Science.gov

Sample records for lightering

  1. Lighter fluid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the person swallowed the lighter fluid, give them water or milk right away, if a provider tells you to do so. ... Fillmore Suburban Hospital, Buffalo, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  2. Lighter fluid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lighter fluids are called hydrocarbons. They include: Benzene Butane Hexamine Lacolene Naptha Propane ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 158. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron ...

  3. 49 CFR 173.308 - Lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the weight of moisture absorbed in the plastic in order to determine the weight loss of the lighters from gas leakage. (v) If the net weight loss for any one of the six lighters exceeds 20 milligrams (0..., weigh each lighter and determine the net weight differences for each lighter tested (subtract the...

  4. 49 CFR 173.308 - Lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.308 Lighters. (a) General requirements. No person may offer... volumetric capacity of each fluid reservoir at 15 °C (59 °F). (3) Each lighter design, including closures... the pressure of the flammable gas at 55 °C (131 °F). (4) Each appropriate lighter design must...

  5. 49 CFR 173.308 - Lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....35 ounce) of flammable gas. (2) The maximum filling density may not exceed 85 percent of the... the weight of moisture absorbed in the plastic in order to determine the weight loss of the lighters... plastic tray, a plastic, fiberboard or paperboard partition must be used to prevent friction between...

  6. 49 CFR 173.308 - Lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....35 ounce) of flammable gas. (2) The maximum filling density may not exceed 85 percent of the... the weight of moisture absorbed in the plastic in order to determine the weight loss of the lighters... plastic tray, a plastic, fiberboard or paperboard partition must be used to prevent friction between...

  7. 49 CFR 173.308 - Lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lighters. 173.308 Section 173.308 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation...

  8. 33 CFR 156.300 - Designated lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (b) Gulfmex No. 2—lightering zone. This... thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (c) Offshore Pascagoula No. 2—lightering zone. This lightering...″, 87°00′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (d) South Sabine Point—lightering...

  9. 33 CFR 156.300 - Designated lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (b) Gulfmex No. 2—lightering zone. This... thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (c) Offshore Pascagoula No. 2—lightering zone. This lightering...″, 87°00′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (d) South Sabine Point—lightering...

  10. 33 CFR 156.300 - Designated lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (b) Gulfmex No. 2—lightering zone. This... thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (c) Offshore Pascagoula No. 2—lightering zone. This lightering...″, 87°00′00″, and thence to the point of beginning. (NAD 83) (d) South Sabine Point—lightering...

  11. 16 CFR 1210.3 - Requirements for cigarette lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for cigarette lighters. 1210.3... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.3 Requirements for cigarette lighters. (a) A lighter subject to this part 1210 shall be resistant to successful operation by...

  12. 16 CFR 1210.3 - Requirements for cigarette lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for cigarette lighters. 1210.3... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.3 Requirements for cigarette lighters. (a) A lighter subject to this part 1210 shall be resistant to successful operation by...

  13. 16 CFR 1210.3 - Requirements for cigarette lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for cigarette lighters. 1210.3... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.3 Requirements for cigarette lighters. (a) A lighter subject to this part 1210 shall be resistant to successful operation by...

  14. 16 CFR 1210.3 - Requirements for cigarette lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for cigarette lighters. 1210.3... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.3 Requirements for cigarette lighters. (a) A lighter subject to this part 1210 shall be resistant to successful operation by...

  15. 16 CFR 1210.3 - Requirements for cigarette lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for cigarette lighters. 1210.3... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.3 Requirements for cigarette lighters. (a) A lighter subject to this part 1210 shall be resistant to successful operation by...

  16. 33 CFR 156.300 - Designated lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements for the Gulf of Mexico § 156.300 Designated lightering zones. The following lightering zones are designated in the Gulf of Mexico and are more than 60 miles from the baseline from which the territorial sea....300 Section 156.300 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  17. 33 CFR 156.300 - Designated lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Requirements for the Gulf of Mexico § 156.300 Designated lightering zones. The following lightering zones are designated in the Gulf of Mexico and are more than 60 miles from the baseline from which the territorial sea....300 Section 156.300 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  18. Current developments lighter than air systems. [heavy lift airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    Lighter than air aircraft (LTA) developments and research in the United States and other countries are reviewed. The emphasis in the U.S. is on VTOL airships capable of heavy lift, and on long endurance types for coastal maritime patrol. Design concepts include hybrids which combine heavier than air and LTA components and characteristics. Research programs are concentrated on aerodynamics, flight dynamics, and control of hybrid types.

  19. Substances To Fill Lighter-Than-Air Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1995-01-01

    Various combinations of solid and liquid chemicals proposed as sources of hydrogen and other gases for inflating lighter-than-air balloons. In all cases energy used to propel balloon upward or downward comes from temperature differences in planet's atmosphere itself. Phase changes and/or reversible chemical reactions used to vary quantities of gases in balloons as functions of pressure and temperature and, as functions of altitude: provides means to control altitude of balloon.

  20. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. 1212.3 Section 1212.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance § 1212.3 Requirements for multi-purpose lighters. (a)...

  1. 33 CFR 156.230 - Factors considered in designating lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER OPERATIONS Special Requirements for Lightering of Oil and Hazardous Material Cargoes § 156.230 Factors considered in designating lightering zones..., and their effect on lightering operations, and the fate of possible cargo discharges; (e) The depth...

  2. Remarkable optical-potential systematics for lighter heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandan, M.E.; McVoy, K.W.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear rainbows, which appear in the elastic scattering angular distributions for certain combinations of lighter heavy ions like {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O, uniquely determine the major features of the optical potentials for these systems. These features are conveniently summarized by the central depth of the real part of the potential, V(r=0){approximately}100{minus}300 MeV, and by the ratio of imaginary to real parts of the potential, W(r)/V(r), found to be {lt}1 for both small and large r (internal and far-tail transparency), but {approx}1 in the surface region. The resulting maximum in W/V, which is found over the entire energy range 6 MeV {approx_lt}E{sub L}/A{approx_lt}100 MeV, appears to correlate with the peripheral reactions that occur in this energy range. At higher energies the data available indicate that the far-surface region is no longer transparent. Rather, W{approx}V there, suggesting the dominance of nuclear knockout reactions in the far tail. The knockout mode of inelasticity is the one described by the double-Glauber approximation, and W(r){approx}V(r) agrees with the Glauber prediction in the high-energy range. This suggests that the double-Glauber prediction begins to be accurate in the low-density tail of the A{sub 1}+A{sub 2} interaction around E{sub L}/A{approx}100 MeV and that its failure for the higher-density interior may provide a means of investigating the density dependence of Pauli blocking on NN scattering in the nuclear medium. By way of contrast, systems like {sup 20}Ne+{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N+{sup 12}C, which do not exhibit rainbows, have distinctly more absorptive potentials and do not follow the above systematics. This suggests that the imaginary part of the optical potential reflects the shell structure of the target and/or projectile in important ways, and so will not be easy to calculate from an infinite-matter many-body approach. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. 33 CFR 156.230 - Factors considered in designating lightering zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER OPERATIONS Special Requirements for Lightering of Oil and Hazardous Material Cargoes § 156.230 Factors considered in designating lightering zones... environmental analysis or, if prepared, the Environmental Impact Statement; (b) The proximity of the zone to:...

  4. ESTIMATION OF EMISSIONS FROM CHARCOAL LIGHTER FLUID AND REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from charcoal lighter fluid, a consumer product consisting entirely of volatile constituents. An estimated 46,250 tons (42,000 Mg) of charcoal lighter fluid is used in the U.S. each year. ...

  5. Estimation of emissions from charcoal lighter fluid and review of alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.L.; Stockton, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The report gives results of an evaluation of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from charcoal lighter fluid, a consumer product consisting entirely of volatile constituents. An estimated 46,250 tons (42,000 Mg) of charcoal lighter fluid is used in the U.S. each year. VOCs contribute to the formation of ozone; therefore, the ozone nonattainment issue has focused attention on VOCs emitted from many sources. VOCs are emitted when charcoal lighter fluid is used, but these emissions are difficult to quantify. Evaporative VOC losses occur from the lighter fluid prior to ignition, and combustion VOC losses occur from burning lighter-fluid-soaked charcoal briquettes. This study evaluates tests conducted to date on charcoal lighter fluid emissions. The information is most complete for evaporative VOC losses. The estimates vary greatly, however, based on the length of time between application of the lighter fluid and ignition. The limited tests conducted to date have not distinguished lighter fluid from charcoal-briquette combustion emissions.

  6. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... lighters can be operated by young children, rather than to regulate such risks under the Federal Hazardous... the lighters can be operated by young children shall be regulated under one or more provisions of...

  7. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... lighters can be operated by young children, rather than to regulate such risks under the Federal Hazardous... the lighters can be operated by young children shall be regulated under one or more provisions of...

  8. An approach to market analysis for lighter than air transportation of freight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. O.; Marcus, H. S.; Pollock, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach is presented to marketing analysis for lighter than air vehicles in a commercial freight market. After a discussion of key characteristics of supply and demand factors, a three-phase approach to marketing analysis is described. The existing transportation systems are quantitatively defined and possible roles for lighter than air vehicles within this framework are postulated. The marketing analysis views the situation from the perspective of both the shipper and the carrier. A demand for freight service is assumed and the resulting supply characteristics are determined. Then, these supply characteristics are used to establish the demand for competing modes. The process is then iterated to arrive at the market solution.

  9. Lighter Ingestion as an Uncommon Cause of Severe Vomiting in a Schizophrenia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Bilgic, Yılmaz; Bestas, Remzi; Seckin, Yüksel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract are important morbid and mortal clinical conditions. Particularly, emergency treatment is required for cutting and drilling bodies. The majority of ingested foreign bodies (80–90%) leave gastrointestinal tract without creating problems. In 10–20% of cases, intervention is absolutely required. Less than 1% of cases need surgery. In this paper, we present a schizophrenia patient who swallowed multiple lighters. Case. A 21-year-old male schizophrenic patient who uses psychotic drugs presented to the emergency department with the complaints of abdominal pain, severe vomiting, and inability to swallow for a week. His physical examination revealed epigastric tenderness. A plain radiograph of the abdomen revealed multiple tiny metallic densities. Gastroscopy was performed. The lighters were not allowing the passage, and some of them had penetrated the gastric mucosa, and bezoars were observed. One lighter was extracted with the help of the polypectomy snare. Other lighters as a bezoar were removed by surgery. Conclusion. Excessive vomiting of swallowed foreign bodies in the etiology of psychotic patients should be kept in mind. Endoscopic therapy can be performed in the early stages in these patients, but in the late stage surgery is inevitable. PMID:27525133

  10. Missions and vehicle concepts for modern, propelled, lighter-than-air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of studies conducted over the last 15 years to assess missions and vehicle concepts for modern, propelled, lighter-than-air vehicles (airships) were surveyed. Rigid and non-rigid airship concepts are considered. The use of airships for ocean patrol and surveillance is discussed along with vertical heavy lift airships. Military and civilian needs for high altitude platforms are addressed.

  11. 16 CFR 1212.3 - Requirements for multi-purpose lighters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... complying with this § 1212.3. (4) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of this section, automatically... an additional feature (e.g., lock, switch, etc.) after a flame is achieved before hands-free... lighter after turning off the flame when the hands-free feature is used....

  12. Airships 101: Rediscovering the Potential of Lighter-Than-Air (LTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Hochstetler, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of airships past, present, and future is provided in a Powerpoint-formatted presentation. This presentation was requested for transfer to the British MOD by Paul Espinosa of NASA Ames, Code PX. The presentation provides general information about airships divided into four main categories: the legacy of NASA Ames in LTA (Lighter-Than-Air), LTA taxonomy and theory, LTA revival and missions, and LTA research and technology.

  13. 16 CFR 1145.16 - Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.16 Section 1145.16... PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.16 Lighters that are...

  14. 16 CFR 1145.16 - Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.16 Section 1145.16... PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.16 Lighters that are...

  15. 16 CFR 1145.16 - Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury. 1145.16 Section 1145.16... PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.16 Lighters that are...

  16. Influence of different liquid-drop-based bindings on lighter mass fragments and entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohit; Shivani; Gautam, Sakshi

    2016-04-01

    We study the production of lighter fragments and associated phenomena within the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) model. The Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method is used to identify the pre-clusters. The final stable fragments were identified by imposing binding energy criteria on the fragments formed using the MST method. The effect of different binding energy criteria was investigated by employing various liquid-drop-based binding energy formulae. Though light clusters show significant effect of different binding energies, their associated phenomenon, i.e. entropy production is insensitive towards different binding energy criteria.

  17. 16 CFR 1145.16 - Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operated by young children, rather than regulate such risks under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act or... materials, where such risks exist because the lighters can be operated by young children, shall be...

  18. 16 CFR 1145.16 - Lighters that are intended for igniting smoking materials and that can be operated by children...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... operated by young children, rather than regulate such risks under the Federal Hazardous Substances Act or... materials, where such risks exist because the lighters can be operated by young children, shall be...

  19. Ab initio studies of atomic properties and experimental behavior of element 119 and its lighter homologs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borschevsky, A.; Pershina, V.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.

    2013-03-01

    Static dipole polarizabilities of element 119 and its singly charged cation are calculated, along with those of its lighter homologs, Cs and Fr. Relativity is treated within the 4-component Dirac-Coulomb formalism and electron correlation is included by the single reference coupled cluster approach with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Very good agreement with available experimental values is obtained for Cs, lending credence to the predictions for Fr and element 119. The atomic properties in group-1 are largely determined by the valence ns orbital, which experiences relativistic stabilization and contraction in the heavier elements. As a result, element 119 is predicted to have a relatively low polarizability (169.7 a.u.), comparable to that of Na. The adsorption enthalpy of element 119 on Teflon, which is important for possible future experimental studies of this element, is estimated as 17.6 kJ/mol, the lowest among the atoms considered here.

  20. Ab initio studies of atomic properties and experimental behavior of element 119 and its lighter homologs.

    PubMed

    Borschevsky, A; Pershina, V; Eliav, E; Kaldor, U

    2013-03-28

    Static dipole polarizabilities of element 119 and its singly charged cation are calculated, along with those of its lighter homologs, Cs and Fr. Relativity is treated within the 4-component Dirac-Coulomb formalism and electron correlation is included by the single reference coupled cluster approach with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)). Very good agreement with available experimental values is obtained for Cs, lending credence to the predictions for Fr and element 119. The atomic properties in group-1 are largely determined by the valence ns orbital, which experiences relativistic stabilization and contraction in the heavier elements. As a result, element 119 is predicted to have a relatively low polarizability (169.7 a.u.), comparable to that of Na. The adsorption enthalpy of element 119 on Teflon, which is important for possible future experimental studies of this element, is estimated as 17.6 kJ/mol, the lowest among the atoms considered here. PMID:23556718

  1. Survey of Applications of Active Control Technology for Gust Alleviation and New Challenges for Lighter-weight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Christopher D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a historical survey and assessment of the state of the art in the modeling and application of active control to aircraft encountering atmospheric disturbances in flight. Particular emphasis is placed on applications of active control technologies that enable weight reduction in aircraft by mitigating the effects of atmospheric disturbances. Based on what has been learned to date, recommendations are made for addressing gust alleviation on as the trend for more structurally efficient aircraft yields both lighter and more flexible aircraft. These lighter more flexible aircraft face two significant challenges reduced separation between rigid body and flexible modes, and increased sensitivity to gust encounters due to increased wing loading and improved lift to drag ratios. The primary audience of this paper is engineering professionals new to the area of gust load alleviation and interested in tackling the multifaceted challenges that lie ahead for lighter-weight aircraft.

  2. Development of a Big Area BackLighter for high energy density experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Emerich, M.; Devolder, B.; Murphy, T. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Kalantar, D. H.; Regan, S. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Merritt, E. C.; Perry, T. S.; Tregillis, I. L.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Fincke, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    A very large area (7.5 mm2) laser-driven x-ray backlighter, termed the Big Area BackLighter (BABL) has been developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to support high energy density experiments. The BABL provides an alternative to Pinhole-Apertured point-projection Backlighting (PABL) for a large field of view. This bypasses the challenges for PABL in the equatorial plane of the NIF target chamber where space is limited because of the unconverted laser light that threatens the diagnostic aperture, the backlighter foil, and the pinhole substrate. A transmission experiment using 132 kJ of NIF laser energy at a maximum intensity of 8.52 × 1014 W/cm2 illuminating the BABL demonstrated good conversion efficiency of >3.5% into K-shell emission producing ˜4.6 kJ of high energy x rays, while yielding high contrast images with a highly uniform background that agree well with 2D simulated spectra and spatial profiles.

  3. Population-based evaluation of the 'LiveLighter' healthy weight and lifestyle mass media campaign.

    PubMed

    Morley, B; Niven, P; Dixon, H; Swanson, M; Szybiak, M; Shilton, T; Pratt, I S; Slevin, T; Hill, D; Wakefield, M

    2016-04-01

    The Western Australian (WA) 'LiveLighter' (LL) mass media campaign ran during June-August and September-October 2012. The principal campaign ad graphically depicts visceral fat of an overweight individual ('why' change message), whereas supporting ads demonstrate simple changes to increase activity and eat healthier ('how' to change message). Cross-sectional surveys among population samples aged 25-49 were undertaken pre-campaign (N= 2012) and following the two media waves (N= 2005 and N= 2009) in the intervention (WA) and comparison state (Victoria) to estimate the population impact of LL. Campaign awareness was 54% after the first media wave and overweight adults were more likely to recall LL and perceive it as personally relevant. Recall was also higher among parents, but equal between socio-economic groups. The 'why' message about health-harms of overweight rated higher than 'how' messages about lifestyle change, on perceived message effectiveness which is predictive of health-related intention and behaviour change. State-by-time interactions showed population-level increases in self-referent thoughts about the health-harms of overweight (P < 0.05) and physical activity intentions (P < 0.05). Endorsement of stereotypes of overweight individuals did not increase after LL aired. LL was associated with some population-level improvements in proximal and intermediate markers of campaign impact. However, sustained campaign activity will be needed to impact behaviour. PMID:26956039

  4. Low-cost inflatable lighter-than-air surveillance system for civilian applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Chen, Peter C.; Niemczuk, John B.

    2002-08-01

    Today's society places an extremely high price on the value of human life and injury. Whenever possible, police and paramilitary actions are always directed towards saving as many lives as possible, whether it is the officer, perpetrator, or innocent civilians. Recently, the advent of robotic systems has enable law enforcement agencies to perform many of the most dangerous aspects of their jobs from relative safety. This is especially true to bomb disposal units but it is also gaining acceptance in other areas. An area where small, remotely operated machines may prove effective is in local aerial surveillance. Currently, the only aerial surveillance assets generally available to law enforcement agencies are costly helicopters. Unfortunately, most of the recently developed unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) are directed towards military applications and have limited civilian use. Systems Planning and Analysis, Inc. (SPA) has conceived and performed a preliminary analysis of a low-cost, inflatable, lighter- than-air surveillance system that may be used in a number of military and law enforcement surveillance situations. The preliminary analysis includes the concept definition, a detailed trade study to determine the optimal configuration of the surveillance system, high-pressure inflation tests, and a control analysis. This paper will provide the details in these areas of the design and provide an insight into the feasibility of such a system.

  5. The Effect of Introducing a Smaller and Lighter Basketball on Female Basketball Players’ Shot Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Podmenik, Nadja; Leskošek, Bojan; Erčulj, Frane

    2012-01-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players’ shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior women’s European championships in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. A size 7 (larger and heavier) basketball was used by 286 players in 1,870 matches, and a size 6 basketball was used by 287 players in 1,966 matches. The players were categorised into three playing positions: guards, forwards and centres. The results revealed that statistically significant changes by year occurred only in terms of the percentage of successful free throws. With the size 6 basketball, this percentage decreased. Statistically significant differences between the playing positions were observed in terms of the percentage of field goals worth three points (between guards and forwards) and two points (between guards and centres). The results show that the introduction of the size 6 basketball did not lead to improvement in shooting accuracy (the opposite was found for free throws), although the number of three-point shots increased. PMID:23486286

  6. The effect of introducing a smaller and lighter basketball on female basketball players' shot accuracy.

    PubMed

    Podmenik, Nadja; Leskošek, Bojan; Erčulj, Frane

    2012-03-01

    Our study examined whether the introduction of a smaller and lighter basketball (no. 6) affected the accuracy of female basketball players' shots at the basket. The International Basketball Federation (FIBA) introduced a size 6 ball in the 2004/2005 season to improve the efficiency and accuracy of technical elements, primarily shots at the basket. The sample for this study included 573 European female basketball players who were members of national teams that had qualified for the senior women's European championships in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. A size 7 (larger and heavier) basketball was used by 286 players in 1,870 matches, and a size 6 basketball was used by 287 players in 1,966 matches. The players were categorised into three playing positions: guards, forwards and centres. The results revealed that statistically significant changes by year occurred only in terms of the percentage of successful free throws. With the size 6 basketball, this percentage decreased. Statistically significant differences between the playing positions were observed in terms of the percentage of field goals worth three points (between guards and forwards) and two points (between guards and centres). The results show that the introduction of the size 6 basketball did not lead to improvement in shooting accuracy (the opposite was found for free throws), although the number of three-point shots increased. PMID:23486286

  7. The cost-effectiveness of the LighterLife weight management programme as an intervention for obesity in England.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L; Taylor, M; Broom, J; Johnston, K L

    2014-06-01

    LighterLife Total is a very low calorie diet total dietary replacement weight reduction programme that provides Foodpacks, behavioural change therapy and group support appropriate for people with a body mass index of 30 kg m(-2) or above. A model was built to assess the cost-effectiveness of LighterLife Total, compared with (i) no treatment, Counterweight, Weight Watchers and Slimming World, as a treatment for obesity in those with a body mass index of 30 kg m(-2) or above, and (ii) no treatment, gastric banding and gastric bypass in those with a body mass index of 40 kg m(-2) or above. Change in body mass index over time was modelled, and prevalence of comorbidities (diabetes, coronary heart disease and colorectal cancer) was calculated. Costs (of intervention and treatment for comorbidities) and quality-adjusted life years were calculated. LighterLife Total was cost-effective against no treatment, Counterweight, Weight Watchers and Slimming World in the 30+ kg m(-2) group (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios: £11 895, £12 453, £12 585 and £12 233, respectively). In the 40+ kg m(-2) group, LighterLife Total was cost-effective against no treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: £4356), but less effective than gastric banding and bypass. PMID:25826774

  8. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REGULATION OF PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children... the Consumer Product Safety Act any risks of injury associated with the fact that...

  9. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REGULATION OF PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children... the Consumer Product Safety Act any risks of injury associated with the fact that...

  10. 16 CFR 1145.17 - Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children; risks of death or injury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REGULATION OF PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.17 Multi-purpose lighters that can be operated by children... the Consumer Product Safety Act any risks of injury associated with the fact that...

  11. Electroactive polymers as a novel actuator technology for lighter-than-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Silvain; Dürager, Christian; Zobel, Martin; Fink, Erich

    2007-04-01

    In this paper the worldwide first EAP actuated blimp will be presented. It consists of a slightly pressurized Helium filled body of a biologically inspired form with Dielectric Elastomer (DE) actuators driving a classical cross tail with two vertical and horizontal rudders for flight control. Two versions of actuators will be discussed: The first version consisted of "spring-roll" type of cylindrical actuators placed together with the electrical supply and control unit in the pay load gondola. The second version consisted of a configuration, where the actuators are placed between the control surfaces and the rudders. This novel type of EAP actuator named "active hinge" was developed and characterized first in the laboratory and afterwards optimized for minimum weight and finally integrated in the blimp structure. In the design phase a numerical simulation tool for the prediction of the DE actuators was developed based on a material model calibrated with the test results from cylindrical actuators. The electrical supply and control system was developed and optimized for minimum of weight. Special attention was paid to the electromagnetic systems compatibility of the high voltage electrical supply system of the DE actuators and the radio flight control system. The design and production of this 3.5 meter long Lighter-than-Air vehicle was collaboration between Empa Duebendorf Switzerland and the Technical University of Berlin. The first version of this EAP blimp first flew at an RC airship regatta hold on 24 th of June 2006 in Dresden Germany, while the second version had his maiden flight on 8 th of January 2007 in Duebendorf Switzerland. In both cases satisfactory flight control performances were demonstrated.

  12. Lighter-Than-Air UAV with slam capabilities for mapping applications and atmpsphere analysys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombatti, G.; Aboudan, A.; La Gloria, N.; Debei, S.; Flamini, E.

    Exploration of the planets and the moons of the Solar System has, up to now, been performed by remote sensing from Earth, fly-by probes, orbiters, landers and rovers. It must be outlined that remote sensing probes and orbiters can only provide non-contact, limited resolution imagery over a small number of spectral bands; on the other hand, landers provide high-resolution imagery and in-situ data collection and analysis capabilities, but only for a single site; while rovers allow imagery collection and in-situ science across their path. These characteristics of the described means highlight how mobility is a key requirement for planetary exploration missions. Autonomous Lighter-Than-Air systems can be used to explore unknown environments without obstacle avoidance problems, mapping large areas to different resolutions and perform a wide variety of measurements and experiments while traveling in the atmosphere. Sensor fusion between Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and vision systems can be used to support vehicle navigation and variable resolution surface mapping. In this work a minimal sensor suite composed by a navigation-grade IMU and stereo camera pair has been studied. At altitudes below 100 m stereo vision techniques can provide range, bearing and elevation measurements of a set of scattered points on the planetary surface. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) extended Kalman filter algorithm has been adapted to deal with stereo camera observations. Sensor fusion with IMU measurements is used to track rapid vehicle movements and to maintain the vehicle position and attitude estimation also if, for a limited period of time, no vision measurements are available. Moreover the SLAM algorithm produces a scattered points map of the complete traveled area. In this work we analyse the dynamics of the airship in response of the encountered environment of Titan moon. Possible trajectories for an extended survey are investigated; this allows to have a precise

  13. [Atypical case of teenager fatal poisoning by butane as a result of gas for lighters inhalation against his will].

    PubMed

    Celiński, Rafał; Skowronek, Rafał; Uttecht-Pudełko, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Inhalatomania with volatile organic compounds is a still present phenomenon among Polish young adolescents. Conscious, voluntary exposition on such substances may result in serious health consequences, including sudden death in the course of acute intoxication. In this paper, atypical case of death of 16-year-old teenager as a result of complications of physically forced inhalation of gas for lighters is presented. According to testimonies of witnesses, the container was placed in the mouth of victim and the gas was introduced directly to his throat. Autopsy revealed small damage of tooth with corresponding bruising of lower lip; brain and lung oedma; single bruisings in the upper respiratory tract and subpleural. Chemical-toxicological analysis of blood, brain and lung samples taken during autopsy revealed in all of them the presence of n-butan--a component of gas for lighters (the greatest in brain and lung tissues). Additionally, in blood the presence of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) in concentration 7% was confirmed. Based on the results of analyses, acute intoxication with n-butan was estimated as a cause of death; however the key role played the information obtained during the investigation. This case shows, that deaths resulting from gas for lighters inhalation may be a consequence of forced exposition--against victim's will. So medical staff should always check, if on the body of patient there are any signs of physical constraint (the presence of bruisings in the area of viscerocranium and oral cavity, teeth damages, etc.). PMID:24167951

  14. Lighter and heavier initial loads yield similar gains in strength when employing a progressive wave loading scheme.

    PubMed

    Wood, P P; Goodwin, J E; Cleather, D J

    2016-09-01

    Progressive wave loading strategies are common within strength and conditioning practice. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the understanding of this strategy by evaluating the effectiveness of 2 wave loading bench press training programmes that differed only in the initial load that was used to start the first wave. Thirty-four resistance-trained men were divided into 2 groups and performed 2 training sessions each week for 20 weeks. One session consisted of 6 sets of 2 repetitions, while the other consisted of 5 sets of 5 repetitions. The load used was incremented by 2.5% of one repetition maximum (1RM) each week until the subject could no longer complete the programmed repetitions. At this point, the load was decreased, and then started to ascend again. The initial loads for the 2 sessions were 87.5% and 80% 1RM respectively for the heavier group, and for the lighter group were 82.5% and 75% 1RM. The subjects experienced a significant improvement in their bench press performance (higher load group: pre test = 106.5 kg ± 14.6, post test = 112.2 kg ± 12.4, p ≤ 0.05; lower load group: pre test = 105.7 kg ± 14.1, post test = 114.3 kg ± 11.0, p ≤ 0.05), but there was no difference in the magnitude of the improvment between the two groups. These results tend to support the common practical recommendation to start with a lighter load when employing a progressive wave loading strategy, as such a strategy yields similar improvements in performance with a lower level of exertion in training. PMID:27601780

  15. Lighter and heavier initial loads yield similar gains in strength when employing a progressive wave loading scheme

    PubMed Central

    Wood, PP; Goodwin, JE

    2016-01-01

    Progressive wave loading strategies are common within strength and conditioning practice. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the understanding of this strategy by evaluating the effectiveness of 2 wave loading bench press training programmes that differed only in the initial load that was used to start the first wave. Thirty-four resistance-trained men were divided into 2 groups and performed 2 training sessions each week for 20 weeks. One session consisted of 6 sets of 2 repetitions, while the other consisted of 5 sets of 5 repetitions. The load used was incremented by 2.5% of one repetition maximum (1RM) each week until the subject could no longer complete the programmed repetitions. At this point, the load was decreased, and then started to ascend again. The initial loads for the 2 sessions were 87.5% and 80% 1RM respectively for the heavier group, and for the lighter group were 82.5% and 75% 1RM. The subjects experienced a significant improvement in their bench press performance (higher load group: pre test = 106.5 kg ± 14.6, post test = 112.2 kg ± 12.4, p ≤ 0.05; lower load group: pre test = 105.7 kg ± 14.1, post test = 114.3 kg ± 11.0, p ≤ 0.05), but there was no difference in the magnitude of the improvment between the two groups. These results tend to support the common practical recommendation to start with a lighter load when employing a progressive wave loading strategy, as such a strategy yields similar improvements in performance with a lower level of exertion in training. PMID:27601780

  16. The Torch Lighters Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Coleman; Austin, Mary C.

    This volume provides a follow-up of a 1961 study which was undertaken to determine how well 74 colleges and universities were preparing prospective reading teachers. Questionnaires were mailed to 220 schools to determine the extent to which the 22 original, published recommendations had been implemented. Chapter one outlines data gathered from the…

  17. Two lighter than air systems in opposing flight regimes: An unmanned short haul, heavy load transport balloon and a manned, light payload airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Lighter Than Air vehicles are generally defined or categorized by the shape of the balloon, payload capacity and operational flight regime. Two balloon systems that are classed as being in opposite categories are described. One is a cable guided, helium filled, short haul, heavy load transport Lighter Than Air system with a natural shaped envelope. The other is a manned, aerodynamic shaped airship which utilizes hot air as the buoyancy medium and is in the light payload class. While the airship is in the design/fabrication phase with flight tests scheduled for the latter part of 1974, the transport balloon system has been operational for some eight years.

  18. Biocompatible, biodegradable polymer-based, lighter than or light as water scaffolds for tissue engineering and methods for preparation and use thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T. (Inventor); Pollack, Solomon R. (Inventor); Levine, Elliot (Inventor); Botchwey, Edward (Inventor); Lu, Helen H. (Inventor); Khan, Mohammed Yusuf (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering prepared from biocompatible, biodegradable polymer-based, lighter than or light as water microcarriers and designed for cell culturing in vitro in a rotating bioreactor are provided. Methods for preparation and use of these scaffolds as tissue engineering devices are also provided.

  19. Filtrates and Residues: Measuring the Atomic or Molecular Mass of a Gas with a Tire Gauge and a Butane Lighter Fluid Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; Magginnis, Lenard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of an inexpensive apparatus (based on a butane lighter fluid can and a standard tire pressure gauge) in measuring the atomic/molecular mass of an unknown gas and in demonstrating the mass of air or the dependence of pressure on the mass of a gas. (JN)

  20. Some factors affecting the use of lighter than air systems. [economic and performance estimates for dirigibles and semi-buoyant hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havill, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The uses of lighter-than-air vehicles are examined in the present day transportation environment. Conventional dirigibles were found to indicate an undesirable economic risk due to their low speeds and to uncertainties concerning their operational use. Semi-buoyant hybrid vehicles are suggested as an alternative which does not have many of the inferior characteristics of conventional dirigibles. Economic and performance estimates for hybrid vehicles indicate that they are competitive with other transportation systems in many applications, and unique in their ability to perform some highly desirable emergency missions.

  1. The lighter side of BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Emily E.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates energy metabolism and feeding behavior. As a neurotrophin, BDNF promotes neuronal differentiation, survival during early development, adult neurogenesis, and neural plasticity; thus, there is the potential that BDNF could modify circuits important to eating behavior and energy expenditure. The possibility that “faulty” circuits could be remodeled by BDNF is an exciting concept for new therapies for obesity and eating disorders. In the hypothalamus, BDNF and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), are extensively expressed in areas associated with feeding and metabolism. Hypothalamic BDNF and TrkB appear to inhibit food intake and increase energy expenditure, leading to negative energy balance. In the hippocampus, the involvement of BDNF in neural plasticity and neurogenesis is important to learning and memory, but less is known about how BDNF participates in energy homeostasis. We review current research about BDNF in specific brain locations related to energy balance, environmental, and behavioral influences on BDNF expression and the possibility that BDNF may influence energy homeostasis via its role in neurogenesis and neural plasticity. PMID:21346243

  2. The Lighter Side of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for using photochemistry to merge descriptive chemistry and molecular orbital theory in first-year chemistry courses. Includes procedures and safety information for various activities, demonstrations, and experiments involving photochemical reactions. (DH)

  3. Lighter-than-Air Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviews practical applications, particularly in scientific research, of hot air balloons. Recent U.S. governmental projects in near-space research are described. Lists (1) major accomplishments of scientific ballooning, including discoveries in cosmic ray particles, gamma and x-rays, and other radiation; (2) measurement of fluorocarbon…

  4. IS THE SUN LIGHTER THAN THE EARTH? ISOTOPIC CO IN THE PHOTOSPHERE, VIEWED THROUGH THE LENS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPECTRUM SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Lyons, J. R.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Wedemeyer-Boehm, S.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the formation of solar infrared (2-6 {mu}m) rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) in CO5BOLD 3D convection models, with the aim of refining abundances of the heavy isotopes of carbon ({sup 13}C) and oxygen ({sup 18}O, {sup 17}O), to compare with direct capture measurements of solar wind light ions by the Genesis Discovery Mission. We find that previous, mainly 1D, analyses were systematically biased toward lower isotopic ratios (e.g., R {sub 23} {identical_to} {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C), suggesting an isotopically 'heavy' Sun contrary to accepted fractionation processes that were thought to have operated in the primitive solar nebula. The new 3D ratios for {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O are R {sub 23} = 91.4 {+-} 1.3 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 89.2) and R {sub 68} = 511 {+-} 10 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 499), where the uncertainties are 1{sigma} and 'optimistic'. We also obtained R {sub 67} = 2738 {+-} 118 (R {sub Circled-Plus} = 2632), but we caution that the observed {sup 12}C{sup 17}O features are extremely weak. The new solar ratios for the oxygen isotopes fall between the terrestrial values and those reported by Genesis (R {sub 68} = 530, R {sub 67} = 2798), although including both within 2{sigma} error flags, and go in the direction favoring recent theories for the oxygen isotope composition of Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. While not a major focus of this work, we derive an oxygen abundance, {epsilon}{sub O} {approx} 603 {+-} 9 ppm (relative to hydrogen; log {epsilon} {approx} 8.78 on the H = 12 scale). The fact that the Sun is likely lighter than the Earth, isotopically speaking, removes the necessity of invoking exotic fractionation processes during the early construction of the inner solar system.

  5. Is the Sun Lighter than the Earth? Isotopic CO in the Photosphere, Viewed through the Lens of Three-dimensional Spectrum Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Lyons, J. R.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Wedemeyer-Böhm, S.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the formation of solar infrared (2-6 μm) rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) in CO5BOLD 3D convection models, with the aim of refining abundances of the heavy isotopes of carbon (13C) and oxygen (18O, 17O), to compare with direct capture measurements of solar wind light ions by the Genesis Discovery Mission. We find that previous, mainly 1D, analyses were systematically biased toward lower isotopic ratios (e.g., R 23 ≡ 12C/13C), suggesting an isotopically "heavy" Sun contrary to accepted fractionation processes that were thought to have operated in the primitive solar nebula. The new 3D ratios for 13C and 18O are R 23 = 91.4 ± 1.3 (R ⊕ = 89.2) and R 68 = 511 ± 10 (R ⊕ = 499), where the uncertainties are 1σ and "optimistic." We also obtained R 67 = 2738 ± 118 (R ⊕ = 2632), but we caution that the observed 12C17O features are extremely weak. The new solar ratios for the oxygen isotopes fall between the terrestrial values and those reported by Genesis (R 68 = 530, R 67 = 2798), although including both within 2σ error flags, and go in the direction favoring recent theories for the oxygen isotope composition of Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. While not a major focus of this work, we derive an oxygen abundance, epsilonO ~ 603 ± 9 ppm (relative to hydrogen; log epsilon ~ 8.78 on the H = 12 scale). The fact that the Sun is likely lighter than the Earth, isotopically speaking, removes the necessity of invoking exotic fractionation processes during the early construction of the inner solar system.

  6. An assessment of lighter than air technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F., Jr. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The workshop on LTA is summarized. The history and background are reviewed. The workshop reports for the following working groups are presented: policy, market analysis, economics, operations, and technology.

  7. The Lighter Side of Educational Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacall, Aaron

    Educators often take themselves a bit too seriously. To remedy the situation, the author, who is a veteran educator and illustrator, offers a little perspective with this collection of lighthearted cartoons. These cartoons can be used as overheads for staff development meetings, for an individual break in a busy day, and perhaps, even for a…

  8. Mobile-Computing Trends: Lighter, Faster, Smarter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The new era of mobile computing promises greater variety in applications, highly improved usability, and speedier networking. The 3G iPhone from Apple is the poster child for this trend, but there are plenty of other developments that point in this direction. Previous surveys, in LLT, and by researchers at the UK's Open University, have…

  9. Environic implications of lighter than air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsbrugh, P.

    1975-01-01

    The advent of any new system of transportation must now be reviewed in the physical context and texture of the landscape. Henceforward, all transportation systems will be considered in respect of their effects upon the environment to ensure that they afford an environic asset as well as provide an economic benefit. The obligations which now confront the buoyancy engineers are emphasized so that they may respond to these ethical and environic urgencies simultaneously with routine technical development.

  10. Make Your Load Lighter with STARS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The Student Teaching and Research Services (STARS) program that is in place in a particular elementary school has proven very successful, not only in improving the services that are offered, but also in helping its participants to build their self-esteem. Those who seek a safe haven in the library during breaks make such a significant and visible…

  11. Lighter load should aid Pilgrim's progress.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    A large NHS acute hospital in Boston, Lincolnshire expects to achieve a 51% reduction in its annual carbon emissions, and annual financial savings of at least pound 210,000 on an ongoing basis, with the potential to save considerably more in the future via a continuous improvement programme, following a complete overhaul of an ageing boiler house to form a new, "state-of-the-art" energy centre. As HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports, the new facility, designed and built, and now operated by, Cofely, is the central element of a new energy-saving programme under which the United Lincolnshire Hospitals (ULH) NHS Trust aims to reduce carbon emissions across all its hospital sites by 30% over the next five years. PMID:20882907

  12. For lighter cars, a heavier plastics diet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    The competition between plastics and aluminum for use in automobile components will intensify after 1985, since up to that time the automobile industry will rely primarily on size reduction to reduce automobile weights. If 1985 automobiles are to achieve 50 mpg, the average weight will have to be cut from the current 2120 lb to 1300 lb, which will require the use of 1000 lb of lightweight material. The cost of plastics in the lightweight car would be less than the cost of aluminum, and the equipment for working plastics is cheaper than metalworking equipment. The equipment for working plastics operates more slowly , however, and plastics cannot withstand the 400/sup 0/F heat of paint ovens, or acquire as good a finish as aluminum. According to the Society of the Plastics Industry Inc., the 1979 uses of plastics in U.S. transportation equipment amounted to (in millions of lb): all thermosets, 569; polyesters, 362; urea and melamine, 24; phenolics, 171; polyurethane foam, 418; all thermoplastics, 1365; low-density polyethylene, 56; high-density polyethylene, 90; polypropylene, 260; ABS and SAN, 317; polystyrene, 23; nylon, 96; PVC, 270; all other thermoplastics, 187; and all plastics (excluding polyurethane foam), 1934. Uses of plastics in specific automobile models are discussed.

  13. The Lighter Side of Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacall, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    As educators, we often take ourselves a bit too seriously, so veteran educator and illustrator Aaron Bacall offers a little perspective with these lighthearted cartoons. Whether used as overheads for meetings or as an individual break in a busy day, this collection of whimsical glimpses at staff development will provide a moment to laugh and add a…

  14. LTA - Recent developments. [Lighter Than Air ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    NASA-sponsored studies of existing and new LTA missions showed that airships looked very promising for some two dozen civil and military applications. These include surveillance of rural and urban areas, in the form of forest and police patrols; transport of very heavy large-volume maritime, industrial, and military payloads; coastal patrol and sea control; seismographic surveys; air pollution monitoring; and moving goods to remote areas; along with a number of less important but still attractive missions. A figure of merit of productivity (payload weight, ton moles per hour) was used to compare airships of various type and size. In each case, this criterion established an index of efficiency for evaluating not only conceptual approaches but also modes of flight. Some, in part unexpected, results of these studies are described.

  15. 78 FR 52679 - Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters; Adjusted Customs Value for Cigarette Lighters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... accordance with the percentage changes in the monthly Wholesale Price Index from June 1993.'' 58 FR 37584....25). Accordingly, the Commission revised the cigarette standard to state the adjusted amount. 69 FR...). The standard provides that the initial $2.00 value adjusts every 5 years for inflation, as measured...

  16. The lighter side of advertising: investigating posing and lighting biases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicole A; Burkitt, Jennifer A; Patrick, Regan E; Elias, Lorin J

    2008-11-01

    People tend to display the left cheek when posing for a portrait; however, this effect does not appear to generalise to advertising. The amount of body visible in the image and the sex of the poser might also contribute to the posing bias. Portraits also exhibit lateral lighting biases, with most images being lit from the left. This effect might also be present in advertisements. A total of 2801 full-page advertisements were sampled and coded for posing direction, lighting direction, sex of model, and amount of body showing. Images of females showed an overall leftward posing bias, but the biases in males depended on the amount of body visible. Males demonstrated rightward posing biases for head-only images. Overall, images tended to be lit from the top left corner. The two factors of posing and lighting biases appear to influence one another. Leftward-lit images had more leftward poses than rightward, while the opposite occurred for rightward-lit images. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the posing biases in advertisements are dependent on the amount of body showing in the image, and that biases in lighting direction interact with these posing biases. PMID:18686164

  17. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  18. Bigger than a Breadbox; Lighter than a Heavy Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert V.

    2009-01-01

    Inexact measurements can have devastating effects in sciences where precision is of paramount importance. In contrast, morphological sciences rely heavily on description, comparison, and estimation to make meaningful inferences about the structure of humans and other animals. A review of the 1918 edition of "Gray's Anatomy" shows that the tendency…

  19. Market assessment in connection with lighter than air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. E. R.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the marketability of the airship is given, and the relative energy consumption and speed potential of the airship is compared to other modes and guidelines to areas of initial development are also provided, together with a brief historical review.

  20. A Lighter-Than-Air System Enhanced with Kinetic Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid airship system is proposed in which the buoyant lift is enhanced with kinetic lift. The airship would consist of twin hulls in which the buoyant gas is contained. The twin hulls would be connected in parallel by a wing having an airfoil contour. In forward flight, the wing would provide kinetic lift that would add to the buoyant lift. The added lift would permit a greater payload/altitude combination than that which could be supported by the buoyant lift alone. The buoyant lift is a function of the volume of gas and the flight altitude. The kinetic lift is a function of the airfoil section, wing area, and the speed and altitude of flight. Accordingly there are a number of factors that can be manipulated to arrive at a particular design. Particular designs could vary from small, lightweight systems to very large, heavy-load systems. It will be the purpose of this paper to examine the sensitivity of such a design to the several variables. In addition, possible uses made achievable by such a hybrid system will be suggested.

  1. Protect Children from Dangerous Lighters Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2009-03-26

    03/26/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S3924) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. X-15 test pilots - in a lighter mood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The X-15 pilots clown around in front of the #2 aircraft.From left to right: USAF Capt. Joseph Engle, USAF Maj. Robert Rushworth, NASA test pilot John 'Jack' McKay, USAF Maj. William 'Pete' Knight, NASA test pilot Milton Thompson, and NASA test pilot William Dana. First flown in 1959 from the NASA High Speed Flight Station (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center), the rocket powered X-15 was developed to provide data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls and the physiological aspects of high speed, high altitude flight. Three were built by North American Aviation for NASA and the U.S. Air Force. They made a total of 199 flights during a highly successful research program lasting almost ten years, following which its speed and altitude records for winged aircraft remained unbroken until the Space Shuttle first returned from earth orbit in 1981. The X-15's main rocket engine provided thrust for the first 80 to 120 seconds of a 10 to 11 minute flight; the aircraft then glided to a 200 mph landing. The X-15 reached altitudes of 354,200 feet (67.08 miles) and a speed of 4,520 mph (Mach 6.7).

  3. Structural materials research for lighter-than-air systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, V. L., Jr.; Mchatton, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Inflatable systems have widespread applications in military, government, and industrial sectors. Improvements in inflatable materials have followed each salient advancement in textiles. The new organic fiber, Kevlar, is a recent and most significant advancement that justified reexamination of old and new inflatable materials' applications. A fertile frontier exists in integrating Kevlar with various other material combinations, in optimization of geometric features, and in selection of thermomechanical characteristics' compatibility with the environment. Expectations regarding Kevlar have been justified by the performance of two experimental materials. Styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymers appear promising as a constituent adhesive for low temperature applications. Biaxial testing for both strength and material elastic properties is a technology area needing greater awareness and technology growth along with improved facilities. Because of dramatic materials' advancements, inflatable systems appear to be moving toward an increased position in tomorrow's aerospace industry.

  4. Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Lighter than Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F., Jr. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers presented at the workshop are reported. Topics discussed include: economic and market analysis, technical and design considerations, manufacturing and operations, design concepts, airship applications, and unmanned and tethered systems.

  5. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... digital air velocity meter, DavisΔ DTA 4000 vane anemometer, or equivalent to method 1A of 40 CFR part 60... Subpart, or use Method 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Continuously record a velocity reference point... CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 25 Total Combustion Analysis (TCA) sampling apparatus consisting...

  6. Search for narrow resonances lighter than Upsilon mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-03-01

    We report a search for narrow resonances, produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, that decay into muon pairs with invariant mass between 6.3 and 9.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The data, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 630 pb{sup -1}. We use the dimuon invariant mass distribution to set 90% upper credible limits of about 1% to the ratio of the production cross section times muonic branching fraction of possible narrow resonances to that of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson.

  7. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... digital air velocity meter, DavisΔ DTA 4000 vane anemometer, or equivalent to method 1A of 40 CFR part 60... Subpart, or use Method 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Continuously record a velocity reference point... CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 25 Total Combustion Analysis (TCA) sampling apparatus consisting...

  8. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... digital air velocity meter, DavisΔ DTA 4000 vane anemometer, or equivalent to method 1A of 40 CFR part 60... Subpart, or use Method 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Continuously record a velocity reference point... CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 25 Total Combustion Analysis (TCA) sampling apparatus consisting...

  9. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... digital air velocity meter, DavisΔ DTA 4000 vane anemometer, or equivalent to method 1A of 40 CFR part 60... Subpart, or use Method 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Continuously record a velocity reference point... CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 25 Total Combustion Analysis (TCA) sampling apparatus consisting...

  10. 40 CFR 59.208 - Charcoal lighter material testing protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... digital air velocity meter, DavisΔ DTA 4000 vane anemometer, or equivalent to method 1A of 40 CFR part 60... Subpart, or use Method 1A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A. Continuously record a velocity reference point... CFR part 60, appendix A, Method 25 Total Combustion Analysis (TCA) sampling apparatus consisting...

  11. Preliminary estimates of operating costs for lighter than air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Ardema, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary set of operating cost relationships are presented for airship transports. The starting point for the development of the relationships is the direct operating cost formulae and the indirect operating cost categories commonly used for estimating costs of heavier than air commercial transports. Modifications are made to the relationships to account for the unique features of airships. To illustrate the cost estimating method, the operating costs of selected airship cargo transports are computed. Conventional fully buoyant and hybrid semi-buoyant systems are investigated for a variety of speeds, payloads, ranges, and altitudes. Comparisons are made with aircraft transports for a range of cargo densities.

  12. Preliminary estimates of operating costs for lighter than air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Ardema, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Presented is a preliminary set of operating cost relationships for airship transports. The starting point for the development of the relationships is the direct operating cost formulae and the indirect operating cost categories commonly used for estimating costs of heavier than air commercial transports. Modifications are made to the relationships to account for the unique features of airships. To illustrate the cost estimating method, the operating costs of selected airship cargo transports are computed. Conventional fully buoyant and hybrid semi-buoyant systems are investigated for a variety of speeds, payloads, ranges, and altitudes. Comparisons are made with aircraft transports for a range of cargo densities.

  13. 78 FR 18965 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of January 14, 2013 (78 FR 2662), the CPSC published a notice... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY...: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act...

  14. Improved fiberglass-to-metal joint produces lighter stronger fiberglass strut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, J. R.; Johnson, H. E.; Eugene, K. T.

    1973-01-01

    Axial tension and compression are transmitted between end fittings and fiberglass tube without depending on glass-to-metal bonding, conventional fasteners or combination of these things. Joint design significantly reduces both structural weight of strut and its cross-sectional area.

  15. Cutting the fat: artificial muscle oscillators for lighter, cheaper, and slimmer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2012-04-01

    Artificial muscles based on dielectric elastomers show enormous promise for a wide range of applications and are slowly moving from the lab to industry. One problem for industrial uptake is the expensive, rigid, heavy and bulky high voltage driver, sensor and control circuitry that artificial muscle devices currently require. One recent development, the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES), shows promise for substantially reducing auxiliary circuitry and helping to mature the technology. DES are piezoresistive elements that can be used to form logic, driver, and sensor circuitry. One particularly useful feature of DES is their ability to embed oscillatory behaviour directly into an artificial muscle device. In this paper we will focus on how DES oscillators can break down the barriers to industrial adoption for artificial muscle devices. We have developed an improved artificial muscle ring oscillator and applied it to form a mechanosensitive conveyor. The free running oscillator ran at 4.4 Hz for 1056 cycles before failing due to electrode degradation. With better materials artificial muscle oscillators could open the door to robots with increased power to weight ratios, simple-to-control peristaltic pumps, and commercially viable artificial muscle motors.

  16. Why are the high altitude inhabitants like the Tibetans shorter and lighter?

    PubMed

    Panesar, N S

    2008-09-01

    High altitude inhabitants (HAI) are generally smaller than low altitude inhabitants (LAI). This anthropological observation has recently been confirmed in the Tibetan refugees who have settled in India since 1950s. Those settled at lower altitudes (970 m) are taller and muscular than compatriots settled at higher altitudes (3500 m). While lower socioeconomic status is implicated in growth retardation at higher altitudes, the smaller stature in adults in well-off communities says otherwise. Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) is the main challenge at high altitudes, which the long established HAI have overcome via biological adaptations, including larger chests, raised blood hemoglobin, and producing more nitric oxide (NO), which deliver similar levels of oxygen to tissues, as LAI. The Tibetans produce 10-fold more NO than LAI. NO is a potent inhibitor of steroidogenesis. Therefore I hypothesize that the short stature and lower musculature in HAI results from steroid deficiency precipitated by NO, which HAI produce to cope with HH. PMID:18495367

  17. Recent Space PV Concentrator Advances: More Robust, Lighter, and Easier to Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A. J.; Brandhorst, Henry; Schmid, Kevin; LaCorte, Peter; Piszczor, Michael; Myers, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three years, the authors have collaborated on several significant advances in space photovoltaic concentrator technology, including a far more robust Fresnel lens for sunlight concentration, improved color-mixing features for the lens to minimize chromatic aberration losses for next-generation 4-junction and 6-junction IMM cells, a new approach to suntracking requiring only one axis of rotation even in the presence of large beta angles (e.g., +/- 50 deg), a new waste heat radiator made of graphene, with 80-90% reduction in mass, and a new platform for deployment and support on orbit (SOLAROSA). These patent-pending advances are described in this paper.

  18. 33 CFR 157.410 - Emergency lightering requirements for oil tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and gaskets must meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.25. Cast iron and malleable iron must not be used. ..., bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets to allow at least two simultaneous transfer connections to be...

  19. 33 CFR 157.410 - Emergency lightering requirements for oil tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and gaskets must meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.25. Cast iron and malleable iron must not be used. ..., bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets to allow at least two simultaneous transfer connections to be...

  20. Special problems and capabilities of high altitude lighter than air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, P. R.; Petrone, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Powered LTA vehicles have historically been limited to operations at low altitudes. Conditions exist which may enable a remotely piloted unit to be operated at an altitude near 70,000 feet. Such systems will be launched like high altitude balloons, operate like nonrigid airships, and have mission capabilities comparable to a low altitude stationary satellite. The limited lift available and the stratospheric environment impose special requirements on power systems, hull materials and payloads. Potential nonmilitary uses of the vehicle include communications relay, environmental monitoring and ship traffic control.

  1. Lighter than air: A look at the past, a look at the possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A brief history of the flight by LTA including the development of the zeppelin is presented. Safety and economy are discussed along with power requirements and production techniques. The problem of ground handling facilities for very large airships are briefly mentioned.

  2. Neutrinos secretly converting to lighter particles to please both KATRIN and the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Hannestad, Steen

    2016-02-01

    Within the framework of the Standard Model of particle physics and standard cosmology, observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) set stringent bounds on the sum of the masses of neutrinos. If these bounds are satisfied, the upcoming KATRIN experiment which is designed to probe neutrino mass down to ~ 0.2 eV will observe only a null signal. We show that the bounds can be relaxed by introducing new interactions for the massive active neutrinos, making neutrino masses in the range observable by KATRIN compatible with cosmological bounds. Within this scenario, neutrinos convert to new stable light particles by resonant production of intermediate states around a temperature of T~ keV in the early Universe, leading to a much less pronounced suppression of density fluctuations compared to the standard model.

  3. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Markun, F.; Zawadzki, M.T.

    1998-04-28

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir. 6 figs.

  4. Fluid clathrate system for continuous removal of heavy noble gases from mixtures of lighter gases

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Markun, Francis; Zawadzki, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for separation of heavy noble gas in a gas volume. An apparatus and method have been devised which includes a reservoir containing an oil exhibiting a clathrate effect for heavy noble gases with a reservoir input port and the reservoir is designed to enable the input gas volume to bubble through the oil with the heavy noble gas being absorbed by the oil exhibiting a clathrate effect. The gas having reduced amounts of heavy noble gas is output from the oil reservoir, and the oil having absorbed heavy noble gas can be treated by mechanical agitation and/or heating to desorb the heavy noble gas for analysis and/or containment and allow recycling of the oil to the reservoir.

  5. 33 CFR 157.410 - Emergency lightering requirements for oil tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adapters, bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets per reducer set must be carried as spares. (c) Reducers, bolts, and gaskets must meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.25. Cast iron and malleable iron must not be used. ..., bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets to allow at least two simultaneous transfer connections to be...

  6. 33 CFR 157.410 - Emergency lightering requirements for oil tankers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adapters, bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets per reducer set must be carried as spares. (c) Reducers, bolts, and gaskets must meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.25. Cast iron and malleable iron must not be used. ..., bolts, washers, nuts, and gaskets to allow at least two simultaneous transfer connections to be...

  7. Magnetic materials and devices for the 21st century: stronger, lighter, and more energy efficient.

    PubMed

    Gutfleisch, Oliver; Willard, Matthew A; Brück, Ekkes; Chen, Christina H; Sankar, S G; Liu, J Ping

    2011-02-15

    A new energy paradigm, consisting of greater reliance on renewable energy sources and increased concern for energy efficiency in the total energy lifecycle, has accelerated research into energy-related technologies. Due to their ubiquity, magnetic materials play an important role in improving the efficiency and performance of devices in electric power generation, conditioning, conversion, transportation, and other energy-use sectors of the economy. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art hard and soft magnets and magnetocaloric materials, with an emphasis on their optimization for energy applications. Specifically, the impact of hard magnets on electric motor and transportation technologies, of soft magnetic materials on electricity generation and conversion technologies, and of magnetocaloric materials for refrigeration technologies, are discussed. The synthesis, characterization, and property evaluation of the materials, with an emphasis on structure-property relationships, are discussed in the context of their respective markets, as well as their potential impact on energy efficiency. Finally, considering future bottlenecks in raw materials, options for the recycling of rare-earth intermetallics for hard magnets will be discussed. PMID:21294168

  8. Narratives of nostalgia in the face of death: The importance of lighter stories of the past in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Synnes, Oddgeir

    2015-08-01

    My research on the stories of palliative care patients emphasizes the heterogeneity of the types of stories they tell, including stories of illness, of everyday life, of the future, and of the past (Synnes, 2012). This article pays special attention to the prevalence of stories of past experiences in which the past is portrayed through idyllic and nostalgic interpretation. In contrast to most research on illness narratives and narrative gerontology that is preoccupied with stories of change, these stories of nostalgia are characterized by a plot where nothing in particular happens. However, this may be the primary purpose for the storytellers in their particular situation of illness and imminent death. The main purpose of nostalgia is precisely to ensure the continuity of identity in the face of adversity (Davis, 1979). In this article, I argue that these stories of nostalgia are vital aspects of maintaining the continuity of the self, or a narrative identity, when much else in life is characterized by discontinuity and uncertainty. Thus, stories of nostalgia should not be dismissed as escapism but valued and listened to as important aspects of narrative care among palliative care patients, and as a way of preserving the sense of a narrative identity. PMID:26162738

  9. Adsorption of the Lighter Homologs of Element 104 and Element 105 on DGA Resin from Various Mineral Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M E; Sudowe, R

    2008-11-17

    The goal of studying transactinide elements is to further understand the fundamental principles that govern the periodic table. The current periodic table arrangement allows for the prediction of the chemical behavior of elements. The correct position of a transactinide element can be assessed by investigating its chemical behavior and comparing it to that of the homologs and pseudo-homologs of a transactinide element. Homologs of a transactinide element are the elements in the same group of the periodic table as the transactinide. A pseudo-homolog of a transactinide element is an element with a similar main oxidation state and similar ionic radius to the transactinide element. For example, the homologs of rutherfordium, Rf, are titanium, zirconium and hafnium (Ti, Zr and Hf); the pseudo homologs of Rf are thorium, Th, and plutonium, Pu. Understanding the chemical behavior of a transactinide element compared to its homologs and pseudo-homologs also allows for the assessment of the role of relativistic effects. Relativistic effects occur when the velocity of the s orbital electrons closest to the nucleus approaches the speed of light. These electrons approach the speed of light because they have no orbital momentum. This causes two effects, first there is in a decrease in Bohr radius of the inner electronic orbitals because of this there is an increase in particle mass. A contraction of outer s and p orbitals is also seen. The contraction of these orbitals results in an energy destabilization of the outer most shell, in the case of transactinides this would be the 5f and 6d orbitals. The outer most d shell and all f shells can also experience a radial expansion due to these orbitals being screened from the effective nuclear charge. Another relativistic effect is the 'spin-orbit splitting' for p, d and f orbitals into j = 1 {+-} 1/2 states. Where j is the total angular momentum vector and 1 is angular quantum number. All of these effects have the same order of magnitude and increase roughly according to Z. This feature is what makes studying the heavy elements so interesting because the chemical properties of transactinide elements should strongly exhibit these effects. For this work the terms heavy element and transactinide elements will be used interchangeably and are defined as elements with an atomic number greater than 103, Z > 103. In order to study the transactinide elements they must be isolated once they have been produced and transported to a chemistry apparatus. The transactinide elements are produced either via 'hot' or 'cold' fusion reactions. 'Hot' fusion reactions result in excitation energies of the compound nucleus of 40-50 MeV and occur when an actinide target nuclei fuse with a projectile with A < 40, where A is the atomic mass number. 'Cold' fusion results in excitation energies of 10-15 MeV. Cold fusion conditions tend to occur when a target of a spherical nuclei (Pb or Bi) is bombarded with a heavy projectile (A > 40). Hot fusion generally leads to neutron rich isotopes and cold fusion tends to produce a compound nucleus that emits 1-2 neutrons upon de-excitation. If a sufficiently thin target is employed, then the products of the nuclear reaction will recoil out of the target and can either be transported to the chemistry setup, e.g. using a gas jet, or trapped by implementing them on a catcher. An example for a catcher setup using a copper block as a catcher is described here. The copper block is placed behind the target during the irradiation and all nuclei recoiling from the target position will implant themselves in the block. The copper block is subsequently dismounted and sputter cleaned. It is then shaved with a micro-lathe. The 7-10 {micro}m copper shavings are then subjected to chemical separation. The copper is dissolved in aqua regia. Lanthanum carrier is added to the aqua regia to precipitate tri-, tetra- and penta- valent cations when ammonium hydroxide is added. The precipitate is then washed and converted to the nitrate form. This solution is then added onto a cation exchange

  10. Z-Beamlet (ZBL) Multi-Frame Back-lighter (MFB) System for ICF/Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J A; Erlandson, A C; Molander, W A; Murray, J E; Robertson, G K; Smith, I C; Sinars, D B; Porter, J L

    2005-09-08

    Z-Beamlet [1] is a single-beam high-energy Nd:glass laser used for backlighting high energy density (HED) plasma physics experiments at Sandia's Z-accelerator facility. The system currently generates a single backlit image per experiment, and has been employed on approximately 50% of Z-accelerator system shots in recent years. We have designed and are currently building a system that uses Z-Beamlet to generate two distinct backlit images with adjustable time delay ranging from 2 to 20 ns between frames. The new system will double the rate of data collection and allow the temporal evolution of high energy density phenomena to be recorded on a single shot.

  11. Material discrimination using scattering and stopping of cosmic ray muons and electrons: Differentiating heavier from lighter metals as well as low-atomic weight materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpied, Gary; Kumar, Sankaran; Dorroh, Dustin; Morgan, Craig; Blanpied, Isabelle; Sossong, Michael; McKenney, Shawn; Nelson, Beth

    2015-06-01

    Reported is a new method to apply cosmic-ray tomography in a manner that can detect and characterize not only dense assemblages of heavy nuclei (like Special Nuclear Materials, SNM) but also assemblages of medium- and light-atomic-mass materials (such as metal parts, conventional explosives, and organic materials). Characterization may enable discrimination between permitted contents in commerce and contraband (explosives, illegal drugs, and the like). Our Multi-Mode Passive Detection System (MMPDS) relies primarily on the muon component of cosmic rays to interrogate Volumes of Interest (VOI). Muons, highly energetic and massive, pass essentially un-scattered through materials of light atomic mass and are only weakly scattered by conventional metals used in industry. Substantial scattering and absorption only occur when muons encounter sufficient thicknesses of heavy elements characteristic of lead and SNM. Electrons are appreciably scattered by light elements and stopped by sufficient thicknesses of materials containing medium-atomic-mass elements (mostly metals). Data include simulations based upon GEANT and measurements in the HMT (Half Muon Tracker) detector in Poway, CA and a package scanner in both Poway and Socorro NM. A key aspect of the present work is development of a useful parameter, designated the "stopping power" of a sample. The low-density regime, comprising organic materials up to aluminum, is characterized using very little scattering but a strong variation in stopping power. The medium-to-high density regime shows a larger variation in scattering than in stopping power. The detection of emitted gamma rays is another useful signature of some materials.

  12. Spectroscopic properties of the low-lying electronic states of RbHen (n = 1, 2) and their comparison with lighter alkali metal-helium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Anjan

    2012-02-01

    Ab initio-based configuration interaction studies on RbHe and He-Rb-He have explored some key features of the low-lying electronic states of these van der Waals systems. The radiative lifetime of the Rb*He exciplex has been calculated to be around 24.5 ns, which is slightly higher than the HeRb*He lifetime (˜20 ns) and lower than the atomic fluorescence lifetime of Rb, by roughly 3.5 ns. Better exciplex stability of the symmetric triatomic system is evidenced by its higher binding energy value in comparison to the diatomic system by a substantial margin. BSSE-corrected spin-orbit calculations of RbHe have predicted a potential barrier of the 12Π1/2 state with a height of 15 cm-1 and width of 2.57 Å. The 2Πu state of the triatomic molecule shows a conical intersection of its Renner-Teller components (12A1 and 12B2) near a 99° bond angle along the bending path. Their unstable higher excited states (12Σ+1/2 or 12Σ+g,1/2) can trigger the pumping of the blue side of the ns2S1/2 → np2P3/2 transition, and this may eventually lead to the np2P1/2 →ns2S1/2 lasing transition. The broad fluorescence band with a peak near 11 900 cm-1 is found to arise from the 12Π3/2-X2Σ+1/2 transition of RbHe.

  13. Identification of Gas Components in Lighter by Gas Chromatography: An Experiment of the Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Which Can Be Used with Distance Learning Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz, Soner; Morgil, Inci

    2006-01-01

    In the applications of instrumental analysis lessons, advanced instruments with the needed experiments are needed. During the lessons it is a fact that the more experiments are performed, the more learning will be. For this reason, experiments that do not last long and should be performed with more simple instruments and that increase students"…

  14. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol esterification and transfer rates to lighter density lipoproteins mediated by cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the fasting and postprandial periods are not altered in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Medina; Nunes; Carrilho; Shimabukuru; Lottenberg; Lottenberg; McPherson; Krauss; Quintão

    2000-10-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with atherosclerosis that has, in part, been ascribed to abnormalities in the reverse cholesterol transport system. Methods: We determined, in the fasting and post-alimentary periods, rates of HDL cholesterol esterification and transfer to apoB-containing lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentration, and apoB lipoprotein size in 10 type 1 diabetics and 10 well-matched controls. Autologous HDL was labeled with [14C]cholesterol and incubated at 37 degrees C during a period of 30 min for measurement of the cholesterol esterification rate (CER), as well as for 24 h for measurement of the endogenous HDL [14C]cholesteryl ester ([14C]CE) transfer rate to apoB-containing lipoproteins after 2- and 4-h incubations with the subject's own plasma. Exogenous cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) was estimated by incubation of the participant's plasma (CETP source) with [14C]CE-HDL and VLDL from a pool of plasma donors. ApoB lipoprotein size was determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis of whole plasma. Results: Contrary to previous studies, we showed that even not well-controlled type 1 diabetics did not differ from lipid-matched, non-diabetic subjects in HDL-[14C]cholesterol esterification rate, transfer rates, or CETP concentration. CETP concentration correlates with the exogenous method of [14C]CE transfer and with the endogenous method only when the latter is corrected for plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentration. In addition, during the postprandial phase, diabetic patients' VLDL are smaller and IDL size increases less than in controls. Conclusion: In type 1 diabetes mellitus, CETA is not altered when the plasma levels of donor and/or acceptor lipoproteins are within the normal range. PMID:11025251

  15. On the coordination chemistry of organochalcogenolates R(NMe2)^E(-) and R(NMe2)^E^O(-) (E = S, Se) onto lead(II) and lighter divalent tetrel elements.

    PubMed

    Pop, Alexandra; Wang, Lingfang; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Silvestru, Anca; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-11-21

    Several families of heteroleptic tetrelenes of general formulae M(E^R(NMe2))[N(SiMe3)2] and M(O^E^R(NMe2))[N(SiMe3)2] (where E = S, Se; M = Ge, Sn, Pb; R(NMe2) = 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4] supported by organochalcogenolato ligands have been prepared and fully characterised. The coordination chemistry of these ligands containing both hard (N, O) and soft (S, Se) atoms onto metals of varying size, polarisability, electropositivity and electrostatic surface potential has been explored. In the molecular solid-state, the complexes M(E^R(NMe2))[N(SiMe3)2] are monomeric, although an occurrence of weak PbSe intermolecular interactions yielding a bimolecular species has been identified in the case of the plumbylene Pb[SeC6H4(CH2NMe2)-2][N(SiMe3)2]. On the other hand, all complexes M(O^E^R(NMe2))[N(SiMe3)2] form centro-symmetric bimetallic dimers with O-bridging atoms. Multinuclear ((29)Si, (77)Se, (119)Sn, (207)Pb) NMR spectroscopy and crystallographic studies reveal that the metal preferably remains 3-coordinated in all these heteroleptic complexes with absence of coordination of N and S/Se atoms, unless severe depletion of electronic density onto the metal is enforced. Coordination of these heteroelements can thus be achieved either through replacement of α-CH3 substituents (as in the ligand 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SeCH2C(Me)2O(-)) by electron-withdrawing α-CF3 moieties (as in the ligand 2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SeCH2C(CF3)2O(-)), or else with recourse to the use of a cationizing agent leading to the formation of the ion pair [{2-(Me2NCH2)C6H4SeCH2C(Me)2O}Pb](+)·[H2N{B(C6F5)3}2](-) where the cationic metal complex is associated to a weakly-coordinating anion. The data collated herein provide compelling evidence that the coordination chemistry of divalent tetrel elements with ligands featuring both hard and soft donors cannot be reliably anticipated by sole use of general concepts such as the HSAB theory. The related metal complexes containing the rigid 8-(NMe2)naphthalen-1-yl group are also discussed. PMID:25251990

  16. 16 CFR 1210.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.2 Definitions. As used in this part 1210: (a) Cigarette lighter. See lighter. (b) Disposable lighter—means a lighter that either is....50. (c) Lighter, also referred to as cigarette lighter, means a flame-producing product commonly...

  17. 16 CFR 1210.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.2 Definitions. As used in this part 1210: (a) Cigarette lighter. See lighter. (b) Disposable lighter—means a lighter that either is..., is $2.25. (c) Lighter, also referred to as cigarette lighter, means a flame-producing...

  18. 16 CFR 1210.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.2 Definitions. As used in this part 1210: (a) Cigarette lighter. See lighter. (b) Disposable lighter—means a lighter that either is..., is $2.25. (c) Lighter, also referred to as cigarette lighter, means a flame-producing...

  19. 16 CFR 1210.20 - Stockpiling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Stockpiling § 1210.20 Stockpiling. (a) Definition. Stockpiling means to... cigarette lighters shall not manufacture or import lighters that do not comply with the requirements of...

  20. 16 CFR 1210.20 - Stockpiling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Stockpiling § 1210.20 Stockpiling. (a) Definition. Stockpiling means to... cigarette lighters shall not manufacture or import lighters that do not comply with the requirements of...

  1. 16 CFR 1210.20 - Stockpiling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Stockpiling § 1210.20 Stockpiling. (a) Definition. Stockpiling means to... cigarette lighters shall not manufacture or import lighters that do not comply with the requirements of...

  2. 16 CFR 1210.20 - Stockpiling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Stockpiling § 1210.20 Stockpiling. (a) Definition. Stockpiling means to... cigarette lighters shall not manufacture or import lighters that do not comply with the requirements of...

  3. 16 CFR 1210.5 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.5 Findings. Section 9(f) of the Consumer Product... draft ASTM standard would not adequately reduce the unreasonable risk associated with lighters. (e)...

  4. 16 CFR 1210.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Product Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR 1210),” (2) The name and address of the... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.12 Certificate of compliance....

  5. 16 CFR 1210.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Product Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR 1210),” (2) The name and address of the... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.12 Certificate of compliance....

  6. 16 CFR 1210.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Product Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR 1210),” (2) The name and address of the... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.12 Certificate of compliance....

  7. 16 CFR 1210.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Product Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR 1210),” (2) The name and address of the... SAFETY STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.12 Certificate of compliance....

  8. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... devices are subject to the requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210...-purpose lighter to be modified with electronics or the like to produce a signal. Manufacturers may use...

  9. 16 CFR 1210.5 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.5 Findings. Section 9(f) of the Consumer Product... draft ASTM standard would not adequately reduce the unreasonable risk associated with lighters. (e)...

  10. 16 CFR 1210.5 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.5 Findings. Section 9(f) of the Consumer Product... draft ASTM standard would not adequately reduce the unreasonable risk associated with lighters. (e)...

  11. 16 CFR 1210.15 - Specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... described in a written product specification. (Section 1210.4(c) requires that six surrogate lighters be... the lighter, including the manufacturer's tolerances for each such dimension or force requirement....

  12. 33 CFR 156.330 - Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a voice warning prior to the commencement of lightering activities via channel 13 VHF and 2182 Khz.... (f) No vessel involved in a lightering operation may open its cargo system until the servicing...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 141 - Commercial Pilot Certification Course

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-lift. (f) Glider. (g) Lighter-than-air airship. (h) Lighter-than-air balloon. 2. Eligibility for... rating. (2) 65 hours of training if the course is for a lighter-than-air category with an airship class...-lift rating. (2) 155 hours of training if the course is for an airship rating. (3) 115 hours...

  14. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 1212 - Findings Under the Consumer Product Safety Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210); devices that contain more than... Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters, 16 CFR part 1210. In developing that standard, the Commission... number of features from the cigarette lighter standard, 16 CFR part 1210, in order to minimize...

  15. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  16. 16 CFR 1202.2 - Findings. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... advertising and nonadvertising matchbooks. Nonadvertising matchbooks are generally sold by large chain stores.... Three types of products: Matchbooks, individual stick matches, and lighters, predominantly supply...

  17. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-2 - Definition of parts or accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pads designed to operate from an automobile cigarette lighter; automobile radio antennae; automobile...; and automobile bearings, such as automobile crankshaft or connecting rod bearings. (e) Effective...

  18. 16 CFR 1210.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.2 Definitions. As used in this... that affect child resistance (including operation and the force(s) required for operation), within... child-resistance. Lighter characteristics that may affect child-resistance include, but are not...

  19. 33 CFR 156.330 - Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (f) No vessel involved in a lightering operation may open its cargo system until the servicing vessel... designated lightering zone. The main propulsion system must not be disabled at any time. (l) In preparing to... be conducted in accordance with the Oil Companies International Marine Forum Ship to Ship...

  20. 33 CFR 156.330 - Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (f) No vessel involved in a lightering operation may open its cargo system until the servicing vessel... designated lightering zone. The main propulsion system must not be disabled at any time. (l) In preparing to... be conducted in accordance with the Oil Companies International Marine Forum Ship to Ship...

  1. 16 CFR 1210.14 - Qualification testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... States, surrogate lighters of each model shall be tested in accordance with § 1210.4, above, to ensure that all such lighters comply with the standard. However, if a manufacturer has tested one model of... differences that would not have an adverse effect on child resistance, the second model need not be tested...

  2. 16 CFR 1212.14 - Qualification testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in commerce in the United States, surrogate multi-purpose lighters of each model shall be tested in... a manufacturer has tested one model of multi-purpose lighter, and then wishes to distribute another... an adverse effect on child resistance, the second model need not be tested in accordance with §...

  3. 16 CFR 1210.11 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.11 General. Section 14(a) of the Consumer Product... certify that their products comply with the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters. This subpart B..., recordkeeping, and reporting pursuant to sections 14, 16(b), 17(g), and 27(e) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2063,...

  4. 16 CFR 1210.11 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.11 General. Section 14(a) of the Consumer Product... certify that their products comply with the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters. This subpart B..., recordkeeping, and reporting pursuant to sections 14, 16(b), 17(g), and 27(e) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2063,...

  5. 16 CFR 1210.11 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.11 General. Section 14(a) of the Consumer Product... certify that their products comply with the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters. This subpart B..., recordkeeping, and reporting pursuant to sections 14, 16(b), 17(g), and 27(e) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2063,...

  6. 46 CFR 39.40-1 - General requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL. 39.40-1... Lightering and Topping-Off Operations with Vapor Balancing § 39.40-1 General requirements for vapor balancing... balancing while conducting a lightering or topping-off operation must meet the requirements of this...

  7. 46 CFR 39.40-5 - Operational requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operational requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL. 39... SYSTEMS Lightering and Topping-Off Operations with Vapor Balancing § 39.40-5 Operational requirements for vapor balancing—TB/ALL. (a) During a lightering or topping-off operation each cargo tank being...

  8. 46 CFR 39.40-5 - Operational requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operational requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL. 39... SYSTEMS Lightering and Topping-Off Operations with Vapor Balancing § 39.40-5 Operational requirements for vapor balancing—TB/ALL. (a) During a lightering or topping-off operation each cargo tank being...

  9. 46 CFR 39.40-1 - General requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements for vapor balancing-TB/ALL. 39.40-1... Lightering and Topping-Off Operations with Vapor Balancing § 39.40-1 General requirements for vapor balancing... balancing while conducting a lightering or topping-off operation must meet the requirements of this...

  10. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section, no person may take off an aircraft with inoperative instruments or equipment... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has...

  11. Establishing Fire Safety Skills Using Behavioral Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houvouras, Andrew J., IV; Harvey, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    The use of behavioral skills training (BST) to educate 3 adolescent boys on the risks of lighters and fire setting was evaluated using in situ assessment in a school setting. Two participants had a history of fire setting. After training, all participants adhered to established rules: (a) avoid a deactivated lighter, (b) leave the training area,…

  12. 7 CFR 51.1439 - Tolerances for defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for shell, center wall, and foreign material; (2) 3 percent for portions of kernels which are “dark amber” or darker color, or darker than any specified lighter color classification but which are not... which are “dark amber” or darker color, or darker than any specified lighter color classification. (b)...

  13. 16 CFR 1212.4 - Test protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... transportation. The surrogate multi-purpose lighters shall not be exposed to extreme heat or cold. The surrogate... could affect child resistance to verify that they are within reasonable operating tolerances for the... appearance, including color. The surrogate multi-purpose lighters shall be labeled with sequential...

  14. 16 CFR 1210.4 - Test protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test protocol. 1210.4 Section 1210.4... STANDARD FOR CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child Resistance § 1210.4 Test protocol. (a) Child test panel. (1) The test to determine if a lighter is resistant to successful operation by children uses...

  15. 16 CFR 1212.4 - Test protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test protocol. 1212.4 Section 1212.4... STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Requirements for Child-Resistance § 1212.4 Test protocol. (a) Child test panel. (1) The test to determine if a multi-purpose lighter is resistant to successful...

  16. 16 CFR 1210.11 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.11 General. Section 14(a) of the Consumer Product... certify that their products comply with the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters. This subpart B..., recordkeeping, and reporting pursuant to sections 14, 16(b), 17(g), and 27(e) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2063,...

  17. 16 CFR 1210.11 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CIGARETTE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1210.11 General. Section 14(a) of the Consumer Product... certify that their products comply with the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters. This subpart B..., recordkeeping, and reporting pursuant to sections 14, 16(b), 17(g), and 27(e) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2063,...

  18. 16 CFR 1212.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... product “complies with the Consumer Product Safety Standard for Multi-purpose lighters (16 CFR part 1212... SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1212.12 Certificate of compliance. (a) General requirements—(1) Manufacturers (including importers). Manufacturers of any...

  19. 16 CFR 1212.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... product “complies with the Consumer Product Safety Standard for Multi-purpose lighters (16 CFR part 1212... SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1212.12 Certificate of compliance. (a) General requirements—(1) Manufacturers (including importers). Manufacturers of any...

  20. 16 CFR 1212.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... product “complies with the Consumer Product Safety Standard for Multi-purpose lighters (16 CFR part 1212... SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1212.12 Certificate of compliance. (a) General requirements—(1) Manufacturers (including importers). Manufacturers of any...

  1. 16 CFR 1212.12 - Certificate of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... product “complies with the Consumer Product Safety Standard for Multi-purpose lighters (16 CFR part 1212... SAFETY STANDARD FOR MULTI-PURPOSE LIGHTERS Certification Requirements § 1212.12 Certificate of compliance. (a) General requirements—(1) Manufacturers (including importers). Manufacturers of any...

  2. Colloidal Brazil-nut effect in sediments of binary charged suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esztermann, A.; Löwen, H.

    2004-10-01

    Equilibrium sedimentation density profiles of charged binary colloidal suspensions are calculated by computer simulations and density-functional theory. For deionized samples, we predict a colloidal "Brazil nut" effect: heavy colloidal particles sediment on top of the lighter ones provided that their mass per charge is smaller than that of the lighter ones. This effect is verifiable in settling experiments.

  3. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 1212 - Findings Under the Consumer Product Safety Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 1212. This definition includes products that are referred to as micro-torches. Multi-purpose... requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210); devices that contain more than... Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters, 16 CFR part 1210. In developing that standard, the...

  4. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 1212 - Findings Under the Consumer Product Safety Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CFR part 1212. This definition includes products that are referred to as micro-torches. Multi-purpose... requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210); devices that contain more than... Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters, 16 CFR part 1210. In developing that standard, the...

  5. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 1212 - Findings Under the Consumer Product Safety Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CFR part 1212. This definition includes products that are referred to as micro-torches. Multi-purpose... requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210); devices that contain more than... Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters, 16 CFR part 1210. In developing that standard, the...

  6. 16 CFR Appendix A to Part 1212 - Findings Under the Consumer Product Safety Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 1212. This definition includes products that are referred to as micro-torches. Multi-purpose... requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210); devices that contain more than... Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters, 16 CFR part 1210. In developing that standard, the...

  7. Mass effects on angular distribution of sputtered atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. R.; King, M. E.; Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtering metal targets at low ion energies (Hg or Ar at less than 300 eV) under normal ion incidence causes the lighter atoms (lighter isotopes or lighter elements of alloys) to be preferentially ejected in a direction normal to the target surface. Experimental results are shown for several elements and alloys at various bombardment energies. The amount of enrichment of the lighter species normal to the target surface decreases quite rapidly with increasing ion energy. The phenomenon is a result of reflective collisions because lighter atoms can be backscattered from heavier ones underneath but not vice versa. The effect provides an explanation of why solar-wind-exposed lunar material is enriched in the heavier isotopes, since sputtered lower-mass elements have a higher chance of achieving the lunar escape velocity.

  8. Establishing fire safety skills using behavioral skills training.

    PubMed

    Houvouras, Andrew J; Harvey, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    The use of behavioral skills training (BST) to educate 3 adolescent boys on the risks of lighters and fire setting was evaluated using in situ assessment in a school setting. Two participants had a history of fire setting. After training, all participants adhered to established rules: (a) avoid a deactivated lighter, (b) leave the training area, and (c) report the lighter to an adult. The response sequence was maintained for both participants after training. The use of in situ assessment to evoke and observe infrequent behavior is discussed. PMID:24764225

  9. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    Collection of two short descriptions of chemical principles seen in life situations: the autocatalytic reaction seen in the bombardier beetle, and molecular potential energy used for quick roasting of beef. Brief reference is also made to methanol lighters. (PS)

  10. Religious Candles Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... windows where a blind or curtain could catch fire. KKK Candles placed on, or near tables, altars, ... in a deep basin filled with water. General Fire Safety • Matches and lighters should be stored out ...

  11. Fiber glass reinforced structural materials for aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Evaluation of fiber glass reinforced plastic materials concludes that fiber glass construction is lighter than aluminum alloy construction. Low thermal conductivity and strength makes the fiber glass material useful in cryogenic tank supports.

  12. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Alan

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  13. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injury Exposure to radiation (such as from the sun) Exposure to heavy metals Changes in hormone levels Exposure ... example, lighter-skinned people are more sensitive to sun exposure and damage, which raises the risk of skin ...

  14. Compact laser through improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 16-joule-pulse laser has been developed in which a boron nitride heat-conductor enclosure is used to remove heat from the elements. Enclosure is smaller and lighter than systems in which cooling fluids are used.

  15. Aviation spirit - past, present, and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunstan, A E; Thole, F B

    1923-01-01

    The volatile fuel of the high-speed internal combustion engine has, in the past, consisted almost exclusively of the lighter distillates from crude petroleum. Alternative and supplementary fuels are discussed such as: tetraline, dekalin, alcohol, cyclo-hexenes.

  16. New materials for fireplace logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieselback, D. J.; Smock, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Fibrous insulation and refractory concrete are used for logs as well as fireproof walls, incinerator bricks, planters, and roof shingles. Insulation is lighter and more shock resistant than fireclay. Lightweight slag bonded with refractory concrete serves as aggregrate.

  17. 75 FR 53679 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... FR 27733), the CPSC published a 60-day notice requesting public comment on the proposed collection of... sources such as lighters, candles and matches. The standard established new performance requirements...

  18. 78 FR 16840 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Testing and Recordkeeping Requirements Under the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of January 4, 2013 (78 FR 694), the Consumer Product Safety... ignited by open-flame sources, such as lighters, candles, and matches. The Mattress Open-Flame...

  19. Fire safety at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reach of children. Never leave a burning candle or fireplace unattended. DO NOT stand too close ... wood stove. DO NOT touch matches, lighters, or candles. Tell an adult right away if you see ...

  20. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... is done to: Check for thyroid cancer Evaluate thyroid nodules or goiter Find the cause of an overactive ... the thyroid appears lighter, it could be a thyroid problem. Nodules that are darker can be overactive and may ...

  1. 40 CFR 247.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., structural, or insulating purposes; Latex paint means a water-based decorative or protective covering having... being paperboard. Paper is generally lighter in basis weight, thinner, and more flexible than...

  2. 40 CFR 247.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., structural, or insulating purposes; Latex paint means a water-based decorative or protective covering having... being paperboard. Paper is generally lighter in basis weight, thinner, and more flexible than...

  3. The F.I.T. Story: Astronautics at F.I.T.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the astronautic programs and research at the Florida Institute of Technology, Melborne, Florida. Undergraduate and graduate students participate in research, such as Lighter-Than-Air vehicles, optical observation, auroral-magnetospheric research, and geomagnetism. (DS)

  4. 49 CFR 803.1 - Description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... gold. The inscription on the scroll is black. The encircling inscription is the same shade of gold as the eagle's beak. The arrows and the olive branch are a lighter shade of gold. The red and blue of...

  5. Some economic tables for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    During the course of the Southern California Aviation Council study on lighter than air it was determined that some form of economic base must be developed for estimation of costs of the airship. The tables are presented.

  6. Lightweight magnesium-lithium alloys show promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. T.; Cataldo, C. E.

    1964-01-01

    Evaluation tests show that magnesium-lithium alloys are lighter and more ductile than other magnesium alloys. They are being used for packaging, housings, containers, where light weight is more important than strength.

  7. Recovery and purification of ethylene

    DOEpatents

    Reyneke, Rian; Foral, Michael J.; Lee, Guang-Chung; Eng, Wayne W. Y.; Sinclair, Iain; Lodgson, Jeffery S.

    2008-10-21

    A process for the recovery and purification of ethylene and optionally propylene from a stream containing lighter and heavier components that employs an ethylene distributor column and a partially thermally coupled distributed distillation system.

  8. 16 CFR 1210.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... hydrocarbon, or a mixture containing any of these, whose vapor pressure at 75 °F (24 °C) exceeds a gage.... (This definition does not require a lighter to be modified with electronics or the like to produce...

  9. NASA Video Gallery

    NASA aeronautics researcher Dawn Jegley describes how they're testing a new lightweight stitched composite (nonmetallic) structure that could be used in aircraft to make them lighter and more fuel ...

  10. 49 CFR 803.1 - Description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gold. The inscription on the scroll is black. The encircling inscription is the same shade of gold as the eagle's beak. The arrows and the olive branch are a lighter shade of gold. The red and blue of...

  11. 49 CFR 803.1 - Description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gold. The inscription on the scroll is black. The encircling inscription is the same shade of gold as the eagle's beak. The arrows and the olive branch are a lighter shade of gold. The red and blue of...

  12. Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both LTA ship hangars. Date unknown but probably circa 1945. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  13. Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking north) circa 1942. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  14. Aerial view of reroofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of re-roofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa 1957. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  15. 27 CFR 555.202 - Classes of explosive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., black powder, safety fuses, igniters, igniter cords, fuse lighters, and “display fireworks” classified as UN0333, UN0334, or UN0335 by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations at 49 CFR...

  16. 27 CFR 555.202 - Classes of explosive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., black powder, safety fuses, igniters, igniter cords, fuse lighters, and “display fireworks” classified as UN0333, UN0334, or UN0335 by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations at 49 CFR...

  17. 27 CFR 555.202 - Classes of explosive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., black powder, safety fuses, igniters, igniter cords, fuse lighters, and “display fireworks” classified as UN0333, UN0334, or UN0335 by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations at 49 CFR...

  18. 27 CFR 555.202 - Classes of explosive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., black powder, safety fuses, igniters, igniter cords, fuse lighters, and “display fireworks” classified as UN0333, UN0334, or UN0335 by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations at 49 CFR...

  19. 27 CFR 555.202 - Classes of explosive materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., black powder, safety fuses, igniters, igniter cords, fuse lighters, and “display fireworks” classified as UN0333, UN0334, or UN0335 by the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations at 49 CFR...

  20. Thinner, More-Efficient Oxygen-Separation Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Douglas J.; Galica, Leo M.; Losey, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Better gas-distribution plates fabricated more easily. Oxygen-separation cell redesigned to make it more efficient, smaller, lighter, and easier to manufacture. Potential applications include use as gas separators, filters, and fuel cells.

  1. Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Kidneys KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Kidneys Print A A ... and it will be lighter. What Else Do Kidneys Do? Kidneys are always busy. Besides filtering the ...

  2. Ion Microprobe Measurements of Carbon Isotopes in Martian Phosphates: Insights into the Martian Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreva, J. S.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2003-03-01

    In-situ measurements of C in the phosphates from meteorites Los Angeles, Zagami, QUE94201 and ALH84001 predict isotopically light martian magmatic C, heavier than previous estimates yet significantly lighter than the terrestrial value.

  3. 30 CFR 100.5 - Determination of penalty amount; special assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... miner who willfully violates the mandatory safety standards relating to smoking or the carrying of smoking materials, matches, or lighters shall be subject to a civil penalty of not more than $375 for...

  4. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  5. Lightweight orthotic appliances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-filament reinforced polymer materials are used in applications requiring high tensile strength and modulus. Superior properties of graphite composite materials permit fabrication of supports that are considerably lighter, thinner, and stiffer than conventional components.

  6. Keloid, pigmented (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries. Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing. Dark-skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals. These patches ...

  7. Keloid above the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries. Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing. Dark skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals.

  8. Guide to Understanding Your Sleep Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself Diagnosis Treatment Options ... a result of sleep-disordered breathing or other sleep disorders. Each arousal sends you back to a lighter ...

  9. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  10. Lithium and Magnesium Isotopes in Sediments of the Ries Area: Constraints on the Sources of Moldavite Tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magna, T.; Žák, K.; Farkaš, J.; Trubač, J.; Rodovská, Z.; Šimeček, M.; Skála, R.; Řanda, Z.; Mizera, J.

    2014-09-01

    New Li and Mg isotope data is presented for sediments from the Ries area, considered sources of moldavite tektites. No direct link can be found between Li and specific lithologies while Mg is isotopically lighter in carbonate-rich samples.

  11. The Role of Unmanned Aerial Systems-Sensors in Air Quality Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) and miniaturized sensors for a variety of scientific and security purposes has rapidly increased. UASs include aerostats (tethered balloons) and remotely controlled, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) including lighter-than-air vessels, fix...

  12. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Alan

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  13. Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

  14. 30 CFR 100.5 - Determination of penalty amount; special assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... miner who willfully violates the mandatory safety standards relating to smoking or the carrying of smoking materials, matches, or lighters shall be subject to a civil penalty of not more than $375 for...

  15. Basic relationships for LTA economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausrotas, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Operating costs based on data of actual and proposed airships for conventional lighter than air craft (LTA) are presented. An economic comparison of LTA with the B-47F is included, and possible LTA economic trends are discussed.

  16. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... that your kids will use drugs such as marijuana or LSD. But you may not realize the dangers of substances in your own home. Household products such as glues, hair sprays, paints and lighter fluid can be drugs ...

  17. Spectrum and Decays of S-wave tetraquarks from chromomagnetism with flavour symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, Franco

    2008-08-01

    From a necessary condition for "open door" decays of tetraquarks into two pseudoscalar mesons or into a vector and pseudoscalar mesons, we deduce that the lighter states may have strong couplings into these final states.

  18. 30 CFR 100.5 - Determination of penalty amount; special assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... miner who willfully violates the mandatory safety standards relating to smoking or the carrying of smoking materials, matches, or lighters shall be subject to a civil penalty of not more than $375 for...

  19. 33 CFR 156.200 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a port or place subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S. This subpart does not apply to lightering... accordance with the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR parts 9 and 300) when conducting response...

  20. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  1. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... devices are subject to the requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210..., fuel for fireplaces, charcoal or gas-fired grills, camp fires, camp stoves, lanterns,...

  2. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices are subject to the requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210..., fuel for fireplaces, charcoal or gas-fired grills, camp fires, camp stoves, lanterns,...

  3. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... devices are subject to the requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210..., fuel for fireplaces, charcoal or gas-fired grills, camp fires, camp stoves, lanterns,...

  4. 16 CFR 1212.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... devices are subject to the requirements of the Safety Standard for Cigarette Lighters (16 CFR part 1210..., fuel for fireplaces, charcoal or gas-fired grills, camp fires, camp stoves, lanterns,...

  5. Ultra-Lightweight Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Silk Fibroin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhu, Bowen; Wang, Hua; Ma, Xiaohua; Hao, Yue; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    Ultra-lightweight resistive switching memory based on protein has been demonstrated. The memory foil is 0.4 mg cm(-2) , which is 320-fold lighter than silicon substrate, 20-fold lighter than office paper and can be sustained by a human hair. Additionally, high resistance OFF/ON ratio of 10(5) , retention time of 10(4) s, and excellent flexibility (bending radius of 800 μm) have been achieved. PMID:27315137

  6. Parents of preschool fire setters: perceptions of the child-play fire hazard.

    PubMed

    Pollack-Nelson, Carol; Faranda, Donna M; Porth, Don; Lim, Nicholas K

    2006-09-01

    The present study sought to learn about risk perceptions held by parents of preschool fire-setters. A 41-item survey was distributed to 60 parents whose children, aged 6 years and younger, had previously set fires and who were involved in intervention programmes throughout the US. Most parents did not think their children would play with matches/lighters, or knew how to use these items, although some had witnessed their children playing with matches/lighters previously. Most parents reported having taken precautions to keep matches/lighters out of reach and also educating their children about fire. Regardless, children not only set fires, but in 40% of cases climbed to access the match/lighter. Parents' perceptions of their children's proclivity for fire play were not consistent with their actual fire-play behaviour. Parents underestimated the likelihood that their children would play with matches/lighters. Although most reportedly undertook preventative measures aimed at thwarting fire play, these strategies were ineffective. Traditionally relied upon precautionary techniques, such as storing lighters out of reach and discussing the dangers of fire, were not sufficient to stem interest and resultant fire play. PMID:16943160

  7. Brightness illusion in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    A long-standing debate surrounds the issue of whether human and nonhuman species share similar perceptual mechanisms. One experimental strategy to compare visual perception of vertebrates consists in assessing how animals react in the presence of visual illusions. To date, this methodological approach has been widely used with mammals and birds, while few studies have been reported in distantly related species, such as fish. In the present study we investigated whether fish perceive the brightness illusion, a well-known illusion occurring when 2 objects, identical in physical features, appear to be different in brightness. Twelve guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were initially trained to discriminate which rectangle was darker or lighter between 2 otherwise identical rectangles. Three different conditions were set up: neutral condition between rectangle and background (same background used for both darker and lighter rectangle); congruent condition (darker rectangle in a darker background and lighter rectangle in a lighter background); and incongruent condition (darker rectangle in a lighter background and lighter rectangle in a darker background). After reaching the learning criterion, guppies were presented with the illusory pattern: 2 identical rectangles inserted in 2 different backgrounds. Guppies previously trained to select the darker rectangle showed a significant choice of the rectangle that appears to be darker by human observers (and vice versa). The human-like performance exhibited in the presence of the illusory pattern suggests the existence of similar perceptual mechanisms between humans and fish to elaborate the brightness of objects. PMID:26881944

  8. Apparatus for treating oil field wastes containing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, R.E.; Wyatt, W.L.

    1986-03-11

    An apparatus is described for treating wastes containing carbonaceous materials comprising: (a) a rotary kiln having a first end higher than a second end whereby material rotating therein will flow from the first to the second end, the kiln having an inlet at the first end; (b) means for injecting burning fuel and air into the first end of the kiln and cause substantially complete combustion of all carbonaceous materials in the wastes and leaving only dry solid non-combustible residue and gases; (c) outlet means at the second end of the kiln; (d) separating means connected to the outlet means for separating heavier solid materials exiting the kiln from lighter solid materials exiting the kiln, the separating means including suction means for entraining the lighter materials in air and gases exhausted from the kiln while permitting heavier solid materials to separate therefrom by gravity; and (e) means downstream from the suction means for separating the lighter solid materials from the gases.

  9. Effects of sizes and conformations of fish-scale collagen peptides on facial skin qualities and transdermal penetration efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chai, Huey-Jine; Li, Jing-Hua; Huang, Han-Ning; Li, Tsung-Lin; Chan, Yi-Lin; Shiau, Chyuan-Yuan; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2010-01-01

    Fish-scale collagen peptides (FSCPs) were prepared using a given combination of proteases to hydrolyze tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) scales. FSCPs were determined to stimulate fibroblast cells proliferation and procollagen synthesis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The transdermal penetration capabilities of the fractionationed FSCPs were evaluated using the Franz-type diffusion cell model. The heavier FSCPs, 3500 and 4500 Da, showed higher cumulative penetration capability as opposed to the lighter FSCPs, 2000 and 1300 Da. In addition, the heavier seemed to preserve favorable coiled structures comparing to the lighter that presents mainly as linear under confocal scanning laser microscopy. FSCPs, particularly the heavier, were concluded to efficiently penetrate stratum corneum to epidermis and dermis, activate fibroblasts, and accelerate collagen synthesis. The heavier outweighs the lighter in transdermal penetration likely as a result of preserving the given desired structure feature. PMID:20625414

  10. Visual detection of body weight change in young women.

    PubMed

    Alley, T R

    1991-12-01

    To assess whether small changes in body weight can be visually detected, college students (58 women and 42 men) were asked to select the less heavy person shown in two photographs for each of 33 young women. All of these women had been photographed twice in a standardized pose and attire, separated by an 8-wk. interval during which most of them lost weight. These pairs were presented in varying orders to control for the order and side of presentation. One photograph was reliably selected as the lighter person for 64% of the pairs, but the picture selected was in fact lighter only 57% of the time. The accuracy of selecting the lighter photograph was not correlated with the percent weight change for the person shown in the pairs of photographs. The results suggest that small changes in women's weight may not have a significant perceptual effect, particularly for male perceivers. PMID:1792140

  11. Divergence of larval resource acquisition for water conservation and starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal; Ranga, Poonam; Singh, Divya

    2012-07-01

    Laboratory selection experiments have evidenced storage of energy metabolites in adult flies of desiccation and starvation resistant strains of D. melanogaster but resource acquisition during larval stages has received lesser attention. For wild populations of D. melanogaster, it is not clear whether larvae acquire similar or different energy metabolites for desiccation and starvation resistance. We tested the hypothesis whether larval acquisition of energy metabolites is consistent with divergence of desiccation and starvation resistance in darker and lighter isofemale lines of D. melanogaster. Our results are interesting in several respects. First, we found contrasting patterns of larval resource acquisition, i.e., accumulation of higher carbohydrates during 3rd instar larval stage of darker flies versus higher levels of triglycerides in 1st and 2nd larval instars of lighter flies. Second, 3rd instar larvae of darker flies showed ~40 h longer duration of development at 21°C; and greater accumulation of carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) in fed larvae as compared with larvae non-fed after 150 h of egg laying. Third, darker isofemale lines have shown significant increase in total water content (18%); hemolymph (86%) and dehydration tolerance (11%) as compared to lighter isofemale lines. Loss of hemolymph water under desiccation stress until death was significantly higher in darker as compared to lighter isofemale lines but tissue water loss was similar. Fourth, for larvae of darker flies, about 65% energy content is contributed by carbohydrates for conferring greater desiccation resistance while the larvae of lighter flies acquire 2/3 energy from lipids for sustaining starvation resistance; and such energy differences persist in the newly eclosed flies. Thus, larval stages of wild-caught darker and lighter flies have evolved independent physiological processes for the accumulation of energy metabolites to cope with desiccation or starvation stress. PMID

  12. Phase space analysis and contribution of participant-spectator matter towards fragments formed in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sukhjit

    2016-05-01

    We study the contribution of participant and spectator matter towards different kinds of fragments. We find higher contribution of spectator matter towards heavier fragments compared to lighter fragments. We also notice that heavier IMFs preserve the time correlations. The nucleons emerging as lighter IMFs however, are well separated in the phase space at the start of the reaction and form the cluster at later times. The neutron-richness of the reacting partners is found to have negligible effect on the participant-spectator matter.

  13. Stop as a next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in constrained MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Huitu, Katri; Leinonen, Lasse; Laamanen, Jari

    2011-10-01

    So far the squarks have not been detected at the LHC indicating that they are heavier than a few hundred GeVs, if they exist. The lighter stop can be considerably lighter than the other squarks. We study the possibility that a supersymmetric partner of the top quark, stop, is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in the constrained supersymmetric standard model. Various constraints, on top of the mass limits, are taken into an account, and the allowed parameter space for this scenario is determined. Observing stop which is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle at the LHC may be difficult.

  14. Search for neutral resonances decaying into a Z boson and a pair of b jets or τ leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-08-01

    A search is performed for a new resonance decaying into a lighter resonance and a Z boson. Two channels are studied, targeting the decay of the lighter resonance into either a pair of oppositely charged τ leptons or a b b ‾ pair. The Z boson is identified via its decays to electrons or muons. The search exploits data collected by the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. No significant deviations are observed from the standard model expectation and limits are set on production cross sections and parameters of two-Higgs-doublet models.

  15. Deformation of the overriding slab during incipient subduction in centrifuge modeling and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, Yossi; Goren, Liran; Koyi, Hemin

    2015-04-01

    Analog models of subduction-related structural deformation emphasize the significance of differences in density and friction between the adjacent plates on the distortion of the overriding slab and its possible effect on the subduction procedure. Centrifuge experiments juxtaposed miniaturized lighter and denser lithospheres, which were floating on denser but less viscous asthenosphere. The lithosphere in the tests comprised brittle and ductile strata, which showed diversified styles of deformation, while factors of equivocal tectonic significance, such as lateral push or negative buoyancy, were not introduced into the experiments. The tests show that the juxtaposition of lighter and denser lithospheres would suffice to drive the denser lithosphere as a wedge between the asthenosphere and the lighter lithosphere, and that the rate of the process would depend on the rate of friction between the slabs, as well as on differential viscosity. It seems that the reduced friction in Nature was derived from the generation of serpentinites, which could be the main agent of lubrication. The underthrusting of the denser lithosphere leads to the uplift and collapse of the edge of the lighter slab, where extension, thinning, normal faulting and rifting took place, and diapiric ascent of parts of the ductile layer of the lighter slab occurred along several rifts. The analog experiments were carried out only to the stage where the denser slab was thrust under the lighter one, but the penetration of the lithosphere into the asthenosphere was not achieved. It seems plausible therefore, that only after eclogitization, and the upward motion of serpentinites, increased the density of the underthrust slab, would it dive and penetrate into the asthenosphere. The experiments indicate the plausibility of the constraints imposed on the subduction process by the deformation of the overthrust slab. The normal faults and rifts in the overthrust block could serve as conduits for the ascent of

  16. Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process

    DOEpatents

    Ignasiak, Teresa; Strausz, Otto; Ignasiak, Boleslaw; Janiak, Jerzy; Pawlak, Wanda; Szymocha, Kazimierz; Turak, Ali A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

  17. Sedimentary features on the surface of Mars as seen from Mariner 6 and 7 photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsley, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Martian sedimentation is primarily aeolian with the principal source areas being the cratered highlands. Lighter albedo in areas of sedimentation may be due to minerals of smaller grain size and/or lighter specific gravity. Martian erosion sedimentation seems to be active as evidenced by removal and/or burial of ejecta mounds and ray ejecta patterns around fresh bowl shaped craters. It is suggested that at least some chaotic terrain may be formed by aeolian removal of material in areas of closely spaced faulting. Transitional areas between uplands and basins are sometimes muted by down slope winds.

  18. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  19. Vocabulary on the Move: Investigating an Intelligent Mobile Phone-Based Vocabulary Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Mobile learning has long been identified as one of the natural directions in which CALL is expected to move, and as smaller portable technologies become less expensive, lighter and more powerful, they have the potential to become a more integral part of language learning courses as opposed to the more supplemental role often assigned to computer…

  20. Development of Graphite/Epoxy Corner Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faile, G.; Hollis, R.; Ledbetter, F.; Maldonado, J.; Sledd, J.; Stuckey, J.; Waggoner, G.; Engler, E.

    1986-01-01

    Report documents development project aimed at improving design and load-carrying ability of complicated corner fitting for optical bench. New fitting made of graphite filaments in epoxy-resin matrix. Composite material selected as replacement for titanium because lighter and dimensions change little with temperature variations.

  1. A Life-Science Action Course for Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley ,Wes W.

    1972-01-01

    Several suggestions are provided for making life-science programs effective in junior high schools. Teacher's job can be made lighter if advanced planning and execution are done wisely. Problems ranging from shortage of space to final grading are discussed. Workable solutions are suggested for each situation. (PS)

  2. Design, fabrication, and tests of a metallic shell tile thermal protection system for space transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, Ian O.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1989-01-01

    A thermal protection tile for earth-to-orbit transports is described. The tiles consist of a rigid external shell filled with a flexible insulation. The tiles tend to be thicker than the current Shuttle rigidized silica tiles for the same entry heat load but are projected to be more durable and lighter. The tiles were thermally tested for several simulated entry trajectories.

  3. Site overview. View of hangar no. 2 from roof of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site overview. View of hangar no. 2 from roof of hangar no. 1. Note control tower at middle distance center. Looking SE. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  4. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The FTS is a compact interferometer with the capability to passively sense the Earth's surface and atmosperic radiation emissions and absorptions. It's a powerful, yet highly versatile instrument, being developed by technologists at NASA Langley Research Center, in partnership with other NASA centers, universities and industry.Using advanced materials, the FTS will be more compact and much lighter than current interferometers.

  5. Inhalant Abuse. Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Although many parents are appropriately concerned about illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, and LSD, they often ignore the dangers posed to their children from common household products such as glues, nail polish remover, lighter fluid, spray paints, deodorant and hair sprays, canned whipped cream, and cleaning fluids. Many young people…

  6. First Report of Veronica Rust by Puccinia veronicae-longifoliae in Minnesota on Veronica spicata Royal Candles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2008, Veronica spicata Royal Candles plants showing foliar symptoms typical of a rust infection were brought to the Plant Disease Clinic at the University of Minnesota by a commercial nursery. A dark brown discoloration was apparent on the upper surface of the leaf with lighter brown pu...

  7. 48 CFR 228.370 - Additional clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...., helicopters, vertical take-off or landing aircraft, lighter-than-air airships, unmanned aerial vehicles, or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional clauses. 228.370 Section 228.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...

  8. 48 CFR 228.370 - Additional clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...., helicopters, vertical take-off or landing aircraft, lighter-than-air airships, unmanned aerial vehicles, or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional clauses. 228.370 Section 228.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...

  9. 48 CFR 228.370 - Additional clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...., helicopters, vertical take-off or landing aircraft, lighter-than-air airships, unmanned aerial vehicles, or... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional clauses. 228.370 Section 228.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...

  10. HIGH VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wright, B.T.

    1959-06-01

    A high voltage regulator for use with calutrons is described which rapidly restores accelerating voltage after a sudden drop such as is caused by sparking. The rapid restoration characteristic prevents excessive contamination of lighter mass receiver pockets by the heavier mass portion of the beam. (T.R.H.)