capacity, ballistic transport, absence of dangling bonds, etc. and on the other hand, in the field of organic electronics, carbon nanotubes offer advantages such as high conductivity, high carrier mobility, optical transparency (in visible and IR spectral ranges), flexibility, robustness, environmental resistance, etc. and hence, they are seriously being considered as contenders to silicon and ITO. This review traces the origin of carbon nanotubes in the field of organic electronics (with emphasis on organic light emitting diodes) and moves on to cover the latest advances in the field of carbon nanotube-based organic light emitting diodes. Topics that are covered within include applications of multi-wall nanotubes and single-wall nanotubes in organic light emitting diodes. Applications of carbon nanotubes as hole-transport layers, as electron-transport layers, as transparent electrodes, etc. in organic light emitting diodes are discussed and the daunting challenges facing this progressive field today are brought into the limelight.

  19. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  20. A multi-source portable light emitting diode spectrofluorometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable luminescence spectrofluorometer weighing only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed and evaluated. Excitation using a sequence of seven individual broad-band LED emission sources enabled the generation of excitation-emission spectra usi...

  1. Efficient Visible Quasi-2D Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jinwoo; Cho, Himchan; Wolf, Christoph; Jang, Mi; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Yang, Hoichang; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Efficient quasi-2D-structure perovskite light-emitting diodes (4.90 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated by mixing a 3D-structured perovskite material (methyl ammonium lead bromide) and a 2D-structured perovskite material (phenylethyl ammonium lead bromide), which can be ascribed to better film uniformity, enhanced exciton confinement, and reduced trap density. PMID:27334788

  2. The Light-Emitting Diode as a Light Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William H.; Hack, W. Nathan; Tran, Kiet; Vira, Zeeshan; Pickett, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A light-emitting diode (LED) and operational amplifier can be used as an affordable method to provide a digital output indicating detection of an intense light source such as a laser beam or high-output LED. When coupled with a microcontroller, the combination can be used as a multiple photogate and timer for under $50. A similar circuit is used…

  3. Singlet oxygen and organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.J.; Sinclair, M.B.; Valencia, V.S.; Kepler, R.G.; Clough, R.L.; Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1995-07-01

    The preparation of light emitting diodes employing a new class of materials, 5,10-dihetera 5,10-dihydro-indeno[3,2b]indenes, as hole transport agents is described. These materials have been found to be more resistant to degradation by singlet oxygen than a poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivative.

  4. Low-temperature treatment of semiconducting interlayers for high-efficiency light-emitting diodes based on a green-emitting polyfluorene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzerini, G. M.; Di Stasio, F.; Fléchon, C.; Caruana, D. J.; Cacialli, F.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the scope for low-temperature treatment of exciton/electron blocking interlayers in light-emitting diodes based on poly(9,9'-dioctylfiuorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT). We focus on poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-alt-N-(4-butylphenyl)-diphenylamine) (TFB) interlayers processed at temperatures up to 50 °C, i.e., far below the glass transition temperature of TFB (˜156 °C). Continuous-wave and time-resolved photoluminescence studies confirm the formation of both excitons and exciplex species, as a result of the F8BT/TFB intermixing. Interestingly, however, we can still increase the electroluminescence external quantum efficiency from 0.05% to 0.5% and 1% for progressively thicker TFB films. We propose that a degree of intermixing may become acceptable as a trade-off to achieve low-temperature processability.

  5. Improvement of device performance of polymer organic light-emitting diodes on smooth transparent sheet with graphene films synthesized by plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okigawa, Yuki; Mizutani, Wataru; Suzuki, Kenkichi; Ishihara, Masatou; Yamada, Takatoshi; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2015-09-01

    Because graphene films have one-atom thickness, the morphology of the transparent sheets could have a greater effect on the performance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices with graphene films than on that with indium tin oxide (ITO). In this study, we have evaluated the polymer OLED devices with graphene films synthesized by plasma treatment on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) sheets having high flatness. The results imply that the surface roughness of the transparent sheets predominantly affects the luminescence of polymer OLED devices with graphene films. The suppression of leakage current and a luminescence higher than 8000 cd/m2 at 15 V were attained for the devices on the transparent sheet with higher flatness in spite of the presence of large sharp spikes.

  6. Naturally formed graded junction for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yan; Yang, Yang

    2003-09-01

    In this letter, we report naturally-formed graded junctions (NFGJ) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These junctions are fabricated using single thermal evaporation boat loaded with uniformly mixed charge transport and light-emitting materials. Upon heating, materials sublimate sequentially according to their vaporizing temperatures forming the graded junction. Two kinds of graded structures, sharp and shallow graded junctions, can be formed based on the thermal properties of the selected materials. The NFGJ OLEDs have shown excellent performance in both brightness and lifetime compared with heterojunction devices.

  7. Design of vertically-stacked polychromatic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Hui, K N; Wang, X H; Li, Z L; Lai, P T; Choi, H W

    2009-06-01

    A new design for a polychromatic light-emitting diode (LED) is proposed and demonstrated. LED chips of the primary colors are physically stacked on top of each other. Light emitted from each layer of the stack passes through each other, and thus is mixed naturally without additional optics. As a color-tunable device, a wide range of colors can be generated, making it suitable for display purposes. As a phosphor-free white light LED, luminous efficacy of 30 lm/watt was achieved. PMID:19506637

  8. Vegetable surface sterilization system using UVA light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Mutsumi; Lian, Xin; Shimohata, Takaaki; Uebanso, Takashi; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Harada, Yumi; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Takahashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Surface sterilization of fresh produce has been needed in the food manufacturing/processing industry. Here we report a UVA-LED (Ultra Violet A-Light Emitting Diode) system for surface sterilization that is safe, efficacious, low cost, and apparently harmless to fresh produce. To test the system, Escherichia coli strain DH5α was spot-inoculated onto vegetable tissues, and treated under UVA-LED. Tissues were homogenized and bacteria quantified by colony-forming assay. Possible effects of UVA-LED on vegetable quality were evaluated by HPLC. Tissue weight changes were checked after treatment at 4℃, 15℃, and 30℃. Bacterial inactivation by UVA-LED radiation was observed after a 10 min treatment and increased with increasing time of irradiation. The log survival ratio reached -3.23 after a 90 min treatment. Bacterial cells surviving treatment grew slowly compared to non-irradiated control cells. Cabbage tissue lost weight over time after treatment, and weight loss increased with increasing incubation temperature, but there was no difference between losses by UVA-LED treated and control tissues at any temperature tested. In addition, no differences of Vitamin C content in cabbage tissue were detected by HPLC after UVA-LED treatment. These results suggest that UVA-LED treatment has great potential for vegetable surface sterilization in the food manufacturing/processing industry. PMID:25264046

  9. Characterization of an Optical Device with an Array of Blue Light Emitting Diodes LEDS for Treatment of Neonatal Jaundice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebbe, Priscilla Fróes; Villaverde, Antonio G. J. Balbin; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Barbosa, Ana Maria; Veissid, Nelson

    2008-04-01

    Phototherapy is a treatment that consists in irradiating a patient with light of high intensity, which promotes beneficial photochemical transformations in the irradiated area. The phototherapy for neonates is applied to break down the bilirubin, an organic pigment that is a sub product of the erythrocytes degradation, and to increase its excretion by the organism. Neonates should be irradiated with light of wavelength that the bilirubin can absorb, and with spectral irradiances between 4 and 16 μW/cm2/nm. The efficiency of the treatment depends on the irradiance and the area of the body that is irradiated. A convenient source of light for treatment of neonatal jaundice is the blue Light Emitter Diode (LED), emitting in the range of 400 to 500 nm, with power of the order of 10-150 mW. Some of the advantages for using LEDS are: low cost, operating long lifetime (over 100,000 hours), narrow emission linewith, low voltage power supply requirement and low heating. The aim of this work was to build and characterize a device for phototherapy treatment of neonatal jaundice. This consists of a blanket with 88 blue LEDs (emission peak at 472 nm), arranged in an 8×11 matrix, all connected in parallel and powered by a 5V-2A power supply. The device was characterized by using a spectroradiometer USB2000 (Ocean Optics Inc, USA), with a sensitivity range of 339-1019 nm. For determination of light spatial uniformity was used a calibrated photovoltaic sensor for measuring light intensity and mapping of the light intensity spatial distribution. Results indicate that our device shows a uniform spatial distribution for distances from the blanket larger than 10 cm, with a maximum of irradiance at such a distance. This device presenting a large and uniform area of irradiation, efficient wavelength emission and high irradiance seems to be promising for neonates' phototherapy treatment.

  10. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  11. Vacuum Nanohole Array Embedded Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sohee; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Song, Young Seok; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jang-Joo; Youn, Jae Ryoun

    2015-01-01

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes that utilize phosphorescent materials has an internal efficiency of 100% but is limited by an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 30%. In this study, extremely high-efficiency organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with an EQE of greater than 50% and low roll-off were produced by inserting a vacuum nanohole array (VNHA) into phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). The resultant extraction enhancement was quantified in terms of EQE by comparing experimentally measured results with those produced from optical modeling analysis, which assumes the near-perfect electric characteristics of the device. A comparison of the experimental data and optical modeling results indicated that the VNHA extracts the entire waveguide loss into the air. The EQE obtained in this study is the highest value obtained to date for bottom-emitting OLEDs. PMID:25732061

  12. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  13. High extraction efficiency ultraviolet light-emitting diode

    DOEpatents

    Wierer, Jonathan; Montano, Ines; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with tailored AlGaN quantum wells can achieve high extraction efficiency. For efficient bottom light extraction, parallel polarized light is preferred, because it propagates predominately perpendicular to the QW plane and into the typical and more efficient light escape cones. This is favored over perpendicular polarized light that propagates along the QW plane which requires multiple, lossy bounces before extraction. The thickness and carrier density of AlGaN QW layers have a strong influence on the valence subband structure, and the resulting optical polarization and light extraction of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes. At Al>0.3, thinner QW layers (<2.5 nm are preferred) result in light preferentially polarized parallel to the QW plane. Also, active regions consisting of six or more QWs, to reduce carrier density, and with thin barriers, to efficiently inject carriers in all the QWs, are preferred.

  14. Silicon light-emitting diode antifuse: properties and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMinh, Phuong; Holleman, Jisk

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews our research on the silicon light-emitting diode antifuse, a tiny source featuring a full white-light spectrum. Optical and electrical properties of the device are discussed together with the modelling of the spectral emission, explaining the emitting mechanism of the device. An estimation of the antifuse's internal power conversion efficiency reveals a reasonable value of at least 10-5. Photochemical effect on two types of photoresists were carried out showing a clear impact of the emitted photons in the near ultraviolet range. The two integrated device prototypes, namely the opto-isolator which communicates optically and the microscale opto-fluidic device which senses the difference in the refractive indices of liquids, indicate that the light-emitting diode antifuse has the potential for sensor and actuator applications.

  15. AC Impedance Studies of Polymer Light-emitting Electrochemical Cells and Light-emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfang; Gao, Jun; Heeger, Alan J.; Yu, Gang; Cao, Yong

    1998-03-01

    The alternating current (ac) impedance of polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is studied and compared with that of polymer light-emitting diodes(LEDs) in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 5 M Hz. The device capacitance, resistance and interface characteristics are analyzed using the frequency dependence of the impedance and plots of the imaginary component of the impedance (Z") vs. the real part (Z'). At low bias voltages, polymer LEDs behave as pure capacitors whereas the polymer blend in the LEC exhibits an ionic conductivity contribution to the impedance. With dc bias higher than the energy gap of the semiconducting polymer (eV > Eg), the Z" vs. Z' plot of the LEC is a flattened semicircle, while that of LED is a semicircle with a small tail at low frequencies. In the LED, the capacitance is independent of voltages, the film resistance decreases as the bias voltage is increased in forward bias due to charge injection at higher voltages. In the LEC, the capacitance increases at voltages sufficient to induce electrochemical redox and doping near the electrodes. From this increase, the thickness of the i-layer of the p-i-n junction is estimated to approximately 0.8 of the film thickness (at the bias voltage of 3 V). Thus, in the LEC under operating conditions, the crossover region from p-type occupies most of the film thickness.

  16. Versatile multispectral microscope based on light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Jayaweera, Hiran; Ålebring, Jens; Svanberg, Sune

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of a novel multispectral microscope, based on light-emitting diodes, capable of acquiring megapixel images in thirteen spectral bands from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The system captures images and spectra in transmittance, reflectance, and scattering modes. We present as examples of applications ground truth measurements for remote sensing and parasitology diagnostics. The system is a general purpose scientific instrument that could be used to develop dedicated simplified instruments with optimal bands and mode selection.

  17. Surface-plasmon-enhanced microcavity organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Chen, Shufen; Zhao, Dewei

    2014-12-15

    Efficiency enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) can be obtained by the combination of microcavity effect and Au nanoparticles based surface plasmons. Au nanoparticles are thermally deposited on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-coated glass substrate, leading to realization of microcavity effect and localized surface plasmon effect. Our results show the current efficiency of OLEDs with DBR/Au nanoparticles as anode is increased by 72% compared to that with ITO as anode. PMID:25607492

  18. Do infrared light-emitting diodes have a stimulatory effect on wound healing? From an in-vitro trial to patient treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinck, Elke; Cagnie, B.; Cambier, D.; Cornelissen, M.

    2002-10-01

    Variable effects of different forms of light therapy on wound healing have been reported. This preliminary study covers the efficacy of infrared light emitting diodes (LED) in this domain. Cultured embryonic chicken fibroblasts were treated in a controlled, radomised manner. LED irradiation was performed three consecutive days with a wavelength of 950 nm and a power output of 160 mW, at 0,6 cm distance from the fibroblasts. Each treatment lasted 6 minutes, resulting in a surface energy denstiy of 3,2 J/cm2. The results indicated that LED treatment does not influence fibroblast proliferation at the applied energy density and irradiation frequency (p=0,474). Meanwhile the effects of LED on wound healing in vivo were studied by treating a surgical incision (6 cm) on the lateral side of the right foot in a male patient. The treatment started after 13 days, when initial stitches were being removed. The same parameters as in the in vitro study were used but the treatment was performed five times. The healing could only be evaluated clinically, the irradiated area (2,6 cm) showed a more appropriate contraction, less discoloration and a less hypertrophic scar than the control area (3,4 cm). The used parameters failed to demonstrate any biological effect of LED irradiation in vitro, although the case study on the other hand illustrated a beneficial effect.

  19. Operation of AC Adapters Visualized Using Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regester, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A bridge rectifier is a diamond-shaped configuration of diodes that serves to convert alternating current (AC) into direct current (DC). In our world of AC outlets and DC electronics, they are ubiquitous. Of course, most bridge rectifiers are built with regular diodes, not the light-emitting variety, because LEDs have a number of disadvantages. For educational purposes, however, an LED-based rectifier is ideal because it allows students to literally see the rectifier operating. Here I'll discuss the practical aspects of building a full AC adapter incorporating an LED-based rectifier and ideas on how to use it in class.

  20. Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.

    1994-08-02

    Acetylene-containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA)-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

  1. Poly (p-phenyleneneacetylene) light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Shinar, Joseph; Swanson, Leland S.; Lu, Feng; Ding, Yiwei; Barton, Thomas J.; Vardeny, Zeev V.

    1994-10-04

    Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

  2. Poly (p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.; Barton, T.J.; Vardeny, Z.V.

    1994-10-04

    Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

  3. Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Shinar, Joseph; Swanson, Leland S.; Lu, Feng; Ding, Yiwei

    1994-08-02

    Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as A1 or A1/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

  4. Study of ethanolamine surface treatment on the metal-oxide electron transport layer in inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ilwan; Kim, Jiwan; Park, Chang Jun; Ippen, Christian; Greco, Tonino; Oh, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongno; Kim, Won Keun; Wedel, Armin; Han, Chul Jong; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-11-01

    The present work shows the effect of ethanolamine surface treatment on inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with inorganic metal oxide layers. In the inverted structure of ITO/ZnO/InP QDs/CBP/MoO3/Al, a sol-gel derived ZnO film was used as an electron transport layer (ETL) and MoO3 was used as a hole injection layer (HIL). First, ethanolamine was treated as a surface modifier on top of the ZnO electron transport layer. The optical performance of the QD-LED device was improved by the ethanolamine surface treatment. Second, low temperature annealing (<200°C) was performed on the ZnO sol-gel electron transport layer, followed by an investigation of the effect of the ZnO annealing temperature. The efficiency of the inverted QD-LEDs was significantly enhanced (more than 3-fold) by optimization of the ZnO annealing temperature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Broadband Light-Emitting Diodes with One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Jung-Sheng; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Chung, Ken-Lin; Lin, Yen-Sheng; Sun, Nai-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a broadband gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diode with a one-dimensional photonic crystal layer is investigated. The broadband light-emitting diode using the proposed backside reflector has high reflectance (>95%) over a 270-nm bandwidth in visible light at an arbitrary incidence angle. A broadband light-emitting diode of high output power due to the high reflectivity is achieved. Also reported are the results for light-emitting diodes by the transistor outline can (TO-can) package. The proposed light-emitting diodes possess broadband high reflected spectra, high output power for light extraction, and a good view angle.

  6. All-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Höfle, Stefan; Czolk, Jens; Mertens, Adrian; Colsmann, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we report on indium tin oxide-free, all-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with inverted device architecture. Conductive polymer layers are employed as both transparent cathodes and transparent anodes, with the top anodes having enhanced conductivities from a supporting stochastic silver nanowire mesh. Both electrodes exhibit transmittances of 80-90% in the visible spectral regime. Upon the incorporation of either yellow- or blue-light emitting fluorescent polymers, the OLEDs show low onset voltages, demonstrating excellent charge carrier injection from the polymer electrodes into the emission layers. Overall luminances and current efficiencies equal the performance of opaque reference OLEDs with indium tin oxide and aluminium electrodes, proving excellent charge carrier-to-light conversion within the device.

  7. All-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Höfle, Stefan; Czolk, Jens; Mertens, Adrian; Colsmann, Alexander

    2015-12-21

    In this work, we report on indium tin oxide-free, all-solution processed transparent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with inverted device architecture. Conductive polymer layers are employed as both transparent cathodes and transparent anodes, with the top anodes having enhanced conductivities from a supporting stochastic silver nanowire mesh. Both electrodes exhibit transmittances of 80-90% in the visible spectral regime. Upon the incorporation of either yellow- or blue-light emitting fluorescent polymers, the OLEDs show low onset voltages, demonstrating excellent charge carrier injection from the polymer electrodes into the emission layers. Overall luminances and current efficiencies equal the performance of opaque reference OLEDs with indium tin oxide and aluminium electrodes, proving excellent charge carrier-to-light conversion within the device. PMID:26566172

  8. Bright light-emitting diodes based on organometal halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Moghaddam, Reza Saberi; Lai, May Ling; Docampo, Pablo; Higler, Ruben; Deschler, Felix; Price, Michael; Sadhanala, Aditya; Pazos, Luis M.; Credgington, Dan; Hanusch, Fabian; Bein, Thomas; Snaith, Henry J.; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-09-01

    Solid-state light-emitting devices based on direct-bandgap semiconductors have, over the past two decades, been utilized as energy-efficient sources of lighting. However, fabrication of these devices typically relies on expensive high-temperature and high-vacuum processes, rendering them uneconomical for use in large-area displays. Here, we report high-brightness light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed organometal halide perovskites. We demonstrate electroluminescence in the near-infrared, green and red by tuning the halide compositions in the perovskite. In our infrared device, a thin 15 nm layer of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite emitter is sandwiched between larger-bandgap titanium dioxide (TiO2) and poly(9,9‧-dioctylfluorene) (F8) layers, effectively confining electrons and holes in the perovskite layer for radiative recombination. We report an infrared radiance of 13.2 W sr-1 m-2 at a current density of 363 mA cm-2, with highest external and internal quantum efficiencies of 0.76% and 3.4%, respectively. In our green light-emitting device with an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbBr3/F8/Ca/Ag structure, we achieved a luminance of 364 cd m-2 at a current density of 123 mA cm-2, giving external and internal quantum efficiencies of 0.1% and 0.4%, respectively. We show, using photoluminescence studies, that radiative bimolecular recombination is dominant at higher excitation densities. Hence, the quantum efficiencies of the perovskite light-emitting diodes increase at higher current densities. This demonstration of effective perovskite electroluminescence offers scope for developing this unique class of materials into efficient and colour-tunable light emitters for low-cost display, lighting and optical communication applications.

  9. Enhancing the electroluminescence efficiency of Si NC/SiO2 superlattice-based light-emitting diodes through hydrogen ion beam treatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Hui-Ju; Wu, Hsuan-Ta; Chen, Shao-Ping; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2016-03-24

    This paper presents a novel method for enhancing the electroluminescence (EL) efficiency of ten-period silicon-rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 superlattice-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). A hydrogen ion beam (HIB) was used to irradiate each SRO layer of the superlattices to increase the interfacial roughness on the nanoscale and the density of the Si nanocrystals (Si NCs). Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling was the major mechanism for injecting the carriers into the Si NCs. The barrier height of the F-N tunneling was lowered by forming a nano-roughened interface and the nonradiative Pb centers were passivated through the HIB treatment. Additionally, the reflectance of the LEDs was lowered because of the nano-roughened interface. These factors considerably increased the slope efficiency of EL and the maximum output power of the LEDs. The lighting efficiency increased by an order of magnitude, and the turn-on voltage decreased considerably. This study established an efficient approach for obtaining bright Si NC/SiO2 superlattice-based LEDs. PMID:26965185

  10. Enhancing the electroluminescence efficiency of Si NC/SiO2 superlattice-based light-emitting diodes through hydrogen ion beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Hui-Ju; Wu, Hsuan-Ta; Chen, Shao-Ping; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method for enhancing the electroluminescence (EL) efficiency of ten-period silicon-rich oxide (SRO)/SiO2 superlattice-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). A hydrogen ion beam (HIB) was used to irradiate each SRO layer of the superlattices to increase the interfacial roughness on the nanoscale and the density of the Si nanocrystals (Si NCs). Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling was the major mechanism for injecting the carriers into the Si NCs. The barrier height of the F-N tunneling was lowered by forming a nano-roughened interface and the nonradiative Pb centers were passivated through the HIB treatment. Additionally, the reflectance of the LEDs was lowered because of the nano-roughened interface. These factors considerably increased the slope efficiency of EL and the maximum output power of the LEDs. The lighting efficiency increased by an order of magnitude, and the turn-on voltage decreased considerably. This study established an efficient approach for obtaining bright Si NC/SiO2 superlattice-based LEDs.

  11. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  12. Medical applications of space light-emitting diode technology-space station and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Donohoe, Deborah L.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W.; Weyenberg, George T.; Larson, David L.; Meyer, Glenn A.; Caviness, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  13. Multilayer light emitting diodes using a PPV based copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. P.; Chen, L. C.; Wang, X.; Huang, Z.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the electrical and optical properties of poly((2,5-(dimethoxy) p-phenylene vinylene)- p-phenylene vinylene) (PDMeOPV/PPV) copolymer used as an emitting layer in light emitting diodes. With p-phenylene vinylene (PPV) used as a hole transport layer and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) as an electron transport layer, the emission intensity of the devices has substantially increased without alteration of the transport property. The different conduction mechanisms in the diodes were examined and discussed in terms of the energy band diagrams of the polymer layers. A balance of the injected charge carriers confined in the copolymer could explain the enhancement of the performance of the multilayer diodes.

  14. Topical and Intradermal Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with Methylene Blue and Light-Emitting Diode in the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Sbeghen, Mônica Raquel; Voltarelli, Evandra Maria; Campois, Tácito Graminha; Kimura, Elza; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Silveira, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The topical and intradermal photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect of methylene blue (MB) using light-emitting diode (LED) as light source (MB/LED-PDT) in the treatment of lesions of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) caused by Leishmania braziliensis in hamsters were investigated. Methods: Hamsters were infected in the footpad with 4×107 promastigotes of L. braziliensis and divided in 4 groups: Control group was not treated, AmB group was treated with amphotericin B, MB-Id group received intradermal MB at the edge of the lesion and MB-Tp group received MB topic. After treatment with MB, the animals were illuminated using red LEDs at the 655 nm wavelength for 1 hour. The MB/LED-PDT was carried out three times a week for 12 weeks. Results: Animals of MB-Tp group presented lesion healing with significant diminution in extent of the lesion, and reduced parasite burden compared to control group; however, no significant difference was seen compared to the AmB group. MB-Tp group also showed reconstitution of the epithelium, the formation of collagen fibers, organization in the epidermis, a little disorganization and inflammation in the dermis. MB-Id was ineffective in all parameters evaluated, and it was comparable to the control group results. Conclusion: These data show that PDT with the use of MB-Tp and LED may be an alternative for the treatment of ACL. However, additional studies are being conducted to assess the potential of MB/LED-PDT, alone or in combination with conventional therapy, for the treatment of ACL. PMID:26464777

  15. Numerical model for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutiš, E.; Bussac, M. N.; Masenelli, B.; Carrard, M.; Zuppiroli, L.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive numerical model recently developed for the multilayer organic light-emitting diode is described and applied to a set of real devices. The model contains a detailed description of electrical contacts including dipolar layer formation, thermionic and tunneling injection, space charge effects, field dependent mobilities and recombination processes. The model is applied to simulate several single layer devices and the family of bilayer devices made in our group. It provides insight into the energy level shifts, internal electric fields and charge distribution (and consequently recombination) throughout the device. Finally, the analysis is extended to the optimization of bilayer device.

  16. Advances and prospects in nitrides based light-emitting-diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinmin, Li; Zhe, Liu; Zhiqiang, Liu; Jianchang, Yan; Tongbo, Wei; Xiaoyan, Yi; Junxi, Wang

    2016-06-01

    Due to their low power consumption, long lifetime and high efficiency, nitrides based white light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) have long been considered to be a promising technology for next generation illumination. In this work, we provide a brief review of the development of GaN based LEDs. Some pioneering and significant experiment results of our group and the overview of the recent progress in this field are presented. We hope it can provide some meaningful information for the development of high efficiency GaN based LEDs and solid-state-lighting. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA03A101).

  17. Performance and trends of high power light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierhuizen, Serge; Krames, Michael; Harbers, Gerard; Weijers, Gon

    2007-09-01

    We will discuss the performance, progress and trend of High Power Light Emitting Diodes (HP-LEDs), suitable for high luminance applications like micro-display projection, car headlamps, spot lamps, theatre lamps, etc. Key drivers for the high luminance applications are LED parameters such as internal quantum efficiency, extraction efficiency, drive current, operating temperature and optical coupling efficiency, which are important for most applications as they also enable higher lumen/$ ratios. Historical progress, prospects for improving these parameters and potential optical luminance enhancement methods to meet the demands for the various illumination applications are presented.

  18. Absorbance Based Light Emitting Diode Optical Sensors and Sensing Devices

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Martina; Diamond, Dermot

    2008-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for in situ monitoring of health, environment and security has created a need for reliable, miniaturised sensing devices. To achieve this, appropriate analytical devices are required that possess operating characteristics of reliability, low power consumption, low cost, autonomous operation capability and compatibility with wireless communications systems. The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources is one strategy, which has been successfully applied in chemical sensing. This paper summarises the development and advancement of LED based chemical sensors and sensing devices in terms of their configuration and application, with the focus on transmittance and reflectance absorptiometric measurements.

  19. Light outcoupling enhanced flexible organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qing-Dong; Xu, Lu-Hai; Zhang, Wen-Yue; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Chen, Jing-De; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-03-21

    Flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are emerging as a leading technology for rollable and foldable display applications. For the development of high-performance flexible OLEDs on plastic substrate, we report a transparent nanocomposite electrode with superior mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, which is realized by integrating the nanoimprinted quasi-random photonic structures into the ultrathin metal/dielectric stack to collectively optimize the electrical conduction and light outcoupling capabilities. The resulting flexible OLEDs with green emission yield the enhanced device efficiency, reaching the maximum external quantum efficiency of 43.7% and luminous efficiency of 154.9 cd/A, respectively. PMID:27136885

  20. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  1. Diverse Optimal Molecular Libraries for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Rupakheti, Chetan; Al-Saadon, Rachael; Zhang, Yuqi; Virshup, Aaron M; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao; Beratan, David N

    2016-04-12

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have wide-ranging applications, from lighting to device displays. However, the repertoire of organic molecules with efficient blue emission is limited. To address this limitation, we have developed a strategy to design property-optimized, diversity-oriented libraries of structures with favorable fluorescence properties. This approach identifies novel diverse candidate organic molecules for blue emission with strong oscillator strengths and low singlet-triplet energy gaps that favor thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emission. PMID:26950518

  2. New materials for organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.J.; Pollagi, T.P.; Sinclair, M.B.; Scurlock, R.D.; Ogilby, P.R.

    1995-12-01

    We have investigated the performance of a class of heterocycles, 5, 10-dihetera-5,10-dihydroindeno[3,2b]indenes, as hole transport agents in simple double heterostructure organic light-emitting diodes with tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq). The best of these materials, 5,10-dihydroindolo[3,2b]indole, yields devices with luminance and lifetimes comparable to those obtained using N,N{prime}-di-(3-methylphenyl)-N,N{prime}diphenyl-4,4{prime}-diaminobiphenyl (TPD) as a hole transporting material.

  3. White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using Blue-Light-Emitting Zn(HPB)2 Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Eun; Kim, Won-Sam; Lee, Burm-Jong; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2007-04-01

    A novel blue light emitter, zinc(II) [2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole] [Zn(HPB)2], has been synthesized and evaluated in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Hereby, an OLED with a white light emission and a high color stability using Zn(HPB)2 and a layer of tris(8-quinolinolato) aluminum (Alq3) doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) (Alq3:DCJTB) as emitters has been demonstrated. The structure of this OLED is indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/N,N'-bis-(1-naphthl)-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB; 40 nm)/Zn(HPB)2 (40 nm)/Alq3:DCJTB (40 nm)/LiF/Al. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the white emission are (0.32, 0.33) at an applied voltage of 14 V. The photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) spectra of Zn(HPB)2 showed emission peaks at a wavelength of 455 nm.

  4. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hua; Zheng, Yina; Liu, Nanliu; Ai, Na; Wang, Qing; Wu, Sha; Zhou, Junhong; Hu, Diangang; Yu, Shufu; Han, Shaohu; Xu, Wei; Luo, Chan; Meng, Yanhong; Jiang, Zhixiong; Chen, Yawen; Li, Dongyun; Huang, Fei; Wang, Jian; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2013-06-01

    Adopting the emerging technology of printed electronics in manufacturing novel ultrathin flat panel displays attracts both academic and industrial interests because of the challenge in the device physics and the potential of reducing production costs. Here we produce all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode displays by solution-depositing the cathode and utilizing a multifunctional buffer layer between the cathode and the organic layers. The use of ink-jetted conducting nanoparticles as the cathode yields high-resolution cathode patterns without any mechanical stress on the organic layers. The buffer layer, which offers the functions of solvent-proof electron injection and proper affinity, is fabricated by mixing the water/alcohol-soluble polymer and a curable epoxy adhesive. Our 1.5-inch polymer light-emitting diode displays are fabricated without any dead pixels or dead lines. The all-solution process eliminates the need for high vacuum for thermal evaporation of the cathode, which paves the way to industrial roll-to-roll manufacturing of flat panel displays.

  5. All-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode displays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua; Zheng, Yina; Liu, Nanliu; Ai, Na; Wang, Qing; Wu, Sha; Zhou, Junhong; Hu, Diangang; Yu, Shufu; Han, Shaohu; Xu, Wei; Luo, Chan; Meng, Yanhong; Jiang, Zhixiong; Chen, Yawen; Li, Dongyun; Huang, Fei; Wang, Jian; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Adopting the emerging technology of printed electronics in manufacturing novel ultrathin flat panel displays attracts both academic and industrial interests because of the challenge in the device physics and the potential of reducing production costs. Here we produce all-solution processed polymer light-emitting diode displays by solution-depositing the cathode and utilizing a multifunctional buffer layer between the cathode and the organic layers. The use of ink-jetted conducting nanoparticles as the cathode yields high-resolution cathode patterns without any mechanical stress on the organic layers. The buffer layer, which offers the functions of solvent-proof electron injection and proper affinity, is fabricated by mixing the water/alcohol-soluble polymer and a curable epoxy adhesive. Our 1.5-inch polymer light-emitting diode displays are fabricated without any dead pixels or dead lines. The all-solution process eliminates the need for high vacuum for thermal evaporation of the cathode, which paves the way to industrial roll-to-roll manufacturing of flat panel displays. PMID:23736123

  6. A novel yellow phosphor for white light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Pan-Lai; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Guo, Qing-Lin; Li, Xu

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that a novel yellow phosphor, LiSrBO3:Eu2+, was synthesized by the solid-state reaction. The excitation and emission spectra indicate that this phosphor can be effectively excited by ultraviolet (360 and 400 nm) and blue (425 and 460 nm) light, and exhibits a satisfactory yellow performance (565 nm). The role of concentration of Eu2+ on the emission intensity in LiSrBO3 is studied, and it is found that the critical concentration is 3 mol%, and the concentration self-quenching mechanism is the dipole-dipole interaction according to the Dexter theory. White light emitting diodes were generated by using an InGaN chip (460 nm or 400 nm) with LiSrBO3:Eu2+ phosphor, the CIE chromaticity is (x = 0.341, y = 0.321) and (x = 0.324, y = 0.318), respectively. Therefore, LiSrBO3:Eu2+ is a promising yellow phosphor for white light emitting diodes.

  7. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W.; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin®. Photofrin® is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin® is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin® has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin®. First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was measured in these cell lines by tumor DNA synthesis

  8. Performance of light-emitting-diode based on quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2013-05-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential in applications such as color-saturated displays and white light with high color-rendering index. However, cadmium-based QD-LEDs are strictly regulated in industrial applications because of the high toxicity of cadmium. As an alternative, InP-based cadmium-free QDs are recommended owing to their wide emission range that is comparable to that of CdSe, and their environmentally friendly properties when applied to QD-LEDs and white QD-LEDs. This feature article provides an overview of QDs' merits in display and light-emitting applications as well as a discussion of their color tunability, photo-stability, and high luminescence efficiency. We will include optical down-conversion devices using various QDs, electroluminescent devices based on organic and inorganic charge-transporting layers, and printing methods using cadmium based and cadmium free QDs.

  9. Semiconductor Nanocrystals-Based White Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Quanqin; Hu, Michael Z.; Duty, Chad E

    2010-01-01

    In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid state lighting, such as white light emitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement could cut the ever-increasing energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in semiconductor nanocrystals-based WLEDs, compare different approaches for generating white light, and discuss the benefits and challenges of the solid state lighting technology.

  10. Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xuefeng; Qiu, Teng; Zhang, Wenjun; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed.

  11. Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuefeng; Qiu, Teng; Zhang, Wenjun; Chu, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed. PMID:21711711

  12. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  13. Exciton dynamics in organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangsik; Won, Taeyoung

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical simulation for the optoelectronic material and device characterization in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Our model includes a Gaussian density of states to account for the energetic disorder in the organic semiconductors and the Fermi-Dirac statistics to account for the charge-hopping process between uncorrelated sites. The motivation for this work is the extraction of the emission profile and the source spectrum of a given OLED structure. The physical model covers all the key physical processes in OLEDs: namely, charge injection, transport and recombination, exciton diffusion, transfer, and decay. The exciton model includes generation, diffusion, energy transfer, and annihilation. We assume that the light emission originates from an oscillation and is thus embodied as excitons and is embedded in a stack of multilayers. The outcoupled emission spectrum is numerically calculated as a function of viewing angle, polarization, and dipole orientation. We also present simulated current-voltage and transient results.

  14. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-12-28

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  15. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  16. Light-emitting diodes enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes [LEDs] are of particular interest recently as their performance is approaching fluorescent/incandescent tubes. Moreover, their energy-saving property is attracting many researchers because of the huge energy crisis we are facing. Among all methods intending to enhance the efficiency and intensity of a conventional LED, localized surface plasmon resonance is a promising way. The mechanism is based on the energy coupling effect between the emitted photons from the semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles fabricated by nanotechnology. In this review, we describe the mechanism of this coupling effect and summarize the common fabrication techniques. The prospect, including the potential to replace fluorescent/incandescent lighting devices as well as applications to flat panel displays and optoelectronics, and future challenges with regard to the design of metallic nanostructures and fabrication techniques are discussed. PMID:21711711

  17. Light manipulation for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Qing-Dong; Zhou, Lei; Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2014-10-01

    To realize high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), it is essential to boost out-coupling efficiency. Here we review our latest reports upon light manipulation for OLEDs by integrating a dual-side bio-inspired deterministic quasi-periodic moth's eye nanostructure with broadband anti-reflective and quasi-omnidirectional properties. Light out-coupling efficiency of OLEDs with stacked triple emission units is over 2 times that of a conventional device, resulting in drastic increase in external quantum efficiency and current efficiency to 119.7% and 366 cd A-1 without introducing spectral distortion and directionality. Theoretical calculations furthermore clarify that the improved device performance is primarily attributed to the effective extraction of the waveguide and surface plasmonic modes of the confined light over all the emission wavelengths and viewing-angles.

  18. Luminescence and squeezing of a superconducting light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlobil, Patrik; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a semiconductor p -n junction in contact with superconducting leads that is operated under forward bias as a light-emitting diode. The presence of superconductivity results in a significant increase of the electroluminescence in a sharp frequency window. We demonstrate that the tunneling of Cooper pairs induces an additional luminescence peak on resonance. There is a transfer of superconducting to photonic coherence that results in the emission of entangled photon pairs and squeezing of the fluctuations in the quadrature amplitudes of the emitted light. We show that the squeezing angle can be electrically manipulated by changing the relative phase of the order parameters in the superconductors. We finally derive the conditions for lasing in the system and show that the laser threshold is reduced due to superconductivity. This reveals how the macroscopic coherence of a superconductor can be used to control the properties of light.

  19. Junction temperature measurement of light emitting diode by electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S. M.; Luo, X. D.; Zhang, B.; Fu, L.; Cheng, L. W.; Wang, J. B.; Lu, W.

    2011-12-01

    Junction temperature (JT) is a key parameter of the performance and lifetime of light emitting diodes (LEDs). In this paper, a mobile instrument system has been developed for the non-contact measurement of JTs of LED under LabVIEW control. The electroluminescence (EL) peak shift of the LED is explored to measure the JT. Commercially available high power blue LEDs are measured. A linear relation between emission peak shift and JT is found. The accuracy of the JT is about 1 °C determined by the precision of the emission peak shift, ±0.03 nm, at 3σ standard deviation for blue LED. Using this system, on-line temperature rise curves of LED lamps are determined.

  20. Mid-ultraviolet light-emitting diode detects dipicolinic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Lee, Stephen Roger; Temkin, Henryk; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Li, Qingyang; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) is a substance uniquely present in bacterial spores such as that from anthrax (B. anthracis). It is known that DPA can be detected by the long-lived fluorescence of its terbium chelate; the best limit of detection (LOD) reported thus far using a large benchtop gated fluorescence instrument using a pulsed Xe lamp is 2 nM. We use a novel AlGaN light-emitting diode (LED) fabricated on a sapphire substrate that has peak emission at 291 nm. Although the overlap of the emission band of this LED with the absorption band of Tb-DPA ({lambda}{sub max} doublet: 273, 279 nm) is not ideal, we demonstrate that a compact detector based on this LED and an off-the-shelf gated photodetection module can provide an LOD of 0.4 nM, thus providing a basis for convenient early warning detectors.

  1. Tunnel junction enhanced nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; May, Brelon J.; Deitz, Julia I.; Grassman, Tyler J.; McComb, David W.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2015-09-07

    Polarization engineered interband tunnel junctions (TJs) are integrated in nanowire ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs). A ∼6 V reduction in turn-on voltage is achieved by the integration of tunnel junction at the base of polarization doped nanowire UV LEDs. Moreover, efficient hole injection into the nanowire LEDs leads to suppressed efficiency droop in TJ integrated nanowire LEDs. The combination of both reduced bias voltage and increased hole injection increases the wall plug efficiency in these devices. More than 100 μW of UV emission at ∼310 nm is measured with external quantum efficiency in the range of 4–6 m%. The realization of tunnel junction within the nanowire LEDs opens a pathway towards the monolithic integration of cascaded multi-junction nanowire LEDs on silicon.

  2. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    SciTech Connect

    Özdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gökdemir, F. Pınar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay; Tekin, Emine; Pravadalı, Selin

    2013-12-16

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  3. Spectral conversion with fluorescent microspheres for light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Hui, K N; Lai, P T; Choi, H W

    2008-01-01

    An innovative spectral conversion scheme for light emitting diodes using fluorescent microspheres has been demonstrated. An optimally mixed proportion of green and red fluorescent microspheres were coated onto a high-extraction-efficiency GaN micro-LED with emission centred at 470 nm. The microspheres self-assemble into ordered hexagonally arrays, forming regular and uniform coating layers. Devices with cool and warm white emission were achieved. The bluish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 27.3 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.26, 0.28) and 8500K CCT, while the yellowish-white LED has a luminous efficacy of 26.67 lm/W (at 20 mA) with CIE coordinates of (0.36, 0.43) and 13000K CCT. PMID:18521128

  4. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Advances in Phosphors for Light-emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun Che; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2011-06-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are excellent candidates for general lighting because of their rapidly improving efficiency, durability, and reliability, their usability in products of various sizes, and their environmentally friendly constituents. Effective lighting devices can be realized by combining one or more phosphor materials with chips. Accordingly, it is very important that the architecture of phosphors be developed. Although numerous phosphors have been proposed in the past several years, the range of phosphors that are suitable for LEDs is limited. This work describes recent progress in our understanding of the prescription, morphology, structure, spectrum, and packaging of such phosphors. It suggests avenues for further development and the scientific challenges that must be overcome before phosphors can be practically applied in LEDs. PMID:26295420

  6. Significant Improvements in Cognitive Performance Post-Transcranial, Red/Near-Infrared Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Open-Protocol Study

    PubMed Central

    Zafonte, Ross; Krengel, Maxine H.; Martin, Paula I.; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.; Meehan, William P.; Baker, Errol H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This pilot, open-protocol study examined whether scalp application of red and near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) could improve cognition in patients with chronic, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially in hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. LED therapy is noninvasive, painless, and non-thermal (cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration [FDA], an insignificant risk device). Eleven chronic, mTBI participants (26–62 years of age, 6 males) with nonpenetrating brain injury and persistent cognitive dysfunction were treated for 18 outpatient sessions (Monday, Wednesday, Friday, for 6 weeks), starting at 10 months to 8 years post- mTBI (motor vehicle accident [MVA] or sports-related; and one participant, improvised explosive device [IED] blast injury). Four had a history of multiple concussions. Each LED cluster head (5.35 cm diameter, 500 mW, 22.2 mW/cm2) was applied for 10 min to each of 11 scalp placements (13 J/cm2). LEDs were placed on the midline from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. Neuropsychological testing was performed pre-LED, and at 1 week, and 1 and 2 months after the 18th treatment. A significant linear trend was observed for the effect of LED treatment over time for the Stroop test for Executive Function, Trial 3 inhibition (p=0.004); Stroop, Trial 4 inhibition switching (p=0.003); California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)-II, Total Trials 1–5 (p=0.003); and CVLT-II, Long Delay Free Recall (p=0.006). Participants reported improved sleep, and fewer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, if present. Participants and family reported better ability to perform social, interpersonal, and occupational functions. These open-protocol data suggest

  7. Significant improvements in cognitive performance post-transcranial, red/near-infrared light-emitting diode treatments in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: open-protocol study.

    PubMed

    Naeser, Margaret A; Zafonte, Ross; Krengel, Maxine H; Martin, Paula I; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R; Knight, Jeffrey A; Meehan, William P; Baker, Errol H

    2014-06-01

    This pilot, open-protocol study examined whether scalp application of red and near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) could improve cognition in patients with chronic, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially in hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. LED therapy is noninvasive, painless, and non-thermal (cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration [FDA], an insignificant risk device). Eleven chronic, mTBI participants (26-62 years of age, 6 males) with nonpenetrating brain injury and persistent cognitive dysfunction were treated for 18 outpatient sessions (Monday, Wednesday, Friday, for 6 weeks), starting at 10 months to 8 years post- mTBI (motor vehicle accident [MVA] or sports-related; and one participant, improvised explosive device [IED] blast injury). Four had a history of multiple concussions. Each LED cluster head (5.35 cm diameter, 500 mW, 22.2 mW/cm(2)) was applied for 10 min to each of 11 scalp placements (13 J/cm(2)). LEDs were placed on the midline from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. Neuropsychological testing was performed pre-LED, and at 1 week, and 1 and 2 months after the 18th treatment. A significant linear trend was observed for the effect of LED treatment over time for the Stroop test for Executive Function, Trial 3 inhibition (p=0.004); Stroop, Trial 4 inhibition switching (p=0.003); California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)-II, Total Trials 1-5 (p=0.003); and CVLT-II, Long Delay Free Recall (p=0.006). Participants reported improved sleep, and fewer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, if present. Participants and family reported better ability to perform social, interpersonal, and occupational functions. These open-protocol data suggest that placebo

  8. Stable blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes with three times longer lifetime than phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mounggon; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-04-17

    High quantum efficiency above 18% and extended lifetime three times longer than that of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated in blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent OLEDs. PMID:25757226

  9. Light emitting diodes as an excitation source for biomedical photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Beard, P. C.

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor light sources, such as laser diodes or light emitting diodes (LEDs) could provide an inexpensive and compact alternative to traditional Q-switched lasers for photoacoustic imaging. So far, only laser diodes 1-3 operating in the 750 to 905nm wavelength range have been investigated for this purpose. However, operating in the visible wavelength range (400nm to 650nm) where blood is strongly absorbent (<10cm-1) and water absorption is weak (<0.01cm-1) could allow for high contrast photoacoustic images of the superficial vasculature to be achieved. High power laser diodes (<10Watt peak power) are however not available in this wavelength range. High power LEDs could be a potential alternative as they are widely available in the visible wavelength range (400nm to 632nm) and relatively cheap. High power LEDs are generally operated in continuous wave mode and provide average powers of several Watts. The possibility of over driving them by tens of times their rated current when driven at a low duty cycle (<1%), offers the prospect of achieving similar pulse energies (tens of μJ) to that provided by high peak power pulsed laser diodes. To demonstrate the possibility of using high power LEDs as an excitation source for biomedical applications, single point measurements were implemented in a realistic blood vessel phantom. A four colour device was also used to demonstrate the possibility of using LEDs for making spectroscopic measurements. It was shown that when driving all four wavelengths at once, the generated photoacoustic signal could be used to design a filter in order to improve the SNR of the photoacoustic signals generated at each individual wavelength. The possibility of acquiring multiwavelength data sets simultaneously when using Golay excitation methods was also demonstrated. This preliminary study demonstrated the potential for using high power LEDs as an inexpensive and compact excitation source for biomedical photoacoustics.

  10. The development of monolithic alternating current light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wen-Yung; Yen, Hsi-Hsuan; Chan, Yi-Jen

    2011-02-01

    The monolithic alternating current light emitting diode (ACLED) has been revealed for several years and was regarded as a potential device for solid state lighting. In this study, we will discuss the characteristics, development status, future challenges, and ITRI's development strategy about ACLED, especially focusing on the development progress of the monolithic GaN-based Schottky barrier diodes integrated ACLED (SBD-ACLED). The SBD-ACLED design can not only improve the chip area utilization ratio but also provide much higher reverse breakdown voltage by integrating four SBDs with the micro-LEDs array in a single chip, which was regarded as a good on-chip ACLED design. According to the experimental results, higher chip efficiency can be reached through SBD-ACLED design since the chip area utilization ratio was increased. Since the principle and the operation condition of ACLED is quite different from those of the typical DCLED, critical issues for ACLED like the current droops, the flicker phenomenon, the safety regulations, the measurement standards and the power fluctuation have been studied for getting a practical and reliable ACLED design. Besides, the "AC LED application and research alliance" (AARA) lead by ITRI in Taiwan for the commercialization works of ACLED has also been introduced.

  11. Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (AMOLED) Environmental Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George A.

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  12. Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes Implementing Platinum Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecton, Jeremy Exton

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable materials for OLEDs with high external quantum efficiency's (EQE) and high operational lifetimes. Recently, significant improvements in the internal quantum efficiency or ratio of generated photons to injected electrons have been achieved with the advent of phosphorescent complexes with the ability to harvest both singlet and triplet excitons. Since then, a variety of phosphorescent complexes containing heavy metal centers including Os, Ni, Ir, Pd, and Pt have been developed. Thus far, the majority of the work in the field has focused on iridium based complexes. Platinum based complexes, however, have received considerably less attention despite demonstrating efficiency's equal to or better than their iridium analogs. In this study, a series of OLEDs implementing newly developed platinum based complexes were demonstrated with efficiency's or operational lifetimes equal to or better than their iridium analogs for select cases. In addition to demonstrating excellent device performance in OLEDs, platinum based complexes exhibit unique photophysical properties including the ability to form excimer emission capable of generating broad white light emission from a single emitter and the ability to form narrow band emission from a rigid, tetradentate molecular structure for select cases. These unique photophysical properties were exploited and their optical and electrical properties in a device setting were elucidated. Utilizing the unique properties of a tridentate Pt complex, Pt-16, a highly efficient white device employing a single emissive layer exhibited a peak EQE of over 20% and high color quality with a CRI of 80 and color coordinates CIE(x=0.33, y=0.33). Furthermore, by employing a rigid, tetradentate platinum complex, PtN1N, with a narrow band emission into a

  13. Blue fluorescent organic light emitting diodes with multilayered graphene anode

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Joohyun; Choi, Hong Kyw; Moon, Jaehyun; Shin, Jin-Wook; Joo, Chul Woong; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Doo-Hee; Huh, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Chu, Hye Yong

    2012-10-15

    As an innovative anode for organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), we have investigated graphene films. Graphene has importance due to its huge potential in flexible OLED applications. In this work, graphene films have been catalytically grown and transferred to the glass substrate for OLED fabrications. We have successfully fabricated 2 mm × 2 mm device area blue fluorescent OLEDs with graphene anodes which showed 2.1% of external quantum efficiency at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. This is the highest value reported among fluorescent OLEDs using graphene anodes. Oxygen plasma treatment on graphene has been found to improve hole injections in low voltage regime, which has been interpreted as oxygen plasma induced work function modification. However, plasma treatment also increases the sheet resistance of graphene, limiting the maximum luminance. In summary, our works demonstrate the practical possibility of graphene as an anode material for OLEDs and suggest a processing route which can be applied to various graphene related devices.

  14. Simulated evolution of fluorophores for light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.

    2015-03-14

    Organic light emitting diodes based on fluorophores with a propensity for thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) are able to circumvent limitations imposed on device efficiency by spin statistics. Molecules with a propensity for TADF necessarily have two properties: a small gap between the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states and a large transition dipole moment for fluorescence. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a genetic algorithm to search a region of chemical space for molecules with these properties. This algorithm is based on a flexible and intuitive representation of the molecule as a tree data structure, in which the nodes correspond to molecular fragments. Our implementation takes advantage of hybrid parallel graphics processing unit accelerated computer clusters to allow efficient sampling while retaining a reasonably accurate description of the electronic structure (in this case, CAM-B3LYP/6-31G{sup ∗∗}). In total, we have identified 3792 promising candidate fluorophores from a chemical space containing 1.26 × 10{sup 6} molecules. This required performing electronic structure calculations on only 7518 molecules, a small fraction of the full space. Several novel classes of molecules which show promise as fluorophores are presented.

  15. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants.

    PubMed

    Bula, R J; Morrow, R C; Tibbitts, T W; Barta, D J; Ignatius, R W; Martin, T S

    1991-02-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems. PMID:11537727

  16. Semiconductor-nanocrystals-based white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Quanqin; Duty, Chad E; Hu, Michael Z

    2010-08-01

    In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid-state lighting, such as white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement can cut the ever-increasing level of energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, the recent progress in semiconductor-nanocrystals-based WLEDs is highlighted, the different approaches for generating white light are compared, and the benefits and challenges of the solid-state lighting technology are discussed. PMID:20602425

  17. Near-field photometry for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Harikumar, Krishnan; Isphording, Alexandar; Venkataramanan, Venkat

    2013-03-01

    Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology is rapidly maturing to be ready for next generation of light source for general lighting. The current standard test methods for solid state lighting have evolved for semiconductor sources, with point-like emission characteristics. However, OLED devices are extended surface emitters, where spatial uniformity and angular variation of brightness and colour are important. This necessitates advanced test methods to obtain meaningful data for fundamental understanding, lighting product development and deployment. In this work, a near field imaging goniophotometer was used to characterize lighting-class white OLED devices, where luminance and colour information of the pixels on the light sources were measured at a near field distance for various angles. Analysis was performed to obtain angle dependent luminous intensity, CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature (CCT) in the far field. Furthermore, a complete ray set with chromaticity information was generated, so that illuminance at any distance and angle from the light source can be determined. The generated ray set is needed for optical modeling and design of OLED luminaires. Our results show that luminance non-uniformity could potentially affect the luminaire aesthetics and CCT can vary with angle by more than 2000K. This leads to the same source being perceived as warm or cool depending on the viewing angle. As OLEDs are becoming commercially available, this could be a major challenge for lighting designers. Near field measurement can provide detailed specifications and quantitative comparison between OLED products for performance improvement.

  18. White organic light-emitting diodes based on tandem structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fawen; Ma, Dongge

    2005-10-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes made of two electroluminescent (EL) units connected by a charge generation layer were fabricated. Thus, with a tandem structure of indium tin oxide/N ,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N ,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB)/9,10-bis-(β-naphthyl)-anthrene (ADN)/2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3)/BCP:Li/V2O5/NPB/Alq3:4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyle-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)4H-pyran (DCJTB)/Alq3/LiF/Al, a stable white light with Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates from (0.35, 0.32) at 18V to (0.36, 0.36) at 50V was generated. It was clearly seen that the EL spectra consist of red band at 600nm due to DCJTB, green band at 505nm due to Alq3, and blue band at 435nm due to ADN, and the current efficiency and brightness equal basically to the sum of the two EL units. As a result, the tandem devices showed white light emission with a maximum brightness of 10200cd /m2 at a bias of 40V and a maximum current efficiency of 10.7cd/A at a current density of 3.5mA/cm2.

  19. Flexible fluorescent white organic light emitting diodes with ALD encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Chittawanij, Apisit; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lin, Pen-Chu; Hong, Lin-Ann; Tsai, Feng-Yu; Tseng, Ming-Hong; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Lin, Kung-Liang; Chen, Szu-Hao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the flexible white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLED) was fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) with structure of ITO/EHI608 (75 nm)/HTG-1 (10 nm)/3% EB502:0.8% EY53 (5 nm)/3% EB502 (35 nm)/Alq3 (10 nm)/LiF (0.8 nm)/Al (150 nm) and was compared with glass substrate the same structure. It was seen that the performances of flexible and glass substrate are almost the same. The luminance, current efficiency, and CIE coordinates of flexible device is 6351 cd/m2, 12.7 cd/A, and (0.31, 0.38) at 50 mA/cm2, respectively. Then, an Al2O3/HfO2 film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a thin film encapsulation layer have been described and compared, such as the characteristics of water permeability and lifetime of flexible WOLED. The results show that the PET/ALD film low value of about 0.04 g/m2d, and the PET film shows WVTR of about 3.8 g/m2/d. The lifetimes of PET/ALD and PET encapsulations are 840 min and 140 min, respectively. Simultaneous deposition of ALD film on PET film gave the lifetime of flexible WOLED is six times longer than device without ALD encapsulation.

  20. High efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Dong, Weili; Gao, Hongyan; Tian, Xiaocui; Zhao, Lina; Jiang, Wenlong; Zhang, Xiyan

    2015-06-01

    The light emitting diodes with the structure of ITO/ m-MTDATA(20 nm)/NPB(10 nm)/CBP BCzVBi ( x, nm, 10%)/CBP(3 nm)/CBP: Ir(ppy)3: DCJTB(10 nm, 8 and 1%)/Bphen(30 nm)/Cs2CO3: Ag2O (2 nm, 20%)/Al (100 nm) employing phosphorescence sensitization and fluorescence doping, were manufactured. The performance of the devices was studied by adjusting the thickness of fluorescence dopant layer ( x = 15, 20, 25, and 30). The best performance was achieved when its thickness was 25 nm. The device has the maximum luminance of 20260 cd/m2 at applied voltage of 14 V and the maximum current efficiency of 11.70 cd/A at 7 V. The device displays a continuous change of color from yellow to white. The CIE coordinates change from (0.49, 0.48) to (0.32, 0.39) when the driving voltage is varied from 5 to 15 V.

  1. A multi-source portable light emitting diode spectrofluorometer.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Safwan; Bai, Baolong; Rayson, Gary D; Anderson, Dean M; Puscheck, Adam D; Landau, Serge Y; Glasser, Tzach

    2008-03-01

    A portable luminescence spectrofluorometer weighing only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed and evaluated. Excitation using a sequence of seven individual broad-band LED emission sources enabled the generation of excitation-emission spectra using a light weight (<1.5 kg) spectrometer. Limits of detection for rhodamine 6G, rhodamine B, and fluorescein were 2.9, 3.2, and 11.0 nM, respectively. Generation of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) enabled the analysis of samples containing mixtures of rhodamine B and fluorescein. Buffered saline plant and animal feed extracts were also analyzed using this instrument. These samples included the woody plants Pistacia lentiscus (Evergreen pistache or Mastic) and Philyria latifolia, and the herbaceous species Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium spp. (clover), and a feed concentrate. Application of multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) to the resulting three-dimensional data sets enabled discernment among these various diet constituents. PMID:18339242

  2. Efficiency roll-off in organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Caroline; Leo, Karl; Gather, Malte C

    2013-12-17

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have attracted much attention in research and industry thanks to their capability to emit light with high efficiency and to deliver high-quality white light that provides good color rendering. OLEDs feature homogeneous large area emission and can be produced on flexible substrates. In terms of efficiency, OLEDs can compete with highly efficient conventional light sources but their efficiency typically decreases at high brightness levels, an effect known as efficiency roll-off. In recent years, much effort has been undertaken to understand the underlying processes and to develop methods that improve the high-brightness performance of OLEDs. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and provide a detailed description of the relevant principles, both for phosphorescent and fluorescent emitter molecules. In particular, we focus on exciton-quenching mechanisms, such as triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching by polarons, or field-induced quenching, but also discuss mechanisms such as changes in charge carrier balance. We further review methods that may reduce the roll-off and thus enable OLEDs to be used in high-brightness applications. PMID:24019178

  3. Microtube Light-Emitting Diode Arrays with Metal Cores.

    PubMed

    Tchoe, Youngbin; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Jun Beom; Baek, Hyeonjun; Chung, Kunook; Jo, Janghyun; Kim, Miyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2016-03-22

    We report the fabrication and characteristics of vertical microtube light-emitting diode (LED) arrays with a metal core inside the devices. To make the LEDs, gallium nitride (GaN)/indium gallium nitride (In(x)Ga(1-x)N)/zinc oxide (ZnO) coaxial microtube LED arrays were grown on an n-GaN/c-aluminum oxide (Al2O3) substrate. The microtube LED arrays were then lifted-off the substrate by wet chemical etching of the sacrificial ZnO microtubes and the silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer. The chemically lifted-off LED layer was then transferred upside-down on other supporting substrates. To create the metal cores, titanium/gold and indium tin oxide were deposited on the inner shells of the microtubes, forming n-type electrodes inside the metal-cored LEDs. The characteristics of the resulting devices were determined by measuring electroluminescence and current-voltage characteristic curves. To gain insights into the current-spreading characteristics of the devices and understand how to make them more efficient, we modeled them computationally. PMID:26855251

  4. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  5. Transparent white organic light emitting diodes with improved cathode transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Ik; Lee, Jonghee; Lee, Joowon; Shin, Jae-Heon; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Chu, Hye Yong

    2009-08-01

    We have fabricated transparent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) for lighting application based on a hybrid white OLED and a phosphorescence white OLED. For the hybrid WOLED, a blue fluorescence emitting layer (FLEML) and green and red phosphorescence emitting layers (PH-EMLs) have been used in the device structure of ITO/hole transporting layer (HTL)/PH-EMLs/interlayer/FL-EML/ETL/LiF/Al. The balanced emissions from the FLEML and the PH-EMLs have been obtained by using appropriate carrier (hole) trapping effects in the PH-EMLs, which resulted in external and power efficiencies of 15 % and 27 lm/W, respectively, at a luminance of 1000 cd/m2 without any out-coupling enhancement. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of this hybrid WOLED is (0.43,0.44) with color rendering index (CRI) of 80 and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3200 K, respectively, in the bottom emission structure. Based on this hybrid WOLED, we established highly efficient transparent WOLED by introduction of a transparent cathode, and obtained over 19 lm/W of power efficiency at a total luminance of 1000 cd/m2 as well as over 60 % of transmittance at 550 nm with the conventional glass encapsulation. Moreover, when the phosphorescent white OLED was combined with a transparent cathode, the power efficiency was reached up to 24 lm/W of power efficiency at a total luminance of 1000 cd/m2.

  6. Carrier modulation layer-enhanced organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Meenu; Chen, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chung-Chia; Lee, Meng-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED)-based display products have already emerged in the market and their efficiencies and lifetimes are sound at the comparatively low required luminance. To realize OLED for lighting application sooner, higher light quality and better power efficiency at elevated luminance are still demanded. This review reveals the advantages of incorporating a nano-scale carrier modulation layer (CML), also known as a spacer, carrier-regulating layer, or interlayer, among other terms, to tune the chromaticity and color temperature as well as to markedly improve the device efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) for numerous OLED devices. The functions of the CML can be enhanced as multiple layers and blend structures are employed. At proper thickness, the employment of CML enables the device to balance the distribution of carriers in the two emissive zones and achieve high device efficiencies and long operational lifetime while maintaining very high CRI. Moreover, we have also reviewed the effect of using CML on the most significant characteristics of OLEDs, namely: efficiency, luminance, life-time, CRI, SRI, chromaticity, and the color temperature, and see how the thickness tuning and selection of proper CML are crucial to effectively control the OLED device performance. PMID:26193252

  7. Device physics of single layer organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, B. K.; Campbell, I. H.; Davids, P. S.; Smith, D. L.; Neef, C. J.; Ferraris, J. P.

    1999-11-01

    We present experimental and device model results for electron only, hole only, and bipolar organic light-emitting diodes fabricated using a soluble poly (p-phenylene vinylene) based polymer. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured for a series of electron only devices in which the polymer thickness was varied. The I-V curves were described using a device model from which the electron mobility parameters were extracted. Similarly, the hole mobility parameters were extracted using a device model description of I-V characteristics for a series of hole only devices where the barrier to hole injection was varied by appropriate choices of hole injecting electrode. The electron and hole mobilities extracted from the single carrier devices are then used, without additional adjustable parameters, to describe the measured current-voltage characteristics of a series of bipolar devices where both the device thickness and contacts were varied. The model successfully describes the I-V characteristics of single carrier and bipolar devices as a function of polymer thickness and for structures that are contact limited, space charge limited, and for cases in between. We find qualitative agreement between the device model and measured external luminance for a thickness series of devices. We investigate the sensitivity of the device model calculations to the magnitude of the bimolecular recombination rate prefactor.

  8. Fast pulsed electroluminescence from polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Sun, R. G.; Yu, G.; Heeger, A. J.

    2002-02-01

    Transient electroluminescence (EL) from polymer light emitting diodes is investigated by measurements of the response to short voltage pulses. The carrier mobility is derived from the delay time between the electrical pulse and the onset of EL, μ≈3×10-4 cm2/V s. Bilayer devices with a polyethylene-dioxythiophene (PEDOT), hole injection layer are also studied. The delay time between the electrical pulse and the onset of EL is independent of the thickness of the injection layer, implying that the conducting PEDOT functions as a part of the electrode. When a dc forward bias is applied to the device, the delay time decreases, probably as a result of the shift of the emission zone towards the anode. The EL turn-on depends on the amplitude of the voltage pulse. The data are modeled by an equivalent circuit with a fixed capacitance connected in parallel with a nonlinear resistance. The solution of the differential equation depends on the exact form of the device's I-V curve. Two analytical solutions are provided, and an analysis based on space-charge-limited current is presented. By applying a dc forward bias in advance to precharge the space-charge capacitance, the turn-on response time is reduced to 12 ns. The EL decay consists of two components with time constants of 15 ns and 1 μs. The decay does not depend on either the amplitude of the voltage pulse or the prebias.

  9. White Light Emitting Diode Development for General Illumination Applications

    SciTech Connect

    James Ibbetson

    2006-05-01

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a 3-year project aimed at developing the chip and packaging technology necessary to demonstrate efficient, high flux light-emitting diode (LED) arrays using Cree's gallium nitride/silicon carbide (GaN/SiC) LED technology as the starting point. Novel chip designs and fabrication processes are described that led to high power blue LEDs that achieved 310 mW of light output at 350 mA drive current, corresponding to quantum and wall plug efficiencies of 32.5% and 26.5%, respectively. When combined with phosphor, high power white LEDs with luminous output of 67 lumens and efficacy of 57 lumens per watt were also demonstrated. Advances in packaging technology are described that enabled compact, multi-chip white LED lamp modules with 800-1000 lumens output at efficacies of up to 55 lumens per watt. Lamp modules with junction-to-ambient thermal resistance as low as 1.7 C/watt have also been demonstrated.

  10. City of Phildelphia: Light emitting diodes for traffic signal displays

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This project investigated the feasibility of using light emitting diodes (LEDs) for red traffic signals in a demonstration program at 27 signalized intersections in the City of Philadelphia. LED traffic signals have the potential to achieve significant savings over standard incandescent signals in terms of energy usage and costs, signal relamping costs, signal system maintenance costs, tort liability, and environmental impact. Based on successful experience with the demonstration program, the City of Philadelphia is currently developing funding for the conversion of all existing red incandescent traffic signals at approximately 2,700 intersections to LED signals. This program is expected to cost approximately $4.0 million and save about $850,000 annually in energy costs. During late 1993 and early 1994, 212 red LED traffic signals (134 8-inch signals and 78 12-inch signals) were installed at 27 intersections in Philadelphia. The first group of 93 signals were installed at 13 prototypical intersections throughout the City. The remaining group of signals were installed on a contiguous route in West Philadelphia consisting of standard incandescent signals and LED signals interspersed in a random pattern.

  11. Simulated evolution of fluorophores for light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.

    2015-03-01

    Organic light emitting diodes based on fluorophores with a propensity for thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) are able to circumvent limitations imposed on device efficiency by spin statistics. Molecules with a propensity for TADF necessarily have two properties: a small gap between the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states and a large transition dipole moment for fluorescence. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a genetic algorithm to search a region of chemical space for molecules with these properties. This algorithm is based on a flexible and intuitive representation of the molecule as a tree data structure, in which the nodes correspond to molecular fragments. Our implementation takes advantage of hybrid parallel graphics processing unit accelerated computer clusters to allow efficient sampling while retaining a reasonably accurate description of the electronic structure (in this case, CAM-B3LYP/6-31G∗∗). In total, we have identified 3792 promising candidate fluorophores from a chemical space containing 1.26 × 106 molecules. This required performing electronic structure calculations on only 7518 molecules, a small fraction of the full space. Several novel classes of molecules which show promise as fluorophores are presented.

  12. Simulated evolution of fluorophores for light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G

    2015-03-14

    Organic light emitting diodes based on fluorophores with a propensity for thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) are able to circumvent limitations imposed on device efficiency by spin statistics. Molecules with a propensity for TADF necessarily have two properties: a small gap between the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states and a large transition dipole moment for fluorescence. In this work, we demonstrate the use of a genetic algorithm to search a region of chemical space for molecules with these properties. This algorithm is based on a flexible and intuitive representation of the molecule as a tree data structure, in which the nodes correspond to molecular fragments. Our implementation takes advantage of hybrid parallel graphics processing unit accelerated computer clusters to allow efficient sampling while retaining a reasonably accurate description of the electronic structure (in this case, CAM-B3LYP/6-31G(∗∗)). In total, we have identified 3792 promising candidate fluorophores from a chemical space containing 1.26 × 10(6) molecules. This required performing electronic structure calculations on only 7518 molecules, a small fraction of the full space. Several novel classes of molecules which show promise as fluorophores are presented. PMID:25778905

  13. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Barta, D. J.; Ignatius, R. W.; Martin, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems.

  14. Performance improvement of indoor positioning using light-emitting diodes and an image sensor for light-emitting diode communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Md. Sazzad; Park, Youngil; Kim, Ki-Doo

    2015-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are expected to replace existing lighting technologies in the near future because of the potential dual function of LED light (i.e., wireless communication and lighting) in the context of visible light communication (VLC). We propose a highly precise indoor positioning algorithm using lighting LEDs, an image sensor, and VLC. In the proposed algorithm, three LEDs transmit their three-dimensional coordinate information, which is received and demodulated by a single image sensor at an unknown position. The unknown position is then calculated from the geometrical relations of the LED images created on the image sensor plane. We describe the algorithm in detail. A simulation of the proposed algorithm is presented in this paper. We also compare the performance of this algorithm with that of our previously proposed algorithm. The comparison indicates significant improvement in positioning accuracy because of the simple algorithmic structure and low computational complexity. This technique does not require any angular measurement, which is needed in the contemporary positioning algorithms using LEDs and image sensor. The simulation results show that the proposed system can estimate the unknown position to an accuracy of 0.001 m inside the approximate positioning area when the pixel value is >3000.

  15. Performance improvement of indoor positioning using light-emitting diodes and an image sensor for light-emitting diode communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Md. Sazzad; Park, Youngil; Kim, Ki-Doo

    2015-04-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are expected to replace existing lighting technologies in the near future because of the potential dual function of LED light (i.e., wireless communication and lighting) in the context of visible light communication (VLC). We propose a highly precise indoor positioning algorithm using lighting LEDs, an image sensor, and VLC. In the proposed algorithm, three LEDs transmit their three-dimensional coordinate information, which is received and demodulated by a single image sensor at an unknown position. The unknown position is then calculated from the geometrical relations of the LED images created on the image sensor plane. We describe the algorithm in detail. A simulation of the proposed algorithm is presented in this paper. We also compare the performance of this algorithm with that of our previously proposed algorithm. The comparison indicates significant improvement in positioning accuracy because of the simple algorithmic structure and low computational complexity. This technique does not require any angular measurement, which is needed in the contemporary positioning algorithms using LEDs and image sensor. The simulation results show that the proposed system can estimate the unknown position to an accuracy of 0.001 m inside the approximate positioning area when the pixel value is >3000.

  16. Selective-area nanoheteroepitaxy for light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeson, Isaac H.

    Over 20% of the electricity in the United States is consumed for lighting, and the majority of this energy is wasted as heat during the lighting process. A solid-state (or light emitting diode (LED)-based) light source has the potential of saving the United States billions of dollars in electricity and reducing megatons of global CO2 emissions annually. While white light LEDs are currently on the market with efficiencies that are superior to incandescent and fluorescent light sources, their high up-front cost is inhibiting mass adoption. One reason for the high cost is the inefficiency of green and amber LEDs that can used to make white light. The inefficiency of green and amber LEDs results in more of these chips being required, and thus a higher cost. Improvements in the performance of green and amber LEDs is also required in order to realize the full potential of solid-state lighting. Nanoheteroepitaxy is an interesting route towards achieving efficient green and amber LEDs as it resolves major challenges that are currently plaguing III-nitride LEDs such as high dislocation densities and limited active region critical thicknesses. A method for fabricating III-nitride nanopyramid LEDs is presented that employs conventional processing used in industry. The present document begins with an overview of the current challenges in III-nitride LEDs and the benefits of nanoheteroepitaxy. A process for controlled selective-area growth of nanopyramid LEDs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy has been developed throughout the course of this work. Dielectric templates used for the selective-area growth are patterned by two methods, namely porous anodic alumina and electron-beam lithography. The dielectric templates serve as efficient dislocation filters; however, planar defects are initiated during lower temperature growth on the nanopyramids. The quantum wells outline six semipolar planes that form each hexagonal pyramid. Quantum wells grown on these semipolar planes

  17. Ultra-High Efficiency White Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukawa, Yukio; Narita, Junya; Sakamoto, Takahiko; Deguchi, Kouichiro; Yamada, Takao; Mukai, Takashi

    2006-10-01

    We fabricated the high luminous efficiency white light emitting diode (LED) and the high power white LED by using the patterned sapphire substrates and an indium-tin oxide (ITO) contact as a p-type electrode. The high luminous efficiency white LED was the yellow YAG-phosphors-coated small-size (240 × 420 μm2) high efficiency blue LED with the quantum efficiency of 63.3% at a forward-bias current of 20 mA. The luminous flux (Φ), the forward-bias voltage (Vf), the correlated color temperature (Tcp), the luminous efficiency (ηL), and the wall-plug efficiency (WPE) of the high luminous efficiency white LED are 8.6 lm, 3.11 V, 5450 K, 138 lm/W, and 41.7%, respectively. The luminous efficiency is 1.5 times greater than that of a tri-phosphor fluorescent lamp (90 lm/W). The high power white LED was fabricated from the larger-size (1 × 1 mm2) blue LED with the output power of 458 mW at 350 mA. Φ, Vf, Tcp, ηL, and WPE of the high power white LED are 106 lm, 3.29 V, 5200 K, 91.7 lm/W, and 27.7%, respectively, at 350 mA. The WPE is greater than that of a fluorescent lamp (25%) in the visible region. Moreover, the luminous flux of the high power white LED reaches to 402 lm at 2 A, which is equivalent to the total flux of a 30 W incandescent lamp.

  18. White polymer light emitting diode using blend of fluorescent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Asit; Katiyar, Monica

    2012-10-01

    White polymer light emitting diodes (WPLEDs) are fabricated using poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) (PFO) as host and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)]-1,4-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) as guest material having structure ITO(150nm)/PEDOT:PSS(40nm)/PFO:MEH-PPV(75-90nm)/Ca(20nm)/Al(120nm). Photoluminescence spectra of blends with different MEH-PPV concentration reveal that at low doping level of MEH-PPV, blue emission from PFO and yellow emission from MEH-PPV co-exist due to incomplete energy transfer from PFO to MEH-PPV. Surface morphology of the spin coated blend films with different concentrations of MEH-PPV were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It shows segregation/agglomeration of polymers at higher concentration of MEH-PPV (~2.0 wt %). Finally, WPLEDs, having MEH-PPV in the range of 0.8-2.0 wt%, were fabricated. We obtained best device at 0.8 wt% of MEH-PPV, it shows white light with Commission Internationale de l'Enclairage (CIE) coordinate of (0.30, 0.38). Electroluminescence turn-on voltage of the device was 4.0 V and maximum luminance reaches 1234 cd/m2 at 8.5 V. The luminous current and power efficiency at current density of 22 mA/cm2 were found to be 2.3 cd/A and 1.1 lm/W, respectively.

  19. The role of isoelectronic dopants in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, B. K.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2007-09-01

    Power efficiency is an important parameter for all OLEDs, and is particularly critical for lighting applications. To maximize the power efficiency one must optimize charge injection, carrier transport, and radiative quantum efficiency, while minimizing energy losses. In this work we discuss how isoelectronic dopants can be used to address these problems. It can be difficult to produce efficient electrical contacts, particularly to large energy gap organic materials, and thus the contacts often limit the performance and stability of OLEDs . Recent results by several groups have attributed improved hole injection in poly (9,9' dioctylfluorene) [PFO] based LEDs to charge trapping, but the origin of the traps is unknown. In order to understand the role of traps in improving injection we studied poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2'- ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) devices with C 60 molecules at the anode to improve hole injection. Isoelectronic dopants are used widely as recombination centers in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In these systems one wants to maximize quantum efficiency by effectively trapping charges on the emitting dopants, while at the same time maximizing power efficiency by maintaining good charge transport. An understanding of the influence of the depth of the dopant on charge capture, and charge transport will aid in optimizing doped organic LEDs. We have looked at the OLED system consisting of the polymer PFO, and the organometallic molecule PhqIr. We show that PhqIr acts as a shallow hole trap in PFO, and that the charge transport and luminescence properties of this system are described by quasi-equilibrium statistics.

  20. Multicolor white light-emitting diodes for illumination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Solomon W. S.; Chen, Tzer-Perng; Tu, Chuan-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Sung; Tsai, Tzong-Liang; Hsieh, Mario C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor light emitting diode (LED) has become a promising device for general-purpose illumination applications. LED has the features of excellent durability, long operation life, low power consumption, no mercury containing and potentially high efficiency. Several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the technical requirements of illumination. In this paper we present a new multi-color white (MCW) LED as a high luminous efficacy, high color rendering index and low cost white illuminator. The device consists of two LED chips, one is AlInGaN LED for emitting shorter visible spectra, another is AlInGaP LED for emitting longer visible spectra. At least one chip in the MCW-LED has two or more transition energy levels used for emitting two or more colored lights. The multiple colored lights generated from the MCW-LED can be mixed into a full-spectral white light. Besides, there is no phosphors conversion layer used in the MCW-LED structure. Therefore, its color rendering property and illumination efficiency are excellent. The Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) of the MCW-LED may range from 2,500 K to over 10,000 K. The theoretical General Color Rendering Index (Ra) could be as high as 94, which is close to the incandescent and halogen sources, while the Ra of binary complementary white (BCW) LED is about 30 ~ 45. Moreover, compared to the expensive ternary RGB (Red AlInGaP + Green AlInGaN + Blue AlInGaN) white LED sources, the MCW-LED uses only one AlInGaN chip in combination with one cheap AlInGaP chip, to form a low cost, high luminous performance white light source. The MCW-LED is an ideal light source for general-purpose illumination applications.

  1. 3D printed quantum dot light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Tamargo, Ian A; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Johnson, Blake N; Gupta, Maneesh K; Koh, Tae-Wook; Chin, Huai-An; Steingart, Daniel A; Rand, Barry P; McAlpine, Michael C

    2014-12-10

    Developing the ability to 3D print various classes of materials possessing distinct properties could enable the freeform generation of active electronics in unique functional, interwoven architectures. Achieving seamless integration of diverse materials with 3D printing is a significant challenge that requires overcoming discrepancies in material properties in addition to ensuring that all the materials are compatible with the 3D printing process. To date, 3D printing has been limited to specific plastics, passive conductors, and a few biological materials. Here, we show that diverse classes of materials can be 3D printed and fully integrated into device components with active properties. Specifically, we demonstrate the seamless interweaving of five different materials, including (1) emissive semiconducting inorganic nanoparticles, (2) an elastomeric matrix, (3) organic polymers as charge transport layers, (4) solid and liquid metal leads, and (5) a UV-adhesive transparent substrate layer. As a proof of concept for demonstrating the integrated functionality of these materials, we 3D printed quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) that exhibit pure and tunable color emission properties. By further incorporating the 3D scanning of surface topologies, we demonstrate the ability to conformally print devices onto curvilinear surfaces, such as contact lenses. Finally, we show that novel architectures that are not easily accessed using standard microfabrication techniques can be constructed, by 3D printing a 2 × 2 × 2 cube of encapsulated LEDs, in which every component of the cube and electronics are 3D printed. Overall, these results suggest that 3D printing is more versatile than has been demonstrated to date and is capable of integrating many distinct classes of materials. PMID:25360485

  2. Host Engineering for High Quantum Efficiency Blue and White Fluorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wook; Lee, Inho; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-08-01

    High quantum efficiency in blue and white fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes is achieved by developing a novel device architecture with fluorescent emitters doped in a thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter as a host material. PMID:26078193

  3. Comparative efficiency analysis of GaN-based light-emitting diodes and laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Nobel laureate Shuji Nakamura predicted in 2014 that GaN-based laser diodes are the future of solid state lighting. However, blue GaN-lasers still exhibit less than 40% wall-plug efficiency, while some GaN-based blue light-emitting diodes exceed 80%. This paper investigates non-thermal reasons behind this difference. The inherently poor hole conductivity of the Mg-doped waveguide cladding layer of laser diodes is identified as main reason for their low electrical-to-optical energy conversion efficiency.

  4. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea, 15-19 March 2004. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to discuss recent progress and future trends in the rapidly advancing wide band gap semiconductor science and technologies and their applications in blue laser and light emitting diodes.

  5. Development of ultraviolet nitride-based light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katona, Thomas Matthew

    2003-10-01

    Deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes, with emission wavelengths shorter than 360 nm, have attracted interest due to their potential applications as replacement white light sources, in non-line of sight communication, for chemical and biological weapons detection, medical applications, water purification, and counterfeit detection. Light emitters in this wavelength range require AlGaN based active regions with increasing Al composition as the wavelength is decreased. High Al composition AlGaN based devices have been challenged by difficulty in growth, low electron and hole mobilities, and deep dopant levels resulting in low carrier concentrations. The combination of these factors has resulted in UV optoelectronic devices with quantum efficiency several orders of magnitude lower than their GaN/InGaN based visible counterparts. This work will details studies on alternative selective area growth techniques for dislocation reduction and the development of ultraviolet LEDs ranging from 292--340 nm. Lateral overgrowth of GaN on patterned Si (111) substrates was developed with the hope of developing seed material for bulk GaN growth. The effect of growth conditions on both the crystallographic wing tilt and crack density in the AlN/GaN films was studied. By controlling the lateral to vertical growth rate at the beginning of lateral overgrowth, the wing tilt can be effectively eliminated. We also demonstrate the first lateral overgrowth of AlN to create low threading dislocation density AlN template layers for optoelectronic device development. Deep UV quantum wells grown on this material were studied with cathodoluminescence to study the effect of dislocations on radiative recombination in deep UV devices. In addition to work on lateral overgrowth of GaN and AlN, 292, 340 nm LEDs were grown on AlN on sapphire and GaN on sapphire respectively. AlN strain relief interlayers were developed to prevent cracking of the 340 nm AlGaN based LEDs that were grown in tension on Ga

  6. Multilayer white lighting polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiong; Wang, Shu; Heeger, Alan J.

    2006-08-01

    Organic and polymer light-emitting diodes (OLEDs/PLEDs) that emit white light are of interest and potential importance for use in active matrix displays (with color filters) and because they might eventually be used for solid-state lighting. In such applications, large-area devices and low-cost of manufacturing will be major issues. We demonstrated that high performance multilayer white emitting PLEDs can be fabricated by using a blend of luminescent semiconducting polymers and organometallic complexes as the emission layer, and water-soluble (or ethanol-soluble) polymers/small molecules (for example, PVK-SO 3Li) as the hole injection/transport layer (HIL/HTL) and water-soluble (or ethanol-soluble) polymers/small molecules (for example, t-Bu-PBD-SO 3Na) as the electron injection/transport layer (EIL/HTL). Each layer is spin-cast sequentially from solutions. Illumination quality light is obtained with stable Commission Internationale d'Eclairage coordinates, stable color temperatures, and stable high color rendering indices, all close to those of "pure" white. The multilayer white-emitting PLEDs exhibit luminous efficiency of 21 cd/A, power efficiency of 6 lm/W at a current density of 23 mA/cm2 with luminance of 5.5 x 10 4 cd/m2 at 16 V. By using water-soluble (ethanol-soluble) polymers/small molecules as HIL/HTL and polymers/small molecules as EIL/ETL, the interfacial mixing problem is solved (the emissive polymer layer is soluble in organic solvents, but not in water/ ethanol). As a result, this device architecture and process technology can potentially be used for printing large-area multiplayer light sources and for other applications in "plastic" electronics. More important, the promise of producing large areas of high quality white light with low-cost manufacturing technology makes the white multilayer white-emitting PLEDs attractive for the development of solid state light sources.

  7. High-performance applications of light-emitting diode displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Gurdial S.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1996-05-01

    A display is an electronic component or subsystem used to convert electrical signals into visual imagery in real time suitable for direct interpretation by a human observer. Until recently, the cathode ray tube (CRT) has been the main source of displays. During the last twenty years, it has been determined that alternatives to CRT displays need to be found. One of the alternatives was the introduction of flat-panel displays. The term 'flat-panel display' is more of a concept than a specific entity. It is a display which is flat and light and may not require a great deal of power. A flat-panel display is often defined in terms of the ideal display, that being: thin form, low volume, even surface, having high resolution, high contrast, sunlight readable, color, low power, and being solid-state and lightweight. This is easy to conceive but difficult to deliver. The objective is to develop displays with as many desirable characteristics as possible. Flat-panel displays are basically of two types: the light valve type (that needs an external source of light such as a backlight or arc-lamp) and the emissive type (that generate light at the display surface). The light emitting diode (LED) display is of the emissive type. The LED displays have been in use for more than 25 years in one form or the other. Because of certain limitations of inorganic materials (such as cost, power, and color), LED displays do not dominate the flat-panel display market. A recent discovery of polymer and organic materials may change LED prospects. It is now believed that it may become possible to make LED displays that are inexpensive, low-power, and at the same time provide full color. If present research objectives are met, LEDs, especially organic LEDs, may revolutionize the flat-panel display market. This paper addresses the various aspects of LED technology with particular reference to its useful characteristics, and the limitations that need to be overcome.

  8. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Guillermo Bazan; Alexander Mikhailovsky

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially

  9. Monolithic integration of OFETs driving organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Michael; Becker, Eike; Schildknecht, Christian; Hartmann, Sören; Johannes, Hans-Hermann; Kowalsky, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Organic field effect transistors are expected to be applicable for low-cost, large-area electronic applications, e.g. the incorporation as active-matrix into displays based on organic light emitting diodes (OLED). There are two major challenges which have to be tackled. As the low charge carrier mobility allows only for comparatively low saturation currents, the ratio of channel width and length has to increase by several orders of magnitude, compared to poly-Si-technology. Furthermore, as organic semiconductor devices usually degrade upon exposure to solvents, standard photolithography cannot be applied once the organic materials have been deposited. Therefore, the definition of single pixels has to occur before the deposition of organic materials. We prepared OFETs employing a bottom-Al-gate, an 50 nm thick anodized Al-oxide gate dielectric and a inter-digital drain-source-structure (Au), topped with 30 nm of pentacene as active layer. By applying an inter-digital structure we increased the W/L-ratio to 4340. For the given configuration, a saturation current of 4 mA could be observed at -20 V drain-source- and -20 V gate-source-voltage. The drain-source-contacts enclosed a predefined ITO-anode shorted to drain and acting as OLED-anode. For preventing shortcuts between the OLED-cathode and the OFET, poly-vinyl-alcohol (PVOH) was spin-coated from an aqueous solution and structurized by photolithography. When the OFET characteristics were measured afterwards the field-effect- mobility dropped by two orders of magnitude but recovered due to desorption of residual water. Afterwards, the organic layers and a Al/LiF-cathode were deposited. The area covered by the OLED was 1.33mm2. Applying an operating bias of 11 V between cathode and source, allows for switching of the OLED by changing the gate-source-voltage from +2.5 V to -5 V. The on-state-brightness is 850 cd/m2 and the on-off-ratio 950. Considering a realistic filling factor of 40% the values observed may be

  10. Interface modification and material synthesis of organic light-emitting diodes using plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong; Yang, Cheng; He, Kongduo; Yang, Xilu; Zhong, Shaofeng; plasma application Team

    2015-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), due to their unique properties of solution processability, compatibility with flexible substrates and with large-scale printing technology, attract huge interest in the field of lighting. The integration of plasma technology into OLEDs provides a new route to improve their performance. Here we demonstrate the modification of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) work function by plasma treatment, synthesis of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials using plasma grafting (polymerisation), and multi-layer solution processing achieved by plasma cross-linking.

  11. Light-emitting diode versus laser irradiation phototherapy with lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Young, Stuart W.; Qing, Fan; Miles, Dale R.; Thiemann, Patricia A.

    1997-05-01

    Lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123) is presently in clinical trials for the treatment of neoplasms. An argon-pumped dye laser has mostly been used to generate light for PCI-0123 photoactivation. However, lasers are expensive and produce a limited area of illumination, so the efficacy of light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated. An LED array was developed so that the spectral emission matched the far red absorption spectrum of PCI-0123. A preclinical PDT efficacy study comparing the laser and the LED was undertaken using EMT6-bearing animals. The LED and laser light sources were statistically comparable in eradicating the murine mammary sarcomas using PCI-0123 as the photosensitizer.

  12. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  13. Method and apparatus for improving the performance of light emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Christopher H.; McElfresh, David K.; Burchet, Steve; Adolf, Douglas B.; Martin, James

    1996-01-01

    A method for increasing the resistance of a light emitting diode and other semiconductor devices to extremes of temperature is disclosed. During the manufacture of the light emitting diode, a liquid coating is applied to the light emitting die after the die has been placed in its lead frame. After the liquid coating has been placed on the die and its lead frames, a thermosetting encapsulant material is placed over the coating. The operation that cures the thermosetting material leaves the coating liquid intact. As the die and the encapsulant expand and contract at different rates with respect to changes in temperature, and as in known light emitting diodes the encapsulating material adheres to the die and lead frames, this liquid coating reduces the stresses that these different rates of expansion and contraction normally cause by eliminating the adherence of the encapsulating material to the die and frame.

  14. Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with high efficiency and brightness

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-11-12

    An organic light emitting device including a) an anode; b) a cathode; and c) an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the emissive layer comprising an organic host compound and a phosphorescent compound exhibiting a Stokes Shift overlap greater than 0.3 eV. The organic light emitting device may further include a hole transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the anode; and an electron transport layer disposed between the emissive layer and the cathode. In some embodiments, the phosphorescent compound exhibits a phosphorescent lifetime of less than 10 .mu.s. In some embodiments, the concentration of the phosphorescent compound ranges from 0.5 wt. % to 10 wt. %.

  15. Diffusion injected multi-quantum well light-emitting diode structure

    SciTech Connect

    Riuttanen, L. Nykänen, H.; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M.; Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.

    2014-02-24

    The attention towards light-emitting diode (LED) structures based on nanowires, surface plasmon coupled LEDs, and large-area high-power LEDs has been increasing for their potential in increasing the optical output power and efficiency of LEDs. In this work we demonstrate an alternative way to inject charge carriers into the active region of an LED, which is based on completely different current transport mechanism compared to conventional current injection approaches. The demonstrated structure is expected to help overcoming some of the challenges related to current injection with conventional structures. A functioning III-nitride diffusion injected light-emitting diode structure, in which the light-emitting active region is located outside the pn-junction, is realized and characterized. In this device design, the charge carriers are injected into the active region by bipolar diffusion, which could also be utilized to excite otherwise challenging to realize light-emitting structures.

  16. Promotion of neural sprouting using low-level green light-emitting diode phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Noa; Duadi, Hamootal; Cohen, Ortal; Samet, Tamar; Zilony, Neta; Schori, Hadas; Shefi, Orit; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-02-01

    We irradiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line with low-level light-emitting diode (LED) illumination at a visible wavelength of 520 nm (green) and intensity of 100 mW/cm2. We captured and analyzed the cell morphology before LED treatment, immediately after, and 12 and 24 h after treatment. Our study demonstrated that LED illumination increases the amount of sprouting dendrites in comparison to the control untreated cells. This treatment also resulted in more elongated cells after treatment in comparison to the control cells and higher levels of expression of a differentiation related gene. This result is a good indication that the proposed method could serve in phototherapy treatment for increasing sprouting and enhancing neural network formation.

  17. High-Efficiency Light-Emitting Diodes of Organometal Halide Perovskite Amorphous Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Yan, Fei; Zhao, Yawen; Chen, Shi; Yu, Huakang; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Rongguang; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiaowei; Huan, Alfred; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-07-26

    Organometal halide perovskite has recently emerged as a very promising family of materials with augmented performance in electronic and optoelectronic applications including photovoltaic devices, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. Herein, we propose and demonstrate facile solution synthesis of a series of colloidal organometal halide perovskite CH3NH3PbX3 (X = halides) nanoparticles with amorphous structure, which exhibit high quantum yield and tunable emission from ultraviolet to near-infrared. The growth mechanism and photoluminescence properties of the perovskite amorphous nanoparticles were studied in detail. A high-efficiency green-light-emitting diode based on amorphous CH3NH3PbBr3 nanoparticles was demonstrated. The perovskite amorphous nanoparticle-based light-emitting diode shows a maximum luminous efficiency of 11.49 cd/A, a power efficiency of 7.84 lm/W, and an external quantum efficiency of 3.8%, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the best colloidal perovskite quantum-dot-based light-emitting diodes previously reported. Our findings indicate the great potential of colloidal perovskite amorphous nanoparticles in light-emitting devices. PMID:27284993

  18. [White organic light-emitting diodes applied for lighting technology].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Yu; Zhao, Su-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Fan, Xing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Qian-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Lighting accounts for approximately 22 percent of the electricity consumed in buildings in the United States, with 40 percent of that amount consumed by inefficient incandescent lamps. This has generated increased interest in the use of white electroluminescent organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDS) as the next generation solid-state lighting source, owing to their potential for significantly improved efficiency over incandescent sources, combined with low-cost, high-throughput manufacturability. The research and application of the devices have witnessed great progress. WOLEDS have incomparable advantages for its special characteristics. This progress report sketched the principle of WOLEDS and provided some common structures, and further investigation of the mechanism of different structures was made. Meanwhile, the key technologies of WOLEDS were summarized. Finally, the latest research progress of WOLEDS was reviewed. PMID:24783527

  19. Voltage reduction in organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, L. S.; Mason, M. G.

    2001-06-04

    For practical applications, it is important to operate organic light-emitting devices at low voltages and low power consumption. When both the cathode and anode are perfectly injecting, low electron mobility in electron-transport materials, such as tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq), becomes a limiting factor on voltage reduction. In this letter copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) is replaced for Alq as an electron-transport layer, and interfacial modification is utilized to enhance electron injection from the CuPc electron-transport layer into the Alq emissive layer. The outcome of this structure significantly facilitates electron transport through the organic materials, thus resulting in substantial reduction in operating voltages and power consumption. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. High-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Higuchi, Takahiro; Furukawa, Taro; Masui, Kensuke; Morimoto, Kei; Numata, Masaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sagara, Yuta; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes have continued to attract interest because of their long operational lifetimes, high colour purity of electroluminescence and potential to be manufactured at low cost in next-generation full-colour display and lighting applications. In fluorescent molecules, however, the exciton production efficiency is limited to 25% due to the deactivation of triplet excitons. Here we report fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes that realize external quantum efficiencies as high as 13.4-18% for blue, green, yellow and red emission, indicating that the exciton production efficiency reached nearly 100%. The high performance is enabled by utilization of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as assistant dopants that permit efficient transfer of all electrically generated singlet and triplet excitons from the assistant dopants to the fluorescent emitters. Organic light-emitting diodes employing this exciton harvesting process provide freedom for the selection of emitters from a wide variety of conventional fluorescent molecules.

  1. Active Matrix Organic light Emitting Diode Display Based on “Super Top Emission” Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Tadashi; Yamada, Jiro; Hirano, Takashi; Iwase, Yuichi; Sato, Yukio; Nakagawa, Ryo; Sekiya, Mitsunobu; Sasaoka, Tatsuya; Urabe, Tetsuo

    2006-05-01

    We developed an original “Super Top Emission” technology, which enables us to optimize the distinctive features of an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display. With this technology, the following characteristics can be obtained: (1) high color reproduction of a 100% NTSC gamut ratio, (2) wide viewing angle, (3) high contrast of 1000:1 maintaining high luminous efficiency with a color filter, (4) original all-solid sealing structure. In addition, Super Top Emission technology was demonstrated by developing a 3.8-type size half video graphics array (HVGA) active matrix organic light emitting diode (AM-OLED) display by the shadow mask patterning process.

  2. New red phosphor for near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with high color-purity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhengliang; He, Pei; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Jishou; Gong, Menglian

    2010-02-15

    New red phosphors, Na{sub 5}Eu(MoO{sub 4}){sub 4} doped with boron oxide were prepared by the solid-state reaction. Their structure and photo-luminescent properties were investigated. With the introduction of boron oxide, the red emission intensity of the phosphors under 395 nm excitation is strengthened, with high color-purity (x = 0.673, y = 0.327). The single red light-emitting diode was obtained by combining InGaN chip with the red phosphor, bright red light can be observed by naked eyes from the red light-emitting diodes under a forward bias of 20 mA.

  3. Printed assemblies of ultrathin, microscale inorganic light emitting diodes for deformable and semitransparent displays

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph; Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Park, Sang Il; Kim, Rak Hwan

    2014-10-21

    Described herein are printable structures and methods for making, assembling and arranging electronic devices. A number of the methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices where one or more device components are embedded in a polymer which is patterned during the embedding process with trenches for electrical interconnects between device components. Some methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices by printing methods, such as by dry transfer contact printing methods. Also described herein are GaN light emitting diodes and methods for making and arranging GaN light emitting diodes, for example for display or lighting systems.

  4. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-09-01

    Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  5. Modification of Conductive Polymer for Polymeric Anodes of Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Feng; Tao, Xiao-Ming; Xin, John H.; Fei, Bin

    2009-07-01

    A conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), was modified with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in solution state, together with sub-sequential thermal treatment of its spin-coated film. The electrical conductivity increased by more than three orders of magnitude improvement was achieved. The mechanism for the conductivity improvement was studied at nanoscale by particle size analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Smaller particle size was observed, resulting in larger contact area and better electrical conductive connections. Connection of conductive PEDOT increased on the surface of the PEDOT:PSS particles, which promoted high conductivity. Flexible anodes based on the modified PEDOT:PSS were fabricated. Flexible organic light-emitting diodes (FOLED) based the polymeric anodes have a comparable performance to those on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anodes.

  6. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying; You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian; Mohney, Suzanne E.

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diodes with a single ferromagnetic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Baofu Alameh, Kamal; Song, Qunliang

    2014-05-19

    In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a room-temperature spin-polarized organic light-emitting diode (Spin-OLED) structure based on (i) the deposition of an ultra-thin p-type organic buffer layer on the surface of the ferromagnetic electrode of the Spin-OLED and (ii) the use of oxygen plasma treatment to modify the surface of that electrode. Experimental results demonstrate that the brightness of the developed Spin-OLED can be increased by 110% and that a magneto-electroluminescence of 12% can be attained for a 150 mT in-plane magnetic field, at room temperature. This is attributed to enhanced hole and room-temperature spin-polarized injection from the ferromagnetic electrode, respectively.

  8. Light emitting diodes as a plant lighting source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Tennessen, D. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    Electroluminescence in solid materials is defined as the generation of light by the passage of an electric current through a body of solid material under an applied electric field. A specific type of electroluminescence, first noted in 1923, involves the generation of photons when electrons are passed through a p-n junction of certain solid materials (junction of a n-type semiconductor, an electron donor, and a p-type semiconductor, an electron acceptor). The development of this light emitting semiconductor technology dates back less than 30 years. During this period of time, the LED has evolved from a rare and expensive light generating device to one of the most widely used electronic components. A number of LED characteristics are of considerable importance in selecting a light source for plant lighting in a controlled environment facility. Of particular importance is the characteristic that light is generated by an LED at a rate far greater than the corresponding thermal radiation predicted by the bulk temperature of the device as defined by Plank's radiation law. This is in sharp contrast to other light sources, such as an incandescent or high intensity discharge lamp. A plant lighting system for controlled environments must provide plants with an adequate flux of photosynthetically active radiation, plus providing photons in the spectral regions that are involved in the photomorphogenic and phototropic responses that result in normal plant growth and development. Use of light sources that emit photons over a broad spectral range generally meet these two lighting requirements. Since the LED's emit over specific spectral regions, they must be carefully selected so that the levels of photsynthetically active and photomorphogenic and phototropic radiation meet these plant requirements.

  9. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  10. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  11. Spectral optimization of phosphor-conversion light-emitting diodes for ultimate color rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Ivanauskas, F.; Vaitkevičius, H.; Shur, M. S.

    2008-08-01

    We apply an optimization scheme based on rendering of all colors of the enhanced Munsell palette to phosphor-conversion (PC) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This approach yields combinations of peak wavelengths and bandwidths for white PC LEDs with partial and complete conversion that enable lighting with better quality than that obtained using designs based on the standard color-rendering assessment procedure.

  12. Response of adult mosquitoes to light emitting diodes placed in resting boxes and in the field.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resting boxes are passive devices used to attract and capture mosquitoes seeking shelter. Increasing the attractiveness of these devices could improve their effectiveness. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) can be attractive to mosquitoes when used together with other trapping devices. Therefore restin...

  13. All-fibre sensing loop using pulse-modulated light-emitting diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.

    1985-01-01

    A sensing system is presented which includes a pulse-modulated light-emitting diode (LED) and an all-fibre-optic loop generating a reference signal in the time domain. The basic principle of operation and parameters are introduced, and some properties of such a system are experimentally examined using a microbend sensor.

  14. Optical Experiments Using Mini-Torches with Red, Green and Blue Light Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Ai

    2007-01-01

    We have developed two kinds of optical experiments: color mixture and fluorescence, using mini-torches with light emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit three primary colors. Since the tools used in the experiments are simple and inexpensive, students can easily retry and develop the experiments by themselves. As well as giving an introduction to basic…

  15. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  16. An evaluation of organic light emitting diode monitors for medical applications: Great timing, but luminance artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Elze, Tobias; Taylor, Christopher; Bex, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast to the dominant medical liquid crystal display (LCD) technology, organic light-emitting diode (OLED) monitors control the display luminance via separate light-emitting diodes for each pixel and are therefore supposed to overcome many previously documented temporal artifacts of medical LCDs. We assessed the temporal and luminance characteristics of the only currently available OLED monitor designed for use in the medical treatment field (SONY PVM2551MD) and checked the authors’ main findings with another SONY OLED device (PVM2541). Methods: Temporal properties of the photometric output were measured with an optical transient recorder. Luminances of the three color primaries and white for all 256 digital driving levels (DDLs) were measured with a spectroradiometer. Between the luminances of neighboring DDLs, just noticeable differences were calculated according to a perceptual model developed for medical displays. Luminances of full screen (FS) stimuli were compared to luminances of smaller stimuli with identical DDLs. Results: All measured luminance transition times were below 300 μs. Luminances were independent of the luminance in the preceding frame. However, for the single color primaries, up to 50.5% of the luminances of neighboring DDLs were not perceptually distinguishable. If two color primaries were active simultaneously, between 36.7% and 55.1% of neighboring luminances for increasing DDLs of the third primary were even decreasing. Moreover, luminance saturation effects were observed when too many pixels were active simultaneously. This effect was strongest for white; a small white patch was close to 400 cd/m2, but in FS the luminance of white saturated at 162 cd/m2. Due to different saturation levels, the luminance of FS green and FS yellow could exceed the luminance of FS white for identical DDLs. Conclusions: The OLED temporal characteristics are excellent and superior to those of LCDs. However, the OLEDs revealed severe

  17. 77 FR 75446 - Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing the Same; Commission Determination To Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... (``the `090 patent''); 7,151,283 (``the `283 patent''); and 7,271,425 (``the `425 patent''). 76 FR 40746... COMMISSION Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing the Same; Commission Determination To Grant... importation of certain light-emitting diodes and products containing same by reason of infringement of...

  18. 76 FR 67761 - Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing Same Determination Not To Review an Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... (collectively, ``LG''). 76 FR 54254 (August 31, 2011). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 based... COMMISSION Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing Same Determination Not To Review an Initial... States after importation of certain light emitting diodes and products containing same by reason...

  19. Effective ionic charge polarization using typical supporting electrolyte and charge injection phenomena in molecularly doped polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Eiji; Yamashita, Takanori; Miyairi, Keiichi

    2002-11-01

    An effective method of enhancing charge injection and electroluminescence efficiency of polymer-based light-emitting diodes is introduced. Spin-coated films of poly (N-vinylcarbazole) blended with electron-transport material (Bu-PBD), laser dye (Coumarin6), and the typical supporting electrolyte [tetraethylammonium perchlorate (TEAP)] were examined and it was found that the injection current and luminance of the light emitting diodes doped with TEAP were enhanced dramatically after heat treatment at 80 degC and appropriate biasing in an external electric field of 1.5 x108 V/m at this temperature. A charge injection model based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is proposed, taking into account electric field distortion due to the accumulation of ionic space charges at the electrode/film interface. The relaxation time of ionic polarization is found to be related to the cation size of the electrolyte.

  20. Synthesis and optical properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots for white light-emitting diode application

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xianmei; Wang, Yilin; Gule, Teri; Luo, Qiang; Zhou, Liya; Gong, Fuzhong

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Stable CdSe QDs were synthesized by the one-step and two-level process respectively. ► The fabricated white LEDs show good white balance. ► CdSe QDs present well green to yellow band luminescence. ► CdSe QDs displayed a broad excitation band. - Abstract: Yellow light-emitting cadmium selenide quantum dots were synthesized using one-step and two-step methods in an aqueous medium. The structural luminescent properties of these quantum dots were investigated. The obtained cadmium selenide quantum dots displayed a broad excitation band suitable for blue or near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode applications. White light-emitting diodes were fabricated by coating the cadmium selenide samples onto a 460 nm-emitting indium gallium nitrite chip. Both samples exhibited good white balance. Under a 20 mA working current, the white light-emitting diode fabricated via the one-step and two-step methods showed Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage coordinates at (0.27, 0.23) and (0.27, 0.33), respectively, and a color rendering index equal to 41 and 37, respectively. The one-step approach was simpler, greener, and more effective than the two-step approach. The one-step approach can be enhanced by combining cadmium selenide quantum dots with proper phosphors.

  1. Semiconductor-Nanocrystals-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Quanqin; Duty, Chad E; Hu, Michael Z.

    2010-01-01

    In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid-state lighting, such as white lightemitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement can cut the ever-increasing level of energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, the recent progress in semiconductor-nanocrystals-based WLEDs is highlighted, the different approaches for generating white light are compared, and the benefits and challenges of the solid-state lighting technology are discussed.

  2. Effect of alcohol vapor treatment on electrical and optical properties of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) films for indium tin oxide-free organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahzadeh, Ali; Saghaei, Jaber; Yousefi, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-11-01

    A simple alcohol vapor treatment (AVT) technique was proposed to improve the conductivity of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films. In this technique, various alcohols, i.e. methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol and ethylene glycol, were applied to treat the surface of the films formed and then they were annealed. The sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS films was significantly reduced from 130 kΩ/sq to 60 Ω/sq when treated with methanol vapor. The investigation of the vertical resistance of the films showed that the sample treated with methanol vapor displayed the lowest resistance as well. The mechanism of conductivity enhancement of PEDOT:PSS films through AVT method was explained by surface phase images, UV and IR spectra of PEDOT:PSS films. Optical transmittance spectrum of treated films exhibited that AVT has even enhanced the optical transmittance slightly. Improvement in the morphology, electrical and optical properties of PEDOT:PSS films prompted their applications as a transparent anode in the fabrication of ITO-free organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The OLED manufactured based on methanol-treated PEDOT:PSS films demonstrated the highest luminance.

  3. Multilayered Organic Light Emitting Diodes Based on Polyfluorenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozano, Luisa; Marsitzky, Dirk; Carter, Kenneth; Swanson, Sally; Lee, Victor; Salem, Jesse; Miller, Robert; Scott, Campbell; Carter, Sue

    2001-03-01

    The electroluminescence of polyfluorene homopolymers and various arylene copolymers is in the deep blue, with peak emission wavelengths as small as 420 nm. These materials are therefore of great interest for use in full-color OLED displays both as emitters for blue subpixels and as hosts for red and green emitting dopants or comonomers. In this work, we compare the properties of single and multilayer diode structures based on dihexyl and di(2-ethylexyl) substituted polyfluorenes. A cross-linkable polymeric arylamine hole transport polymer and/or a polyquinoline electron transport layer are introduced to better balance the charge injection from the electrodes and optimize the recombination in the fluorene emitter layer. External quantum efficiencies increase from about 0.1layer devices to well over 1The electrical and optical response is determined by steady state and transient measurements. The effects on efficiency, emission spectrum and electrical response resulting from the introduction of dopant dyes into the emitter layer are also presented.

  4. Effect of light emitting diode (LED) therapy on the survival of photoreceptors following argon laser injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Brown, Jeremiah; Hacker, Henry D.; Cheramie, Rachel; Schuschereba, Steven; Valo, Lynn; Clarkson, Donna R.; Sankovich, James; Zwick, Harry; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2005-04-01

    Due to the increasing number of optic systems that military personnel are exposed, the development of countermeasures for laser eye injury is of significant concern. Recent reports in the literature suggest some benefit form the use of Light Emitting Diode (LED) therapy on the retina that received a toxic insult. The purpose of this study was to compare retinal cell survival and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) in a laser retinal injury model following treatment with LED photoillumination. Control and LED array (670 nm) illuminated cynomolgus monkeys received macular Argon laser lesions (514 nm, 130 mW, 100 ms). LED array exposure was accomplished for 4 days for a total dose of 4 J/cm2 per day. Baseline and post-laser exposure mfERGs were performed on most of the subjects. Ocular tissues were collected from four animals at Day 4 poast laser exposure and from two animals at 4 months post laser exposure. The tissues were processed for plastic embedding. Retinal cell counts were performed on the lesion sections. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) results yielded no significant difference in the sparing of photoreceptors, inner nuclear and ganglion cells between the control and LED illuminated subjects. Although pathology showed no significant support for diode therapy, our early mfERG observations previously reported suggested a more rapid functional recovery. Since there is still no uniform therapy for laser retinal injury, research is continuing to determine novel therapies that may provide retinal cell sparing and functional retinal return.

  5. CoPt ferromagnetic injector in light-emitting Schottky diodes based on InGaAs/GaAs nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zdoroveyshchev, A. V. Dorokhin, M. V.; Demina, P. B.; Kudrin, A. V.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Ved’, M. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Erofeeva, I. V.; Krjukov, R. N.; Nikolichev, D. E.

    2015-12-15

    The possibility of fabricating a ferromagnetic injector based on a near-equiatomic CoPt alloy with pronounced perpendicular magnetization anisotropy in the InGaAs/GaAs spin light-emitting diode is shown. The physical properties of experimental spin light-emitting diode prototypes are comprehensively studied. Circularly polarized electroluminescence of fabricated diodes is obtained in zero magnetic field due to the remanent magnetization of CoPt layers.

  6. Morphology control of perovskite light-emitting diodes by using amino acid self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nana; Cheng, Lu; Si, Junjie; Liang, Xiaoyong; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Jianpu; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Amino acid self-assembled monolayers are used in the fabrication of light-emitting diodes based on organic-inorganic halide perovskites. The monolayers of amino acids provide modified interfaces by anchoring to the surfaces of ZnO charge-transporting layers using carboxyl groups, leaving the amino groups to facilitate the nucleation of MAPbBr3 perovskite films. This surface-modification strategy, together with chlorobenzene-assisted fast crystallization method, results in good surface coverage and reduced defect density of the perovskite films. These efforts lead to green perovskite light emitting diodes with a low turn-on voltage of 2 V and an external quantum efficiency of 0.43% at a brightness of ˜5000 cd m-2.

  7. Electrical and optical measurements of the bandgap energy of a light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Matthieu; Michez, Lisa; Raimundo, Jean-Manuel; Dumas, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor materials are at the core of electronics. Most electronic devices are made of semiconductors. The operation of these components is well described by quantum physics which is often a difficult concept for students to understand. One of the intrinsic parameters of semiconductors is their bandgap energy {{E}\\text{g}} . In the case of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) {{E}\\text{g}} fixes the colour of the light emitted by the diodes. In this article we propose an experiment to compare {{E}\\text{g}} of a green LED obtained by both electrical and optical measurements. The two slightly different results can be explained by the theoretical knowledge of students on solid physics and the internal structure of electronic devices.

  8. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  9. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  10. Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2013-04-15

    Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

  11. Highly Efficient Perovskite Nanocrystal Light-Emitting Diodes Enabled by a Universal Crosslinking Method.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangru; Rivarola, Florencia Wisnivesky Rocca; Davis, Nathaniel J L K; Bai, Sai; Jellicoe, Tom C; de la Peña, Francisco; Hou, Shaocong; Ducati, Caterina; Gao, Feng; Friend, Richard H; Greenham, Neil C; Tan, Zhi-Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The preparation of highly efficient perovskite nanocrystal light-emitting diodes is shown. A new trimethylaluminum vapor-based crosslinking method to render the nanocrystal films insoluble is applied. The resulting near-complete nanocrystal film coverage, coupled with the natural confinement of injected charges within the perovskite crystals, facilitates electron-hole capture and give rise to a remarkable electroluminescence yield of 5.7%. PMID:26990965

  12. Simultaneous color and luminance control of organic light-emitting diodes for mood-lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhnen, Anne; Meerholz, Klaus; Hagemann, Malte; Brinkmann, Matthias; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using polymer blends as a single emissive layer often suffer from large color shifts with changing operational voltage. Until now, such devices cannot stand the critical demands of lighting industry. In this contribution, we introduce a pulse-width-modulation-based driver concept, enabling the user to simultaneously and independently adjust color and luminance of a single device with two contacts. This concept makes color-shifting OLEDs highly interesting for "mood-light" applications.

  13. Photo thermal efficacy of green light emitting diode and gold nano spheres for malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gananathan, Poorani; Prakasa Rao, Aruna; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Manickan, Elanchezhiyan

    2016-03-01

    The effect of 30nm Gold Nanoparticles (GNP) based on concentration and incubation time with respect to their cellular uptake kinetics was studied with Vero and HeLa cells . Photoirradiation effect of GNPs in combination with light emitting diode(LED) found to be remarkable and this work concentrates on optimizing concentration and light source. The effect of Gold nanoparticles alone and in combination with LED in malignant and normal cells lines were studied.

  14. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  15. Extracting the emitter orientation in organic light-emitting diodes from external quantum efficiency measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Tobias D. Reichardt, Lukas J.; Wehrmeister, Sebastian; Scholz, Bert J.; Mayr, Christian; Brütting, Wolfgang; Rausch, Andreas F.; Wehlus, Thomas; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Ciarnáin, Rossá Mac; Danz, Norbert

    2014-07-28

    Emitter orientation will play a major role in future applications of organic light-emitting diodes due to its strong impact on the efficiency of the devices. Up to now, determining the orientation of transition dipole moments required elaborate angular-dependent measurements of the light emission pattern. In this paper, we present a simplified and straightforward method to extract the emitter orientation from external quantum efficiency measurements. We demonstrate the validity of the method on three different dye-doped emitting systems.

  16. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner. PMID:26619309

  17. Analytical devices based on light-emitting diodes--a review of the state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duy Anh; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    A general overview of the development of the uses of light-emitting diodes in analytical instrumentation is given. Fundamental aspects of light-emitting diodes, as far as relevant for this usage, are covered in the first part. The measurement of light intensity is also discussed, as this is an essential part of any device based on light-emitting diodes as well. In the second part, applications are discussed, which cover liquid and gas-phase absorbance measurements, flow-through detectors for chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, sensors, as well as some less often reported methods such as photoacoustic spectroscopy. PMID:25467449

  18. Green-light supplementation for enhanced lettuce growth under red- and blue-light-emitting diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Hye; Goins, Gregory D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Sager, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Plants will be an important component of future long-term space missions. Lighting systems for growing plants will need to be lightweight, reliable, and durable, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have these characteristics. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of red and blue light was an effective light source for several crops. Yet the appearance of plants under red and blue lighting is purplish gray making visual assessment of any problems difficult. The addition of green light would make the plant leave appear green and normal similar to a natural setting under white light and may also offer a psychological benefit to the crew. Green supplemental lighting could also offer benefits, since green light can better penetrate the plant canopy and potentially increase plant growth by increasing photosynthesis from the leaves in the lower canopy. In this study, four light sources were tested: 1) red and blue LEDs (RB), 2) red and blue LEDs with green fluorescent lamps (RGB), 3) green fluorescent lamps (GF), and 4) cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF), that provided 0%, 24%, 86%, and 51% of the total PPF in the green region of the spectrum, respectively. The addition of 24% green light (500 to 600 nm) to red and blue LEDs (RGB treatment) enhanced plant growth. The RGB treatment plants produced more biomass than the plants grown under the cool-white fluorescent lamps (CWF treatment), a commonly tested light source used as a broad-spectrum control.

  19. Red/near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Ho, Michael D.; Krengel, Maxine H.; Bogdanova, Yelena; Knight, Jeffrey A.; Yee, Megan K.; Zafonte, Ross; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R.; Koo, Bang-Bon

    2015-05-01

    This invited paper reviews our research with scalp application of red/near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) to improve cognition in chronic, traumatic brain injury 1. Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased ATP, important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. Eleven chronic, mTBI participants with closed-head injury and cognitive dysfunction received 18 outpatient treatments (MWF, 6 Wks) starting at 10 Mo. to 8 Yr. post-mTBI (MVA, sports-related, IED blast injury). LED therapy is non-invasive, painless, non-thermal (FDA-cleared, non-significant risk device). Each LED cluster head (2.1" diameter, 500mW, 22.2mW/cm2) was applied 10 min (13J/cm2) to 11 scalp placements: midline, from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, temporal, and parietal areas. Testing performed pre- and post-LED (+1 Wk, 1 and 2 Mo post- 18th treatment) showed significant linear trend for LED effect over time, on improved executive function and verbal memory. Fewer PTSD symptoms were reported. New studies at VA Boston include TBI patients treated with transcranial LED (26J/cm2); or treated with only intranasal red, 633nm and NIR, 810nm diodes placed into the nostrils (25 min, 6.5mW, 11.4J/cm2). Intranasal LEDs are hypothesized to deliver photons to hippocampus. Results are similar to Naeser et al. (2014). Actigraphy sleep data show increased sleep time (average, +1 Hr/night) post-18th transcranial or intranasal LED treatment. LED treatments may be self-administered at home (Naeser et al., 2011). A shamcontrolled study with Gulf War Illness Veterans is underway.

  20. Temperature-dependent electroluminescence from GeSn heterojunction light-emitting diode on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chiao; Li, Hui; Huang, Ssu-Hsuan; Lin, Li-Chien; Cheng, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-04-01

    The electroluminescence from a Ge/GeSn/Ge p-i-n light-emitting diode on Si was investigated under different temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 K. The diode was operated at a low injection current density of 13 A/cm2. We obtained no-phonon- and phonon-assisted replicas in emission spectra. Also, the relationship between indirect bandgap energy and temperature was investigated. The temperature-dependent bandgap energy followed Varshni’s empirical expression with α = 4.884 × 10-4 eV/K and β = 130 K.

  1. On the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current in semiconductor light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyeong Won; Shim, Jong-In; Shin, Dong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    While there have been many discussions on the standard Si pn-diodes, little attention has been paid and confusion still arises on the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current in semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In this letter, we theoretically demonstrate and experimentally confirm by using blue and infrared semiconductor LEDs that the ideality factor of the radiative recombination current is unity especially for low-current-density ranges. We utilize the data of internal quantum efficiency measured by the temperature-dependent electroluminescence to separate the radiative current component from the total current.

  2. Hourglass-graded heterostructures as a possible route towards extremely efficient light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaux, Julien; Iqbal, Asif; Bevan, Kirk H.

    2015-08-01

    In this study a theoretical analysis of hourglass-graded light emitting diodes (LEDs) is provided. The term hourglass-grading refers to the placement of a wide band gap material at the diode contacts, smoothly tapering to a smaller band gap material in the active centre region. Utilizing AlGaN as our model system, we show that such a device can both effectively confine carrier recombination and mitigate overflow under high doping conditions. Moreover, by lowering the Auger coefficient of recombination in the active region, room temperature internal quantum efficiencies of 95% or more might be achieved in hourglass-graded LEDs at drive currents near 103 A cm-2.

  3. Cuban experience for therapy in dentistry with light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopena, Esperanza P.; Serra, Mayra C.; Sopena, Maria d. l. A.; Lopez Silva, Sonnia M.

    1996-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of low power light with tissues has increased in the last few years. Very often, the stimulating effects of irradiation have been explained by the role of the coherence of laser radiation as it acts upon biological objects. This argument is not convincing and the purpose of the present report is to describe the experiences during two years working with infrared (IR) GaAs light emitting diodes (LED) as clinical light for the therapy of some dental diseases. Equipment was designed and built, FOTOTER, which was approved by the National Health Office (registration No. 7910B). The treatment was practiced on 360 patients. They presented pain on buccal or facial structures and disorders on buccal tissues. Pathologies, number of patients treated, application time in each trigger point, number of sessions, and the relief pain patients are summarized. We conclude that the therapy with IR LED has the same effects as the HeNe and GaAs laser therapy on the biological buccal tissues. We recommend LED therapy for the treatment of these dentistry diseases.

  4. Enhancement of electrical property by oxygen doping to copper phthalocyanine in inverted top emitting organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kihyon; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2009-11-23

    We reported the evidence of oxygen doping to copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) by O{sub 2}-plasma treatment to inverted top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (ITOLEDs). In situ synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that a new Cu-O bond appeared and the energy difference between the highest-occupied molecular orbital and E{sub F} is lowered by 0.15 eV after plasma treatment. The oxygen ions chemically interacted with Cu atoms and transferred charges to the CuPc. Thus the hole injection barrier was lowered, enhancing the electroluminescent property of ITOLEDs.

  5. Mild oxygen plasma treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for vacuum deposited organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunfei; Yuan, Yongbo; Lian, Jiarong; Zhang, Jie; Pang, Hongqi; Cao, Lingfang; Zhou, Xiang

    2006-08-01

    The surface morphology of PEDOT:PSS after mild oxygen plasma treatment were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The nanometer-scale islands on the surface of treated PEDOT:PSS were observed. Vacuum deposited organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer had been fabricated. The OLEDs with an appropriately treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer exhibited significantly enhanced lifetime and decreased driving voltage. The results suggest that the appropriate mild oxygen plasma treatment of PEDOT:PSS layers may be useful for the improvement of the interface with the hole transport layer and enhanced device performance.

  6. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  7. Electroluminescence spectra of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes based on p-n-heterostructures coated with phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'china, N. A.; Kogan, L. M.; Soshchin, N. P.; Shirokov, S. S.; Yunovich, A. E.

    2007-09-15

    The electroluminescence spectra of light-emitting diodes based on p-n heterostructures of the InGaN/AlGaN/GaN type are studied in the near-ultraviolet spectral region (360-405 nm). The spectra are peaked at the wavelengths 385 and 395 nm, and the intensity of emission falls exponentially with the photon energy in the shorter-wavelength and longer-wavelength regions. The emitters in the green and yellow spectral regions based on these light-emitting diodes coated with silicate phosphors are studied. The luminescence spectra of phosphors have the Gaussian shape and maximums in the range from 525 to 560 nm. The color characteristics of emitters depend on the ratios of intensities of the ultraviolet and yellow-green bands. The possibilities of fabrication of light-emitting diodes of visible luminescence based on ultraviolet light-emitting diodes that excite colored phosphors are discussed.

  8. Application of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for water disinfection: A review.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an effective technology for the inactivation of pathogens in water and is of growing interest for industrial application. A new UV source - ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) - has emerged in the past decade with a number of advantages compared to traditional UV mercury lamps. This promising alternative raises great interest in the research on application of UV-LEDs for water treatment. Studies on UV-LED water disinfection have increased during the past few years. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent studies on UV-LEDs with various wavelengths for the inactivation of different microorganisms. Many inconsistent and incomparable data were found from published studies, which underscores the importance of establishing a standard protocol for studying UV-LED inactivation of microorganisms. Different UV sensitivities to UV-LEDs and traditional UV lamps were observed in the literature for some microorganisms, which requires further investigation for a better understanding of microorganism response to UV-LEDs. The unique aspects of UV-LEDs improve inactivation effectiveness by applying LED special features, such as multiple wavelengths and pulsed illumination; however, more studies are needed to investigate the influencing factors and mechanisms. The special features of UV-LEDs offer the flexibility of novel reactor designs for a broad application of UV-LED reactors. PMID:26971809

  9. Comparative effectiveness of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers in near infrared photoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-03-22

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two NIR-light sources; light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers, for their effectiveness in NIR-PIT. A photosensitizer, IRDye-700DX, conjugated to panitumumab (pan-IR700), was incubated with EGFR-expressing A431 and MDA-MB-468-luc cells. NIR-light was provided by LEDs or Lasers at the same light dose. Laser-light produced more cytotoxicity and greater reductions in IR700-fluorescence intensity than LED-light. Laser-light also produced more cytotoxicity in vivo in both cell lines. Assessment of super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects were stronger with Laser than LED. These results suggest that Laser-light produced significantly more cytotoxic effects compared to LEDs. Although LED is less expensive, Laser-light produces superior results in NIR-PIT. PMID:26885688

  10. Comparative effectiveness of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers in near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two NIR-light sources; light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers, for their effectiveness in NIR-PIT. A photosensitizer, IRDye-700DX, conjugated to panitumumab (pan-IR700), was incubated with EGFR-expressing A431 and MDA-MB-468-luc cells. NIR-light was provided by LEDs or Lasers at the same light dose. Laser-light produced more cytotoxicity and greater reductions in IR700-fluorescence intensity than LED-light. Laser-light also produced more cytotoxicity in vivo in both cell lines. Assessment of super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects were stronger with Laser than LED. These results suggest that Laser-light produced significantly more cytotoxic effects compared to LEDs. Although LED is less expensive, Laser-light produces superior results in NIR-PIT. PMID:26885688

  11. Short-circuit prevention strategies in organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Jasper J.; Jolt Oostra, A.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2016-08-01

    Short-circuit prevention and repair strategies are essential to allow for upscaled production of organic electronic devices based on thin-film production technology. Occurrence of short circuits is a consequence of manufacturing imperfections and particle contamination. After giving a concise review of short-circuit prevention methods for organic thin-film devices in the open literature of the past decade, this overview article summarizes our recent work on short-circuit prevention in organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells by chemical oxidation methods. Our main strategy is based on self-aligned disruption of the conductivity of exposed areas of the typically applied hole transport material poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) by aqueous sodium hypochlorite, prior to cathode deposition. The ten orders of magnitude decrease in local conductivity obtained proves sufficient to let deliberately flawed devices operate at pristine performance levels. We next show that in the case of organic solar cells based on a lithium fluoride/aluminium cathode the shunting junctions can be made sufficiently resistive to allow for near unflawed operation, without applying wet treatment.

  12. Graphene oxide/graphene vertical heterostructure electrodes for highly efficient and flexible organic light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jia, S; Sun, H D; Du, J H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Ma, L P; Chen, J S; Ma, D G; Cheng, H M; Ren, W C

    2016-05-19

    The relatively high sheet resistance, low work function and poor compatibility with hole injection layers (HILs) seriously limit the applications of graphene as transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, a graphene oxide/graphene (GO/G) vertical heterostructure is developed as TCEs for high-performance OLEDs, by directly oxidizing the top layer of three-layer graphene films with ozone treatment. Such GO/G heterostructure electrodes show greatly improved optical transmittance, a large work function, high stability, and good compatibility with HIL materials (MoO3 in this work). Moreover, the conductivity of the heterostructure is not sacrificed compared to the pristine three-layer graphene electrodes, but is significantly higher than that of pristine two-layer graphene films. In addition to high flexibility, OLEDs with different emission colors based on the GO/G heterostructure TCEs show much better performance than those based on indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes. Green OLEDs with GO/G heterostructure electrodes have the maximum current efficiency and power efficiency, as high as 82.0 cd A(-1) and 98.2 lm W(-1), respectively, which are 36.7% (14.8%) and 59.2% (15.0%) higher than those with pristine graphene (ITO) anodes. These findings open up the possibility of using graphene for next generation high-performance flexible and wearable optoelectronics with high stability. PMID:27153523

  13. Comparison of light emitting diodes and semiconductor laser inducing photodynamic therapy of cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macecek, Jaroslav; Kolarova, Hana; Bajgar, Robert; Strnad, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The goal of anticancer therapy is achievement of balance between destruction of tumour cells and tissues and conservation of physiological functions of noncancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of novel alternative treatment modality of malignant neoplasms. This method is based on cytotoxic action of excited sensitizers in the oxygen-rich environment. Sensitizers bound to cells and are excited by light source identical to absorption maximum of sensitizer. Photodynamic reactions lead to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause necrosis or apoptosis of cancer cells. The objective of our work was to analyse of phototoxicity in the sense of DNA damage in cancer cells after PDT by single cell gell electrophoresis (SCGE, comet assay) using ZnTPPS4 (zinc(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulphonatophenyl) porphyrine and disulfonated chloraluminium phthalocyanine ClAlPcS II as sensitizers. Violet light emitting diodes (LEDs; 1.5 mJ.cm -2.s -1; 418 nm) and semiconductor laser (50mW; 675 nm) were used as sources of radiation. Level of DNA fragmentation was detected after application of different light doses.

  14. Exciton quenching at PEDOT:PSS anode in polymer blue-light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, D.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Nicolai, H. T.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2014-12-01

    The quenching of excitons at the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) anode in blue polyalkoxyspirobifluorene-arylamine polymer light-emitting diodes is investigated. Due to the combination of a higher electron mobility and the presence of electron traps, the recombination zone shifts from the cathode to the anode with increasing voltage. The exciton quenching at the anode at higher voltages leads to an efficiency roll-off. The voltage dependence of the luminous efficiency is reproduced by a drift-diffusion model under the condition that quenching of excitons at the PEDOT:PSS anode and metallic cathode is of equal strength. Experimentally, the efficiency roll-off at high voltages due to anode quenching is eliminated by the use of an electron-blocking layer between the anode and the light-emitting polymer.

  15. Exciton quenching at PEDOT:PSS anode in polymer blue-light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Abbaszadeh, D.; Wetzelaer, G. A. H.; Nicolai, H. T.

    2014-12-14

    The quenching of excitons at the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) anode in blue polyalkoxyspirobifluorene-arylamine polymer light-emitting diodes is investigated. Due to the combination of a higher electron mobility and the presence of electron traps, the recombination zone shifts from the cathode to the anode with increasing voltage. The exciton quenching at the anode at higher voltages leads to an efficiency roll-off. The voltage dependence of the luminous efficiency is reproduced by a drift-diffusion model under the condition that quenching of excitons at the PEDOT:PSS anode and metallic cathode is of equal strength. Experimentally, the efficiency roll-off at high voltages due to anode quenching is eliminated by the use of an electron-blocking layer between the anode and the light-emitting polymer.

  16. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin; Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young; Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse; Young Kim, Woo

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  17. [Comparison of the effects of laser and light-emitting diodes on lipid peroxidation in rat wound exudate].

    PubMed

    Klebanov, G I; Shuraeva, N Iu; Chichuk, T V; Osipov, A N; Vladimirov, Iu A

    2006-01-01

    The effect of laser and light-emitting diode radiation on lipid peroxidation in rat wound exudate was studied with the aim to compare the efficiency of coherent laser and incoherent light-emitting diode radiations. A model of aseptic wound in rat suggested by L.I. Slutskii was used. A He-Ne laser (632 nm) and a U-332B light-emitting diode were used in this study. The intensity of lipid peroxidation was estimated by the TBA assay. The antioxidative capacity of rat wound fluid was evaluated by means of chemiluminescent assays in two model systems: a) aqueous system with ABAP and luminol and b) in phospholipid liposome suspension with Fe2+ and cumarin. It was shown that exposure of rat wounds to both laser and light-emitting diode radiation decreased the concentration of TBA products and increased the antioxidative capacity of wound exudates, compared with the control group (without irradiation). The results obtained show that exposure of wounds to both laser and light-emitting diode irradiation causes a decrease in the oxidative stress in the rat wound fluid. No significant quantitative difference between the effects of laser and light-emitting diode irradiation was found. PMID:16637342

  18. AlGaInN-based light emitting diodes with a transparent p-contact based on thin ITO films

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, I. P. Markov, L. K.; Pavlyuchenko, A. S.; Kukushkin, M. V.

    2012-03-15

    A method for obtaining transparent conductive ITO (indium-tin oxide) films aimed for use in light emitting diodes of the blue spectral range is developed. The peak external quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes with a p-contact based on the obtained films reaches 25%, while for similar light-emitting diodes with a standard semitransparent metal contact, it is <10%. An observed increase in the direct voltage drop from 3.15 to 3.37 V does not significantly affect the possibility of applying these films in light-emitting diodes since the optical power of light-emitting diodes with a transparent p-contact based on ITO films exceeds that of chips with metal semitransparent p-contacts with a working current of 20 mA by a factor of almost 2.5. Light-emitting diodes with p-contacts based on ITO films successfully withstand a pumping current that exceeds their calculated working current by a factor of 5 without the appearance of any signs of degradation.

  19. Enhancement of current injection in organic light emitting diodes with sputter treated molybdenum oxides as hole injection layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Sheng; Wu, I.-Wen; Tseng, Wei-Hsuan; Chen, Mei-Hsin; Wu, Chih-I.

    2011-04-01

    The enhancement of current density and luminance in organic light emitting diodes is achieved by treating molybdenum oxide (MoO3) hole-injection-layers with slight argon ion sputtering. The sputter treated MoO3 layers provide improvement in current injection efficiency, resulting in better current density which is about ten times higher than that of the reference devices. Photoemission spectroscopy shows that molybdenum in MoO3 is reduced to lower oxidation states after sputter treatment due to the removal of oxygen. As a result, gap states are formed to enhance metallic characteristics of the sputter treated MoO3 surface and facilitate better hole injection efficiency.

  20. Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes for future solid-state lighting: Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, Jonathan J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Sizov, Dmitry S.

    2013-08-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) is now the most efficient source of high color quality white light ever created. Nevertheless, the blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are the light engine of SSL still have significant performance limitations. Foremost among these is the decrease in efficiency at high input current densities widely known as “efficiency droop.” Efficiency droop limits input power densities, contrary to the desire to produce more photons per unit LED chip area and to make SSL more affordable. Pending a solution to efficiency droop, an alternative device could be a blue laser diode (LD). LDs, operated in stimulated emission, can have high efficiencies at much higher input power densities than LEDs can. In this article, LEDs and LDs for future SSL are explored by comparing: their current state-of-the-art input-power-density-dependent power-conversion efficiencies; potential improvements both in their peak power-conversion efficiencies and in the input power densities at which those efficiencies peak; and their economics for practical SSL.

  1. Efficient inverted organic light-emitting devices by amine-based solvent treatment (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myoung Hoon; Choi, Kyoung-Jin; Jung, Eui Dae

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of inverted polymer light-emitting diodes (iPLEDs) were remarkably enhanced by introducing spontaneously formed ripple-shaped nanostructure of ZnO (ZnO-R) and amine-based polar solvent treatment using 2-methoxyethanol and ethanolamine (2-ME+EA) co-solvents on ZnO-R. The ripple-shape nanostructure of ZnO layer fabricated by solution process with optimal rate of annealing temperature improves the extraction of wave guide modes inside the device structure, and 2-ME+EA interlayer enhances the electron injection and hole blocking and reduces exciton quenching between polar solvent treated ZnO-R and emissive layer. As a result, our optimized iPLEDs show the luminous efficiency (LE) of 61.6 cd A-1, power efficiency (PE) of 19.4 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 17.8 %. This method provides a promising method, and opens new possibilities for not only organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) but also other organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaics, organic thin film transistors, and electrically driven organic diode laser.

  2. High-efficient and brightness white organic light-emitting diodes operated at low bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Junsheng; Yuan, Kai; Jian, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) used for display application and lighting need to possess high efficiency, high brightness, and low driving voltage. In this work, white OLEDs consisted of ambipolar 9,10-bis 2-naphthyl anthracene (ADN) as a host of blue light-emitting layer (EML) doped with tetrabutyleperlene (TBPe) and a thin codoped layer consisted of N, N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) as a host of yellow light-emitting layer doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) were investigated. With appropriate tuning in the film thickness, position, and dopant concentration of the co-doped layer, a white OLED with a luminance yield of 10.02 cd/A with the CIE coordinates of (0.29, 0.33) has been achieved at a bias voltage of 9 V and a luminance level of over 10,000 cd/m2. By introducing the PIN structure with both HIL and bis(10- hydroxybenzo-quinolinato)-beryllium (BeBq2) ETL, the power efficiency of white OLED was improved.

  3. P-doping-free III-nitride high electron mobility light-emitting diodes and transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baikui; Tang, Xi; Chen, Kevin J.; Wang, Jiannong

    2014-07-21

    We report that a simple metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diode is capable of producing GaN band-edge ultraviolet emission at 3.4 eV at a small forward bias larger than ∼2 V at room temperature. Based on the surface states distribution of AlGaN, a mature impact-ionization-induced Fermi-level de-pinning model is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of the electroluminescence (EL) process. By experimenting with different Schottky metals, Ni/Au and Pt/Au, we demonstrated that this EL phenomenon is a “universal” property of metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes. Since this light-emitting Schottky diode shares the same active structure and fabrication processes as the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, straight-forward and seamless integration of photonic and electronic functional devices has been demonstrated on doping-free III-nitride heterostructures. Using a semitransparent Schottky drain electrode, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility light-emitting transistor is demonstrated.

  4. Frequency-Downconversion Stability of PMMA Coatings in Hybrid White Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Fulvio; Mosca, Mauro; Rinella, Salvatore; Macaluso, Roberto; Calì, Claudio; Saiano, Filippo; Feltin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We report on the properties of a poly(methyl methacrylate)-based coating used as a host for an organic dye in hybrid white light-emitting diodes. The device is composed by a pump source, which is a standard inorganic GaN/InGaN blue light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at around 450 nm, and a spin-coated conversion layer making use of Lumogen® F Yellow 083. Under prolonged irradiation, the coating exhibits significant bleaching, thus degrading the color rendering performance of the LED. We present experimental results that confirm that the local temperature rise of the operating diode does not affect the conversion layer. It is also proven that, during the test, the photostability of the organic dye is compromised, resulting in a chromatic shift from Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) ( x; y) coordinates (0.30;0.39) towards the color of the pump (0.15;0.04). Besides photodegradation of the dye, we address a phenomenon attributed to modification of the polymer matrix activated by the LED's blue light energy as confirmed by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Three methods for improving the overall stability of the organic coating are presented.

  5. Mixed-mode oscillations via canard explosions in light-emitting diodes with optoelectronic feedback.

    PubMed

    Marino, F; Ciszak, M; Abdalah, S F; Al-Naimee, K; Meucci, R; Arecchi, F T

    2011-10-01

    Chaotically spiking attractors in semiconductor lasers with optoelectronic feedback have been recently observed to be the result of canard phenomena in three-dimensional phase space (incomplete homoclinic scenarios). Since light-emitting diodes display the same dynamics and are much more easily controllable, we use one of these systems to complete the attractor analysis demonstrating experimentally and theoretically the occurrence of complex sequences of periodic mixed-mode oscillations. In particular, we investigate the transition between periodic and chaotic mixed-mode states and analyze the effects of the unavoidable experimental noise on these transitions. PMID:22181318

  6. Mixed-mode oscillations via canard explosions in light-emitting diodes with optoelectronic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, F.; Ciszak, M.; Abdalah, S. F.; Al-Naimee, K.; Meucci, R.; Arecchi, F. T.

    2011-10-01

    Chaotically spiking attractors in semiconductor lasers with optoelectronic feedback have been recently observed to be the result of canard phenomena in three-dimensional phase space (incomplete homoclinic scenarios). Since light-emitting diodes display the same dynamics and are much more easily controllable, we use one of these systems to complete the attractor analysis demonstrating experimentally and theoretically the occurrence of complex sequences of periodic mixed-mode oscillations. In particular, we investigate the transition between periodic and chaotic mixed-mode states and analyze the effects of the unavoidable experimental noise on these transitions.

  7. White-blue electroluminescence from a Si quantum dot hybrid light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Yunzi; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-18

    A silicon (Si) quantum dot (QD)-based hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diode (LED) was fabricated via solution processing. This device exhibited white-blue electroluminescence at a low applied voltage of 6 V, with 78% of the effective emission obtained from the Si QDs. This hybrid LED produced current and optical power densities 280 and 350 times greater than those previously reported for such device. The superior performance of this hybrid device was obtained by both the prepared Si QDs and the optimized layer structure and thereby improving carrier migration through the hybrid LED and carrier recombination in the homogeneous Si QD layer.

  8. Evaluation of light-emitting diodes as attractant for sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francinaldo Soares; Brito, Jefferson Mesquita; Costa Neta, Benedita Maria; Lobo, Shelre Emile Pereira Duarte

    2015-09-01

    Hoover Pugedo light traps were modified for use with green and blue-light-emitting diodes to trap phlebotomine sandflies in northeastern Brazil. A total of 2,267 specimens belonging to eight genera and 15 species were sampled. The predominant species were Nyssomyia whitmani(34.41%) and Micropygomyia echinatopharynx(17.25%).The green LED trap prevailed over the blue and control lights; however, no statistically significant difference could be detected among the three light sources. Even without statistical significance, we suggest using LEDs as an attractant for the capture of sandflies because of several advantages over the conventional method with incandescent lamps. PMID:26517661

  9. Optical design of tunnel lighting with white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Shiou; Lee, Xuan-Hao; Lo, Yi-Chien; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2014-10-10

    This paper presents a tunnel lighting design consisting of a cluster light-emitting diode and a free-form lens. Most of the energy emitted from the proposed luminaire is transmitted onto the surface of the road in front of drivers, and the probability that that energy is emitted directly into drivers' eyes is low. Compared with traditional fluorescent lamps, the proposed luminaire, of which the optical utilization factor, optical efficiency, and uniformity are, respectively, 44%, 92.5%, and 0.72, exhibits favorable performance in energy saving, glare reduction, and traffic safety. PMID:25322407

  10. Note: Measuring spectral response of photocells with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kazuya; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    Although the spectral response is a key data for photocells, traditional measurement setup for it consists of expensive optical precision components including white-light source, collimator and monochromator, and has relatively large footprint. Here, it is demonstrated that a compact, portable, and low-cost device based on an array of light-emitting diodes can provide quantitatively reliable spectral response characterization of photocells. The device seems to be useful for the purpose of preliminary survey of the spectral response of novel material and/or materials system prior to precise measurement with the traditional equipment. PMID:26724087