Science.gov

Sample records for lightweight trauma module

  1. Lightweight Trauma Module - LTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Current patient movement items (PMI) supporting the military's Critical Care Air Transport Team (CCATT) mission as well as the Crew Health Care System for space (CHeCS) have significant limitations: size, weight, battery duration, and dated clinical technology. The LTM is a small, 20 lb., system integrating diagnostic and therapeutic clinical capabilities along with onboard data management, communication services and automated care algorithms to meet new Aeromedical Evacuation requirements. The Lightweight Trauma Module is an Impact Instrumentation, Inc. project with strong Industry, DoD, NASA, and Academia partnerships aimed at developing the next generation of smart and rugged critical care tools for hazardous environments ranging from the battlefield to space exploration. The LTM is a combination ventilator/critical care monitor/therapeutic system with integrated automatic control systems. Additional capabilities are provided with small external modules.

  2. Lightweight flexible rooftop PV module

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, H.C.; Whelan, K.

    1994-12-31

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) and United Solar Systems Corp. (United Solar) are developing lightweight, flexible photovoltaic modules that can replace conventional roofing materials and be economically and aesthetically integrated into residential and commercial buildings. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency multi-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. These cells are produced on thin, flexible, stainless steel substrates. Two types of products 1 ft by 10 ft overlapping PV shingles and 1.3 ft by 20 ft PV roof panels are being developed by United Solar and ECD, respectively. United Solar`s shingle type design uses a roof mounting procedures similar to those used with conventional asphalt shingles, while ECD`s PV panel uses mounting procedures conforming to metal roof systems. Thus, they can be installed on roof sheathings, replacing ordinary shingles or metal roofing panels, on a standard wood roof construction.

  3. Lightweight photovoltaic module development for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M.J.; Maglitta, J.C.; Lamp, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    Lightweight photovoltaic modules are being developed for powering high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Terrestrial crystalline silicon solar cell and module technologies are being applied to minimize module cost, with modifications to improve module specific power (W/kg) and power density (W/m{sup 2}). New module processes are being developed for assembling standard thickness (320 mm) and thin (125 mm) solar cells, thin (50 to 100 mm) encapsulant films, and thin (25 mm) cover films. In comparison, typical terrestrial modules use 300 to 400 mm thick solar cells, 460 mm thick encapsulants, and 3.2 mm thick glass covers. The use of thin, lightweight materials allows the fabrication of modules with specific powers ranging from 120 to 200 W/kg, depending on cell thickness and efficiency, compared to 15 W/kg or less for conventional terrestrial modules. High efficiency designs based on ultra-thin (5 mm) GaAs cells have also been developed, with the potential for achieving substantially higher specific powers. Initial design, development, and module assembly work is completed. Prototype modules were fabricated in sizes up to 45 cm x 99 cm. Module materials and processes are being evaluated through accelerated environmental testing, including thermal cycling, humidity-freeze cycling, mechanical cycling, and exposure to UV and visible light.

  4. Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors

    DOEpatents

    Butler, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

  5. Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry L.

    1985-01-01

    A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

  6. A preclinical dental trauma teaching module.

    PubMed

    Marriot-Smith, Charlotte; Marino, Victor; Heithersay, Geoffrey Sinclair

    2016-06-01

    A dental trauma exercise using the anterior segment of a sheep mandible as a model has been incorporated into the undergraduate dental programme at the University of Adelaide since 2011. Students are required to replant a simulated tooth avulsion, reposition a laterally luxated tooth injury and then apply a flexible splint consisting of 40 lb fishing nylon attached with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement, GC Fuji Ortho LC. The exercise concludes with the simple removal of the splint with a spoon excavator. The acrylic mounted formalin-fixed sheep mandible is reusable, which has obvious economic and practical advantages. PMID:26667108

  7. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  8. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  9. Design, Construction, and Testing of Lightweight X-ray Mirror Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Biskach, Michael P.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Espina, Rebecca A.; Hohl, Bruce R.; Matson, Elizabeth A.; Saha, Timo C.; Zhang, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution optics are needed for future space-based X-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. The Next Generation X-ray Optics (NGXO) team at NASA GSFC is nearing mission readiness for a 10 arc-second Half Power Diameter (HPD) slumped glass mirror technology while laying the groundwork for a future 1-2 arc-second technology based on polished silicon mirrors. Technology Development Modules (TDMs) have been designed, fabricated, integrated with mirrors segments, and extensively tested to demonstrate technology readiness. Tests include X-ray performance, thermal vacuum, acoustic load, and random vibration. The thermal vacuum and acoustic load environments have proven relatively benign, while the random vibration environment has proven challenging due to large input amplification at frequencies above 500 Hz. Epoxy selection, surface preparation, and larger bond area have increased bond strength while vibration isolation has decreased vibration amplification allowing for space launch requirements to be met in the near term. The next generation of TDMs, which demonstrates a lightweight structure supporting more mirror segments, is currently being fabricated. Analysis predicts superior performance characteristics due to the use of E-60 Beryllium-Oxide Metal Matrix Composite material, with only a modest cost increase. These TDMs will be larger, lighter, stiffer, and stronger than the current generation. Preliminary steps are being taken to enable mounting and testing of 1-2 arc-second mirror segments expected to be available in the future. A Vertical X-ray Test Facility (VXTF) will minimize module gravity distortion and allow for less constrained mirror mounts, such as fully kinematic mounts. Permanent kinematic mounting into a modified TDM has been demonstrated to achieve 2 arc-second level distortion free alignment.

  10. Trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain and spine injury (TBI/TSI) is a leading cause of death and lifelong disability in children. The biomechanical properties of the child's brain, skull, and spine, the size of the child, the age-specific activity pattern, and variance in trauma mechanisms result in a wide range of age-specific traumas and patterns of brain and spine injuries. A detailed knowledge about the various types of primary and secondary pediatric head and spine injuries is essential to better identify and understand pediatric TBI/TSI, which enhances sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, will guide therapy, and may give important information about the prognosis. The purposes of this chapter are to: (1) discuss the unique epidemiology, mechanisms, and characteristics of TBI/TSI in children; (2) review the anatomic and functional imaging techniques that can be used to study common and rare pediatric TBI/TSI and their complications; (3) comprehensively review frequent primary and secondary brain injuries; and (4) to give a short overview of two special types of pediatric TBI/TSI: birth-related and nonaccidental injuries. PMID:27430465

  11. Synaptic strength modulation after cortical trauma: a role in epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, Sinziana; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries are often followed by abnormal hyperexcitability, leading to acute seizures and epilepsy. Previous studies documented the rewiring capacity of neocortical neurons in response to various cortical and subcortical lesions. However, little information is available on the functional consequences of these anatomical changes after cortical trauma and the adaptation of synaptic connectivity to a decreased input produced by chronic deafferentation. In this study, we recorded intracellular (IC) activities of cortical neurons simultaneously with extracellular (EC) unit activities and field potentials of neighboring cells in cat cortex, after a large transection of the white matter underneath the suprasylvian gyrus, in acute and chronic conditions (at 2, 4, and 6 weeks) in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized cats. Using EC spikes to compute the spike-triggered averages of IC membrane potential, we found an increased connection probability and efficacy between cortical neurons weeks after cortical trauma. Inhibitory interactions showed no significant changes in the traumatized cortex compared with control. The increased synaptic efficacy was accompanied by enhanced input resistance and intrinsic excitability of cortical neurons, as well as by increased duration of silent network periods. Our electrophysiological data revealed functional consequences of previously reported anatomical changes in the injured cortex. We suggest that homeostatic synaptic plasticity compensating the decreased activity in the undercut cortex leads to an uncontrollable cortical hyperexcitability and seizure generation. PMID:18596152

  12. Nephrilin peptide modulates a neuroimmune stress response in rodent models of burn trauma and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; ElAyadi, Amina; Singh, Baljit K; Prasai, Anesh; Hegde, Sachin D; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis occurs three times more often in burns than in other types of trauma, suggesting an overlap or synergy between underlying immune mechanisms in burn trauma and sepsis. Nephrilin peptide, a designed inhibitor of mTORC2, has previously been shown to modulate a neuroimmune stress response in rodent models of xenobiotic and metabolic stress. Here we investigate the effect of nephrilin peptide administration in different rodent models of burn trauma and sepsis. In a rat scald burn model, daily subcutaneous bolus injection of 4 mg/kg nephrilin significantly reduced the elevation of kidney tissue substance P, S100A9 gene expression, PMN infiltration and plasma inflammatory markers in the acute phase, while suppressing plasma CCL2 and insulin C-peptide, kidney p66shc-S36 phosphorylation and PKC-beta and CGRP in dorsal root ganglia at 14 days (chronic phase). In the mouse cecal ligation and puncture model of sepsis, nephrilin fully protected mice from mortality between surgery and day 7, compared to 67% mortality in saline-treated animals, while significantly reducing elevated CCL2 in plasma. mTORC2 may modulate important neuroimmune responses in both burn trauma and sepsis. PMID:24273694

  13. Pharmacological Modulation of Acute Trauma Memories to Prevent PTSD: Considerations from a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Bryce; Cullen, Patrick K.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in American adults range from 6.4–6.8%. PTSD is associated with increased risk for comorbid major depression, substance use disorder, suicide, and a variety of other mental and physical health conditions. Given the negative sequelae of trauma/PTSD, research has focused on identifying efficacious interventions that could be administered soon after a traumatic event to prevent or reduce the subsequent incidence of PTSD. While early psychosocial interventions have been shown to be relatively ineffective, early (secondary) pharmacological interventions have shown promise. These pharmacological approaches are largely based on the hypothesis that disruption of altered stress hormone levels and the consequent formation of trauma memories could protect against the development of PTSD. The present manuscript reviews the literature regarding the role of peri-traumatic stress hormones as risk factors for the development of PTSD and reviews evidence for the efficacy of exogenously modulating stress hormone levels to prevent/buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. Whereas prior literature has focused primarily on either child or adult studies, the present review incorporates both child and adult studies in a developmental approach to understanding risk for PTSD and how pharmacological modulation of acute memories may buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:24513176

  14. Childhood Exposure to Psychological Trauma and the Risk of Suicide Attempts: The Modulating Effect of Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Subin; Hong, Jin Pyo; Jeon, Hong Jin; Seong, Sujeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined whether childhood exposure to psychological trauma is associated with greater suicidality and whether specific psychiatric disorders modulate this association in a representative sample of Korean adults. Methods The Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 was administered to 6,027 subjects aged 18-74 years. Subjects who experienced a traumatic event before the age of 18 years, the childhood-trauma-exposure group, were compared with controls without childhood trauma exposure. Results Childhood exposure to psychological trauma was associated with lifetime suicidal ideation (OR=3.19, 95% CI=2.42-4.20), suicide plans (OR=4.15, 95% CI=2.68-6.43), and suicide attempts (OR=4.52, 95% CI=2.97-6.88). These associations weakened after further adjustment for any psychiatric disorders, but they were not eliminated. The risk of suicide attempts related to childhood trauma increased with the presence of a concurrent alcohol use, depressive, or eating disorder. Conclusion In terms of clinical implications, patients with these disorders who have a history of childhood trauma should be carefully assessed for their suicide risk and aggressively treated for psychiatric disorders. PMID:25866516

  15. Lightweight PV Inverters: Dual Bi-Directional IGBTs Modules Enables Breakthrough PV Inverter Using Current Modulation Topology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-30

    Solar ADEPT Project: PV inverters convert DC power generated by modules into usable AC power. IPC’s initial 30kW 94lb. PV inverter reduces the weight of comparable 30kW PV inverters by 90%—reducing the cost of materials, manufacturing, shipping, and installation. With ARPA-E support, new bi-directional silicon power switches will be developed, commercialized, and utilized in IPC’s next-generation PV inverter. With these components, IPC will produce 100kW inverters that weight less than 100lb., reducing the weight of conventional 3,000lb. 100kW inverters by more than 95%. The new power switches will cut IPC’s $/W manufacturing cost in half, as well as further reduce indirect shipping and installation costs.

  16. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  17. Stress, trauma and PTSD: translational insights into the core synaptic circuitry and its modulation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Hatton, Sean N; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Evidence is considered as to whether behavioral criteria for diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are applicable to that of traumatized animals and whether the phenomena of acquisition, extinction and reactivation of fear behavior in animals are also successfully applicable to humans. This evidence suggests an affirmative answer in both cases. Furthermore, the deficits in gray matter found in PTSD, determined with magnetic resonance imaging, are also observed in traumatized animals, lending neuropsychological support to the use of animals to probe what has gone awry in PTSD. Such animal experiments indicate that the core synaptic circuitry mediating behavior following trauma consists of the amygdala, ventral-medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, all of which are modulated by the basal ganglia. It is not clear if this is the case in PTSD as the observations using fMRI are equivocal and open to technical objections. Nevertheless, the effects of the basal ganglia in controlling glutamatergic synaptic transmission through dopaminergic and serotonergic synaptic mechanisms in the core synaptic circuitry provides a ready explanation for why modifying these mechanisms delays extinction in animal models and predisposes towards PTSD. In addition, changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the core synaptic circuitry have significant effects on acquisition and extinction in animal experiments with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the BDNF gene predisposing to PTSD. PMID:25985955

  18. Compact lightweight payload for covert datalink using a multiple quantum well modulating retroreflector on a small rotary-wing unmanned airborne vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Rabinovich, William S.; Meehan, Timothy J.; Vilcheck, Michael J.; Mahon, Rita; Burris, Ray; Ferraro, Mina; Sokolsky, Ilene; Vasquez, John A.; Bovais, Chris S.; Cochrell, Kerry; Goins, Kim C.; Barbehenn, Robin; Katzer, D. Scott; Ikossi-Anastasiou, Kiki; Montes, Marcos J.

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, we describe progress in the development of the NRL Multiple Quantum Well modulating retro-reflector including a description of recent demonstrations of an infrared data link between a small rotary-wing unmanned airborne vehicle and a ground based laser interrogator using the NRL multiple quantum well modulating retro-reflector. Modulating retro-reflector systems couple an optical retro- reflector, such as a corner-cube, and an electro-optic shutter to allow two-way optical communications using a laser, telescope and pointer-tracker on only one platform. The NRL modulating retro-reflector uses a semiconductor based multiple quantum well shutter capable of modulation rates up to 10 Mbps, depending on link characteristics. The technology enable the use of near-infrared frequencies, which is well known to provide covert communications immune to frequency allocation problems. The multiple quantum well modulating retro-reflector has the added advantage of being compact, lightweight, covert, and requires very low power. Up to an order of magnitude in onboard power can be saved using a small array of these devices instead of the Radio Frequency equivalent. In the described demonstration, a Mbps optical link to an unmanned aerial vehicle in flight at a range of 100-200 feet is shown. Near real-time compressed video is also demonstrated at the Mbps level.

  19. Lightweight Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver and Co., Michigan City, IN.

    One of the newest and most promising developments in architecture has been the use of lightweight structures for encapsulating space. Using this new technology, builders can enclose large and small areas at a fraction of the cost of conventional construction and at the same time provide interior space that is totally flexible. This brochure shows…

  20. Modulation of interpersonal trust in borderline personality disorder by intranasal oxytocin and childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Andreas; Kolb, Meike; Heller, Jörg; Edel, Marc-Andreas; Roser, Patrik; Brüne, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpersonal difficulties, whereby patients are negatively biased concerning the evaluation of others' trustworthiness. Here, we examined the effect of oxytocin on interpersonal behavior of BPD patients in a trust game, emphasizing the assessment of facial attractiveness of the patients' counterparts in the game, and patients' history of childhood trauma. Thirteen BPD patients and thirteen healthy controls played a trust game after receiving oxytocin or placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Childhood trauma was evaluated using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Patients transferred less money in the oxytocin condition compared to placebo. While healthy controls transferred more money units (MUs) to attractive counterparts than to unattractive ones only after the administration of oxytocin, BPD patients showed this pattern in both conditions. Emotional neglect during childhood negatively correlated with the amount of MUs transferred by patients under oxytocin, but not placebo. Oxytocin had a trust-lowering effect in BPD, which was correlated with patients' history of childhood trauma. Patients' evaluation of interpersonal trust seems to depend more on attractiveness features of their counterparts than in controls, a finding that may have important implications for further research on the usefulness of "prosocial" peptides as an adjunct to psychotherapeutic interventions. PMID:23802121

  1. Lightweight transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Swallom, D.W.; Enos, G.

    1990-05-01

    The technical effort described in this report relates to the program that was performed to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight transformer for Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) mission requirements. The objectives of this program were two-fold: (1) design and fabricate a lightweight transformer using liquid hydrogen as the coolant; and (2) test the completed transformer assembly with a low voltage, dc power source. Although the full power testing with liquid helium was not completed, the program demonstrated the viability of the design approach. The lightweight transformer was designed and fabricated, and low and moderate power testing was completed. The transformer is a liquid hydrogen cooled air core transformer that uses thin copper for its primary and secondary windings. The winding mass was approximately 12 kg, or 0.03 kg/kW. Further refinements of the design to a partial air core transformer could potentially reduce the winding mass to as low as 4 or 5 kg, or 0.0125 kg/kW. No attempt was made on this program to reduce the mass of the related structural components or cryogenic container. 8 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Lightweight piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight piston composed of carbon-carbon composites is presented. The use of carbon-carbon composites over conventional materials, such as aluminum, reduces piston weight and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocation engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance is so small as to eliminate the necessity for piston rings. Use of the carbon-carbon composite has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. The Significance of Human-Animal Relationships as Modulators of Trauma Effects in Children: A Developmental Neurobiological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Emotional stress and trauma impacts the neurobiology of children. They are especially vulnerable given the developmental plasticity of the brain. The neural synaptic circular processes between the anterior cingulated cortex, prefrontal cortex, amygdala and the hypothalamus are altered. Trauma results in the release of the peptide glucocortisoid,…

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  7. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  8. Lightweight Helmet For Eye/Balance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcstravick, M. Catherine; Proctor, David R.; Wood, Scott J.

    1988-01-01

    Lightweight helmet serves as mounting platform for stimulus and sensor modules in experiments on role of vestibulo-ocular reflex in motion sickness and space-adaptation syndrome. Fitted liner and five inflatable air bladders stabilize helmet with respect to subject's head. Personal bite board attached to chin-bar assembly makes hard palate in subject's mouth serve as final position reference for helmet.

  9. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 23. Mayersak RJ. Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  10. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  11. Light-weight plastination.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Rabi, Suganthy; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sawutti, Alimjan; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2008-11-20

    Plastination is an excellent technique which helps to keep the anatomical specimens in a dry, odourless state. Since the invention of plastination technique by von Hagens, research has been done to improve the quality of plastinated specimens. In this paper, we have described a method of producing light-weight plastinated specimens using xylene along with silicone and in the final step, substitute xylene with air. The finished plastinated specimens were light-weight, dry, odourless and robust. This method requires less use of resin thus making the plastination technique more cost-effective. The light-weight specimens are easy to carry and can easily be used for teaching. PMID:18752934

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  13. Systemic trauma.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Rachel E; Martin, Christina Gamache; Smith, Carly Parnitzke

    2014-01-01

    Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. The current issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation is composed of articles that incorporate systemic approaches to trauma. This perspective extends conceptualizations of trauma to consider the influence of environments such as schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, the military, workplace settings, hospitals, jails, and prisons; agencies and systems such as police, foster care, immigration, federal assistance, disaster management, and the media; conflicts involving war, torture, terrorism, and refugees; dynamics of racism, sexism, discrimination, bullying, and homophobia; and issues pertaining to conceptualizations, measurement, methodology, teaching, and intervention. Although it may be challenging to expand psychological and psychiatric paradigms of trauma, a systemic trauma perspective is necessary on both scientific and ethical grounds. Furthermore, a systemic trauma perspective reflects current approaches in the fields of global health, nursing, social work, and human rights. Empirical investigations and intervention science informed by this paradigm have the potential to advance scientific inquiry, lower the incidence of a broader range of traumatic experiences, and help to alleviate personal and societal suffering. PMID:24617751

  14. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  15. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  18. Neuroenteric axis modulates the balance of regulatory T cells and T-helper 17 cells in the mesenteric lymph node following trauma/hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Koji; Coimbra, Raul; Langness, Simone; Eliceiri, Brian P; Costantini, Todd W

    2015-08-01

    CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) continuously migrate from the intestine to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and maintain tolerance by driving the development of regulatory T cells (Treg) in the gut. The relative expression of Treg and T-helper 17 (Th17) cells determines the balance between tolerance and immunity in the gut. We hypothesized that trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) would decrease the CD103(+) DC population in the mesenteric lymph and alter the Treg-to-Th17 ratio in the MLN. We further hypothesized that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) would promote tolerance to inflammation by increasing the Treg-to-Th17 ratio in the MLN after injury. Male rats were assigned to sham shock (SS), trauma/sham shock (T/SS), or T/HS. T/HS was induced by laparotomy and 60 min of HS (blood pressure 35 mmHg) followed by fluid resuscitation. A separate cohort of animals underwent cervical VNS after the HS phase. MLN samples were collected 24 h after resuscitation. The CD103(+) DC population and Treg-to-Th17 cell ratio in the MLN were decreased after T/HS compared with SS and T/SS, suggesting a shift to an inflammatory response. VNS prevented the T/HS-induced decrease in the CD103(+) DC population and increased the Treg-to-Th17 ratio compared with T/HS alone. VNS alters the gut inflammatory response to injury by modulating the Treg-Th17 cell balance in the MLN. VNS promotes tolerance to inflammation in the gut, further supporting its ability to modulate the inflammatory set point and alter the response to injury. PMID:26045612

  19. Sensory Modulation Disorders among Children with a History of Trauma: A Frame of Reference for Speech-Language Pathologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Ben J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present definitions and concepts about sensory modulation, illustrate behavioral aspects of sensory modulation disorders, describe a framework for assessment and intervention, and present advances in research. Method: A review of descriptive and evidence-based literature related to the impact of exposure…

  20. Geriatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    Reske-Nielsen, Casper; Medzon, Ron

    2016-08-01

    Within the next 15 years, 1 in 5 Americans will be over age 65. $34 billion will be spent yearly on trauma care of this age group. This section covers situations in trauma unique to the geriatric population, who are often under-triaged and have significant injuries underestimated. Topics covered include age-related pathophysiological changes, underlying existing medical conditions and certain daily medications that increase the risk of serious injury in elderly trauma patients. Diagnostic evaluation of this group requires liberal testing, imaging, and a multidisciplinary team approach. Topics germane to geriatric trauma including hypothermia, elder abuse, and depression and suicide are also covered. PMID:27475011

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  5. A lightweight ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenjan, S.K.; Allen, C.M.; Gardner, D.; Wong, H.R.

    1998-12-31

    The detection of buried objects, particularly unexploded ordnance (UXO), has gained significant interest in the US in the late 1990s. The desire to remediate the thousands of sites worldwide has become an increasing humanitarian concern. The application of radar to this problem has received renewed attention. Bechtel Nevada, Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has developed several frequency modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) units for the US Department of Energy since 1984. To meet these new technical requirements for high resolution data and UXO detection, STL is moving forward with advances to GPR technology, signal processing, and imaging with the development of an innovative system. The goal is to design and fabricate a lightweight, battery operated unit that does not require surface contact and can be operated by a novice user.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  7. Lightweight Electrical Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Hollow plastic spheres expanded and fused together. Hollow, gasfilled plastic spheres piled in mold. Heating in vacuum softens and expands spheres, forcing them together into nearly regular hexagonal close packing. Foam used as lightweight, electrically insulating material in place of solid ceramic, glass, or polymer. Padding to protect against mechanical shocks another application for such dense, regular foam.

  8. LIGHTWEIGHT GREEN ROOF SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Applying a Lightweight Green Roof System to a building can achieve in managing storm water runoff, decreasing heat gain, yielding energy savings, and mitigating the heat island effect. Currently, Most green roof systems are considerably heavy and require structural reinforceme...

  9. [Chest trauma].

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. PMID:21640287

  10. Tailbone trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Choi SB, Cwinn AA. Pelvic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Vora ...

  11. Essential Amino Acid Enriched High-Protein Enteral Nutrition Modulates Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 System Function in a Rat Model of Trauma-Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xianfeng; Wang, Xinying; Li, Qiurong; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-01-01

    Background Nutrition support for critically ill patients supplemented with additional modular protein may promote skeletal muscle protein anabolism in addition to counteracting acute nitrogen loss. The present study was designed to investigate whether the essential amino acid (EAA) enriched high-protein enteral nutrition (EN) modulates the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) system and activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) anabolic signaling pathway in a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T-HS) rat model. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 90, 278.18±0.94 g) were randomly assigned to 5 groups: (1) normal control, (2) pair-fed, (3) T-HS, (4) T-HS and standard EN, and (5) T-HS and EAA enriched high-protein EN. Six animals from each group were harvested on days 2, 4, and 6 for serum, gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus sample collection. T-HS significantly reduced muscle mass. Nutrition support maintained muscle mass, especially the EAA enriched high-protein EN. Meanwhile, a pronounced derangement in IGF-1-IGFBPs axis as well as impaired mTOR transduction was observed in the T-HS group. Compared with animals receiving standard EN, those receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN presented 18% higher serum free IGF-1 levels following 3 days of nutrition support and 22% higher after 5 days. These changes were consistent with the concomitant elevation in serum insulin and reduction in corticosterone levels. In addition, phosphorylations of downstream anabolic signaling effectors - including protein kinase B, mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 - increased significantly in rats receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN. Conclusion/Significance Our findings firstly demonstrate the beneficial effect of EAA enriched high-protein EN on the metabolic modulation of skeletal muscle protein anabolism by regulating the IGF-1 system and downstream anabolic signaling transduction. PMID:24204984

  12. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  13. Lightweight solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hotaling, S.P.

    1993-06-22

    A lightweight solar cell is described comprising: (a) an LD aerogel substrate having a density of between 10-1,000 mg/cc, the surface of the substrate being polished (b) a dielectric planarization layer being applied to the polished surface, and (c) at least one layer of PV material deposited thereon. The solar cell having a plurality of PV layers deposited on the planarization layer.

  14. Lightweight Solar Photovoltaic Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceragioli, R.; Himmler, R.; Nath, P.; Vogeli, C.; Guha, S.

    1995-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible sheets containing arrays of stacked solar photovoltaic cells developed to supply electric power aboard spacecraft. Solar batteries satisfying stringent requirements for operation in outer space also adaptable to terrestrial environment. Attractive for use as long-lived, portable photovoltaic power sources. Cells based on amorphous silicon which offers potential for order-of-magnitude increases in power per unit weight, power per unit volume, and endurance in presence of ionizing radiation.

  15. Thin, Lightweight Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    Improved design for thin, lightweight solar photovoltaic cells with front contacts reduces degradation of electrical output under exposure to energetic charged particles (protons and electrons). Increases ability of cells to maintain structural integrity under exposure to ultraviolet radiation by eliminating ultraviolet-degradable adhesives used to retain cover glasses. Interdigitated front contacts and front junctions formed on semiconductor substrate. Mating contacts formed on back surface of cover glass. Cover glass and substrate electrostatically bonded together.

  16. Lightweight bipolar storage battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus [10] is disclosed for a lightweight bipolar battery of the end-plate cell stack design. Current flow through a bipolar cell stack [12] is collected by a pair of copper end-plates [16a,16b] and transferred edgewise out of the battery by a pair of lightweight, low resistance copper terminals [28a,28b]. The copper terminals parallel the surface of a corresponding copper end-plate [16a,16b] to maximize battery throughput. The bipolar cell stack [12], copper end-plates [16a,16b] and copper terminals [28a,28b] are rigidly sandwiched between a pair of nonconductive rigid end-plates [20] having a lightweight fiber honeycomb core which eliminates distortion of individual plates within the bipolar cell stack due to internal pressures. Insulating foam [30] is injected into the fiber honeycomb core to reduce heat transfer into and out of the bipolar cell stack and to maintain uniform cell performance. A sealed battery enclosure [ 22] exposes a pair of terminal ends [26a,26b] for connection with an external circuit.

  17. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  18. Lightweight reflector assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Jolley, J.; Walker, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight reflective assembly member having good optical quality and particularly adaptable to accommodating temperature variations without providing destructive thermal stresses and reflective slope errors is described. The reflective assembly consists of a thin sheet of glass with appropriate reflective coating and a cellular glass block substrate bonded together. The method of fabrication includes abrading the cellular substrate with an abrasive master die to form an appropriate concave surface. An adhesive is applied to the abraded surface and a lamina reflective surface is placed under a uniform pressure to conform the reflective surface onto the desired abraded surface of the substrate.

  19. Lightweight piston architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Allan H. (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is an improvement in a lightweight carbon-carbon composite piston, the improvement uses near-net shape knitted or warp-interlock preforms to improve the structural qualities of the piston. In its preferred embodiment, a one piece, tubular, closed-ended, knitted preform (a sock) of carbon fibers embedded within the matrix of the piston structure forms the crown, side wall, skirt and inner surface of the piston, and wrap-interlock preforms strengthen the piston crown and wrist pin bosses.

  20. Shock trauma.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    1984-09-01

    Trauma - accidental or intentional injury - is a major health and social problem. It is still the chief cause of death in people between the ages of 1 and 38 years. In the United States, the mortality due to trauma between the ages of 15 and 24 years increased by 13% from 1960 to 1978. During the same period, the mortality for people aged 25 to 64 years declined by 16%. Murders have increased from 8464 in 1960, to 26 000 in 1982. The overall death rate of American teenagers and young adults is 50% higher than that of their counterparts in Britain, Sweden and Japan. Trauma affects young, productive citizens, and the estimated costs for death, disability and loss of productivity exceed $230 million a day. The most tragic statistic is that at least 40% of the deaths are needless and preventable if better treatment and prevention programs were available. Trauma deaths that might be prevented are those due to motor vehicle accidents, homicide, burns, and alcohol and drug abuse. In this paper suggestions for prevention are made. They include improved crash worthiness of motor vehicles, revocation of drunk drivers' licences, use of devices that limit drunk drivers, increased tax on alcohol and random breathalyser tests, and the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets. Control of hand-guns and burn characteristics of cigarettes could also reduce deaths. The problems and issues in trauma care can be divided into two broad categories: system and professional. System problems include prehospital care, in-hospital care, rehabilitation and prevention. Professional problems include education, research, economics, and quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6478325

  1. Staring arrays - The future lightweight imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, P. N. J.; Dann, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    High performance thermal imagers, such as the common modules, are now readily available. These systems generally employ a scanning mechanism to generate the two-dimensional display which makes their adaptation to cheap, lightweight, small imagers difficult. However, with the advent of two-dimensional close packed arrays of infrared detectors the development of such a system is now becoming feasible. A small imager using cadium mercury telluride detectors has been produced commercially. The system has been designed to be adaptable to use both 3-5-micrometer and 8-14-micrometer arrays, and to study various electronic correction mechanisms.

  2. Penetrating trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  3. Penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Dervelegas, Konstantinos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax occurs when air enters the pleural space. Currently there is increasing incidence of road traffic accidents, increasing awareness of healthcare leading to more advanced diagnostic procedures, and increasing number of admissions in intensive care units are responsible for traumatic (non iatrogenic and iatrogenic) pneumothorax. Pneumothorax has a clinical spectrum from asymptomatic patient to life-threatening situations. Diagnosis is usually made by clinical examination and imaging techniques. In our current work we focus on the treatment of penetrating trauma. PMID:25337403

  4. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  5. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  6. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  7. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-11-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  8. Coast Guard Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are jointly developing a lightweight, helicopter-transportable, completely self-contained firefighting module for combating shipboard and dockside fires. The project draws upon NASA technology in high-capacity rocket engine pumps, lightweight materials and compact packaging.

  9. Lightweight ceramic insulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for manufacturing a low density ceramic powder which can be formed to make a lightweight material for insulation or other construction. The ceramic product made from the process has a final density of less than 25 to about 1 percent of the theoretical weight of the ceramic powder. The ceramic product is lightweight and can be made to withstand high temperatures greater than 1400 C.

  10. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  11. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  12. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  13. NASA space shuttle lightweight seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Jermstad, Wayne; Lewis, James; Colangelo, Todd

    1996-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Lightweight Seat-Mission Specialist (LWS-MS) is a crew seat for the mission specialists who fly aboard the Space Shuttle. The LWS-MS is a lightweight replacement for the mission specialist seats currently flown on the Shuttle. Using state-of-the-art analysis techniques, a team of NASA and Lockheed engineers from the Johnson Space Center (JSC) designed a seat that met the most stringent requirements demanded of the new seats by the Shuttle program, and reduced the weight of the seats by 52%.

  14. Making a Lightweight Battery Plaque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.; Post, R. E.; Soltis, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plaque formed in porous plastic by electroless plating. Lightweight plaque prepared by electroless plating of porous plastic contains embedded wire or expanded metal grid. Plastic may or may not be filled with soluble pore former. If it contains soluble pore former, treated to remove soluble pore former and increase porosity. Porous plastic then clamped into rig that allows plating solutions to flow through plastic. Lightweight nickel plaque used as electrode substrate for alkaline batteries, chiefly Ni and Cd electrodes, and for use as electrolyte-reservoir plates for fuel cells.

  15. Lightweight solar array blanket tooling, laser welding and cover process technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    A two phase technology investigation was performed to demonstrate effective methods for integrating 50 micrometer thin solar cells into ultralightweight module designs. During the first phase, innovative tooling was developed which allows lightweight blankets to be fabricated in a manufacturing environment with acceptable yields. During the second phase, the tooling was improved and the feasibility of laser processing of lightweight arrays was confirmed. The development of the cell/interconnect registration tool and interconnect bonding by laser welding is described.

  16. Rural trauma management.

    PubMed

    Wayne, R

    1989-05-01

    Rural trauma is a major problem in the United States. Up to 70 percent of trauma fatalities occur in rural areas, even though 70 percent of the population live in urban areas. Over the past 3 decades, numerous studies have defined the concept of preventable trauma death in both rural and urban populations. With the development of a regional trauma care system in Oregon, preventable trauma mortality should decrease. An effort was made to improve the quality of trauma care in Clatsop County, Oregon, a community of 30,000 people with 2 small rural hospitals. To obtain this goal, four steps were taken: (1) physician and nurse education was improved, (2) trauma protocols promoting prompt resuscitation and stabilization of patients were established, (3) regular trauma case reviews were conducted, and (4) emergency medical technician and prehospital management were coordinated. This study reviews the trail from sporadic, uncoordinated rural trauma care to the designation process. PMID:2712202

  17. Lightweight Deployable Mirrors with Tensegrity Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.; Bradford, Larry J.; Cleve, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    The upper part of Figure 1 shows a small-scale prototype of a developmental class of lightweight, deployable structures that would support panels in precise alignments. In this case, the panel is hexagonal and supports disks that represent segments of a primary mirror of a large telescope. The lower part of Figure 1 shows a complete conceptual structure containing multiple hexagonal panels that hold mirror segments. The structures of this class are of the tensegrity type, which was invented five decades ago by artist Kenneth Snelson. A tensegrity structure consists of momentfree compression members (struts) and tension members (cables). The structures of this particular developmental class are intended primarily as means to erect large segmented primary mirrors of astronomical telescopes or large radio antennas in outer space. Other classes of tensegrity structures could also be designed for terrestrial use as towers, masts, and supports for general structural panels. An important product of the present development effort is the engineering practice of building a lightweight, deployable structure as an assembly of tensegrity modules like the one shown in Figure 2. This module comprises two octahedral tensegrity subunits that are mirror images of each other joined at their plane of mirror symmetry. In this case, the plane of mirror symmetry is both the upper plane of the lower subunit and the lower plane of the upper subunit, and is delineated by the midheight triangle in Figure 2. In the configuration assumed by the module to balance static forces under mild loading, the upper and lower planes of each sub-unit are rotated about 30 , relative to each other, about the long (vertical) axis of the structure. Larger structures can be assembled by joining multiple modules like this one at their sides or ends. When the module is compressed axially (vertically), the first-order effect is an increase in the rotation angle, but by virtue of the mirror arrangement, the net

  18. Lightweight Distributed Metric Service (LDMS)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-09-14

    LDMS is a framework for collecting system data from computational clusters and transporting it off the cluster. It utilizes existing data sources on the cluster (e.g., temperature sensors, network traffic counters). The collection and transport mechanisms of LDMS are lightweight and do not significantly adversely impact the performance of the applications running concurrently on the cluster.

  19. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  20. Lightweight Thermal-Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Lawson, A. G.; Whiteman, T. C.; Brien, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Hexagonal honeycomb panels secured by Y-shaped plates form lightweight, easily-maintained thermal-protection system. Honeycomb outer panel and fastener materials are selected to match local heating rates. Typical materials include composites, titanium, superalloys, and refractory metals. Advantages include complete symmetry of components--there are no left- or right-hand parts and no asymmetry in thermal expansion.

  1. Lightweight, Wearable, Metal Rubber Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    For autonomous health monitoring. NanoSonic, Inc., has developed comfortable garments with multiple integrated sensors designed to monitor astronaut health throughout long-duration space missions. The combined high electrical conductivity, low mechanical modulus, and environmental robustness of the sensors make them an effective, lightweight, and comfortable alternative to conventional use of metal wiring and cabling.

  2. Lightweight Cathodes For Nickel Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight cathodes for rechargeable nickel-based electrochemical cells undergoing development. In cathodes, mats of nickel fibers are substrates providing structural support of, and electrical contact with, active cathode material. Offers specific energies greater than sintered nickel plaque cathodes. Electrodes used in rechargeable batteries for applications in which weight major concern, including laptop computers, cellular phones, flashlights, soldiers' backpacks, and electric vehicles.

  3. Relationship between trauma narratives and trauma pathology.

    PubMed

    Amir, N; Stafford, J; Freshman, M S; Foa, E B

    1998-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between posttrauma pathology and the level of articulation (complexity) in rape narratives recounted by victims shortly after the assault. Degree of articulation was operationalized as the reading level of the narrative as determined by a computer program. Shortly after the trauma, reading level was correlated with severity of anxiety but not with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Degree of the narrative articulation shortly after the trauma, however, was related to severity of later PTSD. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the less developed trauma narratives hinder recovery from trauma. PMID:9565923

  4. Exomerge user's manual : a lightweight Python interface for manipulating Exodus files.

    SciTech Connect

    Kostka, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Exomerge is a lightweight Python module for reading, manipulating and writing data within ExodusII files. It is built upon a Python wrapper around the ExodusII API functions. This module, the Python wrapper, and the ExodusII libraries are available as part of the standard SIERRA installation.

  5. Helping Youth Overcome Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jamie C.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of trauma can roll on unchecked like a spirit of death. In its path are strewn its once vibrant victims. Human bonds are rent asunder by the disgrace of trauma. These are the youngsters who have been verbally bashed, physically battered, sexually assaulted, and spiritually exploited. Other traumas of childhood neglect include: (1)…

  6. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  7. Lightweight Space Tug body structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lager, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Lightweight honeycomb sandwich construction using a wide variety of metal and fibrous composite faceskins was used in the design of a typical Space Tug skirt structure. Relatively low magnitude combined loading of axial compression and torsion resulted in designs using ultrathin faceskins, lightweight honeycomb cores, and thin faceskin/core adhesive bond layers. Two of the designs with metal faceskins (aluminum and titanium) and four with fibrous composite faceskins (using combinations of fiberglass, boron, and graphite) were evaluated through the fabrication and structural test of a series of small development panels. The two most promising concepts with aluminum and graphite/epoxy faceskins, were further evaluated through the fabrication and structural test of larger compression and shear panels. All panels tested exceeded design ultimate load levels, thereby, verifying the structural integrity of the selected designs. Projected skirt structural weights for the graphite/epoxy and aluminum concepts fall within original weight guidelines established for the Space Tug vehicle.

  8. Lightweight Exoskeletons with Controllable Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavrodis, Constantinos; Melli-Huber, Juan; Fisch, Avi (Alan)

    2004-01-01

    A proposed class of lightweight exoskeletal electromechanical systems would include electrically controllable actuators that would generate torques and forces that, depending on specific applications, would resist and/or assist wearers movements. The proposed systems would be successors to relatively heavy, bulky, and less capable human-strength-amplifying exoskeletal electromechanical systems that have been subjects of research during the past four decades. The proposed systems could be useful in diverse applications in which there are needs for systems that could be donned or doffed easily, that would exert little effect when idle, and that could be activated on demand: examples of such applications include (1) providing controlled movement and/or resistance to movement for physical exercise and (2) augmenting wearers strengths in the performance of military, law-enforcement, and industrial tasks. An exoskeleton according to the proposal would include adjustable lightweight graphite/epoxy struts and would be attached to the wearer's body by belts made of hook-and-pile material. At selected rotary and linear joints, the exoskeleton would be fitted, variously, with lightweight, low-power-consumption rotary and linear brakes, clutches, and motors. The exoskeleton would also be equipped with electronic circuitry for monitoring, control, and possibly communication with external electronic circuits that would perform additional monitoring and control functions.

  9. Directly polished lightweight aluminum mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Tromp, Niels; de Haan, Menno; Navarro, Ramon; Venema, Lars; Pragt, Johan

    2008-07-01

    During the last ten years, Astron has been a major contractor for the design and manufacturing of astronomical instruments for Space- and Earth based observatories, such as VISIR, MIDI, SPIFFI, X-Shooter and MIRI. The collaboration between optical- and mechanical designers at Astron led to new design philosophies and strategies. Driven by the need to reduce the weight of optically ultra-stiff structures, two promising techniques have been developed in the last years: ASTRON Extreme Lightweighting for mechanical structures and an improved Polishing Technique for Aluminum Mirrors. Using one single material for both optical components and mechanical structure simplifies the design of a cryogenic instrument significantly, it is very beneficial during instrument test and verification, and makes the instrument insensitive to temperature changes. Aluminum has been the main material used for cryogenic optical instruments, and optical aluminum mirrors are generally diamond turned. The application of a polishable hard top coating like nickel removes excess stray light caused by the groove pattern, but limits the degree of lightweighting of the mirrors due to the bi-metal effect. By directly polishing the aluminum mirror surface, the recent developments at Astron allow for using a non-exotic material for light weighted yet accurate optical mirrors, with a lower surface roughness (~1nm RMS), higher surface accuracy and reduced light scattering. This paper presents the techniques, obtained results and a global comparison with alternative lightweight mirror solutions.

  10. Performance of lightweight nickel electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries. These electrodes are lighter in weight and have higher energy densities than the heavier state-of-the-art (SOA) sintered nickel electrodes. In the present approach, lightweight materials or plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques (fiber and felt, nickel plated plastic and graphite) are commercial products that are fabricated into nickel electrodes by electrochemically impregnating them with active material. Evaluation is performed in half cells structured in the bipolar configuration. Initial performance tests include capacity measurements at five discharge levels, C/2, 1.0C, 1.37C, 2.0C and 2.74C. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a low earth orbit regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Different formulations of nickel fiber materials obtained from several manufacturers are currently being tested as possible candidates for nickel electrodes. One particular lightweight fiber mat electrode has accumulated over 3000 cycles to date, with stable capacity and voltage. Life and performance data of this electrode were investigated and presented. Good dimensional stability and active material adherence have been demonstrated in electrodes made from this lightweight plaque.

  11. Performance of lightweight nickel electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries. These electrodes are lighter in weight and have higher energy densities than the heavier state-of-the-art (SOA) sintered nickel electrodes. In the present approach, lightweight materials or plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques (fiber and felt, nickel plated plastic and graphite) are commercial products that are fabricated into nickel electrodes by electrochemically impregnating them with active material. Evaluation is performed in half cells structured in the bipolar configuration. Initial performance tests include capacity measurements at five discharge levels, C/2, 1.0C 1.37C, 2.0C and 2.74C. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a low Earth orbit regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Different formulations of nickel fiber materials obtained from several manufacturers are currently being tested as possible candidates for nickel electrodes. One particular lightweight fiber mat electrode has accumulated over 3000 cycles to date, with stable capacity and voltage. Life and performance data of this electrode were investigated and presented. Good dimensional stability and active material adherence have been demonstrated in electrodes made from this lightweight plaque.

  12. Lightweight materials for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.S.; Sherman, A.M.

    1995-07-01

    As a result of more stringent requirements for improved fuel economy and emissions, there is a growing tend to substitute Al and Mg for conventional steel and cast irons in vehicles. this article describes some of the technical issues that must be considered if the automotive industry is to utilize these lightweight materials in larger volumes. Lightweight metals may be used in the vehicle in both wrought and cast forms. Aluminum, in the form of stamped sheet, has the potential to be used extensively in vehicle structures and closures. However, compared to steel, aluminum is more difficult to stamp and spot weld. Current research is exploring ways of improving the formability of Al alloys and developing alternate joining methods including adhesive bonding and fasteners. Mg, Al, and metal-matrix composite casting have the potential to be used as replacements for many ferrous castings in power-train and chassis components. However, because of their different tribology, strength, and ductility, light-metal castings require improved foundry procedures and more sophisticated design rules before product engineers will use them in larger quantities. A major challenge for lightweight materials is the ability to produce a functional component at an acceptable price. The presentation concludes with a cost-benefit perspective for typical light-metal applications in the automotive industry.

  13. Computed tomography in trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  14. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  15. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  16. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  17. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system. PMID:23210554

  18. Making Lightweight Structures By Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1990-01-01

    Technique developed for fabrication of stiff, strong, lightweight structures of silicon carbide or other materials by any of several deposition processes. Structures made by method can have complicated shapes. Ability to manufacture complex shape from pure deposited SiC useful and leads to new products in several fields. These lightweight structures used as backup structures for optical components, as structural components in automotive, aerospace, and outer space applications, and as lightweight parts of furniture for outer space.

  19. Lightweight Seat Lever Operation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar

    1999-01-01

    In 1999, a Shuttle crew member was unable to operate the backrest lever for the lightweight seat in microgravity. It is essential that crew members can adjust this backrest lever, which is titled forward during launch and then moved backward upon reaching orbit. This adjustment is needed to cushion the crew members during an inadvertent crash landing situation. JSCs Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) performed an evaluation of the seat controls and provided recommendations on whether the seat lever positions and operations should be modified. The original Shuttle seats were replaced with new lightweight seats whose controls were moved, with one control at the front and the other at the back. The ABF designed a 12-person experiment to investigate the amount of pull force exerted by suited subjects, when controls were placed in the front and back of the lightweight seat. Each subject was asked to perform the pull test at least three times for each combination of lever position and suit pressure conditions. The results showed that, in general, the subjects were able to pull on the lever at the back position with only about half the amount of force that they were able to exert on the lever at the front position. In addition, the results also showed that subjects wearing the pressurized suit were unable to reach the seat lever when it was located at the back. The pull forces on the front lever diminished about 50% when subjects wore pressurized suits. Based on these results from this study, it was recommended that the levers should not be located in the back position. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the levers at the front of the seat could be modified or adjusted to increase the leverage for crew members wearing pressurized launch/escape suits.

  20. Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Loftin, Timothy A.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum reinforced with carbon fibers superior to copper in some respects. Lightweight composite material has high thermal conductivity. Consists of aluminum matrix containing graphite fibers, all oriented in same direction. Available as sheets, tubes, and bars. Thermal conductivity of composite along fibers rises above that of pure copper over substantial range of temperatures. Graphite/aluminum composite useful in variety of heat-transfer applications in which reduction of weight critical. Used to conduct heat in high-density, high-speed integrated-circuit packages for computers and in base plates for electronic equipment. Also used to carry heat away from leading edges of wings in high-speed airplanes.

  1. Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, Frederick Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a precise, diffraction- limited, ultra-lightweight, composite- material (matrix/fiber) paraboloidal telescope mirror has been devised. Unlike the traditional process of fabrication of heavier glass-based mirrors, this process involves a minimum of manual steps and subjective judgment. Instead, this process involves objectively controllable, repeatable steps; hence, this process is better suited for mass production. Other processes that have been investigated for fabrication of precise composite-material lightweight mirrors have resulted in print-through of fiber patterns onto reflecting surfaces, and have not provided adequate structural support for maintenance of stable, diffraction-limited surface figures. In contrast, this process does not result in print-through of the fiber pattern onto the reflecting surface and does provide a lightweight, rigid structure capable of maintaining a diffraction-limited surface figure in the face of changing temperature, humidity, and air pressure. The process consists mainly of the following steps: 1. A precise glass mandrel is fabricated by conventional optical grinding and polishing. 2. The mandrel is coated with a release agent and covered with layers of a carbon- fiber composite material. 3. The outer surface of the outer layer of the carbon-fiber composite material is coated with a surfactant chosen to provide for the proper flow of an epoxy resin to be applied subsequently. 4. The mandrel as thus covered is mounted on a temperature-controlled spin table. 5. The table is heated to a suitable temperature and spun at a suitable speed as the epoxy resin is poured onto the coated carbon-fiber composite material. 6. The surface figure of the optic is monitored and adjusted by use of traditional Ronchi, Focault, and interferometric optical measurement techniques while the speed of rotation and the temperature are adjusted to obtain the desired figure. The proper selection of surfactant, speed or rotation

  2. Lightweight Restraint For Coupling Flanges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Willie D.

    1989-01-01

    End flanges of flexible coupling system restrained against excessive rotation or axial separation by inexpensive, lightweight mechanism based on cables and pulleys. Restraining mechanism adapted to cable, duct, hose, or passageway couplings between vehicles, or to other applications in which angular and positional misalignments must be restricted to moderate specified values. Total misalignment of two end flanges limited to amount of slack available in cable-and-pulley mechanism. When cable taut, further axial separation of flange centers restrained, but small tilts accommodated by running of cable through pulleys.

  3. Lightweight Boom For Rescue Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A.

    1993-01-01

    Telescoping boom and associated mechanisms attached to helicopter aid rescue operations by extending lifeline beyond sweep of main rotor. Pilot observes rescuee and control position of helicopter more effectively than if rescuee directly below and hidden from pilot's view. Rescuee outside downdraft of rotor, which is often powerful enough to blow away or submerge someone in water. Used for marine or land operations. Boom thin and lightweight because it need not support weight of rescuee. Lifeline pulls away from boom after secured around rescuee, who is lifted directly into cabin by winch. Potential application for in situ erection of telescopic space structures.

  4. Caring for Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Although trauma exposure is common, few people develop acute and chronic psychiatric disorders. Those who develop posttraumatic stress disorder likely have coexisting psychiatric and physical disorders. Psychiatric nurses must be knowledgeable about trauma responses, implement evidence-based approaches to conduct assessments, and create safe environments for patients. Most researchers assert that trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral approaches demonstrate the most efficacious treatment outcomes. Integrated approaches, offer promising treatment options. This article provides an overview of clinical factors necessary to help the trauma survivor begin the process of healing and recovery and attain an optimal level of functioning. PMID:27229285

  5. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  6. Small and lightweight power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Fox, Robert L.; Moses, Robert W.; Bryant, Robert G.; Robinson, Paul C.; Shirvani, Mir

    2002-07-01

    The control of u wanted structural vibration is implicit in most of NASA's programs. Currently several approaches to control vibrations in large, lightweight, deployable structures and twin tail aircraft at high angles of attack are being evaluated. The Air Force has been examining a vertical tail buffet load alleviation system that can be integrated onboard an F/A-18 and flown. Previous wind tunnel and full-scale ground tests using distributed actuators have shown that the concept works; however, there is insufficient rom available onboard an F/A-18 to store current state-of- the-art system components such as amplifiers, DC-to-DC converter and a computer for performing vibration suppression. Sensor processing, power electronics, DC-to-DC converters, and control electronics that may be collocated with distributed actuators, are particularly desirable. Such electronic system would obviate the need for complex, centralized, control processing and power distribution components that will eliminate the weight associated with lengthy wiring and cabling networks. Several small and lightweight power amplifiers ranging from 300V pp to 650V pp have been designed using off the shelf components for different applications. In this paper, the design and testing of these amplifiers will be presented under various electrical loads.

  7. High-flexibility, noncollapsing lightweight hose

    DOEpatents

    Williams, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-flexibility, noncollapsing, lightweight, large-bore, wire-reinforced hose is inside fiber-reinforced PVC tubing that is flexible, lightweight, and abrasion resistant. It provides a strong, kink- and collapse-free conduit for moving large quantities of dangerous fluids, e.g., removing radioactive waste water or processing chemicals.

  8. High-flexibility, noncollapsing lightweight hose

    DOEpatents

    Williams, D.A.

    1993-04-20

    A high-flexibility, noncollapsing, lightweight, large-bore, wire-reinforced hose is inside fiber-reinforced PVC tubing that is flexible, lightweight, and abrasion resistant. It provides a strong, kink- and collapse-free conduit for moving large quantities of dangerous fluids, e.g., removing radioactive waste water or processing chemicals.

  9. Advantages and challenges of dissimilar materials in automotive lightweight construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberpals, Jan-Philipp; Schmidt, Philipp A.; Böhm, Daniel; Müller, Steffen

    2015-03-01

    The core of future automotive lightweight materials is the joining technology of various material mixes. The type of joining will be essential, particularly in electrified propulsion systems, especially as an improved electrical energy transmission leads to a higher total efficiency of the vehicle. The most evident parts to start the optimization process are the traction battery, the electrical performance modules and the engines. Consequently aluminum plays a very central role for lightweight construction applications. However, the physical-technical requirements of components often require the combination with other materials. Thus the joining of mixed material connections is an essential key technology for many of the current developments, for example in the areas E-Mobility, solar energy and lightweight construction. Due to these advantages mixed material joints are already established in the automotive industry and laser beam remote welding is now a focus technology for mixed material connections. The secret of the laser welding process with mixed materials lies within the different areas of the melting phase diagram depending on the mixing ratio and the cooling down rate. According to that areas with unwanted, prim, intermetallic phases arise in the fusion zone. Therefore, laser welding of mixed material connections can currently only be used with additional filler in the automotive industry.

  10. Fracture properties of lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.P.; Shieh, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    This study presents the experimental results of fracture properties of concrete incorporating two kinds of domestic lightweight aggregate (LWA) manufactured through either a cold-bonding or a sintering process. The cold-bonded aggregates were mainly made of pulverized fly-ash through a cold-pelletization process at ambient temperature, while the sintered aggregates were made of clay and shale expanded by heat at a temperature near 1,200 C. Experimental results show that the 28-day compressive strengths of {phi} 100 x 200 mm cylindrical concrete specimen made of those LWAs range from 30.1 (sintered) to 33.9 MPa (cold-bonded). By means of size effect law, it is found that the fracture energies, G{sub f}, were 34.42 N/m (sintered) and 37.2 N/m (cold-bonded), respectively.

  11. Development of a lightweight nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, D. L.; Reid, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel electrodes made using lightweight plastic plaque are about half the weight of electrodes made from state of the art sintered nickel plaque. This weight reduction would result in a significant improvement in the energy density of batteries using nickel electrodes (nickel hydrogen, nickel cadmium and nickel zinc). These lightweight electrodes are suitably conductive and yield comparable capacities (as high as 0.25 AH/gm (0.048 AH/sq cm)) after formation. These lightweight electrodes also show excellent discharge performance at high rates.

  12. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  13. The coagulopathy of trauma.

    PubMed

    Maegele, M

    2014-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death, with uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination being the primary causes of preventable deaths during the first 24 h following trauma. Death usually occurs quickly, typically within the first 6 h after injury. One out of four patients arriving at the Emergency Department after trauma is already in hemodynamic and hemostatic depletion. This early manifestation of hemostatic depletion is referred to as the coagulopathy of trauma, which may distinguished as: (i) acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and (ii) iatrogenic coagulopathy (IC). The principle drivers of ATC have been characterized by tissue trauma, inflammation, hypoperfusion/shock, and the acute activation of the neurohumoral system. Hypoperfusion leads to an activation of protein C with cleavage of activated factors V and VIII and the inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), with subsequent fibrinolysis. Endothelial damage and activation results in Weibel-Palade body degradation and glycocalyx shedding associated with autoheparinization. In contrast, there is an IC which occurs secondary to uncritical volume therapy, leading to acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. This coagulopathy may, then, be an integral part of the "vicious cycle" when combined with acidosis and hypothermia. The awareness of the specific pathophysiology and of the principle drivers underlying the coagulopathy of trauma by the treating physician is paramount. It has been shown that early recognition prompted by appropriate and aggressive management can correct coagulopathy, control bleeding, reduce blood product use, and improve outcome in severely injured patients. This paper summarizes: (i) the current concepts of the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy of trauma, including ATC and IC, (ii) the current strategies available for the early identification of patients at risk for coagulopathy and ongoing life-threatening hemorrhage after trauma, and (iii) the current and updated European

  14. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  15. FY 2011 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-28

    The FY 2011 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  16. Lightweight structural columns. [space erectable trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Lightweight half-lengths of columns for truss structures are described. The columns are adapted for nestable storage and transport to facilitate fabrication of large area truss structures at a remote site and particularly adaptable for space applications.

  17. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  18. Imaging in orbital trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken Y.; Ngai, Philip; Echegoyen, Julio C.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital trauma is one of the most common reasons for ophthalmology specialty consultation in the emergency department setting. We survey the literature from 1990 to present to describe the role of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their associated angiography in some of the most commonly encountered orbital trauma conditions. CT orbit can often detect certain types of foreign bodies, lens dislocation, ruptured globe, choroidal or retinal detachments, or cavernous sinus thrombosis and thus complement a bedside ophthalmic exam that can sometimes be limited in the setting of trauma. CT remains the workhorse for acute orbital trauma owing to its rapidity and ability to delineate bony abnormalities; however MRI remains an important modality in special circumstances such as soft tissue assessment or with organic foreign bodies. PMID:23961028

  19. Imaging of Abusive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shekdar, Karuna

    2016-06-01

    "Shaken baby syndrome" is a term often used by the physicians and public to describe abusive trauma inflicted on infants and young children. Advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and the associated clinical spectrum of injury has lead us to modify our terminology and address it as "abusive trauma" (AT). Pediatric abusive head trauma is defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of an infant or a young child (< 5 y age) due to inflicted blunt impact and/or violent shaking. This chapter focuses on the imaging aspects of childhood abusive trauma along with a brief description of the mechanism and pathophysiology of abusive injury. The diagnosis of AT is not always obvious, and abusive injuries in many infants may remain unrecognized. Pediatricians should be cognizant of AT since pediatricians play a crucial role in the diagnosis, management and prevention of AT. PMID:26882906

  20. Trauma program development.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    The development of a strong trauma program is clearly one of the most important facets of successful business development. Several recent publications have demonstrated that well run trauma services can generate significant profits for both the hospital and the surgeons involved. There are many aspects to this task that require constant attention and insight. Top notch patient care, efficiency, and cost-effective resource utilization are all important components that must be addressed while providing adequate physician compensation within the bounds of hospital financial constraints and the encompassing legal issues. Each situation is different but many of the components are universal. This chapter addresses all aspects of trauma program development to provide the graduating fellow with the tools to create a new trauma program or improve an existing program in order to provide the best patient care while optimizing financial reward and improving care efficiency. PMID:24918830

  1. Basic trauma life support.

    PubMed

    Werman, H A; Nelson, R N; Campbell, J E; Fowler, R L; Gandy, P

    1987-11-01

    The impact of traumatic injuries on modern society in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic cost is enormous. Studies have shown that both advanced life support skills and rapid stabilization and transport of the trauma victim have a beneficial effect on the patient's ultimate outcome. The Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) course was designed to provide pre-hospital care providers with the skills necessary to provide a thorough assessment, initial resuscitation, and rapid transportation of the trauma victim. Early studies suggest that the material is easily learned by prehospital care providers and that the on-scene time for trauma cases is reduced following training in BTLS. More widespread training in BTLS may have a significant effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with traumatic injuries. PMID:3662184

  2. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  3. Trauma registry reengineered.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Christina; Bolig, Nicole; Hixson, Heather; McWilliams, Nate; Rummerfield, Heather; Stratton, Elaine; Woodruff, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    A successful trauma registry balances accuracy of abstraction and timeliness of case submissions to achieve quality performance. Staffing to achieve quality performance is a challenge at times based on competitive institutional need. The aim of this performance improvement timing study was to identify trauma registry job responsibilities and redesign the responsibilities to create increased abstraction time and maintain accuracy of data abstraction. The outcome is measured by case submission rates with existing staffing and interrater reliability outcomes. PMID:25397337

  4. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  6. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  7. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  8. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  9. Lightweight, Self-Deployable Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, Artur; Sokolowski, Witold; Rand, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight, self-deployable wheels made of polymer foams have been demonstrated. These wheels are an addition to the roster of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structural applications. Intended originally for use on nanorovers (very small planetary-exploration robotic vehicles), CHEM wheels could also be used for many commercial applications, such as in toys. The CHEM concept was reported in "Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory (CHEM) Expandable Structures" (NPO-20394), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 2 (February 1999), page 56. To recapitulate: A CHEM structure is fabricated from a shape-memory polymer (SMP) foam. The structure is compressed to a very small volume while in its rubbery state above its glass-transition temperature (Tg). Once compressed, the structure can be cooled below Tg to its glassy state. As long as the temperature remains

  10. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  11. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  12. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  13. Lightweight Ceramics for Aeroacoustic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, H. W.; Spamer, G. T.; Yu, J.; Yasukawa, B.

    1997-01-01

    The use of a HTP (High Temperature Performance) ceramic foam for aeroacoustic applications is investigated. HTP ceramic foam is a composition of silica and alumina fibers developed by LMMS. This foam is a lightweight high-temperature fibrous bulk material with small pore size, ultra high porosity, and good strength. It can be used as a broadband noise absorber at both room and high temperature (up to 1800 F). The investigation included an acoustic assessment as well as material development, and environmental and structural evaluations. The results show that the HTP ceramic foam provides good broadband noise absorbing capability and adequate strength when incorporating the HTP ceramic foam system into a honeycomb sandwich structure. On the other hand, the material is sensitive to Skydrol and requires further improvements. Good progress has been made in the impedance model development. A relationship between HTP foam density, flow resistance, and tortuosity will be established in the near future. Additional effort is needed to investigate the coupling effects between face sheet and HTP foam material.

  14. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  15. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  16. MAOA Genotype, Childhood Trauma and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: A Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinying; Bremner, James D.; Goldberg, Jack; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Vaccarino, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Objective A functional promoter polymorphism in the MAOA gene has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders and also moderates the association between early life stress and mental disorders, which often co-occur with cardiovascular disease. No study has examined the relationship between MAOA genotype, childhood trauma and subclinical atherosclerosis. The objective of this investigation was to examine whether childhood trauma moderates the association between MAOA genotype and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods A sample including 289 middle-aged male twin pairs was studied. Subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using ultrasound. Childhood trauma, before age 18, was measured with the Early Trauma Inventory and included physical, emotional, and sexual abuse as well as general trauma. Generalized estimating equation models were used to test the main and interactive effects of the MAOA genotype and each domain of childhood trauma on FMD, adjusting for known risk factors. Results General trauma was the most prevalent childhood trauma (28.4%), followed by physical abuse (25.0%), emotional abuse (19.4%) and sexual abuse (11.6%). MAOA genotype was not associated with any domain of childhood trauma (β ≥ 0.36). There was no significant evidence for a main effect for the MAOA genotype (β = 0.02, p = 0.82) or childhood trauma (0.005 < β < 0.10, p > 0.54) on early atherosclerosis. However, a significant interaction was observed between MAOA genotype and physical (βinteraction = 0.37, p = 0.026) or emotional abuse (βinteraction = 0.43, p = 0.025) on subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusion This study provides initial evidence that childhood trauma modulates the impact of MAOA variant on subclinical atherosclerosis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:23723362

  17. Hierarchical resilience with lightweight threads.

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Kyle Bruce

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes methodology for providing robustness and resilience for a highly threaded distributed- and shared-memory environment based on well-defined inputs and outputs to lightweight tasks. These inputs and outputs form a failure 'barrier', allowing tasks to be restarted or duplicated as necessary. These barriers must be expanded based on task behavior, such as communication between tasks, but do not prohibit any given behavior. One of the trends in high-performance computing codes seems to be a trend toward self-contained functions that mimic functional programming. Software designers are trending toward a model of software design where their core functions are specified in side-effect free or low-side-effect ways, wherein the inputs and outputs of the functions are well-defined. This provides the ability to copy the inputs to wherever they need to be - whether that's the other side of the PCI bus or the other side of the network - do work on that input using local memory, and then copy the outputs back (as needed). This design pattern is popular among new distributed threading environment designs. Such designs include the Barcelona STARS system, distributed OpenMP systems, the Habanero-C and Habanero-Java systems from Vivek Sarkar at Rice University, the HPX/ParalleX model from LSU, as well as our own Scalable Parallel Runtime effort (SPR) and the Trilinos stateless kernels. This design pattern is also shared by CUDA and several OpenMP extensions for GPU-type accelerators (e.g. the PGI OpenMP extensions).

  18. Firefighting module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The firefighting module is a lightweight, compact, self contained, helicopter-transportable unit for fighting harbor and other specialty fires as well as for use in emergency water pumping applications. Units were fabricated and tested. A production type unit is undergoing an inservice evaluation and demonstration program at the port of St Louis. The primary purpose is to promote enhanced harbor fire protection at inland and coastal ports. The module and its development are described.

  19. Pitfalls in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2003-08-01

    In Western Europe the most frequent cause of multiple injuries is blunt trauma. Only few of us have experience with penetrating trauma, without exception far less than in the USA or South-Africa. In Rotterdam, the Erasmus Medical Centre is a level I trauma centre, situated directly in the town centre. All penetrating traumas are directly presented to our emergency department by a well organized ambulance service supported by a mobile medical team if necessary. The delay with scoop and run principles is very short for these cases, resulting in severely injured reaching the hospital alive in increasing frequency. Although the basic principles of trauma care according to the guidelines of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) (1-2) are the same for blunt and penetrating trauma with regard to priorities, diagnostics and primary therapy, there are some pitfalls in the strategy of management in penetrating trauma one should be aware of. Simple algorithms can be helpful, especially in case of limited experience (3). In case of life-saving procedures, the principles of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) must be followed (4-5). This approach is somewhat different from "traditional" surgical treatment. In the Ist phase prompt interventions by emergency thoracotomy and laparotomy are carried out, with only two goals to achieve: surgical control of haemorrhage and contamination. After temporary life-saving procedures, the 2nd phase is characterized by intensive care treatment, dealing with hypothermia, metabolic acidosis and clotting disturbances. Finally in the 3rd phase, within 6-24 hours, definitive surgical care takes place. In this overview, penetrating injuries of neck, thorax, abdomen and extremities will be outlined. Penetrating cranial injuries, as a neurosurgical emergency with poor prognosis, are not discussed. History and physical examination remain the corner stones of good medical praxis. In a work-up according to ATLS principles airway, breathing and circulation

  20. Classification of Liver Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Hanna, Sherif S.; Kahnamoui, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    The classification of liver injuries is important for clinical practice, clinical research and quality assurance activities. The Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) Committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma proposed the OIS for liver trauma in 1989. The purpose ofthe present study was to apply this scale to a cohort ofliver trauma patients managed at a single Canadian trauma centre from January 1987 to June 1992.170 study patients were identified and reviewed. The mean age was 30, with 69% male and a mean ISS of 33.90% had a blunt mechanism ofinjury. The 170 patients were categorized into the 60IS grades ofliver injury. The number of units of blood transfused, the magnitude of the operative treatment required, the liver-related complications and the liver-related mortality correlated well with the OIS grade. The OIS grade was unable to predict the need for laparotomy or the length of stay in hospital. We conclude that the OIS is a useful, practical and important tool for the categorization of liver injuries, and it may prove to be the universally accepted classification scheme in liver trauma. PMID:8809585

  1. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. PMID:25241267

  2. Male genital trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-07-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references.

  3. Glutamine May Repress the Weak LPS and Enhance the Strong Heat Shock Induction of Monocyte and Lymphocyte HSP72 Proteins but May Not Modulate the HSP72 mRNA in Patients with Sepsis or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Briassouli, Efrossini; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Goukos, Dimitris; Routsi, Christina; Nanas, Serafim; Vardas, Kostas; Apostolou, Kleovoulos; Kanariou, Maria; Daikos, George; Briassoulis, George

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We assessed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or heat shock (HS) induction of heat shock protein-72 (HSP72) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with severe sepsis (SS) or trauma-related systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compared to healthy individuals (H); we also investigated any pre- or posttreatment modulating glutamine (Gln) effect. Methods. SS (11), SIRS (10), and H (19) PBMCs were incubated with 1 μg/mL LPS or 43°HS. Gln 10 mM was either added 1 h before or 1 h after induction or was not added at all. We measured monocyte (m), lymphocyte (l), mRNA HSP72, HSP72 polymorphisms, interleukins (ILs), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cortisol levels. Results. Baseline lHSP72 was higher in SS (p < 0.03), and mHSP72 in SIRS (p < 0.02), compared to H. Only HS induced l/mHSP72/mRNA HSP72; LPS induced IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1. Induced mRNA was related to l/mHSP72, and was related negatively to cytokines. Intracellular l/mHSP72/HSP72 mRNA was related to serum ILs, not being influenced by cortisol, illness severity, and HSP72 polymorphisms. Gln did not induce mRNA in any group but modified l/mHSP72 after LPS/HS induction unpredictably. Conclusions. HSP72 mRNA and l/mHSP72 are higher among critically ill patients, further induced by HS, not by LPS. HSP72 proteins and HSP72 mRNA are related to serum ILs and are negatively related to supernatant cytokines, not being influenced by HSP72 polymorphisms, cortisol, or illness severity. Gln may depress l/mHSP72 after LPS exposure and enhance them after HS induction, but it may not affect early induced HSP72 mRNA. PMID:26550577

  4. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  5. Assuring optimal trauma care: the role of trauma centre accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Optimal care of the injured patient requires the delivery of appropriate, definitive care shortly after injury. Over the last 30 to 40 years, civilian trauma systems and trauma centres have been developed in the United States based on experience gained in military conflicts, particularly in Korea and Vietnam. A similar process is evolving in Canada. National trauma committees in the US and Canada have defined optimal resources to meet the goal of rapid, appropriate care in trauma centres. They have introduced programs (verification or accreditation) to externally audit trauma centre performance based on these guidelines. It is generally accepted that implementing trauma systems results in decreased preventable death and improved survival after trauma. What is less clear is the degree to which each facet of trauma system development contributes to this improvement. The relative importance of national performance guidelines and trauma centre audit as integral steps toward improved outcomes following injury are reviewed. Current Trauma Association of Canada guidelines for trauma centres are presented and the process of trauma centre accreditation is discussed. PMID:12174987

  6. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will this in some way impair their responding to current or ongoing trauma? The paper addresses practical strategies for implementing one evidence-based treatment, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with ongoing traumas. Collaboration with local therapists and families participating in TF-CBT community and international programs elucidated effective strategies for applying TF-CBT with these youth. These strategies included: 1) enhancing safety early in treatment; 2) effectively engaging parents who experience personal ongoing trauma; and 3) during the trauma narrative and processing component focusing on a) increasing parental awareness and acceptance of the extent of the youths’ ongoing trauma experiences; b) addressing youths’ maladaptive cognitions about ongoing traumas; and c) helping youth differentiate between real danger and generalized trauma reminders. Case examples illustrate how to use these strategies in diverse clinical situations. Through these strategies TF-CBT clinicians can effectively improve outcomes for youth experiencing ongoing traumas. PMID:21855140

  7. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  8. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-22

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at -150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries. PMID:27463668

  9. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)–, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at –150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries.

  10. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  11. Improving Trauma Care in India: the Potential Role of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC).

    PubMed

    Ali, Jameel; Kumar, Subodh; Gautam, Subash; Sorvari, Anne; Misra, Mahesh C

    2015-12-01

    The Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC) was devised to optimize trauma resuscitation training in under-resourced rural institutions. This program appears ideal for India because of its dense traffic, large population, and high frequency of rural trauma. We report on the feasibility and desirability of introducing RTTDC in India. An instructor course for 20 faculties and a provider course for 23 were conducted in New Delhi, India. The courses were evaluated by multiple choice question (MCQ) performance, by rating the modules on a three-point scale (1 = very relevant, 2 = relevant, and 3 = not relevant) for communication skills, principles of performance improvement and patient safety (PIPS), and clinical scenarios. Evaluation questionnaires including desirability of promulgation in India were completed using a five-point Likert Scale (1 = strongly agree, 2 = agree, 3 = neutral, 4 = disagree, and 5 = strongly disagree). Overall written comments were also provided. Both faculty and providers improved post-course MCQ scores (p < 0.05) with lower scores in the provider group. Seventy-eight percent faculty and 74 % providers rated the communication module very relevant. PIPS was rated very relevant by 72 % faculty and 65 % providers. There were over 150 comments, generally positive with over 90 % of both faculty and providers rating strongly agree to agree that the course be promulgated widely in India. The RTTDC including plans for promulgation was enthusiastically received in India, and its potential for improving trauma care including communication skills and PIPS appears excellent. PMID:26729998

  12. Lightweight SAR GMTI radar technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, John C.; Lin, Kai; Gray, Andrew; Hseih, Chung; Darden, Scott; Kwong, Winston; Majumder, Uttam; Scarborough, Steven

    2013-05-01

    A small and lightweight dual-channel radar has been developed for SAR data collections. Using standard Displaced Phase Center Antenna (DPCA) radar digital signal processing, SAR GMTI images have been obtained. The prototype radar weighs 5-lbs and has demonstrated the extraction of ground moving targets (GMTs) embedded in high-resolution SAR imagery data. Heretofore this type of capability has been reserved for much larger systems such as the JSTARS. Previously, small lightweight SARs featured only a single channel and only displayed SAR imagery. Now, with the advent of this new capability, SAR GMTI performance is now possible for small UAV class radars.

  13. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect

    Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Wang, Paul

    2011-12-27

    The three major objectives of this Phase III project are: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios.

  14. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  15. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  16. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  17. Pediatric head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2011-01-01

    Head injury in children accounts for a large number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Falls are the most common type of injury, followed by motor-vehicle-related accidents. In the present study, we discuss the evaluation, neuroimaging and management of children with head trauma. Furthermore, we present the specific characteristics of each type of pediatric head injury. PMID:21887034

  18. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Firefly II pump module is NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's commercial offshoot of a NASA/US Coast Guard program involving development of a lightweight, helicopter-transportable firefighting module for a quick response in combating shipboard or harbor fires. Operable on land or water, the Amphib One is equipped with 3 water cannons. When all 3 are operating, unit pumps more than 3,000 gallons a minute. Newly developed model used by U.S. Coast Guard can pump 5,000 gallons per minute. It was designed for applications such as firefighting onboard ship fires, emergency dockside water pumping, dewatering ships in danger of sinking, flood control, and emergency water supply at remote locations.

  19. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Returning samples of Martian soil and rock to Earth is of great interest to scientists. There were numerous studies to evaluate Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission architectures, technology needs, development plans, and requirements. The largest propulsion risk element of the MSR mission is the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). Along with the baseline solid-propellant vehicle, liquid propellants have been considered. Similar requirements apply to other lander ascent engines and reaction control systems. The performance of current state-ofthe- art liquid propellant engines can be significantly improved by increasing both combustion temperature and pressure. Pump-fed propulsion is suggested for a single-stage bipropellant MAV. Achieving a 90-percent stage propellant fraction is thought to be possible on a 100-kg scale, including sufficient thrust for lifting off Mars. To increase the performance of storable bipropellant rocket engines, a high-pressure, lightweight combustion chamber was designed. Iridium liner electrodeposition was investigated on complex-shaped thrust chamber mandrels. Dense, uniform iridium liners were produced on chamber and cylindrical mandrels. Carbon/carbon composite (C/C) structures were braided over iridium-lined mandrels and densified by chemical vapor infiltration. Niobium deposition was evaluated for forming a metallic attachment flange on the carbon/ carbon structure. The new thrust chamber was designed to exceed state-of-the-art performance, and was manufactured with an 83-percent weight savings. High-performance C/Cs possess a unique set of properties that make them desirable materials for high-temperature structures used in rocket propulsion components, hypersonic vehicles, and aircraft brakes. In particular, more attention is focused on 3D braided C/Cs due to their mesh-work structure. Research on the properties of C/Cs has shown that the strength of composites is strongly affected by the fiber-matrix interfacial bonding, and that weakening

  20. The Evolution of the Society of Trauma Nurses' Leadership Institute.

    PubMed

    Krichten, Amy; Kyle, Amber

    2015-01-01

    The Society of Trauma Nurses (STN) understands the increasing complexity of trauma care and the vital leadership role nurses play. In 2009, the STN took the initiative to form a Leadership Committee tasked with researching the possibility of developing a mechanism to offer trauma leaders opportunities in leadership development. Investigation and collaboration among the committee members, with input from the Board of Directors and the organization's executive director, resulted in the STN Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute design is to equip trauma nurses with the tools needed to effectively lead from the bedside to the boardroom and beyond through web-based modules. Operationalization of the plan took intense focus and dedicated leadership. Following a pilot study, the initial cohort ran the first quarter of 2015. Because of the positive feedback and identified opportunities for improvement, the program will continue to be offered with further expansion planning underway. PMID:26574939

  1. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  2. Lightweight solar concentrator structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Kaplan, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the program conducted by Ultramet under SBIR Phase 2 Contract NAS3-25418. The objective of this program was to develop lightweight materials and processes for advanced high accuracy Space Solar Concentrators using rigidized foam for the substrate structure with an integral optical surface.

  3. Method of fabricating lightweight honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Pickering, Michael (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for fabricating lightweight honeycomb type structures out of material such as silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon (S). The lightweight structure consists of a core to define the shape and size of the structure. The core is coated with an appropriate deposit such as SiC or Si to give the lightweight structure strength and stiffness and for bonding the lightweight structure to another surface. The core is fabricated from extremely thin ribs of appropriately stiff and strong material such as graphite. First, a graphite core consisting of an outer hexagonal cell with six inner triangular cells is constructed from the graphite ribs. The graphite core may be placed on the back-up side of a SiC faceplate and then coated with SiC to produce a monolithic structure without the use of any bonding agent. Cores and methods for the fabrication thereof in which the six inner triangular cells are further divided into a plurality of cells are also disclosed.

  4. Small, Lightweight Welding-Current Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Welding-current indicator made of surface-mounted components on flexible circuit board. Holds variety of components on surface. After assembly, flexible circuit wrapped to fit around transformer core. Surface-mounted devices make it unnecessary to drill holes in circuit board to accommodate component leads. Use of small surface-mounted devices result in lightweight, compact indicator circuit.

  5. Lightweight Electronic Camera for Research on Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "Micro-CPI" (wherein "CPI" signifies "cloud-particle imager") is the name of a small, lightweight electronic camera that has been proposed for use in research on clouds. It would acquire and digitize high-resolution (3- m-pixel) images of ice particles and water drops at a rate up to 1,000 particles (and/or drops) per second.

  6. Compact, Lightweight Servo-Controllable Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.; Townsend, William; Guertin, Jeffrey; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2010-01-01

    Compact, lightweight servo-controllable brakes capable of high torques are being developed for incorporation into robot joints. A brake of this type is based partly on the capstan effect of tension elements. In a brake of the type under development, a controllable intermediate state of torque is reached through on/off switching at a high frequency.

  7. FY 2012 Lightweight Materials Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, David C.

    2013-04-15

    The FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Lightweight Materials provides a detailed description of the activities and technical accomplishments which focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  8. The Light-Weight Group Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-02

    The Light-Weight Group (LWGRP) bibrary provides data structures and collective routines to define and operate on groups of MPI processes. Groups can be created and freed efficiently in O(log N) time space requiring less overhead that constructing full MPI communicators. This facilitates faster development of applications and libraries that need to rapidly create, use, and destroy process groups.

  9. Study of Automated Module Fabrication for Lightweight Solar Blanket Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Cost-effective automated techniques for accomplishing the titled purpose; based on existing in-house capability are described. As a measure of the considered automation, the production of a 50 kilowatt solar array blanket, exclusive of support and deployment structure, within an eight-month fabrication period was used. Solar cells considered for this blanket were 2 x 4 x .02 cm wrap-around cells, 2 x 2 x .005 cm and 3 x 3 x .005 cm standard bar contact thin cells, all welded contacts. Existing fabrication processes are described, the rationale for each process is discussed, and the capability for further automation is discussed.

  10. Vehicle Lightweighting: 40% and 45% Weight Savings Analysis: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarin, Anthony; Hannibal, Ted; Raghunathan, Anand; Ivanic, Ziga; Francfort, James

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, Materials area commissioned a study to model and assess manufacturing economics of alternative design and production strategies for a series of lightweight vehicle concepts. The strategic targets were a 40% and a 45% mass reduction relative to a standard North American midsize passenger sedan at an effective cost of $3.42 per pound (lb) saved. The baseline vehicle was an average of several available vehicles in this class. Mass and cost breakdowns from several sources were used, including original equipment manufacturers’ (OEMs’) input through U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office programs and public presentations, A2Mac1 LLC’s teardown information, Lotus Engineering Limited and FEV, Inc. breakdowns in their respective lightweighting studies, and IBIS Associates, Inc.’s decades of experience in automotive lightweighting and materials substitution analyses. Information on lightweighting strategies in this analysis came from these same sources and the ongoing U.S. Department of Energy-funded Vehma International of America, Inc. /Ford Motor Company Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Demonstration Project, the Aluminum Association Transportation Group, and many United States Council for Automotive Research’s/United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC lightweight materials programs.

  11. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:27414143

  12. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. PMID:26971084

  13. Needle Thoracotomy in Trauma.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Misgav; Fay, Shmuel; Gendler, Sami; Klein, Yoram; Arkovitz, Marc; Rottenstreich, Amihai

    2015-12-01

    Tension pneumothorax is one of the leading causes of preventable death in trauma patients. Needle thoracotomy (NT) is the currently accepted first-line intervention but has not been well validated. In this review, we have critically discussed the evidence for NT procedure, re-examined the recommendations by the Advanced Trauma Life Support organization and investigated the safest and most effective way of NT. The current evidence to support the use of NT is limited. However, when used, it should be applied in the 2nd intercostal space at midclavicular line using a catheter length of at least 4.5 cm. Alternative measures should be studied for better prehospital management of tension pneumothorax. PMID:26633663

  14. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD. PMID:27613348

  15. Rethinking historical trauma.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. PMID:24855142

  16. [The Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma 2009].

    PubMed

    Kühne, C A; Mand, C; Sturm, J; Lackner, C K; Künzel, A; Siebert, H; Ruchholtz, S

    2009-10-01

    In 2009, 3 years after the foundation of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma (TraumaNetzwerkD DGU), the majority of German hospitals participating in the treatment of seriously injured patients is registered in regional trauma networks (TNW). Currently there are 41 trauma networks with more than 660 hospitals in existence, 18 more are registered but are still in the planning phase. Each Federal State has an average of 39 trauma centres of different levels taking part in the treatment of seriously injured patients and every trauma network has an average catchment area of 8708 km(2). The most favourable geographical infrastructure conditions exist in Nordrhein-Westfalen, the least favourable in Sachsen-Anhalt and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. A total of 95 hospitals have already fulfilled the first audit of the structural, personnel and qualitative requirements by the certification bodies. Examination of the check lists of 26 hospitals showed shortcomings in the clinical structure so that these hospitals must be rechecked after correction of the shortcomings. A total of 59 hospitals throughout Germany were successfully audited and only one failed to fulfil the requirements. Because of the varying sizes of the trauma networks there are differences in the areas covered by each trauma network and trauma centre. Concerning the process of certification and auditing (together with the company DIOcert) it could be seen that by careful examination of the check lists of each hospital unforeseen problems during the audit could be avoided. The following article will present the current state of development of the Trauma Network of the German Society for Trauma and describe the certification and auditing process. PMID:19756455

  17. Trauma Exposure and Cigarette Smoking: The Impact of Negative Affect and Affect-Regulatory Smoking Motives

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Beckham, Jean C.; Vujanovic, Anka A.; Schmidt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive-affective mechanisms related to the maintenance of smoking among trauma-exposed individuals are largely unknown. Cross-sectional data from trauma-exposed treatment-seeking smokers (n = 283) were utilized to test a series of multiple mediator models of trauma exposure and smoking, as mediated by the sequential effects of negative affect and affect-modulation smoking motives. The sequential effects of both mediators indirectly predicted the effect of greater trauma exposure types on nicotine dependence, a biochemical index of smoking, perceived barriers to smoking cessation, and greater withdrawal-related problems during past quit attempts. Negative affect and affect-modulation motives for smoking may contribute to the trauma-smoking association. PMID:25299617

  18. Trauma exposure and cigarette smoking: the impact of negative affect and affect-regulatory smoking motives.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Zvolensky, Michael J; Beckham, Jean C; Vujanovic, Anka A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive-affective mechanisms related to the maintenance of smoking among trauma-exposed individuals are largely unknown. Cross-sectional data from trauma-exposed treatment-seeking smokers (n = 283) were utilized to test a series of multiple mediator models of trauma exposure and smoking, as mediated by the sequential effects of negative affect and affect-modulation smoking motives. The sequential effects of both mediators indirectly predicted the effect of greater trauma exposure types on nicotine dependence, a biochemical index of smoking, perceived barriers to smoking cessation, and greater withdrawal-related problems during past quit attempts. Negative affect and affect-modulation motives for smoking may contribute to the trauma-smoking association. PMID:25299617

  19. Trauma Informed Guilt Reduction Therapy With Combat Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Sonya B.; Wilkins, Kendall C.; Myers, Ursula S.; Allard, Carolyn B.

    2014-01-01

    Guilt related to combat trauma is highly prevalent among veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Trauma-related guilt has been associated with increased risk for posttraumatic psychopathology and poorer response to treatment. Trauma Informed Guilt Reduction (TrIGR) therapy is a 4-module cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy designed to reduce guilt related to combat trauma. The goals of this study were to describe the key elements of TrIGR and report results of a pilot study with 10 recently deployed combat veterans. Ten combat veterans referred from a VA Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or mental health clinic completed TrIGR over 4 to 7 sessions. Nine veterans completed the posttreatment assessment. This initial pilot suggests that TrIGR may help to reduce trauma-related guilt severity and associated distress. Changes in trauma-related guilt were highly correlated with reductions in PTSD and depression symptoms over the course of treatment, suggesting a possible mechanistic link with severity of posttraumatic psychopathology. TrIGR warrants further evaluation as an intervention for reducing guilt related to traumatic experiences in combat. PMID:25404850

  20. Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the Canadian Military

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Alain; Monson, Eva; Liu, Aihua; Fikretoglu, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the lifetime prevalence of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among a representative, active military sample, and to identify demographic and military variables that modulate rates of trauma exposure as well as PTSD rates and duration. Method: A cross-sectional weighted sample of 5155 regular members and 3957 reservists (n = 8441) of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) was face-to-face interviewed using a lay-administered structured interview that generates Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, psychiatric diagnoses. Results: Within this sample, 85.6% reported 1 or more trauma exposure, with a median number of 3 or more exposures. Compared with males, females were less likely (P < 0.05) to be exposed to warlike trauma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.40), disasters (AOR 0.43), assaultive violence (AOR 0.52), and witnessing trauma (AOR 0.75). However, they were more likely to report sexual assault (AOR 7.36). The lifetime prevalence of PTSD was 6.6% and the conditional rate was 7.7%. Both lifetime and conditional PTSD rates were higher among female soldiers, but lower among the reserve forces, both male and female. Finally, the median duration of PTSD was negatively influenced by younger age of onset, but not influenced by whether the event occurred during deployment. Conclusions: Active members of the CAF report a high degree of trauma exposure but a moderate rate of lifetime PTSD. PMID:26720506

  1. Manufacturing of lightweighted ZERODUR components at SCHOTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, Thorsten; Thomas, Armin; Jedamzik, Ralf; Kohlmann, Heiko; Hartmann, Peter

    2007-09-01

    There is a broad range of applications for lightweighted components made from ZERODUR (R) glass ceramic. The main markets are secondary and tertiary mirrors for astronomical telescopes, mirrors and structural components for satellites, and mechanical structures for industrial applications, mainly in microlithography. Prominent examples from astronomy are VLT-M3, GEMINI-M2, SOFIA-M1, MAGELLAN-M2, MMT-M2, and METEOSAT-SEVIRI. At SCHOTT components with blind or undercut semiclosed holes are manufactured, typically with circular, hexagonal, rectangular or triangular shapes. The classical grinding process results in weight reduction factors of about 70 %. By additional acid etching technologies even higher lightweighting factors and rib thicknesses below 1 mm have been achieved.

  2. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  3. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  4. Cryostable lightweight frit bonded silicon mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, F.; McCarter, D.; Tangedahl, M.; Content, D.

    The excellent polishability, low density and relatively high stiffness of silicon make it an attractive candidate for optical applications that require superior performance. Assembly of silicon details by means of glass frit bonding permits significant light weighting thus enhancing the benefit of silicon mirrors. To demonstrate the performance potential, a small lightweight glass frit bonded silicon mirror was fabricated and tested for cryoability. The test mirror was 12.5cm in diameter with a 60cm spherical radius and a maximum thickness, at the perimeter, of 2.5cm. A machined silicon core was used to stiffen the two face sheets of the silicon sandwich. These three elements were assembled, by glass frit bonding, to form the substrate that was polished. The experimental evaluation in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, demonstrated cryostability performance significantly better than required by the mirror specification. Key WordsCryostable, Lightweight, Silicon, Frit Bond, Spherical, Mirror

  5. Semi lightweight concretes produced by volcanic slags

    SciTech Connect

    Topcu, I.B.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the semi-lightweight concretes produced by using volcanic slags as coarse aggregate were investigated. The volcanic slags were brought from the quarry crushed and then classified according to their aggregate sizes of 0--8, 0--16, 0--31.5, 4--8, and 8--16 mm. The concrete series of five different volcanic slag sizes were produced by addition of a specific cement paste in volume fractions of 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 and 0.60. The cubic, cylindrical and prismatic specimens were made from each of the concrete series. The physical and mechanical properties of the concrete series were determined by conducting unit weight, slump, ultrasound velocity, Schmidt hardness, cylindrical and cubic compressive, bending and splitting tensile strength tests. The results indicated that the volcanic slags can be safely used in the production of semi lightweight concrete.

  6. Trauma in the geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Cathy A

    2015-06-01

    Injury in older adults is a looming public health crisis. This article provides a broad overview of geriatric trauma across the continuum of care. After a review of the epidemiology of geriatric trauma, optimal approaches to patient care are presented for triage and transport, trauma team activation and initial assessment, inpatient management, and injury prevention. Special emphasis is given to assessment of frailty, advanced care planning, and transitions of care. PMID:25981722

  7. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  8. Orthotic devices using lightweight composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Potential applications of high strength, lightweight composite technology in the orthotic field were studied. Several devices were designed and fabricated using graphite-epoxy composite technology. Devices included shoe plates, assistive walker devices, and a Simes prosthesis reinforcement. Several other projects having medical application were investigated and evaluations were made of the potential for use of composite technology. A seat assembly was fabricated using sandwich construction techniques for the Total Wheelchair Project.

  9. A lightweight sensor network management system design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuan, F.; Song, W.-Z.; Peterson, N.; Peng, Y.; Wang, L.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a lightweight and transparent management framework for TinyOS sensor networks, called L-SNMS, which minimizes the overhead of management functions, including memory usage overhead, network traffic overhead, and integration overhead. We accomplish this by making L-SNMS virtually transparent to other applications hence requiring minimal integration. The proposed L-SNMS framework has been successfully tested on various sensor node platforms, including TelosB, MICAz and IMote2. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  10. Flight Controller Software Protects Lightweight Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible aircraft may be the future of aviation, but a major problem is their susceptibility to flutter-uncontrollable vibrations that can destroy wings. Armstrong Flight Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Minneapolis, Minnesota-based MUSYN Inc. to develop software that helps program flight controllers to suppress flutter. The technology is now available for aircraft manufacturers and other industries that use equipment with automated controls.

  11. Aladin Lite: Lightweight sky atlas for browsers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boch, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Aladin Lite is a lightweight version of the Aladin tool, running in the browser and geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. It allows visualization of image surveys (JPEG multi-resolution HEALPix all-sky surveys) and permits superimposing tabular (VOTable) and footprints (STC-S) data. Aladin Lite is powered by HTML5 canvas technology and is easily embeddable on any web page and can also be controlled through a Javacript API.

  12. Computationally Lightweight Air-Traffic-Control Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for computationally lightweight simulation of automated air traffic control (ATC) at a busy airport has been derived. The algorithm is expected to serve as the basis for development of software that would be incorporated into flight-simulator software, the ATC component of which is not yet capable of handling realistic airport loads. Software based on this algorithm could also be incorporated into other computer programs that simulate a variety of scenarios for purposes of training or amusement.

  13. Amorphous silicon thin films: The ultimate lightweight space solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendura, G. J., Jr.; Kruer, M. A.; Schurig, H. H.; Bianchi, M. A.; Roth, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Progress is reported with respect to the development of thin film amorphous (alpha-Si) terrestrial solar cells for space applications. Such devices promise to result in very lightweight, low cost, flexible arrays with superior end of life (EOL) performance. Each alpha-Si cell consists of a tandem arrangement of three very thin p-i-n junctions vapor deposited between film electrodes. The thickness of this entire stack is approximately 2.0 microns, resulting in a device of negligible weight, but one that must be mechanically supported for handling and fabrication into arrays. The stack is therefore presently deposited onto a large area (12 by 13 in), rigid, glass superstrate, 40 mil thick, and preliminary space qualification testing of modules so configured is underway. At the same time, a more advanced version is under development in which the thin film stack is transferred from the glass onto a thin (2.0 mil) polymer substrate to create large arrays that are truly flexible and significantly lighter than either the glassed alpha-Si version or present conventional crystalline technologies. In this paper the key processes for such effective transfer are described. In addition, both glassed (rigid) and unglassed (flexible) alpha-Si cells are studied when integrated with various advanced structures to form lightweight systems. EOL predictions are generated for the case of a 1000 W array in a standard, 10 year geosynchronous (GEO) orbit. Specific powers (W/kg), power densities (W/sq m) and total array costs ($/sq ft) are compared.

  14. Global trauma: the great divide

    PubMed Central

    Paniker, Jayanth; Graham, Simon Matthew; Harrison, James William

    2015-01-01

    Road trauma is an emergent global issue. There is huge disparity between the population affected by road trauma and the resource allocation. If the current trend continues, a predicted extra 5 million lives will be lost in this decade. This article aims to create an awareness of the scale of the problem of road trauma and the inequality in the resources available to address this problem. It also describes the responses from the international organisations and the orthopaedic community in dealing with this issue. The International Orthopaedic community has a unique opportunity and moral obligation to play a part in changing this trend of global trauma. PMID:27163075

  15. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-24

    The Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) has developed an experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation effort to optimize automotive components in order to decrease weight and cost, yet increase performance and safety in crash scenarios. In summary, the three major objectives of this project are accomplished: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios. In this final report, we divided the content into two parts: the first part contains the development of building blocks for the project, including materials and process models, process-structure-property (PSP) relationship, and experimental validation capabilities; the second part presents the demonstration task for Mg front-end work associated with USAMP projects.

  16. Lightweight composite reflectors for space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.; Ono, Russell M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to advance the state of the art in lightweight, high optical quality reflectors for space- and Earth-based telescopes. This was accomplished through the combination of a precision silicon carbide (SiC) reflector surface and a high specific strength, low-mass SiC structural support. Reducing the mass of components launched into space can lead to substantial cost savings, but an even greater benefit of lightweight reflectors for both space- and Earth-based optics applications is the fact that they require far less complex and less expensive positioning systems. While Ultramet is not the first company to produce SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for reflector surfaces, it is the first to propose and demonstrate a lightweight, open-cell SiC structural foam that can support a thin layer of the highly desirable polished SiC reflector material. SiC foam provides a substantial structural and mass advantage over conventional honeycomb supports and alternative finned structures. The result is a reflector component that meets or exceeds the optical properties of current high-quality glass, ceramic, and metal reflectors while maintaining a substantially lower areal density.

  17. Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, L.; Chen, M.; Deblonk, B.; Palusinski, I.

    The use of monolithic glass and beryllium to produce lightweighted aerospace mirror systems has reached its limits due to the long lead times, high processing costs, environmental effects and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and manufacturing processes are required to meet DoD's directed energy weapons, reconnaissance/surveillance, and secured communications needs. Over the past several years the Air Force, MDA, and NASA has focused their efforts on the fabrication, lightweighting, and scale-up of numerous silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time and cost, and non-destructive evaluation methods being investigated to help eliminate risk. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced engineered materials (far term solutions) such as composites, foams, and microsphere arrays for ultra lightweighting will also be briefly discussed.

  18. A lightweight, high strength dexterous manipulator for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Schena, Bruce M.; Cohan, Steve M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept, design, and features are described of a lightweight, high strength, modular robot manipulator being developed for space and commercial applications. The manipulator has seven fully active degrees of freedom and is fully operational in 1 G. Each of the seven joints incorporates a unique drivetrain design which provides zero backlash operation, is insensitive to wear, and is single fault tolerant to motor or servo amplifier failure. Feedback sensors provide position, velocity, torque, and motor winding temperature information at each joint. This sensing system is also designed to be single fault tolerant. The manipulator consists of five modules (not including gripper). These modules join via simple quick-disconnect couplings and self-mating connectors which allow rapid assembly and/or disassembly for reconfiguration, transport, or servicing. The manipulator is a completely enclosed assembly, with no exposed components or wires. Although the initial prototype will not be space qualified, the design is well suited to meeting space requirements. The control system provides dexterous motion by controlling the endpoint location and arm pose simultaneously. Potential applications are discussed.

  19. Thin, lightweight electroacoustic projector for low frequency underwater applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tressler, James F.; Howarth, Thomas R.; Carney, Walter L.

    2004-09-01

    A thin, lightweight oil-filled electroacoustic projector has been designed and fabricated for application on unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) and autonomous unmanned vehicles (AUVs) used in littoral environments. The projector has dimensions of 381 mm×280 mm×64 mm and weighs 26 N in water. The acoustic aperture consists of 294 cymbal-type miniature Class V flextensional drivers. These 294 elements are divided into six independent modules of 49 cymbals wired together electrically in parallel. The six modules, in turn, are wired so that they can be easily combined together electrically either in parallel, series, or as a combination of both. Based on the VA power curve and a low duty cycle input voltage, an acoustic source level of at least 180 dB (re: 1 μPa at 1 m) is attainable across the frequency span ~3-15 kHz. This particular design is best suited for shallow water, but is shown to still be operable at water depths up to 200 meters without significant degradation in performance.

  20. Biomechanics of penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that injuries and deaths due to penetrating projectiles have become a national and an international epidemic in Western society. The application of biomedical engineering to solve day-to-day problems has produced considerable advances in safety and mitigation/prevention of trauma. The study of penetrating trauma has been largely in the military domain where war-time specific applications were advanced with the use of high-velocity weapons. With the velocity and weapon caliber in the civilian population at half or less compared with the military counterpart, wound ballistics is a largely different problem in today's trauma centers. The principal goal of the study of penetrating injuries in the civilian population is secondary prevention and optimized emergency care after occurrence. A thorough understanding of the dynamic biomechanics of penetrating injuries quantifies missile type, caliber, and velocity to hard and soft tissue damage. Such information leads to a comprehensive assessment of the acute and long-term treatment of patients with penetrating injuries. A review of the relevant military research applied to the civilian domain and presentation of new technology in the biomechanical study of these injuries offer foundation to this field. Relevant issues addressed in this review article include introduction of the military literature, the need for secondary prevention, environmental factors including projectile velocity and design, experimental studies with biological tissues and physical models, and mathematical simulations and analyses. Areas of advancement are identified that enables the pursuit of biomechanics research in order to arrive at better secondary prevention strategies. PMID:9719858

  1. Rural Trauma: Is Trauma Designation Associated with Better Hospital Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Stephen M.; Zimmerman, Frederick J.; Sharar, Sam R.; Baker, Margaret W.; Martin, Diane P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While trauma designation has been associated with lower risk of death in large urban settings, relatively little attention has been given to this issue in small rural hospitals. Purpose: To examine factors related to in-hospital mortality and delayed transfer in small rural hospitals with and without trauma designation. Methods: Analysis…

  2. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  3. Trauma-focused CBT for youth with complex trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for youth with complex trauma. Methods TF-CBT treatment phases are described and modifications of timing, proportionality and application are described for youth with complex trauma. Practical applications include a) dedicating proportionally more of the model to the TF-CBT coping skills phase; b) implementing the TF-CBT Safety component early and often as needed throughout treatment; c) titrating gradual exposure more slowly as needed by individual youth; d) incorporating unifying trauma themes throughout treatment; and e) when indicated, extending the TF-CBT treatment consolidation and closure phase to include traumatic grief components and to generalize ongoing safety and trust. Results Recent data from youth with complex trauma support the use of the above TF-CBT strategies to successfully treat these youth. Conclusions The above practical strategies can be incorporated into TF-CBT to effectively treat youth with complex trauma. Practice implications Practical strategies include providing a longer coping skills phase which incorporates safety and appropriate gradual exposure; including relevant unifying themes; and allowing for an adequate treatment closure phase to enhance ongoing trust and safety. Through these strategies therapists can successfully apply TF-CBT for youth with complex trauma. PMID:22749612

  4. Management of Pediatric Trauma.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Injury is still the number 1 killer of children ages 1 to 18 years in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/children.htm). Children who sustain injuries with resulting disabilities incur significant costs not only for their health care but also for productivity lost to the economy. The families of children who survive childhood injury with disability face years of emotional and financial hardship, along with a significant societal burden. The entire process of managing childhood injury is enormously complex and varies by region. Only the comprehensive cooperation of a broadly diverse trauma team will have a significant effect on improving the care of injured children. PMID:27456509

  5. Radiology of skeletal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    This 1000-page book contains over 1700 illustrations, is presented in two volumes and subdivided into 23 chapters. After brief chapters of Introduction and General Anatomy, a section on Skeletal Biomechanics is presented. The Epidemiology of Fractures chapter examines, among other things, the effects of age on the frequency and distribution of fractures. In the chapter on Classifications of Fractures, the author describes the character of traumatic forces such as angulating, torsional, avulsive, and compressive, and then relates these to the resultant fracture configurations. The Fracture Treatment chapter presents an overview of treatment principles. Other chapters deal with specific problems in pediatric trauma, fracture healing and nonhealing, and fracture complications.

  6. Effects of lightweight fly ash aggregate properties on the behavior of lightweight concretes.

    PubMed

    Kockal, Niyazi Ugur; Ozturan, Turan

    2010-07-15

    Influence of different lightweight fly ash aggregates on the behavior of concrete mixtures was discussed. The performance characteristics of lightweight concretes (LWCs) and normalweight concrete (NWC) were investigated through compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and splitting tensile strength representing the mechanical behavior; through rapid chloride permeability representing the transport properties and through rapid freezing and thawing cycling representing the durability of concrete. In order to investigate the aggregate-cement paste interfacial transition zone (ITZ), SEM observations were performed. Regression and graphical analysis of the experimental data obtained were also performed. An increase in compressive strength was observed with the increase in oven-dry density. The ratios of splitting tensile strength to compressive strength of lightweight aggregate concretes were found to be similar to that of normalweight concrete. All the 28- and 56-day concrete specimens had a durability factor greater than 85 and 90, respectively, which met the requirement for freezing and thawing durability. PMID:20399557

  7. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  8. Coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Christiaans, Sarah C; Duhachek-Stapelman, Amy L; Russell, Robert T; Lisco, Steven J; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Pittet, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States among children aged 1 to 21 years. The most common cause of lethality in pediatric trauma is traumatic brain injury. Early coagulopathy has been commonly observed after severe trauma and is usually associated with severe hemorrhage and/or traumatic brain injury. In contrast to adult patients, massive bleeding is less common after pediatric trauma. The classical drivers of trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, acidosis, hemodilution, and consumption of coagulation factors secondary to local activation of the coagulation system after severe traumatic injury. Furthermore, there is also recent evidence for a distinct mechanism of trauma-induced coagulopathy that involves the activation of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Whether this new mechanism of posttraumatic coagulopathy plays a role in children is still unknown. The goal of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the incidence and potential mechanisms of coagulopathy after pediatric trauma and the role of rapid diagnostic tests for early identification of coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss different options for treating coagulopathy after severe pediatric trauma. PMID:24569507

  9. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  10. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services. PMID:25494913

  11. Laser Additive Manufacturing and Bionics: Redefining Lightweight Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmelmann, C.; Sander, P.; Kranz, J.; Wycisk, E.

    New layer wise manufacturing technologies such as Laser Additive Manufacturing (LAM) allow innovative approaches to product design. Especially for lightweight design in aircraft applications LAM offers new possibilities for load-adapted structures. However, to fully capture lightweight potential of LAM technologies new design guidelines and processes have to be developed. A novel approach to extreme lightweight design is realized by incorporating structural optimization tools, bionic structures and LAM guidelines into one design process. By consequently following this design process designers can achieve lightweight savings in designing new aircraft structures.

  12. Precise Alignment and Permanent Mounting of Thin and Lightweight X-ray Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biskach, Michael P.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Hong, Melinda N.; Mazzarella, James R.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Norman, Michael J.; Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    To provide observations to support current research efforts in high energy astrophysics. future X-ray telescope designs must provide matching or better angular resolution while significantly increasing the total collecting area. In such a design the permanent mounting of thin and lightweight segments is critical to the overall performance of the complete X-ray optic assembly. The thin and lightweight segments used in the assemhly of the modules are desigued to maintain and/or exceed the resolution of existing X-ray telescopes while providing a substantial increase in collecting area. Such thin and delicate X-ray segments are easily distorted and yet must be aligned to the arcsecond level and retain accurate alignment for many years. The Next Generation X-ray Optic (NGXO) group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has designed, assembled. and implemented new hardware and procedures mth the short term goal of aligning three pairs of X-ray segments in a technology demonstration module while maintaining 10 arcsec alignment through environmental testing as part of the eventual design and construction of a full sized module capable of housing hundreds of X-ray segments. The recent attempts at multiple segment pair alignment and permanent mounting is described along with an overview of the procedure used. A look into what the next year mll bring for the alignment and permanent segment mounting effort illustrates some of the challenges left to overcome before an attempt to populate a full sized module can begin.

  13. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  14. Lightweight, Fire-Resistant Graphite Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; MING-TA-HSU

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft safety improved with interior paneling made of new laminate with good thermophysical properties. Featuring lightweight graphite composite, laminate more heat-and flame-resistant and produces much less smoke in fire than commonly used epoxy-resin-containing laminates. New laminate prepared without epoxy resin. Graphite unidirectional cloth preimpregnated with blend of vinyl polystyrylpyridine and bismaleimide (VPSP-BMI). Either of two types of VPSP-BMI blend used, depending on method of preparation of chemicals and technique used to fabricate panel.

  15. ZERODUR for lightweight secondary/tertiary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morian, Hans F.; Mackh, Reiner

    1998-08-01

    ZERODUR, the glass ceramic, with CTE values near zero, has excellent performance up to 8.2 m primary mirrors as well as for lightweight (LW) mirrors for Secondaries and Tertiaries. The high homogeneity of major properties of ZERODUR is an important prerequisite for the LW production and application. The production of CNC grinding and subsequent lightening via acid etching for additional weight reduction will be discussed. Results of Secondary and Tertiary LW mirrors for advanced technology telescopes like 8 m, 6.5 m and 3.5 m telescopes will be addressed. This paper presents also some examples of space based satellites with LW Zerodur mirrors in use since several years.

  16. Radiation Transmission Measurements for a Lightweight Fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H; Singh, M S; DeMeo, R F

    2003-01-17

    Radiation Shield Technologies has developed a lightweight fabric, shown in Fig. 1, with radiation shielding properties for X ray, gamma ray and beta particle emissions in the range of energies relevant to clinical and Homeland Security applications. Detailed measurements were done to measure the shielding properties of this material against the spectra of standard radionuclides and x-ray generators. The mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using LLNL cross section data, a 3-D photon transport code, elemental weight fractions and the measured density of the fabric.

  17. Lightweight Forms for Epoxy/Aramid Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mix, E. W.; Anderson, A. N.; Bedford, Donald L., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminum mandrels easy to remove. Lightweight aluminum mandrel for shaping epoxy/aramid ducts simplifies and speeds production. In new process, glass-reinforced epoxy/aramid cloth wrapped on aluminum mandrel. Stainless-steel flanges and other hardware fitted on duct and held by simple tooling. Entire assembly placed in oven to cure epoxy. After curing, assembly placed in alkaline bath dissolves aluminum mandrel in about 4 hours. Epoxy/aramid shell ready for use as duct. Aluminum mandrel used to make ducts of various inside diameters up to 6 in. Standard aluminum forms used. Conventional tube-bending equipment produces requisite curves in mandrels.

  18. A Light-Weight Instrumentation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kidner, Ronald

    1999-06-02

    To meet challenging constraints on telemetry system weight and volume, a custom Light-Weight Instrumentation System was developed to collect vehicle environment and dynamics on a short-duration exo-atmospheric flight test vehicle. The total telemetry system, including electronics, sensors, batteries, and a 1 watt transmitter weighs about 1 kg. Over 80 channels of measurement, housekeeping, and telemetry system diagnostic data are transmitted at 128 kbps. The microcontroller-based design uses the automotive industry standard Controller Area Network to interface with and support in-flight control fimctions. Operational parameters are downloaded via a standard asynchronous serial communications intefiace. The basic design philosophy and functionality is described here.

  19. [MUSCULOSKELETAL MARKERS, ARTHROPATY, TRAUMAS].

    PubMed

    Caldarini, Carla; Zavaroni, Federica; Benassi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The bone tissue remodeling due to strong physical/working activity is defined as ergonomic markers or MSM (Muscoloskeletal Stress Markers) (Capasso et al. 1999) and MOS (Markers of Occupational Stress). Among them we can find: enthesopaties, arthropaties, non metrical stress and traumas markers. In the present study, the analysis of these traits has been used to clarify habitual activity patterns of four imperial populations from Suburbium: Castel Malnome, Casal Bertone area Q, Via Padre Semeria e Quarto Cappello del Prete. The very high prevalence of activity-induced stress lesions occurred among the individuals of Castel Malnome and Casal Bertone area Q suggests that these groups were involved in strenuous occupations such as, respectively: the processing and storage of salt and the dyeing of textiles and hides discernible from the archaeological context. For the individuals of Via Padre Semeria and Quarto Cappello del Prete the alterations, instead, could be compatibles with agricultural work. PMID:27348990

  20. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  1. Trauma and religiousness.

    PubMed

    Gostečnik, Christian; Repič Slavič, Tanja; Lukek, Saša Poljak; Cvetek, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Victims of traumatic events who experience re-traumatization often develop a highly ambivalent relationship to God and all religiosity as extremely conflictual. On the one hand, they may choose to blame God for not having protected them, for having left them to feel so alone, for having been indifferent to them or they may even turn their wrath upon God, as the source of cruelty. Often though, the traumas experienced by individuals prompt them to turn to God and religion in search of help. This gives reason for the need of new and up-to-date research that can help elucidate why some people choose to seek help in religion and others turn away from it. PMID:23187617

  2. FKBP5 genotype interacts with early life trauma to predict heavy drinking in college students.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Richard; Armeli, Stephen; Scott, Denise M; Kranzler, Henry R; Tennen, Howard; Covault, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is debilitating and costly. Identification and better understanding of risk factors influencing the development of AUD remain a research priority. Although early life exposure to trauma increases the risk of adulthood psychiatric disorders, including AUD, many individuals exposed to early life trauma do not develop psychopathology. Underlying genetic factors may contribute to differential sensitivity to trauma experienced in childhood. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is susceptible to long-lasting changes in function following childhood trauma. Functional genetic variation within FKBP5, a gene encoding a modulator of HPA axis function, is associated with the development of psychiatric symptoms in adulthood, particularly among individuals exposed to trauma early in life. In the current study, we examined interactions between self-reported early life trauma, past-year life stress, past-year trauma, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1360780) in FKBP5 on heavy alcohol consumption in a sample of 1,845 college students from two university settings. Although we found no effect of early life trauma on heavy drinking in rs1360780*T-allele carriers, rs1360780*C homozygotes exposed to early life trauma had a lower probability of heavy drinking compared to rs1360780*C homozygotes not exposed to early life trauma (P < 0.01). The absence of an interaction between either current life stress or past-year trauma, and FKBP5 genotype on heavy drinking suggests that there exists a developmental period of susceptibility to stress that is moderated by FKBP5 genotype. These findings implicate interactive effects of early life trauma and FKBP5 genetic variation on heavy drinking. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27196697

  3. A Lightweight Vertical Rosette for Deployment in Ice Covered Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, W. M.; Chayes, D. N.; Perry, R. S.; Schlosser, P.

    2009-12-01

    Although remote sensing technology provides measurement capability for a number of water properties, there are important substances for which this technology does not currently exist and the only way to measure these substances is to collect water samples and return the samples to the lab. In the Arctic Ocean water samples are difficult to obtain from ships because of the extensive ice cover and thick pressure ridges. However, the ice provides a landing platform for aircraft, which can rapidly cover long distances. Aircraft have been used for sampling the Arctic Ocean for the past half-century using bottles and internally recording CTDs attached to a cable and lowered through leads or holes drilled in the ice. The routine CTD/rosette technology used for sampling from ships measures profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen as well as other substances in situ, displays the data in real time for choosing depths to obtain water samples and the water samples are then collected with the rosette. These systems are too heavy and bulky to deploy from aircraft. We have developed a lightweight modular CTD/rosette system that is deployed through a 12-inch diameter hole drilled in the ice. The modules are connected together physically and electrically with the water bottle modules, which contain four 4-liter bottles each, stacked on top of the CTD module. The CTD traces are displayed on a laptop computer and the bottles are tripped using modified Seabird controllers and a melt-lanyard tripping mechanism. We have used this system for several years with Twin Otter fixed wing aircraft as part of the Switchyard Project, sampling a line of stations annually in the heavily ice covered region between Alert and the North Pole. Casts are carried out in a tent connected to the airplane using a lightweight winch mounted in the airplane. At the completion of a cast, the water modules are placed in a cooler with bags of snow to provide thermal stability at about 0°C and the end caps

  4. TRAUMA AND IMMUNE RESPONSE – EFFECT OF GENDER DIFFERENCES

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Bland, Kirby I.; Chaudry, Irshad H.

    2009-01-01

    A major consequence of traumatic injury is the immunosuppression. Findings from previous studies suggest that the depression of immune functions is severe in young males, ovariectomized and aged females. In contrast, the immune functions in proestrus females following trauma-hemorrhage are maintained. Studies have also shown that the survival rate in proestrus females following trauma-hemorrhage and the induction of subsequent sepsis is significantly higher than in age-matched males and ovariectomized females. Furthermore, administration of female sex hormone 17β-estradiol in males and ovariectomized females after trauma-hemorrhage prevents the suppression of immune response. Thus, these findings suggest that sex hormones play a significant role in shaping the host response following trauma. This article reviews studies delineating the mechanism by which sex hormones regulate immune cell functions in the experimental model of trauma-hemorrhage. The findings from the studies reviewed in this article suggest that sex steroids can be synthesized by the immune cell. The findings further indicate that T cell and macrophages express receptors for androgen and estrogen. Since these cells are also the cells that produce cytokines, local synthesis of active steroids in these cells may become the significant factor in modulating their cytokine production. PMID:18048037

  5. Missed injuries in trauma patients: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Roman; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Background Overlooked injuries and delayed diagnoses are still common problems in the treatment of polytrauma patients. Therefore, ongoing documentation describing the incidence rates of missed injuries, clinically significant missed injuries, contributing factors and outcome is necessary to improve the quality of trauma care. This review summarizes the available literature on missed injuries, focusing on overlooked muscoloskeletal injuries. Methods Manuscripts dealing with missed injuries after trauma were reviewed. The following search modules were selected in PubMed: Missed injuries, Delayed diagnoses, Trauma, Musculoskeletal injuires. Three time periods were differentiated: (n = 2, 1980–1990), (n = 6, 1990–2000), and (n = 9, 2000-Present). Results We found a wide spread distribution of missed injuries and delayed diagnoses incidence rates (1.3% to 39%). Approximately 15 to 22.3% of patients with missed injuries had clinically significant missed injuries. Furthermore, we observed a decrease of missed pelvic and hip injuries within the last decade. Conclusion The lack of standardized studies using comparable definitions for missed injuries and clinically significant missed injuries call for further investigations, which are necessary to produce more reliable data. Furthermore, improvements in diagnostic techniques (e.g. the use of multi-slice CT) may lead to a decreased incidence of missed pelvic injuries. Finally, the standardized tertiary trauma survey is vitally important in the detection of clinically significant missed injuries and should be included in trauma care. PMID:18721480

  6. An ecological view of psychological trauma and trauma recovery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M R

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an ecological view of psychological trauma and trauma recovery. Individual differences in posttraumatic response and recovery are the result of complex interactions among person, event, and environmental factors. These interactions define the interrelationship of individual and community and together may foster or impede individual recovery. The ecological model proposes a multidimensional definition of trauma recovery and suggests that the efficacy of trauma-focused interventions depends on the degree to which they enhance the person-community relationship and achieve "ecological fit" within individually varied recovery contexts. In attending to the social, cultural and political context of victimization and acknowledging that survivors of traumatic experiences may recover without benefit of clinical intervention, the model highlights the phenomenon of resiliency, and the relevance of community intervention efforts. PMID:8750448

  7. Immunohistochemical alterations after muscle trauma.

    PubMed

    Fechner, G; Bajanowski, T; Brinkmann, B

    1993-01-01

    The proteins fibrin, fibrinogen, fibronectin and complement C5b-9 were investigated in mechanically damaged skeletal muscle. An accumulation of fibrin, fibrinogen and fibronectin could be observed immediately after intra-vital trauma in damaged fibre zones, later an accumulation at the torn edges of the fibres. The accumulation of complement C5b-9 began one hour after trauma. After post mortem trauma no positive reactions could be observed for any of the proteins. The degree of expression of these proteins can therefore be used to differentiate between vital and postmortem muscle damage as well as the estimation of wound age in the early antemortem time period. PMID:8431399

  8. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-15

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  9. Advanced lightweight optics development for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    A considerable amount of effort over the past year has been devoted to exploring ultra-lightweight optics for two specific NASA programs, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), and the High Throughput X-ray Spectrometer (HTXS). Experimental investigations have been undertaken in a variety of materials including glass, composites, nickel, beryllium, Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (CSiC), Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide, Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide, and Silicon. Overall results of these investigations will be summarized, and specific details will be provided concerning the in-house development of ultra-lightweight nickel replication for both grazing incidence and normal incidence optics. This will include x-ray test results of the grazing incidence optic and cryogenic test results of the normal incidence optic. The status of two 1.5 meter diameter demonstration mirrors for NGST will also be presented. These two demonstrations are aimed at establishing the capability to manufacture and test mirrors that have an areal density of 15 kilograms per square meter. Efforts in thin membrane mirrors and Fresnel lenses will also be briefly discussed.

  10. Light-weight black ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, black ceramic insulation having a density ranging from about 0.12 g/cc. to 0.6 g/cc. such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing siloxane gels derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes also may contain an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gels. The siloxane gels are dried at ambient temperatures and pressures to form siloxane ceramic precursors without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursors are subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C., and particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  11. A comparison of performance of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Richard, Ralph M.; Hileman, Edward A.

    1990-01-01

    Four lightweight solid contoured back mirror shapes (a double arch, a single arch, a modified single arch, and a double concave mirror) and a cellular sandwich lightweight meniscus mirror, have been considered for the primary mirror of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A parametric design study using these shapes for the SIRTF 40 inch primary mirror with a focal ratio f/2 is presented. Evaluations of the optical performance and fundamental frequency analyses are performed to compare relative merits of each mirror configuration. Included in these are structural, optical, and frequency analyses for (1) different back contour shapes, (2) different number and location of the support points, and (3) two gravity orientations (ZENITH and HORIZON positions). The finite element program NASTRAN is used to obtain the structural deflections of the optical surface. For wavefront error analysis, FRINGE and PCFRINGE programs are used to evaluate the optical performance. A scaling law relating the optical and structural performance for various mirror contoured back shapes is developed.

  12. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies. PMID:26130845

  13. Lightweight, Segmented, Mostly Silicon Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2006-01-01

    A document presents the concept of a curved telescope primary reflector structure, made mostly of silicon, that would have an areal mass density 1 kg/m2 and would be deployed in outer space, where it would be operated at a temperature in the cryogenic range. The concept provides for adjustment of the shape of the mirror to maintain the required precise optical surface figure despite the flexibility inherent in the ultra-lightweight design. The structure would include a thin mirror layer divided into hexagonal segments supported by flexure hinges on a lightweight two-layer backing structure. Each segment would also be supported at three points by sets of piezoelectric linear microactuators that could impose small displacements along the optical axis. The excitations applied to the aforementioned microactuators would be chosen to effect fine adjustments of the axial positions and the orientations of the segments relative to the supporting structure. Other piezoelectric linear microactuators embedded in the backing structure would enable control of the displacements of the segments along the hexagonal axes; they would also enable control of the curvature of the backing structure and, thus, additional control of the curvature of the reflector.

  14. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies.

  15. Lightweight Community-Driven Ontology Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siorpaes, Katharina

    Only few well-maintained domain ontologies can be found on the Web. The likely reasons for the lack of useful domain ontologies include that (1) informal means to convey intended meaning more efficiently are used for ontology specification only to a very limited extent, (2) many relevant domains of discourse show a substantial degree of conceptual dynamics, (3) ontology representation languages are hard to understand for the majority of (potential) ontology users and domain experts, and (4) the community does not have control over the ontology evolution. In this thesis, we propose to (1) ground a methodology for community-grounded ontology building on the culture and philosophy of wikis by giving users who have no or little expertise in ontology engineering the opportunity to contribute in all stages of the ontology lifecycle and (2) exploit the combination of human and computational intelligence to discover and resolve inconsistencies and align lightweight domain ontologies. The contribution of this thesis is a methodology and prototype for community-grounded building and evolution of lightweight domain ontologies.

  16. Computed tomography in trauma: An atlas approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book discussed computed tomography in trauma. The text is organized according to mechanism of injury and site of injury. In addition to CT, some correlation with other imaging modalities is included. Blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, complications and sequelae of trauma, and use of other modalities are covered.

  17. Secondary Trauma in Children and School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motta, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    A review of childhood secondary trauma is presented. Secondary trauma involves the transfer and acquisition of negative affective and dysfunctional cognitive states due to prolonged and extended contact with others, such as family members, who have been traumatized. As such, secondary trauma refers to a spread of trauma reactions from the victim…

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  1. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  3. FY2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing lightweight materials for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  4. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy. PMID:26745537

  5. V-band integrated quadriphase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grote, A.; Chang, K.

    1983-01-01

    A V-band integrated circuit quadriphase shift keyed modulator/exciter for space communications systems was developed. Intersatellite communications systems require direct modulation at 60 GHz to enhance signal processing capability. For most systems, particularly space applications, small and lightweight components are essential to alleviate severe system design constraints. Thus to achieve wideband, high data rate systems, direct modulation techniques at millimeter waves using solid state integrated circuit technology are an integral part of the overall technology developments.

  6. Trauma and the wise baby.

    PubMed

    Kilborne, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    This paper expands upon Ferenczi's concept of the wise baby and explores the dynamics of ignorance and compensatory ideals of wisdom as reactions to trauma and as manifestations of "double conscience," shame dynamics and Oedipal shame. Focusing on feelings of ignorance, of knowing and not knowing and their relation to trauma, the author elaborates on the dynamics of fantasies of wisdom, adumbrating implications for psychoanalytic technique. PMID:21818096

  7. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  8. An exploratory association study of the influence of noradrenergic genes and childhood trauma in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Martín-Blanco, Ana; Ferrer, Marc; Soler, Joaquim; Arranz, Maria Jesús; Vega, Daniel; Bauzà, Joana; Calvo, Natalia; Elices, Matilde; Sanchez-Mora, Cristina; García-Martinez, Iris; Salazar, Juliana; Ribases, Marta; Carmona, Cristina; Prat, Mónica; Pascual, Juan C

    2015-09-30

    This study investigated the possible association of 40 polymorphisms within 4 noradrenergic genes with BPD risk and the modulating effect of childhood trauma on these associations in 481 BPD subjects and 442 controls. COMT rs5993882, DBH rs77905 and SLC6A2 rs1814270 showed associations with BPD, which were modulated by childhood trauma. However, none of these findings survived Bonferroni correction. Further investigation is needed to clarify the involvement of these genes in BPD pathogenesis. PMID:26216165

  9. [Trauma of the midface].

    PubMed

    Kühnel, T S; Reichert, T E

    2015-03-01

    Fractures of the midface pose a serious medical problem as for their complexity, frequency and their socio-economic impact. Interdisciplinary approaches and up-to-date diagnostic and surgical techniques provide favorable results in the majority of cases though. Traffic accidents are the leading cause and male adults in their thirties are affected most often. Treatment algorithms for nasal bone fractures, maxillary and zygoma fractures are widely agreed upon whereas trauma to the frontal sinus and the orbital apex are matter of current debate. Advances in endoscopic surgery and limitations of evidence based gain of knowledge are matters that are focused on in the corresponding chapter. As for the fractures of the frontal sinus a strong tendency towards minimized approaches can be seen. Obliteration and cranialisation seem to decrease in numbers.Some critical remarks in terms of high dose methylprednisolone therapy for traumatic optic nerve injury seem to be appropriate.Intraoperative cone beam radiographs and preshaped titanium mesh implants for orbital reconstruction are new techniques and essential aspects in midface traumatology. Fractures of the anterior skull base with cerebrospinal fluid leaks show very promising results in endonasal endoscopic repair. PMID:25860490

  10. [Major respiratory tract traumas].

    PubMed

    Petrov, D; Obretenov, E; Kalaĭdzhiev, G; Plochev, M; Kostadinov, D

    2002-01-01

    Between 1988 and 2000 a total of 33 patients with traumatic tracheobronchial lesions were diagnosed and treated. The trauma was penetrating in 7 (stab and gun-shot), blunt in 10 (car accidents, compression and falling from heights) and iatrogenic in 16 of them (postintubational--15, after foreign body extraction--1). The main clinical and radiological features were subcutaneous emphysema, hemoptysis, respiratory insufficiency, pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients by early fiberoptic bronchoscopy. "Watch and see" tactics with massive antibiotics therapy was followed in 4 (12%) patients. A surgical treatment was carried out in 29 (88%) patients as follows: simple repair--19 (58%), left pneumonectomy--2 (6%), tracheal resection and anastomosis "end to end"--2 (6%), tracheostomy--1 (3%), thoracocenthesis and drainage--3 (9%) and cervical mediastinotomy--2 (6%). The operative mortality was 9%. The cause of death in these 3 patients were associated brain and spinal cord injuries. In the rest of patients the early and long-term postoperative results were considered very good. PMID:12515032