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Sample records for lightest kaluza-klein particledark

  1. Neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy E-mail: melbeus@kth.se

    2010-01-01

    We investigate indirect neutrino signals from annihilations of Kaluza-Klein dark matter in the Sun. Especially, we examine a five- as well as a six-dimensional model, and allow for the possibility that boundary localized terms could affect the spectrum to give different lightest Kaluza-Klein particles, which could constitute the dark matter. The dark matter candidates that are interesting for the purpose of indirect detection of neutrinos are the first Kaluza-Klein mode of the gauge boson and the neutral component of the gauge bosons. Using the DarkSUSY and WimpSim packages, we calculate muon fluxes at an Earth-based neutrino telescope, such as IceCube. For the five-dimensional model, the results that we obtained agree reasonably well with the results that have previously been presented in the literature, whereas for the six-dimensional model, we find that, at tree-level, the results are the same as for the five-dimensional model. Finally, if the first Kaluza-Klein mode of the gauge boson constitutes the dark matter, IceCube can constrain the parameter space. However, in the case that the neutral component of the gauge bosons is the LKP, the signal is too weak to be observed.

  2. Kaluza-Klein nature of entropy function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salti, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Oktay; Yanar, Hilmi

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we mainly investigate the nature of entropy function in non-flat Kaluza-Klein universe. We prove that the first and generalized second laws of gravitational thermodynamics are valid on the dynamical apparent horizon.

  3. Cosmological production of Kaluza-Klein monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Kolb, E.W.; Perry, M.J.

    1984-09-01

    The cosmological production of Kaluza-Klein monopoles is discussed. The present monopole to entropy ratio is calculated in some simple models with the conclusion that this ratio is unacceptably large unless additional mechanisms for entropy production or monopole annihilation are present.

  4. Universal extra dimension: Violation of Kaluza-Klein parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob

    2009-01-01

    The minimal universal extra dimension (mUED) model respects the Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity (-1){sup n}, where n is the KK number. However, it is possible to have interactions located at only one of the two fixed points of the S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. Such asymmetric interactions violate the KK parity. This kills the cold dark matter component of UED but also removes the upper bound on the inverse compactification radius, and thus nonobservation of the KK excitations even at the Large Hadron Collider does not necessarily invalidate the model. Apart from the decay of the lightest n=1 KK excitation, this leads to collider signals which are markedly different from those in the mUED scenario. The phenomenological consequences of such KK-parity violating terms are explored.

  5. The abundance of Kaluza-Klein dark matter with coannihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Burnell, Fiona; Kribs, Graham D.

    2006-01-01

    In universal extra dimension models, the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle is generically the first KK excitation of the photon and can be stable, serving as particle dark matter. We calculate the thermal relic abundance of the KK photon for a general mass spectrum of KK excitations including full coannihilation effects with all (level-one) KK excitations. We find that including coannihilation can significantly change the relic abundance when the coannihilating particles are within about 20% of the mass of the KK photon. Matching the relic abundance with cosmological data, we find the mass range of the KK photon is much wider than previously found, up to about 2 TeV if the masses of the strongly interacting level-one KK particles are within 5% of the mass of the KK photon. We also find cases where several coannihilation channels compete (constructively and destructively) with one another. The lower bound on the KK photon mass, about 540 GeV when just right-handed KK leptons coannihilate with the KK photon, relaxes upward by several hundred GeV when coannihilation with electroweak KK gauge bosons of the same mass is included.

  6. Galactic entropy in extended Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanar, Hilmi; Salti, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Oktay; Acikgoz, Irfan; Yasar, Erol

    2016-02-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein model with variable cosmological and gravitational terms to discuss the nature of galactic entropy function. For this purpose, we assume a universe filled with dark fluid and consider five-dimensional (5D) field equations using the Gamma law equation. We mainly discuss the validity of the first and generalized second laws of galactic thermodynamics for viable Kaluza-Klein models.

  7. Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; al., et

    2009-10-23

    A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.

  8. A neo-intuitive proposal for Kaluza-Klein unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Steven M.

    1988-11-01

    This paper addresses a central question of contemporary theoretical physics: Can a unified account be provided for the known forces of nature? The issue is brought into focus by considering the recently revived Kaluza-Klein approach to unification, a program entailing dimensional transformation through cosmogony. First it is demonstrated that, in a certain sence, revitalized Kaluza-Klein theory appears to undermine the intuitive foundations of mathematical physics, but that this implicit consequence has been repressed at a substantial cost. A fundamental reformulation of the Kaluza-Klein strategy is then undertaken, one that casts it within a new intuitive context. This is followed by a provisional application of the suggested approach to the specific problem of cosmological change. The paper concludes by exploring the far-reaching epistemological implications of the “neo-intuitive” proposal set forth.

  9. Kaluza's and Klein's Contributions to the Kaluza-Klein-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, Daniela; Goenner, Hubert

    2006-02-01

    Kaluza's and Klein's contributions to Kaluza-Klein-theory. The Kaluza-Klein-theory is one of the "classics" of modern theoretical physics. All theories that construct a space with extra dimensions, such as superstring and membrane theory, are based on the structure of this unified theory. The original five-dimensional theories by Theodor Kaluza (from 1921) and Oskar Klein (from 1926) have not yet been closely analysed, historically. What has survived as an established part of physics is a "folklore version" that mixes together elements from both theories. Our paper analyses the individual mathematical and physical contributions by Kaluza and Klein. It points out the importance of the achievements of these two founders of five-dimensional unified theories, and compares them with the folklore version of the Kaluza-Klein theory.

  10. Klein-Gordon oscillator in Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Josevi; Carvalho, Alexandre M. de M.; Cavalcante, Everton; Furtado, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution we study the Klein-Gordon oscillator on the curved background within the Kaluza-Klein theory. The problem of the interaction between particles coupled harmonically with topological defects in Kaluza-Klein theory is studied. We consider a series of topological defects, then we treat the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled to this background, and we find the energy levels and corresponding eigenfunctions in these cases. We show that the energy levels depend on the global parameters characterizing these spacetimes. We also investigate a quantum particle described by the Klein-Gordon oscillator interacting with a cosmic dislocation in Som-Raychaudhuri spacetime in the presence of homogeneous magnetic field in a Kaluza-Klein theory. In this case, the energy spectrum is determined, and we observe that these energy levels represent themselves as the sum of the terms related with Aharonov-Bohm flux and of the parameter associated to the rotation of the spacetime.

  11. Charged rotating dilaton black holes with Kaluza-Klein asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Christian; Nedkova, Petya

    2016-03-01

    We construct a class of stationary and axisymmetric solutions to the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity, which describe configurations of charged rotating black objects with Kaluza-Klein asymptotics. The solutions are constructed by uplifting a vacuum seed solution to six dimensions, performing a boost and a subsequent circle reduction. We investigate the physical properties of the charged solutions and obtain their general relations to the properties of the vacuum seed. We also derive the gyromagnetic ratio and the Smarr-like relations. As particular cases, we study three solutions, which describe a charged rotating black string, a charged rotating black ring on Kaluza-Klein bubbles, and a superposition of two black holes and a Kaluza-Klein bubble.

  12. Non-oscillatory behaviour in vacuum Kaluza-Klein cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaret, J.; Henneaux, M.; Spindel, P.; Taormina, A.; Hanquin, J.-L.

    The generic behavior of vacuum inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein cosmologies is studied in the vicinity of the cosmological singularity. It is argued that, in spacetime dimensions equal to or greater than 11, the generalized Kasner solution, with monotonic power-law behavior of the spatial distances, becomes a general solution of the Einstein vacuum field equations and, moreover, the chaotic oscillatory behavior disappears.

  13. Kaluza-Klein Braneworld Cosmology with Static Internal Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, S.; Langlois, D.; Sasaki, M.; Soda, J.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate the Kaluza-Klein braneworld cosmology from the point of view of observers on the brane. We first generalize the Shiromizu-Maeda-Sasaki (SMS) equations to higher dimensions. As an application, we study a (4+n)-dimensional brane with n dimensions compactified on the brane, in a (5+n)-dimensional bulk. By assuming that the size of the internal space is static, that the bulk energy-momentum tensor can be ignored, we determine the effect of the bulk geometry on the Kaluza-Klein braneworld. Then we derive the effective Friedmann equation on the brane. It turns out that the Friedmann equation explicitly depends on the equation of state, in contrast to the braneworld in a 5-dimensional bulk spacetime. In particular, in a radiation-dominated era, the effective Newton constant depends logarithmically on the scale factor. If we include a pressureless matter on the brane, this dependence disappears after the radiation-matter equality. This may be interpreted as st abilization of the Newton constant by the matter on the brane. Our findings imply that the Kaluza-Klein braneworld cosmology is quite different from the conventional Kaluza-Klein cosmology even at low energy.

  14. Geodetic precession in squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Ken; Ishihara, Hideki

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the geodetic precession effect of a parallelly transported spin vector along a circular geodesic in five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole spacetime. Then we derive the higher-dimensional correction of the precession angle to general relativity. We find that the correction is proportional to the square of (size of extra dimension)/(gravitational radius of central object)

  15. Supersymmetric and Kaluza-Klein Particles Multiple Scattering in the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Ivone; Klein, Spencer

    2009-05-19

    Neutrino telescopes with cubic kilometer volume have the potential to discover new particles. Among them are next to lightest supersymmetric (NLSPs) and next to lightest Kaluza-Klein (NLKPs) particles. Two NLSPs or NLKPs will transverse the detector simultaneously producing parallel charged tracks. The track separation inside the detector can be a few hundred meters. As these particles might propagate a few thousand kilometers before reaching the detector, multiple scattering could enhance the pair separation at the detector. We find that the multiple scattering will alter the separation distribution enough to increase the number of NLKP pairs separated by more than 100 meters (a reasonable experimental cut) by up to 46% depending on the NLKP mass. Vertical upcoming NLSPs will have their separation increased by 24% due to multiple scattering.

  16. Residue theorem and summing over Kaluza-Klein excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Taifu; Chen Jianbin; Gao Tiejun; Sun Kesheng

    2011-11-01

    Applying the equations of motion together with corresponding boundary conditions of bulk profiles at infrared and ultraviolet branes, we verify some lemmas on the eigenvalues of Kaluza-Klein modes in extension of the standard model with a warped extra dimension and the custodial symmetry SU(3){sub c}xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub X}xP{sub LR}. Using the lemmas and performing properly analytic extensions of bulk profiles, we present the sufficient condition for a convergent series of Kaluza-Klein excitations and sum over the series through the residue theorem. The method can also be applied to sum over the infinite series of Kaluza-Klein excitations in a universal extra dimension. Furthermore, we analyze the possible connection between the propagators in five-dimensional full theory and the product of bulk profiles with corresponding propagators of exciting Kaluza-Klein modes in four-dimensional effective theory, and recover some relations presented in the literature for warped and universal extra dimensions, respectively. As an example, we present the correction from new physics to the branching ratio of B{yields}X{sub s{gamma}} to the order O({mu}{sub EW}{sup 2}/{Lambda}{sub KK}{sup 2}) in extension of the standard model with a warped extra dimension and the custodial symmetry, where {Lambda}{sub KK} denotes the energy scale of low-lying Kaluza-Klein excitations and {mu}{sub EW} denotes the electroweak energy scale.

  17. Charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdizadeh, Masoud; Matsuno, Ken; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-02-15

    We obtain a class of slowly rotating charged Kaluza-Klein black hole solutions of the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling constant. At infinity, the spacetime is effectively four dimensional. In the absence of the squashing function, our solution reduces to the five-dimensional asymptotically flat slowly rotating charged dilaton black hole solution with two equal angular momenta. We calculate the mass, the angular momentum, and the gyromagnetic ratio of these rotating Kaluza-Klein dilaton black holes. It is shown that the dilaton field and the nontrivial asymptotic structure of the solutions modify the gyromagnetic ratio of the black holes. We also find that the gyromagnetic ratio crucially depends on the dilaton coupling constant, {alpha}, and decreases with increasing {alpha} for any size of the compact extra dimension.

  18. Towards Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter on nilmanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriot, David; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Deandrea, Aldo; Deutschmann, Nicolas; Tsimpis, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    We present a first study of the field spectrum on a class of negatively-curved compact spaces: nilmanifolds or twisted tori. This is a case where analytical results can be obtained, allowing to check numerical methods. We focus on the Kaluza-Klein expansion of a scalar field. The results are then applied to a toy model where a natural Dark Matter candidate arises as a stable massive state of the bulk scalar.

  19. Constraints on cosmic superstrings from Kaluza-Klein emission.

    PubMed

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    Cosmic superstrings interact generically with a tower of light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. We study the production of KK particles by cosmic superstring loops, and show that it is constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis. We study the resulting constraints in the parameter space of the underlying string theory model and highlight their complementarity with the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments. PMID:23031097

  20. Einstein-Rosen solutions from Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, L. A.; Bretón, N.; Ramírez, B. V.

    2013-01-01

    From a time-dependent boost-rotational symmetric vacuum solution of the Einstein Equations in five dimensions, through the Kaluza-Klein reduction the corresponding Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton solutions are obtained. The four dimensional counterpart turns out to be generalized Einstein-Rosen spacetimes representing unpolarized gravitational waves traveling in an inhomogeneous cosmology. Restricting the parameters we are able to obtain different 4D time-dependent solutions equipped with scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  1. Constraints on the size of the extra dimension from Kaluza-Klein gravitino decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gherson, David

    2007-08-15

    We study the consequences of the gravitino decay into dark matter. We suppose that the lightest neutralino is the main component of dark matter. In our framework the gravitino is heavy enough to decay before big bang nucleosynthesis starts. We consider a model coming from a five dimensional supergravity compactified on S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} with gravity in the bulk and matter localized on tensionless branes at the orbifold fixed points. We require that the dark matter, which is produced thermally and in the decay of Kaluza-Klein modes of the gravitino, has an abundance compatible with observation. We deduce from our model that there are curves of constraints between the size of the extra dimension and the reheating temperature of the Universe after inflation.

  2. Finite Number of Kaluza-Klein Modes, all with Zero Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Recai

    Kaluza-Klein modes of fermions in a five-dimensional toy model are considered. The number of Kaluza-Klein modes that survive after integration over extra dimensions is finite in this space. Moreover, the extra dimensional piece of the kinetic part of the Lagrangian in this space induces no mass for the higher Kaluza-Klein modes on contrary to the standard lore.

  3. On the stability of toroidally compact Kaluza-Klein theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, S. K.; Guendelman, E. I.; Taormina, A.; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    1984-08-01

    We study the stability ar the one loop level, of finite temperature Kaluza-Klein theories coupled to matter fields. We restrict our attention to space-times containing compact manifolds which are toruses and Klein bottles. If the cosmological constant is chosen so that the effective potential vanishes at its minimum, and if twisted bosons or untwisted fermions are introduced into the theory, then these space-times are stable below a critical temperature of the order of the particle masses. We also discuss some subtleties that arises when Fermi fields are defined on non-simply connected manifolds.

  4. Vacuum destabilization from Kaluza Klein modes in an inflating brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujolàs, Oriol; Sasaki, Misao

    2005-09-01

    We discuss the effects from the Kaluza Klein modes in the brane world scenario when an interaction between bulk and brane fields is included. We focus on the bulk inflaton model, where a bulk field Ψ drives inflation in an almost AdS5 bulk bounded by an inflating brane. We couple Ψ to a brane scalar field phiv representing matter on the brane. The bulk field Ψ is assumed to have a light mode, whose mass depends on the expectation value of phiv. The KK modes form a continuum with masses m>3H/2, where H is the Hubble constant. To estimate their effects, we integrate them out and obtain the 1-loop effective potential Veff(phiv). With no tuning of the parameters of the model, the vacuum becomes (meta)stable—Veff(phiv) develops a true vacuum at \\varphi \

  5. Generalized Kaluza-Klein monopole, quadratic algebras and ladder operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, Ian

    2011-06-01

    We present a generalized Kaluza-Klein monopole system. We solve this quantum superintegrable system on a Euclidean Taub Nut manifold using the separation of variables of the corresponding Schrödinger equation in spherical and parabolic coordinates. We present the integrals of motion of this system, the quadratic algebra generated by these integrals, the realization in terms of a deformed oscillator algebra using the Daskaloyannis construction and the energy spectrum. The structure constants and the Casimir operator are functions not only of the Hamiltonian but also of other two integrals commuting with all generators of the quadratic algebra and forming an Abelian subalgebra. We present another algebraic derivation of the energy spectrum of this system using the factorization method and ladder operators.

  6. Charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Toshiharu; Ishihara, Hideki; Matsuno, Ken; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2008-02-15

    We construct a new charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole solution in the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with a Chern-Simon term. The features of the solutions are also investigated. The spacetime is asymptotically locally flat, i.e., it asymptotes to a twisted S{sup 1} bundle over the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. The solution describe a non-BPS black hole rotating in the direction of the extra dimension. The solutions have the limits to the supersymmetric black hole solutions, a new extreme non-BPS black hole solution and a new rotating non-BPS black hole solution with a constant twisted S{sup 1} fiber.

  7. Cosmic super-strings and Kaluza-Klein modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    Cosmic super-strings interact generically with a tower of relatively light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. In this paper, we study the production of spin-2 KK particles by cusps on loops of cosmic F- and D-strings. We consider cosmic super-strings localized either at the bottom of a warped throat or in a flat internal space with large volume. The total energy emitted by cusps in KK modes is comparable in both cases, although the number of produced KK modes may differ significantly. We then show that KK emission is constrained by the photo-dissociation of light elements and by observations of the diffuse gamma ray background. We show that this rules out regions of the parameter space of cosmic super-strings that are complementary to the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments. KK modes are also expected to play an important role in the friction-dominated epoch of cosmic super-string evolution.

  8. Warped Kaluza-Klein reduction from string duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael; Tammaro, Elliott

    2014-03-01

    Virtually all phenomenologically relevant string theory compactifications are of warped type, in which the overall scale factor of 4D spacetime varies over the internal dimensions. However, the procedure for Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction is more poorly understood for warped compactifications than for standard compactifications. The simplest standard compactifications are compactifications on tori, and the simplest warped compactifications differ from these by the addition of parallel D-branes and O-branes. It is astonishing that a direct derivation of the dimensionally reduced action does not exist even for these simple warped compactifications (which are T-dual to Type I), although the answer is known on supersymmetry grounds. We fill this void. We derive the procedure for the KK reduction of a simple Type IIA warped compactification with D6 branes and O6 planes, via its lift to the standard compactification of M-theory on K3. Our derivation utilizes an approximate K3 metric of Gibbons-Hawking form, which is exactly equivalent to the classical type IIA supergravity description of the warped compactification. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY09-12219 and PHY11-25915.

  9. The Equivalence Principle in Kaluza-Klein Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    In four-dimensional general relativity the space-time outside of an isolated spherical star is described by a unique line element, which is the Schwarzschild metric. As a consequence, the "gravitational" mass and the "inertial" mass of a star are equal to each other. However, theories that envision our world as being embedded in a larger universe, with more than four dimensions, permit a number of possible non-Schwarzschild 4D exteriors, which typically lead to different masses, violating the weak equivalence principle of ordinary general relativity. Therefore, the question arises as to whether the violation of this principle, i.e. the equality of gravitational and inertial mass, is a necessary consequence of the existence of extra dimensions. In this paper, in the context of Kaluza-Klein gravity in 5D, we show that the answer to this question is negative. We find a one-parameter family of asymptotically flat non-Schwarzschild static exteriors for which the inertial and gravitational masses are equal to each other, and equal to the Deser-Soldate mass. This family is consistent with the Newtonian weak field limit as well as with the general-relativistic Schwarzschild limit. Thus, we conclude that the existence of an extra dimension, and the corresponding non-Schwarzschild exterior, does not necessarily require different masses. However, to an observer in 4D, it does affect the motion of test particles in 4D, which is a consequence of the departure from the usual (4D) law of geodesic motion.

  10. Measuring a Kaluza-Klein radius smaller than the Planck length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank; Morris, Randall

    2003-03-01

    Hestenes has shown that a bispinor field on a Minkowski space-time is equivalent to an orthonormal tetrad of one-forms together with a complex scalar field. More recently, the Dirac and Einstein equations were unified in a tetrad formulation of a Kaluza-Klein model which gives precisely the usual Dirac-Einstein Lagrangian. In this model, Dirac’s bispinor equation is obtained in the limit for which the radius of higher compact dimensions of the Kaluza-Klein manifold becomes vanishingly small compared with the Planck length. For a small but finite radius, the Kaluza-Klein model predicts the velocity splitting of single fermion wave packets. That is, the model predicts that a single fermion wave packet will split into two wave packets with slightly different group velocities. The observation of such wave packet splits would determine the size of the Kaluza-Klein radius. If wave packet splits were not observed in experiments with currently achievable accuracies, the Kaluza-Klein radius would be bounded by at most 10-25 times the Planck length.

  11. Hawking radiation as tunneling from squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Ken; Umetsu, Koichiro

    2011-03-15

    We discuss Hawking radiation from a five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole on the basis of the tunneling mechanism. A simple method, which was recently suggested by Umetsu, may be used to extend the original derivation by Parikh and Wilczek to various black holes. That is, we use the two-dimensional effective metric, which is obtained by the dimensional reduction near the horizon, as the background metric. Using the same method, we derive both the desired result of the Hawking temperature and the effect of the backreaction associated with the radiation in the squashed Kaluza-Klein black hole background.

  12. Kaluza-Klein models: Can we construct a viable example?

    SciTech Connect

    Eingorn, Maxim; Zhuk, Alexander

    2011-02-15

    In Kaluza-Klein models with toroidal compactification of the extra dimensions, we investigate soliton solutions of Einstein equation. The nonrelativistic gravitational potential of these solitons exactly coincides with the Newtonian one. We obtain the formulas for perihelion shift, deflection of light, time delay of radar echoes and post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. Using the constraint on PPN parameter {gamma}, we find that the solitonic parameter k should be very big: |k|{>=}2.3x10{sup 4}. We define a soliton solution which corresponds to a pointlike mass source. In this case the soliton parameter k=2, which is clearly contrary to this restriction. A similar problem with the observations takes place for static spherically symmetric perfect fluid with the dustlike equation of state in all dimensions. The common for both of these models is the same (dustlike) equations of state in our three dimensions and in the extra dimensions. All dimensions are treated at equal footing. This is the crucial point. To be in agreement with observations, it is necessary to break the symmetry (in terms of equations of state) between the external/our and internal spaces. It takes place for black strings which are particular examples of solitons with k{yields}{infinity}. For such k, black strings are in concordance with the observations. Moreover, we show that they are the only solitons which are at the same level of agreement with the observations as in general relativity. Black strings can be treated as perfect fluid with dustlike equation of state p{sub 0}=0 in the external/our space and very specific equation of state p{sub 1}=-(1/2){epsilon} in the internal space. The latter equation is due to negative tension in the extra dimension. We also demonstrate that dimension 3 for the external space is a special one. Only in this case we get the latter equation of state. We show that the black string equations of state satisfy the necessary condition of the internal space stabilization

  13. Confining the scalar field of the Kaluza-Klein wormhole soliton

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, G. )

    1989-08-01

    The Maison five-to-three dimensional reduction, generalized to the case of five-dimensional general relativity with sources, is applied to the problem of confining the scalar field of the Kaluza-Klein wormhole soliton by a very weak perfect fluid source, without affecting the spatial geometry of this localized solution.

  14. On Pauli's Invention of Non-Abelian Kaluza-Klein Theory in 1953

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumann, N.

    2002-12-01

    There are documents which show that Wolfgang Pauli developed in 1953 the first consistent generalization of the five-dimensional theory of Kaluza, Klein, Fock and others to a higher dimensional internal space. Because he saw no way to give masses to the gauge bosons, he refrained from publishing his results formally.

  15. Z boson decay to photon plus Kaluza Klein graviton: large extra dimensional bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Skittrall, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of the decay of a Z boson into a photon and a Kaluza Klein excitation of the graviton in the ADD model. Using LEP data, we obtain an upper bound on the branching ratio corresponding to this process of ˜10-11. We also investigate energy profiles of the process.

  16. Deformed phase space Kaluza-Klein cosmology and late time acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabido, M.; Yee-Romero, C.

    2016-06-01

    The effects of phase space deformations on Kaluza-Klein cosmology are studied. The deformation is introduced by modifying the symplectic structure of the minisuperspace variables. In the deformed model, we find an accelerating scale factor and therefore infer the existence of an effective cosmological constant from the phase space deformation parameter β.

  17. Hoop conjecture and the horizon formation cross section in Kaluza-Klein spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Ishihara, Hideki; Kimura, Masashi; Tanzawa, Sugure

    2010-01-15

    We analyze momentarily static initial data sets of the gravitational field produced by two-point sources in five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein spacetimes. These initial data sets are characterized by the mass, the separation of sources and the size of an extra dimension. Using these initial data sets, we discuss the condition for black hole formation, and propose a new conjecture which is a hybrid of the four-dimensional hoop conjecture and the five-dimensional hyperhoop conjecture. By using the new conjecture, we estimate the cross section of black hole formation due to collisions of particles in Kaluza-Klein spacetimes. We show that the mass dependence of the cross section gives us information about the size and the number of the compactified extra dimensions.

  18. Uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in five-dimensional minimal supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2010-11-15

    We show a uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in the bosonic sector of five-dimensional minimal supergravity. More precisely, under the assumptions of the existence of two commuting axial isometries and a nondegenerate connected event horizon of the cross-section topology S{sup 3}, or lens space, we prove that a stationary charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole in five-dimensional minimal supergravity is uniquely characterized by its mass, two independent angular momenta, electric charge, magnetic flux, and nut charge, provided that there exists neither a nut nor a bolt (a bubble) in the domain of outer communication. We also show that under the assumptions of the same symmetry, same asymptotics, and the horizon cross section of S{sup 1}xS{sup 2}, a black ring within the same theory--if it exists--is uniquely determined by its dipole charge and rod intervals besides the charges and magnetic flux.

  19. Statefinder Parameters for Different Dark Energy Models with Variable G Correction in Kaluza-Klein Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Shuvendu; Debnath, Ujjal; Jamil, Mubasher; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we have calculated the deceleration parameter, statefinder parameters and EoS parameters for different dark energy models with variable G correction in homogeneous, isotropic and non-flat universe for Kaluza-Klein Cosmology. The statefinder parameters have been obtained in terms of some observable parameters like dimensionless density parameter, EoS parameter and Hubble parameter for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy and generalized Chaplygin gas models.

  20. Z boson decay to photon plus Kaluza-Klein graviton in large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Skittrall, Jordan P.; Sridhar, K.

    2007-11-01

    In the large extra dimensional ADD scenario, Z bosons undergo a one-loop decay into a photon and Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons/gravi-scalars. We calculate such a decay width, extending previous arguments about the general form of the four-dimensional on-shell amplitude. The amplitudes calculated are relevant to processes in other extra dimensional models where the Standard Model fields are confined to a 4-brane.

  1. The fate of the mixmaster behaviour in vacuum inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaret, Jacques; Hanquin, Jean-Luc; Henneaux, Marc; Spindel, Philipe; Taormina, Anne

    1986-07-01

    The generic behaviour of vacuum inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein cosmologies is studied in the vicinity of the cosmological singularity. The collision law for the Kasner exponents is calculated in any number of spatial dimensions d. Its properties are investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is argued that the chaotic oscillatory behaviour disappears for d >= 10. This regime is replaced by the monotonic Kasner behaviour found previously.

  2. Distinctive ultraviolet structure of extra-dimensional Yang-Mills theories by integration of heavy Kaluza-Klein modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jiménez, I.; Novales-Sánchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    One-loop Standard Model observables produced by virtual heavy Kaluza-Klein fields play a prominent role in the minimal model of universal extra dimensions. Motivated by this aspect, we integrate out all the Kaluza-Klein heavy modes coming from the Yang-Mills theory set on a spacetime with an arbitrary number, n , of compact extra dimensions. After fixing the gauge with respect to the Kaluza-Klein heavy gauge modes in a covariant manner, we calculate a gauge-independent effective Lagrangian expansion containing multiple Kaluza-Klein sums that entail a bad divergent behavior. We use the Epstein-zeta function to regularize and characterize discrete divergences within such multiple sums, and then we discuss the interplay between the number of extra dimensions and the degree of accuracy of effective Lagrangians to generate or not divergent terms of discrete origin. We find that nonrenormalizable terms with mass dimension k are finite as long as k >4 +n . Multiple Kaluza-Klein sums of nondecoupling logarithmic terms, not treatable by Epstein-zeta regularization, are produced by four-dimensional momentum integration. On the grounds of standard renormalization, we argue that such effects are unobservable.

  3. Rotating Kaluza-Klein multi-black holes with Goedel parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Ken; Ishihara, Hideki; Nakagawa, Toshiharu; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2008-09-15

    We obtain new five-dimensional supersymmetric rotating multi-Kaluza-Klein black hole solutions with the Goedel parameter in the Einstein-Maxwell system with a Chern-Simons term. These solutions have no closed timelike curve outside the black hole horizons. At infinity, the space-time is effectively four-dimensional. Each horizon admits various lens space topologies L(n;1)=S{sup 3}/Z{sub n} in addition to a round S{sup 3}. The space-time can have outer ergoregions disjointed from the black hole horizons, as well as inner ergoregions attached to each horizon. We discuss the rich structures of ergoregions.

  4. Kaluza-Klein theory revisited: projective structures and differential operators on algebra of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudaverdian, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    We consider differential operators acting on densities of arbitrary weights on manifold M identifying pencils of such operators with operators on algebra of densities of all weights. This algebra can be identified with the special subalgebra of functions on extended manifold . On one hand there is a canonical lift of projective structures on M to affine structures on extended manifold . On the other hand the restriction of algebra of all functions on extended manifold to this special subalgebra of functions implies the canonical scalar product. This leads in particular to classification of second order operators with use of Kaluza-Klein-like mechanisms.

  5. Entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy in Kaluza-Klein universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Jawad, Abdul

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of interacting holographic dark energy with logarithmic corrections in the flat Kaluza-Klein universe. We evaluate the equation of state parameter and also reconstruct the scalar field models in this scenario. For this purpose, the well-known choice of scale factor in the power law form is taken. It is interesting to mention here that the corresponding equation of state parameter crosses the phantom divide line for a particular choice of interacting parameters. Finally, we conclude that the behavior of the dynamical scalar field as well as the scalar potential is consistent with the present observations.

  6. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  7. Compact hyperbolic extra dimensions: branes, kaluza-klein modes, and cosmology

    PubMed

    Kaloper; March-Russell; Starkman; Trodden

    2000-07-31

    We reconsider theories with low gravitational (or string) scale M(*) where Newton's constant is generated via new large-volume spatial dimensions, while standard model states are localized to a 3-brane. Utilizing compact hyperbolic manifolds we show that the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein modes is radically altered. This allows the early Universe to evolve normally up to substantial temperatures, and completely negates the astrophysical constraints on M(*). Furthermore, an exponential hierarchy between the usual Planck scale and the true fundamental scale of physics can emerge with only O(1) coefficients. The linear size of the internal space remains small. The proposal has striking testable signatures. PMID:10991441

  8. A 5D noncompact and non Ricci flat Kaluza-Klein Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.

    2009-03-01

    A model universe is proposed in the framework of 5D noncompact Kaluza-Klein cosmology which is not Ricci flat. The 4D part as the Robertson-Walker metric is coupled to conventional perfect fluid, and its extra-dimensional part is coupled to a dark pressure through a scalar field. It is shown that neither early inflation nor current acceleration of the 4D universe would happen if the nonvacuum states of the scalar field would contribute to 4D cosmology.

  9. a 5d Noncompact Kaluza-Klein Cosmology in the Presence of Null Perfect Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajollahi, Hossein; Amiri, Hamed

    For the description of the early inflation and acceleration expansion of the universe that are compatible with observational data, the 5D noncompact Kaluza-Klein cosmology is investigated. It is proposed that the 5D space is filled with a null perfect fluid, resulting in a perfect fluid in a 4D universe, plus one along the fifth dimension. By analyzing the reduced field equations for the flat FRW model, we show the early inflationary behavior and the current acceleration of the universe.

  10. Graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in nonflat branes with stabilized modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanmoy; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    We consider a generalized two brane Randall-Sundrum model where the branes are endowed with nonzero cosmological constant. In this scenario, we re-examine the modulus stabilization mechanism and the nature of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton modes. Our result reveals that while the KK mode graviton masses may change significantly with the brane cosmological constant, the Goldberger-Wise stabilization mechanism, which assumes a negligible backreaction on the background metric, continues to hold even when the branes have a large cosmological constant. The possibility of having a global minimum for the modulus is also discussed. Our results also include an analysis for the radion mass in this nonflat brane scenario.

  11. Infinite-dimensional spin-2 symmetries in Kaluza-Klein theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf

    2006-02-01

    We consider the couplings of an infinite number of spin-2 fields to gravity appearing in Kaluza-Klein theories. They are constructed as the broken phase of a massless theory possessing an infinite-dimensional spin-2 symmetry. Focusing on a circle compactification of four-dimensional gravity we show that the resulting gravity/spin-2 system in D=3 has in its unbroken phase an interpretation as a Chern-Simons theory of the Kac-Moody algebra iso(1,2)^ associated to the Poincaré group and also fits into the geometrical framework of algebra-valued differential geometry developed by Wald. Assigning all degrees of freedom to scalar fields, the matter couplings in the unbroken phase are determined, and it is shown that their global symmetry algebra contains the Virasoro algebra together with an enhancement of the Ehlers group SL(2,R) to its affine extension. The broken phase is then constructed by gauging a subgroup of the global symmetries. It is shown that metric, spin-2 fields and Kaluza-Klein vectors combine into a Chern-Simons theory for an extended algebra, in which the affine Poincaré subalgebra acquires a central extension.

  12. Dynamics of localized Kaluza-Klein black holes in a collapsing universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastor, David; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Traschen, Jennie

    2012-03-01

    The Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 prohibits corporate mergers that would result in certain highly undesired end states. We study an exact solution of the Einstein equations describing localized, charged Kaluza-Klein black holes in a collapsing de Sitter universe and seek to demonstrate that a similar effect holds, preventing a potentially catastrophic black hole merger. As the collapse proceeds, it is natural to expect that the black hole undergoes a topological transition, wrapping around the shrinking compact dimension to merge with itself and form a black string. However, the putative uniform charged black string end state is singular and such a transition would violate (a reasonable notion of) cosmic censorship. We present analytic and numerical evidence that strongly suggests the absence of such a transition. Based on this evidence, we expect that the Kaluza-Klein black hole horizon stays localized, despite the increasingly constraining size of the compact dimension. On the other hand, the de Sitter horizon does change between spherical and cylindrical topologies in a simple way.

  13. Kaluza-Klein graviton phenomenology for warped compactifications, and the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giddings, Steven B.; Zhang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    A generic prediction of scenarios with extra dimensions accessible in TeV-scale collisions is the existence of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton. For a broad class of strongly warped scenarios one expects to initially find an isolated resonance, whose phenomenology in the simplest cases is described by a simplified model with two parameters, its mass, and a constant Λ with units of mass parametrizing its coupling to the Standard Model stress tensor. These parameters are in turn determined by the geometrical configuration of the warped compactification. We explore the possibility that the 750 GeV excess recently seen in 13 TeV data at ATLAS and CMS could be such a warped Kaluza-Klein graviton, and find a best-fit value Λ ≈60 TeV . We find that while there is some tension between this interpretation and data from 8 TeV and from the dilepton channel at 13 TeV, it is not strongly excluded. However, in the simplest scenarios of this kind, such a signal should soon become apparent in both diphoton and dilepton channels.

  14. Light Kaluza Klein States in Randall-Sundrum Models with Custodial SU(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Ponton, Eduardo; Santiago, Jose; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago

    2006-07-01

    We consider Randall-Sundrum scenarios based on SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} and a discrete parity exchanging L with R. The custodial and parity symmetries can be used to make the tree level contribution to the T parameter and the anomalous couplings of the bottom quark to the Z very small. We show that the resulting quantum numbers typically induce a negative T parameter at one loop that, together with the positive value of the S parameter, restrict considerably these models. There are nevertheless regions of parameter space that successfully reproduce the fit to electroweak precision observables with light Kaluza-Klein excitations accessible at colliders. We consider models of gauge-Higgs unification that implement the custodial and parity symmetries and find that the electroweak data singles out a very well defined region in parameter space. In this region one typically finds light gauge boson Kaluza-Klein excitations as well as light SU(2){sub L} singlet, and sometimes also doublet, fermionic states, that mix with the top quark, and that may yield interesting signatures at future colliders.

  15. Dimensional reduction of the 5D Kaluza-Klein geodesic deviation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacquaniti, V.; Montani, Giovanni; Vietri, F.

    2010-02-01

    In the work of Kerner et al. (Phys Rev D 63:027502, 2001) the problem of the geodesic deviation in a 5D Kaluza-Klein background is faced. The 4D space-time projection of the resulting equation coincides with the usual geodesic deviation equation in the presence of the Lorenz force, provided that the fifth component of the deviation vector satisfies an extra constraint which takes into account the q/ m conservation along the path. The analysis was performed setting as a constant the scalar field which appears in Kaluza-Klein model. Here we focus on the extension of such a work to the model where the presence of the scalar field is considered. Our result coincides with that of Kerner et al. when the minimal case {φ=1} is considered, while it shows some departures in the general case. The novelty due to the presence of {φ} is that the variation of the q/ m between the two geodesic lines is not conserved during the motion; an exact law for such a behaviour has been derived.

  16. Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli Metric from Quaternion-Clifford Space, Lorentz' Force, and Some Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianto, Vic; Smarandache, Florentin

    2009-05-01

    It was known for quite long time that a quaternion space can be generalized to a Clifford space, and vice versa; but how to find its neat link with more convenient metric form in the General Relativity theory, has not been explored extensively. We begin with a representation of group with non-zero quaternions to derive closed FLRW metric, and from there obtains Carmeli metric, which can be extended further to become 5D and 6D metric (which we propose to call Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli metric). Thereafter we discuss some plausible implications of this metric, beyond describing a galaxy's spiraling motion and redshift data as these have been done by Carmeli and Hartnett. In subsequent section we explain Podkletnov's rotating disc experiment. We also note possible implications to quantum gravity. Further observations are of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  17. Kaluza-Klein masses in nonprime orbifolds: Z{sub 12-I} compactification and threshold correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok

    2008-05-15

    Analyzing the one-loop partition function, we discuss possible Kaluza-Klein (KK) states in the orbifold compactification of the heterotic string theory, toward the application to the threshold correction. The KK massive states associated with (relatively) large extra dimensions can arise only in nonprime orbifolds. The Gliozzi-Scherk-Olive (GSO) projection condition by a shift vector V{sup I} is somewhat relaxed above the compactification scale 1/R. We also present the other condition on Wilson line W, P{center_dot}W=integer. With the knowledge of the partition function, we obtain the threshold corrections to gauge couplings, which include the Wilson line effects. We point out the differences in string and field theoretic orbifolds.

  18. Casimir Effect Near the Future Singularity in Kaluza Klein Viscous Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadekar, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the analytical properties of the scalar expansion θ in the cosmic fluid close to the future singularity, when the fluid possesses a constant bulk viscosity ζ in the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory of gravitation. In addition, we assume the viscous cosmology theories in the sense that the Casimir contributions to the energy density and pressure are both proportional to 1/ a 4, where a being scale factor. We also worked out the series expansion for the scalar expansion θ under the condition that the Casimir influence is small. However, near to the big rip singularity the Casimir term has to fade away and we obtain the same singularity behavior for the scalar expansion θ, energy density ρ, the scale factor a as in the Casimir-free viscous case.

  19. Zeta-function regularization approach to finite temperature effects in Kaluza-Klein space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Bytsenko, A.A. ); Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S. )

    1992-09-21

    In the framework of heat-kernel approach to zeta-function regularization, in this paper the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature for scalar and spinor fields on Kaluza-Klein space-time of the form M[sup p] [times] M[sub c][sup n], where M[sup p] is p-dimensional Minkowski space-time is evaluated. In particular, when the compact manifold is M[sub c][sup n] = H[sup n]/[Gamma], the Selberg tracer formula associated with discrete torsion-free group [Gamma] of the n-dimensional Lobachevsky space H[sup n] is used. An explicit representation for the thermodynamic potential valid for arbitrary temperature is found. As a result a complete high temperature expansion is presented and the roles of zero modes and topological contributions is discussed.

  20. A Note on Gaugino Masses in Kaluza-Klein/Radion Mediated SUSY Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    2001-05-01

    We review the equivalence of two approaches to study theories with gauge fields in extra spatial dimensions, namely the ``4D'' approach (with KK states) and the ``5D'' approach (with matching to the 4D theory at the compactification scale). In particular, we reiterate that there are two different power-law scalings of ``effective'' gauge couplings. In a supersymmetric framework with SUSY breaking in the radius modulus, i.e. the field which fixes the size of the extra dimensions, these two approaches seem to give gaugino masses at loop-level (with a possible enhancement due to large number of Kaluza-Klein states) [1], and tree-level [2], respectively. We show explicitly how this discrepancy can be resolved.

  1. Kaluza-Klein Bulk Viscous Cosmological Model with Time Dependent Gravitational Constant and Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Namrata I.; Bhoga, Shyamsunder S.

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological models with time varying gravitational constant G and cosmological constant Λ in the presence of viscous fluid in Kaluza-Klein metric were investigated. The solutions to Einstein Field Equation were obtained for different types of G, with bulk coefficient ξ = ξ 0 ρ d (where ρ is density of the Universe, d is some constant) and lambda Λ = α H 2 + β R -2 where H and R are Hubble parameter and scale factor respectively. Two possible models are suggested, one where G is proportional to H and, the other where G is inversely proportional to H. While the former leads to a non-singular model, the latter results in an inflationary model. Both Cosmological models show that the Universe is accelerating; but at the early stage of the Universe the behaviour of both models is quite different,which has been studied through the variation of decelerating parameter q with time.

  2. Astrophysical Evidence for AN Extra Dimension: Phenomenology of a Kaluza-Klein Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Montani, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this brief review, we discuss the viability of a multi-dimensional geometrical theory with one compactified dimension. We discuss the case of a Kaluza-Klein (KK) fifth-dimensional theory, addressing the problem by an overview of the astrophysical phenomenology associated with this five-dimensional (5D) theory. By comparing the predictions of our model with the features of the ordinary (four-dimensional (4D)) Relativistic Astrophysics, we highlight some small but finite discrepancies, expectably detectible from the observations. We consider a class of static, vacuum solutions of free electromagnetic KK equations with three-dimensional (3D) spherical symmetry. We explore the stability of the particle dynamics in these spacetimes, the construction of self-gravitating stellar models and the emission spectrum generated by a charged particle falling on this stellar object. The matter dynamics in these geometries has been treated by a multipole approach adapted to the geometric theory with a compactified dimension.

  3. Kaluza-Klein Reduction of Pure Gravity and its Implications for K3 Surface Compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammaro, Elliott

    Kaluza demonstrated that a geometrical unification of Einsteinian gravity and Maxwell's equations could occur in five (4+1) dimensions if the dependence on the fourth spatial coordinate is ignorable. Klein noted that the last assumption would be natural for a compact extra dimension (i.e., a circle, rather than a line) of very small size. Since this initial proposal dimensional reduction has been incorporated into string theory, where the compactification manifold of choice is a Calabi-Yau manifold. In this dissertation, we investigate reduction via the Kaluza-Klein mechanism by considering the general compactification from D to d (D>d) dimensions of pure gravity, wherein the internal metric moduli are promoted to moduli fields. An essential point is that D-dimensional equations of motion must be satisfied, even in the effective degrees of freedom (the moduli fields). If the d-dimensional equations of motion imply the D-dimensional equations the effective theory is consistent. As a first pass the truncation to massless modes is made, but with a special gauge choice, transverse/traceless gauge, imposed on the internal metric. Equivalently, compensating fields, which are intended to assure consistency, are included in the metric ansatz. It is concluded that the consistency of the compactification demands that all massless and massive Kaluza-Klein modes be included in the lower dimensional theory. Motivated by the importance and ubiquitousness of K3 compactifications, a review of K3 geometry is presented. The E8 ⊕ E 8 ⊕ U31,1 and Sp(32)/Z2 ⊕ U 31,1 decompositions of the (co)homology lattice of the K3 are exhibited explicitly in terms of a natural orbifold basis, which augments the abstract derivations available in the literature. A novel feature is introduced -- an approximate, but explicit, metric on K3, which exactly generates a K3 metric in the limit of small fiber and large base.

  4. Gluon-initiated production of a Kaluza-Klein gluon in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Skittrall, Jordan P.; Sridhar, K.

    2010-03-01

    In the Bulk Randall-Sundrum model, the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons are the primary signatures. In particular, the search for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon at hadron colliders is of great importance in testing this model. At the leading order in QCD, the production of this KK-gluon proceeds only via qbar q -initial states. We study the production of KK-gluons from gluon initial states at next-to-leading order in QCD. We find that, even after including the sub-dominant KK-gluon loops at this order, the next-to-leading order (NLO) cross-section is tiny compared to the leading order cross-section and unlikely to impact the searches for this resonance at hardon colliders.

  5. Magnetized configurations with black holes and Kaluza-Klein bubbles: Smarr-like relations and the first law

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Nedkova, Petia G.

    2009-07-15

    We present a general class of exact solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity describing configurations of black holes and Kaluza-Klein bubbles magnetized along the compact dimension. Smarr-like relations for the mass and the tension are found. We also derive the mass and tension first laws for the configurations under consideration using the Noether current approach. The novelty is the appearance of new terms in the Smarr-like relations and the first laws containing the magnetic flux. The solutions we consider are also explicit examples showing that in Kaluza-Klein spacetimes the interval (rod) structure and the charges (which are zero by construction for the solutions here), are insufficient to classify the solutions and additional data is necessary, namely, the magnetic flux(es)

  6. Kaluza-Klein cosmological model in f(R, T) gravity with Λ(T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P. K.; Mishra, B.; Tripathy, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    A class of Kaluza-Klein cosmological models in $f(R,T)$ theory of gravity have been investigated. In the work, we have considered the functional $f(R,T)$ to be in the form $f(R,T)=f(R)+f(T)$ with $f(R)=\\lambda R$ and $f(T)=\\lambda T$. Such a choice of the functional $f(R,T)$ leads to an evolving effective cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ which depends on the stress energy tensor. The source of the matter field is taken to be a perfect cosmic fluid. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by considering a constant deceleration parameter which leads two different aspects of the volumetric expansion namely a power law and an exponential volumetric expansion. Keeping an eye on the accelerating nature of the universe in the present epoch, the dynamics and physical behaviour of the models have been discussed. From statefinder diagnostic pair we found that the model with exponential volumetric expansion behaves more like a $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  7. Kaluza-Klein gluon + jets associated production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, A. M.; Mahmoudi, F.; Manglani, N.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Kaluza-Klein excitations of gluons offer the exciting possibility of probing bulk Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. In these bulk models either a custodial symmetry or a deformation of the metric away from AdS is invoked in order to deal with electroweak precision tests. Addressing both these models, we suggest a new channel in which to study the production of KK-gluons (gKK): one where it is produced in association with one or more hard jets. The cross-section for the gKK + jets channel is significant because of several contributing sub-processes. In particular, the 1-jet and the 2-jet associated processes are important because at these orders in QCD the qg and the gg initial states respectively come into play. We have performed a hadron-level simulation of the signal and present strategies to effectively extract the signal from what could potentially be a huge background. We present results for the kinematic reach of the LHC Run-II for different gKK masses in bulk-RS models.

  8. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons in extra dimension models via forward detectors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gi-Chol; Kono, Takanori; Mawatari, Kentarou; Yamashita, Kimiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigate contributions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in extra dimension models to the process p p →p γ p →p γ j X , where a proton emits a quasireal photon and is detected by using the very forward detectors planned at the LHC. In addition to the γ q initial state as in the Compton scattering in the standard model, the γ g scattering contributes through the t -channel exchange of KK gravitons. Taking account of pileup contributions to the background and examining viable kinematical cuts, constraints on the parameter space of both the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model and the RS (Randall and Sundrum) model are studied. With 200 fb-1 data at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, the expected lower bound on the cutoff scale for the ADD model is 6.3 TeV at 95% confidence level, while a lower limit of 2.0 (0.5) TeV is set on the mass of the first excited graviton with the coupling parameter k /M¯ Pl=0.1 (0.01 ) for the RS model.

  9. The PAMELA and ATIC Signals From Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Zurek, Kathryn M.; /Fermilab /Michigan U.

    2009-02-01

    In this letter, we study the possibility that Kaluza-Klein dark matter in a model with one universal extra dimension is responsible for the recent observations of the PAMELA and ATIC experiments. In this model, the dark matter particles annihilate largely to charged leptons, which enables them to produce a spectrum of cosmic ray electrons and positrons consistent with the PAMELA and ATIC measurements. To normalize to the observed signal, however, large boost factors ({approx}10{sup 3}) are required. Despite these large boost factors and significant annihilation to hadronic modes (35%), we find that the constraints from cosmic ray antiproton measurements can be satisfied. Relic abundance considerations in this model force us to consider a rather specific range of masses (approximately 600-900 GeV) which is very similar to the range required to generate the ATIC spectral feature. The results presented here can also be used as a benchmark for model-independent constraints on dark matter annihilation to hadronic modes.

  10. Static wormholes on the brane inspired by Kaluza-Klein gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, J. Ponce de

    2009-11-01

    We use static solutions of 5-dimensional Kaluza-Klein gravity to generate several classes of static, spherically symmetric spacetimes which are analytic solutions to the equation {sup (4)}R = 0, where {sup (4)}R is the four-dimensional Ricci scalar. In the Randall and Sundrum scenario they can be interpreted as vacuum solutions on the brane. The solutions contain the Schwarzschild black hole, and generate new families of traversable Lorenzian wormholes as well as nakedly singular spacetimes. They generalize a number of previously known solutions in the literature, e.g., the temporal and spatial Schwarzschild solutions of braneworld theory as well as the class of self-dual Lorenzian wormholes. A major departure of our solutions from Lorenzian wormholes a la Morris and Thorne is that, for certain values of the parameters of the solutions, they contain three spherical surfaces (instead of one) which are extremal and have finite area. Two of them have the same size, meet the ''flare-out'' requirements, and show the typical violation of the energy conditions that characterizes a wormhole throat. The other extremal sphere is ''flaring-in'' in the sense that its sectional area is a local maximum and the weak, null and dominant energy conditions are satisfied in its neighborhood. After bouncing back at this second surface a traveler crosses into another space which is the double of the one she/he started in. Another interesting feature is that the size of the throat can be less than the Schwarzschild radius 2M, which no longer defines the horizon, i.e., to a distant observer a particle or light falling down crosses the Schwarzschild radius in a finite time.

  11. Hamiltonian Map to Conformal Modification of Spacetime Metric: Kaluza-Klein and TeVeS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Lawrence; Gershon, Avi; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the orbits of motion for a wide class of non-relativistic Hamiltonian systems can be described as geodesic flows on a manifold and an associated dual by means of a conformal map. This method can be applied to a four dimensional manifold of orbits in spacetime associated with a relativistic system. We show that a relativistic Hamiltonian which generates Einstein geodesics, with the addition of a world scalar field, can be put into correspondence in this way with another Hamiltonian with conformally modified metric. Such a construction could account for part of the requirements of Bekenstein for achieving the MOND theory of Milgrom in the post-Newtonian limit. The constraints on the MOND theory imposed by the galactic rotation curves, through this correspondence, would then imply constraints on the structure of the world scalar field. We then use the fact that a Hamiltonian with vector gauge fields results, through such a conformal map, in a Kaluza-Klein type theory, and indicate how the TeVeS structure of Bekenstein and Saunders can be put into this framework. We exhibit a class of infinitesimal gauge transformations on the gauge fields {mathcal{U}}_{μ}(x) which preserve the Bekenstein-Sanders condition {mathcal{U}}_{μ}{mathcal{U}}^{μ}=-1. The underlying quantum structure giving rise to these gauge fields is a Hilbert bundle, and the gauge transformations induce a non-commutative behavior to the fields, i.e. they become of Yang-Mills type. Working in the infinitesimal gauge neighborhood of the initial Abelian theory we show that in the Abelian limit the Yang-Mills field equations provide residual nonlinear terms which may avoid the caustic singularity found by Contaldi et al.

  12. ‘Effective two dimensionality’ cases bring a new hope to the Kaluza-Klein(like) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukman, D.; Mankoč Borštnik, N. S.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2011-10-01

    One step towards realistic Kaluza-Klein(like) theories and a loophole through Witten's ‘no-go theorem’ is presented for cases that we call effective two dimensionality cases: in d = 2, the equations of motion following from the action with the linear curvature leave spin connections and zweibeins undetermined. We present the case of a spinor in d = (1 + 5) compactified on a formally infinite disc with the zweibein that makes a disc curved on an almost S2 and with the spin connection field that allows on such a sphere only one massless normalizable spinor state of a particular charge, which couples the spinor chirally to the corresponding Kaluza-Klein gauge field. We assume no external gauge fields. The masslessness of a spinor is achieved by the choice of a spin connection field (which breaks the left-right symmetry), the zweibein and the normalizability condition for spinor states, which guarantee a discrete spectrum forming the complete basis. We discuss the meaning of the hole, which manifests the non-compactness of the space.

  13. Uniqueness theorem for black holes with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, we prove a uniqueness theorem for stationary multi-black hole configurations with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in a certain sector of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As a part of the technical assumptions in the theorem, we assume that the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension is orthogonal to the other Killing vectors and that it is also hypersurface orthogonal. About the Maxwell field, we assume that it is invariant under the Killing symmetries and has a nonzero component only along the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension. We show that such multi-black hole configurations are uniquely specified by the interval structure, angular momenta of the horizons, magnetic charges, and the magnetic flux. A straightforward generalization of the uniqueness theorem for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity is also given.

  14. Search for Kaluza-Klein graviton emission in pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV using the missing energy signature.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2004-03-26

    We report on a search for direct Kaluza-Klein graviton production in a data sample of 84 pb(-1) of ppmacr; collisions at sqrt[s]=1.8 TeV, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We investigate the final state of large missing transverse energy and one or two high energy jets. We compare the data with the predictions from a (3+1+n)-dimensional Kaluza-Klein scenario in which gravity becomes strong at the TeV scale. At 95% confidence level (C.L.) for n=2, 4, and 6 we exclude an effective Planck scale below 1.0, 0.77, and 0.71 TeV, respectively. PMID:15089665

  15. An Expanding 4d Universe in a 5d Kaluza-Klein Cosmology with Higher Dimensional Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.

    In the framework of Kaluza-Klein theory, we investigate a (4+1)-dimensional universe consisting of a (4+1)-dimensional Robertson-Walker type metric coupled with a (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The matter part consists of an energy density together with a pressure subject to 4D part of the (4+1)-dimensional energy-momentum tensor. The dark part consists of just a dark pressure bar {p}, corresponding to the extra-dimension endowed by a scalar field, with no element of dark energy. It is shown that the reduced Einstein field equations are free of 4D pressure and are just affected by an effective pressure produced by the 4D energy density and dark pressure. It is then proposed that the expansion of the universe may be controlled by the equation of state in higher dimension rather than four dimensions. This may account for the current acceleration at the beginning or in the middle of matter dominant era.

  16. Mass and Charge in Brane-World and Non-Compact Kaluza-Klein Theories in 5 Dim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    2003-08-01

    In classical Kaluza-Klein theory, with compactified extra dimensions and without scalar field, the rest mass as well as the electric charge of test particles are constants of motion. We show that in the case of a large extra dimension this is no longer so. We propose the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism, instead of the geodesic equation, for the study of test particles moving in a five-dimensional background metric. This formalism has a number of advantages: (i) it provides a clear and invariant definition of rest mass, without the ambiguities associated with the choice of the parameters used along the motion in 5D and 4D, (ii) the electromagnetic field can be easily incorporated in the discussion, and (iii) we avoid the difficulties associated with the ``splitting'' of the geodesic equation. For particles moving in a general 5D metric, we show how the effective rest mass, as measured by an observer in 4D, varies as a consequence of the large extra dimension. Also, the fifth component of the momentum changes along the motion. This component can be identified with the electric charge of test particles. With this interpretation, both the rest mass and the charge vary along the trajectory. The constant of motion is now a combination of these quantities. We study the cosmological variations of charge and rest mass in a five-dimensional bulk metric which is used to embed the standard k = 0 FRW universes. The time variations in the fine structure ``constant'' and the Thomson cross section are also discussed.

  17. Searches for Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations and microscopic black holes with the aid of the CMS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    A survey of the results of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that concern searches for massive Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations and microscopic black holes, quantum black holes, and string balls within models of low-energy multidimensional gravity is presented on behalf of the CMS Collaboration. The analysis in question is performed on the basis of a complete sample of data accumulated for proton-proton collisions at the c.m. energies of 7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) over the period spanning 2010 and 2012.

  18. Kaluza-Klein model with spontaneous symmetry breaking: Light-particle effective actionand its compactification scale dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Akhoury, Ratindranath; Gauthier, Christopher S.

    2008-11-15

    We investigate decoupling of heavy Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in an Abelian Higgs model with space-time topologies R{sup 3,1}xS{sup 1} and R{sup 3,1}xS{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}. After integrating out only the heavy KK modes we find the one-loop, light-particle (irreducible) effective action (LPEA) for the zero-mode fields. We find that in the R{sup 3,1}xS{sup 1} topology the heavy modes do not decouple in this low-energy effective action, due to the zero mode of the 5th component of the 5D gauge field A{sub 5}. Because A{sub 5} is a scalar under 4D Lorentz transformations, there is no gauge symmetry protecting it from getting mass and A{sub 5}{sup 4} interaction terms after loop corrections. In addition, after symmetry breaking, we find that the effective action has new divergences in the A{sub 5} mass that did not appear in the symmetric phase. The new divergences are traced back to the gauge-goldstone mixing that occurs after symmetry breaking. We find that when considering low-energy physical processes, however, the divergences of the zero-mode loop diagrams will cancel the divergences in the effective action, rendering the radiatively corrected couplings finite. Although, this clears up the extra divergences in the A{sub 5} sector, the gauge coupling still has a different compactification scale dependence in the A{sub 5} then it does in the A{sub {mu}} sector, leading to an explicit violation of decoupling. If instead of the LPEA one considers the Wilsonian effective action by integrating out zero modes of momenta |p|>M (M is the mass of the lowest KK excitation) in addition to the heavy modes, then decoupling is manifest. However, as is well known the price is the difficulty in maintaining 4D Lorentz and gauge invariance. In order to get a more sensible effective theory in the LPEA formalism, we investigate the S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} compactification. With this kind of compact topology, the A{sub 5} zero mode disappears. With no A{sub 5}, there are no new divergences and the

  19. Radiative corrections to the lightest neutral Higgs mass in warped supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Ray, Tirtha Sankar

    2008-10-01

    We compute radiative correction to the lightest neutral Higgs mass (m{sub h}) induced by the Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers of fermions and sfermions in a minimal supersymmetric scenario embeded in a 5-dimensional warped space. The Higgs is confined to the TeV brane. The KK spectra of matter supermultiplets is tied to the explanation of the fermion mass hierarchy problem. We demonstrate that for a reasonable choice of extra-dimensional parameters, the KK-induced radiative correction can enhance the upper limit on m{sub h} by as much as 100 GeV beyond the 4d limit of 135 GeV.

  20. Cosmological properties and reconstruction of scalar field models of the Holographic Dark Energy model with Granda-Oliveros cut-off in Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Assaf, Khudhair A.; Salako, Ines G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the Holographic Dark Energy (HDE) model in the context of Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology with infrared cut-off given by the recently proposed by Granda-Oliveros cut-off, which contains a term proportional to the time derivative of the Hubble parameter and one proportional to the Hubble parameter squared. Moreover, this cut-off is characterized by two free parameters which are the proportional constants of the two terms of the cut-off. We derive the expression of the Equation of State (EoS) parameter ωD and of the deceleration parameter q for both non-interacting and interacting Dark Sectors and in the limiting case of a flat Dark Dominated Universe. Moreover, we study the squared speed of the sound vs2 and the statefinder diagnostic \\{r,s\\} in order to understand the cosmological properties of the model considered. We also develop a correspondence between the model considered and three scalar field models: the tachyon, the k-essence and the quintessence ones.

  1. Photo-production of a 750 GeV di-photon resonance mediated by Kaluza-Klein leptons in the loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Khoze, Valentin V.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a 750 GeV resonance X which can be produced at the LHC by only photon fusion and subsequently decay into di-photons. We propose that the spin-zero state X is coupled to a heavy lepton that lives in the bulk of a higher-dimensional theory and interacts only with the photons of the Standard Model. We compute the di-photon rate in these models with two and more compact extra dimensions and demonstrate that they allow for a compelling explanation of the di-photon excess recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The central role in our approach is played by the summation over the Kaluza-Klein modes of the new leptons, thus providing a significant enhancement of the X → γγ loops for the production and decay subprocesses. It is expected that the jet activity accompanying these purely electromagnetic (at the partonic level) processes is numerically suppressed by factors such as {α}_{em}^2{{C}}_{qoverline{q}}/{{C}}_{γ γ}˜ 1{0}^{-3}.

  2. Compact stars in Kaluza -Klein World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Lévai, Péter; Lukács, Béla

    2010-03-01

    Unification and geometrization of interactions has been extensively studied during the XX. century. In this short contribution we investigated the possible effect of an extra compactified dimension (alias hypercharge) on a flavor dependent gravitational potential, proposed by Fischbach et al.. We estimated the deviation from the 3 + 1 dimensional scheme and found that, although the deviation is moderate, for celestial compact object it may be higher by orders of magnitude than in terrestrial laboratory measurements.

  3. Magnetic monopoles in Kaluza Klein theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, M.K.; Tanaka, K.

    1985-01-01

    We start with an introduction to magnetic monopoles and then discuss the magnetic monopoles in 5-dimensions, the stability of solution with respect to small changes in the metric, and finally end with remarks.

  4. Kaluza-Klein monopoles in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, M.K.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-01-15

    We obtain the general perturbation of the metric belonging to a given q,l,m, and parity of the monopole harmonics. We examine the stability of the monopole solution against small perturbation of the metric.

  5. New branch of Kaluza-Klein compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Shunichiro

    2007-12-15

    We found a new branch of solutions in Freund-Rubin type flux compactifications. The geometry of these solutions is described as the external space which has a de Sitter symmetry and the internal space which is topologically spherical. However, it is not a simple form of dS{sub p}xS{sup q} but a warped product of de Sitter space and a deformed sphere. We explicitly constructed numerical solutions for a specific case with p=4 and q=4. We show that the new branch of solutions emanates from the marginally stable solution in the branch of dS{sub 4}xS{sup 4} solutions.

  6. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  7. Developed Adomian method for quadratic Kaluza-Klein relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha

    2010-01-01

    We develop and modify the Adomian decomposition method (ADecM) to work for a new type of nonlinear matrix differential equations (MDE's) which arise in general relativity (GR) and possibly in other applications. The approach consists in modifying both the ADecM linear operator with highest order derivative and ADecM polynomials. We specialize in the case of a 4 × 4 nonlinear MDE along with a scalar one describing stationary cylindrically symmetric metrics in quadratic five-dimensional GR, derive some of their properties using ADecM and construct the most general unique power series solutions. However, because of the constraint imposed on the MDE by the scalar one, the series solutions terminate in closed forms exhausting all possible solutions.

  8. The lightest hybrid meson supermultiplet in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J

    2011-10-01

    We interpret the spectrum of meson states recently obtained in non-perturbative lattice QCD calculations in terms of constituent quark-antiquark bound states and states, called 'hybrids', in which the q{bar q} pair is supplemented by an excitation of the gluonic field. We identify a lightest supermultiplet of hybrid mesons with J{sup PC} = (0,1,2){sup {-+}}, 1{sup -} built from a gluonic excitation of chromomagnetic character coupled to q{bar q} in an S-wave. The next lightest hybrids are suggested to be quark orbital excitations with the same gluonic excitation, while the next distinct gluonic excitation is significantly heavier. Existing models of gluonic excitations are compared to these findings and possible phenomenological consequences explored.

  9. Mass limit for the lightest neutralino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Quyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jacobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignain, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emerya, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1996-12-01

    Indirect limits on the mass of the lightest neutralino are derived from the results of searches for charginos, neutralinos, and sleptons performed with data taken by the ALEPH Collaboration at centre-of-mass energies near the Z peak and at 130 and 136 GeV. Within the context of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and whenM_{tilde ν } ≥slant 200 GeV/c^2 , the bound M x > 12.8 GeV/ c 2 at the 95% confidence level applies for any tan β. The impact of lighter sneutrinos is presented in the framework of SUSY grand unified theories; a massless neutralino is allowed only for a narrow range of tan β, μ, and the scalar mass parameter m 0. Finally, by including Higgs mass constraints and requiring that radiative electroweak symmetry breaking occur, more stringent bounds on M x as a function of tan β are derived.

  10. Supersymmetry with a heavy lightest supersymmetric particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Taoli; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    To escape the current LHC supersymmetry (SUSY) search constraints while preserving the naturalness condition, we propose the heavy lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) SUSY. According to the different dependencies on the LSP mass, we systematically classify the discriminating variables into three categories. We find that the strong dependence of all current SUSY searches on variables in the first category render weak sensitivity for the heavy LSP SUSY. In particular, all the current LHC SUSY search constraints can be evaded if the LSP mass is around 600 GeV or higher. In the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), we find that the heavy LSP SUSY does not induce more fine-tuning than the Higgs boson mass. Moreover, the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be satisfied within the 3-σ level. We systematically study the viable parameter space for the heavy LSP SUSY and present four benchmark points that realize our proposal concretely. An improved collider search for those benchmark points, which mainly relies on the variable in the second category, is discussed in detail.

  11. Hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebras and chaos in Kaluza-Klein models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, T.; Henneaux, M.; Julia, B.; Nicolai, H.

    2001-06-01

    Some time ago, it was found that the never-ending oscillatory chaotic behaviour discovered by Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL) for the generic solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in the vicinity of a spacelike (``cosmological'') singularity disappears in spacetime dimensions /D≡d+1>10. Recently, a study of the generalization of the BKL chaotic behaviour to the superstring effective Lagrangians has revealed that this chaos is rooted in the structure of the fundamental Weyl chamber of some underlying hyperbolic Kac-Moody algebra. In this Letter we show that the same connection applies to pure gravity in any spacetime dimension />=4, where the relevant algebras are AEd. In this way the disappearance of chaos in pure gravity models in /D>=11 dimensions becomes linked to the fact that the Kac-Moody algebras AEd are no longer hyperbolic for /d>=10.

  12. Equations of motion and fifth force in a general Kaluza-Klein space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejancu, Aurel

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we present a new point of view on space-time-matter (STM) theory. First, some weak points from earlier research papers on STM theory are presented. Then, we obtain in a covariant form the fully general equations of motion for STM theory. This enables us to classify the motions and to give a new definition of the fifth force in physics.

  13. Microstates of the D1-D5-Kaluza-Klein monopole system

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Kraus, Per

    2005-07-15

    We find supergravity solutions corresponding to all U(1)xU(1) invariant chiral primaries of the D1-D5-KK system. These solutions are 1/8 BPS, carry angular momentum, and are asymptotically flat in the 3+1 dimensional sense. They can be thought of as representing the ground states of the four-dimensional black hole constructed from the D1-D5-KK-P system. Demanding the absence of unphysical singularities in our solutions determines all free parameters, and gives precise agreement with the quantum numbers expected from the CFT point of view. The physical mechanism behind the smoothness of the solutions is that the D1 branes and D5 branes expand into a KK-monopole supertube in the transverse space of the original KK monopole.

  14. Gauge invariance, quantization and integration of heavy modes in a gauge Kaluza-Klein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novales-Sánchez, H.

    This dissertation examines topics at the intersection of environmental and energy economics. The first two chapters explore how policies can induce more efficient use of the energy sources available for generating electricity. The electricity sector is a major source of a wide variety of harmful pollutants. To mitigate the environmental impacts of electricity production, a variety of policies are being implemented to increase the quantity of generation from clean, renewable energy sources. The first chapter identifies the short-run reductions in emissions caused by generation from a particular renewable technology; wind turbines. Using the estimates of the pollution offset by the renewable production, I explore the efficiency of the incentives created by the current set of renewable energy policies. The second chapter examines the impact adding bulk electricity storage capacity will have on the full social costs of generating electricity. The third chapter explores the impact of various gasoline tax structures on both retail price volatility and state revenue volatility.

  15. Kaluza-Klein theory as a dynamics in a dual geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershon, Avi; Horwitz, Lawrence

    2009-10-01

    It has been shown that the orbits of motion for a wide class of nonrelativistic Hamiltonian systems can be described as geodesic flow on a manifold and an associated dual. This method can be applied to a four dimensional manifold of orbits in space-time associated with a relativistic system. One can study the consequences on the geometry of the introduction of electromagnetic interaction. We find that resulting geometrical structure in the dual space is that of Kaluza and Klein.

  16. Hamiltonian Formulation of the 5-D Kaluza-Klein Model and Test-Particle Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacquaniti, Valentino; Montani, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We examine the ADM reformulation of the 5-D KK model: the dimensional reduction is provided to commute with the ADM splitting and we show how the time component of the gauge vector is given by combination of the Lagrangian multipliers for the 5-D gravitational field. We consider 5D particles motion and after dimensional reduction the definition of charge is recovered within electrodynamic coupling. A time-varying fine structure constant is recognized because an extra scalar field is present in the 4-D theory.

  17. Pre-big bang collapsing universe from modern Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Mauricio

    2011-11-01

    We study the collapse of the universe described by a scalar field spherically symmetric collapse of a system described by a massless scalar field from a 5D Riemann-flat canonical metric, on which we make a dynamical foliation on the extra space-like dimension. The asymptotic universe (absent of singularities) results to be finite in size and energy density, with an vacuum dominated equation of state. The important result here obtained is that the asymptotic back-reaction effects are given by a negative constant: 1 2 [ 1 1 + ψ ˙ + 1 ψ ˙ ] < ( > + 1 2 a 2 < ( ∇ > | = - 8 Λ 3 π G .

  18. Tunnelling of scalar and Dirac particles from squashed charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsko, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    The thermal radiation of scalar particles and Dirac fermions from squashed charged rotating five-dimensional black holes is considered. To obtain the temperature of the black holes we use the tunnelling method. In the case of scalar particles we make use of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. To consider tunnelling of fermions the Dirac equation was investigated. The examination shows that the radial parts of the action for scalar particles and fermions in the quasi-classical limit in the vicinity of horizon are almost the same and as a consequence it gives rise to identical expressions for the temperature in the two cases.

  19. Spectroscopy of the lightest nuclei in the Lanthanide region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrache, C. M.; Fantuzi, M.

    2007-11-01

    The lightest nuclei in the A = 130 mass region reachable with stable beams were investigated by using the 40Ca+92Mo fusion-evaporation reaction and the powerful detection system consisting of GASP+ISIS+n-ring at Legnaro (Italy). The level scheme of 122La was established for the first time. The observed rotational bands are compared with the bands observed in the heavier Lanthanum nuclei and possible configuration assignments are discussed.

  20. Spectroscopy of the lightest nuclei in the Lanthanide region

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C. M.; Fantuzi, M.

    2007-11-30

    The lightest nuclei in the A = 130 mass region reachable with stable beams were investigated by using the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 92}Mo fusion-evaporation reaction and the powerful detection system consisting of GASP+ISIS+n-ring at Legnaro (Italy). The level scheme of {sup 122}La was established for the first time. The observed rotational bands are compared with the bands observed in the heavier Lanthanum nuclei and possible configuration assignments are discussed.

  1. Instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter kernel for the lightest pseudoscalar mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Schöberl, Franz F.

    2016-05-01

    Starting from a phenomenologically successful, numerical solution of the Dyson-Schwinger equation that governs the quark propagator, we reconstruct in detail the interaction kernel that has to enter the instantaneous approximation to the Bethe-Salpeter equation to allow us to describe the lightest pseudoscalar mesons as quark-antiquark bound states exhibiting the (almost) masslessness necessary for them to be interpretable as the (pseudo) Goldstone bosons related to the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of quantum chromodynamics.

  2. On the Origin of the Lightest Molybdenum Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisker, J L; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, J

    2007-10-24

    We discuss implications of recent precision measurements for the {sup 93}Rh proton separation energy for the production of the lightest molybdenum isotopes in proton-rich type II supernova ejecta. It has recently been shown that a novel neutrino-induced process makes these ejecta a promising site for the production of the light molybdenum isotopes and other 'p-nuclei' with atomic mass near 100. The origin of these isotopes has long been uncertain. A distinguishing feature of nucleosynthesis in neutrino-irradiated outflows is that the relative production of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo is set by a competition governed by the proton separation energy of {sup 93}Rh. We use detailed nuclear network calculations and the recent experimental results for this proton separation energy to place constraints on the outflow characteristics that produce the lightest molybdenum isotopes in their solar proportions. It is found that for the conditions calculated in recent two-dimensional supernova simulations, and also for a large range of outflow characteristics around these conditions, the solar ratio of {sup 92}Mo to {sup 94}Mo cannot be achieved. This suggests that either proton-rich winds from type II supernova do not exclusively produce both isotopes, or that these winds are qualitatively different than calculated in today's supernova models.

  3. Cosmological scenario of the stop as the next lightest supersymmetric particle with the gravitino as the lightest supersymmetric particle, and the cosmic lithium problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Santoso, Yudi

    2009-02-15

    The discrepancy on {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li abundances between the observational data and the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis theory prediction has been a nagging problem in astrophysics and cosmology, given the highly attractive and successful big-bang paradigm. One possible solution of this lithium problem is through hadronic decays of a massive metastable particle which alter the primordial element abundances. We explore this possibility using a gravitino dark matter framework in which the next lightest supersymmetric particle is typically long-lived. We found that the stop as the next lightest supersymmetric particle may provide an attractive solution to the lithium problem.

  4. Natural gauge mediation with a Bino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Barnard, James; Farmer, Benjamin; Gherghetta, Tony; White, Martin

    2012-12-14

    Natural models of supersymmetry with a gravitino lightest supersymmetric particle provide distinctive signatures at the LHC. For a neutralino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle, sparticles can decay to two high energy photons plus missing energy. We use the ATLAS diphoton search with 4.8 b(-1) of data to place limits in both the top-squark-gluino and neutralino-chargino mass planes for this scenario. If the neutralino is heavier than 50 GeV, the lightest top squark must be heavier than 580 GeV, the gluino must be heavier than 1100 GeV, and charginos must be heavier than approximately 300-470 GeV. This provides the first nontrivial constraints in natural gauge mediation models with a neutralino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle decaying to photons and implies a fine-tuning of at least a few percent in such models. PMID:23368306

  5. Stop as a next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in constrained MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Huitu, Katri; Leinonen, Lasse; Laamanen, Jari

    2011-10-01

    So far the squarks have not been detected at the LHC indicating that they are heavier than a few hundred GeVs, if they exist. The lighter stop can be considerably lighter than the other squarks. We study the possibility that a supersymmetric partner of the top quark, stop, is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in the constrained supersymmetric standard model. Various constraints, on top of the mass limits, are taken into an account, and the allowed parameter space for this scenario is determined. Observing stop which is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle at the LHC may be difficult.

  6. Same-sign trileptons as a signal of sneutrino lightest supersymmetric particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arindam; Chakrabarty, Nabarun; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2016-03-01

    Contrary to common expectation, a left-sneutrino can occasionally be the lightest supersymmetric particle. This has important implications in both collider and dark matter studies. We show that same-sign tri-lepton (SS3L) events at the Large Hadron Collider, with any lepton having opposite sign vetoed, distinguish such scenarios, up to gluino masses exceeding 2 TeV. The jets + MET signal rate is somewhat suppressed in this case, thus enhancing the scope of leptonic signals.

  7. Constraints on Universal Extra-Dimensional Dark Matter from Direct Detection Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Duda, Gintaras

    2011-04-01

    Detection of dark matter is one of the most challenging and important problems in astro-particle physics. One theory that produces a viable particle dark matter candidate is Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which the existence of a 4th spatial dimension is theorized. The extra dimension is not seen because it is compactifed on a circular orbifold whose radius is too small to be observed with current technology. What separates this theory over other Kaluza-Klein-type theories is that UED allows all standard model particles and fields to propagate in the extra dimension. The dark matter candidate in UED theories is a stable particle known as the Lightest Kaluza-Klein Particle or LKP, and the LKP can exist with sufficient relic density to serve as the dark matter. This work will present bounds on UED model parameters from direct dark matter searches such as the CDMS II.

  8. Lightest Higgs boson production at photon colliders in the two Higgs doublet model type III

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis; Milanes, D.A.

    2005-08-01

    The branching ratios of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson h{sup 0} are calculated in the framework of the general two higgs doublet model. Different scenarios are presented taking into account constraints on the flavor changing neutral currents factors obtained in previous works. Plausible scenarios where appear flavor changing processes at tree level like bs and tc are analyzed for relevant parameters. The loop-induced Higgs couplings to photon pairs can be tested with a photon collider. The number of events of h{sup 0} as a resonance in photon colliders are calculated taking into account its corresponding background signal at TESLA, CLIC, and NLC.

  9. Neff in low-scale seesaw models versus the lightest neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, P.; Kekic, M.; Lopez-Pavon, J.

    2014-09-01

    We evaluate the contribution to Neff of the extra sterile states in low-scale type I seesaw models (with three extra sterile states). We explore the full parameter space and find that at least two of the heavy states always reach thermalization in the early Universe, while the third one might not thermalize provided the lightest neutrino mass is below O(10-3 eV). Constraints from cosmology therefore severely restrict the spectra of heavy states in the range 1 eV-100 MeV. The implications for neutrinoless double beta decay are also discussed.

  10. Flavor anarchy in a Randall-Sundrum model with 5D minimal flavor violation and a low Kaluza-Klein scale.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, A Liam; Perez, Gilad; Randall, Lisa

    2008-05-01

    A variant of a warped extra dimension model is presented. It is based on 5D minimal flavor violation, in which the only sources of flavor breaking are two 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. These matrices also control the bulk masses, which are responsible for the resulting flavor hierarchy. The theory flows to a next to minimal flavor violation model where flavor violation is dominantly coming from the 3rd generation. Flavor violation is also suppressed by a parameter that dials the violation in the up or down sector. There is therefore a sharp limit in which there is no flavor violation in the down-type quark sector which, remarkably, is consistent with the observed flavor parameters. This is used to eliminate the current Randall-Sundrum flavor and CP problem. Our construction suggests that strong dynamic-based, flavor models may be built based on the same concepts. PMID:18518274

  11. Flavor Anarchy in a Randall-Sundrum Model with 5D Minimal Flavor Violation and a Low Kaluza-Klein Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Randall, Lisa; Perez, Gilad

    2008-05-02

    A variant of a warped extra dimension model is presented. It is based on 5D minimal flavor violation, in which the only sources of flavor breaking are two 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. These matrices also control the bulk masses, which are responsible for the resulting flavor hierarchy. The theory flows to a next to minimal flavor violation model where flavor violation is dominantly coming from the 3rd generation. Flavor violation is also suppressed by a parameter that dials the violation in the up or down sector. There is therefore a sharp limit in which there is no flavor violation in the down-type quark sector which, remarkably, is consistent with the observed flavor parameters. This is used to eliminate the current Randall-Sundrum flavor and CP problem. Our construction suggests that strong dynamic-based, flavor models may be built based on the same concepts.

  12. Flavor Anarchy in a Randall-Sundrum Model with 5D Minimal Flavor Violation and a Low Kaluza-Klein Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Perez, Gilad; Randall, Lisa

    2008-05-01

    A variant of a warped extra dimension model is presented. It is based on 5D minimal flavor violation, in which the only sources of flavor breaking are two 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. These matrices also control the bulk masses, which are responsible for the resulting flavor hierarchy. The theory flows to a next to minimal flavor violation model where flavor violation is dominantly coming from the 3rd generation. Flavor violation is also suppressed by a parameter that dials the violation in the up or down sector. There is therefore a sharp limit in which there is no flavor violation in the down-type quark sector which, remarkably, is consistent with the observed flavor parameters. This is used to eliminate the current Randall-Sundrum flavor and CP problem. Our construction suggests that strong dynamic-based, flavor models may be built based on the same concepts.

  13. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in the dielectron and diphoton final states with 5.4fb$^{-1}$ of data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-04-01

    Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for decays of the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model to ee and {gamma}{gamma}. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of the lightest graviton between 560 GeV and 1050 GeV for values of the coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} between 0.01 and 0.1.

  14. Search for the minimal universal extra dimension model at the LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Ghosh, Kirtiman

    2011-02-01

    The Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model is one of the popular extension of the standard model (SM) which offers interesting phenomenology. In the minimal UED (mUED) model, Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity conservation ensures that n=1 KK states can only be pair produced at colliders and the lightest KK particle is stable. In most of the parameter space, first KK excitation of SM hypercharge gauge boson is the lightest one and it can be a viable dark matter candidate. Thus, the decay of n=1 KK particles will always involve missing transverse energy.

  15. Anapole moment of the lightest neutralino in the cMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G.; Mondragón, Myriam; Reyes-Pérez, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    We study the anapole moment of the lightest neutralino in the constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (cMSSM). The electromagnetic anapole is the only allowed electromagnetic form factor for Majorana fermions, such as the neutralino. Since the neutralino is the LSP in many versions of the MSSM and therefore a candidate for dark matter, its characterization through its electromagnetic properties is important both for particle physics and for cosmology. We perform a scan in the parameter space of the cMSSM and find that the anapole moment is different from zero albeit very small (<10-3 GeV-2). Combined with experimental constraints like the Higgs mass and the DM relic density, the allowed region of parameter space lies within the reach of future direct DM searches. Thus, the anapole moment could be used as a complementary constraint when studying the parameter space of the cMSSM and other similar models.

  16. Two-dimensional boron: Lightest catalyst for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Showkat H.; Chakraborty, Sudip; Jha, Prakash C.; Wärnâ, John; Soni, Himadri; Jha, Prafulla K.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-08-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been envisaged on a two-dimensional (2D) boron sheet through electronic structure calculations based on a density functional theory framework. To date, boron sheets are the lightest 2D material and, therefore, exploring the catalytic activity of such a monolayer system would be quite intuitive both from fundamental and application perspectives. We have functionalized the boron sheet (BS) with different elemental dopants like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur, and lithium and determined the adsorption energy for each case while hydrogen and oxygen are on top of the doping site of the boron sheet. The free energy calculated from the individual adsorption energy for each functionalized BS subsequently guides us to predict which case of functionalization serves better for the HER or the OER.

  17. A search for the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin Jr, Dennis S.

    2010-08-01

    We report the result of a search for the pair production of the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark ($\\tilde{t}$1) in 5.4 ± 0.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector at a p$\\bar{p}$ center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton and a scalar neutrino ($\\tilde{v}$), and the search is performed in the electron plus muon final state. No significant excess of events above the standard model prediction is detected and new exclusion limits at the 95% C.L. are set for a portion of the (m$\\tilde{t}$1, m $\\tilde{v}$) mass plane.

  18. Orbital dependent pairing and the structure of the lightest isotopes of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzywacz, Robert; Darby, Iain; Batchelder, Jon; Bingham, Carrol; Cartegni, Lucia; Gross, Carl; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Joss, David; Liddick, Sean; Nazarewicz, Witold; Page, Robert; Papenbrock, Thomas; Rajabali, Mustafa; Rotureau, Jimmy; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Padgett, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    The island of alpha radioactivity near doubly magic ^100Sn provides an opportunity to study properties of tin isotopes using the extreme selectivity of charge particle decay spectroscopy. In an experiment, which used the most advanced experimental spectroscopic techniques the ^109Xe->^105Te->^101Sn alpha decay chain was studied at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge. The majority of the alpha decay branching ratio of the ^105Te populates not the ground state but the first excited state in ^101Sn leading to the revision of the established order of single particle levels. The in-depth analysis of this result with the state-of-the-art shell model calculations lead to surprising conclusions on the role of the pairing correlations in the lightest tin isotopes.

  19. Decay spectroscopy of 160Sm: The lightest four-quasiparticle K isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Ideguchi, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Nishimura, S.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Sumikama, T.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Aoi, N.; Baba, H.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Benzoni, G.; Daido, R.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Gey, G.; Go, S.; Gottardo, A.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Komatsubara, T.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Li, Z.; Liu, H. L.; Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S.; Moon, C.-B.; Nishibata, H.; Nishizuka, I.; Odahara, A.; Şahin, E.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Xu, F. R.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.

    2016-02-01

    The decay of a new four-quasiparticle isomeric state in 160Sm has been observed using γ-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF, RIKEN. The four-quasiparticle state is assigned a 2 π ⊗ 2 ν π5/2- [ 532 ], π5/2+ [ 413 ], ν5/2- [ 523 ], ν7/2+ [ 633 ] configuration. The half-life of this (11+) state is measured to be 1.8(4) μs. The (11+) isomer decays into a rotational band structure, based on a (6-) ν5/2- [ 523 ] ⊗ ν7/2+ [ 633 ] bandhead, consistent with the gK -gR values. This decays to a (5-) two-proton quasiparticle state, which in turn decays to the ground state band. Potential energy surface and blocked-BCS calculations were performed in the deformed midshell region around 160Sm. They reveal a significant influence from β6 deformation and that 160Sm is the best candidate for the lightest four-quasiparticle K isomer to exist in this region. The relationship between reduced hindrance and isomer excitation energy for E1 transitions from multiquasiparticle states is considered with the new data from 160Sm. The E1 data are found to agree with the existing relationship for E2 transitions.

  20. The lightest market in the world: light and mild cigarettes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Assunta, Mary; Chapman, Simon

    2008-05-01

    This article reviews the history of the introduction and use of light and mild labeled cigarettes in Japan, the "lightest" market in the world. Systematic keyword and opportunistic Web site searches were conducted on tobacco industry internal documents relevant to Japan, supplemented with relevant material from the tobacco trade and sociological literatures. Certain "market quirks" of the Japanese society benefited the tobacco industry in promoting its light and mild cigarettes. Japan's is a trend-conscious society with a penchant for new fashion and products. The Japanese are innovative, with the propensity to transform concepts into something characteristically their own marked by a distinct cultural style, such as the concept of keihaku tansho ("light-thin-short-small"). With big-budget sophisticated advertising, tobacco companies developed a lucrative market for mild, light, and ultra-low-tar cigarettes. Smokers had a preference for charcoal filters, which they believed protected them. Tar numbers meant little to smokers. The transnational tobacco companies capitalized on consumer concerns about the health hazards of smoking to promote low-tar cigarettes as a safer alternative. This may be one factor that explains why smoking prevalence in Japan remains high. Light and mild cigarettes are popular in Japan because Japanese smokers believe low tar/nicotine cigarette with charcoal filters protect them and help mollify their health concerns about smoking. PMID:18569753

  1. Neutrino fluxes from constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model lightest supersymmetric particle annihilations in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Savage, Christopher; Spanos, Vassilis C.

    2010-04-15

    We evaluate the neutrino fluxes to be expected from neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) annihilations inside the Sun, within the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model with supersymmetry-breaking scalar and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the grand unified theory scale [the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM)]. We find that there are large regions of typical CMSSM (m{sub 1/2},m{sub 0}) planes where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate. We show that neutrino fluxes are dependent on the solar model at the 20% level, and adopt the AGSS09 model of Serenelli et al. for our detailed studies. We find that there are large regions of the CMSSM (m{sub 1/2},m{sub 0}) planes where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering, e.g., at large m{sub 1/2} along the CMSSM coannihilation strip. We calculate neutrino fluxes above various threshold energies for points along the coannihilation/rapid-annihilation and focus-point strips where the CMSSM yields the correct cosmological relic density for tan{beta}=10 and 55 for {mu}>0, exploring their sensitivities to uncertainties in the spin-dependent and -independent scattering matrix elements. We also present detailed neutrino spectra for four benchmark models that illustrate generic possibilities within the CMSSM. Scanning the cosmologically favored parts of the parameter space of the CMSSM, we find that the IceCube/DeepCore detector can probe at best only parts of this parameter space, notably the focus-point region and possibly also at the low-mass tip of the coannihilation strip.

  2. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons with 1 fb(-1) of data from pp collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, S; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-03-01

    We search for decays of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions to e+ e(-) and gamma gamma in 1 fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction, which translate into lower limits on the mass of the lightest excitation between 300 and 900 GeV for values of the coupling k/MPl between 0.01 and 0.1. PMID:18352697

  3. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions with the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Jason D.

    2011-10-01

    A search for signs of universal extra dimensions (UED) has been performed with the D0 experiment, using events with two same-sign muons. The considered minimal UED model includes one extra dimension, and has a stable lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) which is a dark matter candidate. In the search, 7.3 fb{sup -1} of D0 data, collected in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, have been used.

  4. Bulk Randall-Sundrum models, electroweak precision tests, and the 125 GeV Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Sridhar, K.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2016-04-01

    We present up-to-date electroweak fits of various Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. We consider the bulk RS, deformed RS, and the custodial RS models. For the bulk RS case we find the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the gauge boson to be ˜8 TeV , while for the custodial case it is ˜3 TeV . The deformed model is the least fine-tuned of all which can give a good fit for KK masses <2 TeV depending on the choice of the model parameters. We also comment on the fine-tuning in each case.

  5. Shell-model study on event rates of lightest supersymmetric particles scattering off 83Kr and 125Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirinen, P.; Srivastava, P. C.; Suhonen, J.; Kortelainen, M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) dark matter off two possible target nuclei, 83Kr and 125Te. For the nuclear-structure calculations, we employ the nuclear shell model using recently generated realistic interactions. We have condensed the nuclear-physics contribution to a set of nuclear-structure factors that are independent of the adopted supersymmetric (SUSY) model. Total event rates are then easily calculated by combining the nuclear-structure factors with SUSY parameters of choice. In particular, 125Te shows promise as a detector material with both the elastic and inelastic channels yielding an appreciable nuclear response.

  6. Reconstruction of the left-chiral tau sneutrino in supersymmetry with a right sneutrino as the lightest supersymmetric particle

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Sanjoy

    2010-10-01

    We have considered a supersymmetric scenario in which the minimal supersymmetric standard model is augmented with a right-chiral neutrino superfield for each generation. Such a scenario can have a lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) dominated by the right-chiral sneutrino state and the lighter stau as the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP). This can easily be motivated by assuming a high-scale framework of supersymmetry breaking like minimal supergravity (mSUGRA). Because of the extremely small neutrino Yukawa coupling, the decay of the NLSP to the LSP is suppressed and, consequently, the NLSP - here the lighter stau mass eigenstate -becomes stable at the length scale of the detector. The collider signal in this case consists of charged tracks of massive stable particles in the muon chamber. Following up on our earlier studies on neutralino and chargino reconstruction in such a scenario, we have shown that the kinematical information obtained from these charged tracks allows us to reconstruct the left-chiral tau sneutrino as well over a significant region of the mSUGRA parameter space. Two methods for reconstruction are suggested and their relative merits are discussed.

  7. χc 0(3915 ) as the lightest c c ¯s s ¯ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, Richard F.; Polosa, Antonio D.

    2016-05-01

    The state χc 0(3915 ) has recently been demoted by the Particle Data Group from its previous status as the conventional c c ¯ 23P0 state, largely due to the absence of expected D D ¯ decays. We propose that χc 0(3915 ) is actually the lightest c c ¯s s ¯ state, and calculate the spectrum of such states using the diquark model, identifying many of the observed charmoniumlike states that lack open-charm decay modes as c c ¯s s ¯. Among other results, we argue that Y (4140 ) is a JP C=1++ c c ¯s s ¯ state that has been not been seen in two-photon fusion largely as a consequence of the Landau-Yang theorem.

  8. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260BhReaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Sarah L.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Dragojevic, Irena; Garcia, Mitch A.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Nitsche, Heino

    2007-05-07

    The lightest isotope of Bh known was produced in the new {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. {sup 260}Bh decays with a 35{sub -9}{sup +19} ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59{sub -20}{sup +29} pb is approximately a factor of four larger than compared to recent model predictions. The influences of the N = 152 and Z = 108 shells on alpha decay properties are discussed.

  9. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced via the {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. L.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Sudowe, R.

    2008-01-18

    The lightest isotope of Bh was produced in the new {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. {sup 260}Bh decays with a 35{sub -9}{sup +19} ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59{sub -20}{sup +29} pb is compared to model predictions. The influence of the N=152 and Z=108 shells on alpha decay properties is discussed.

  10. Cross section systematics for the lightest Bi and Po nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A.N.; Ackermann, D.; Muenzenberg, G.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Streicher, B.; Darby, I.G.; Page, R.D.; Wiseman, D.R.; Franchoo, S.; Hessberger, F.P.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lommel, B.; Kindler, B.; Mann, R.; Sulignano, B.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Vel, K. van de; Duppen, P. van

    2005-07-01

    The production of the very neutron-deficient nuclides {sup 184-192}Bi and {sup 186-192}Po in the vicinity of the neutron midshell at N = 104 has been studied by using heavy-ion-induced complete fusion reactions in a series of experiments at the velocity filter SHIP. The cross sections for the xn and pxn evaporation channels of the {sup 46}Ti+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 98}Mo+{sup 92}Mo{yields}{sup 190}Po*,{sup 50,52}Cr+{sup 142}Nd{yields}{sup 192,194}Po*, and {sup 94,95}Mo+{sup 93}Nb{yields}{sup 187,188}Bi* reactions were measured. The results obtained, together with the previously known cross section data for the heavier Bi and Po nuclides, are compared with the results of statistical model calculations carried out with the HIVAP code. It is shown that a satisfactory description of the experimental data requires a significant (up to 35%) reduction of the theoretical fission barriers. The optimal reactions for production of the lightest Bi and Po isotopes are discussed.

  11. Search for extra dimensions in the diphoton final state with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, Quentin

    2012-06-01

    The large difference between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale, known as the hierarchy problem, has been addressed in some models through the existence of extra spatial dimensions. A search for evidence of extra spatial dimensions has been performed, through an analysis of the diphoton final state in data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis uses a dataset of 2.12 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV. The diphoton invariant mass spectrum is observed to be in good agreement with the expected Standard Model (SM) background. We set 95% CL lower limits on the scale related to virtual graviton exchange process in the context of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali model (ADD) and on the lightest Kaluza Klein excitation mass in the context of the Randall-Sundrum model (RS).

  12. Perturbative bottom-up approach for neutrino mass matrix in light of large θ13 and role of lightest neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rupak; Ch, Upender; Giri, Anjan K.; Sahu, Narendra

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the role of lightest neutrino mass (m0) in the neutrino mass matrix, defined in a flavor basis, through a bottom-up approach using the current neutrino oscillation data. We find that if m0 < 10-3eV, then the deviation δMν in the neutrino mass matrix from a tree-level, say tribimaximal neutrino mass matrix, does not depend on m0. As a result δMν's are exactly predicted in terms of the experimentally determined quantities such as solar and atmospheric mass squared differences and the mixing angles. On the other hand for m0 ≳10-3eV, δMν strongly depends on m0 and hence cannot be determined within the knowledge of oscillation parameters alone. In this limit, we provide an exponential parametrization for δMν for all values of m0 such that it can factorize the m0 dependency of δMν from rest of the oscillation parameters. This helps us in finding δMν as a function of the solar and atmospheric mass squared differences and the mixing angles for all values of m0. We use this information to build up a model of neutrino masses and mixings in a top-down scenario which can predict large θ13 perturbatively.

  13. Search for charginos nearly mass degenerate with the lightest neutralino based on a disappearing-track signature in pp collisions at (s)=8TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. 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T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. 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A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. 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C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-12-01

    A search is presented for direct chargino production based on a disappearing-track signature using 20.3fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at s=8TeV collected with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. In anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) models, the lightest chargino is nearly mass degenerate with the lightest neutralino and its lifetime is long enough to be detected in the tracking detectors by identifying decays that result in tracks with no associated hits in the outer region of the tracking system. Some models with supersymmetry also predict charginos with a significant lifetime. This analysis attains sensitivity for charginos with a lifetime between 0.1 and 10 ns, and significantly surpasses the reach of the LEP experiments. No significant excess above the background expectation is observed for candidate tracks with large transverse momentum, and constraints on chargino properties are obtained. In the AMSB scenarios, a chargino mass below 270 GeV is excluded at 95% confidence level.

  14. The horizon of the lightest black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier; Casadio, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    We study the properties of the poles of the resummed graviton propagator obtained by resumming bubble matter diagrams which correct the classical graviton propagator. These poles have been previously interpreted as black holes precursors. Here, we show using the horizon wave-function formalism that these poles indeed have properties which make them compatible with being black hole precursors. In particular, when modeled with a Breit-Wigner distribution, they have a well-defined gravitational radius. The probability that the resonance is inside its own gravitational radius, and thus that it is a black hole, is about one half. Our results confirm the interpretation of these poles as black hole precursors.

  15. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  16. De Sitter thin brane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masato

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the large mass hierarchy problem in a braneworld model which represents our acceleratively expanding universe. The Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with one extra warped dimension added to a flat four-dimensional space-time cannot describe our expanding universe. Here, we study instead the de Sitter thin brane model. This is described by the same action as that for the RS model, but the four-dimensional space-time on the branes is dS_4. We study the model for both the cases of positive five-dimensional cosmological constant Λ_5 and a negative one. In the positive Λ_5 case, the four-dimensional large hierarchy necessitates a five-dimensional large hierarchy, and we cannot get a natural explanation. On the other hand, in the negative Λ_5 case, the large hierarchy is naturally realized in the five-dimensional theory in the same manner as in the RS model. Moreover, another large hierarchy between the Hubble parameter and the Planck scale is realized by the O(10^2) hierarchy of the five-dimensional quantities. Finally, we find that the lightest mass of the massive Kaluza-Klein modes and the intervals of the mass spectrum are of order 10^2 GeV, which are the same as in the RS case and do not depend on the value of the Hubble parameter.

  17. Sterile Neutrino Searches in MINOS and MINOS+ Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Junting

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents the searches on sterile neutrinos using the data collected in MINOS+ Experiment from September 2013 to September 2014, and the full data set of MINOS Experiment collected from 2005 to 2012. Anomalies in short baseline experiments, such as LSND and MiniBooNE, showed hints of sterile neutrinos, a type of neutrino that does not interact with the Standard Model particles. In this work, two models are considered: 3+1 and large extra dimension (LED). In the 3+1 model, one sterile neutrino state is added into the standard oscillation scheme consisting of three known active neutrino states ve, vμ and vτ. In the LED model, sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein (KK) states due to assumed large extra dimensions. Mixing between sterile and active neutrino states may modify the oscillation patterns observed in the MINOS detectors. Both searches yield null results. For 3+1, a combined fit of MINOS and MINOS+ data gives a stronger limit on θ24 in the range of 10-2 eV2 < Δm412 < 1 eV2 than previous experiments. For LED, with the complete MINOS data set, the size of extra dimensions is constrained to be smaller than ~ 0.35 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest neutrino mass.

  18. Off-the-Wall Higgs in the Universal Randall-Sundrum Model

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2005-09-09

    We outline a consistent Randall-Sundrum (RS) framework in which a fundamental 5-dimensional Higgs doublet induces electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). In this framework of a warped Universal Extra Dimension, the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the bulk Higgs is tachyonic leading to a vacuum expectation value (vev) at the TeV scale. The consistency of this picture imposes a set of constraints on the parameters in the Higgs sector. A novel feature of our scenario is the emergence of an adjustable bulk profile for the Higgs vev. We also find a tower of nontachyonic Higgs KK modes at the weak scale. We consider an interesting implementation of this ''Off-the-Wall Higgs'' mechanism where the 5-dimensional curvature-scalar coupling alone generates the tachyonic mode responsible for EWSB. In this case, additional relations among the parameters of the Higgs and gravitational sectors are established. We discuss the experimental signatures of the bulk Higgs in general, and those of the ''Gravity-Induced'' EWSB in particular.

  19. CALET's sensitivity to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motz, H.; Asaoka, Y.; Torii, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2015-12-01

    CALET (Calorimetric Electron Telescope), installed on the ISS in August 2015, directly measures the electron+positron cosmic rays flux up to 20 TeV. With its proton rejection capability of 1 : 105 and an aperture of 1200 cm2· sr, it will provide good statistics even well above one TeV, while also featuring an energy resolution of 2%, which allows it to detect fine structures in the spectrum. Such structures may originate from Dark Matter annihilation or decay, making indirect Dark Matter search one of CALET's main science objectives among others such as identification of signatures from nearby supernova remnants, study of the heavy nuclei spectra and gamma astronomy. The latest results from AMS-02 on positron fraction and total electron+positron flux can be fitted with a parametrization including a single pulsar as an extra power law source with exponential cut-off, which emits an equal amount of electrons and positrons. This single pulsar scenario for the positron excess is extrapolated into the TeV region and the expected CALET data for this case are simulated. Based on this prediction for CALET data, the sensitivity of CALET to Dark Matter annihilation in the galactic halo has been calculated. It is shown that CALET could significantly improve the limits compared to current data, especially for those Dark Matter candidates that feature a large fraction of annihilation directly into e+ + e-, such as the LKP (Lightest Kaluza-Klein particle).

  20. An entropic understanding of Coulomb force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Kim, Hyosung

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting Verlinde's proposal on the entropic understanding of Newton's law, we show that Coulomb force could also be understood as an entropically emergent force (rather than as a fundamental force). We apply Kaluza-Klein idea to Verlinde's formalism to obtain Coulomb interaction in the lower dimensions. The kinematics concerning the Kaluza-Klein momenta separates the interaction due to the momentum flow from the gravitational interaction. The momentum-charge conversion relation results in the precise form of Coulomb interaction.

  1. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dielectron and Diphoton Final States with 5.4fb-1 of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; /Columbia U.

    2010-03-01

    A search for the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension is performed in the dielectron and diphoton channels. The data set used for the search corresponds to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron between July 2002 and Summer 2009. We search for resonances in the invariant mass spectrum of two electromagnetic showers from the decay of the graviton to either electron-positron pairs or photon pairs. To optimize the sensitivity, the dielectron and diphoton channels are analyzed separately, then the results are combined together in the end. We also investigate whether, due to the unique spin-2 nature of the graviton, the angular distribution of the final state particles can be used to significantly enhance the sensitivity of the search. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the graviton production cross section times branching fraction into electron-positron pairs of between {approx} 7 fb and {approx} 0.5 fb for a range of graviton masses from 220 GeV and 1050 GeV, respectively. Compared with Randall-Sundrum model predictions, these results correspond to lower limits on the lightest graviton mass between 440 GeV and 1040 GeV, for the dimensionless graviton coupling to the Standard Model fields k/{bar M}{sub Pl} in the range from 0.01 to 0.1. In addition, for coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} of 0.01, gravitons with masses between 460 GeV and 560 GeV are also excluded at 95% confidence level. These results represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  2. Two photon couplings of the lightest isoscalars from BELLE data

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-07-07

    Amplitude Analysis of two photon production of ππ and K¯K, using S-matrix constraints and fitting all available data, including the latest precision results from Belle, yields a single partial wave solution up to 1.4 GeV. The two photon couplings of the σ/f0(500), f0(980) and f2(1270) are determined from the residues of the resonance poles.

  3. Progenitor neutron stars of the lightest and heaviest millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, M.; Bejger, M.; Haensel, P.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The recent mass measurements of two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M = 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ and M = 1.26 ± 0.14 M⊙, respectively, indicate a wide range of masses for such objects and possibly also a broad spectrum of masses of neutron stars born in core-collapse supernovae. Aims: Starting from the zero-age main sequence binary stage, we aim at inferring the birth masses of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807 by taking the differences in the evolutionary stages preceding their formation into account. Methods: Using simulations for the evolution of binary stars, we reconstruct the evolutionary tracks leading to the formation of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807. We analyse in detail the spin evolution due to the accretion of matter from a disk in the intermediate-mass/low-mass X-ray binary. We consider two equations of state of dense matter, one for purely nucleonic matter and the other one including a high-density softening due to the appearance of hyperons. Stationary and axisymmetric stellar configurations in general relativity are used, together with a recent magnetic torque model and observationally-motivated laws for the decay of magnetic field. Results: The estimated birth mass of the neutron stars PSR J0751+1807 and PSR J1614-2230 could be as low as 1.0 M⊙ and as high as 1.9 M⊙, respectively. These values depend weakly on the equation of state and the assumed model for the magnetic field and its accretion-induced decay. Conclusions: The masses of progenitor neutron stars of recycled pulsars span a broad interval from 1.0 M⊙ to 1.9 M⊙. Including the effect of a slow Roche-lobe detachment phase, which could be relevant for PSR J0751+1807, would make the lower mass limit even lower. A realistic theory for core-collapse supernovæ should account for this wide range of mass.

  4. Two photon couplings of the lightest isoscalars from BELLE data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Ling -Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-07-07

    Amplitude Analysis of two photon production of ππ and K¯K, using S-matrix constraints and fitting all available data, including the latest precision results from Belle, yields a single partial wave solution up to 1.4 GeV. The two photon couplings of the σ/f0(500), f0(980) and f2(1270) are determined from the residues of the resonance poles.

  5. Static axisymmetric solutions with electric fields in low-energy string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yi-Huan; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong; He, Feng

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, we prove that all five-dimensional axisymmetric Kaluza-Klein spacetime solutions with electrostatic fields may also be those of low-energy string theory. From the class of TS-like solutions in Kaluza-Klein theory we obtain the corresponding class of solutions with electric dipoles in low-energy string theory, which are enlarged to solutions with electric charges under the SO(1, 1) transformation. We obtain the complete metric for the TS-like solution with δ = 1. Lastly, we give a discussion.

  6. Aether compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean M.; Tam, Heywood

    2008-08-15

    We propose a new way to hide large extra dimensions without invoking branes, based on Lorentz-violating tensor fields with expectation values along the extra directions. We investigate the case of a single vector aether field on a compact circle. In such a background, interactions of other fields with the aether can lead to modified dispersion relations, increasing the mass of the Kaluza-Klein excitations. The mass scale characterizing each Kaluza-Klein tower can be chosen independently for each species of scalar, fermion, or gauge boson. No small-scale deviations from the inverse square law for gravity are predicted, although light graviton modes may exist.

  7. New instabilities of de Sitter spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Copsey, Keith; Mann, Robert

    2010-04-15

    We construct an instanton describing the pair production of non-Kaluza-Klein bubbles of nothing in higher odd-dimensional de Sitter spaces. In addition to showing that higher-dimensional de Sitter spaces have a nonzero probability to become topologically nontrivial, this process provides direct evidence for the association of entropy with cosmological horizons as well as evidence that non-Kaluza-Klein bubbles of nothing are a necessary ingredient in string theory or any other consistent quantum theory of gravity in higher dimensions.

  8. Stability of the warped black string with nontrivial topology in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shaoyu; Wang, Bin; Mann, Robert; Lee, Chong Oh; Lin, Chi-Yong; Su, Ru-Keng

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the stability of a new warped black string with nontrivial topologies in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. After studying the linear gravitational perturbation, we find that this black string is unstable when the Kaluza-Klein mass falls in a certain range, and the instability exists for all topological spacetimes.

  9. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbeus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where singlet fermions are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the standard model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are nonrenormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal Kaluza-Klein number. This truncation, together with the structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the Kaluza-Klein modes of the singlet fermions pair to form Dirac fermions, except for a number of unpaired Majorana fermions at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana fermions are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the nonunitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  10. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  11. A characterization for the sensitivity of a metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mohammadreza; Khajoei, Najmeh

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we introduce the universal functions which describe the sensitivity of metrics on the local charts of their ambient manifolds. We find these functions for Bianchi type II, V, VII and IX cosmological models. We also find these values for Kaluza-Klein and FRW space-times.

  12. Proton stability and dark matter : are they related?

    SciTech Connect

    Servant, G.; High Energy Physics

    2004-06-01

    We address the problem of baryon number violation in Randall-Sundrum backgrounds and provide a solution leading to a stable light Kaluza--Klein fermion in warped GUT. This adds to the list of dark matter candidates which stability can follow from ensuring proton stability in weak scale extensions of the Standard Model.

  13. Dark Matter and Collider Physics in Split-UED

    SciTech Connect

    Chan Park, Seong; Shu Jing

    2010-02-10

    Kaluza-Klein dark matter is an attractive weakly interacting massive particle in universal extra dimension model. In the recent extension 'split-UED', annihilation of Kaluza-Klein dark matter with a mass range 600-1000 GeV provides excellent fits to the recently observed excesses in cosmic electron and positron fluxes of Pamela, ATIC and Fermi-LAT experiments. The cosmic gamma-ray flux in the same process can be significant around 300 GeV, thus can be observed or constrained by the forthcoming Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray data. The collider signal at the LHC is the resonance in the dijets channels and the large missing energy in the missing energy plus jets.

  14. The soft-wall standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Sword, Daniel; Gherghetta, Tony

    2008-12-01

    We explore the possibility of modeling electroweak physics in a warped extra dimension with a soft wall. The infrared boundary is replaced with a smoothly varying dilaton field that provides a dynamical spacetime cutoff. We analyze gravity, gauge fields, and fermions in the soft-wall background and obtain a discrete spectrum of Kaluza-Klein states which can exhibit linear Regge-like behavior. Bulk Yukawa interactions give rise to nonconstant fermion mass terms, leading to fermion localization in the soft-wall background and a possible explanation of the standard model flavor structure. Furthermore we construct electroweak models with custodial symmetry, where the gauge symmetry is broken with a bulk Higgs condensate. The electroweak constraints are not as stringent as in hard-wall models, allowing Kaluza-Klein masses of order the TeV scale.

  15. Higher Curvature Gravity in TeV-Scale Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-03-31

    We begin a general exploration of the phenomenology of TeV-scale extra-dimensional models with gravitational actions that contain higher curvature terms. In particular, we examine how the classic collider signatures of the models of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (missing energy and new dimension-8 contact interactions) and of Randall and Sundrum (TeV-scale graviton Kaluza-Klein resonances) are altered by these modifications to the usual Einstein-Hilbert action. We find that not only are the detailed signatures for these gravitationally induced processes altered but new contributions are found to arise due to the existence of additional scalar Kaluza-Klein states in the spectrum.

  16. Top quark spin correlations in the Randall-Sundrum model at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel

    2007-05-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum model, we study top-antitop pair production and top spin correlations at the Large Hadron Collider. In addition to the standard model processes, there is a new contribution to the top-antitop pair production process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in the s-channel. We calculate the density matrix for the top-antitop pair production including the new contribution. With a reasonable parameter choice in the Randall-Sundrum model, we find a sizable deviation of the top-antitop pair production cross section and the top spin correlations from those in the standard model. In particular, resonant productions of the graviton Kaluza-Klein modes give rise to a remarkable enhancement of such a deviation.

  17. Nondecoupling of maximal supergravity from the superstring.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael B; Ooguri, Hirosi; Schwarz, John H

    2007-07-27

    We consider the conditions necessary for obtaining perturbative maximal supergravity in d dimensions as a decoupling limit of type II superstring theory compactified on a (10-d) torus. For dimensions d=2 and d=3, it is possible to define a limit in which the only finite-mass states are the 256 massless states of maximal supergravity. However, in dimensions d>or=4, there are infinite towers of additional massless and finite-mass states. These correspond to Kaluza-Klein charges, wound strings, Kaluza-Klein monopoles, or branes wrapping around cycles of the toroidal extra dimensions. We conclude that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in dimensions>or=4. In particular, we conjecture that pure N=8 supergravity in four dimensions is in the Swampland. PMID:17678349

  18. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to a heavy resonance production and decay into top quark pair at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jun; Li Chongsheng; Li Bohua; Zhu Huaxing; Yuan, C.-P.

    2010-07-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculation to a heavy resonance production and decay into a top quark pair at the LHC, where the resonance could be either a Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein graviton G or an extra gauge boson Z{sup '}. The complete NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 80%-100% and 20%-40% for the G and the Z{sup '}, respectively, depending on the resonance mass. We also explore in detail the NLO corrections to the polar angle distributions of the top quark, and our results show that the shapes of the NLO distributions can be different from the leading order ones for the Kaluza-Klein graviton. Moreover, we study the NLO corrections to the spin correlations of the top quark pair production via the above process, and find that the corrections are small.

  19. Killing superalgebra deformations of ten-dimensional supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Vercnocke, Bert

    2007-12-01

    We explore Lie superalgebra deformations of the Killing superalgebras of some ten-dimensional supergravity backgrounds. We prove the rigidity of the Poincaré superalgebras in types I, IIA and IIB, as well as of the Killing superalgebra of the Freund Rubin vacuum of type IIB supergravity. We also prove rigidity of the Killing superalgebras of the NS5-, D0-, D3-, D4- and D5-branes, whereas we exhibit the possible deformations of the D1-, D2-, D6- and D7-brane Killing superalgebras, as well as of that of the type II fundamental string solutions. We relate the superalgebra deformations of the D2- and D6-branes to those of the (delocalized) M2-brane and the Kaluza Klein monopole, respectively. The good behaviour under Kaluza Klein reduction suggests that the deformed superalgebras ought to have a geometric interpretation.

  20. Q-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Kehagias, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Non-topological solitons (Q-balls) are discussed in some stringy settings. Our main result is that the dielectric D-brane system of Myers admits non-abelian Q-ball solutions on their world-volume, in which N D p-branes relax to the standard dielectric form outside the Q-ball, but assume a more diffuse configuration at its centre. We also consider how Q-balls behave in the bulk of extra-dimensional theories, or on wrapped branes. We demonstrate that they carry Kaluza-Klein charge and possess a corresponding Kaluza-Klein tower of states just as normal particles, and we discuss surface energy effects by finding exact Q-ball solutions in models with a specific logarithmic potential.

  1. Phenomenology of TeV little string theory from holography.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Giveon, Amit

    2012-02-24

    We study the graviton phenomenology of TeV little string theory by exploiting its holographic gravity dual five-dimensional theory. This dual corresponds to a linear dilaton background with a large bulk that constrains the standard model fields on the boundary of space. The linear dilaton geometry produces a unique Kaluza-Klein graviton spectrum that exhibits a ~TeV mass gap followed by a near continuum of narrow resonances that are separated from each other by only ~30 GeV. Resonant production of these particles at the LHC is the signature of this framework that distinguishes it from large extra dimensions, where the Kaluza-Klein states are almost a continuum with no mass gap, and warped models, where the states are separated by a TeV. PMID:22463515

  2. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  3. Orbifold SUSY GUT from the Heterotic String

    SciTech Connect

    Kyae, Bumseok

    2008-11-23

    From the string partition function, we discuss the mass-shell and GSO projection conditions valid for Kaluza-Klein (KK) as well as massless states in the heterotic string theory compactifled on a nonprime orbifold. Using the obtained conditions we construct a 4D string standard model, which is embedded in a 6D SUSY GUT by including KK states above the compactiflcation scale. We discuss the stringy threshold corrections to gauge couplings, including the Wilson line effects.

  4. More on N=8 attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Ceresole, Anna; Ferrara, Sergio; Gnecchi, Alessandra; Marrani, Alessio

    2009-08-15

    We examine a few simple extremal black hole configurations of N=8, d=4 supergravity. We first elucidate the relation between the BPS Reissner-Noerdstrom black hole and the non-BPS Kaluza-Klein dyonic black hole. Their classical entropy, given by the Bekenstein-Hawking formula, can be reproduced via the attractor mechanism by suitable choices of symplectic frame. Then, we display the embedding of the axion-dilaton black hole into N=8 supergravity.

  5. Fully covariant cosmology and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesson, Paul S.; Liu, Hongya

    1995-01-01

    We present a cosmological model with good physical properties which is invariant not only under changes of the space and time coordinates but also under changes of an extra (Kaluza-Klein) coordinate related to rest mass. In frames where the latter is chosen to be constant we recover standard cosmology. In frames where it is chosen to be variable we obtain new astrophysical effects and gain insight into the nature of the big bang.

  6. Proceedings of the fourth workshop on grand unification

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, H.A.; Langacker, P.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented at the fourth conference of grand unified theories of nuclear physics held in University of Pennsylvania April 1983. The topics covered were proton decay theory; angular distribution and flux of atmospheric neutrinos; atmospheric neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos in proton decay experiments; review of future nucleon decay experiments; monopole experiments; searches for magnetic monopole; monopoles, gauge, fields and anomalies; darkmatter, galaxies and voids; adiabatic fluctuations; supersymmetry, supergravity, and Kaluza-Klein theories; superstring theory and superunification.

  7. Leptogenesis with many neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Eisele, Marc-Thomas

    2008-02-15

    We consider leptogenesis in scenarios with many neutrino singlets. We find that the lower bound for the reheating temperature can be significantly relaxed with respect to the hierarchical three neutrino case. We further argue that the upper bound for the neutrino mass scale from leptogenesis gets significantly lifted in these scenarios. As a specific realization, we then discuss an extradimensional model, where the large number of neutrinos is provided by Kaluza-Klein excitations.

  8. Semiclassical instability of compactification. [in dynamic universe model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Kolb, E. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that several schemes for compactification of the extra dimensions in Kaluza-Klein theories are unstable to a quantum gravitational process of barrier penetration: The universe can tunnel from a state with static extra dimensions to a de Sitter expansion of all dimensions. The tunneling rate is estimated, and it is found that the present state of the universe is probably long-lived (in good agreement with observation).

  9. Bounds on Masses of Bulk Fields in String Compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; McGreevy, John; Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-02-13

    In string compactification on a manifold X, in addition to the string scale and the normal scales of low-energy particle physics, there is a Kaluza-Klein scale 1/R associated with the size of X. We present an argument that generic string models with low-energy supersymmetry have, after moduli stabilization, bulk fields with masses which are parametrically lighter than 1/R. We discuss the implications of these light states for anomaly mediation and gaugino mediation scenarios.

  10. Kac Moody theories for colored phase space (quantum Hall) droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronakos, Alexios P.

    2005-04-01

    We derive the canonical structure and Hamiltonian for arbitrary deformations of a higher-dimensional (quantum Hall) droplet of fermions with spin or color on a general phase space manifold. Gauge fields are introduced via a Kaluza-Klein construction on the phase space. The emerging theory is a nonlinear higher-dimensional generalization of the gauged Kac-Moody algebra. To leading order in ℏ this reproduces the edge state chiral Wess-Zumino-Witten action of the droplets.

  11. Evolution of the CKM matrix in the universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, A. S.; Liu Luxin

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the quark Yukawa couplings is performed for the one-loop renormalization group equations in the universal extra dimension model. It is found that the evolution of mixing angles and the CP violation measure J may rapidly vary in the presence of the Kaluza-Klein modes, and this variation becomes dramatic as the energy approaches the unification scale.

  12. Galileons from Lovelock actions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Acoleyen, Karel; Van Doorsselaere, Jos

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate how, for an arbitrary number of dimensions, the Galileon actions and their covariant generalizations can be obtained through a standard Kaluza-Klein compactification of higher-dimensional Lovelock gravity. In this setup, the dilaton takes on the role of the Galileon. In addition, such compactifications uncover other more general Galilean actions, producing purely second-order equations in the weak-field limit, now both for the Galileon and the metric perturbations.

  13. Phantom black holes and sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Azreg-Aienou, Mustapha; Clement, Gerard; Fabris, Julio C.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.

    2011-06-15

    We construct static multicenter solutions of phantom Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory from null geodesics of the target space, leading to regular black holes without spatial symmetry for certain discrete values of the dilaton coupling constant. We also discuss the three-dimensional gravitating sigma models obtained by reduction of phantom Einstein-Maxwell, phantom Kaluza-Klein and phantom Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion theories. In each case, we generate by group transformations phantom charged black hole solutions from a neutral seed.

  14. Production of a KK-graviton and a vector boson in ADD model via gluon fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaji, Ambresh; Ravindran, V.; Agrawal, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    In the models with large extra-dimensions, we examine the production of a vector boson (γ/ Z) in association with the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the graviton via gluon fusion. At the leading order, the process takes place through quark-loop box and triangle diagrams and it is ultraviolate finite. We report the results for the LHC. We also discuss the issues of anomaly and decoupling of heavy quarks in the amplitude.

  15. Extra dimensions in γγ → γγ process at the CERN-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atağ, S.; Inan, S. C.; Şahin, I.

    2010-09-01

    Potential of the LHC to explore the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) tower of gravitons in the scenarios of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali(ADD) model and Randall-Sundrum (RS) model is discussed via the process γγ → γγ including the Standard Model one loop diagram. The improved constraints on model parameters have been obtained compared to the LEP and Tevatron sensitivity.

  16. Inflaton and metric fluctuations in the early universe from a 5D vacuum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membiela, Agustin; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-04-01

    In this Letter we complete a previously introduced formalism to study the gauge-invariant metric fluctuations from a noncompact Kaluza Klein theory of gravity, to study the evolution of the early universe. The evolution of both, metric and inflaton field fluctuations are reciprocally related. We obtain that <δρ>/ρ depends on the coupling of Φ with δφ and the spectral index of its spectrum is 0.9483

  17. Numerical Solutions in 5d Standing Wave Braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Sakhelashvili, Otari; Tukhashvili, Giorgi

    2013-06-01

    Within the 5D standing wave braneworld model numerical solutions of the equations for matter fields with various spins are found. It is shown that corresponding action integrals are factorizable and convergent over the extra coordinate, i.e. 4D fields are localized on the brane. We find that only left massless fermions are localized on the brane, while the right fermions are localized in the bulk. We demonstrate also quantization of Kaluza-Klein excited modes in our model.

  18. Counting the microstates of a Kerr black hole in M theory.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Gary T; Roberts, Matthew M

    2007-11-30

    We show that an extremal Kerr black hole, appropriately lifted to M theory, can be transformed to a Kaluza-Klein black hole in M theory, or a D0-D6 charged black hole in string theory. Since all the microstates of the latter have recently been identified, one can exactly reproduce the entropy of an extremal Kerr black hole. We also show that the topology of the event horizon is not well defined in M theory. PMID:18233277

  19. Warped penguin diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Csaki, Csaba; Grossman, Yuval; Tanedo, Philip; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2011-04-01

    We present an analysis of the loop-induced magnetic dipole operator in the Randall-Sundrum model of a warped extra dimension with anarchic bulk fermions and an IR brane-localized Higgs. These operators are finite at one-loop order and we explicitly calculate the branching ratio for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} using the mixed position/momentum space formalism. The particular bound on the anarchic Yukawa and Kaluza-Klein (KK) scales can depend on the flavor structure of the anarchic matrices. It is possible for a generic model to either be ruled out or unaffected by these bounds without any fine-tuning. We quantify how these models realize this surprising behavior. We also review tree-level lepton flavor bounds in these models and show that these are on the verge of tension with the {mu}{yields}e{gamma} bounds from typical models with a 3 TeV Kaluza-Klein scale. Further, we illuminate the nature of the one-loop finiteness of these diagrams and show how to accurately determine the degree of divergence of a five-dimensional loop diagram using both the five-dimensional and KK formalism. This power counting can be obfuscated in the four-dimensional Kaluza-Klein formalism and we explicitly point out subtleties that ensure that the two formalisms agree. Finally, we remark on the existence of a perturbative regime in which these one-loop results give the dominant contribution.

  20. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  1. Three-loop corrections to the lightest Higgs boson mass within SQCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, L.

    2008-11-23

    In this talk we report on the computation of the light CP-even Higgs boson mass with three-loop accuracy, taking into account the next-to-next-to-leading order effects from supersymmetric Quantum Chromodynamics. We find that the numerical results amount to corrections of the same order of magnitude as the experimental accuracy expected at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  2. The ``light-est'' of all Projectiles: Nuclear Structure Studies Using Photonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietralla, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by photons have had and continue to have a large impact on the course of nuclear physics. Photons interact purely electromagnetically with the atomic nucleus and induce minimal momentum transfer at given excitation energy. Photonuclear reaction processes can be expanded in terms of QED and photonuclear excitations are by far dominated by one-step processes. They allow for a model independent measurement of nuclear observables and, hence, for a clean characterization of effective nuclear forces. Apart from the pioneering photonuclear reactions by Bothe and Gentner in the 1930s, bremsstrahlung has been used most widely as an intense source of gamma-rays for photonuclear reactions from the 1940s until today. The nuclear dipole strength distribution has largely been mapped out at bremsstrahlung facilities. While the continuous-energy distribution of bremsstrahlung photons offers a complete view of the spectrum of photonuclear excitations, it suffers from a poor sensitivity to specific energy intervals. Intense, energy-tunable, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams from laser-Compton backscattering processes have revolutionized the field of photonuclear reactions for the last ten years. A set of new techniques is under development and new information on fundamental nuclear modes, such as the IVGDR, IVGQR, Pygmy Dipole Resonance, and the Scissors Mode, has recently been obtained. We will attempt to give a brief overview of the state of the art and dare an outlook at the research opportunities at the next generation of gamma-ray facilities under construction in the U.S. and Europe. Supported by the DFG under grant No. SFB634.

  3. Orbital Dependent Nucleonic Pairing in the Lightest Known Isotopes of Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, Iain; Grzywacz, R.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Gross, Carl J; Liddick, Sean; Nazarewicz, Witold; Padgett, Stephen; Papenbrock, T.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rotureau, J.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2010-01-01

    By studying the {sup 109}Xe {yields} {sup 105}Te {yields} {sup 101}Sn superallowed {alpha}-decay chain, we observe low-lying states in {sup 101}Sn, the one-neutron system outside doubly magic {sup 100}Sn. We find that the spins of the ground state (J=7/2) and first excited state (J=5/2) in {sup 101}Sn are reversed with respect to the traditional level ordering postulated for {sup 103}Sn and the heavier tin isotopes. Through simple arguments and state-of-the-art shell-model calculations we explain this unexpected switch in terms of a transition from the single-particle regime to the collective mode in which orbital-dependent pairing correlations dominate.

  4. The lightest organic radical cation for charge storage in redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhua; Pan, Baofei; Duan, Wentao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Assary, Rajeev S; Su, Liang; Brushett, Fikile R; Cheng, Lei; Liao, Chen; Ferrandon, Magali S; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K; Curtiss, Larry A; Shkrob, Ilya A; Moore, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    In advanced electrical grids of the future, electrochemically rechargeable fluids of high energy density will capture the power generated from intermittent sources like solar and wind. To meet this outstanding technological demand there is a need to understand the fundamental limits and interplay of electrochemical potential, stability, and solubility in low-weight redox-active molecules. By generating a combinatorial set of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene derivatives with different arrangements of substituents, we discovered a minimalistic structure that combines exceptional long-term stability in its oxidized form and a record-breaking intrinsic capacity of 161 mAh/g. The nonaqueous redox flow battery has been demonstrated that uses this molecule as a catholyte material and operated stably for 100 charge/discharge cycles. The observed stability trends are rationalized by mechanistic considerations of the reaction pathways. PMID:27558638

  5. The lightest organic radical cation for charge storage in redox flow batteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhua; Pan, Baofei; Duan, Wentao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Assary, Rajeev S.; Su, Liang; Brushett, Fikile R.; Cheng, Lei; Liao, Chen; Ferrandon, Magali S.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    In advanced electrical grids of the future, electrochemically rechargeable fluids of high energy density will capture the power generated from intermittent sources like solar and wind. To meet this outstanding technological demand there is a need to understand the fundamental limits and interplay of electrochemical potential, stability, and solubility in low-weight redox-active molecules. By generating a combinatorial set of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene derivatives with different arrangements of substituents, we discovered a minimalistic structure that combines exceptional long-term stability in its oxidized form and a record-breaking intrinsic capacity of 161 mAh/g. The nonaqueous redox flow battery has been demonstrated that uses this molecule as a catholyte material and operated stably for 100 charge/discharge cycles. The observed stability trends are rationalized by mechanistic considerations of the reaction pathways. PMID:27558638

  6. The lightest scalar-isoscalar meson, its history, new parameters and role in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The most interesting and spectacular events in history of the σ meson are presented. Widely discussed is the role of new (GKPY) and old (Roy) dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition in its almost rediscovery three years ago. Example of a successful application of the GKPY equations in modification of coupled channel ππ, K K ¯ and ηη amplitudes in the S- and P-waves fitted in past only to experimental data and not fulfilling crossing symmetry condition is mentioned. Short and purely mathematical proof of the uniqueness and correctness of the dispersive method used to precise determination of ππ interaction parameters is presented.

  7. The properties of the lightest scalar mesons in a holographic QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing-Ran; Harada, Masayasu; Kim, Youngman; Ma, Yong-Liang

    2014-09-01

    We study a mixing structure of light scalar mesons corresponding to the two-quark state, four-quark state and the glueball state using a bottom-up holographic QCD model. In our model, the geometry of the five dimensional space-time and the vacuum expectation value of the glueball field are determined through the Einstein equation by requiring that the dilaton potential can reproduce the asymptotic freedom of QCD and the glueball field arises as the fluctuation with respect to the gravity background. By using the geometry as a background, we add the scalar field corresponding to the two-quark state and four-quark state. Using this model, we study the spectra of the light iso-scalar scalar mesons and the mixing among the glueball, the two-quark states and four-quark states.

  8. Throat Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harling, B. v.

    2010-02-01

    In this thesis, we study throats in the early, hot universe. Throats are a common feature of the landscape of type IIB string theory. If a throat is heated during cosmological evolution, energy is subsequently transferred to other throats and to the standard model. We calculate the heat transfer rate and the decay rate of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states in a ten-dimensional model. For the calculation, we employ the dual description of the throats in terms of gauge theories. We discuss modifications of the decay rate which arise in flux compactifications and for Klebanov-Strassler throats and emphasize the role of tachyonic scalars in such throats in mediating decays of Kaluza-Klein modes. Our results are also applicable to the energy transfer from the heated standard model to throats. We determine the resulting energy density in throats at our epoch in dependence of their infrared scales and of the reheating temperature. The Kaluza-Klein modes in the throats decay to other sectors with a highly suppressed rate. If their lifetime is longer than the age of the universe, they are an interesting dark matter candidate. We show that, if the reheating temperature was 10^10 - 10^11 GeV, throats with infrared scales in the range of 10^5 GeV to 10^10 GeV can account for the observed dark matter. We identify several scenarios where this type of dark matter is sufficiently stable but where decays to the standard model can be discovered via gamma-ray observations.

  9. Nonminimal universal extra dimensional model confronts Bs→μ+μ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2016-03-01

    The addition of boundary localized kinetic and Yukawa terms to the action of a five-dimensional Standard Model would nontrivially modify the Kaluza-Klein spectra and some of the interactions among the Kaluza-Klein excitations compared to the minimal version of this model, in which these boundary terms are not present. In the minimal version of this framework, known as the universal extra dimensional model, special assumptions are made about these unknown, beyond the cutoff contributions to restrict the number of unknown parameters of the theory to be minimum. We estimate the contribution of Kaluza-Klein modes to the branching ratios of Bs (d )→μ+μ- in the framework of the nonminimal universal extra dimensional model, at one-loop level. The results have been compared to the experimental data to constrain the parameters of this model. From the measured decay branching ratio of Bs→μ+μ- (depending on the values of boundary localized parameters), the lower limit on R-1 can be as high as 800 GeV. We have briefly reviewed the bounds on nonminimal universal extra dimensional parameter space coming from electroweak precision observables. The present analysis (Bs→μ+μ-) has ruled out new regions of parameter space in comparison to the analysis of electroweak data. We have revisited the bound on R-1 in the universal extra dimensional model, which came out to be 454 GeV. This limit on R-1 in the universal extra dimensional framework is not as competitive as the limits derived from the consideration of relic density or Standard Model Higgs boson production and decay to W+W-. Unfortunately, the Bd→μ+μ- decay branching ratio would not set any significant limit on R-1 in a minimal or nonminimal universal extra dimensional model.

  10. Current Status and Future Plans for the General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, Lorenzo; Koglin, Johnathon D; Craig, Teresa M; Mori, Ken-Ichi; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    We discuss current progress and future plans for the general antiparticle spectrometer experiment (GAPS). GAPS detects antideuterons through the X-rays and pions emitted during the deexcitation of exotic atoms formed when the antideuterons are slowed down and stopped in targets. GAPS provides an exceptionally sensitive means to detect cosmic-ray antideuterons. Cosmic-ray antideuterons can provide indirect evidence for the existence of dark matter in such form as neutralinos or Kaluza-Klein particles. We describe results of accelerator testing of GAPS prototypes, tentative design concepts for a flight GAPS detector, and near-term plans for flying a GAPS prototype on a balloon.

  11. (Super)symmetries of semiclassical models in theoretical and condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngome, J.-P.

    2011-03-01

    Van Holten's covariant algorithm for deriving conserved quantities is presented, with particular attention paid to Runge-Lenz-type vectors. The classical dynamics of isospin-carrying particles is reviewed. Physical applications including non-Abelian monopole-type systems in diatoms, introduced by Moody, Shapere and Wilczek, are considered. Applied to curved space, the formalism of van Holten allows us to describe the dynamical symmetries of generalized Kaluza-Klein monopoles. The framework is extended to supersymmetry and applied to the SUSY of the monopoles. Yet another application concerns the three-dimensional non-commutative oscillator.

  12. Search for universal extra dimensions in pp collisions.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Aoki, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atkins, S; Atramentov, O; Augsten, K; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-Guerra, G A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goryachev, V N; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb(-1), collected by the D0 detector at a pp center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R(-1)>260 GeV in a minimal UED model. PMID:22540694

  13. High-energy effective theory for orbifold branes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Fujii, Shunsuke; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Rham, Claudia de

    2006-04-15

    We derive an effective theory on the orbifold branes of the Randall-Sundrum 1 (RS1) braneworld scenario in the presence of a bulk brane. We concentrate on the regime where the three branes are close and consider a scenario where the bulk brane collides with one of the orbifold branes. This theory allows us to understand the corrections to a low-energy approach due to the presence of higher velocity terms, coming from the Kaluza-Klein modes. We consider the evolution of gravitational waves on a cosmological background and find that, within the large velocity limit, the boundary branes recover a purely four-dimensional behavior.

  14. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  15. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in dilepton and diphoton final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-08-26

    We report the first direct search for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of Randall-Sundrum gravitons using dielectron, dimuon, and diphoton events observed with the D0 detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron pp(-) Collider at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. No evidence for resonant production of gravitons has been found in the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately equal to 260 pb(-1). Lower limits on the mass of the first KK mode at the 95% C.L. have been set between 250 and 785 GeV, depending on its coupling to standard model particles. PMID:16197208

  16. Holographic twin Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Geller, Michael; Telem, Ofri

    2015-05-15

    We present the first realization of a "twin Higgs" model as a holographic composite Higgs model. Uniquely among composite Higgs models, the Higgs potential is protected by a new standard model (SM) singlet elementary "mirror" sector at the sigma model scale f and not by the composite states at m_{KK}, naturally allowing for m_{KK} beyond the LHC reach. As a result, naturalness in our model cannot be constrained by the LHC, but may be probed by precision Higgs measurements at future lepton colliders, and by direct searches for Kaluza-Klein excitations at a 100 TeV collider. PMID:26024160

  17. Dynamical algebra and Dirac quantum modes in the Taub-NUT background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotaescu, Ion I.; Visinescu, Mihai

    2001-09-01

    The SO(4,1) gauge-invariant theory of the Dirac fermions in the external field of the Kaluza-Klein monopole is investigated. It is shown that the discrete quantum modes are governed by reducible representations of the o(4) dynamical algebra generated by the components of the angular momentum operator and those of the Runge-Lenz operator of the Dirac theory in the Taub-NUT background. The consequence is that there exist central and axial discrete modes whose spinors have no separated variables.

  18. Search for randall-sundrum gravitons in dilepton and diphoton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2005-05-01

    We report the first direct search for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of Randall-Sundrum gravitons using dielectron, dimuon, and diphoton events observed with the DØ detector operating at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at √ s = 1.96 TeV. No evidence for resonant production of gravitons has been found in the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ≈ 260 pb-1. Lower limits on the mass of the first KK mode at the 95% C.L. have been set between 250 and 785 GeV, depending on its coupling to SM particles.

  19. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-01

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter gsM satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  20. Dual technicolor with hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    We consider a dual description of the technicolor-like gauge theory within the D4/D8-brane configuration with varying confinement and electroweak symmetry breaking scales. Constructing an effective truncated model valid below a certain cutoff, we identify the particle spectrum with Kaluza-Klein modes of the model in a manner consistent with the hidden local symmetry. Integrating out heavy states, we find that the low-energy action receives nontrivial corrections stemming from the mixing between standard model and heavy gauge bosons, which results in reduction of oblique parameters.

  1. Four-nucleon contact interactions from holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngman; Yi, Deokhyun; Yi, Piljin

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the low energy constants of four-nucleon interactions in an effective chiral Lagrangian in holographic QCD. We start with a D4-D8 model to obtain meson-nucleon interactions and then integrate out massive mesons to obtain the four-nucleon interactions in 4D. We end up with two low energy constants at the leading order and seven of them at the next leading order, which is consistent with the effective chiral Lagrangian. The values of the low energy constants are evaluated with the first five Kaluza-Klein resonances.

  2. Abelian tensor hierarchy in 4D, N = 1 superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Linch, William D.; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    With the goal of constructing the supersymmetric action for all fields, massless and massive, obtained by Kaluza-Klein compactification from type II theory or M-theory in a closed form, we embed the (Abelian) tensor hierarchy of p-forms in four-dimensional, N =1superspaceandconstructitsChern-Simons-likeinvariants. Whenspecializedtothe case in which the tensors arise from a higher-dimensional theory, the invariants may be interpreted as higher-dimensional Chern-Simons forms reduced to four dimensions. As an application of the formalism, we construct the eleven-dimensional Chern-Simons form in terms of four-dimensional, N = 1 superfields.

  3. Black holes radiate mainly on the brane.

    PubMed

    Emparan, R; Horowitz, G T; Myers, R C

    2000-07-17

    We examine the evaporation of a small black hole on a brane in a world with large extra dimensions. Since the masses of many Kaluza-Klein modes are much smaller than the Hawking temperature of the black hole, it has been claimed that most of the energy is radiated into these modes. We show that this is incorrect. Most of the energy goes into the modes on the brane. This raises the possibility of observing Hawking radiation in future high energy colliders if there are large extra dimensions. PMID:10991325

  4. Event rates for WIMP detection

    SciTech Connect

    Vergados, J. D.; Moustakidis, Ch. C.; Oikonomou, V.

    2006-11-28

    The event rates for the direct detection of dark matter for various types of WIMPs are presented. In addition to the neutralino of SUSY models, we considered other candidates (exotic scalars as well as particles in Kaluza-Klein and technicolour theories) with masses in the TeV region. Then one finds reasonable branching ratios to excited states. Thus the detection of the WIMP can be made not only by recoil measurements, by measuring the de-excitation {gamma}-rays as well.

  5. Non-canonical inflation coupled to matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Céspedes, Sebastián; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2015-11-01

    We compute corrections to the inflationary potential due to conformally coupled non-relativistic matter. We find that under certain conditions of the matter coupling, inflation may be interrupted abruptly. We display this in the superconformal Starobinsky model, where matter is conformally coupled to the Einstein frame metric. These corrections may easily stop inflation provided that there is an initial density of non-relativistic matter. Since these additional heavy degrees of freedom generically occur in higher dimension theories, for example as Kaluza-Klein modes, this effect can arise in multiple scenarios.

  6. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  7. Generalization of the Randall-Sundrum solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisselev, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The generalization of the Randall-Sundrum solution for the warp factor exp ⁡ [ σ (y) ] in the scenario with one extra coordinate y, non-factorizable space-time geometry and two branes is obtained. It is shown that the function obtained σ (y) is symmetric with respect to an interchange of two branes. It also obeys the orbifold symmetry y → - y and explicitly reproduces jumps of its derivative on both branes. This solution is defined by the Einstein-Hilbert's equations up to a constant C. It is demonstrated that different values of C result in theories with quite different spectra of the Kaluza-Klein gravitons.

  8. Static spherically symmetric space-times with six Killing vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qadir, A.; Ziad, M.

    1988-11-01

    It had been proved earlier that spherically symmetric, static space-times have ten, seven, six, or four independent Killing vectors (KV's), but there are no cases in between. The case of six KV's is investigated here. It is shown that the space-time corresponds to a hyperboloid cross a sphere, reminiscent of Kaluza--Klein theory, with a compactification from four down to two dimensions. In effect, there is a unique metric for this space-time corresponding to a uniform mass distribution over all space.

  9. Top quark spin correlations in theories with large extra dimensions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Simak, Vladislav

    2004-12-01

    In theories with large extra dimensions, we study the top-spin correlations at the Large Hadron Collider. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes contributes to the top-antitop pair production in addition to the standard model processes, and affects the resultant top-spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. With the fundamental scale of the extra dimensional theory below 2 TeV, we find a sizable deviation of the top-spin correlations from the standard model one.

  10. Probing the Universal Randall-Sundrum Model at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, H.; Lillie, B.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    The Randall-Sundrum model with all Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, including the Higgs, can be probed by precision measurements at the ILC. In particular, the couplings of the Higgs to the gauge bosons of the SM can be determined with high accuracy at the ILC. Here we examine the deviations in these couplings from their SM values within the framework of the Universal Randall-Sundrum Model (URSM) as well as the corresponding couplings of the first Higgs Kaluza-Klein excitation.

  11. Searching for Decaying Axionlike Dark Matter from Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer-Soerensen, Signe; Hansen, Steen H.; Pedersen, Kristian; Zioutas, Konstantin; Dahle, Haakon; Liolios, Anastasios

    2007-09-28

    We constrain the lifetime of radiatively decaying dark matter in clusters of galaxies inspired by generic Kaluza-Klein axions, which have been invoked as a possible explanation for the solar coronal x-ray emission. These particles can be produced inside stars and remain confined by the gravitational potential of clusters. By analyzing x-ray observations of merging clusters, where gravitational lensing observations have identified massive, baryon poor structures, we derive the first cosmological lifetime constraint on this kind of particles of {tau} > or approx. 10{sup 23} sec.

  12. M-theory and G2 manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Robbins, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we report on recent progress in describing compactifications of string theory and M-theory on G2 and Spin(7) manifolds. We include the infinite set of α’-corrections and describe the entire tower of massless and massive Kaluza-Klein modes resulting from such compactifications. Contribution to the ‘Focus Issue on Gravity, Supergravity and Fundamental Physics: the Richard Arnowitt Symposium’, to be published in Physica Scripta. Based on a talk delivered by Becker at the workshop ‘Superstring Perturbation Theory’ at the Perimeter Institute, 22-24 April 2015.

  13. Hawking Temperature of Dilaton Black Holes from Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ji-Rong; Li, Ran; Liu, Fei-Hu

    Recently, it has been suggested that Hawking radiation can be derived from quantum tunneling methods. Here, we calculated Hawking temperature of dilatonic black holes from tunneling formalism. The two semiclassical methods adopted here are: the null-geodesic method proposed by Parikh and Wilczek and the Hamilton-Jacobi method proposed by Angheben et al. We apply the two methods to analyze the Hawking temperature of the static spherical symmetric dilatonic black hole, the rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole, and the rotating Kerr-Sen black hole.

  14. Towards the large N limit of pure Nu = 1 super Yang-Mills theory.

    PubMed

    Maldacena, J; Nuñez, C

    2001-01-22

    We find the gravity solution corresponding to a large number of Neveu-Schwarz or D5-branes wrapped on a two sphere so that we have pure Nu = 1 super Yang-Mills in the IR. The supergravity solution is smooth, it shows confinement, and it breaks the U(1)(R) chiral symmetry in the appropriate way. When the gravity approximation is valid the masses of glueballs are comparable to the masses of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states on the 5-brane, but if we could quantize strings on this background it looks like we should be able to decouple the KK states. PMID:11177888

  15. Searches for gauge mediated supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Pierre; /Saclay

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of searches for new physics in events with two photons and large missing transverse energy collected with both detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Several models of physics beyond the Standard Model motivate searches in this final state, in particular supersymmetry (SUSY) with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. The D0 collaboration interprets also its search in the framework of universal extra dimensions (UED) with gravity-mediated Kaluza-Klein excitation decays. The results presented use 2.6 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 6.3 fb{sup -1} (D0) of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  16. Rotating black rings on Taub-NUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Teo, Edward

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we construct new solutions describing rotating black rings on Taub-NUT using the inverse-scattering method. These are five-dimensional vacuum spacetimes, generalising the Emparan-Reall and extremal Pomeransky-Sen'kov black rings to a Taub-NUT background space. When reduced to four dimensions in Kaluza-Klein theory, these solutions describe (possibly rotating) electrically charged black holes in superposition with a finitely separated magnetic monopole. Various properties of these solutions are studied, from both a five- and four-dimensional perspective.

  17. A New Lorentz Violating Nonlocal Field Theory From String-Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ganor, Ori J.

    2007-10-04

    A four-dimensional field theory with a qualitatively new type of nonlocality is constructed from a setting where Kaluza-Klein particles probe toroidally compactified string theory with twisted boundary conditions. In this theory fundamental particles are not pointlike and occupy a volume proportional to their R-charge. The theory breaks Lorentz invariance but appears to preserve spatial rotations. At low energies, it is approximately N=4 Super Yang-Mills theory, deformed by an operator of dimension seven. The dispersion relation of massless modes in vacuum is unchanged, but under certain conditions in this theory, particles can travel at superluminal velocities.

  18. A no-go for no-go theorems prohibiting cosmic acceleration in extra dimensional models

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, Rik; Postma, Marieke E-mail: mpostma@nikhef.nl

    2011-12-01

    A four-dimensional effective theory that arises as the low-energy limit of some extra-dimensional model is constrained by the higher dimensional Einstein equations. Steinhardt and Wesley use this to show that accelerated expansion in our four large dimensions can only be transient in a large class of Kaluza-Klein models that satisfy the (higher dimensional) null energy condition [1]. We point out that these no-go theorems are based on a rather ad-hoc assumption on the metric, without which no strong statements can be made.

  19. Entropy of 4D extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.; Khuri, Ramzi R.; Myers, Robert C.

    1996-02-01

    We derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula for four-dimensional Reissner-Nordström extremal black holes in type II string theory. The derivation is performed in two separate (T-dual) weak coupling pictures. One uses a type IIB bound state problem of D5- and D1-branes, while the other uses a bound state problem of D0- and D4-branes with macroscopic fundamental type IIA strings. In both cases, the D-brane systems are also bound to a Kaluza-Klein monopole, which then yields the four-dimensional black hole at strong coupling.

  20. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D- detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale MD from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  1. Influence of graviton on top-antitop production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolek, K.; Arai, M.; Okada, N.; Šimák, V.

    2008-05-01

    We examine the top quark production in the brane world scenario. We study two typical models - the model proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD) and the model of Randall and Sundrum (RS). In addition to the Standard Model processes, there is a new contribution to the top-antitop pair production process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in the s-channel. We calculated the density matrix for the top-antitop pair production including the new contribution. With a reasonable parameter choice, we find a sizable deviation of the top-antitop quark spin correlations from those in the Standard Model.

  2. Vector boson production in association with KK modes of the ADD model to NLO in QCD at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit

    2011-05-01

    Next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the associated production of the vector boson (Z/W±) with the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the graviton in large extra-dimensional model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are presented. We have obtained various kinematic distributions using a Monte Carlo code which is based on the two-cutoff phase space slicing method that handles soft and collinear singularities appearing at the NLO level. We estimate the impact of the QCD corrections on various observables and find that they are significant. We also show the reduction in factorization scale uncertainty when QCD corrections are included.

  3. Searches for Exotics: Heavy resonances with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Simon; ATLAS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Many theories that go beyond the Standard Model predict the existence of new heavy resonances decaying into pairs of particles. This review summarizes a wide collection of recent results from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider on searches for resonances decaying into various combinations of charged leptons, neutrinos, jets from gluons or light quarks, top quarks, photons and heavy gauge bosons. Limits are set on a variety of theories beyond the Standard Model used as benchmarks, among them Kaluza-Klein, Randall-Sundrum and ADD models with extra dimensions, as well as Grand Unified Theories and Technicolour.

  4. Classical ultra-relativistic scattering in ADD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'tsov, Dmitry V.; Kofinas, Georgios; Spirin, Pavel; Tomaras, Theodore N.

    2009-05-01

    The classical differential cross-section is calculated for high-energy small-angle gravitational scattering in the factorizable model with toroidal extra dimensions. The three main features of the classical computation are: (a) It involves summation over the infinite Kaluza-Klein towers but, contrary to the Born amplitude, it is finite with no need of an ultraviolet cutoff. (b) It is shown to correspond to the non-perturbative saddle-point approximation of the eikonal amplitude, obtained by the summation of an infinite number of ladder graphs of the quantum theory. (c) In the absence of extra dimensions it reproduces all previously known results.

  5. Higher curvature effects in Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali and Randall-Sundrum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, T. G.

    2007-11-01

    We explore the collider phenomenology of terascale extra-dimensional models with gravitational actions that contain higher curvature terms. In particular, we examine how the classic collider signatures of the models of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD) and of Randall and Sundrum (RS) are altered by these modifications to the usual Einstein--Hilbert (EH) action. Not only are the detailed signatures for gravitationally induced processes altered but new contributions are found to arise due to the existence of additional scalar Kaluza--Klein (KK) states in the spectrum.

  6. GLUEBALLS AND ADS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN TERNING

    2002-01-01

    I review the calculation of the glueball spectrum in non-supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory (in 3 and 4 dimensions) using the conjectured duality between supergravity and large N gauge theories. The glueball masses are obtained by solving the supergravity wave equations in a black hole geometry. The masses obtained this way are in unexpectedly good agreement with the available lattice data, and are much better than strong-coupling expansion results. I also show how to use a modified version of the duality to calculate the glueball mass spectrum with some of the Kaluza-Klein states of the supergravity theory decoupled from the spectrum.

  7. Search for large extra dimensions in the mono-photon final state at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    The authors report on a search for large extra dimensions in a data sample of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. They investigate Kaluza-Klein graviton production with a photon and missing transverse energy in the final state. At the 95% C.L. they set limits on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 884 GeV to 778 GeV for 2 to 8 extra dimensions.

  8. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model possesses. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can change significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  9. General self-tuning solutions and no-go theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Förste, Stefan; Kim, Jihn E.; Lee, Hyun Min E-mail: jihnekim@gmail.com

    2013-03-01

    We consider brane world models with one extra dimension. In the bulk there is in addition to gravity a three form gauge potential or equivalently a scalar (by generalisation of electric magnetic duality). We find classical solutions for which the 4d effective cosmological constant is adjusted by choice of integration constants. No go theorems for such self-tuning mechanism are circumvented by unorthodox Lagrangians for the three form respectively the scalar. It is argued that the corresponding effective 4d theory always includes tachyonic Kaluza-Klein excitations or ghosts. Known no go theorems are extended to a general class of models with unorthodox Lagrangians.

  10. Heterotic enhançon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuume, Makoto

    2002-04-01

    The enhançon mechanism is studied in heterotic string theory. We consider the NL=0 winding strings with momentum (NS1-W*) and the Kaluza-Klein dyons (KK5-NS5*). The NS1-W* and KK5-NS5* systems are dualized to the D4-D0* and D6-D2* systems, respectively, under the d=6 heterotic-type-IIA S duality. The heterotic form has a number of advantages over the type IIA form. We study these backgrounds and obtain the enhançon radii by brane probe analysis. The results are consistent with S duality.

  11. Decaying hidden dark matter in warped compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang

    2009-09-01

    The recent PAMELA and ATIC/Fermi/HESS experiments have observed an excess of electrons and positrons, but not anti-protons, in the high energy cosmic rays. To explain this result, we construct a decaying hidden dark matter model in string theory compactification that incorporates the following two ingredients, the hidden dark matter scenario in warped compactification and the phenomenological proposal of hidden light particles that decay to the Standard Model. In this model, on higher dimensional warped branes, various warped Kaluza-Klein particles and the zero-mode of gauge field play roles of the hidden dark matter or mediators to the Standard Model.

  12. Detecting extra dimensions with gravity-wave spectroscopy: the black-string brane world.

    PubMed

    Seahra, Sanjeev S; Clarkson, Chris; Maartens, Roy

    2005-04-01

    Using the black string between two branes as a model of a brane-world black hole, we compute the gravity-wave perturbations and identify the features arising from the additional polarizations of the graviton. The standard four-dimensional gravitational wave signal acquires late-time oscillations due to massive modes of the graviton. The Fourier transform of these oscillations shows a series of spikes associated with the masses of the Kaluza-Klein modes, providing in principle a spectroscopic signature of extra dimensions. PMID:15903904

  13. Cosmology from induced matter model applied to 5D f( R, T) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, P. H. R. S.

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that the universe is undergoing a phase of accelerated expansion. Plenty of models have already been created with the purpose of describing what causes this non-expected cosmic feature. Among them, one could quote the extradimensional and the f( R, T) gravity models. In this work, in the scope of unifying Kaluza-Klein extradimensional model with f( R, T) gravity, cosmological solutions for density and pressure of the universe are obtained from the induced matter model application. Particular solutions for vacuum quantum energy and radiation are also shown.

  14. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A. Serenkova, I. A. Tsytrinov, A. V. Bednyakov, V. A.

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  15. Nonperturbative instability of AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}/Z{sub k}

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Gary T.; Orgera, Jacopo; Polchinski, Joe

    2008-01-15

    We study the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence with boundary conditions AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}/Z{sub k}, where the Z{sub k} acts freely but breaks all supersymmetry. While there are closed string tachyons at small 't Hooft coupling, there are no tachyons at large coupling. Nevertheless, we show that there is a nonperturbative instability directly analogous to the decay of the Kaluza-Klein vacuum. We discuss the implications of this instability for the strongly coupled dual field theory, and compare with earlier studies of this theory at weak coupling.

  16. Microstates of a neutral black hole in M theory.

    PubMed

    Emparan, Roberto; Horowitz, Gary T

    2006-10-01

    We consider vacuum solutions in M theory of the form of a five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black hole cross T6. In a certain limit, these include the five-dimensional neutral rotating black hole (cross T6). From a type-IIA standpoint, these solutions carry D0 and D6 charges. We show that there is a simple D-brane description which precisely reproduces the Hawking-Bekenstein entropy in the extremal limit, even though supersymmetry is completely broken. PMID:17155239

  17. Glueballs and AdS/CFT.

    SciTech Connect

    Terning, J.

    2002-01-01

    The author reviews the calculation of the glueball spectrum in non-supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory (in 3 and 4 dimensions) using the conjectured duality between supergravity and large N gauge theories. The glueball masses are obtained by solving the supergravity wave equations in a black hole geometry. The masses obtained this way are in unexpectedly good agreement with the available lattice data, and are much better than strong-coupling expansion results. The author also shows how to use a modified version of the duality to calculate the glueball mass spectrum with some of the Kaluza-Klein states of the supergravity theory decoupled from the spectrum.

  18. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  19. Gauge coupling unification in a 6D SO (10) orbifold GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Min

    2006-12-01

    We consider the gauge coupling running in a six-dimensional SO (10) orbifold GUT model. The bulk gauge symmetry is broken down to the standard model gauge group with an extra U(1)X by orbifold boundary conditions and the extra U(1)X is further broken through the U(1) B- L breaking with bulk hyper multiplets. We obtain the corrections of Kaluza-Klein massive modes to the running of the gauge couplings and discuss their implication to the successful gauge coupling unification.

  20. Shape-changing particle decays of 185 Bi and structure of the lightest odd-mass Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Ackermann, D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Heyde, K.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Karlgren, D.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Münzenberg, G.; Page, R. D.; van de Vel, K.; van Duppen, P.; Walters, W. B.; Wyss, R.

    2004-05-01

    Proton and α decay of the proton-rich nuclide 185 Bi has been restudied in more detail in the complete fusion reaction 93 Nb ( 95 Mo ,3n ) 185 Bi at the velocity filter SHIP. The observed decay pattern of 185 Bi and of the heavier odd-mass isotopes 187,189,191,193 Bi are interpreted based on potential-energy surface calculations. It is shown that the experimental systematics of the particle decays and of the excited states in these nuclei (where known) can be explained by the prolate-oblate shape co-existence at low excitation energy. The observed state in 185 Bi is proposed to be of prolate nature, which is in contrast with the previously proposed oblate interpretation.

  1. Chiral Perturbation Theory, the 1/N_c expansion and Regge behavior determine the structure of the lightest scalar meson

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, J. R.; Michael R. Pennington; de Elvira, J. Ruiz; Wilson, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    The leading 1/N{sub c} behavior of Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory distinguishes the nature of the {rho} and the {sigma}. At one loop order the {rho} is a {bar q}q meson, while the {sigma} is not. However, semi-local duality between resonances and Regge behaviour cannot be satisfied for larger N{sub c}, if such a distinction holds. While the {sigma} at N{sub c}= 3 is inevitably dominated by its di-pion component, Unitarised Chiral Perturbation Theory beyond one loop order reveals that as N{sub c} increases above 6-8, the {sigma} has a sub-dominant {bar q}q fraction up at 1.2 GeV. Remarkably this ensures semi-local duality is fulfilled for the range of N{sub c} {approx}< 15-30, where the unitarization procedure adopted applies.

  2. From the lightest nuclei to the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter with realistic nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Lovato, A.; Carlson, J.; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2014-12-01

    We present microscopic calculations of light and medium mass nuclei and the equation of state of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter using different nucleon-nucleon interactions, including a new Argonne version that has the same spin-isospin structure as local chiral forces at next-to-next-to-leading order. The calculations are performed using auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) combined with an improved variational wave function and sampling technique. The AFDMC method can now be used to successfully calculate the energies of very light to medium mass nuclei as well as the energy of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter, demonstrating microscopically the quadratic dependence of the energy on the symmetry energy.

  3. The nature of the lightest scalar meson, its N_c behaviour and semi-local duality

    SciTech Connect

    JR Pelaez, MR Pennington, J Ruiz de Elvira, DJ Wilson

    2011-12-01

    One-loop unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory (UChPT) calculations, suggest a different N{sub c} behaviour for the {sigma} or f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) mesons: while the {rho} meson becomes narrower with N{sub c}, as expected for a {bar q}q meson, the f{sub 0}(600) contribution to the total cross section below 1 GeV becomes less and less important. Here we review our recent work where we have shown, by means of finite energy sum rules, that a different N{sub c} behavior for these resonances may lead to a conflict with semi-local duality for large N{sub c}, since local duality requires a cancellation between the f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) amplitudes. However, UChPT calculations also suggest a subdominant {bar q}q component for the f{sub 0}(600) with a mass above 1 GeV and this can restore semi-local duality, as we show.

  4. Matrix membrane big bangs and D-brane production

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumit R.; Michelson, Jeremy

    2006-06-15

    We construct matrix membrane theory in pp wave backgrounds that have a null linear dilaton in Type IIB string theory. Such backgrounds can serve as toy models of big bang cosmologies. At late times only Abelian degrees of freedom survive, and if the Kaluza-Klein modes along one of the directions of the membrane decouple, standard perturbative strings emerge. Near the 'big bang', non-Abelian configurations of fuzzy ellipsoids are present, as in the Type IIA theories. A generic configuration of these shrink to zero volume at late times. However, the Kaluza-Klein modes (which can be thought of as states of (p,q) strings in the original IIB theory) can be generically produced in pairs in both pp wave and flat backgrounds in the presence of time dependence. Indeed, if we require that at late times the theory evolves to the perturbative string vacuum, these modes must be prepared in a squeezed state with a thermal distribution at early times.

  5. Dark matter from late decays and the small-scale structure problems

    SciTech Connect

    Borzumati, Francesca; Bringmann, Torsten; Ullio, Piero

    2008-03-15

    The generation of dark matter in late decays of quasistable massive particles has been proposed as a viable framework to address the excess of power found in numerical N-body simulations for cold dark matter cosmologies. We identify a convenient set of variables to illustrate which requirements need to be satisfied in any generic particle-physics model to address the small-scale problems and to fulfill other astrophysical constraints. As a result of this model-independent analysis, we point out that meeting these requirements in a completely natural way is inherently difficult. In particular, we reexamine the role of gravitinos and Kaluza-Klein gravitons in this context and find them disfavored as a solution to the small-scale problems in case they are dark matter candidates generated in the decay of thermally produced weakly interacting massive particles. We propose right-handed sneutrinos and right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos as alternatives. We find that they are viable dark matter candidates, but that they can contribute to a solution of the small-scale problems only in case the associated Dirac neutrino mass term appears as a subdominant contribution in the neutrino mass matrix.

  6. Enhanced Higgs mass in Compact Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobioka, Kohsaku; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    The current LHC results make weak scale supersymmetry difficult due to relatively heavy mass of the discovered Higgs boson and the null results of new particle searches. Geometrical supersymmetry breaking from extra dimensions, Scherk-Schwarz mechanism, is possible to accommodate such situations. A concrete example, the Compact Supersymmetry model, has a compressed spectrum ameliorating the LHC bounds and large mixing in the top and scalar top quark sector with |{A}_t|˜ 2{m}_{tilde{t}} which radiatively raises the Higgs mass. While the zero mode contribution of the model has been considered, in this paper we calculate the Kaluza-Klein tower effect to the Higgs mass. Although such contributions are naively expected to be as small as a percent level for 10 TeV Kaluza-Klein modes, we find the effect significantly enhances the radiative correction to the Higgs quartic coupling by from 10 to 50%. This is mainly because the top quark wave function is pushed out from the brane, which makes the top mass depend on higher powers in the Higgs field. As a result the Higgs mass is enhanced up to 15 GeV from the previous calculation. We also show the whole parameter space is testable at the LHC run II.

  7. Topological interactions in the Higgsless model at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perelstein, Maxim; Qi Yonghui

    2010-07-01

    Topological quantum interactions, namely, Chern-Simons terms and global Wess-Zumino terms, arise naturally in theories with extra dimensions of space compactified on orbifolds. If the extra dimensions become manifest at the TeV scale, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could observe signatures of topological interactions. Decays of Kaluza-Klein excitations of neutral electroweak gauge bosons into pairs of neutral standard model gauge bosons, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0} and Z{sup 0{gamma}}, would provide a clean signature, since such decays do not occur at tree level. In this paper, we investigate the prospects for discovering such decays at the LHC, in the context of the Higgsless model of electroweak symmetry breaking. We identify the form of the relevant topological interactions, and estimate their strength. We find that in the minimal version of the model, the signal may be observed with about 100 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC using the Drell-Yan production process of the Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons. In addition, it is likely that the ultraviolet completion of the model would contain additional massive fermions, which can significantly enhance the signal. With two additional fermion multiplets, observation of the topological decay modes at the 3-sigma level would be possible with about 100 fb{sup -1} of data using the highly model-independent vector-boson fusion production channel.

  8. Gauge-Higgs unification, neutrino masses, and dark matter in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Medina, Anibal D.; Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-05-01

    Gauge-Higgs unification in warped extra dimensions provides an attractive solution to the hierarchy problem. The extension of the standard model gauge symmetry to SO(5)xU(1){sub X} allows the incorporation of the custodial symmetry SU(2){sub R} plus a Higgs boson doublet with the right quantum numbers under the gauge group. In the minimal model, the Higgs mass is in the range 110-150 GeV, while a light Kaluza-Klein excitation of the top quark appears in the spectrum, providing agreement with precision electroweak measurements and a possible test of the model at a high luminosity LHC. The extension of the model to the lepton sector has several interesting features. We discuss the conditions necessary to obtain realistic charged lepton and neutrino masses. After the addition of an exchange symmetry in the bulk, we show that the odd neutrino Kaluza-Klein modes provide a realistic dark-matter candidate, with a mass of the order of 1 TeV, which will be probed by direct dark-matter detection experiments in the near future.

  9. Search for resonances in the dilepton mass distribution in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Benucci, L.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; Cortina Gil, E.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Carvalho, W.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Da Silva De Araujo, F. Torres; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Mohr, N.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Ata, M.; Bender, W.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Frangenheim, J.; Hebbeker, T.

    2011-05-01

    A search for narrow resonances at high mass in the dimuon and dielectron channels has been performed by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC, using pp collision data recorded at sqrt {s} = 7 TeV. The event samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 40 pb-1 in the dimuon channel and 35 pb-1 in the dielectron channel. Heavy dilepton resonances are predicted in theoretical models with extra gauge bosons (Z') or as Kaluza-Klein graviton excitations (GKK) in the Randall-Sundrum model. Upper limits on the inclusive cross section of Z'(GKK) → ℓ + ℓ - relative to Z → ℓ + ℓ - are presented. These limits exclude at 95% confidence level a Z' with standard-model-like couplings below 1140GeV, the superstring-inspired Z ψ ' below 887 GeV, and, for values of the coupling parameter {{k} left/ {{{{overline M }_{text{Pl}}}}} right.} of 0.05 (0.1), Kaluza-Klein gravitons below 855 (1079) GeV.

  10. Contrasting Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions at the CLIC Multi-TeV e+e- Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marco; Datta, AseshKrishna; De Roeck, Albert; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2005-07-13

    Universal extra dimensions and supersymmetry have rather similar experimental signatures at hadron colliders. The proper interpretation of an LHC discovery in either case may therefore require further data from a lepton collider. In this paper we identify methods for discriminating between the two scenarios at the linear collider. We study the processes of Kaluza-Klein muon pair production in universal extra dimensions in parallel to smuon pair production in supersymmetry, accounting for the effects of detector resolution, beam-beam interactions and accelerator induced backgrounds. We find that the angular distributions of the final state muons, the energy spectrum of the radiative return photon and the total cross-section measurement are powerful discriminators between the two models. Accurate determination of the particle masses can be obtained both by a study of the momentum spectrum of the final state leptons and by a scan of the particle pair production thresholds. We also calculate the production rates of various Kaluza-Klein particles and discuss the associated signatures.

  11. Search for resonances decaying into top-quark pairs using fully hadronic decays in pp collisions with ATLAS at sqrt{s}=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. 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B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    A search for resonances produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions and decaying into top-quark pairs is described. In this Letter events where the top-quark decay produces two massive jets with large transverse momenta recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are considered. Two techniques that rely on jet substructure are used to separate top-quark jets from those arising from light quarks and gluons. In addition, each massive jet is required to have evidence of an associated bottom-quark decay. The data are consistent with the Standard Model, and limits can be set on the production cross section times branching fraction of a Z' boson and a Kaluza-Klein gluon resonance. These limits exclude, at the 95% credibility level, Z' bosons with masses 0.70-1.00 TeV as well as 1.28-1.32 TeV and Kaluza-Klein gluons with masses 0.70-1.62 TeV.

  12. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb-1 will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order MS = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and MS = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  13. Six-dimensional supergravity on S3 x AdS3 and 2d conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    de Boer, Jan

    1998-06-20

    In this paper we study the relation between six-dimensional supergravity compactified on S{sup 3} x AdS{sub 3} and certain two-dimensional conformal field theories. We compute the Kaluza-Klein spectrum of supergravity using representation theory; these methods are quite general and can also be applied to other compactifications involving anti-de Sitter spaces. A detailed comparison between the spectrum of the two-dimensional conformal field theory and supergravity is made, and we find complete agreement. This applies even at the level of certain non-chiral primaries, and we propose a resolution to the puzzle of the missing states recently raised by Vafa. As a further illustration of the method the Kaluza-Klein spectra of F-theory on M{sup 6} x S{sup 3} x AdS{sub 3} and of M-theory on M{sup 6} x S{sup 2} x AdS{sub 3} are computed, with M{sup 6} some Calabi-Yau manifold.

  14. SU(5){sub flip}xSU(5){sup '} from Z{sub 12-I}

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok

    2009-12-01

    Based on the Z{sub 12-I} orbifold compactification of heterotic string theory, we construct a flipped-SU(5) model with three families of standard model matter and ingredients for dynamical supersymmetry breaking through the hidden sector matter 10{sup '} and 5{sup '} of SU(5){sup '}, which are neutral under the visible sector flipped-SU(5). The appearance of one chiral set 10{sup '} and 5{sup '} is the new feature of the present flipped-SU(5) string model with sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup 0}=(3/8). As required, all the exotic states are shown to decouple from low energy physics. Above the compactification scale, the flipped-SU(5) gauge symmetry is enhanced to SO(10) gauge symmetry by including the Kaluza-Klein modes. The threshold correction is calculated by counting Kaluza-Klein modes, and we show that the model allows a very wide range for the hidden-sector confining scale (10{sup 11} GeV-10{sup 16} GeV)

  15. 'Black universe' epoch in string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Buchel, Alex; Kofman, Lev

    2008-10-15

    String theory compactification involves manifolds with multiple warp factors. For cosmological applications, we often introduce a short, high-energy inflationary throat, and a long, low-energy standard model (SM) throat. It is assumed that at the end of inflation, the excited Kaluza-Klein modes from the inflationary throat tunnel to the SM throat and reheat standard model degrees of freedom, which are attached to probe brane(s). However, the huge hierarchy of energy scales can result in a highly dynamic transition of the throat geometry. We point out that in such a cosmological scenario the standard model throat (together with SM brane) will be cloaked by a Schwarzschild horizon, produced by the Kaluza-Klein modes tunneling from the short throat. The black brane formation is dual to the first order chiral phase transition of the cascading gauge theory. We calculate the critical energy density corresponding the formation of the black hole (BH) horizon in the long throat. We discuss the duality between 'black universe' cosmology and an expanding universe driven by the hot gauge theory radiation. We address the new problem of the hierarchical multiple-throat scenarios: SM brane disappearance after the decay of the BH horizon.

  16. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb⁻¹ will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order M{sub S} = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and M{sub S} = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  17. Signal for an extra-dimensional model of flavor at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Priscila M; Burdman, Gustavo; Eboli, Oscar J P

    2007-03-30

    In Randall-Sundrum models with gauge bosons and fermions in the extra-dimensional bulk, it is possible to build models of flavor by localizing the fermions in the extra dimension. Since the Higgs boson must be localized at or close to the TeV scale fixed point, heavier fermions must be localized close to this brane. The first Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons are also TeV-localized, so they have stronger couplings to heavier fermions leading to tree-level flavor-violating couplings. We investigate the potential of the Large Hadron Collider to observe flavor violation in single top production at very high invariant masses, in addition to the observation of the corresponding t-t[over] resonance. We conclude that the Large Hadron Collider will be able to observe tree-level flavor violation in single top production, probing Kaluza-Klein masses at least as large as 2 TeV, as well as a very interesting region of the parameters. PMID:17501183

  18. Signal for an Extra-Dimensional Model of Flavor at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Priscila M.; Burdman, Gustavo; Eboli, Oscar J. P.

    2007-03-30

    In Randall-Sundrum models with gauge bosons and fermions in the extra-dimensional bulk, it is possible to build models of flavor by localizing the fermions in the extra dimension. Since the Higgs boson must be localized at or close to the TeV scale fixed point, heavier fermions must be localized close to this brane. The first Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons are also TeV-localized, so they have stronger couplings to heavier fermions leading to tree-level flavor-violating couplings. We investigate the potential of the Large Hadron Collider to observe flavor violation in single top production at very high invariant masses, in addition to the observation of the corresponding t-t resonance. We conclude that the Large Hadron Collider will be able to observe tree-level flavor violation in single top production, probing Kaluza-Klein masses at least as large as 2 TeV, as well as a very interesting region of the parameters.

  19. Heavy Higgs boson with a light sneutrino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle in the MSSM with enhanced SU(2) D-terms.

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, A. D.; Shah, N. R.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of California at Davis; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model provides a solution to the hierarchy problem and leads to the presence of a light Higgs. A Higgs boson with mass above the present experimental bound may only be obtained for relatively heavy third generation squarks, requiring a precise, somewhat unnatural balance between different contributions to the effective Higgs mass parameter. It was recently noticed that somewhat heavier Higgs bosons, which are naturally beyond the CERN LEP bound, may be obtained by enhanced weak SU(2) D-terms. Such contributions appear in models with an enhanced electroweak gauge symmetry, provided the supersymmetry breaking masses associated with the scalars responsible for the breakdown of the enhanced gauge symmetry group to the standard model one are larger than the enhanced symmetry breaking scale. In this article we emphasize that the enhanced SU(2) D-terms will not only raise the Higgs boson mass but also affect the spectrum of the nonstandard Higgs bosons, sleptons, and squarks, which therefore provide a natural contribution to the T parameter, compensating for the negative one coming from the heavy Higgs boson. The sleptons and nonstandard Higgs bosons of these models, in particular, may act in a way similar to the so-called inert Higgs doublet. The phenomenological properties of these models are emphasized, and possible cosmological implications as well as collider signatures are described.

  20. Mirror effect induced by the dilaton field on the Hawking radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kengo; Okamura, Takashi

    2006-11-03

    A ''stringy particle'' action is naturally derived from Kaluza-Klein compactification of a test string action coupled to the dilaton field in a conformally invariant manner. According to the standard procedure, we perform the second quantization of the stringy particle. As an interesting application, we consider evaporation of a near-extremal dilatonic black hole by Hawking radiation via the stringy particles. We show that a mirror surface which reflects them is induced by the dilaton field outside the the horizon when the size of the black hole is comparable to the Planck scale. As a result, the energy flux does not propagate across the surface, and hence the evaporation of the dilatonic black hole stops just before the naked singularity at the extremal state appears even though the surface gravity is non-zero in the extremal limit.

  1. Solution of a braneworld big crunch/big bang cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul L.; Turok, Neil; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2007-11-15

    We solve for the cosmological perturbations in a five-dimensional background consisting of two separating or colliding boundary branes, as an expansion in the collision speed V divided by the speed of light c. Our solution permits a detailed check of the validity of four-dimensional effective theory in the vicinity of the event corresponding to the big crunch/big bang singularity. We show that the four-dimensional description fails at the first nontrivial order in (V/c){sup 2}. At this order, there is nontrivial mixing of the two relevant four-dimensional perturbation modes (the growing and decaying modes) as the boundary branes move from the narrowly separated limit described by Kaluza-Klein theory to the well-separated limit where gravity is confined to the positive-tension brane. We comment on the cosmological significance of the result and compute other quantities of interest in five-dimensional cosmological scenarios.

  2. Phase transitions of an anisotropic N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma via holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Elliot

    2016-07-01

    Black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity were previously found that are dual to N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with an anisotropic spatial deformation. In the zero temperature limit, these black holes approach a Liftshitz like scaling solution in the IR. It was recently shown that these black holes are unstable, and at low temperatures there is a new class of black hole solutions that are thermodynamically preferred. We extend this analysis, by considering consistent truncations of the Kaluza-Klein reduction of IIB supergravity on a five-sphere that preserves multiple scalar and U(1) gauge fields. We show that the previously constructed black holes become unstable at low temperatures, and construct new classes of exotic black hole solutions. We study the DC thermo-electric conductivity of these U(1) charged black holes, and find a diverging DC conductivity at zero temperature due to the divergence of the gauge field coupling.

  3. Solution to the flavor problem of warped extra-dimension models.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias

    2012-02-24

    A minimal solution to the flavor problem of warped extra-dimension models, i.e., the excessive mixed-chirality contribution to CP violation in K-K ¯ mixing arising from Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluon exchange, is proposed. Extending the strong-interaction gauge group in the bulk by an additional SU(3), and breaking this symmetry to QCD via boundary conditions, the constraints arising from the ε(K) parameter are significantly relaxed. As a result, KK scales M(KK)~2 TeV are consistent with all flavor observables without significant fine-tuning. The model predicts an extended Higgs sector featuring massive color-octet scalars and a tower of KK pseudoaxial gluon resonances, whose existence is not in conflict with recent LHC dijet bounds. PMID:22463516

  4. Unitarity sum rules, three-site moose model, and the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nagai, Ryo; Okawa, Shohei; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate W' interpretations for the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies. The roles of the unitarity sum rules, which ensure the perturbativity of the longitudinal vector boson scattering amplitudes, are emphasized. We find the unitarity sum rules and the custodial symmetry are powerful enough to predict various nontrivial relations among W W Z', W Z W', W W h , W W'h and Z Z'h coupling strengths in a model independent manner. We also perform surveys in the general parameter space of W' models and find the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies may be interpreted as a W' particle of the three-site moose model, i.e., a Kaluza-Klein like particle in a deconstructed extra dimension model. It is also shown that the nonstandard-model-like Higgs boson is favored by the present data to interpret the ATLAS diboson anomalies as the consequences of the W' and Z' bosons.

  5. H →Z γ in the gauge-Higgs unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funatsu, Shuichiro; Hatanaka, Hisaki; Hosotani, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    The decay rate of the Higgs decay H →Z γ is evaluated at the one-loop level in the S O (5 )×U (1 ) gauge-Higgs unification. Although an infinite number of loops with Kaluza-Klein states contribute to the decay amplitude, there appears the cancellation among the loops, and the decay rate is found to be finite and nonzero. It is found that the decay rate is well approximated by the decay rate in the standard model multiplied by cos2θH, where θH is the Aharonov-Bohm phase induced by the vacuum expectation value of an extra-dimensional component of the gauge field.

  6. Search for resonant pair production of Higgs bosons decaying to two bottom quark-antiquark pairs in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.

    2015-10-01

    A model-independent search for a narrow resonance produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV and decaying to a pair of 125 GeV Higgs bosons that in turn each decays into a bottom quark-antiquark pair is performed by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 17.9 fb-1. No evidence for a signal is observed. Upper limits at a 95% confidence level on the production cross section for such a resonance, in the mass range from 270 to 1100 GeV, are reported. Using these results, a radion with decay constant of 1 TeV and mass from 300 to 1100 GeV, and a Kaluza-Klein graviton with mass from 380 to 830 GeV are excluded at a 95% confidence level.

  7. Fermion flavor in the soft-wall AdS model

    SciTech Connect

    Gherghetta, Tony; Sword, Daniel

    2009-09-15

    The formalism for modeling multiple fermion generations in a warped extra dimension with a soft wall is presented. A bulk Higgs condensate is responsible for generating mass for the zero-mode fermions but leads to additional complexity from large mixing between different flavors. We extend existing single-generation analyses by considering new special cases in which analytical solutions can be derived. The general three-generation case is then treated using a simple numerical routine. Assuming anarchic 5D parameters, we find a fermion mass spectrum resembling the standard model quarks and leptons with highly degenerate couplings to Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons. This confirms that the soft-wall model has similar attractive features as that found in hard-wall models, providing a framework to generalize existing phenomenological analyses.

  8. Evolution Of The Concept Of Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journeau, Philippe F.

    2007-04-01

    Concepts of time elapsing `in' a space measuring the real emerge over the centuries. But Kant refutes absolute time and defines it, with space, as forms reacting to Newtonian mechanics. Einstein and Minkowski open a 20th century where time is a dimension, a substratum of reality `with' space rather than `in' it. Kaluza-Klein and String theories then develop a trend of additional spatial dimensions while de Broglie and Bohm open the possiblity that form, to begin with wave, be a reality together `with' a space-time particle. Other recent theories, such as spin networks, causal sets and twistor theory, even head to the idea of other "systems of dimensions." On the basis of such progresses and recent experiments the paper then considers a background independent fourfold time-form-action-space system of dimensions.

  9. On the extra force in brane world scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejancu, Aurel; Farran, Hani Reda

    2014-09-01

    In the study of the dynamics in a 5D bulk from brane world scenario, an extra force with abnormal properties was detected (cf. [D. Youm, Extra force in brane worlds, Phys. Rev. D62 (2000) 084002; D. Youm, Null geodesics in brane world universe, Mod. Phys. Lett. A16 (2001) 2371; L. F. Zhang and Y. Z. Zhang, Null geodesics in brane world scenarios, Commun. Theor. Phys. (Beijing)41 (2004) 48]). In this paper, by using the Riemannian horizontal connection introduced in [A. Bejancu, A new point of view on general Kaluza-Klein theories, Progr. Theor. Phys.128 (2012) 541], we give a new definition for the extra force in a 5D bulk, and show that it does not contradict the 4D physics. In particular, we show that this force appears very rarely along geodesics in a warped 5D bulk.

  10. Neutral triple gauge boson production in the large extra dimensions model at linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Sun; Ya-Jin, Zhou

    2012-10-01

    We consider the neutral triple-gauge boson production process in the context of large extra dimensions (LED) models including the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excited gravitons at future linear colliders, say ILC(CLIC). We consider γγγ, γγZ, γZZ, and ZZZ production processes, and analyze their impacts on both the total cross section and some key distributions. These processes are important for new physics searches at linear colliders. Our results show that KK graviton exchange has the most significant effect on e-e+→γZZ among the four processes with relatively small MS, while it has the largest effect on e-e+→γγγ with larger MS. By using the neutral triple-gauge boson production we could set the discovery limit on the fundamental Plank scale MS up to around 6-9 TeV for δ=4 at the 3 TeV CLIC.

  11. Warped general gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarrie, Moritz; Thompson, Daniel C.

    2010-12-01

    We develop the formalism of “general gauge mediation” for five-dimensional theories in a slice of AdS space. A set of current correlators encodes the effect of a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector localized on the IR brane. These current correlators provide a tree-level gaugino mass and loop-level sfermion masses on the UV brane. We also use this formalism to calculate the Casimir energy and masses for bulk hyperscalars. To illustrate this general construction we consider a perturbative hidden sector of generalized messengers coupled to a spurion. For models with large warping, we find that when the AdS warp factor k is less than the characteristic mass scale M of the hidden sector, the whole Kaluza-Klein tower of vector superfields propagate supersymmetry breaking effects to the UV brane. When M is less than k, the zero modes dominate.

  12. B-Factory Signals for a Warped Extra Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-11-01

    We study predictions for B physics in a class of warped extra dimension models recently introduced, where few (˜3) TeV Kaluza-Klein masses are consistent with electroweak data due to custodial symmetry. As in the standard model (SM), flavor violations arise due to the heavy top quark leading to striking signals: (i)New physics contributions to ΔF=2 transitions are comparable to the SM, so the success of the SM unitarity triangle fit is a “coincidence.” Thus, clean extractions of unitarity angles are likely to be affected, in addition to O(1) deviation from the SM prediction in Bs mixing. (ii)O(1) deviation from various SM predictions for B→Xsl+l-. (iii)Large mixing-induced CP asymmetry in radiative B decays. Also, the neutron electric dipole moment is roughly 20 times larger than the current bound so that this framework has a “CP problem.”

  13. Gauge coupling renormalization in RS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Delgado, A.; Sundrum, R.

    2002-11-01

    We compute the 4D low energy effective gauge coupling at one-loop order in the compact Randall-Sundrum scenario with bulk gauge fields and charged matter, within controlled approximations. While such computations are subtle, they can be important for studying phenomenological issues such as grand unification. Ultraviolet divergences are cut-off using Pauli-Villars regularization so as to respect 5D gauge and general coordinate invariance. The structure of these divergences on branes and in the bulk is elucidated by a 5D position-space analysis. The remaining finite contributions are obtained by a careful analysis of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum. We comment on the agreement between our results and expectations based on the AdS/CFT correspondence, in particular logarithmic sensitivity to the 4D Planck scale.

  14. Remarks on Models with Singlet Neutrino in Large Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    2002-03-01

    In this talk, we discuss two non-minimal models with singlet neutrino in large extra dimensions: (1) singlet neutrino in a sub-space of the bulk and (2) Dirac mass for singlet with lepton number violating Yukawa couplings. The motivation is to obtain the mass scale relevant for atmospheric neutrino oscillations with a quantum gravity scale M* ~ a few TeV and with at most O(1) higher-dimensional couplings. In both non-minimal models, such a low M* can be consistent with the limit on BR(μ → eγ) (unlike in the minimal model). We also show that in this scenario, with 2 Higgs doublets, the decay of charged Higgs into left-handed τ can be significantly enhanced, with O(1) branching ratio, due to the large number of Kaluza-Klein states of the right-handed neutrino.

  15. Charged Higgs decays in models with singlet neutrino in large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2000-09-01

    In models with large extra dimensions and TeV scale quantum gravity, small (Dirac) neutrino masses can be obtained naturally if the right-handed neutrino propagates in the extra dimensions. In this scenario, with /2 Higgs doublets, we show that the decay of charged Higgs into left-handed charged lepton (say /τ) and right-handed neutrino can be significantly enhanced, with /O(1) branching ratio, due to the large number of Kaluza-Klein states of the right-handed neutrino. Since /τ's from the standard decay of charged Higgs are right-handed, the above novel charged Higgs decay can provide a distinctive signature of these models at hadron/lepton colliders. Similarly, top quark decays to bμ+ν, bτ+ν through virtual charged Higgs can be enhanced.

  16. Warped Unification, Proton Stability, and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Servant, Géraldine

    2004-12-01

    We show that solving the problem of baryon-number violation in nonsupersymmetric grand unified theories (GUT's) in warped higher-dimensional spacetime can lead to a stable Kaluza Klein particle. This exotic particle has gauge quantum numbers of a right-handed neutrino, but carries fractional baryonnumber and is related to the top quark within the higher-dimensional GUT. A combination of baryonnumber and SU(3) color ensures its stability. Its relic density can easily be of the right value for masses in the 10GeV few TeV range. An exciting aspect of these models is that the entire parameter space will be tested at near future dark matter direct detection experiments. Other exotic GUT partners of the top quark are also light and can be produced at high energy colliders with distinctive signatures.

  17. The potential for very high-frequency gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruise, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    The science case for observing gravitational waves at frequencies in the millihertz-kilohertz range using LIGO, VIRGO, GEO600 or LISA is very strong and the first results are expected at these frequencies. However, as gravitational wave astronomy progresses beyond the first detections, other frequency bands may be worth exploring. Early predictions of gravitational wave emission from discrete sources at very much higher frequencies (megahertz and above) have been published and more recent studies of cosmological signals from inflation, Kaluza-Klein modes from gravitational interactions in brane worlds and plasma instabilities surrounding violent astrophysical events, are all possible sources. This communication examines current observational possibilities and the detector technology required to make meaningful observations at these frequencies.

  18. Dynamical Casimir Effect in Braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Durrer, Ruth; Ruser, Marcus

    2007-08-17

    In braneworld cosmology the expanding Universe is realized as a brane moving through a warped higher-dimensional spacetime. Like a moving mirror causes the creation of photons out of vacuum fluctuations, a moving brane leads to graviton production. We show that, very generically, Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles scale like stiff matter with the expansion of the Universe and can therefore not represent the dark matter in a warped braneworld. We present results for the production of massless and KK gravitons for bouncing branes in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We find that for a realistic bounce the back reaction from the generated gravitons will be most likely relevant. This Letter summarizes the main results and conclusions from numerical simulations which are presented in detail in a long paper [M. Ruser and R. Durrer, arXiv:0704.0790].

  19. Dynamical casimir effect in braneworlds.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Ruth; Ruser, Marcus

    2007-08-17

    In braneworld cosmology the expanding Universe is realized as a brane moving through a warped higher-dimensional spacetime. Like a moving mirror causes the creation of photons out of vacuum fluctuations, a moving brane leads to graviton production. We show that, very generically, Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles scale like stiff matter with the expansion of the Universe and can therefore not represent the dark matter in a warped braneworld. We present results for the production of massless and KK gravitons for bouncing branes in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We find that for a realistic bounce the back reaction from the generated gravitons will be most likely relevant. This Letter summarizes the main results and conclusions from numerical simulations which are presented in detail in a long paper [M. Ruser and R. Durrer, arXiv:0704.0790]. PMID:17930884

  20. Quantum (in)stability of 2D charged dilaton black holes and 3D rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    1999-02-01

    The quantum properties of charged black holes (BHs) in two-dimensional (2D) dilaton-Maxwell gravity (spontaneously compactified from heterotic string) with N dilaton coupled scalars are studied. We first investigate 2D BHs found by McGuigan, Nappi, and Yost. Kaluza-Klein reduction of 3D gravity with minimal scalars leads also to 2D dilaton-Maxwell gravity with dilaton coupled scalars and the rotating BH solution found by Bañados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli, which can be also described by 2D charged dilatonic BHs. Evaluating the one-loop effective action for dilaton coupled scalars in large N (and the s-wave approximation for the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli case), we show that quantum-corrected BHs may evaporate or else antievaporate similarly to 4D Nariai BHs as is observed by Bousso and Hawking. Higher modes may cause the disintegration of BHs in accordance with recent observation by Bousso.

  1. Feeble forces and gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Visser, Matt

    1987-03-01

    We develop a scenario in which feeble intermediate range forces emerge as an effect resulting from the compactification (à la Kaluza-Klein) of multidimensional theories. These feeble forces compete with gravity and in general permit different bodies to fall to earth with different accelerations. We show that these feeble forces are mediated by vectors (V) and/or scalars (S), whose dimensionless coupling constants are typically of order gv ≈ gs ≈ 10-10 Under certain plausible assumptions the ranges of these feeble forces are expected to be of order 1 m to 1 km. It is conjectured that the general strategy will prove applicable to realistic multidimensional theories such as the 10-dimensional superstring theories. We speculate that deviations from the standard gravitational force-similar to the ones reported recently as a “fifth force”-may be interpreted as evidence for higher dimensions.

  2. Exact quantization of a superparticle in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Horigane, Tetsuo; Kazama, Yoichi

    2010-02-15

    As a step toward deeper understanding of the AdS/CFT correspondence, exact quantization of a Brink-Schwarz superparticle in the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background with Ramond-Ramond flux is performed from the first principle in the phase space formulation. It includes the construction of the quantum Noether charges for the psu(2,2|4) superconformal symmetry and by solving the superconformal primary conditions we obtain the complete physical spectrum of the system with the explicit wave functions. The spectrum agrees precisely with the supergravity results, including all the Kaluza-Klein excitations. Our method and the result are expected to shed light on the eventual quantization of a superstring in this important background.

  3. Cross sections for production of closed superstrings at high energy colliders in brane world models

    SciTech Connect

    Chialva, Diego; Iengo, Roberto; Russo, Jorge G.

    2005-05-15

    In brane world string models with large extra dimensions, there are processes where fermion and antifermion (or two gluons) can annihilate producing a light particle (e.g. gluon) carrying transverse momentum and a Kaluza-Klein graviton or an excited closed string that propagates in the extra dimensions. In high energy colliders, this process gives a missing-momentum signature. We compute the total cross section for this process within the context of type II superstring theory in the presence of a D-brane. This includes all missing-energy sources for this string-theory model up to s=8M{sub s}{sup 2}, and it can be used to put new limits on the string scale M{sub s}.

  4. On dilatons and the LHC diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pujolàs, Oriol; Quirós, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    We study soft wall models that can embed the Standard Model and a naturally light dilaton. Exploiting the full capabilities of these models we identify the parameter space that allows to pass Electroweak Precision Tests with a moderate Kaluza-Klein scale, around 2 TeV. We analyze the coupling of the dilaton with Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, and discuss two applications: i) Models with a light dilaton as the first particle beyond the SM pass quite easily all observational tests even with a dilaton lighter than the Higgs. However the possibility of a 125 GeV dilaton as a Higgs impostor is essentially disfavored; ii) We show how to extend the soft wall models to realize a 750 GeV dilaton that could explain the recently reported diphoton excess at the LHC.

  5. Projective Relativity: Present Status and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauser, Bertfried

    2001-05-01

    We give a critical analysis of projective relativity theory. Examining Kaluza's own intention and the following development by Klein, Jordan, Pauli, Thiry, Ludwig and others, we conclude that projective relativity was abused in its own terms and much more in the case of newer higher dimensional Kaluza-Klein theories with non-Abelian gauge groups. Reviewing the projective formulation of the Jordan isomorphy theorem yields some hints how one can proceed in a different direction. We can interpret the condition mathop Rlimits^5 _{μ ν } = 0 not as a field equation in a 5-dimensional Riemannian space, e.g. as vacuum Einstein-Hilbert equation, but can (or should) interpret it as a geometrical object, a null-quadric. Projective aspects of quantum (field) theory are discussed under this viewpoint.

  6. Holographic mixing quantified

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Gherghetta, Tony

    2007-08-15

    We compute the precise elementary/composite field content of mass eigenstates in holographic duals of warped models in a slice of AdS{sub 5}. This is accomplished by decomposing the bulk fields not in the usual Kaluza-Klein basis, but rather into a holographic basis of 4D fields, corresponding to purely elementary source or conformal field theory (CFT) composite fields. Generically, this decomposition yields kinetic and mass mixing between the elementary and composite sectors of the holographic theory. Depending on where the bulk zero mode is localized, the elementary/composite content may differ radically, which we show explicitly for several examples including the bulk Randall-Sundrum graviton, bulk gauge boson, and Higgs boson.

  7. Towers of Gravitational Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    In this essay, we introduce a theoretical framework designed to describe black hole dynamics. The difficulties in understanding such dynamics stems from the proliferation of scales involved when one attempts to simultaneously describe all of the relevant dynamical degrees of freedom. These range from the modes that describe the black hole horizon, which are responsible for dissipative effects, to the long wavelength gravitational radiation that drains mechanical energy from macroscopic black hole bound states. We approach the problem from a Wilsonian point of view, by building a tower of theories of gravity each of which is valid at different scales. The methodology leads to multiple new results in diverse topics including phase transitions of Kaluza-Klein black holes and the interactions of spinning black hole in non-relativistic orbits. Moreover, our methods tie together speculative ideas regarding dualities for black hole horizons to real physical measurements in gravitational wave detectors.

  8. Towers of gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2006-11-01

    In this essay we introduce a theoretical framework designed to describe black hole dynamics. The difficulties in understanding such dynamics stems from the proliferation of scales involved when one attempts to simultaneously describe all of the relevant dynamical degrees of freedom. These range from the modes that describe the black hole horizon, which are responsible for dissipative effects, to the long wavelength gravitational radiation that drains mechanical energy from macroscopic black hole bound states. We approach the problem from a Wilsonian point of view, by building a tower of theories of gravity each of which is valid at different scales. The methodology leads to multiple new results in diverse topics including phase transitions of Kaluza-Klein black holes and the interactions of spinning black hole in non-relativistic orbits. Moreover, our methods tie together speculative ideas regarding dualities for black hole horizons to real physical measurements in gravitational wave detectors.

  9. Remarks on scale separation in flux vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, F. F.; Schillo, M.; Van Riet, T.; Williams, M.

    2016-03-01

    We argue that the Maldacena-Nuñez no-go theorem excluding Minkowski and de Sitter vacua in flux compactifications can be extended to anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua for which the Kaluza-Klein scale is parametrically smaller than the AdS length scale. In the absence of negative tension sources, scale-separated AdS vacua are ruled out in 11-dimensional supergravity; in 10-dimensional supergravity, we show that such vacua can only arise in conjunction with large dilaton gradients. As a practical application of this observation we demonstrate that the mechanism to resolve O6 singularities in massive type IIA at the classical level is likely not to occur in AdS compactifications with scale separation. We furthermore remark that a compactification to four observable dimensions implies a large cosmological hierarchy.

  10. Confluent Heun functions in gauge theories on thick braneworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, M. S.; Christiansen, H. R.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the propagation modes of gauge fields in an infinite Randall-Sundrum scenario. In this model a sine-Gordon soliton represents our thick four-dimensional braneworld while an exponentially coupled scalar acts for the dilaton field. For the gauge-field motion we find a differential equation which can be transformed into a confluent Heun equation. By means of another change of variables we obtain a related Schroedinger equation with a family of symmetric rational ({gamma}-{omega}z{sup 2})/(1-z{sup 2}){sup 2} potential functions. We discuss both results and present the infinite spectrum of analytical solutions for the gauge field. Finally, we assess the existence and the relative weights of Kaluza-Klein modes in the present setup.

  11. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for graviton and photon associated production in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiangdong; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Wang Jian; Oakes, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross sections for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton and photon associated production process pp{yields}{gamma}G{sub KK}+X in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC. We show that the NLO QCD corrections in general enhance the total cross sections and reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the factorization and renormalization scales. When jet veto is considered, the NLO corrections reduce the total cross sections. We also calculate some important differential cross sections for this process at NLO: the missing transverse momentum distribution, the transverse momentum distribution, and the pseudorapidity distribution of photon.

  12. Multiverse Space-Antispace Dual Calabi-Yau `Exciplex-Zitterbewegung' Particle Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    Modeling the `creation/emergence' of matter from spacetime is as old as modern cosmology itself and not without controversy within each model such as Static, Steady-state, Big Bang or Multiverse Continuous-State. In this paper we present only a brief primitive introduction to a new form of `Exciplex-Zitterbewegung' dual space-antispace vacuum Particle Creation applicable especially to Big Bang alternatives which are well-known but ignored; Hubble discovered `Redshift' not a Doppler expansion of the universe which remains the currently popular interpretation. Holographic Anthropic Multiverse cosmology provides viable alternatives to all seemingly sacrosanct pillars of the Big Bang. A model for Multiverse Space-Antispace Dual Calabi-Yau `Exciplex-Zitterbewegung' particle creation has only become possible by incorporating the additional degrees of freedom provided by the capacity complex dimensional extended Yang-Mills Kaluza-Klein correspondence provides.

  13. BPS amplitudes, helicity supertraces and membranes in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wit, B. d.; Lüst, D.

    2000-03-01

    We study BPS dominated loop amplitudes in M-theory on T2. For this purpose we generalize the concept of helicity supertraces to nine spacetime dimensions. These traces distinguish between various massive supermultiplets and appear as coefficients in their one-loop contributions to n-graviton scattering amplitudes. This can be used to show that only ultrashort BPS multiplets contribute to the R4 term in the effective action, which was first computed by Green, Gutperle and Vanhove. There are two inequivalent ultrashort BPS multiplets which describe the Kaluza-Klein states and the wrapped membranes that cover the torus a number of times. From the perspective of the type-II strings they correspond to momentum and winding states and D0 or D1 branes.

  14. Identification of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Through a Combined Measurement of Axial and Scalar Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Collar, J. I.; Odom, B.

    2007-10-12

    We study the prospects for detecting weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that, in case of detection, a comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF{sub 3}I and C{sub 4}F{sub 10} bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  15. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-15

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter g{sub s}M satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  16. Topology and Flux of T-Dual Manifolds with Circle Actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, Varghese; Wu, Siye

    2012-11-01

    We present an explicit formula for the topology and H-flux of the T-dual of a general type II, compactification, significantly generalizing earlier results. Our results apply to T-dualities with respect to any circle action on spacetime X. As before, T-duality exchanges type IIA and type IIB string theories. A new consequence is that the T-dual spacetime is a singular space when the fixed point set {X^{T}} is non-empty; the singularities correspond to Kaluza-Klein monopoles. We propose that the Ramond-Ramond charges of type II string theories on the singular dual are classified by twisted equivariant cohomology groups. We also discuss the K-theory approach.

  17. Measurement of the top-antitop quark pair differential cross section with respect to the invariant mass of the pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bridgeman, Alice; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2008-10-01

    I present a measurement of the t{bar t} differential cross section, d{sigma}/dM{sub t{bar t}}, in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 2.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data. I find that d{sigma}/dM{sub t{bar t}} is consistent with the Standard Model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions. I set limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} in the Randall-Sundrum model by looking for Kaluza Klein gravitons which decay to top quarks. I find {kappa}/M{sub Pl} > 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Top Quarks Spin Correlations with Graviton in ADD and RS Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika; Smolek, Karel; Šimák, Vladislav

    2008-03-01

    In LHC physics we study the spin correlation of top-antitop pairs production to investigate the production mechanism of heavy quarks[F. Hubard et al. Eur. Phys. J. C 44 (2006) 13]. The s-channel process mediated by graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in ADD model with several extra dimensions[N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. 429B (1998) 263, hep-ph/9803315] or in the Randall-Sundrum model with only one extra dimension[L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3370 hep-ph/9905221] contribute to the top-antitop pair production and affects the resulting top spin correlations. We calculated the full density matrix for the top-antitop pair production. We find a sizable deviation of the top spin correlations from the Standard.

  19. Search for and Identification of Graviton Exchange Effects in Drell-Yan Process at Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    New physics signatures arising from different sources may be confused when first observed at future colliders. Thus it is important to examine how various scenarios may be differentiated given the availability of only limited information. Here, we explore the capability of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energies and luminosities will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order 4.6 - 9.4 TeV (3.6 - 6.0 TeV) depending on energy, luminosity and number of extra dimensions.

  20. Plasma graviton production in TeV-scale gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkumova, E. Yu

    2010-11-01

    We develop the theory of interaction of classical plasma with Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons in the ADD model of TeV-scale gravity. Plasma is described within the kinetic approach as the system of charged particles and Maxwell field both confined on the brane. Interaction with multidimensional gravity living in the bulk with n compact extra dimensions is introduced within the linearized theory. The KK gravitons emission rates are computed taking into account plasma collective effects through the two-point correlation functions of the fluctuations of the plasma energy-momentum tensor. Apart from known mechanisms (such as bremsstrahlung and gravi-Primakoff effect) we find essentially collective channels such as the coalescence of plasma waves into gravitons which may be manifest in turbulent plasmas. Our results indicate that commonly used rates of the KK gravitons production in stars and supernovae may be underestimated.

  1. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  2. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  3. 750 GeV diphoton resonance as a singlet scalar in an extra dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chengfeng; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Hong-Hao

    2016-04-01

    We interpret the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently found in the 13 TeV LHC data as a singlet scalar in an extra dimensional model, where one extra dimension is introduced. In the model, the scalar couples to multiple vectorlike fermions, which are just the Kaluza-Klein modes of SM fermions. Mediated by the loops of these vectorlike fermions, the ϕ effective couplings to gluons and photons can be significantly large. Therefore, it is quite easy to obtain an observed cross section for the diphoton excess. We also calculate the cross sections for other decay channels of ϕ , and find that this interpretation can evade the bounds from the 8 TeV LHC data.

  4. Flavor-changing decays of the top quark in 5D warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Furlong, Alfonso; Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel; Xoxocotzi, Reyna

    2016-08-01

    We study flavor-changing neutral current decays of the top quark in the context of general warped extra dimensions, where the five-dimensional (5D) metric is slightly modified from 5D anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). These models address the Planck-electroweak hierarchies of the Standard Model and can obey all the low-energy flavor bounds and electroweak precision tests, while allowing the scale of new physics to be at the TeV level, and thus within the reach of the LHC at Run II. We perform the calculation of these exotic top decay rates for the case of a bulk Higgs, and thus include in particular the effect of the additional Kaluza-Klein (KK) Higgs modes running in the loops, along with the usual KK fermions and KK gluons.

  5. Bubbles of nothing in flux compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2010-10-15

    We construct a simple AdS{sub 4}xS{sup 1} flux compactification stabilized by a complex scalar field winding the single extra dimension and demonstrate an instability to nucleation of a bubble of nothing. This occurs when the Kaluza-Klein dimension degenerates to a point, defining the bubble surface. Because the extra dimension is stabilized by a flux, the bubble surface must be charged, in this case under the axionic part of the complex scalar. This smooth geometry can be seen as a de Sitter topological defect with asymptotic behavior identical to the pure compactification. We discuss how a similar construction can be implemented in more general Freund-Rubin compactifications.

  6. Linear collider signals of an invisible Higgs boson in theories of large extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Anindya; Huitu, Katri; Laamanen, Jari; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the possibility of detecting a Higgs boson in electron-positron collider experiments if large extra dimensions are realized in nature. In such a case, the Higgs boson can decay invisibly by oscillating into a graviscalar Kaluza-Klein tower. We show that the search for such a Higgs boson at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider entails more complications than are usually thought of in relation to an invisibly decaying Higgs boson. The main sources of such complications are due to the simultaneous presence of a continuum graviton production and the broadening of the Higgs peak. We discuss possible ways of overcoming such difficulties and conclude that the detection of such a Higgs boson might still be a problem beyond the mass range of 250-300 GeV.

  7. Higgs boson production and decay in 5D warped models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the production and decay rates of the Higgs boson at the LHC in the context of general five-dimensional warped scenarios with a spacetime background modified from the usual AdS5 , with Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We extend previous work by considering the full flavor structure of the SM, and thus including all possible flavor effects coming from mixings with heavy fermions. We proceed in three different ways, first by only including two complete Kaluza-Klein (KK) levels (15 ×15 fermion mass matrices), then including three complete KK levels (21 ×21 fermion mass matrices) and finally we compare with the effect of including the infinite (full) KK towers. We present numerical results for the Higgs production cross section via gluon fusion and Higgs decay branching fractions in both the modified metric scenario and in the usual Randall-Sundrum metric scenario.

  8. Perturbations of near-horizon geometries and instabilities of Myers-Perry black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Mark N.; Reall, Harvey S.

    2011-05-15

    It is shown that the equations governing linearized gravitational (or electromagnetic) perturbations of the near-horizon geometry of any known extreme vacuum black hole (allowing for a cosmological constant) can be Kaluza-Klein reduced to give the equation of motion of a charged scalar field in AdS{sub 2} with an electric field. One can define an effective Breitenloehner-Freedman bound for such a field. We conjecture that if a perturbation preserves certain symmetries then a violation of this bound should imply an instability of the full black hole solution. Evidence in favor of this conjecture is provided by the extreme Kerr solution and extreme cohomogeneity-1 Myers-Perry solution. In the latter case, we predict an instability in seven or more dimensions and, in five dimensions, we present results for operator conformal weights assuming the existence of a conformal field theory dual. We sketch a proof of our conjecture for scalar field perturbations.

  9. A search for resonant Z pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Boveia, Antonio

    2008-12-01

    I describe a search for anomalous production of Z pairs through a new massive resonance X in 2.5-2.9 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the CDFII Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. I reconstruct Z pairs through their decays to electrons, muons, and quarks. To achieve perhaps the most efficient lepton reconstruction ever used at CDF, I apply a thorough understanding of the detector and new reconstruction software heavily revised for this purpose. In particular, I have designed and employ new general-purpose algorithms for tracking at large η in order to increase muon acceptance. Upon analyzing the unblinded signal samples, I observe no X → ZZ candidates and set upper limits on the production cross section using a Kaluza-Klein graviton-like acceptance.

  10. Strings in Einstein's paradigm of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2002-10-01

    Spherically symmetric solutions with a flux of electric and magnetic fields in Kaluza-Klein gravity are considered. It is shown that under the condition (electric charge q) ≈ (magnetic charge Q) (q > Q) these solutions are like a flux tube stretched between two universes. The longitudinal size of this tube depends on the value of δ = 1 - Q/q. The cross section of the tube can be chosen ≈lPl. In this case, the flux tube looks like a one-dimensional object (thread) stretched between two universes. The propagation of gravitational waves on the thread is considered. The corresponding equations are very close to the classical string equations. This result allows us to say that the thread between two universes is similar to the string attached to two D-branes.

  11. Search for high-mass resonances decaying to dimuons at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-01

    We present a search for high-mass neutral resonances using dimuon data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb(-1) collected in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. No significant excess above the standard model expectation is observed in the dimuon invariant-mass spectrum. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on sigmaBR(pp-->X-->micromicro), where X is a boson with spin-0, 1, or 2. Using these cross section limits, we determine lower mass limits on sneutrinos in R-parity-violating supersymmetric models, Z' bosons, and Kaluza-Klein gravitons in the Randall-Sundrum model. PMID:19392510

  12. Dark matter searches with H.E.S.S.: nearby dwarf galaxies and IMBH mini-spikes

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, E.; Vivier, M.; Brun, P.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Peyaud, B.

    2008-12-24

    WIMP pair annihilations produce high energy gamma-rays in the final state, which can be detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes such as the H.E.S.S. array. We focus in this contribution on searches towards dwarf galaxies and mini-spikes around intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in the Galactic halo. H.E.S.S. observations towards the nearby dwarf galaxies Sagittarius and Canis Major are presented. Using realistic modellings for the dark matter (DM) density profiles, constraints on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross section {sigma}v of DM particles are derived in the framework of Supersymmetric and Kaluza-Klein models. A search for DM mini-spikes around IMBHs is described as well as constraints on the particle physics parameters.

  13. 3D supergravity from wrapped M5-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karndumri, Parinya; Ó Colgáin, Eoin

    2016-03-01

    Through consistent Kaluza-Klein reduction, we construct 3D N=2 gauged supergravities corresponding to twisted compactifications of M5-branes on a product of constant curvature Riemann surfaces, including Kähler-Einstein four-manifolds. We extend the reduction to fermionic supersymmetry variations in order to determine the 3D Killing spinor equations and classify all timelike supersymmetric solutions. As a by-product, we identify an infinite class of new supersymmetric warped AdS 3 (Gödel) and warped dS 3 solutions. Moreover, we show that the superpotential T encodes the central charge and R symmetry of the dual N=(0,2) SCFTs in the large N limit. We demonstrate that the R symmetry matches the canonical U(1) isometry from existing classifications of supersymmetric AdS 3 solutions to 11D supergravity with N=(0,2) supersymmetry.

  14. Excursions through KK modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this article we study Kaluza-Klein (KK) dimensional reduction of massive Abelian gauge theories with charged matter fields on a circle. Since local gauge transformations change position dependence of the charged fields, the decomposition of the charged matter fields into KK modes is gauge dependent. While whole KK mass spectrum is independent of the gauge choice, the mode number depends on the gauge. The masses of the KK modes also depend on the field value of the zero-mode of the extra dimensional component of the gauge field. In particular, one of the KK modes in the KK tower of each massless 5D charged field becomes massless at particular values of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field. When the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field is identified with the inflaton, this structure leads to recursive cosmological particle productions.

  15. Higgs-gluon coupling in warped extra dimensional models with brane kinetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ujjal Kumar; Ray, Tirtha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Warped models with the Higgs confined to the weak brane and the gauge and matter fields accessing the AdS5 bulk provide a viable setting to address the gauge hierarchy problem. Brane kinetic terms for the bulk fields are known to ease some of the tensions of these models with precision electroweak observables and flavor constraints. We study the loop-driven Higgs coupling to the gluons that are relevant to the Higgs program at the LHC, in this scenario. We demonstrate a partial cancellation in the contribution of the fermionic Kaluza-Klein (KK) towers within such framework relatively independent of the 5D parameters. The entire dependence of this coupling on the new physics arises from the mixing between the Standard Model states and the KK excitations. We find that the present precision in measurement of these couplings can lead to a constraint on the KK scale up to 1.2 TeV at 95% confidence level.

  16. Distinguishing Supersymmetry From Universal Extra Dimensions or Little Higgs Models With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    There are compelling reasons to think that new physics will appear at or below the TeV-scale. It is not known what form this new physics will take, however. Although The Large Hadron collider is very likely to discover new particles associated with the TeV-scale, it may be difficult for it to determine the nature of those particles, whether superpartners, Kaluza-Klein modes or other states. In this article, we consider how direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments may provide information complementary to hadron colliders, which can be used to discriminate between supersymmetry, models with universal extra dimensions, and Little Higgs theories. We find that, in many scenarios, dark matter experiments can be effectively used to distinguish between these possibilities.

  17. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  18. WLWL scattering in Higgsless models: Identifying better effective theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexander S.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2009-09-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgsless models. In this paper we analyze how well the three-site model performs as a general exemplar of Higgsless models in describing WLWL scattering, and which modifications can make it more representative. We employ general sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgsless models as a way to compare the different theories. We show that the size of the four-point vertex for the (unphysical) Nambu-Goldstone modes and the degree to which the sum rules are saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying Kaluza-Klein resonances both provide good measures of the extent to which a highly deconstructed theory can accurately describe the low-energy physics of a continuum 5D Higgsless model. After comparing the three-site model to flat and warped continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear moose with an additional U(1) group and to a ring (“breaking electroweak symmetry strongly” or “hidden local symmetry”) model with three sites and three links. Both cases may be readily analyzed in the framework of the general sum rules. We demonstrate that WLWL scattering in the ring model can very closely approximate scattering in the continuum models, provided that the hidden local symmetry parameter a is chosen to mimic ρ-meson dominance of ππ scattering in QCD. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is briefly discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from precision measurements of the Z' line shape and ZWW coupling at a high-energy lepton collider.

  19. W{sub L}W{sub L} scattering in Higgsless models: Identifying better effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander S.; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He Hongjian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2009-09-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgsless models. In this paper we analyze how well the three-site model performs as a general exemplar of Higgsless models in describing W{sub L}W{sub L} scattering, and which modifications can make it more representative. We employ general sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgsless models as a way to compare the different theories. We show that the size of the four-point vertex for the (unphysical) Nambu-Goldstone modes and the degree to which the sum rules are saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying Kaluza-Klein resonances both provide good measures of the extent to which a highly deconstructed theory can accurately describe the low-energy physics of a continuum 5D Higgsless model. After comparing the three-site model to flat and warped continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear moose with an additional U(1) group and to a ring ('breaking electroweak symmetry strongly' or 'hidden local symmetry') model with three sites and three links. Both cases may be readily analyzed in the framework of the general sum rules. We demonstrate that W{sub L}W{sub L} scattering in the ring model can very closely approximate scattering in the continuum models, provided that the hidden local symmetry parameter a is chosen to mimic {rho}-meson dominance of {pi}{pi} scattering in QCD. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is briefly discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from precision measurements of the Z{sup '} line shape and ZWW coupling at a high-energy lepton collider.

  20. The particle problem in classical gravity: a historical note on 1941

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, Mariano; Giribet, Gastón

    2005-11-01

    This historical note is mainly based on a relatively unknown paper published by Albert Einstein in Revista de la Universidad Nacional de Tucumán in 1941. Taking the ideas of this work as a leitmotiv, we review the discussions about the particle problem in the theory of gravitation within the historical context by means of the study of seminal works on the subject. The revision shows how the digressions regarding the structure of matter and the concise problem of finding regular solutions of the pure field equations turned out to be intrinsically unified in the beginning of the programme towards a final theory of fields. The paper mentioned (Einstein 1941a Rev. Univ. Nac. Tucumán A 2 11) represents the basis of the one written by Einstein in collaboration with Wolfgang Pauli in 1943, in which, following analogous lines, the proof of the non-existence of regular particle-type solutions was generalized to the case of cylindrical geometries in Kaluza-Klein theory (Einstein and Pauli 1943 Ann. Math. 44 131). Besides, other generalizations were subsequently presented. The (non-)existence of such solutions in classical unified field theory was undoubtedly an important criterion leading Einstein's investigations. This aspect was investigated with expertness by Jeroen van Dongen in a recent work, though restricting the scope to the particular case of Kaluza-Klein theory (van Dongen 2002 Stud. Hist. Phil. Mod. Phys. 33 185). Here, we discuss the particle problem within a more general context, presenting in this way a complement to previous reviews.

  1. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  2. Geometry and symmetry structures in two-time gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak; Chen, S.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Two-time (2T) gravity in d+2 dimensions predicts 1T general relativity in d dimensions, augmented with a local scale symmetry known as the Weyl symmetry in 1T field theory. The emerging general relativity comes with a number of constraints, particularly on scalar fields and their interactions in 1T field theory. These constraints, detailed in this paper, are footprints of 2T gravity and could be a basis for testing 2T physics. Some of the conceptually interesting consequences of the 'accidental' Weyl symmetry include that the gravitational constant emerges from vacuum values of the dilaton and other Higgs-type scalars and that it changes after every cosmic phase transition (inflation, grand unification, electroweak phase transition, etc.). We show that this consequential Weyl symmetry in d dimensions originates from coordinate reparametrization, not from scale transformations, in the d+2 spacetime of 2T gravity. To recognize this structure we develop in detail the geometrical structures, curvatures, symmetries, etc. of the d+2 spacetime which is restricted by a homothety condition derived from the action of 2T gravity. Observers that live in d dimensions perceive general relativity and all degrees of freedom as shadows of their counterparts in d+2 dimensions. Kaluza-Klein type modes are removed by gauge symmetries and constraints that follow from the 2T-gravity action. However some analogs to Kaluza-Klein modes, which we call 'prolongations' of the shadows into the higher dimensions, remain but they are completely determined, up to gauge freedom, by the shadows in d dimensions.

  3. Massive gravity on a brane

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Graesser, M.L.; Grojean, C.; Pilo, L.

    2003-12-11

    At present no theory of a massive graviton is known that is consistent with experiments at both long and short distances. The problem is that consistency with long distance experiments requires the graviton mass to be very small. Such a small graviton mass however implies an ultraviolet cutoff for the theory at length scales far larger than the millimeter scale at which gravity has already been measured. In this paper we attempt to construct a model which avoids this problem. We consider a brane world setup in warped AdS spacetime and we investigate the consequences of writing a mass term for the graviton on a the infrared brane where the local cutoff is of order a large (galactic) distance scale. The advantage of this setup is that the low cutoff for physics on the infrared brane does not significantly affect the predictivity of the theory for observers localized on the ultraviolet brane. For such observers the predictions of this theory agree with general relativity at distances smaller than the infrared scale but go over to those of a theory of massive gravity at longer distances. A careful analysis of the graviton two-point function, however, reveals the presence of a ghost in the low energy spectrum. A mode decomposition of the higher dimensional theory reveals that the ghost corresponds to the radion field. We also investigate the theory with a brane localized mass for the graviton on the ultraviolet brane, and show that the physics of this case is similar to that of a conventional four dimensional theory with a massive graviton, but with one important difference: when the infrared brane decouples and the would-be massive graviton gets heavier than the regular Kaluza-Klein modes, it becomes unstable and it has a finite width to decay off the brane into the continuum of Kaluza-Klein states.

  4. Supergravities with positive definite potentials and AdSpp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerimo, Johannes

    Ten-dimensional superstring theory (or the conjectured nonperturbative M-theory in eleven dimensions) is the most promising candidate for a consistent quantum theory of gravity capable of unifying all known forces of nature. An important question concerning these fundamental theories is how they compactify to lower dimensions and how to obtain a real four dimensional world? In this dissertation we present new avenues for M/string theory to reduce to lower dimensions as well as to four dimensions. For example, we show that by performing a generalized Kaluza-Klein R reduction on the low-energy field theory of the heterotic string, the resulting lower dimensional theory compactifies spontaneously on S3 to give rise to (Minkowski)6 spacetime. Furthermore, a generalized reduction of M-theory on K3 x R compactifies spontaneously on S2 to give rise to a (Minkowski)4 spacetime. The generalized Kaluza-Klein reduction gauges the Cremmer-Julia type global symmetry and the homogeneous rescaling symmetry of the supergravity equations of motion by giving the higher dimensional fields an additional dependence on the circle coordinate. We apply the generalized reduction scheme to half-maximal supergravities which are obtained from the heterotic string (or the NS-NS sector of the type-II string) compactified on a (10 - D)-dimensional torus truncated to the pure supergravity multiplet. This gives rise to new gauged supergravities in diverse dimensions with supersymmetric Minkowski x sphere vacua. Since two large extra dimensions have received much attention recently, we make a detailed study of the gauged D = 6, N = (1,1) supergravity. In particular, we show that this theory allows for a consistent sphere reduction on S2 to give rise to D = 4, N = 2 supergravity coupled to a vector multiplet which can further be truncated to N = 1 supergravity with a chiral multiplet. We also investigate pp-waves in AdS backgrounds, i.e. pp-waves as solutions of gauged supergravities with AdS vacua

  5. Variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, S. J.; Vucetich, H.

    La variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales es un problema que ha motivado numerosos trabajos teóricos y experimentales desde la hipótesis de los grandes números de Dirac en 1937. Entre los métodos experimentales y observacionales para establecer restricciones sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentes es importante mencionar: comparación entre relojes atómicos[1], métodos geofísicos[2][3], análisis de sistemas de absorción en quasares[4][5][6] y cotas provenientes de la nucleosíntesis primordial[7]. En un trabajo reciente[5], se reportó una significativa variación en la constante de estructura fina. Intentos de unificar las cuatro interacciones fundamentales dieron como resultado teorías con múltiples dimensiones como las teorías de Kaluza-Klein y teorías de supercuerdas. Estas teorías proporcionan un marco teórico natural para el estudio de la variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales. A su vez, un modelo sencillo para estudiar la variación de la constante de estructura fina, fue propuesto en [8], a partir de premisas muy generales como ser covarianza, invarianza de gauge, causalidad y invarianza ante reversiones temporales en el electromagnetismo. Diferentes versiones de las teorías antes mencionadas coinciden en predecir variaciones temporales de las constantes fundamentales pero difieren en la forma de esta variación[9][10]. De esta manera, las restricciones establecidas experimentalmente sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentales pueden ser una herramienta importante para testear estas diferentes teorías. En este trabajo, utilizamos las cotas provenientes de diversas técnicas experimentales, para testear si las mismas son consistentes con alguna de las teorías antes mencionadas. En particular, establecemos cotas sobre la variación de los parámentros libres de las diferentes teorías como por ejemplo el radio de las dimensiones extras en las teorías tipo Kaluza-Klein.

  6. Localization and mass spectrum of q-form fields on branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate localization of a bulk massless q-form field on codimension-one branes by using a new Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition, for which there are two types of KK modes for the bulk q-form field, the q-form and (q - 1)-form modes. The first modes may be massive or massless while the second ones are all massless. These two types of KK modes satisfy two Schrödinger-like equations. For a five-dimensional brane model with a finite extra dimension, the spectrum of a bulk 3-form field on the brane consists of some massive bound 3-form KK modes as well as some massless bound 2-form ones with different configuration along the extra dimension. These 2-form modes are different from those obtained from a bulk 2-form field. For a five-dimensional degenerated Bloch brane model with an infinite extra dimension, some massive 3-form resonant KK modes and corresponding massless 2-form resonant ones are obtained for a bulk 3-form field.

  7. Higgs production and decay processes via loop diagrams in various 6D Universal Extra Dimension models at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    We calculate loop-induced Higgs production and decay processes which are relevant for the LHC in various six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models. More concretely, we focus on the Higgs production through gluon fusion and the Higgs decay into two photons induced by loop diagrams. They are one-loop leading processes and the contribution of Kaluza-Klein particles is considered to be significant. These processes are divergent in six dimensions. Therefore, we employ a momentum cutoff, whose size is fixed from the validity of perturbative calculation through naive dimensional analysis. In these six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models, the Higgs production cross section through gluon fusion is highly enhanced and the Higgs decay width into two photons is suppressed. In particular in the case of the compactification on Projective Sphere, these effects are remarkable. The deviation of the h (0) → 2γ signal from the prediction of the Standard model is much greater than that in the case of the five-dimensional minimal UED model. We also consider threshold corrections in the two processes and these effect are noteworthy even when we take a higher cutoff and/or a heavy KK scale. Comparing our calculation to the recent LHC results which were published at the Lepton-Photon 2011 and at the December of 2011 is performed briefly.

  8. Gravity localization in a string-cigar braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jose Euclides G.; Santos, Victor; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We proposed a six-dimensional string-like braneworld built from a warped product between a 3-brane and the Hamilton cigar soliton space, the string-cigar braneworld. This transverse manifold is a well-known steady solution of the Ricci flow equation that describes the evolution of a manifold. The resulting bulk is an interior and exterior metric for a thick string. Furthermore, the source satisfies the dominant energy condition. It is possible to realize the geometric flow as a result of variations of the matter content of the brane, actually, as its tensions. Furthermore, the Ricci flow defines a family of string-like branes and we studied the effects that the evolution of the transverse space have on the geometric and physical quantities. The geometric flow makes the cosmological constant and the relationship between the Planck masses evolves. The gravitational massless mode remains trapped to the brane and the width of the mode depends on the evolution parameter. For the Kaluza-Klein modes, the asymptotic spectrum of mass is the same as that for the thin string-like brane and the analogue Schrödinger potential also changes according to the flow.

  9. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  10. Geometrical properties of the trans-spherical solutions in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2009-06-15

    We investigate the geometrical properties of static vacuum p-brane solutions of Einstein gravity in D=n+p+3 dimensions, which have spherical symmetry of S{sup n+1} orthogonal to the p directions and which are invariant under the translation along them. The solutions are characterized by the mass density and p number of tension densities. The causal structure of the higher-dimensional solutions is essentially the same as that of the five-dimensional ones. Namely, a naked singularity appears for most solutions except for the Schwarzschild black p-brane and the Kaluza-Klein bubble. We show that some important geometric properties such as the area of S{sup n+1} and the total spatial volume are characterized only by the three parameters (the mass density, the sum of tension densities, and the sum of tension density squares), rather than individual tension densities. These geometric properties are analyzed in detail in this parameter space and are compared with those of the five-dimensional case.

  11. Controlling chaos through compactification in cosmological models with a collapsing phase

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley, Daniel H.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2005-09-15

    We consider the effect of compactification of extra dimensions on the onset of classical chaotic mixmaster behavior during cosmic contraction. Assuming a universe that is well-approximated as a four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model (with negligible Kaluza-Klein excitations) when the contraction phase begins, we identify compactifications that allow a smooth contraction and delay the onset of chaos until arbitrarily close to the big crunch. These compactifications are defined by the de Rham cohomology (Betti numbers) and Killing vectors of the compactification manifold. We find compactifications that control chaos in vacuum Einstein gravity, as well as in string theories with N=1 supersymmetry and M-theory. In models where chaos is controlled in this way, the universe can remain homogeneous and flat until it enters the quantum gravity regime. At this point, the classical equations leading to chaotic behavior can no longer be trusted, and quantum effects may allow a smooth approach to the big crunch and transition into a subsequent expanding phase. Our results may be useful for constructing cosmological models with contracting phases, such as the ekpyrotic/cyclic and pre-big bang models.

  12. Diphoton portal to warped gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowski, Adam; Kamenik, Jernej F.

    2016-07-01

    The diphoton excess around mX=750 GeV observed by ATLAS and CMS can be interpreted as coming from a massive spin-2 excitation. We explore this possibility in the context of warped five-dimensional models with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk of the extra dimension. The 750 GeV resonance is identified with the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the five-dimensional graviton that is parametrically lighter than KK resonances of SM fields. Our setup makes it possible to realize nonuniversal couplings of the spin-2 resonance to matter, and thus to explain nonobservation of the 750 GeV resonance in leptonic channels. Phenomenological predictions of the model depend on the localization of fields in the extra dimension. If, as required by naturalness arguments, the zero modes of the Higgs and top fields are localized near the IR brane, one expects large branching fractions to t t ¯, h h , W+W- and Z Z final states. Decays to Z γ can also be observable when the KK graviton couplings to the SM gauge fields are nonuniversal.

  13. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Luz M.; Moreno, Claudia; Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-10-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  14. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  15. The R.I. Pimenov unified gravitation and electromagnetism field theory as semi-Riemannian geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A.

    2009-05-15

    More than forty years ago R.I. Pimenov introduced a new geometry-semi-Riemannian one-as a set of geometrical objects consistent with a fibering pr: M{sub n} {yields} M{sub m}. He suggested the heuristic principle according to which the physically different quantities (meter, second, Coulomb, etc.) are geometrically modelled as space coordinates that are not superposed by automorphisms. As there is only one type of coordinates in Riemannian geometry and only three types of coordinates in pseudo-Riemannian one, a multiple-fibered semi-Riemannian geometry is the most appropriate one for the treatment of more than three different physical quantities as unified geometrical field theory. Semi-Euclidean geometry {sup 3}R{sub 5}{sup 4} with 1-dimensional fiber x{sup 5} and 4-dimensional Minkowski space-time as a base is naturally interpreted as classical electrodynamics. Semi-Riemannian geometry {sup 3}V{sub 5}{sup 4} with the general relativity pseudo-Riemannian space-time {sup 3}V{sub 4}, and 1-dimensional fiber x{sup 5}, responsible for the electromagnetism, provides the unified field theory of gravitation and electromagnetism. Unlike Kaluza-Klein theories, where the fifth coordinate appears in nondegenerate Riemannian or pseudo-Riemannian geometry, the theory based on semi-Riemannian geometry is free from defects of the former. In particular, scalar field does not arise.

  16. U(1) × SU(2) from the tangent bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Jose G.

    2013-11-01

    Élie Cartan developed modern differential geometry as theory of moving frames. Particles do not enter the equations of structure and thus play a less fundamental role. A Kaluza-Klein (KK) space without compactification brings particles into the core of geometry by making propertime (τ) the fifth dimension. (xi, τ) emerges as the subspace for the quantum sector. This KK space does not make sense in SR, by virtue of non-orthogonality of τ to 3-space (actually), which brings a preferred frame to the fore. In contrast, propertime is perpendicular to 3-space in the "para-Lorentzian structure" with absolute time dilation (PL). Its (xi,τ) subspace looks very much like (t,xi) in SR. And its (t,xi) sector is not made of orthogonal frames but does not cause contradictions with SR, which supporters of the thesis of conventionality of synchronizations have been claiming for many decades. In PL, the conjunction of the Clifford algebras of differential forms (Kaehler's) and of their valuedness gives rise to a commutative algebra of primitive idempotents that embodies the U(1) × SU(2) symmetry. SU(3) also emerges in the process, but we do not deal with this issue beyond proposing the geometric palet of quarks.

  17. CAST: An Inspiring Axion Helioscope ala Sikivie

    SciTech Connect

    Zioutas, K.; Anastassopoulos, V.; Tsagri, M.; Semertzidis, Y.; Papaevangelou, T.

    2010-08-30

    CAST is a data taking axion helioscope using a recycled LHC test magnet, CERN's detector technology and cryogenics expertise. An imaging X-ray telescope improves substantially the detection sensitivity and axion-ID. Massive axion-like particles of the Kaluza-Klein type were first introduced to explain the paradox of the hot corona, which is even hotter at locations overlying magnetic spots. This is suggesting that the CAST detection principle might be at work there, but being somehow modified and performing better. Remarkably, the density profile of the Sun allows for resonance crossing (m{sub axion}c{sup 2{approx_equal}}h{omega}{sub plasma}), which axion helioscopes are aiming to reach. The restless Sun favours this occasionally even further. Then, such processes can give rise to a chimera of converted axions or the like, making the Sun appear, within known physics, as mysterious and unpredictable as it is. CAST axion limits were used to conclude also for the hidden sector paraphotons. This is then suggestive for novel helioscopes for exotica like paraphotons, chameleons, etc. Pierre Sikivie's pioneering idea was to use a magnetic field as a catalyst to transform particles from the dark sector to ours, and vice versa.

  18. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T. J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ã.-.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Dordevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at 95% confidence level for a W' -boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W -boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein WKK(2 ) states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W -boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W' -boson and the standard model W -boson and for a compositeness model.

  19. Search for resonant t t ¯ production in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dobur, D.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Ali, A.; Aly, R.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Lotfy, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Masod, R.; Radi, A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Pekkanen, J.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV . Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the t t ¯ →W b W b decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. No significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. Upper limits on the production cross section of heavy resonances decaying to t t ¯ are calculated. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 2.4 TeV is excluded at 95% confidence level. Limits are also derived for a broad Z' resonance with a 10% width relative to the resonance mass, and a Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in the Randall-Sundrum model. These are the most stringent limits to date on heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs.

  20. An excess of cosmic ray electrons at energies of 300-800 GeV.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Adams, J H; Ahn, H S; Bashindzhagyan, G L; Christl, M; Ganel, O; Guzik, T G; Isbert, J; Kim, K C; Kuznetsov, E N; Panasyuk, M I; Panov, A D; Schmidt, W K H; Seo, E S; Sokolskaya, N V; Watts, J W; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V I

    2008-11-20

    Galactic cosmic rays consist of protons, electrons and ions, most of which are believed to be accelerated to relativistic speeds in supernova remnants. All components of the cosmic rays show an intensity that decreases as a power law with increasing energy (for example as E(-2.7)). Electrons in particular lose energy rapidly through synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, resulting in a relatively short lifetime (about 10(5) years) and a rapidly falling intensity, which raises the possibility of seeing the contribution from individual nearby sources (less than one kiloparsec away). Here we report an excess of galactic cosmic-ray electrons at energies of approximately 300-800 GeV, which indicates a nearby source of energetic electrons. Such a source could be an unseen astrophysical object (such as a pulsar or micro-quasar) that accelerates electrons to those energies, or the electrons could arise from the annihilation of dark matter particles (such as a Kaluza-Klein particle with a mass of about 620 GeV). PMID:19020615

  1. Constructing gravitational dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Matthew

    2003-07-01

    It would be extremely useful to know whether a particular low energy effective theory might have come from a compactification of a higher dimensional space. Here, this problem is approached from the ground up by considering theories with multiple interacting massive gravitons. It is actually very difficult to construct discrete gravitational dimensions which have a local continuum limit. In fact, any model with only nearest neighbor interactions is doomed. If we could find a non-linear extension for the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for a graviton of mass mg, which does not break down until the scale Λ2=(mgMPl), this could be used to construct a large class of models whose continuum limit is local in the extra dimension. But this is shown to be impossible: a theory with a single graviton must break down by Λ3=(m2gMPl)1/3. Next, we look at how the discretization prescribed by the truncation of the Kaluza-Klein tower of an honest extra dimension raises the scale of strong coupling. It dictates an intricate set of interactions among various fields which conspire to soften the strongest scattering amplitudes and allow for a local continuum limit, at least at the tree level. A number of candidate symmetries associated with locality in the discretized dimension are also discussed.

  2. Electroweak constraints on warped geometry in five dimensions and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul R.; Huber, Stephan J.

    2010-10-01

    Here we consider the tree level corrections to electroweak (EW) observables from standard model (SM) particles propagating in generic warped extra dimensions. The scale of these corrections is found to be dominated by three parameters, the Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass scale, the relative coupling of the KK gauge fields to the Higgs and the relative coupling of the KK gauge fields to fermion zero modes. It is found that 5D spaces that resolve the hierarchy problem through warping typically have large gauge-Higgs coupling. It is also found in D> 5 where the additional dimensions are warped the relative gauge-Higgs coupling scales as a function of the warp factor. If the warp factor of the additional spaces is contracting towards the IR brane, both the relative gauge-Higgs coupling and resulting EW corrections will be large. Conversely EW constraints could be reduced by finding a space where the additional dimension’s warp factor is increasing towards the IR brane. We demonstrate that the Klebanov Strassler solution belongs to the former of these possibilities.

  3. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  4. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  5. Cosmological singularity theorems and splitting theorems for N-Bakry-Émery spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolgar, Eric; Wylie, William

    2016-02-01

    We study Lorentzian manifolds with a weight function such that the N-Bakry-Émery tensor is bounded below. Such spacetimes arise in the physics of scalar-tensor gravitation theories, including Brans-Dicke theory, theories with Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction, and low-energy approximations to string theory. In the "pure Bakry-Émery" N = ∞ case with f uniformly bounded above and initial data suitably bounded, cosmological-type singularity theorems are known, as are splitting theorems which determine the geometry of timelike geodesically complete spacetimes for which the bound on the initial data is borderline violated. We extend these results in a number of ways. We are able to extend the singularity theorems to finite N-values N ∈ (n, ∞) and N ∈ (-∞, 1]. In the N ∈ (n, ∞) case, no bound on f is required, while for N ∈ (-∞, 1] and N = ∞, we are able to replace the boundedness of f by a weaker condition on the integral of f along future-inextendible timelike geodesics. The splitting theorems extend similarly, but when N = 1, the splitting is only that of a warped product for all cases considered. A similar limited loss of rigidity has been observed in a prior work on the N-Bakry-Émery curvature in Riemannian signature when N = 1 and appears to be a general feature.

  6. Procura de Sinais de Dimensões Extras Universais em Colisões Próton-Antipróton

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza Santos, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Models that predict the existence of extra spatial dimensions have been studied since the beginning of the 20th century. These models can incorporate gravity in the framework that describes the other interactions and they can present a number of interesting features such as a dark matter candidate. In this work, we explore the consequences of the Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) model by searching for the production of Kaluza-Klein particles whose decay chain leads to signature $\\mu^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm} + \\mathrm{jets} + \\met$. We employ the data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\unit{7.3}{\\femto\\barn}$^{-1}$, collected by the \\dzero{} detector at a $p\\bar p$ collider at a center of mass energy of \\unit{1.96}{\\tera\\electronvolt}. Since no excess was observed in the data, we were able to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of $R^{-1}>260$ GeV in the model. This is the first study to impose a direct limit on the minimal UED model.

  7. Comparison of associated Higgs boson-radion and Higgs boson pair production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, E.; Keizerov, S.; Rakhmetov, E.; Svirina, K.

    2016-07-01

    Many models—in particular, the brane-world models with two branes—predict the existence of the scalar radion, whose mass can be somewhat smaller than those of all the Kaluza-Klein modes of the graviton and Standard Model (SM) particles. Due to its origin the radion interacts with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of the SM. The fermion part of the radion interaction Lagrangian is different from that for the SM Higgs boson due to the presence of additional terms playing a role for off-shell fermions. It was shown previously [Phys. Rev. D 90, 095026 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.095026] that for the case of the single radion and single Higgs boson production processes in association with an arbitrary number of SM gauge bosons all the contributions to the perturbative amplitudes appearing due to these additional terms were canceled out, making the processes similar up to a replacement of masses and overall coupling constants. For the case of the associated Higgs boson-radion and the Higgs boson pair-production processes involving the SM gauge bosons, the similarity property also appears. However, a detailed consideration shows that in this case it is not enough to simply replace the masses and the constants (mh→mr and v →Λr). One should also rescale the triple Higgs coupling by the factor ξ ≡1 +m/r2-mh2 3 mh2 .

  8. Critical gravity on AdS2 spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2011-09-01

    We study the critical gravity in two-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS2) spacetimes, which was obtained from the cosmological topologically massive gravity (TMGΛ) in three dimensions by using the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction. We perform the perturbation analysis around AdS2, which may correspond to the near-horizon geometry of the extremal Banados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli (BTZ) black hole obtained from the TMGΛ with identification upon uplifting three dimensions. A massive propagating scalar mode δF satisfies the second-order differential equation away from the critical point of K=l, whose solution is given by the Bessel functions. On the other hand, δF satisfies the fourth-order equation at the critical point. We exactly solve the fourth-order equation, and compare it with the log gravity in two dimensions. Consequently, the critical gravity in two dimensions could not be described by a massless scalar δFml and its logarithmic partner δFlog⁡4th.

  9. Bulk charges in eleven dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.; Taylor-Robinson, M. M.

    1998-07-01

    Eleven dimensional supergravity has electric type currents arising from the Chern-Simon and anomaly terms in the action. However the bulk charge integrates to zero for asymptotically flat solutions with topological trivial spatial sections. We show that by relaxing the boundary conditions to generalisations of the ALE and ALF boundary conditions in four dimensions one can obtain static solutions with a bulk charge. Solutions involving anomaly terms preserve between 1/16 and 1/4 of the supersymmetries but Chern-Simons fluxes generally break all of the remaining supersymmetry. One can introduce membranes with the same sign of charge into these backgrounds. This raises the possibility that these generalized membranes might decay quantum mechanically to leave just a bulk distribution of charge. Alternatively and more probably, a bulk distribution of charge can decay into a collection of singly charged membranes. Dimensional reductions of these solutions lead to novel representations of extreme black holes in four dimensions with up to four charges. We discuss how the eleven-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole wrapped around a space with non-zero first Pontryagin class picks up an electric charge proportional to the Pontryagin number.

  10. LHC signals for coset electroweak gauge bosons in warped/composite pseudo-Goldstone boson Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Azatov, Aleksandr; Han, Tao; Li, Yingchuan; Si, Zong-Guo; Zhu, Lijun

    2010-05-01

    The framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model (SM) fields propagating in it is a very well-motivated extension of the SM since it can address both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. Within this framework, solution to the little hierarchy problem motivates extending the SM electroweak (EW) 5D gauge symmetry in such a way that its breakdown to the SM delivers the SM Higgs boson. We study signals at the large hadron collider (LHC) for the extra EW (called coset) gauge bosons, a fundamental ingredient of this framework. The coset gauge bosons, due to their unique EW gauge quantum numbers [doublets of SU(2)L], do not couple at leading order to two SM particles. We find that, using the associated production of the charged coset gauge bosons via their coupling to bottom quark and a (light) Kaluza-Klein excitation of the top quark, the LHC can have a 3σ reach of ˜2(2.6)TeV for the coset gauge boson masses with ˜100(1000)fb-1 luminosity. Since current theoretical framework(s) suggest an indirect lower limit on coset gauge boson masses of ≳3TeV, luminosity or energy upgrade of LHC is likely to be crucial in observing these states.

  11. Flavor structure of warped extra dimension models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We recently showed that warped extra-dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) masses lead to striking signals at B factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B physics. We also briefly study other new physics signatures that arise in rare K decays (K→πνν), in rare top decays [t→cγ(Z,gluon)], and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D0 decays to CP eigenstates such as KSπ0 and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, ˜3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a “CP problem” since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  12. Baryon number in warped grand unified theories: model building and (dark matter related) phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Servant, Géraldine

    2005-02-01

    In the past year, a new non-supersymmetric framework for electroweak symmetry breaking (with or without Higgs) involving SU(2)L × SU(2)R × U(1)B-L in higher dimensional warped geometry has been suggested. In this work, we embed this gauge structure into a GUT such as SO(10) or Pati Salam. We showed recently (in hep-ph/0403143) that in a warped GUT, a stable Kaluza Klein fermion can arise as a consequence of imposing proton stability. Here, we specify a complete realistic model where this particle is a weakly interacting right-handed neutrino, and present a detailed study of this new dark matter candidate, providing relic density and detection predictions. We discuss phenomenological aspects associated with the existence of other light ({\\lesssim }\\mathrm {TeV} ) KK fermions (related to the neutrino), whose lightness is a direct consequence of the top quark's heaviness. The AdS/CFT interpretation of this construction is also presented. Most of our qualitative results do not depend on the nature of the breaking of the electroweak symmetry provided that it happens near the TeV brane.

  13. Conformal field theory dual of the RS model with gauge fields in the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Delgado, A.

    2003-02-01

    It has been conjectured that the (weakly coupled) Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with gauge fields in the bulk is dual to a (strongly coupled) 4D conformal field theory (CFT) with an UV cutoff and in which global symmetries of the CFT are gauged. We elucidate features of this dual CFT which are crucial for a complete understanding of the proposed duality. We argue that the limit of no (or small) brane-localized kinetic term for bulk gauge field on the RS side (often studied in the literature) is dual to no bare kinetic term for the gauge field which is coupled to the CFT global current. In this limit, the kinetic term for this gauge field in the dual CFT is “induced” by CFT loops. Then, this CFT loop contribution to the gauge field 1PI two-point function is dual (on the RS side) to the full gauge propagator (i.e., including the contribution of Kaluza-Klein and zero modes) with both external points on the Planck brane. We also emphasize that loop corrections to the gauge coupling on the RS side are dual to subleading effects in a large-N expansion on the CFT side; these subleading corrections to the gauge coupling in the dual CFT are (in general) sensitive to the strong dynamics of the CFT.

  14. Warped gravitons at the CERN LHC and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-08-01

    We study the production and decay of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in the framework of a warped extra dimension in which the standard model (SM) fields propagate. Such a scenario can provide solutions to both the Planck-weak hierarchy problem and the flavor puzzle of the SM. In this scenario, the production via qq¯ annihilation and decays to the conventional photon and lepton channels are highly suppressed. However, we show that graviton production via gluon fusion followed by decay to longitudinal Z/W can be significant; vector boson fusion is found to be a subdominant production mode. In particular, the golden ZZ decay mode offers a distinctive 4-lepton signal that could lead to the observation at the LHC with 300fb-1 (SLHC with 3ab-1) of a KK graviton with a mass up to ˜2 (˜3) TeV for the ratio of the AdS5 curvature to the Planck scale modestly above unity. We argue that (contrary to the lore) such a size of the curvature scale can still be within the regime of validity of the framework. Upgrades beyond the SLHC luminosity are required to discover gravitons heavier than ˜4TeV, as favored by the electroweak and flavor precision tests in the simplest such models.

  15. Universal extra dimensions and /b-->sγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2001-08-01

    We analyze the effect of flat universal extra dimensions (i.e., extra dimensions accessible to all SM fields) on the process /b-->sγ. With one Higgs doublet, the dominant contribution at one-loop is from Kaluza-Klein (KK) states of the charged would-be-Goldstone boson (WGB) and of the top quark. The resulting constraint on the size of the extra dimension is comparable to the constraint from /T parameter. In two-Higgs-doublet model II, the contribution of zero-mode and KK states of physical charged Higgs can cancel the contribution from WGB KK states. Therefore, in this model, there is no constraint on the size of the extra dimensions from the process /b-->sγ and also the constraint on the mass of the charged Higgs from this process is weakened compared to /4D. In two-Higgs-doublet model I, the contribution of the zero-mode and KK states of physical charged Higgs and that of the KK states of WGB are of the same sign. Thus, in this model and for small /tanβ, the constraint on the size of the extra dimensions is stronger than in one-Higgs-doublet model and also the constraint on the mass of the charged Higgs is stronger than in /4D.

  16. Can extra dimensions accessible to the SM explain the recent measurement of anomalous magnetic moment of the muon?*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Deshpande, N. G.; Wu, G.-H.

    2001-06-01

    We investigate whether models with flat extra dimensions in which SM fields propagate can give a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (MMM). In models with only SM gauge and Higgs fields in the bulk, the contribution to the MMM from Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of gauge bosons is very small. This is due to the constraint on the size of the extra dimensions from tree-level effects of KK excitations of gauge bosons on precision electroweak observables such as Fermi constant. If the quarks and leptons are also allowed to propagate in the (same) bulk (``universal'' extra dimensions), then there are no contributions to precision electroweak observables at tree-level. However, in this case, the constraint from one-loop contribution of KK excitations of (mainly) the top quark to /T parameter again implies that the contribution to the MMM is small. We show that in models with leptons, electroweak gauge and Higgs fields propagating in the (same) bulk, but with quarks and gluon propagating in a sub-space of this bulk, both the above constraints can be relaxed. However, with only one Higgs doublet, the constraint from the process /b-->sγ requires the contribution to the MMM to be smaller than the SM electroweak correction. This constraint can be relaxed in models with more than one Higgs doublet.

  17. CERN LHC signals from warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Perez, Gilad; Virzi, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of the KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton’s constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decays mostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG≲4TeV, 100fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic “top-jets.” We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays (golden modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example, little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely, (1) suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their “light-fermion-phobic” nature, and (2) difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  18. Maeda-Dadhich solutions as real black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyev, S. O.; Petrov, A. N.; Latosh, B. N.

    2015-11-01

    Four-dimensional static Schwarzschild-like solutions obtained in [H. Maeda and N. Dadhich, Phys. Rev. D 74, 021501(R) (2006).H. Maeda and N. Dadhich, Phys. Rev. D 75, 044007 (2007).N. Dadhich and H. Maeda, Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 17, 513 (2008).A. Molina and N. Dadhich, Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 18, 599 (2009).] in the frames of the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity at the Kaluza-Klein split are analyzed. In such models matter is created by auxiliary dimensions. The main goal of our work is to check that these solutions are physically sensible, and to examine their characteristics, which could be observable. A noncontradictive definition of a total mass (energy) is given. Study of the perturbed equations demonstrates a possibility of their stability under linear perturbations. Depending on the combination of the parameters, black hole-like objects with one or two horizons or naked singularity are described in detail. Stable orbits of test particles around these black holes are presented. We show the exotic thermodynamical properties of the solution, in which the Hawking evaporation law has the behavior opposite to the usual one in general relativity. Unfortunately, current astronomical data do not allow one to distinguish special observable evidences, which we find for the solutions under consideration, from usual Schwarzschild ones.

  19. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. 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A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-01

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20 .3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Six-dimensional origin of gravity-mediated brane to brane supersymmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamandis, G. A.; Georgalas, B. C.; Kouroumalou, P.; Lahanas, A. B.

    2014-04-01

    Four-dimensional supergravities may be the right framework to describe particle physics at low energies. Its connection to the underlying string theory can be implemented through higher dimensional supergravities which bear special characteristics. Their reduction to four dimensions breaks supersymmetry whose magnitude depends both on the compactifying manifold and the mechanism that generates the breaking. In particular compactifications, notably on a S1/Z2 orbifold, the breaking of supersymmetry occurring on a hidden brane, residing at one end of S1/Z2, is communicated to the visible brane which lies at the other end, via gravitational interactions propagating in the bulk. This scenario has been exemplified in the framework of the N=2, D=5 supergravity. In this paper, motivated by the recent developments in the field, related to the six-dimensional description of the supergravity theory, we study the N=2, D=5 supergravity theory as originating from a D=6 supergravity which, in addition to the gravity, includes a number of tensor multiplets. This reduces to N=1, D=4 supergravity in a two step manner, first by a Kaluza-Klein reduction followed by a S1/Z2 orbifold compactification. The resulting theory has striking similarities with the one that follows from the single stand alone N=2, D=5 supergravity, with no reference to the underlying higher dimensional D=6 supergravity, and a structure that makes the supersymmetry breaking mechanisms studied in the past easily incorporated in higher dimensional schemes.

  1. The effective action of D6-branes in mathcal{N} = 1 type IIA orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstan, Max; Weigand, Timo

    2011-06-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein reduction to compute the low-energy effective action for the massless modes of a spacetime-filling D6-brane wrapped on a special Lagrangian 3-cycle of a type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifold. The modifications to the characteristic data of the mathcal{N} = 1 bulk orientifold theory in the presence of a D6-brane are analysed by studying the underlying Type IIA supergravity coupled to the brane world volume in the democratic formulation and performing a detailed dualisation procedure. The mathcal{N} = 1 chiralcoordinates are found to be in agreement with expectations from mirror symmetry. We work out the Kähler potential for the chiral superfields as well as the gauge kinetic functions for the bulk and the brane gauge multiplets including the kinetic mixing between the two. The scalar potential resulting from the dualisation procedure can be formally interpreted in terms of a superpotential. Finally, the gauging of the Peccei-Quinn shift symmetries of the complex structure multiplets reproduces the D-term potential enforcing the calibration condition for special Lagrangian 3-cycles.

  2. Anomaly cancelation in field theory and F-theory on a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Thomas W.; Kapfer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We study the manifestation of local gauge anomalies of four- and six-dimensional field theories in the lower-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory obtained after circle compactification. We identify a convenient set of transformations acting on the whole tower of massless and massive states and investigate their action on the low-energy effective theories in the Coulomb branch. The maps employ higher-dimensional large gauge transformations and precisely yield the anomaly cancelation conditions when acting on the one-loop induced Chern-Simons terms in the three- and five-dimensional effective theory. The arising symmetries are argued to play a key role in the study of the M-theory to F-theory limit on Calabi-Yau manifolds. For example, using the fact that all fully resolved F-theory geometries inducing multiple Abelian gauge groups or non-Abelian groups admit a certain set of symmetries, we are able to generally show the cancelation of pure Abelian or pure non-Abelian anomalies in these models.

  3. Warped gravitons at the CERN LHC and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Soni, Amarjit; Perez, Gilad

    2007-08-01

    We study the production and decay of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in the framework of a warped extra dimension in which the standard model (SM) fields propagate. Such a scenario can provide solutions to both the Planck-weak hierarchy problem and the flavor puzzle of the SM. In this scenario, the production via qq annihilation and decays to the conventional photon and lepton channels are highly suppressed. However, we show that graviton production via gluon fusion followed by decay to longitudinal Z/W can be significant; vector boson fusion is found to be a subdominant production mode. In particular, the golden ZZ decay mode offers a distinctive 4-lepton signal that could lead to the observation at the LHC with 300 fb{sup -1} (SLHC with 3 ab{sup -1}) of a KK graviton with a mass up to {approx}2 ({approx}3) TeV for the ratio of the AdS{sub 5} curvature to the Planck scale modestly above unity. We argue that (contrary to the lore) such a size of the curvature scale can still be within the regime of validity of the framework. Upgrades beyond the SLHC luminosity are required to discover gravitons heavier than {approx}4 TeV, as favored by the electroweak and flavor precision tests in the simplest such models.

  4. Ultravisible warped model from flavor triviality and improved naturalness

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunay, Cedric; Gedalia, Oram; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad; Ponton, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    A warped extra-dimensional model, where the standard model Yukawa hierarchy is set by UV physics, is shown to have a sweet spot of parameters with improved experimental visibility and possibly naturalness. Upon marginalizing over all the model parameters, a Kaluza-Klein scale of 2.1 TeV can be obtained at 2{sigma} (95.4% C.L.) without conflicting with electroweak precision measurements. Fitting all relevant parameters simultaneously can relax this bound to 1.7 TeV. In this bulk version of the Rattazzi-Zaffaroni shining model, flavor violation is also highly suppressed, yielding a bound of 2.4 TeV. Nontrivial flavor physics at the LHC in the form of flavor gauge bosons is predicted. The model is also characterized by a depletion of the third-generation couplings--as predicted by the general minimal flavor violation framework--which can be tested via flavor precision measurements. In particular, sizable CP violation in {Delta}B=2 transitions can be obtained, and there is a natural region where B{sub s} mixing is predicted to be larger than B{sub d} mixing, as favored by recent Tevatron data. Unlike other proposals, the new contributions are not linked to Higgs or any scalar exchange processes.

  5. Does the force from an extra dimension contradict physics in 4D?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, J. Ponce

    2001-12-01

    We examine the question of whether violation of 4D physics is an inevitable consequence of existence of an extra non-compactified dimension. Recent investigations in membrane and Kaluza-Klein theory indicate that when the metric of the spacetime is allowed to depend on the extra coordinate, i.e., the cilindricity condition is dropped, the equation describing the trajectory of a particle in one lower dimension has an extra force with some abnormal properties. Among them, a force term parallel to the four-velocity of the particle and, what is perhaps more surprising, uμfμ≠uμfμ. These properties violate basic concepts in 4D physics. In this Letter we argue that these abnormal properties are not consequence of the extra dimension, but result from the formalism used. We propose a new definition for the force, from the extra dimension, which is free of any contradictions and consistent with usual 4D physics. We show, using warp metrics, that this new definition is also more consistent with our physical intuition. The effects of this force could be detected observing objects moving with high speed, near black holes and/or in cosmological situations.

  6. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter. PMID:27015472

  7. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  8. Plane-wave matrix theory from N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R×S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nakwoo; Klose, Thomas; Plefka, Jan

    2003-11-01

    Recently a mass deformation of the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills quantum mechanics has been constructed from the supermembrane action in eleven-dimensional plane-wave backgrounds. However, the origin of this plane-wave matrix theory in terms of a compactification of a higher-dimensional super-Yang-Mills model has remained obscure. In this paper we study the Kaluza-Klein reduction of D=4, N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory on a round three-sphere, and demonstrate that the plane-wave matrix theory arises through a consistent truncation to the lowest lying modes. We further explore the relation between the dilatation operator of the conformal field theory and the Hamiltonian of the quantum mechanics through perturbative calculations up to two-loop order. In particular, we find that the one-loop anomalous dimensions of pure scalar operators are completely captured by the plane-wave matrix theory. At two-loop level this property ceases to exist.

  9. Effective theory of brane world with small tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisano, Junji; Okada, Nobuchika

    2000-05-01

    The five dimensional theory compactified on S1 with two ``branes'' (two domain walls) embedded in it is constructed, based on the field-theoretic mechanism to generate the ``brane.'' Some light states localized in the ``brane'' appear in the theory. One is the Nambu-Goldstone boson, which corresponds to the breaking of the translational invariance in the transverse direction of the ``brane.'' In addition, if the tension of the ``brane'' is smaller than the fundamental scale of the original theory, it is found that there may exist not only massless states but also some massive states lighter than the fundamental scale in the ``brane.'' We analyze the four dimensional effective theory by integrating out the freedom of the fifth dimension. We show that some effective couplings can be explicitly calculated. As one of our results, some effective couplings of the state localized in the ``brane'' to the higher Kaluza-Klein modes in the bulk are found to be suppressed by the width of the ``brane.'' The resultant suppression factor can be quantitatively different from the one analyzed by Bando et al. using the Nambu-Goto action, while they are qualitatively the same.

  10. Sharpening the weak gravity conjecture with dimensional reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Ben; Reece, Matthew; Rudelius, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the behavior of the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) under toroidal compactification and RG flows, finding evidence that WGC bounds for single photons become weaker in the infrared. By contrast, we find that a photon satisfying the WGC will not necessarily satisfy it after toroidal compactification when black holes charged under the Kaluza-Klein photons are considered. Doing so either requires an infinite number of states of different charges to satisfy the WGC in the original theory or a restriction on allowed compactification radii. These subtleties suggest that if the Weak Gravity Conjecture is true, we must seek a stronger form of the conjecture that is robust under compactification. We propose a "Lattice Weak Gravity Conjecture" that meets this requirement: a superextremal particle should exist for every charge in the charge lattice. The perturbative heterotic string satisfies this conjecture. We also use compactification to explore the extent to which the WGC applies to axions. We argue that gravitational instanton solutions in theories of axions coupled to dilaton-like fields are analogous to extremal black holes, motivating a WGC for axions. This is further supported by a match between the instanton action and that of wrapped black branes in a higher-dimensional UV completion.

  11. Non-supersymmetric F-theory compactifications on Spin(7) manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Federico; Grimm, Thomas W.; Pugh, Tom G.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to obtain four-dimensional effective actions coupled to supersymmetry-breaking boundaries by considering F-theory on manifolds with special holonomy Spin(7). To perform such studies we suggest that a duality relating M-theory on a certain class of Spin(7) manifolds with F-theory on the same manifolds times an interval exists. The Spin(7) geometries under consideration are constructed as quotients of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau fourfolds by an anti-holomorphic and isometric involution. The three-dimensional minimally supersymmetric effective action of M-theory on a general Spin(7) manifold with fluxes is determined and specialized to the aforementioned geometries. This effective theory is compared with an interval Kaluza-Klein reduction of a non-supersymmetric four-dimensional theory with definite boundary conditions for all fields. Using this strategy a minimal set of couplings of the four-dimensional low-energy effective actions is obtained in terms of the Spin(7) geometric data. We also discuss briefly the string interpretation in the Type IIB weak coupling limit.

  12. Evidence for the holographic dual of N =3 solution in massive type IIA supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yi; Rong, Junchen

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the Kaluza-Klein spectrum of spin-2 fluctuations around the N =3 warped AdS4×M6 solution in massive IIA supergravity. This solution was conjectured to be dual to the D =3 N =3 superconformal SU (N ) Chern-Simons matter theory with level k and 2 adjoint chiral multiplets. The SO (3 )R×SO (3 )D isometry of the N =3 solution is identified with the SU (2 )F×SU (2 )R global symmetry of the dual N =3 supersymmetric conformal field theory (SCFT). We show that the SO (3 )R×SO (3 )D quantum numbers and the AdS energies carried by the BPS spin-2 modes match precisely with those of the spin-2 gauge invariant operators in the short multiplets of operators in the N =3 SCFT. We also compute the Euclidean action of the N =3 solution and the free energy of the N =3 SCFT on S3, in the limit N ≫k . Remarkably, the results show a complete agreement.

  13. Towards establishing the spin of warped gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, Oleg; Soni, Amarjit

    2008-10-01

    We study the possibility of experimental verification of the spin=2 nature of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton which is predicted to exist in the extra-dimensional Randal-Sundrum (RS) warped models. The couplings of these gravitons to the particles located on or near the TeV brane is the strongest as the overlap integral of their profiles in the extra-dimension is large. Among them are unphysical Higgses (W±L and ZL) and KK excitations of the Standard Model (SM) gauge bosons. We consider the possibility to confirm the spin-2 nature of the first KK mode of the warped graviton (G1) based on the angular distribution of the Z bozon in the graviton rest frame in the gg → G1 → WKK(ZKK)W(Z) → WWZ, gg → G1 → ZZ and gg → G1 → ZKKZ → ZZH decay channels. Using Wigner D-matrix properties, we derive the relationship between the graviton spin, signal angular distribution peak value, and other theoretically calculable quantities. We then study the LHC signals for these decay modes and find that with 1000 fb-1 of data, spin of the RS graviton up to ~ 2 TeV may be confirmed in the pp → WKK(ZKK)W(Z) → WWZ → 3 leptons + jet + \\slashed{E}_T and pp → ZZ → 4 leptons decay modes.

  14. B-factory signals for a warped extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2004-08-24

    We study predictions for B-physics in a class of models, recently introduced, with a non-supersymmetric warped extra dimension. In these models few ({approx} 3) TeV Kaluza-Klein masses are consistent with electroweak data due to bulk custodial symmetry. Furthermore, there is an analog of GIM mechanism which is violated by the heavy top quark (just as in SM) leading to striking signals at B-factories: (1) New Physics (NP) contributions to {Delta}F = 2 transitions are comparable to SM. This implies that, within this NP framework, the success of the SM unitarity triangle fit is a ''coincidence''. Thus, clean extractions of unitarity angles via e.g. B {yields} {pi}{pi}, {rho}{pi}, {rho}{rho}, DK are likely to be affected, in addition to O(1) deviation from SM prediction in Bs mixing. (2) O(1) deviation from SM predictions for B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} in rate as well as in forward-backward and direct CP asymmetry. (3) Large mixing-induced CP asymmetry in radiative B decays, wherein the SM unambiguously predicts very small asymmetries. Also, with KK masses 3 TeV or less, and with anarchic Yukawa masses, contributions to electric dipole moments of the neutron are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound so that this framework has a ''CP problem''.

  15. Introduction to the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nąstase, Horaǧiu

    2015-09-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Background: 1. Elements of quantum field theory and gauge theory; 2. Basics of general relativity. Anti-de Sitter space; 3. Basics of supersymmetry; 4. Basics of supergravity; 5. Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction; 6. Black holes and p-branes; 7. String theory actions and spectra; 8. Elements of conformal field theory; 9. D-branes; Part II. Basics of AdS/CFT for N = 4 SYM vs AdS5 × S5: 10. The AdS/CFT correspondence: motivation, definition and spectra; 11. Witten prescription and 3-point correlator calculations; 12. Holography in Lorentzian signature: Poincaré and global; 13. Solitonic objects in AdS/CFT; 14. Quarks and the Wilson loop; 15. Finite temperature and N = 4 SYM plasmas; 16. Scattering processes and gravitational shockwave limit; 17. The pp-wave correspondence; 18. Spin chains; Part III. AdS/CFT Developments and Gauge-Gravity Dualities: 19. Other conformal cases; 20. The 3 dimensional ABJM model vs. AdS4 × CP3; 21. Gravity duals; 22. Holographic renormalization; 23. RG flow between fixed points; 24. Phenomenological gauge-gravity duality I: AdS/QCD; 25. Phenomenological gauge-gravity duality II: AdS/CMT; 26. Gluon scattering: the Alday-Maldacena prescription; 27. Holographic entanglement entropy: the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription.

  16. LHC Signals from Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, K.; Belyaev, A.; Krupovnickas, T.; Perez, G.; Virzi, J.

    2006-12-06

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein gluons (KKG) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decaysmostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG<~;; 4 TeV, 100 fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizeable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic"top-jets." We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays ("golden" modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely (1) Suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their"lightfermion-phobic" nature, and (2) Difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  17. Compactification on phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin; Wheeler, James

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge for string theory is to understand the dimensional reduction required for comparison with the standard model. We propose reducing the dimension of the compactification by interpreting some of the extra dimensions as the energy-momentum portion of a phase-space. Such models naturally arise as generalized quotients of the conformal group called biconformal spaces. By combining the standard Kaluza-Klein approach with such a conformal gauge theory, we may start from the conformal group of an n-dimensional Euclidean space to form a 2n-dimensional quotient manifold with symplectic structure. A pair of involutions leads naturally to two n-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds. For n = 5, this leaves only two extra dimensions, with a countable family of possible compactifications and an SO(5) Yang-Mills field on the fibers. Starting with n=6 leads to 4-dimensional compactification of the phase space. In the latter case, if the two dimensions each from spacetime and momentum space are compactified onto spheres, then there is an SU(2)xSU(2) (left-right symmetric electroweak) field between phase and configuration space and an SO(6) field on the fibers. Such a theory, with minor additional symmetry breaking, could contain all parts of the standard model.

  18. Topological charges in SL(2,R) covariant massive 11-dimensional and type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Andrew K.; Smith, Douglas J.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we construct closed expressions that correspond to the topological charges of the various 1/2-BPS states of the maximal 10- and 11-dimensional supergravity theories. These expressions are related to the structure of the supersymmetry algebras in curved spacetimes. We mainly focus on IIB supergravity and 11-dimensional supergravity in a double M9-brane background, with an emphasis on the SL(2,R) multiplet structure of the charges and how these map between theories. This includes the charges corresponding to the multiplets of 7- and 9-branes in IIB. We find that examining the possible multiplet structures of the charges provides another tool for exploring the spectrum of BPS states that appear in these theories. As a prerequisite to constructing the charges we determine the field equations and multiplet structure of the 11-dimensional gauge potentials, extending previous results on the subject. The massive gauge transformations of the fields are also discussed. We also demonstrate how these massive gauge transformations are compatible with the construction of an SL(2,R) covariant kinetic term in the 11-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole worldvolume action.

  19. Controlling chaos through compactification in cosmological models with a collapsing phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Daniel H.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2005-09-01

    We consider the effect of compactification of extra dimensions on the onset of classical chaotic mixmaster behavior during cosmic contraction. Assuming a universe that is well-approximated as a four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model (with negligible Kaluza-Klein excitations) when the contraction phase begins, we identify compactifications that allow a smooth contraction and delay the onset of chaos until arbitrarily close to the big crunch. These compactifications are defined by the de Rham cohomology (Betti numbers) and Killing vectors of the compactification manifold. We find compactifications that control chaos in vacuum Einstein gravity, as well as in string theories with N=1 supersymmetry and M-theory. In models where chaos is controlled in this way, the universe can remain homogeneous and flat until it enters the quantum gravity regime. At this point, the classical equations leading to chaotic behavior can no longer be trusted, and quantum effects may allow a smooth approach to the big crunch and transition into a subsequent expanding phase. Our results may be useful for constructing cosmological models with contracting phases, such as the ekpyrotic/cyclic and pre-big bang models.

  20. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{-1}$$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.« less

  1. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  2. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  3. Some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we examine, from the purely theoretical point of view and in a model-independent way, the case, when matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension, and the Standard Model fields and their interactions are supposed to be reproduced by the corresponding zero Kaluza-Klein modes. An unexpected result is that in order to avoid possible pathological behavior in the fermion sector, it is necessary to impose constraints on the fermion field Lagrangian. In the case when the fermion zero modes are supposed to be localized at one of the branes, these constraints imply an additional relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric. Moreover, this relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric results in the exact reproduction of the gauge boson and fermion sectors of the Standard Model by the corresponding zero mode four-dimensional effective theory in all the physically relevant cases, allowed by the absence of pathologies. Meanwhile, deviations from these conditions can lead either back to pathological behavior in the fermion sector or to a variance between the resulting zero mode four-dimensional effective theory and the Standard Model, which, depending on the model at hand, may, in principle, result in constraints putting the theory out of the reach of the present day experiments.

  4. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  5. Transverse Beam Polarizationas an Alternate View into New Physics at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    In e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, transverse beam polarization can be a useful tool in studying the properties of particles associated with new physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). However, unlike in the case of measurements associated with longitudinal polarization, the formation of azimuthal asymmetries used to probe this physics in the case of transverse polarization requires both e{sup {+-}} beams to be simultaneously polarized. In this paper we discuss the further use of transverse polarization as a probe of new physics models at a high energy, {radical}s = 3 TeV version of CLIC. In particular, we show (i) how measurements of the sign of these asymmetries is sufficient to discriminate the production of spin-0 supersymmetric states from the spin-1/2 Kaluza-Klein excitations of Universal Extra Dimensions. Simultaneously, the contribution to this asymmetry arising from the potentially large SM W{sup +}W{sup -} background can be made negligibly small. We then show (ii) how measurements of such asymmetries and their associated angular distributions on the peak of a new resonant Z{prime}-like state can be used to extract precision information on the Z{prime} couplings to the SM fermions.

  6. Black rings in Taub-NUT and D0-D6 interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Joan; Emparan, Roberto; Figueras, Pau; Giusto, Stefano; Saxena, Ashish

    2009-02-01

    We analyze the dynamics of neutral black rings in Taub-NUT spaces and their relation to systems of D0 and D6 branes in the supergravity approximation. We employ several recent techniques, both perturbative and exact, to construct solutions in which thermal excitations of the D0-branes can be turned on or off, and the D6-brane can have B-fluxes turned on or off in its worldvolume. By explicit calculation of the interaction energy between the D0 and D6 branes, we can study equilibrium configurations and their stability. We find that although D0 and D6 branes (in the absence of B fields, and at zero temperature) repeal each other at non-zero separation, as they get together they go over continuosly to an unstable bound state of an extremal singular Kaluza-Klein black hole. We also find that, for B-fields larger than a critical value, or sufficiently large thermal excitation, the D0 and D6 branes form stable bound states. The bound states with thermally excited D0 branes are black rings in Taub-NUT, and we provide an analysis of their phase diagram.

  7. Alignment of Quasar Polarizations on Large Scales Explained by Warped Cosmic Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagter, Reinoud Jan

    The recently discovered alignment of quasar polarizations on very large scales could possibly explained by considering cosmic strings on a warped five dimensional spacetime. Compact objects, such as cosmic strings, could have tremendous mass in the bulk, while their warped manifestations in the brane can be consistent with general relativity in 4D. The self-gravitating cosmic string induces gravitational wavelike disturbances which could have effects felt on the brane, i.e., the massive effective 4D modes (Kaluza-Klein modes) of the perturbative 5D graviton. This effect is amplified by the time dependent part of the warp factor. Due to this warp factor, disturbances don't fade away during the expansion of the universe. From a non-linear perturbation analysis it is found that the effective Einstein 4D equations on an axially symmetric spacetime, contain a "back-reaction" term on the righthand side caused by the projected 5D Weyl tensor and can act as a dark energy term. The propagation equations to first order for the metric components and scalar-gauge fields contain $\\varphi$-dependent terms, so the approximate wave solutions are no longer axially symmetric. The disturbances, amplified by the warp factor, can possess extremal values for fixed polar angles. This could explain the two preferred polarization vectors mod $(\\varphi, 90^o)$.

  8. Neutron electric dipole moment in the gauge-Higgs unification

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yuki; Lim, C. S.; Maru, Nobuhito

    2009-09-01

    We study the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) in a five-dimensional SU(3) gauge-Higgs unification compactified on M{sup 4}xS{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} space-time including a massive fermion. We point out that to realize the CP violation is a nontrivial task in the gauge-Higgs unification scenario and argue how the CP symmetry is broken spontaneously by the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs, the extra space component of the gauge field. We emphasize the importance of the interplay between the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs and the Z{sub 2}-odd bulk mass term to get physically the CP violation. We then calculate the one-loop contributions to the neutron EDM as the typical example of the CP violating observable and find that the EDM appears already at the one-loop level, without invoking the three-generation scheme. We then derive a lower bound for the compactification scale, which is around 2.6 TeV, by comparing the contribution due to the nonzero Kaluza-Klein modes with the experimental data.

  9. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in themore » observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  10. Non-supersymmetric D1/D5, F/NS5 and closed string tachyon condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Roy, Shibaji; Wang, Zhao-Long; Wu, Rong-Jun

    2009-09-01

    We construct the intersecting non-supersymmetric (non-susy) D1/D5 solution of type IIB string theory. While, as usual, the solution is charged under an electric two-form and an electric six-form gauge field, it also contains a non-susy chargeless (non-BPS) D0-brane. The S-dual of this solution is the non-susy F/NS5 solution. We show how these solutions nicely interpolate between the corresponding black (or non-extremal) solutions and the Kaluza-Klein (KK) "bubble of nothing" (BON) by continuously changing some parameters characterizing the solutions from one set of values to another. We show, by a time symmetric general bubble initial data analysis, that the final bubbles in these cases are static and stable and the interpolations can be physically interpreted as closed string tachyon condensation. As special cases, we recover the transition of two charge black F-string to BON, considered by Horowitz, and also the transition from AdS 3 black hole to global AdS 3.

  11. Observational evidence for axion(-like) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiLella, L.; Zioutas, K.

    2002-04-01

    Several unexpected astrophysical observations can be explained by gravitationally captured massive axions or axion-like particles produced inside the Sun or other stars. Their radiative decay in solar outer space would give rise to a `self-irradiation' of the whole star, providing the missing corona heating source. In analogy with the Sun-irradiated Earth atmosphere, the temperature and density gradient in the corona/-chromosphere transition region is suggestive for an omnipresent irradiation of the Sun, which is the strongest evidence for the generic axion-like scenario. The radiative decay of a population of such elusive particles mimics a hot gas. The recently reconstructed quiet solar X-ray spectrum supports this work, since it covers the expected energy range, and it is consistent with the result of a simulation based on Kaluza-Klein axions above /~1 keV. At lower energies, using also a ROSAT observation, only /~3% of the solar X-ray intensity is explained. Data from orbiting X-ray Telescopes provide upper limits for particle decay rates 1 AU from the Sun, and suggest new types of searches on Earth or in space. In particular, X-ray observatories, with an unrivalled equivalent fiducial volume of ~103 m3 for the 0.1-10 keV range, can search for the radiative decay of new particles even from existing data.

  12. Dark energy and the hierarchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin

    2009-03-01

    The well-known hierarchy between the Planck scale (˜10GeV) and the TeV scale, namely a ratio of ˜10 between the two, is coincidentally repeated in a inverted order between the TeV scale and the dark energy scale at ˜10eV implied by the observations. We argue that this is not a numerical coincidence. The same brane-world setups to address the first hierarchy problem may also in principle address this second hierarchy issue. Specifically, we consider supersymmetry in the bulk and its breaking on the brane and resort to the Casimir energy induced by the bulk graviton-gravitino mass-shift on the brane as the dark energy. For the ADD model we found that our notion is sensible only if the number of extra dimension n=2. We extend our study to the Randall-Sundrum model. Invoking the chirality-flip on the boundaries for SUSY-breaking, the zero-mode gravitino contribution to the Casimir energy does give rise to the double hierarchy. Unfortunately since the higher Kaluza-Klein modes acquire relative mass-shifts at the TeV level, the zero-mode contribution to Casimir energy is overshadowed.

  13. Search for heavy resonances, and resonant diboson production with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal Hod, Noam

    2013-05-01

    Heavy resonances decaying into a pair of fundamental particles such as jj, ℓ+ℓ-, γγ, and ℓV, are among the most common features to search for phenomena beyond the standard model (SM). Electroweak boson pair production, such as WW or ZZ with subsequent decays to ℓVℓ'V' and ℓℓjj respectively, is a powerful test of the spontaneously broken gauge symmetry of the SM and can be also used to search for phenomena beyond the SM. There is a wide spectrum of theoretical models predicting these kinds of resonant signatures. This note covers several searches for these new phenomena conducted within ATLAS in 2011 and 2012 for the LHC 7 and 8 TeV center of mass energies respectively. No significant deviations from the SM have been observed and therefore, limits are set on the characteristic parameters of several new physics models. These benchmark models include new heavy Z'/W' gauge bosons, chiral excitation of the SM weak gauge bosons, Z*/W* Randal-Sundrum and ADD gravitons, Composite models for quarks, e.g. q* with substructure scale Λ, Quantum black holes, TeV-1 Kaluza-Klein excitation of γ/Z and more.

  14. Searches for hyperbolic extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a model of large extra dimensions where the internal space has the geometry of a hyperbolic disc. Compared with the ADD model, this model provides a more satisfactory solution to the hierarchy problem between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale, and it also avoids constraints from astrophysics. In general, a novel feature of this model is that the physical results depend on the position of the brane in the internal space, and in particular, the signal almost disappears completely if the brane is positioned at the center of the disc. Since there is no known analytic form of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum for our choice of geometry, we obtain a spectrum based on a combination of approximations and numerical computations. We study the possible signatures of our model for hadron colliders, especially the LHC, where the most important processes are the production of a graviton together with a hadronic jet or a photon. We find that the signals are similar to those of the ADD model, regarding both qualitative behavior and strength. For the case of hadronic jet production, it is possible to obtain relatively strong signals, while for the case of photon production, this is much more difficult.

  15. Supergravity in twelve dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kang-Sin

    2015-09-01

    We consider supergravity in twelve dimension, whose dimensional reduction yields eleven-dimensional, IIA, and IIB supergravities. This also provides the effective field theory of F-theory. We must take one direction as a compact circle, so that the Poincaré symmetry and the zero-mode field contents are identical to those of eleven-dimensional supergravity. We also have a tower of massive Kaluza-Klein states to be viewed as the wrapping modes of M2-branes. The twelfth dimension decompactifies only if other two directions are compactified on a torus, restoring different ten dimensional Poincaré symmetry of IIB supergravity, whose missing graviton is provided by components of the rank three tensor field. This condition prevents us from violating the condition on the maximal number of real supercharges, which should be thirty-two. The self-duality condition of the IIB four-form fields is understood from twelve-dimensional Hodge duality. In this framework T-duality is re-interpreted as taking different compactification routes.

  16. Gravity localization on hybrid branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, D. F. S.; Cruz, W. T.; Maluf, R. V.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with gravity localization on codimension-1 brane worlds engendered by compacton-like kinks, the so-called hybrid branes. In such scenarios, the thin brane behavior is manifested when the extra dimension is outside the compact domain, where the energy density is non-trivial, instead of asymptotically as in the usual thick brane models. The zero mode is trapped in the brane, as required. The massive modes, although not localized in the brane, have important phenomenological implications such as corrections to the Newton's law. We study such corrections in the usual thick domain wall and in the hybrid brane scenarios. By means of suitable numerical methods, we attain the mass spectrum for the graviton and the corresponding wavefunctions. The spectra possess the usual linearly increasing behavior from the Kaluza-Klein theories. Further, we show that the 4D gravitational force is slightly increased at short distances. The first eigenstate contributes highly for the correction to the Newton's law. The subsequent normalized solutions have diminishing contributions. Moreover, we find out that the phenomenology of the hybrid brane is not different from the usual thick domain wall. The use of numerical techniques for solving the equations of the massive modes is useful for matching possible phenomenological measurements in the gravitational law as a probe to warped extra dimensions.

  17. An Introduction to General Relativity and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebanski, Jerzy; Krasinski, Andrzej

    2006-08-01

    1. How the theory of relativity came into being (a brief historical sketch); Part I. Elements of Differential Geometry: 2. A short sketch of two-dimensional differential geometries; 3. Tensors, tensor densities; 4. Covariant derivatives; 5. Parallel transport and geodesic lines; 6. Curvature of a manifold: flat manifolds; 7. Riemannian geometry; 8. Symmetries of Rieman spaces, invariance of tensors; 9. Methods to calculate the curvature quickly - Cartan forms and algebraic computer programs; 10. The spatially homogeneous Bianchi-type spacetimes; 11. The Petrov classification by the spinor method; Part II. The Gravitation Theory: 12. The Einstein equations and the sources of a gravitational field; 13. The Maxwell and Einstein-Maxwell equations and the Kaluza-Klein theory; 14. Spherically symmetric gravitational field of isolated objects; 15. Relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics; 16. Relativistic cosmology I: general geometry; 17. Relativistic cosmology II: the Robertson-Walker geometry; 18. Relativistic cosmology III: the Lemaître-Tolman geometry; 19. Relativistic cosmology IV: generalisations of L-T and related geometries; 20. The Kerr solution; 21. Subjects omitted in this book; References.

  18. An Introduction to General Relativity and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plebanski, Jerzy; Krasinski, Andrzej

    2012-09-01

    1. How the theory of relativity came into being (a brief historical sketch); Part I. Elements of Differential Geometry: 2. A short sketch of two-dimensional differential geometries; 3. Tensors, tensor densities; 4. Covariant derivatives; 5. Parallel transport and geodesic lines; 6. Curvature of a manifold: flat manifolds; 7. Riemannian geometry; 8. Symmetries of Rieman spaces, invariance of tensors; 9. Methods to calculate the curvature quickly - Cartan forms and algebraic computer programs; 10. The spatially homogeneous Bianchi-type spacetimes; 11. The Petrov classification by the spinor method; Part II. The Gravitation Theory: 12. The Einstein equations and the sources of a gravitational field; 13. The Maxwell and Einstein-Maxwell equations and the Kaluza-Klein theory; 14. Spherically symmetric gravitational field of isolated objects; 15. Relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics; 16. Relativistic cosmology I: general geometry; 17. Relativistic cosmology II: the Robertson-Walker geometry; 18. Relativistic cosmology III: the Lemaître-Tolman geometry; 19. Relativistic cosmology IV: generalisations of L-T and related geometries; 20. The Kerr solution; 21. Subjects omitted in this book; References.

  19. Cosmological rotating black holes in five-dimensional fake supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Masato; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2011-01-15

    In recent series of papers, we found an arbitrary dimensional, time-evolving, and spatially inhomogeneous solution in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with particular couplings. Similar to the supersymmetric case, the solution can be arbitrarily superposed in spite of nontrivial time-dependence, since the metric is specified by a set of harmonic functions. When each harmonic has a single point source at the center, the solution describes a spherically symmetric black hole with regular Killing horizons and the spacetime approaches asymptotically to the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. We discuss in this paper that in 5 dimensions, this equilibrium condition traces back to the first-order 'Killing spinor' equation in 'fake supergravity' coupled to arbitrary U(1) gauge fields and scalars. We present a five-dimensional, asymptotically FLRW, rotating black-hole solution admitting a nontrivial 'Killing spinor', which is a spinning generalization of our previous solution. We argue that the solution admits nondegenerate and rotating Killing horizons in contrast with the supersymmetric solutions. It is shown that the present pseudo-supersymmetric solution admits closed timelike curves around the central singularities. When only one harmonic is time-dependent, the solution oxidizes to 11 dimensions and realizes the dynamically intersecting M2/M2/M2-branes in a rotating Kasner universe. The Kaluza-Klein-type black holes are also discussed.

  20. Holographic Systematics of D-brane Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Dymarsky, Anatoly; Kachru, Shamit; Klebanov, Igor R.; McAllister, Liam; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-11-05

    We provide a systematic treatment of possible corrections to the inflaton potential for D-brane inflation in the warped deformed conifold. We consider the D3-brane potential in the presence of the most general possible corrections to the throat geometry sourced by coupling to the bulk of a compact Calabi-Yau space. This corresponds to the potential on the Coulomb branch of the dual gauge theory, in the presence of arbitrary perturbations of the Lagrangian. The leading contributions arise from perturbations by the most relevant operators that do not destroy the throat geometry. We find a generic contribution from a non-chiral operator of dimension {Delta} = 2 associated with a global symmetry current, resulting in a negative contribution to the inflaton mass-squared. If the Calabi-Yau preserves certain discrete symmetries, this is the dominant correction to the inflaton potential, and fine-tuning of the inflaton mass is possible. In the absence of such discrete symmetries, the dominant contribution comes from a chiral operator with {Delta} = 3/2, corresponding to a {phi}{sup 3/2} term in the inflaton potential. The resulting inflationary models are phenomenologically identical to the inflection point scenarios arising from specific D7-brane embeddings, but occur under far more general circumstances. Our strategy extends immediately to other warped geometries, given sufficient knowledge of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum.

  1. Possible ambiguities in the equation of state for neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Ryu, C. Y.; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We addressed possible ambiguities on the properties of neutron stars (NSs) estimated in theoretical sides. First, roles of hyperons inside the NS are discussed through various relativistic mean field (RMF) theories. In particular, the extension of SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry to SU(3) flavor symmetry is shown to give rise to the increase of hyperon threshold density, similarly to the Fock term effects in RMF theories. As a result, about 2.0 solar mass is obtained with the hyperons. Second, the effect by the modified f(R) gravity, which leaves a room for the dark energy in the Einstein equation to be taken into account, is discussed for the NS in a strong magnetic field (MF). Our results show that the modified gravity with the Kaluza-Klein electro-magnetism theory expanded in terms of a length scale parameter may reasonably describe the NS in strong MF, so called magnetar. Even the super-soft equation of state is shown to be revived by the modified f(R) gravity.

  2. Randall-Sundrum membrane model with 7D anti-de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ruoyu; Lykken, Joseph D.; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U. /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    In the same sense that AdS{sub 5} warped geometries arise naturally from Type IIB string theory with stacks of D3 branes, AdS{sub 7} warped geometries arise naturally from M theory with stacks of M5 branes. We compactify two spatial dimensions of AdS{sub 7} to get AdS{sub 5} x {Sigma}{sup 2}, where {Sigma}{sup 2} is e.g. a torus T{sup 2} or a sphere S{sup 2}. The metric for {Sigma} inherits the same warp factor as appears in the AdS{sub 5}. Bulk fields generically have both Kaluza-Klein and winding modes associated with {Sigma}. In the effective 5d action these will contribute exotic new excitations. We analyze the 5d spectrum in detail for the case of a bulk scalar or a graviton in AdS{sub 5} x T{sup 2}, in a setup which mimics the first Randall-Sundrum model. The results display several novel features, some of which might be observed in experiments at the LHC. For example, we obtain TeV scale string winding states without lowering the string scale. This is due to the double warping which is a generic feature of winding states along compactified AdS directions. Experimental verification of these signatures of AdS{sub 7} could be interpreted as direct evidence for M theory.

  3. Extra dimensions, SN1987a, and nucleon-nucleon scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Hanhart; Daniel R. Phillips; Sanjay Reddy; Martin J. Savage

    2001-02-01

    One of the strongest constraints on the existence of large, compact, ''gravity-only'' dimensions comes from SN1987a. If the rate of energy loss into these putative extra dimensions is too high, then the neutrino pulse from the supernova will differ from that actually seen. The dominant mechanism for the production of Kaluza-Klein gravitons and dilatons in the supernova is via gravistrahlung and dilastrahlung from the nucleon-nucleon system. In this paper we compute the rates for these processes in a model-independent way using low-energy theorems which relate the emissivities to the measured nucleon-nucleon cross section. This is possible because for soft gravitons and dilatons the leading contribution to the energy-loss rate is from graphs in which the gravitational radiation is produced from external nucleon legs. Previous calculations neglected these mechanisms. We re-evaluate the bounds on toroidally-compactified ''gravity-only'' dimensions (GODs), and find that consistency with the observed SN1987a neutrino signal requires that if there are two such dimensions then their radius must be less than 1 micron.

  4. Search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying to a pair of Z bosons in the qqbarℓ+ℓ- final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Ansari, M. H.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for a narrow, spin-2 resonance decaying into a pair of Z bosons, with one Z-boson decaying into leptons (e+e- or μ+μ-) and the other into jets. An example of such a resonance is the Kaluza-Klein graviton, GKK, predicted in Randall-Sundrum models. The analysis is based on a 4.9 fb-1 sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Kinematic and topological properties including decay angular distributions are used to discriminate between signal and background. No evidence for a resonance is observed, and upper limits on the production cross sections times branching fractions are set. In two models that predict Z-boson spin correlations in graviton decays, graviton masses are excluded lower than a value which varies between 610 and 945 GeV, depending on the model and the strength of the graviton couplings.

  5. Universal spin-1/2 fermion field localization on a 5D braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa-Cendejas, Nandinii; Malagón-Morejón, Dagoberto; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present a refined method for the localization of spin- fermions on the 5D braneworld paradigm. We begin by proposing a more natural ansatz for the Yukawa coupling in the 5D bulk fermionic action, that guarantees the localization of the ground states for the 4D fermions with right- or left-chirality. In earlier works the existing freedom on the form of the Yukawa coupling was used in a rather speculative way depending on the type of model, the ansatz proposed in this work is suitable for thin and thick braneworld models and can be applied to branes made of a scalar field or not and in this sense it is the more natural choice. Furthermore, we show that the fermion ground states localization allow us to show the absence of tachyonic modes in the left- and right-chiral Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum. More precisely, we show that localization of gravity in the 5D braneworld implies the localization of the spin- fermions.

  6. On the 5D Extra-Force according to Basini Capozziello Ponce De Leon Formalism and five important features: Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light, Chung Freese Superluminal Behaviour, Maartens Clarkson Black Strings, experimental measures of Extra Dimensions on board International Space Station (ISS) and the existence of the Particle Z due to a higher dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loup, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    We use the Conformal Metric as described in Kar Sinha work on Gravitational Bending of Light in a 5 D Spacetime to recompute the equations of the 5 D Force in Basini Capozziello Ponce De Leon Formalism and we arrive at a result that possesses some advantages. The equations of the Extra Force as proposed by Ponce De Leon are now more elegant in Conformal Formalism and many algebraic terms can be simplified or even suppressed. Also we recompute the Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light affected by the presence of the Extra Dimension and analyze the Superluminal Chung Freese Features of this Formalism describing the advantages of the Chung Freese BraneWorld when compared to other Superluminal spacetime metrics (e.g. Warp Drive) and we describe why the Extra Dimension is invisible and how the Extra Dimension could be made visible at least in theory. We also examine the Maartens Clarkson Black Holes in 5 D (Black Strings) coupled to massive Kaluza Klein graviton modes predicted by Extra Dimensions theories and we study experimental detection of Extra Dimensions on-board LIGO and LISA Space Telescopes. We also propose the use of International Space Station (ISS) to measure the additional terms (resulting from the presence of Extra Dimensions) in the Kar Sinha Gravitational Bending of Light in Outer Space to verify if we really lives in a Higher Dimensional Spacetime. Also we demonstrate that Particle Z can only exist if the 5 D spacetime exists.

  7. Unifying Geometrical Representations of Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsid, Scott; Serna, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We unify three approaches within the vast body of gauge-theory research that have independently developed distinct representations of a geometrical surface-like structure underlying the vector-potential. The three approaches that we unify are: those who use the compactified dimensions of Kaluza-Klein theory, those who use Grassmannian models (also called gauge theory embedding or models) to represent gauge fields, and those who use a hidden spatial metric to replace the gauge fields. In this paper we identify a correspondence between the geometrical representations of the three schools. Each school was mostly independently developed, does not compete with other schools, and attempts to isolate the gauge-invariant geometrical surface-like structures that are responsible for the resulting physics. By providing a mapping between geometrical representations, we hope physicists can now isolate representation-dependent physics from gauge-invariant physical results and share results between each school. We provide visual examples of the geometrical relationships between each school for electric and magnetic fields. We highlight a first new result: in all three representations a static electric field (electric field from a fixed ring of charge or a sphere of charge) has a hidden gauge-invariant time dependent surface that is underlying the vector potential.

  8. Holography and hydrodynamics for EMD theory with two Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolic, Milena

    2013-03-01

    We use `generalized dimensional reduction' to relate a specific Einstein-Max-well-Dilaton (EMD) theory, including two gauge fields, three neutral scalars and an axion, to higher-dimensional AdS gravity (with no higher-dimensional Maxwell field). In general, this is a dimensional reduction over compact Einstein spaces in which the dimension of the compact space is continued to non-integral values. Specifically, we perform a non-diagonal Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction over a torus, involving two KK gauge fields. Our aim is to determine the holographic dictionary and hydrodynamic behaviour of the lower-dimensional theory by performing the generalized dimensional reduction on AdS. We study a specific example of a black brane carrying a wave, whose universal sector is described by gravity coupled to two Maxwell fields, three neutral scalars and an axion, and compute the first order transport coefficients of the dual theory. In these theories {{widehat{ζ}}_s}/widehat{η}<2( {1/( {d-1} )-widehat{c}_s^2} ) , where {{widehat{c}}_s} is the speed of sound, violating a conjectured bound, but an alternative bound is satisfied.

  9. Natural quintessence in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Pedro, Francisco G.; Tasinato, Gianmassimo E-mail: f.pedro1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a natural model of quintessence in string theory where the light rolling scalar is radiatively stable and couples to Standard Model matter with weaker-than-Planckian strength. The model is embedded in an anisotropic type IIB compactification with two exponentially large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity. The bulk turns out to be nearly supersymmetric since the scale of the gravitino mass is of the order of the observed value of the cosmological constant. The quintessence field is a modulus parameterising the size of an internal four-cycle which naturally develops a potential of the order (gravitino mass){sup 4}, leading to a small dark energy scale without tunings. The mass of the quintessence field is also radiatively stable since it is protected by supersymmetry in the bulk. Moreover, this light scalar couples to ordinary matter via its mixing with the volume mode. Due to the fact that the quintessence field is a flat direction at leading order, this mixing is very small, resulting in a suppressed coupling to Standard Model particles which avoids stringent fifth-force constraints. On the other hand, if dark matter is realised in terms of Kaluza-Klein states, unsuppressed couplings between dark energy and dark matter can emerge, leading to a scenario of coupled quintessence within string theory. We study the dynamics of quintessence in our set-up, showing that its main features make it compatible with observations.

  10. Noncommutative D{sub 3}-brane, black holes, and attractor mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Supriya; Majumdar, Sumit

    2006-09-15

    We revisit the 4D generalized black hole geometries, obtained by us 14, with a renewed interest, to unfold some aspects of effective gravity in a noncommutative D{sub 3}-brane formalism. In particular, we argue for the existence of extra dimensions in the gravity decoupling limit in the theory. We show that the theory is rather described by an ordinary geometry and is governed by an effective string theory in 5D. The extremal black hole geometry AdS{sub 5} obtained in effective string theory is shown to be in precise agreement with the gravity dual proposed for D{sub 3}-brane in a constant magnetic field. Kaluza-Klein compactification is performed to obtain the corresponding charged black hole geometries in 4D. Interestingly, they are shown to be governed by the extremal black hole geometries known in string theory. The attractor mechanism is exploited in effective string theory underlying a noncommutative D{sub 3}-brane and the macroscopic entropy of a charged black hole is computed. We show that the generalized black hole geometries in a noncommutative D{sub 3}-brane theory are precisely identical to the extremal black holes known in 4D effective string theory.

  11. Type D solutions of 3D new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmedov, Haji; Aliev, Alikram N.

    2011-04-15

    In a recent reformulation of three-dimensional new massive gravity, the field equations of the theory consist of a massive (tensorial) Klein-Gordon type equation with a curvature-squared source term and a constraint equation. Using this framework, we present all algebraic type D solutions of new massive gravity with constant and nonconstant scalar curvatures. For constant scalar curvature, they include homogeneous anisotropic solutions which encompass both solutions originating from topologically massive gravity, Bianchi types II, VIII, IX, and those of non-topologically massive gravity origin, Bianchi types VI{sub 0} and VII{sub 0}. For a special relation between the cosmological and mass parameters, {lambda}=m{sup 2}, they also include conformally flat solutions, and, in particular, those being locally isometric to the previously-known Kaluza-Klein type AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 1} or dS{sub 2}xS{sup 1} solutions. For nonconstant scalar curvature, all the solutions are conformally flat and exist only for {lambda}=m{sup 2}. We find two general metrics which possess at least one Killing vector and comprise all such solutions. We also discuss some properties of these solutions, delineating among them black hole type solutions.

  12. Semiclassical strings in electric and magnetic field deformed AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W.-H.

    2006-01-15

    We first apply the transformation of mixing azimuthal and internal coordinate or mixing time and internal coordinate to the 11D M-theory with a stack N M2-branes to find the spacetime of a stack of N D2-branes with magnetic or electric flux in 10 D IIA string theory, after the Kaluza-Klein reduction. We then perform the T-duality to the spacetime to find the background of a stack of N D3-branes with magnetic or electric flux. In the near-horizon limit the background becomes the magnetic or electric field deformed AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. We adopt an ansatz to find the classical string solution which is rotating in the deformed S{sup 5} with three angular momenta in the three rotation planes. The relations between the classical string energy and its angular momenta are found and results show that the external magnetic and electric fluxes will increase the string energy. Therefore, from the AdS/CFT point of view, the corrections of the anomalous dimensions of operators in the dual SYM theory will be positive. We also investigate the small fluctuations in these solutions and discuss the effects of magnetic and electric fields on the stability of these classical rotating string solutions. Finally, we find the possible solutions of string pulsating on the deformed spacetimes and show that the corrections to the anomalous dimensions of operators in the dual SYM theory are non-negative.

  13. Beyond the three-site Higgless model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurachi, Masafumi; Belyaev, Alexander S; Chivukula, R Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D; Simmon, Elizabeth H; He, Hong - Jian; Tanabashie, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    The three-site model has been offered as a benchmark or test case for studying the collider phenomenology of Higgs-less models. It is therefore appropriate to consider how well the three-site model performs as a general representative of Higgs-less models, and which modifications might remedy any shortcomings. We employ sum rules relating the masses and couplings of the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge fields in continuum and deconstructed Higgs-less models as a way to compare the different theories. These identities enable us to quantify how well a given theory performs at unitarizing the scattering of electroweak gauge bosons at a particular energy scale. We will see that the tendency of the sum rules to be saturated by contributions from the lowest-lying KK resonances provides a good measure of the extent to which a highly-deconstructed theory like the three-site model can accurately describe the low-energy physics. After comparing the three-site model to a pair of continuum models, we analyze extensions of the three-site model to a longer open linear model with an additional U(I) group and to a ring model with three sites and three links; both cases can be analyzed in the framework created by the sum rules. The hadron and lepton collider phenomenology of both extended models is discussed, with a focus on the complementary information to be gained from the different facilities.

  14. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$^{\\prime}$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$^{\\prime}$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.

  15. On perturbative instability of Pope-Warner solutions on Sasaki-Einstein manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilch, Krzysztof; Yoo, Isaiah

    2013-09-01

    Given a Sasaki-Einstein manifold, M 7, there is the supersymmetric AdS 4 × M 7 Freund-Rubin solution of eleven-dimensional supergravity and the corresponding non-supersymmetric solutions: the perturbatively stable skew-whiffed solution, the perturbatively unstable Englert solution, and the Pope-Warner solution, which is known to be perturbatively unstable when M 7 is the seven-sphere or, more generally, a tri-Sasakian manifold. We show that similar perturbative instability of the Pope-Warner solution will arise for any regular Sasaki-Einstein manifold, M 7, admitting a basic, primitive, transverse (1,1)-eigenform of the Hodge-de Rham Laplacian with the eigenvalue in the range between and . Existence of such (1,1)-forms on all homogeneous Sasaki-Einstein manifolds can be shown explicitly using the Kähler quotient construction or the standard harmonic expansion. The latter shows that the instability arises from the coupling between the Pope-Warner background and Kaluza-Klein scalar modes that at the supersymmetric point lie in a long Z-vector supermultiplet. We also verify that the instability persists for the orbifolds of homogeneous Sasaki-Einstein manifolds that have been discussed recently.

  16. Search for anomalous toverline t production in the highly-boosted all-hadronic final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cerny, K.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Amaral, S. M. Silva Do; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Fischer, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmanau, M.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Radics, B.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi, A.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Pereira, A. Vilela; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Jo, H. Y.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Seo, E.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Brona, G.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Musella, P.; Pela, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Diez Pardos, C.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sanudo, M. Sobron; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Breuker, H.; Bunkowski, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; D'Enterria, D.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Nguyen, M.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Chen, Z.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Aguilo, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Go, A.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karapinar, G.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Cerci, D. Sunar; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; RadburnSmith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Nelson, R.; Pellett, D.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Sierra, R. Vasquez; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lueking, L.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Chung, K.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Radicci, V.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-09-01

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a {t}overline {t} pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gluon. In addition, the result contrain any enhancement in {t}overline {t} production beyond expectations of the standard mode for tt invariant mass larger than 1 TeV/ c 2.

  17. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-12-20

    A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

  18. Localization and quasilocalization of a spin-1 /2 fermion field on a two-field thick braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Heng; Xie, Qun-Ying; Fu, Chun-E.

    2015-11-01

    Localization of a spin-1 /2 fermion on the braneworld is an important and interesting problem. It is well known that a five-dimensional free massless fermion Ψ minimally coupled to gravity cannot be localized on the Randall-Sundrum braneworld. In order to trap such a fermion, the coupling between the fermion and bulk scalar fields should be introduced. In this paper, localization and quasilocalization of a bulk fermion on the thick braneworld generated by two scalar fields (a kink scalar ϕ and a dilaton scalar π ) are investigated. Two types of couplings between the fermion and two scalars are considered. One coupling is the usual Yukawa coupling -η Ψ ¯ϕ Ψ between the fermion and kink scalar, another one is λ Ψ ¯ΓM∂Mπ γ5Ψ between the fermion and dilaton scalar. The left-chiral fermion zero mode can be localized on the brane, and both the left- and right-chiral fermion massive Kaluza-Klein modes may be localized or quasilocalized. Hence the four-dimensional massless left-chiral fermion and massive Dirac fermions, whose lifetime is infinite or finite, can be obtained on the brane.

  19. D -oscillons in the standard model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R. A. C.; da Rocha, Roldão; de Souza Dutra, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we investigate the consequences of the Lorentz symmetry violation on extremely long-lived, time-dependent, and spatially localized field configurations, named oscillons. This is accomplished for two interacting scalar field theories in (D +1 ) dimensions in the context of the so-called standard model extension. We show that D -dimensional scalar field lumps can present a typical size Rmin≪RKK , where RKK is the extent of extra dimensions in Kaluza-Klein theories. The size Rmin is shown to strongly depend upon the terms that control the LV of the theory. This implies either contraction or dilation of the average radius Rmin, and a new rule for its composition, likewise. Moreover, we show that the spatial dimensions for existence of oscillating lumps have an upper limit, opening new possibilities to probe the existence of D -dimensional oscillons at TeV energy scale. In addition, in a cosmological scenario with Lorentz symmetry breaking, we show that in the early Universe with an extremely high energy density and a strong LV, the typical size Rmin was highly dilated. As the Universe had expanded and cooled down, it then passed through a phase transition toward a Lorentz symmetry, wherein Rmin tends to be compact.

  20. New Dimensions for Randall-Sundrum Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2008-09-30

    We consider a 6D extension of the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model, RS6, where the Standard Model (SM) gauge fields are allowed to propagate in an additional dimension, compactified on S{sup 1} or S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}. In a minimal scenario, fermions propagate in the 5D RS subspace and their localization provides a model of flavor. New Kaluza-Klein (KK) states, corresponding to excitations of the gauge fields along the 6th dimension, appear near the TeV scale. The new gauge KK modes behave differently from those in the 5D warped models. These RS6 states have couplings with strong dependence on 5D field localization and, within the SM, only interact with heavy fermions and the Higgs sector, to a very good approximation. Thus, the collider phenomenology of the new gauge KK states sensitively depends on the 5D fermion geography. We briefly discuss inclusion of SM fermions in all 6 dimensions, as well as the possibility of going beyond 6D.

  1. Flavor Constraints on Split Fermion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, Ben

    2003-06-26

    We examine the contributions to rare processes that arise in models where the Standard Model fermions are localized at distinct points in compact extra dimensions. Tree-level flavor changing neutral current interactions for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge field excitations are induced in such models, and hence strong constraints are thought to exist on the size of the additional dimensions. We find a general parameterization of the model which does not depend on any specific fermion geography and show that typical values of the parameters can reproduce the fermion hierarchy pattern. Using this parameterization, we reexamine the contributions to neutral meson mixing, rare meson decays, and single top-quark production in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. We find that is it possible to evade the stringent bounds for natural regions of the parameters, while retaining finite separations between the fermion fields and without introducing a new hierarchy. The resulting limits on the size of the compact dimension can be as low as TeV{sup -1}.

  2. One universal extra dimension in PYTHIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElKacimi, M.; Goujdami, D.; Przysiezniak, H.; Skands, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Universal Extra Dimensions model has been implemented in the PYTHIA generator from version 6.4.18 onwards, in its minimal formulation with one TeV -1-sized extra dimension. The additional possibility of gravity-mediated decays, through a variable number of eV -1-sized extra dimensions into which only gravity extends, is also available. The implementation covers the lowest lying Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of Standard Model particles, except for the excitations of the Higgs fields, with the mass spectrum calculated at one loop. 2→2 tree-level production cross sections and unpolarized KK number conserving 2-body decays are included. Mixing between iso-doublet and -singlet KK excitations is neglected thus far, and is expected to be negligible for all but the top sector. New version summaryProgram title: PYTHIA Version number: 6.420 Catalogue identifier: ACTU_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ACTU_v2_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 362 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 590 900 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: CERN lxplus and any other machine with a Fortran 77 compiler Operating system: Linux Red Hat RAM: about 800 K words Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ACTU_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 135 (2001) 238 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: At high energy collisions between elementary particles, physics beyond the Standard Model is searched for. Many models are being investigated, namely extra-dimensional models. Solution method: The Universal Extra Dimension model is implemented in the PYTHIA event generator. Reasons for new version

  3. SEARCH FOR DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION SIGNALS FROM THE FORNAX GALAXY CLUSTER WITH H.E.S.S

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Brucker, J.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Brun, F.; Bolmont, J.; Collaboration: H.E.S.S. Collaboration; and others

    2012-05-10

    The Fornax galaxy cluster was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System for a total live time of 14.5 hr, searching for very high energy (VHE; E > 100GeV) {gamma}-rays from dark matter (DM) annihilation. No significant signal was found in searches for point-like and extended emissions. Using several models of the DM density distribution, upper limits on the DM velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section ({sigma}v) as a function of the DM particle mass are derived. Constraints are derived for different DM particle models, such as those arising from Kaluza-Klein and supersymmetric models. Various annihilation final states are considered. Possible enhancements of the DM annihilation {gamma}-ray flux, due to DM substructures of the DM host halo, or from the Sommerfeld effect, are studied. Additional {gamma}-ray contributions from internal bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton radiation are also discussed. For a DM particle mass of 1 TeV, the exclusion limits at 95% of confidence level reach values of ({sigma}v){sup 95%C.L.} {approx} 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, depending on the DM particle model and halo properties. Additional contribution from DM substructures can improve the upper limits on ({sigma}v) by more than two orders of magnitude. At masses around 4.5 TeV, the enhancement by substructures and the Sommerfeld resonance effect results in a velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section upper limit at the level of ({sigma}v){sup 95%C.L.} {approx}10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}.

  4. The GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) Theory of Field Unification and its Application to Human Flight and Gravity Wave Production and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2005-02-01

    Theoretical progress on the GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) unification theory is summarized as applied to human flight and dynamically modified gravity fields and waves, as well as progress towards a GEMS (GEMStrong) theory. The GEM theory in the static Newtonian limit is the portion of the Kaluza-Klein action that is quadratic in first derivatives of the metric and in Poynting Flux that appears in the form of a VBE ("Vacuum Bernoulli Equation"). This shows Gravitational energy density to be equated to an EM dynamic pressure that is quadratic in the local Poynting Flux: g2/(2π G) + S2/(c2 L)= Constant, where g and S are the local gravity and Poynting vector magnitudes, respectively, and where L is the Lagrangian density of the vacuum EM field. The VBE can be used to understand anomalous weight loss reported in gyroscope experiments and to understand possible gravity modification for human flight. The GEM gravity modification theory is extended to predict a VHE (Vacuum Hall Effect). Methods for creating dynamic gravity fields via VHE for production and detection of high frequency gravity fields involve electric quadrapole fields normal to static magnetic fields. In terms of fundamental GEM theory, the important value of the proton to electron mass ratio Rm =1836 in the theory is linked, via the MIT Bag Model, to the value of the reciprocal fine structure constant: Rm=αs/α where αs =13.34 is the asymptotic Strong Force coupling constant. An experiment was performed using this theory that validated the anomalous gyroscope effects predicted by Kosyrev and others, that rotating EM fields appear to create lifting forces. The theory appears to offer insights into enhanced forms of propellant-less propulsion.

  5. M theory model of a big crunch/big bang transition

    SciTech Connect

    Turok, Neil; Perry, Malcolm; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2004-11-15

    We consider a picture in which the transition from a big crunch to a big bang corresponds to the collision of two empty orbifold planes approaching each other at a constant nonrelativistic speed in a locally flat background space-time, a situation relevant to recently proposed cosmological models. We show that p-brane states which wind around the extra dimension propagate smoothly and unambiguously across the orbifold plane collision. In particular we calculate the quantum mechanical production of winding M2-branes extending from one orbifold to the other. We find that the resulting density is finite and that the resulting gravitational backreaction is small. These winding states, which include the string theory graviton, can be propagated smoothly across the transition using a perturbative expansion in the membrane tension, an expansion which from the point of view of string theory is an expansion in inverse powers of {alpha}{sup '}. The conventional description of a crunch based on Einstein general relativity, involving Kasner or mixmaster behavior is misleading, we argue, because general relativity is only the leading order approximation to string theory in an expansion in positive powers of {alpha}{sup '}. In contrast, in the M theory setup we argue that interactions should be well behaved because of the smooth evolution of the fields combined with the fact that the string coupling tends to zero at the crunch. The production of massive Kaluza-Klein states should also be exponentially suppressed for small collision speeds. We contrast this good behavior with that found in previous studies of strings in Lorentzian orbifolds.

  6. Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appell, David Allen

    Three studies in elementary particle physics are presented. In the first, titled "Jets as a probe of quark -gluon plasmas", we investigate the propagation of jets through a quark-gluon plasma. The transverse-momentum imbalance of a jet pair is shown to be sensitive to multiple scattering off the constituents of the plasma for expected values of the plasma temperature and size. This raises the possibility that such transverse-momentum imbalance could be used as a probe of a quark-gluon plasma produced by partonic interactions in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The second topic considered is "Soft gluon effects and the normalization of the Drell-Yan cross section." There we analyze the sensitivity of the inclusive Drell -Yan cross section to soft gluon effects, using a previously developed summation procedure which includes nonleading logarithmic effects. By varying an infrared cutoff in gluon energies, we study the importance of soft, but still perturbative, gluons to the normalization of the cross section or, equivalently, the "K-factor." The result is strongly dependent on the kinematic range being considered, as well as on the parton distributions of the incoming hadrons. Finally, in "Problems of dimensional reduction and inflationary cosmology", we discuss various aspects of the relationship between Kaluza-Klein theories and cosmology, with particular emphasis on the process of dimensional reduction. Some features of higher-dimensional Friedman -Robertson-Walker-type universes are considered, such as the compatibility of the Einstein equations, their connection with the inflationary scenarios, and their consequences for the critical density of the observable universe. The role of the Casimir effect as a possible mechanism for dimensional compactification is noted, and the absence of the Casimir effect for supersymmetric theories is noted. Various subtleties of the Casimir effect make it difficult to decide at this point whether the Casimir effect

  7. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Jurg; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  8. Supersymmetric configurations in the rotating D1-D5 system andpp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoz, Liat

    Two families of supersymmetric configurations are considered. One is the 1/4 supersymmetric D1--D5 system with angular momentum, and the other is a family of pp-waves of type IIB string theory with some supersymmetry. In the first part of the thesis some configurations of the D1--D5 system are examined which give conical singularities in AdS 3 as their near horizon limit. It is shown that they can be made non-singular by adding angular momentum to the brane system. The smooth asymptotically flat solutions constructed this way are used to obtain global AdS 3 as the near horizon geometry. Using the relation of the D1--D5 system to the oscillating string, a large family of supergravity solutions is constructed which describe BPS excitations on AdS3 x S 3 with angular momentum on S3. These solutions take into account the full back reaction on the metric, and can be viewed as Kaluza-Klein monopole "supertubes", which are completely non-singular geometries. The different chiral primaries of the dual CFT are identified with these different supergravity solutions. This part is adapted from the papers [1], [2]. In its second part, a general class of supersymmetric pp-wave solutions of type IIB string theory is constructed, such that the superstring worldsheet action in light cone gauge is that of an interacting massive field theory. It is shown that when the light cone Lagrangian has (2.2) supersymmetry, one can find backgrounds that lead to arbitrary superpotentials on the worldsheet. Both flat and curved transverse spaces are considered. In particular, the background giving rise to the N = 2 sine Gordon theory on the worldsheet is analyzed. Massive mirror symmetry relates it to the deformed CP1 model (or sausage model) which seems to elude a purely supergravity target space interpretation. These are results which appeared in the paper [3].

  9. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. 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J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. 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J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-04-01

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb-1 for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z{SSM/'} resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z{/ψ '} lighter than 2.57 TeV, and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on Λ, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Systematics of Coupling Flows in AdS Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-03-18

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge

  11. A 750 GeV messenger of dark conformal symmetry breaking

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Zhang, Cen

    2016-03-03

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of ~750 GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a “dark” sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum-type five-dimensional geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, correspondingmore » to “elementary” fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the five-dimensional bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be SU(3)c×U(1)Y. The “dark” radion is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vectorlike fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our minimal setup favors scalar DM of O(TeV) mass. A generic expectation in this scenario, suggested by DM considerations, is the appearance of vector bosons at ~ few TeV, corresponding to the gluon and hypercharge Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes that couple to UV boundary states with strengths that are suppressed uniformly compared to their SM values. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that these KK modes could be within the reach of the LHC in the coming years.« less

  12. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  13. Photon cascade decay of the warped graviton at LHC14 and a 100 TeV hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Chen, Chien-Yi; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Kim, Doojin

    2015-04-01

    In warped 5D models of hierarchy and flavor, the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) state of the graviton G1 is heavy enough to decay into a photon and its first KK mode γ1 on-shell: G1→γ1γ . The volume-suppression of the rate for this process [relative to 2-body decay into heavy Standard Model (SM) final states (W /Z /t /H )] may be partially compensated by the simplicity of the photon final state. We consider γ1→W+W- , with a typical O (1 ) branching fraction, and focus on the semileptonic final state W (→j j )W (→ℓ,ν ) with ℓ=e ,μ . The SM background originates from 2 →3 parton processes and is relatively suppressed compared to those for 2-body decays of G1. Moreover, to further reduce the background, we can impose an invariant mass window cut for γ1 (in addition to that for G1) in this new channel. We emphasize that this "photon cascade" decay probes a different combination of (bulk and brane) interactions of the KK states than the decays into two heavy SM states. Thus, in combination with other channels, the cascade decay could be used to extract the individual underlying geometric parameters. The 3 σ reach for G1 in our channel is up to 1.5 TeV at the high luminosity (14 TeV) LHC, and can be extended to about 4 TeV, at 5 σ , at a future 100 TeV hadron collider. Along the way, we point out the novel feature that the invariant mass distribution of KK graviton decay products becomes skewed from the Breit-Wigner form, due to the KK graviton coupling growing with energy.

  14. Astrophysical implications of a visible dark matter sector from a custodially warped GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Blum, Kfir; Lee, Seung J.; Perez, Gilad

    2010-04-01

    We explore, within the warped extra dimensional framework, the possibility of finding antimatter signals in cosmic rays (CRs) from dark matter (DM) annihilation. We find that exchange of order 100 GeV radion, an integral part of this class of models, generically results in a sizable Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation rate for DM mass at the TeV scale. No ad hoc dark sector is required to obtain boosted annihilation cross sections and hence signals. Such a mild hierarchy between the radion and DM masses can be natural due to the pseudo-Goldstone boson nature of the radion. We study the implications of a Sommerfeld enhancement specifically in warped grand unified theory (GUT) models, where proton stability implies a DM candidate. We show, via a partially unified Pati-Salam group, how to incorporate a custodial symmetry for Z→bb¯ into the GUT framework such that a few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass scale is allowed by electroweak precision tests. Among such models, the one with the smallest SO(10) (fully unified) representation, with SU(5) hypercharge normalization, allows us to decouple the DM from the electroweak gauge bosons. Thus, a correct DM relic density can be obtained and direct detection bounds are satisfied. Looking at robust CR observables, we find a possible future signal in the p¯/p flux ratio consistent with current constraints. Using a different choice of representations, we show how to embed in this GUT model a similar custodial symmetry for the right-handed tau, allowing it to be strongly coupled to KK particles. Such a scenario might lead to an observed signal in CR positrons; however, the DM candidate in this case cannot constitute all of the DM in the Universe. As an aside and independent of the GUT or DM model, the strong coupling between KK particles and tau’s can lead to striking LHC signals.

  15. LHC signals for warped electroweak charged gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Han, Tao; Huang, Gui-Yu; Soni, Amarjit

    2009-10-01

    We study signals at the LHC for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of electroweak charged gauge bosons in the framework of the standard model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk of a warped extra dimension. Such a scenario can solve both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. There are two such charged states in this scenario with couplings to light quarks and leptons being suppressed relative to those in the SM, whereas the couplings to top/bottom quarks are enhanced, similar to the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons previously studied. However, unlike the case of electroweak neutral gauge bosons, there is no irreducible QCD background (including pollution from possibly degenerate KK gluons) for decays to top+bottom final states so that this channel is useful for the discovery of the charged states. Moreover, decays of electroweak charged gauge bosons to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are enhanced just as for the neutral bosons. However, unlike for the neutral gauge bosons, the purely leptonic (and hence clean) decay mode of the WZ is fully reconstructible so that the ratio of the signal to the SM (electroweak) background can potentially be enhanced by restricting to the resonance region more efficiently. We show that such final states can give sensitivity to 2(3) TeV masses with an integrated luminosity of 100(300)fb-1. We emphasize that improvements in discriminating a QCD jet from a highly boosted hadronically decaying W, and a highly boosted top jet from a bottom jet will enhance the reach for these KK particles, and that the signals we study for the warped extra dimensional model might actually be applicable also to a wider class of nonsupersymmetric models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  16. Warped dipole completed, with a tower of Higgs bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Azatov, Aleksandr; Cui, Yanou; Randall, Lisa; Son, Minho

    2015-06-01

    In the context of warped extra-dimensional models which address both the Planck-weak- and flavor-hierarchies of the Standard Model (SM), it has been argued that certain observables can be calculated within the 5D effective field theory only with the Higgs field propagating in the bulk of the extra dimension, just like other SM fields. The related studies also suggested an interesting form of decoupling of the heavy Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermion states in the warped 5D SM in the limit where the profile of the SM Higgs approaches the IR brane. We demonstrate that a similar phenomenon occurs when we include the mandatory KK excitations of the SM Higgs in loop diagrams giving dipole operators for SM fermions, where the earlier work only considered the SM Higgs (zero mode). In particular, in the limit of a quasi IR-localized SM Higgs, the effect from summing over KK Higgs modes is unsuppressed (yet finite), in contrast to the naive expectation that KK Higgs modes decouple as their masses become large. In this case, a wide range of KK Higgs modes have quasi-degenerate masses and enhanced couplings to fermions relative to those of the SM Higgs, which contribute to the above remarkable result. In addition, we find that the total contribution from KK Higgs modes in general can be comparable to that from the SM Higgs alone. It is also interesting that KK Higgs couplings to KK fermions of the same chirality as the corresponding SM modes have an unsuppressed overall contribution, in contrast to the result from the earlier studies involving the SM Higgs. Our studies suggest that KK Higgs bosons are generally an indispensable part of the warped 5D SM, and their phenomenology such as signals at the LHC are worth further investigation.

  17. Flavor-violation tests of the warped/composite standard model in the two-site approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Azatov, Aleksandr; Zhu, Lijun

    2009-03-01

    We study flavor violation in the quark sector in a purely 4D, two-site effective field theory description of the standard model (SM) and just their first Kaluza-Klein excitations from a warped extra dimension. The warped 5D framework can provide solutions to both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchies of the SM. It is also related (via the AdS/CFT correspondence) to partial compositeness of the SM. We focus on the dominant contributions in the two-site model to two observables which we argue provide the strongest constraints from flavor violation, namely, γK and BR(b→sγ), where contributions in the two-site model occur at tree and loop-level, respectively. In particular, we demonstrate that a “tension” exists between these two observables in the sense that they have opposite dependence on composite site Yukawa couplings, making it difficult to decouple flavor-violating effects using this parameter. We choose the size of the composite site QCD coupling based on the relation of the two-site model to the 5D model (addressing the Planck-weak hierarchy), where we match the 5D QCD coupling to the 4D coupling at the loop-level and assuming negligible tree-level brane-localized kinetic terms. We estimate that a larger size of the 5D gauge coupling is constrained by the requirement of 5D perturbativity. We find that ˜O(5)TeV mass scale for the new particles in the two-site model can then be consistent with both observables. We also compare our analysis of γK in the two-site model to that in 5D models, including both the cases of a brane-localized and bulk Higgs.

  18. CERN LHC signals for warped electroweak neutral gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Han, Tao; Huang, Gui-Yu; Perez, Gilad; Si, Zong-Guo; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-12-01

    We study signals at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of the electroweak gauge bosons in the framework with the standard model (SM) gauge and fermion fields propagating in a warped extra dimension. Such a framework addresses both the Planck-weak and flavor hierarchy problems of the SM. Unlike the often studied Z' cases, in this framework, there are three neutral gauge bosons due to the underlying SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)X gauge group in the bulk. Furthermore, couplings of these KK states to light quarks and leptons are suppressed, whereas those to top and bottom quarks are enhanced compared to the SM gauge couplings. Therefore, the production of light quark and lepton states is suppressed relative to other beyond the SM constructions, and the fermionic decays of these states are dominated by the top and bottom quarks, which are, though, overwhelmed by KK gluons dominantly decaying into them. However, as we emphasize in this paper, decays of these states to longitudinal W, Z and Higgs are also enhanced similarly to the case of top and bottom quarks. We show that the W, Z and Higgs final states can give significant sensitivity at the LHC to ˜2(3)TeV KK scale with an integrated luminosity of ˜100fb-1 (˜1ab-1). Since current theoretical framework(s) favor KK masses ≳3TeV, a luminosity upgrade of LHC is likely to be crucial in observing these states.

  19. Relaxing constraints from lepton flavor violation in 5D flavorful theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh

    2009-12-01

    We propose new mechanisms for ameliorating the constraints on the Kaluza-Klein mass scale from charged lepton flavor violation in the framework of the standard model fields propagating in a warped extra dimension, especially in models accounting for neutrino data. These mechanisms utilize the extended five-dimensional (5D) electroweak gauge symmetry [SU(2)L×SU(2)R×U(1)X] which is already strongly motivated in order to satisfy electroweak precision tests in this framework. We show that new choices of representations for leptons under this symmetry (naturally) can allow small mixing angles for left-handed (LH) charged leptons and simultaneously large mixing angles for their SU(2)L partners, i.e., the LH neutrinos, with the neutrino data being accounted for by the latter mixings. Enhancement of charged lepton flavor violation by the large mixing angle observed in leptonic charged currents, which is present for the minimal choice of representations where the LH charged lepton and neutrino mixing angles are similar, can thus be avoided in these models. This idea might also be useful for suppressing the contributions to Bd,s mixing in this framework and in order to suppress flavor violation from exchange of superpartners (instead of from KK modes) in 5D “flavorful supersymmetry” models. Additionally, the less minimal representations can provide custodial protection for shifts in couplings of fermions to Z and, in turn, further suppress charged lepton flavor violation from tree-level Z exchange in the warped extra-dimensional scenario. As a result, ˜O(3)TeV KK mass scale can be simultaneously consistent with charged lepton flavor violation and neutrino data, even without any particular structure in the 5D flavor parameters in the framework of a warped extra dimension.

  20. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  1. Ricci solitons, Ricci flow and strongly coupled CFT in the Schwarzschild Unruh or Boulware vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Pau; Lucietti, James; Wiseman, Toby

    2011-11-01

    The elliptic Einstein-DeTurck equation may be used to numerically find Einstein metrics on Riemannian manifolds. Static Lorentzian Einstein metrics are considered by analytically continuing to Euclidean time. The Ricci-DeTurck flow is a constructive algorithm to solve this equation, and is simple to implement when the solution is a stable fixed point, the only complication being that Ricci solitons may exist which are not Einstein. Here we extend previous work to consider the Einstein-DeTurck equation for Riemannian manifolds with boundaries, and those that continue to static Lorentzian spacetimes which are asymptotically flat, Kaluza-Klein, locally AdS or have extremal horizons. Using a maximum principle, we prove that Ricci solitons do not exist in these cases and so any solution is Einstein. We also argue that the Ricci-DeTurck flow preserves these classes of manifolds. As an example, we simulate the Ricci-DeTurck flow for a manifold with asymptotics relevant for AdS5/CFT4. Our maximum principle dictates that there are no soliton solutions, and we give strong numerical evidence that there exists a stable fixed point of the flow which continues to a smooth static Lorentzian Einstein metric. Our asymptotics are such that this describes the classical gravity dual relevant for the CFT on a Schwarzschild background in either the Unruh or Boulware vacua. It determines the leading O(N2c) part of the CFT stress tensor, which interestingly is regular on both the future and past Schwarzschild horizons.

  2. On conserved charges and thermodynamics of the AdS4 dyonic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Marcela; Fuentealba, Oscar; Matulich, Javier

    2016-05-01

    We consider four-dimensional gravity in the presence of a dilatonic scalar field and an Abelian gauge field. This theory corresponds to the bosonic sector of a Kaluza-Klein reduction of eleven-dimensional supergravity which induces a specific self-interacting potential for the scalar field. We compute the conserved charges and carry out the thermodynamics of an anti-de Sitter (AdS) dyonic black hole solution that was proposed recently. The charges coming from symmetries of the action are computed using the Regge-Teitelboim Hamiltonian approach. They correspond to the mass, which acquires contributions from the scalar field, and the electric charge. We introduce integrability conditions because the scalar field leads to non-integrable terms in the variation of the mass. These conditions are generically solved by introducing boundary conditions that relate the leading and subleading terms of the scalar field fall-off. The Hamiltonian Euclidean action, computed in the grand canonical ensemble, is obtained by demanding the action to have an extremum. Its value is given by a radial boundary term plus an additional polar angle boundary term due to the presence of a magnetic monopole. Remarkably, the magnetic charge can be identified from the variation of the additional polar angle boundary term, confirming that the first law of black hole thermodynamics is a consequence of having a well-defined and finite Hamiltonian action principle, even if the charge does not come from a symmetry of the action. The temperature and electrostatic potential are determined by demanding regularity of the black hole solution, whereas the value of the magnetic potential is determined by the variation of the additional polar angle boundary term. Consequently, the first law of black hole thermodynamics is identically satisfied by construction.

  3. Stability of a tachyon braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Martorano Kuerten, André; Malagón-Morejón, Dagoberto; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-01-01

    Within the braneworld paradigm the tachyonic scalar field has been used to generate models that attempt to solve some of the open problems that physics faces nowadays, both in cosmology and high energy physics as well. When these field configurations are produced by the interplay of higher dimensional warped gravity with some matter content, braneworld models must prove to be stable under the whole set of small fluctuations of the gravitational and matter fields background, among other consistency tests. Here we present a complete proof of the stability under scalar perturbations of tachyonic thick braneworlds with an embedded maximally symmetric 4D space-time, revealing its physical consistency. This family of models contains a recently reported tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld which possesses a series of appealing properties. These features encompass complete regularity, asymptotic flatness (instead of being asymptotically dS or AdS) even when it contains a negative bulk cosmological constant, a relevant 3-brane with dS metric which naturally arises from the full set of field equations of the 5D background (it is not imposed), qualitatively describing the inflationary epochs of our Universe, and a graviton spectrum with a single zero mode bound state that accounts for the 4D graviton localised on the brane and is separated from the continuum of Kaluza-Klein massive graviton excitations by a mass gap. The presence of this mass gap in the graviton spectrum makes the extra-dimensional corrections to Newton's law decay exponentially. Gauge vector fields with a single massless bound state in its mass spectrum are also localised on this braneworld model a fact that allows us to recover the Coulomb's law of our 4D world. All these properties of the above referred tachyonic braneworld together with the positive stability analysis provided in this work, constitute a firm step towards the construction of realistic cosmological models within the braneworld paradigm.

  4. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  5. The Ongoing Impact of Modular Localization on Particle Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-08-01

    Modular localization is the concise conceptual formulation of causal localization in the setting of local quantum physics. Unlike QM it does not refer to individual operators but rather to ensembles of observables which share the same localization region, as a result it explains the probabilistic aspects of QFT in terms of the impure KMS nature arising from the local restriction of the pure vacuum. Whereas it played no important role in the perturbation theory of low spin particles, it becomes indispensible for interactions which involve higher spin s≥1 fields, where is leads to the replacement of the operator (BRST) gauge theory setting in Krein space by a new formulation in terms of stringlocal fields in Hilbert space. The main purpose of this paper is to present new results which lead to a rethinking of important issues of the Standard Model concerning massive gauge theories and the Higgs mechanism. We place these new findings into the broader context of ongoing conceptual changes within QFT which already led to new nonperturbative constructions of models of integrable QFTs. It is also pointed out that modular localization does not support ideas coming from string theory, as extra dimensions and Kaluza-Klein dimensional reductions outside quasiclassical approximations. Apart from hologarphic projections on null-surfaces, holograhic relations between QFT in different spacetime dimensions violate the causal completeness property, this includes in particular the Maldacena conjecture. Last not least, modular localization sheds light onto unsolved problems from QFT's distant past since it reveals that the Einstein-Jordan conundrum is really an early harbinger of the Unruh effect.

  6. A New Physical Model for Pulsars as Gravitational Shielding and Oscillating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    Pulsars are fast rotating neutron stars that synchronously emit periodic Dirac delta shape pulses of radio-frequency radiation and Lorentzian shape oscillations of X-rays. The acceleration of particles near the magnetic poles, which derivate from the rotating axis produces coherent beams of radio emissions that are viewed as pulses of radiation whenever the magnetic poles sweep the viewers. However, the conventional lighthouse model of pulsars is only conceptual. The physical mechanism through which particles are accelerated to produce coherent beams of radio emissions is still poorly understood. The process for periodically oscillating X-rays to emit from hot spots at the inner edge of accretion disks of pulsars is also remained as an unsolved mystery. Recently, a new physical model of pulsars is proposed by the author to quantitatively interpret the emission characteristics of pulsars, in accordance with his well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein gravitational shielding theory and the physics of thermal and accelerating charged particle radiation. The results indicate that with the significant gravitational shielding by scalar field a neutron star nonlinearly oscillates and produces synchronous periodically Dirac delta shape pulse-like radio-frequency radiation (emitted by the oscillating or accelerating charged particles) as well as periodically Lorentzian shape oscillating X-rays (as the thermal radiation of neutron stars that temperature varies due to the oscillation). This physical model of pulsars as gravitational shielding and oscillating neutron stars broadens our understanding of neutron stars and develops an innovative mechanism to disclose the mystery of pulsars. In this presentation, I will show the results obtained from the quantitative studies of this new physical model of pulsars for the oscillations of neutron stars and the powers of radio pulse-like emissions and oscillating X-rays.

  7. High-energy photon-hadron scattering in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Ryoichi; Watari, Taizan

    2011-10-01

    This article provides an in-depth look at hadron high-energy scattering by using gravity dual descriptions of strongly coupled gauge theories. Just like deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) serve as clean experimental probes into nonperturbative internal structure of hadrons, elastic scattering amplitude of a hadron and a (virtual) photon in gravity dual can be exploited as a theoretical probe. Since the scattering amplitude at sufficiently high energy (small Bjorken x) is dominated by parton contributions (=Pomeron contributions) even in strong coupling regime, there is a chance to learn a lesson for generalized parton distribution (GPD) by using gravity dual models. We begin with refining derivation of the Brower-Polchinski-Strassler-Tan (BPST) Pomeron kernel in gravity dual, paying particular attention to the role played by the complex spin variable j. The BPST Pomeron on warped spacetime consists of a Kaluza-Klein tower of 4D Pomerons with nonlinear trajectories, and we clarify the relation between Pomeron couplings and the Pomeron form factor. We emphasize that the saddle-point value j* of the scattering amplitude in the complex j-plane representation is a very important concept in understanding qualitative behavior of the scattering amplitude. The total Pomeron contribution to the scattering is decomposed into the saddle-point contribution and at most a finite number of pole contributions, and when the pole contributions are absent (which we call saddle-point phase), kinematical variable (q,x,t)-dependence of ln(1/q) evolution and ln(1/x) evolution parameters {gamma}{sub eff} and {lambda}{sub eff} in DIS and t-slope parameter B of DVCS in HERA experiment are all reproduced qualitatively in gravity dual. All of these observations shed a new light on modeling of GPD. Straightforward application of those results to other hadron high-energy scattering is also discussed.

  8. Über-naturalness: unexpectedly light scalars from supersymmetric extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, F.

    2011-05-01

    Standard lore asserts that quantum effects generically forbid the occurrence of light (non-pseudo-Goldstone) scalars having masses smaller than the Kaluza Klein scale, M KK , in extra-dimensional models, or the gravitino mass, M 3/2, in supersymmetric situations. We argue that a hidden assumption underlies this lore: that the scale of gravitational physics, M g , ( e.g the string scale, M s , in string theory) is of order the Planck mass, {M_p} = sqrt {{8π G}} ˜eq {10^{18}} GeV. We explore sensitivity to this assumption using the spectrum of masses arising within the specific framework of large-volume string compactifications, for which the ultraviolet completion at the gravity scale is explicitly known to be a Type IIB string theory. In such models the separation between M g and M p is parameterized by the (large) size of the extra dimensional volume, {V} (in string units), according to M p : M g : M KK : M 3/2 ∝ 1: {{V}^{ - {{1} / {2} .}}}:{{V}^{ - {{2} / {3} .}}}:{{V}^{ - 1}} . We find that the generic size of quantum corrections to masses is of the order of M KK M 3/2 /M p ≃ {{{{M_p}}} / {{{{V}^{{{5} / {3} .}}}}} .} . The mass of the lighest modulus (corresponding to the extra-dimensional volume) which at the classical level is M V ≃ {{{{M_p}}} / {{{{V}^{{{3} / {2} .}}}}} .} ≪ M 3/2 ≪ M KK is thus stable against quantum corrections. This is possible because the couplings of this modulus to other forms of matter in the low-energy theory are generically weaker than gravitational strength (something that is also usually thought not to occur according to standard lore). We discuss some phenomenological and cosmological implications of this observation.

  9. A search for $ t\\overline{t} $ resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.

    2015-08-01

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8s=8 TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to W+bW-b¯¯W+bW-b¯, with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to tt¯tt¯. These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  10. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  11. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pairmore » resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.« less

  12. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  13. M theory model of a big crunch/big bang transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turok, Neil; Perry, Malcolm; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2004-11-01

    We consider a picture in which the transition from a big crunch to a big bang corresponds to the collision of two empty orbifold planes approaching each other at a constant nonrelativistic speed in a locally flat background space-time, a situation relevant to recently proposed cosmological models. We show that p-brane states which wind around the extra dimension propagate smoothly and unambiguously across the orbifold plane collision. In particular we calculate the quantum mechanical production of winding M2-branes extending from one orbifold to the other. We find that the resulting density is finite and that the resulting gravitational backreaction is small. These winding states, which include the string theory graviton, can be propagated smoothly across the transition using a perturbative expansion in the membrane tension, an expansion which from the point of view of string theory is an expansion in inverse powers of α'. The conventional description of a crunch based on Einstein general relativity, involving Kasner or mixmaster behavior is misleading, we argue, because general relativity is only the leading order approximation to string theory in an expansion in positive powers of α'. In contrast, in the M theory setup we argue that interactions should be well behaved because of the smooth evolution of the fields combined with the fact that the string coupling tends to zero at the crunch. The production of massive Kaluza-Klein states should also be exponentially suppressed for small collision speeds. We contrast this good behavior with that found in previous studies of strings in Lorentzian orbifolds.

  14. Localization of 4D gravity on pure geometrical thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa-Cendejas, Nandinii; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo

    2006-04-15

    We consider the generation of thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D spacetime which constitutes a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory. In this framework, we show how 4D gravity can be localized on a scalar thick brane which does not necessarily respect reflection symmetry, generalizing in this way several previous models based on the Randall-Sundrum (RS) system and avoiding both, the restriction to orbifold geometries and the introduction of the branes in the action by hand. We first obtain a thick brane solution that preserves 4D Poincare invariance and breaks Z{sub 2}-symmetry along the extra dimension which, indeed, can be either compact or extended, and supplements brane solutions previously found by other authors. In the noncompact case, this field configuration represents a thick brane with positive energy density centered at y=c{sub 2}, whereas pairs of thick branes arise in the compact case. Remarkably, the Weylian scalar curvature is nonsingular along the fifth dimension in the noncompact case, in contraposition to the RS thin brane system. We also recast the wave equations of the transverse traceless modes of the linear fluctuations of the classical background into a Schroedinger's equation form with a volcano potential of finite bottom in both the compact and the extended cases. We solve Schroedinger equation for the massless zero mode m{sup 2}=0 and obtain a single bound wave function which represents a stable 4D graviton. We also get a continuum gapless spectrum of KK states with m{sup 2}>0 that are suppressed at y=c{sub 2} and turn asymptotically into plane waves.

  15. Gravitational contributions to the running Yang-Mills coupling in large extra-dimensional brane worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Dietmar; Plefka, Jan; Rodigast, Andreas

    2009-02-01