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Sample records for lignin concentration sensor

  1. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor. Final report. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    The ultimate objective of the DOE-sponsored program discussed in this report is to commercialize an instrument for real-time, in-situ measurement of lignin in wood pulp at a variety of locations in the pulp process stream. The instrument will be used as a primary sensor for process control in the pulp and paper industry. Work done by B&W prior to the initiation of this program had shown: there is a functional relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the Kappa number as measured at the pulp mill laboratory. Kappa number is a standard wet chemical method for determination of the lignin concentration; the relationship is one of decreasing intensity with Kappa number, indicating operation in the quenched fluorescence regime; a great deal of scatter in the data. Because of the preliminary nature of the study, the origin of the scatter was not identified. This report documents the results of laboratory measurements made on a variety of well defined pulp samples to generate the data necessary to: determine the feasibility of an instrument for on-line lignin concentration measurement using laser fluorescence; identify the preferred measurement strategy; define the range of applicability of the instrument; and to provide background information to guide the design of a field-worthy prototype.

  2. Lignin Sensor Based On Flash-Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, Eug Y.; Lawson, Daniel D.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy

    1990-01-01

    New lignin sensor takes only few minutes to measure lignin content of specimen of wood, pulp, paper, or similar material. Includes flash pyrolizer and ion-trap detector that acts as mass spectrometer. Apparatus measures amount of molecular fragments of lignin in pyrolysis products of samples. Helpful in controlling digestors in paper mills to maintain required lignin content, and also in bleaching plants, where good control of bleaching becomes possible if quick determination of lignin content made.

  3. A facile method for processing lignin reinforced chitosan biopolymer microfibres: optimising the fibre mechanical properties through lignin type and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Loo, L. S.; Goh, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    A chitosan biopolymer microfibre—reinforced by lignin—has been processed by a wet-spinning method. To optimise the fibre mechanical and structural properties two types of lignin, with molecular weights 28 000 g mol-1 and 60 000 g mol-1, were examined and the chitosan fibre was blended with the respective lignin type at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 wt% lignin concentrations. The main effects of lignin type and concentration, as well as the interaction between the two parameters, on the fibre tensile stiffness, extensibility, strength and toughness were evaluated using the two-factor analysis of variance. Significant variations in the respective mechanical properties were observed with varying lignin concentrations (P < 0.05). The magnitude of the respective mechanical properties is low at 1 wt% but peaks at 3 wt% before decreasing steadily with increasing lignin concentration. Except for extensibility, significant variations in the strength and toughness were observed with respect to lignin type (P < 0.05) variations in the stiffness were masked by interactions between lignin type and concentration. These results were related to the dispersion of lignin in the fibre and the nature of the bonds between lignin and chitosan, based on findings from scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This new method for the fabrication of chitosan biopolymer microfibre is inexpensive and versatile and could lend itself to the production of high performance biocomposite structures.

  4. LIGNINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignins are complex and irregular polymers occurring in the cell walls of vascular plants. An understanding of their nature is evolving as a result of detailed structural investigations aided by recent improvements in analytical methodology and the availability of lignin-biosynthetic-pathway mutants...

  5. Continuous on-line measurement of lignin concentration in wood pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, L.A.; Roman, G.W.

    1994-06-01

    We are working toward the development of an instrument for the continuous, on-line measurement of the lignin concentration in wood pulp. The instrument is based on laser induced fluorescence of the wood pulp and is to be used as a primary sensor for both feedback control of the pulping and feedforward control of bleaching. We report here the results of a series of laboratory tests that characterized the fluorescence properties of wood pulp and demonstrated a correlation between various fluorescence functions and the Kappa number of the pulps as determined by TAPPI Procedure T236.

  6. SNP markers associated with lignin concentration in divergent switchgrass populations selected for digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharification efficiency of switchgrass biomass is highly correlated with lignin concentration and lignin structure. Divergent selection for in vitro dry matter digestibility in switchgrass was initiated in 1974 by Kenneth P. Vogel, USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE, resulting in seven divergent populations ...

  7. Potentiometric chemical sensors from lignin-poly(propylene oxide) copolymers doped by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Costa, Luis C; Graça, M Pedro F; Fernandes, António J S; Correia, M Rosario P; Gomes, M Teresa S R; Oliveira, J A B P

    2013-01-21

    Hardwood and softwood lignins obtained from industrial sulphite and kraft and laboratory oxygen-organosolv pulping processes were employed in co-polymerization with tolylene 2,4-diisocyanate terminated poly(propylene glycol). The obtained lignin-based polyurethanes were doped with 0.72 w/w% of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the aim of increasing their electrical conductivity to the levels suitable for sensor applications. Effects of the polymer doping with MWCNTs were assessed using electrical impedance (EIS) and UV-Resonance Raman (UV-RR) spectroscopy. Potentiometric sensors were prepared by drop casting of liquid polymer on the surface of carbon glass or platinum electrodes. Lignin-based sensors displayed a very low or no sensitivity to all alkali, alkali-earth and transition metal cations ions except Cr(VI) at pH 2. Response to Cr(VI) values of 39, 50 and 53 mV pX(-1) for the sensors based on kraft, organosolv and lignosulphonate lignins, respectively, were observed. Redox sensitivity values close to the theoretical values of 20 and 21 mV pX(-1) for organosolv and lignosulphonate based sensors respectively were detected in the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) solutions while a very low response was observed in the solutions containing Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-). Conducting composite lignin-based polyurethanes doped with MWCNTs were suggested as being promising materials for Cr(VI)-sensitive potentiometric sensors. PMID:23162814

  8. Laser Induced Fluorescence For Measurement Of Lignin Concentrations In Pulping Liquors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.; Biasca, K. L.; Attala, R.

    1988-11-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of pulping liquors was investigated for use in the pulp and paper industry for process measurement and control applications. Liquors from both mill and laboratory cooks were studied. A Nd-YAG pumped dye laser was used to generate the excitation wavelength of 280 nm; measurements were also performed using a commercially available fluorometer. Measurements on mill pulping liquors gave strong signals and showed changes in the fluorescence intensity during the cook. Absorption spectra of diluted mill liquor samples showed large changes during the cook. Samples from well controlled and characterized laboratory cooks showed fluorescence to be linear with concentration over two decades with an upper limit of approximately 1000 ppm dissolved lignin. At the end of these cooks a possible chemical change was indicated by an increase in the observed fluorescence intensity. Results indicate that lignin concentrations in pulping liquors can be accurately determined with fluorescence in the linear optical region over a greater dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. Laser induced fluorescence may also provide an indication of chemical changes occurring in the lignin structure during a cook.

  9. Lignin Peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A: Enzyme Concentration Using Ultrafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Leda M. F.; Bon, Elba P. S.; Nobrega, Ronaldo

    It is well known that lignin degradation is a key step in the natural process of biomass decay whereby oxidative enzymes such as laccases and high redox potential ligninolytic peroxidases and oxidases play a central role. More recently, the importance of these enzymes has increased because of their prospective industrial use for the degradation of the biomass lignin to increase the accessibility of the cellulose and hemicellulose moieties to be used as renewable material for the production of fuels and chemicals. These biocatalysts also present potential application on environmental biocatalysis for the degradation of xenobiotics and recalcitrant pollutants. However, the cost for these enzymes production, separation, and concentration must be low to permit its industrial use. This work studied the concentration of lignin peroxidase (LiP), produced by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, by ultrafiltration, in a laboratory-stirred cell, loaded with polysulfone (PS) or cellulose acetate (CA) membranes with molecular weight cutoffs (MWCO) of 10, 20, and 50 KDa. Experiments were carried out at 25 °C and pH 7.0 in accordance to the enzyme stability profile. The best process conditions and enzyme yield were obtained using a PS membrane with 10 KDa MWCO, whereby it was observed a tenfold LiP activity increase, reaching 1,000 U/L and 90% enzyme activity upholding.

  10. Through Lignin Biodegradation to Lignin-based Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Yan

    The consequences of strong noncovalent intermolecular interactions between oligomeric and/or polymeric lignin components are encountered during enzyme-catalyzed lignin degradation and in the properties of lignin-based plastics. A new chapter in the 30-year quest for functional lignin-depolymerizing enzymes has been opened. The lignin-degrading capacity of the flavin-dependent monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase acting as a putative lignin depolymerase, has been characterized using a water-soluble native softwood lignin substrate under mildly acidic aqueous conditions. When macromolecular lignins undergo lignin-depolymerase catalyzed degradation, the cleaved components tend to associate with one another, or with nearby associated lignin complexes, through processes mediated by the enzyme acting in a non-catalytic capacity. As a result, the radius of gyration (Rg) falls rapidly to approximately constant values, while the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of the substrate rises more slowly to an extent dependent on enzyme concentration. Xylanase, when employed in an auxiliary capacity, is able to facilitate dissociation of the foregoing complexes through its interactions with the lignin depolymerase. The flavin-dependent lignin depolymerase must be reduced before reaction with oxygen can occur to form the hydroperoxy intermediate that hydroxylates the lignin substrate prior to cleavage. In the absence of the cofactor, NADH, the necessary reducing power can be provided (albeit more slowly) by the lignin substrate itself. Under such conditions, a simultaneous decrease in R g and Mw is initially observed during the enzymatic process through which the lignin is cleaved. The partially degraded product-lignins arising from lignin depolymerase activity can be readily converted into polymeric materials with mechanical properties that supersede those of polystyrene. Methylation and blending of ball-milled softwood lignins with miscible low-Tg polymers, or simple low

  11. Sensoring hydrogen gas concentration using electrolyte made of proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Koyanaka, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas promises to be a major clean fuel in the near future. Thus, sensors that can measure the concentrations of hydrogen gas over a wide dynamic range (e.g., 1 99.9%) are in demand for the production, storage, and utilization of hydrogen gas. However, it is difficult to directly measure hydrogen gas concentrations greater than 10% using conventional sensor [1 11]. We report a simple sensor using an electrolyte made of proton conductive manganese dioxide that enables in situmeasurements of hydrogen gas concentration over a wide range of 0.1 99.9% at room temperature.

  12. Application of a two-stream radiative transfer model for leaf lignin and cellulose concentrations from spectral reflectance measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Grove, Cindy I.

    1993-01-01

    We used the Kubelka-Munk theory of diffuse spectral reflectance in layers to analyze influences of multiple chemical components in leaves. As opposed to empirical approaches to estimation of plant chemistry, the full spectral resolution of laboratory reflectance data was retained in an attempt to estimate lignin or other constituent concentrations from spectral band positions. A leaf water reflectance spectrum was derived from theoretical mixing rules, reflectance observations, and calculations from theory of intrinsic k- and s-functions. Residual reflectance bands were then isolated from spectra of fresh green leaves. These proved hard to interpret for composition in terms of simple two component mixtures such as lignin and cellulose. We next investigated spectral and dilution influences of other possible components (starch, protein). These components, among others, added to cellulose in hypothetical mixtures, produce band displacements similar to lignin, but will disguise by dilution the actual abundance of lignin present in a multicomponent system. This renders interpretation of band positions problematical. Knowledge of end-members and their spectra, and a more elaborate mixture analysis procedure may be called for. Good observational atmospheric and instrumental conditions and knowledge thereof are required for retrieval of expected subtle reflectance variations present in spectra of green vegetation.

  13. A New Multifunctional Sensor for Measuring Concentrations of Ternary Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guo; Shida, Katsunori

    This paper presents a multifunctional sensor with novel structure, which is capable of directly sensing temperature and two physical parameters of solutions, namely ultrasonic velocity and conductivity. By combined measurement of these three measurable parameters, the concentrations of various components in a ternary solution can be simultaneously determined. The structure and operation principle of the sensor are described, and a regression algorithm based on natural cubic spline interpolation and the least square method is adopted to estimate the concentrations. The performances of the proposed sensor are experimentally tested by the use of ternary aqueous solution of sodium chloride and sucrose, which is widely involved in food and beverage industries. This sensor could prove valuable as a process control sensor in industry fields.

  14. Nano-fiber diameters as liquid concentration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyad, Radhi M.; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    2013-05-01

    Manufacturing technologies of nano-fiber sensors offer a number of approved properties of optical fiber sensors utilized in various sensory applications. The nano-fiber sensor is utilized to sense the difference in the concentration of D-glucose in double-distilled deionized water and to measure the refractive index (RI) of a sugar solution. Our proposed method exhibited satisfactory capability based on bimolecular interactions in the biological system. The response of the nano-fiber sensors indicates a different kind of interaction among various groups of AAs. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and the structure making or breaking ability of solutes in the given solution. This study utilized spectra photonics to measure the transmission of light through different concentrations of sugar solution, employing cell cumber and nano-optical fibers as sensors.

  15. Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Compensation for Variations in Ambient Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, research toward painless glucose sensing continues. Oxygen sensitive phosphors with glucose oxidase (GOx) can be used to determine glucose levels indirectly by monitoring oxygen consumption. This is an attractive combination because of its speed and specificity. Packaging these molecules together in “smart materials” for implantation will enable non-invasive glucose monitoring. As glucose levels increase, oxygen levels decrease; consequently, the luminescence intensity and lifetime of the phosphor increase. Although the response of the sensor is dependent on glucose concentration, the ambient oxygen concentration also plays a key role. This could lead to inaccurate glucose readings and increase the risk of hyper- or hypoglycemia. To mitigate this risk, the dependence of hydrogel glucose sensor response on oxygen levels was investigated and compensation methods explored. Sensors were calibrated at different oxygen concentrations using a single generic logistic equation, such that trends in oxygen-dependence were determined as varying parameters in the equation. Each parameter was found to be a function of oxygen concentration, such that the correct glucose calibration equation can be calculated if the oxygen level is known. Accuracy of compensation will be determined by developing an overall calibration, using both glucose and oxygen sensors in parallel, correcting for oxygen fluctuations in real time by intentionally varying oxygen, and calculating the error in actual and predicted glucose levels. While this method was developed for compensation of enzymatic glucose sensors, in principle it can also be implemented with other kinds of sensors utilizing oxidases. PMID:26257458

  16. Lignin degradation during plant litter photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; King, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant compound, after cellulose, synthesized by plants. Numerous studies have demonstrated that initial lignin concentration is negatively correlated with litter decomposition rate under both laboratory and field conditions. Thus lignin is commonly considered to be a "recalcitrant" compound during litter decomposition. However, lignin can also serve as a radiation-absorbing compound during photodegradation, the process through which solar radiation breaks down organic matter. Here, we synthesize recent studies concerning lignin degradation during litter photodegradation and report results from our study on how photodegradation changes lignin chemistry at a molecular scale. Recent field studies have found that litter with high initial lignin concentration does not necessarily exhibit high mass loss during photodegradation. A meta-analysis (King et al. 2012) even found a weak negative correlation between initial lignin concentration and photodegradation rate. Contradicting results have been reported with regard to the change in lignin concentration during photodegradation. Some studies have found significant loss of lignin during photodegradation, while others have not. In most studies, loss of lignin only accounts for a small proportion of the overall mass loss. Using NMR spectroscopy, we found significant loss of lignin structural units containing beta-aryl ether linkages during photodegradation of a common grass litter, Bromus diandrus, even though conventional forage fiber analysis did not reveal changes in lignin concentration. Both our NMR and fiber analyses supported the idea that photodegradation induced loss of hemicellulose, which was mainly responsible for the litter mass loss during photodegradation. Our results suggest that photodegradation induces degradation, but not necessarily complete breakdown, of lignin structures and consequently exposes hemicellulose and cellulose to microbial decomposition. We conclude that lignin

  17. Low cost electrochemical sensor module for measurement of gas concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Grzegorz; Strzelczyk, Anna; Koscinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a low cost electrochemical sensor module for gas concentration measurement. A module is universal and can be used for many types of electrochemical gas sensors. Device is based on AVR ATmega8 microcontroller. As signal processing circuit a specialized integrated circuit LMP91000 is used. The proposed equipment will be used as a component of electronic nose system employed for classifying and distinguishing different levels of air contamination.

  18. An integrated optical sensor for measuring glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Hering, P.; Scully, M. O.

    1992-01-01

    We used an optical sensor combined with a Mach-Zehnder interferometric waveguide and optical fibers to measure slight changes of aqueous sugar concentrations. The merits of this sensor are simplicity, reliability, high sensitivity and continuous monitoring. The technique is based on the fact that the refractive index of sugar solution changes with the concentration of sugar. In the experiment, one arm of the interferometer is clad with glue and is thus isolated from the sugar solution. The other one is exposed to the sugar solution. A single mode fiber is directly glued onto the interferometric waveguide, to guide the light into the interferometer. If the concentration of sugar covering the waveguide changes, the phase of propagating light in the exposed arm will be changed, while the phase in the other arm is fixed. Hence the output intensity from the interferometer is directly related to the concentration of the sugar solution. The result of this experiment yields the relation between the sugar concentration and output signal. From 0% to 1% concentration of sugar solution, there is only a 1.4×10-3 refractive index difference. Two sets of experimental data have been obtained, showing a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the output signal from our sensor. This sensor could be used for continuous monitoring of blood sugar in the human body.

  19. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  20. Tracking heat flux sensors for concentrating solar applications

    DOEpatents

    Andraka, Charles E; Diver, Jr., Richard B

    2013-06-11

    Innovative tracking heat flux sensors located at or near the solar collector's focus for centering the concentrated image on a receiver assembly. With flux sensors mounted near a receiver's aperture, the flux gradient near the focus of a dish or trough collector can be used to precisely position the focused solar flux on the receiver. The heat flux sensors comprise two closely-coupled thermocouple junctions with opposing electrical polarity that are separated by a thermal resistor. This arrangement creates an electrical signal proportional to heat flux intensity, and largely independent of temperature. The sensors are thermally grounded to allow a temperature difference to develop across the thermal resistor, and are cooled by a heat sink to maintain an acceptable operating temperature.

  1. Does elevated N make lignin more recalcitrant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, M. N.; Rinkes, Z. L.; Grandy, S.; Wickings, K.; Bertrand, I.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in nitrogen (N) availability are often found to reduce decomposition rates of lignin-rich plant litter. However, the biological and chemical mechanisms that cause this inhibitory effect are still unclear. Our goal was to determine why increased N availability inhibits lignin decomposition. We tested two competing hypotheses: 1) decomposers degrade lignin to obtain protected N compounds and stop producing lignin-degrading enzymes if mineral N is available; or 2) chemical reactions between lignin and mineral N make lignin more recalcitrant, thereby limiting the ability of decomposers to break it down. To test these hypotheses, we followed changes in carbon (C) mineralization, microbial biomass and enzyme activities, litter chemistry, and lignin monomer concentrations over a 478-day laboratory incubation of three genotypes of maize stem internodes varying in litter quality. They were factorially combined with either an acidic or neutral pH sandy soil, with and without added N. Adding N reduced C mineralization, microbial biomass, and lignin-degrading enzyme activities in all treatments. Furthermore, our data on litter chemistry and lignin monomers indicate that N addition did not significantly alter the quantity or quality of lignin in any treatment. These results suggest that abiotic interactions between N and lignin compounds did not alter the ability of decomposers to breakdown lignin. Thus, we conclude that mineral N alters microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics, but not lignin chemistry during maize decomposition.

  2. Preparation and Analysis of Biomass Lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L

    2009-01-01

    Lignin, comprised primarily of three randomly polymerized phenylpropenyl monomers, is, arguably, the second most common organic molecule on earth. In current biorefinery applications, lignin is burned, usually in concentrated pulping or hydrolysis liquor, as a source of process steam and both internal and exported electricity. The aromatic content of lignin makes it a potentially attractive feedstock for highly-valued aromatic chemicals, polymers, and carbon products (graphite, activated carbon, and carbon fiber). Revenue from production of lignin-based chemicals could play a major role in biorefinery profitability if cost-effective methods for lignin separation and purification can be developed. This article presents descriptions of methods for assessing and purifying biorefinery lignins so that they can be evaluated for use as feedstocks for production of chemical products. Areas covered are: 1) initial evaluations of as-received lignin samples (visual, microscopic, separable organics), 2) analysis of common contaminants (bulk and filterable ash and particulate contaminants in liquid and dry lignin samples), 3) preparation of lignins for experimental use as chemical feedstocks (prefiltration, filtration using bench-scale chemical apparatus and larger scale bag filters, one-step lignin precipitation, two-step carbohydrate and lignin precipitation, desalting of dry powdered or precipitated lignin, and lyophilization). These methods have been used successfully at bench-scale to produce the 1 50 kg amounts of wood and grass lignins typically required for bench-scale assessment as chemical feedstocks

  3. Preparation and Analysis of Biomass Lignins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    Lignin, comprised primarily of three randomly polymerized phenylpropenyl monomers, is, arguably, the second most common organic molecule on earth. In current biorefinery applications, lignin is burned, usually in concentrated pulping or hydrolysis liquor, as a source of process steam and both internal and exported electricity. The aromatic content of lignin makes it a potentially attractive feedstock for high-value aromatic chemicals, polymers, and carbon products (graphite, activated carbon, and carbon fiber). Revenue from production of lignin-based chemicals could play a major role in biorefinery profitability if cost-effective methods for lignin separation and purification can be developed. This chapter presents descriptions of methods for assessing and purifying biorefinery lignins so that they can be evaluated for use as feedstock for production of chemical products. Areas covered are: (1) initial evaluations of as-received lignin samples (visual, microscopic, separable organics); (2) analysis of common contaminants (bulk and filterable ash and particulate contaminants in liquid and dry lignin samples); (3) preparation of lignins for experimental use as chemical feedstock (prefiltration, filtration using bench-scale chemical apparatus and larger scale bag filters, one-step lignin precipitation, two-step carbohydrate and lignin precipitation, desalting of dry powdered or precipitated lignin, and lyophilization). These methods have been used successfully at the bench scale to produce the 1-50 kg amounts of wood and grass lignins typically required for bench-scale assessment as chemical feedstocks.

  4. Tuning magnetic nanostructures and flux concentrators for magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaolu; Liu, Yen-Fu; Ewing, Dan; Ruder, Carmen K.; De Rego, Paul J.; Edelstein, A. S.; Liou, Sy-Hwang

    2015-09-01

    The methods for the optimization of the magnetoresistive (MR) sensors are to reduce sources of noises, to increase the signal, and to understand the involved fundamental limitations. The high-performance MR sensors result from important magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) properties, such as tunneling magnetoresistance ratio (TMR), coercivity (Hc), exchange coupling field (He), domain structures, and noise properties as well as the external magnetic flux concentrators. All these parameters are sensitively controlled by the magnetic nanostructures, which can be tuned by varying junction free layer nanostructures, geometry, and magnetic annealing process etc. In this paper, we discuss some of efforts that an optimized magnetic sensor with a sensitivity as high as 5,146 %/mT. This sensitivity is currently the highest among all MR-type sensors that have been reported. The estimated noise of our magnetoresistive sensor is 47 pT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. This magnetoresistance sensor dissipates only 100 μW of power while operating under an applied voltage of 1 V at room temperature.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide sensing and cytotoxicity activity of Acacia lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aadil, Keshaw Ram; Barapatre, Anand; Meena, Avtar Singh; Jha, Harit

    2016-01-01

    The study is aimed at detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using Acacia lignin mediated silver nanoparticles (AGNPs). The synthesis of AGNPs was achieved at conditions optimized as, 3 ml of 0.02% lignin and 1mM silver nitrate incubated for 30 min at 80°C and pH 9. Initial screening of AGNPs was performed by measuring the surface plasmon resonance peak at 410-430 nm using UV-vis spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis confirmed the spherical shaped face centered cubic structure and 10-50 nm size of AGNPs. The infrared spectroscopy study further revealed that the active functional groups present in lignin were responsible for the reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) to metallic silver (Ag(0)). Lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles showed good sensitivity and a linear response over wide concentrations of H2O2 (10(-1) to 10(-6)M). Further, the in vitrocytotoxicity activity of the lignin mediated AGNPs (5-500 μg/ml) demonstrated toxicity effects in MCF-7 and A375 cell lines. Thus, lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles based optical sensor for H2O2 could be potentially applied in the determination of reactive oxygen species and toxic chemicals which further expands the importance of lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles. PMID:26434518

  6. Gas sensor characterization at low concentrations of natural oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambemana, H.; Siadat, M.; Lumbreras, M.

    2009-05-01

    Inhalation of essential oils can be used in aromatherapy due to their activating or relaxing effects. The study of these effects requires behavioral measurements on living subjects, by varying the nature and also the quantity of the volatile substances to be present in the atmosphere. So, to permit the evaluation of therapeutic effects of a variety of natural oils, we propose to develop an automatic diffusion/detection system capable to create an ambient air with low stabilized concentration of chosen oil. In this work, we discuss the performance of an array of eight gas sensors to discriminate low and constant concentrations of a chosen natural oil.

  7. Fabricated nano-fiber diameter as liquid concentration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyad, Radhi M.; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    Nanofiber is characterized by thin, long, and very soft silica. Taper fibers are made using an easy and low cost chemical method. Etching is conducted with a HF solution to remove cladding and then a low molarity HF solution to reduce the fiber core diameter. One approach to on-line monitoring of the etching process uses spectrophotometer with a white light source. In the aforementioned technique, this method aims to determine the diameter of the reduced core and show the evolution of the two different processes from the nanofiber regime to the fixed regime in which the mode was remote from the surrounding evanescent field, intensity can propagate outside the segment fiber when the core diameter is less than 500 nm. Manufacturing technologies of nano-fiber sensors offer a number of approved properties of optical fiber sensors utilized in various sensory applications. The nano-fiber sensor is utilized to sense the difference in the concentration of D-glucose in double-distilled deionized water and to measure the refractive index (RI) of a sugar solution. Our proposed method exhibited satisfactory capability based on bimolecular interactions in the biological system. The response of the nano-fiber sensors indicates a different kind of interaction among various groups of AAs. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and the structure making or breaking ability of solutes in the given solution. This study utilized spectra photonics to measure the transmission of light through different concentrations of sugar solution, employing cell cumber and nano-optical fibers as sensors.

  8. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  9. Concentric Coplanar Capacitive Sensor System with Quantitative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowler, Nicola (Inventor); Chen, Tianming (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A concentric coplanar capacitive sensor includes a charged central disc forming a first electrode, an outer annular ring coplanar with and outer to the charged central disc, the outer annular ring forming a second electrode, and a gap between the charged central disc and the outer annular ring. The first electrode and the second electrode may be attached to an insulative film. A method provides for determining transcapacitance between the first electrode and the second electrode and using the transcapacitance in a model that accounts for a dielectric test piece to determine inversely the properties of the dielectric test piece.

  10. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  11. Lignin Formation in Wheat Coleoptile Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    Four growth-influencing compounds—hydroxyproline, 2,2′-dipyridyl, 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, and indoleacetic acid—were used to examine the relationship between lignin formation and growth of wheat coleoptile sections. Hydroxyproline and 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, at low concentrations, inhibited growth and increased lignin content. Dipyridyl, which promoted coleoptile elongation, decreased lignin content. Indoleacetic acid caused a 300% increase in growth at 0.1 mm but resulted in lignin content no different from controls with no auxin. Chemical and anatomical evidence is given which indicates that lignin is present in the epidermal cell walls of the wheat coleoptile. It is thus possible that bonding between lignin and hemicellulose may have some influence on coleoptile growth. Images PMID:16657843

  12. Micro-LiDAR velocity, temperature, density, concentration sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M. (Inventor); Dorrington, Adrian A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A light scatter sensor includes a sensor body in which are positioned a plurality of optical fibers. The sensor body includes a surface, in one end of each of the optical fibers terminates at the surface of the sensor body. One of the optical fibers is an illumination fiber for emitting light. A plurality of second optical fibers are collection fibers for collecting scattered light signals. A light sensor processor is connected to the collection fibers to detect the scattered light signals.

  13. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  14. Evaluation of Electrical and Optical Plethysmography Sensors for Noninvasive Monitoring of Hemoglobin Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Justin P.; Hickey, Michelle; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A.

    2012-01-01

    Completely noninvasive monitoring of hemoglobin concentration has not yet been fully realized in the clinical setting. This study investigates the viability of measuring hemoglobin concentration noninvasively by evaluating the performance of two types of sensor using a tissue phantom perfused with a blood substitute. An electrical sensor designed to measure blood volume changes during the cardiac cycle was used together with an infrared optical sensor for detection of erythrocyte-bound hemoglobin. Both sensors demonstrated sensitivity to changes in pulse volume (plethysmography). The electrical sensor produced a signal referred to as capacitance plethysmograph (CPG) a quantity which was invariant to the concentration of an infrared absorbing dye present in the blood substitute. The optical sensor signal (photoplethysmograph) increased in amplitude with increasing absorber concentration. The ratio PPG:CPG is invariant to pulse pressure. This quantity is discussed as a possible index of in vivo hemoglobin concentration. PMID:22438739

  15. LIGNIN ACYLATION IN GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acylation of lignin during growth and development is a commonly found among some plant species. Grasses form unique acylated lignins involving p-coumarate (pCA). In corn rind tissue, it is exclusively attached to the gamma-carbon of lignin monomers, with a strong preference (over 90%) for attachment...

  16. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOEpatents

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  17. Optoelectronic sensor device for monitoring ethanol concentration in winemaking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Márquez, F.; Vázquez, J.; Úbeda, J.; Rodríguez-Rey, J.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The supervision of key variables such as sugar, alcohol, released CO2 and microbiological evolution in fermenting grape must is of great importance in the winemaking industry. However, the fermentation kinetics is assessed by monitoring the evolution of the density as it varies during a fermentation, since density is an indicator of the total amount of sugars, ethanol and glycerol. Even so, supervising the fermentation process is an awkward and non-comprehensive task, especially in wine cellars where production rates are massive, and enologists usually measure the density of the extracted samples from each fermentation tank manually twice a day. This work aims at the design of a fast, low-cost, portable and reliable optoelectronic sensor for measuring ethanol concentration in fermenting grape must samples. Different sets of model solutions, which contain ethanol, fructose, glucose, glycerol dissolved in water and emulate the grape must composition at different stages of the fermentation, were prepared both for calibration and validation. The absorption characteristics of these model solutions were analyzed by a commercial spectrophotometer in the NIR region, in order to identify key wavelengths from which valuable information regarding the sample composition can be extracted. Finally, a customized optoelectronic prototype based on absorbance measurements at two wavelengths belonging to the NIR region was designed, fabricated and successfully tested. The system, whose optoelectronics is reduced after a thorough analysis to only two LED lamps and their corresponding paired photodiodes operating at 1.2 and 1.3 μm respectively, calculates the ethanol content by a multiple linear regression.

  18. Comparison of UV-VIS and FDOM sensors for in situ monitoring of stream DOC concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.-J.; Yoo, G.-Y.; Jeong, Y.; Kim, K.-U.; Park, J.-H.; Oh, N.-H.

    2015-05-01

    Optical measurements using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrophotometric sensors and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) sensors have recently been used as proxies of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams and rivers at a high temporal resolution. Despite the merits of the sensors, temperature changes and particulate matter in water can interfere with the sensor readings, over- or underestimating DOC concentrations. However, little efforts have been made to compare responses of the two types of the sensors to critical interferences such as temperature and turbidity. The performance of a UV-VIS sensor and an FDOM sensor was compared in both laboratory experiments and in situ monitoring in a forest stream in Korea during three storm events. Although the UV-VIS sensor did not require temperature correction in laboratory experiments using the forest stream water, the deviations of its values from the DOC concentrations measured with a TOC analyzer increased linearly as turbidity increased. In contrast, the FDOM sensor outputs decreased significantly as temperature or turbidity increased, requiring temperature and turbidity correction for in situ monitoring of DOC concentrations. The results suggest that temperature correction is relatively straightforward but turbidity correction may not be simple because the attenuation of light by particles can significantly reduce the sensitivity of the sensors in highly turbid waters. Shifts in composition of fluorophores also need to be carefully tracked using periodically collected samples since light absorbance and fluorescence can vary as the concentrations of dominant fluorophores change.

  19. Comparison of in-situ optical sensors in monitoring stream DOC concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, G.; Jeong, Y.; Park, J.; Oh, N.

    2013-12-01

    Using sensors to estimate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of streams and rivers is of great interest because they can be used for high-resolution monitoring of DOC concentrations. Optical sensors such as ultra-violet/visible (UV/Vis) spectrophotometric sensors and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) sensors have been frequently used for this purpose. However, there is little information on how the two types of sensors perform under a range of temperature and turbidities. We conducted both laboratory experiments and in-situ monitoring with UV/Vis and FDOM sensors during the three storm events in the fall of 2012 and the spring of 2013 in a small forested watershed in Korea in order to compare and contrast their performance. Laboratory experiments using extracted DOC from the forest soils and the reference materials including the Suwannee River (SR) natural organic matter, SR fulvic acid, and SR humic acid showed that both sensors can be successfully used as a proxy for stream DOC concentrations in clear water. However, both UV/Vis and FDOM signals were significantly attenuated as turbidity increased, and FDOM signals decreased slightly when temperature increased, while temperature effect on the UV/Vis sensor was relatively small. In-situ monitoring of the UV/Vis and FDOM sensors during storms also demonstrated that both types of sensors could be used for a proxy for DOC concentrations after correction for turbidity and temperature. However, the correlation between the sensor outputs and measured DOC concentrations suggests that the FDOM sensor could be more reliable than the UV sensor for forested streams where terrestrial DOC includes a variety of fluorophores.

  20. Measurement of Concentration of Refrigerant in Refrigeration Oil by Capacitance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Mitsuhiro; Yanagisawa, Yadashi; Ogi, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Junya

    In general, refrigeration oil of good solubility with refrigerant is used in refrigeration compressors, and development of a concentration sensor of refrigerant dissolved in the oil is needed. In this study, oil and refrigerant concentrations are measured with newly developed capacitance sensor which measure the change of dielectric constant with the concentration. It is found that in most cases of oil-refrigerant combinations the dielectric constant of refrigerant is two to three times as large as that of refrigeration oil and the dielectric constant of mixtures increases linearly with the concentration of refrigerant. When measuring the refrigerant concentration of R410A, t he measurement of the concentration by the dielectric constant is also feasible as long as the composition of each refrigerant component dissolved in the oil does not change from the nominal composition. Prototypes of small sensors, such as a cylindrical type and a needle type, are developed and the performance of the needle sensor with shield is preferable. A correlation for a given oil-refrigerant mixture obtained by a large capacitance sensor is applicable for the small sensors after correcting for stray capacitance. Flow of fluid in the sensors does not affect the capacitance measured by the sensors, while bubbles due to foaming do affect the measurement.

  1. Application of a two-stream radiative transfer model for leaf lignin and cellulose concentrations from spectral reflectance measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Grove, Cindy I.

    1993-01-01

    Lignin and nitrogen contents of leaves constitute the primary rate-limiting parameters for the decomposition of forest litter, and are determinants of nutrient- and carbon-cyclic rates in forest ecosystems (Melillo et al., 1982). Wessman et al. (1988a) developed empirical multivariate relationships between forest canopy lignin amount and the (first-difference) AIS spectral response in three bands spread over the wavelength interval 1256-1555 nm. Wessman et al. (1988b) and McLellan et al. (1991) developed similar regression relationships from laboratory reflectance measurements on dried samples prepared in a standard fashion. They used four to six infrared bands for analysis of nitrogen, lignin and cellulose content of foliage in forest and prairie species. In the present article (Parts 1 and 2) the feasibility of compositional determinations is explored using positions of composite absorption bands that originate from mixtures of lignin, cellulose, and possibly other chemical constituents in the spectral reflectance of green leaves. To carry out this program, we employ full-spectral-resolution single-leaf diffuse reflectance measurements made with a laboratory spectrometer and integrating sphere. The leaf and other chemical reflectance data compiled by Elvidge (1990) have also been utilized extensively.

  2. Lignin Degradation in a Coastal Groundwater Aquifer: a Useful Tracer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howley, E. M.; Jex, C.; Andersen, M. S.; Baker, A.; Zainuddin, N. S.; Meredith, K.; Wells, E.; McDonald, J.; Khan, S.; Blyth, A. J.; Spencer, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin as a biomarker in soils, peat, lakes and intertidal and marine sediment cores has been widely researched in the last four decades. The biogeochemical processes controlling their distribution and composition include fractionation due to phase changes, mineral binding, and abiotic and biotic decay. However, there appears to be no studies in the literature describing the concentration and composition of lignin in groundwater aquifers, despite lignin tracing having the potential to differentiate between types of vegetation and recharge source. In the latter case aquifers could potentially be a source of old, degradation resistant lignin. In this study, we characterise the lignin composition in groundwater samples from a coastal sand aquifer, in SE Australia. We compare these data with lignin composition of fresh vegetation samples from the study site, and with lignin data from other environments in the literature. Groundwater samples were also analysed for Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) and inorganic chemistry (major ions, Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) and redox sensitive species) to investigate lignin fractionation processes. To achieve this, the groundwater lignin composition was compared to the total DOC and DIC in the samples and the prevailing redox reactions. The lignin composition in groundwater was found to be unrelated to the surrounding surface vegetation, indicating significant alteration by biogeochemical processes along its flow paths. We identify potential lignin degradation zones, via determination of total OC consumed through redox reactions and microbial activity. In conclusion, this study, by closely examining the correlations of lignin phenols in groundwater with lignin in surface waters, as well as biogeochemical processes in the aquifer is shedding a new light on the ability of lignin as a biomarker in these subsurface systems. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to assess the usefulness of lignin as a tracer in groundwater.

  3. Classification and concentration estimation of explosive precursors using nanowires sensor array and decision tree learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Junghwan; Li, Xiaopeng; Gu, Zhiyong; Kurup, Pradeep

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to classify and estimate concentrations of explosive precursors using a nanowire sensor array and decision tree learning algorithm. The nanowire sensor array consists of tin oxide sensors with four different additives, platinum (Pt), copper (Cu), indium (In), and nickel (Ni). The nanowire sensor array was tested using the vapors from four explosives precursors, acetone, nitrobenzene, nitrotoluene, and octane with 10 different concentration levels each. A pattern recognition technique based on decision tree learning was applied to classify the explosive precursors and estimate their concentration. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used for classification. The CART was also utilized for the purpose of structure identification in Sugeno fuzzy inference system (FIS) for estimating the concentration of the precursors. Two CARTs were trained and their testing results were investigated.

  4. The effect of grain size and surface area on organic matter, lignin and carbohydrate concentration, and molecular compositions in Peru Margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Tsamakis, E.; Keil, R.G.; Eglinton, T.I.; Montlucon, D.B.; Hedges, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    A C-rich sediment sample from the Peru Margin was sorted into nine hydrodynamically-determined grain size fractions to explore the effect of grain size distribution and sediment surface area on organic matter content and composition. The neutral monomeric carbohydrate composition, lignin oxidation product yields, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen contents were determined independently for each size fraction, in addition to sediment surface area and abundance of biogenic opal. The percent organic carbon and percent total nitrogen were strongly related to surface area in these sediments. In turn, the distribution of surface area closely followed mass distribution among the textural size classes, suggesting hydrodynamic controls on grain size also control organic carbon content. Nevertheless, organic compositional distinctions were observed between textural size classes. Total neutral carbohydrate yields in the Peru Margin sediments were found to closely parallel trends in total organic carbon, increasing in abundance among grain size fractions in proportion to sediment surface area. Coincident with the increases in absolute abundance, rhamnose and mannose increased as a fraction of the total carbohydrate yield in concert with surface area, indicating these monomers were preferentially represented in carbohydrates associated with surfaces. Lignin oxidation product yields varied with surface area when normalized to organic carbon, suggesting that the terrestrially-derived component may be diluted by sorption of marine derived material. Lignin-based parameters suggest a separate source for terrestrially derived material associated with sand-size material as opposed to that associated with silts and clays. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. The effect of grain size and surface area on organic matter, lignin and carbohydrate concentration, and molecular compositions in Peru Margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Tsamakis, Elizabeth; Keil, Richard G.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Hedges, John I.

    1997-03-01

    A C-rich sediment sample from the Peru Margin was sorted into nine hydrodynamically-determined grain size fractions to explore the effect of grain size distribution and sediment surface area on organic matter content and composition. The neutral monomeric carbohydrate composition, lignin oxidation product yields, total organic carbon, and total nitrogen contents were determined independently for each size fraction, in addition to sediment surface area and abundance of biogenic opal. The percent organic carbon and percent total nitrogen were strongly related to surface area in these sediments. In turn, the distribution of surface area closely followed mass distribution among the textural size classes, suggesting hydrodynamic controls on grain size also control organic carbon content. Nevertheless, organic compositional distinctions were observed between textural size classes. Total neutral carbohydrate yields in the Peru Margin sediments were found to closely parallel trends in total organic carbon, increasing in abundance among grain size fractions in proportion to sediment surface area. Coincident with the increases in absolute abundance, rhamnose and mannose increased as a fraction of the total carbohydrate yield in concert with surface area, indicating these monomers were preferentially represented in carbohydrates associated with surfaces. Lignin oxidation product yields varied with surface area when normalized to organic carbon, suggesting that the terrestrially-derived component may be diluted by sorption of marine derived material. Lignin-based parameters suggest a separate source for terrestrially derived material associated with sand-size material as opposed to that associated with silts and clays.

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of lignin-siloxane hybrid functional polymers.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Fischer, Roman; Eichinger, Reinhard; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2012-02-01

    This study combines the properties of siloxanes and lignin polymers to produce hybrid functional polymers that can be used as adhesives, coating materials, and/or multifunctionalized thin-coating films. Lignin-silica hybrid copolymers were synthesized by using a sol-gel process. Laccases from Trametes hirsuta were used to oxidize lignosulphonates to enhance their reactivity towards siloxanes and then were incorporated into siloxane precursors undergoing a sol-gel process. In vitro copolymerization studies using pure lignin monomers with aminosilanes or ethoxytrimethylsilane and analysis by ²⁹Si NMR spectroscopy revealed hybrid products. Except for kraft lignin, an increase in lignin concentration positively affected the tensile strength in all samples. Similarly, the viscosity generally increased in all samples with increasing lignin concentration and also affected the curing time. PMID:21751391

  7. Lignin Fast Pyrolysis: Results from an International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Meier, Dietrich; de Wild, Paul

    2010-05-01

    An international study of fast pyrolysis of lignin was undertaken. Fourteen laboratories in eight different countries contributed. Two lignin samples were distributed to the laboratories for analysis and bench-scale process testing in fast pyrolysis. Analyses included proximate and ultimate analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and analytical pyrolysis. The bench-scale test included bubbling fluidized bed reactors and entrained flow systems. Based on the results of the various analyses and tests it was concluded that a concentrated lignin (estimated at about 50% lignin and 50% cellulose) behaved like a typical biomass, producing a slightly reduced amount of a fairly typical bio-oil, while a purified lignin material was difficult to process in the fast pyrolysis reactors and produced a much lower amount of a different kind of bio-oil. It was concluded that for highly concentrated lignin feedstocks new reactor designs will be required other than the typical fluidized bed fast pyrolysis systems.

  8. Flux concentration and modulation based magnetoresistive sensor with integrated planar compensation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wugang; Hu, Jiafei; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang; Zhao, Jianqiang

    2013-03-01

    1/f noise is one of the main noise sources of magnetoresistive (MR) sensors, which can cause intrinsic detection limit at low frequency. To suppress this noise, the solution of flux concentration and vertical motion modulation (VMM) has been proposed. Magnetic hysteresis in MR sensors is another problem, which degrades their response linearity and detection ability. To reduce this impact, the method of pulse magnetization and magnetic compensation field with integrated planar coils has been introduced. A flux concentration and VMM based magnetoresistive prototype sensor with integrated planar coils was fabricated using microelectromechanical-system technology. The response linearity of the prototype sensors is improved from 0.8% to 0.12%. The noise level is reduced near to the thermal noise level, and the low-frequency detection ability of the prototype sensor is enhanced with a factor of more than 80.

  9. Benchmarking of the five-sensor probe method for a measurement of an interfacial area concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euh, D. J.; Yun, B. J.; Song, C. H.

    2006-09-01

    Interfacial area concentration (IAC) is one of the most important parameters in the two-phase flow models. Five-sensor probe method is a useful measurement technique to measure an IAC. It is essentially based on the four-sensor probe method but it is improved by adapting one more sensor. The passing types of the interfaces through the sensors are classified into four categories and independent methods are applied to the interfaces belonging to each category. To verify the applicability of the five-sensor probe method, benchmarking tests are performed for a rectangular visual channel by using the photographic method. The bubble velocity, void fraction, and Sauter mean diameter measured by the probe are also benchmarked. This paper also includes the design of the five-sensor conductivity probe, the IAC measurement method, the signal processing procedure of the probe signal and the data analysis method by photography.

  10. Lignin geochemistry of sediments from the Narragansett Bay Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, A. G.; Brown, John S.; Boehm, Paul D.

    1986-12-01

    Cupric oxide oxidation has been employed to characterize the lignin geochemistry of Narragansett Bay sediments. Lignin concentrations throughout the estuary are low when expressed on a carbon-normalized basis, but can be characterized as enriched when expressed on a mass-normalized basis. This implies substantial dilution of the sedimentary lignin by inputs of lignin-poor carbon. Lignin concentrations do not correlate with the 13C isotopic composition of the sedimentary organic matter. These results are consistent with a sediment lignin component consisting of varying amounts of vascular plant debris and lignin-depleted organic matter, the latter originating from both marine (planktonic) and terrestrial (uncharacterized) sources. Compositional plots of lignin-derived phenols show that sediments in the upper estuary are influenced to a greater extent by gymnosperm lignin sources than those in the mid-and lower estuary. Given the extent to which the upper estuary is affected by pollution sources, inputs from anthropogenic discharges are the most likely cause of these compositional differences. However, an evaluation of processed paper products as an "anthropogenic" lignin source indicates that the lignin content of these materials is insufficient to account for the levels found in the sediments. Subsurface lignin compositions at an upper estuary site reveal that lignin originating from the inferred anthropogenic sources disappears at a depth shallower than that which would be expected based on the distribution of other trace organic pollutants (hydrocarbons and several synthetic organic compounds). We speculate that differences in either the depositional history or the degree of preservation of these two compound classes are responsible for the observed trends.

  11. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luciano B.; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C.; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F.; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns. PMID:25985166

  12. NDIR Gas Sensor for Spatial Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Naturally Ventilated Livestock Buildings.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luciano B; Ogink, Nico W M; Edouard, Nadège; van Dooren, Hendrik Jan C; Tinôco, Ilda de Fátima F; Mosquera, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The tracer gas ratio method, using CO2 as natural tracer, has been suggested as a pragmatic option to measure emissions from naturally ventilated (NV) barns without the need to directly estimate the ventilation rate. The aim of this research was to assess the performance of a low-cost Non-Dispersive Infra-Red (NDIR) sensor for intensive spatial field monitoring of CO2 concentrations in a NV dairy cow house. This was achieved by comparing NDIR sensors with two commonly applied methods, a Photo-Acoustic Spectroscope (PAS) Gas Monitor and an Open-Path laser (OP-laser). First, calibrations for the NDIR sensors were obtained in the laboratory. Then, the NDIR sensors were placed in a dairy cow barn for comparison with the PAS and OP-laser methods. The main conclusions were: (a) in order to represent the overall barn CO2 concentration of the dairy cow barn, the number of NDIR sensors to be accounted for average concentration calculation was dependent on barn length and on barn area occupation; and (b) the NDIR CO2 sensors are suitable for multi-point monitoring of CO2 concentrations in NV livestock barns, being a feasible alternative for the PAS and the OP-laser methods to monitor single-point or averaged spatial CO2 concentrations in livestock barns. PMID:25985166

  13. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. PMID:24780273

  14. Effect of lignin on water vapor barrier, mechanical, and structural properties of agar/lignin composite films.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable composite films were prepared using two renewable resources based biopolymers, agar and lignin alkali. The lignin was used as a reinforcing material and agar as a biopolymer matrix. The effect of lignin concentration (1, 3, 5, and 10wt%) on the performance of the composite films was studied. In addition, the mechanical, water vapor barrier, UV light barrier properties, FE-SEM, and TGA of the films were analyzed. The agar/lignin films exhibited higher mechanical and UV barrier properties along with lower water vapor permeability compared to the neat agar film. The FTIR and SEM results showed the compatibility of lignin with agar polymer. The swelling ratio and moisture content of agar/lignin composite films were decreased with increase in lignin content. The thermostability and char content of agar/lignin composite films increased with increased lignin content. The results suggested that agar/lignin films have a potential to be used as a UV barrier food packaging material for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food. PMID:26271435

  15. Nanostructure sensor of presence and concentration of a target molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system (i) to determine when a selected target molecule is present or absent in a fluid, (2) to estimate concentration of the target molecule in the fluid and (3) estimate possible presence of a second (different) target molecule in the fluid, by analyzing differences in resonant frequencies of vibration of a thin beam suspended in the fluid, after the fluid has moved across the beam.

  16. Lignin as immobilization matrix for HIV p17 peptide used in immunosensing.

    PubMed

    Cerrutti, Bianca M; Moraes, Marli L; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V

    2015-09-15

    Immunosensors based on electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are increasingly being used as a fast and potentially low cost method for clinical diagnostics. In this work we fabricated immunosensors by depositing layer-by-layer (LbL) films made with an antigenic peptide (p17-1) sequence (H2N-LSGGELDRWEKIRLRPGG-OH) and lignin on interdigitated gold electrodes, which could detect anti-p17 (HIV, human immune deficiency virus) antibodies (Ab) in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). The molecular recognition interaction between the peptide (p17-1) and the specific Ab (anti-p17) yielded substantial changes in morphology of the with LbL films, with increased roughness according to atomic force microscopy data. This interaction is behind the high sensitivity of the immunosensor. Indeed, from the EIS results, we noted that the capacitance increased significantly with the specific Ab concentration, before getting close to saturation of available peptide sites at high concentrations. Concentrations of specific antibodies as low as 0.1 ng/mL could be detected and the immunosensors had their activity preserved for two months at least. The selectivity of the immunosensor was confirmed with two types of control experiments. First, no changes in impedance were observed when the lignin/peptide LbL immunosensor was immersed into a PBS solution containing the non-specific Ab (anti-HCV for Hepatitis C) antibodies. Furthermore, for sensing units made LbL films of lignin only, the electrical response was not affected by adding specific antibodies into the PBS buffer. The successful immunosensing for HIV with antigenic peptides in a lignin matrix is also relevant for valorization of lignin, which is an important biomass component in the sugar and ethanol industry, and brings the prospect for all-organic, biocompatible sensors if implantation is ever required. PMID:25950938

  17. Photoacoustic Detection of Methane in Large Concentrations with a Helmholtz Sensor: Simulation and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeninari, Virginie; Vallon, Raphaël; Risser, Christophe; Parvitte, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of a photoacoustic Helmholtz sensor for the detection of large concentrations of methane. In this case, methane is in concentration where the photoacoustic signal is no more linear with concentration. Moreover the resonance frequency of the Helmholtz resonant cell is modified, as the concentration of methane cannot be neglected. This situation is simulated using a finite element method with the software Comsol Multiphysics. Simulation is compared with experimental results from 0.1 % up to 8 % of methane concentration in air.

  18. Ultrasonic flexural-plate-wave sensor for detecting the concentration of settling E. coli W3110 cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, S E; Black, J; Keasling, J D; White, R M

    1999-08-15

    The flexural-plate-wave (FPW) sensor, a type of ultrasonic sensor, can detect changes in E. coli W3110 concentration in solution as the cells settle onto the sensor under the influence of gravity. A model of the sensor's response to cell settling has been developed and is in good agreement with the experimental data. The FPW technique improves on conventional methods for determining cell concentrations; this technique allows for on-line data collection, is nondestructive, and requires only small sample volumes. The FPW sensor has applications as a device to measure cell concentrations and growth rates in industrial fermentors, biofilms, and wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:10464487

  19. Intelligent Fiber Optic Sensor for Estimating the Concentration of a Mixture-Design and Working Principle

    PubMed Central

    Borecki, Michal

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the construction and working principles of an intelligent fiber-optic intensity sensor used for examining the concentration of a mixture in conjunction with water. It can find applications e.g. in waste-water treatment plant for selection of a treatment process. The sensor head is the end of a large core polymer optical fiber, which constitutes one arm of an asymmetrical coupler. The head works on the reflection intensity basis. The reflected signal level depends on the Fresnel reflection from the air and from the mixture examined when the head is immersed in it. The sensor head is mounted on a lift. For detection purposes the signal can be measured on head submerging, submersion, emerging and emergence. Therefore, the measured signal depends on the surface tension, viscosity, turbidity and refraction coefficient of the solution. The signal coming from the head is processed electrically in an opto-electronic interface. Then it is fed to a neural network. The novelty of the proposed sensor lies in that it contains an asymmetrical coupler and a neural network that works in the generalization mode. The sensor resolution depends on the efficiency of the asymmetrical coupler, the precision of the opto-electronic signal conversion and the learning accuracy of the neural network. Therefore, the number and quality of the points used for the learning process is very important. By way of example, the paper describes a sensor intended for examining the concentration of liquid soap in water.

  20. Isolation and characterization of lignins from Eucalyptus tereticornis (12ABL).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiping; Lu, Fachuang; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2010-11-10

    A three-step sequential extraction-precipitation method was used to isolate lignin from Eucalyptus tereticornis. The ball-milled eucalyptus was extracted with 96% dioxane, 50% dioxane, and 80% dioxane containing 1% NaOH at boiling temperature, consecutively resulting in solubilization of lignin and hemicelluloses. By precipitating such solutions into 70% aqueous ethanol, the hemicelluloses were removed substantially although there were still some carbohydrates left over, especially for lignin fraction extracted by 50% dioxane. Lignins dissolved in the 70% ethanol solutions were recovered via concentration and precipitation into acidified water. About 37% of the original lignin was released following such procedure whereas only 13.5% can be isolated by traditional milled wood lignin (MWL) method. The obtained lignin fractions were analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) following acid hydrolysis for sugar composition of the contaminating carbohydrates and characterized by quantitative (31)P NMR as well as two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence ((13)C-(1)H) NMR. The results showed that 96% aqueous dioxane extraction of ball-milled wood under conditions used in this study resulted in lignin preparation with very similar structures and sugar composition as traditional MWL. Therefore extracting ball-milled wood with 96% aqueous dioxane produced lignin in 33.6% yield, which makes it very attractive as an alternative to the traditional MWL method. However further extraction with 50% aqueous dioxane or 80% aqueous dioxane containing 1% NaOH gave just a little more lignins with different carbohydrate compositions from those in MWL. The eucalyptus lignins obtained were syringyl and guaiacyl type units. Lignin fraction obtained from 96% dioxane extraction was found to have more phenolic hydroxyl and less aliphatic hydroxyl than the other two preparations. PMID:20954709

  1. An integrated temperature-compensated flexible shear-stress sensor microarray with concentrated leading-wire.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Liu, Wu; Zhang, Weiping; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Honghai

    2016-02-01

    Flexible shear stress sensor is quite important for characterizing curved surface flows. In this work, a novel integrated shear stress sensor microarray is designed with twenty parallel channels, which share the concentrated leading-wire to transmit the ground signal. Electrical pads in rows are easily connected to the circuits with two separate Wheatstone bridges and constant-temperature-difference mode operation is provided for the hot-wires. Temperature crosstalk between adjacent hot-wires is prevented well and the effectiveness of the temperature compensated circuits is verified. Relatively large output response is obtained as the shear stress varies and the sensitivity of the sensors is measured about 0.086 V(2)/Pa(1/3) with nonlinearity lower than 1%, revealing high performance characteristic of the sensors. PMID:26931882

  2. Design of interdigital spiral and concentric capacitive sensors for materials evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianming; Bowler, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design of two circular coplanar interdigital sensors with i) a spiral interdigital configuration and ii) a concentric interdigital configuration for the nondestructive evaluation of multilayered dielectric structures. A numerical model accounting for sensor geometry, test-piece geometry and real permittivity, and metal electrode thickness has been developed to calculate the capacitance of the sensors when in contact with a planar test-piece comprising up to four layers. Compared with a disk-and-ring coplanar capacitive sensor developed previously, the interdigital configurations are predicted to have higher signal-to-noise ratio and better accuracy in materials characterization. The disk-and-ring configuration, on the other hand, possesses advantages such as deeper penetration depth and better immunity to lift-off variations.

  3. Polymer optical fiber compound parabolic concentrator tip for enhanced coupling efficiency for fluorescence based glucose sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Soren; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the light excitation and capturing efficiency of fluorescence based fiber-optical sensors can be significantly increased by using a CPC (Compound Parabolic Concentrator) tip instead of the standard plane-cut tip. We use Zemax modelling to find the optimum CPC tip profile and fiber length of a polymer optical fiber diabetes sensor for continuous monitoring of glucose levels. We experimentally verify the improved performance of the CPC tipped sensor and the predicted production tolerances. Due to physical size requirements when the sensor has to be inserted into the body a non-optimal fiber length of 35 mm is chosen. For this length an average improvement in efficiency of a factor of 1.7 is experimentally demonstrated and critically compared to the predicted ideal factor of 3 in terms of parameters that should be improved through production optimization. PMID:26713213

  4. An integrated temperature-compensated flexible shear-stress sensor microarray with concentrated leading-wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian; Liu, Wu; Zhang, Weiping; Sun, Yongming; Chen, Honghai

    2016-02-01

    Flexible shear stress sensor is quite important for characterizing curved surface flows. In this work, a novel integrated shear stress sensor microarray is designed with twenty parallel channels, which share the concentrated leading-wire to transmit the ground signal. Electrical pads in rows are easily connected to the circuits with two separate Wheatstone bridges and constant-temperature-difference mode operation is provided for the hot-wires. Temperature crosstalk between adjacent hot-wires is prevented well and the effectiveness of the temperature compensated circuits is verified. Relatively large output response is obtained as the shear stress varies and the sensitivity of the sensors is measured about 0.086 V2/Pa1/3 with nonlinearity lower than 1%, revealing high performance characteristic of the sensors.

  5. Single ZnO Nanowire-Based Gas Sensors to Detect Low Concentrations of Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cardoza-Contreras, Marlene N; Romo-Herrera, José M; Ríos, Luis A; García-Gutiérrez, R; Zepeda, T A; Contreras, Oscar E

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of hazardous gases are difficult to detect with common gas sensors. Using semiconductor nanostructures as a sensor element is an alternative. Single ZnO nanowire gas sensor devices were fabricated by manipulation and connection of a single nanowire into a four-electrode aluminum probe in situ in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope-focused ion beam with a manipulator and a gas injection system in/column. The electrical response of the manufactured devices shows response times up to 29 s for a 121 ppm of H₂ pulse, with a variation in the nanowire resistance appreciable at room temperature and at 373.15 K of approximately 8% and 14% respectively, showing that ZnO nanowires are good candidates to detect low concentrations of H₂. PMID:26690158

  6. Single ZnO Nanowire-Based Gas Sensors to Detect Low Concentrations of Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza-Contreras, Marlene N.; Romo-Herrera, José M.; Ríos, Luis A.; García-Gutiérrez, R.; Zepeda, T. A.; Contreras, Oscar E.

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of hazardous gases are difficult to detect with common gas sensors. Using semiconductor nanostructures as a sensor element is an alternative. Single ZnO nanowire gas sensor devices were fabricated by manipulation and connection of a single nanowire into a four-electrode aluminum probe in situ in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope-focused ion beam with a manipulator and a gas injection system in/column. The electrical response of the manufactured devices shows response times up to 29 s for a 121 ppm of H2 pulse, with a variation in the nanowire resistance appreciable at room temperature and at 373.15 K of approximately 8% and 14% respectively, showing that ZnO nanowires are good candidates to detect low concentrations of H2. PMID:26690158

  7. Low concentration biomolecular detection using liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF) SERS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Claire; Seballos, Leo; Zhang, Jin Z.

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the use of a highly sensitive Liquid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (LCPCF) Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) sensor in detecting biological and biochemical molecules. The Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) probe was prepared by carefully sealing the cladding holes using a fusion splicer while leaving the central hollow core open, which ensures that the liquid mixture of the analyte and silver nanoparticles only fills in the hollow core of the PCF, therefore preserving the photonic bandgap. The dependence of the SERS signal on the excitation power and sample concentration was fully characterized using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules. The result shows that the LCPCF sensor has significant advantages over flat surface SERS detections at lower concentrations. This is attributed to the lower absorption at lower concentration leading to a longer effective interaction length inside the LCPCF, which in turn, results in a stronger SERS signal. Several biomolecules, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) and alpha-synuclein, which are indicators of prostate cancer and Parkinson's disease, respectively, and fail to be detected directly, are successfully detected by the LCPCF sensor. Our results demonstrate the potential of the LCPCF SERS sensor for biomedical detection at low concentrations.

  8. Utilizing existing sensor technology to predict spring wheat grain nitrogen concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining optimum grain N concentration and yield in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) can be problematic without proper nitrogen (N) fertilizer management. Sensor-based technologies have been used for an accurate and precise application of fertilizers. This technology has also been used to predic...

  9. Temperature Compensation in Determining of Remazol Black B Concentrations Using Plastic Optical Fiber Based Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Su Sin; Aziz, A.R. Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman W.; Arof, Hamzah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the construction and test of tapered plastic optical fiber (POF) sensors, based on an intensity modulation approach are described. Tapered fiber sensors with different diameters of 0.65 mm, 0.45 mm, and 0.35 mm, were used to measure various concentrations of Remazol black B (RBB) dye aqueous solutions at room temperature. The concentrations of the RBB solutions were varied from 0 ppm to 70 ppm. In addition, the effect of varying the temperature of the RBB solution was also investigated. In this case, the output of the sensor was measured at four different temperatures of 27 °C, 30 °C, 35 °C, and 40 °C, while its concentration was fixed at 50 ppm and 100 ppm. The experimental results show that the tapered POF with d = 0.45 mm achieves the best performance with a reasonably good sensitivity of 61 × 10−4 and a linearity of more than 99%. It also maintains a sufficient and stable signal when heat was applied to the solution with a linearity of more than 97%. Since the transmitted intensity is dependent on both the concentration and temperature of the analyte, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to combine the two independent variables into a single equation. The resulting equation was then validated experimentally and the best agreement between the calculated and experimental results was achieved by the sensor with d = 0.45 mm, where the minimum discrepancy is less than 5%. The authors conclude that POF-based sensors are suitable for RBB dye concentration sensing and, with refinement in fabrication, better results could be achieved. Their low fabrication cost, simple configuration, accuracy, and high sensitivity would attract many potential applications in chemical and biological sensing. PMID:25166498

  10. PPy/PMMA/PEG-based sensor for low-concentration acetone detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshkhah, A.; Shrestha, S.; Agarwal, M.; Varahramyan, K.

    2014-05-01

    A polymer pellet-based sensor device comprised of polypyrrole (PPy), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), its fabrication methods, and the experimental results for low-concentration acetone detection are presented. The design consists of a double layer pellet, where the top layer consists of PPy/PMMA and the bottom layer is composed of PPy/PMMA/PEG. Both sets of material compositions are synthesized by readily realizable chemical polymerization techniques. The mechanism of the sensor operation is based on the change in resistance of PPy and the swelling of PMMA when exposed to acetone, thereby changing the resistance of the layers. The resistances measured on the two layers, and across the pellet, are taken as the three output signals of the sensor. Because the PPy/PMMA and PPy/PMMA/PEG layers respond differently to acetone, as well as to other volatile organic compounds, it is demonstrated that the three output signals can allow the presented sensor to have a better sensitivity and selectivity than previously reported devices. Materials characterizations show formation of new composite with PPy/PMMA/PEG. Material response at various concentrations of acetone was conducted using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). It was observed that the frequency decreased by 98 Hz for 290 ppm of acetone and by 411 Hz for 1160 ppm. Experimental results with a double layer pellet of PPy/PMMA and PPy/PMMA/PEG show an improved selectivity of acetone over ethanol. The reported acetone sensor is applicable for biomedical and other applications.

  11. Performance of a low-cost methane sensor for ambient concentration measurements in preliminary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, W.; Kling, G. W.

    2012-03-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after CO2 and contributes to global warming. Its sources are not uniformly distributed across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and most of the methane flux is expected to stem from hotspots which often occupy a very small fraction of the total landscape area. Continuous time-series measurements of CH4 concentrations can help identify and locate these methane hot-spots. Newer, low-cost trace gas sensors such as the Figaro TGS 2600 can detect CH4 even at ambient concentrations. Hence, in this paper we tested this sensor under real-world conditions over Toolik Lake, Alaska, to determine its suitability for preliminary studies before placing more expensive and service-intensive equipment at a given locality. A reasonably good agreement with parallel measurements made using a Los Gatos Research FMA 100 methane analyzer was found after removal of the strong cross-sensitivities for temperature and relative humidity. Correcting for this cross-sensitivity increased the absolute accuracy required for in-depth studies, and the reproducibility between two TGS 2600 sensors run in parallel is very good. We conclude that the relative CH4 concentrations derived from such sensors are sufficient for preliminary investigations in the search of potential methane hot-spots.

  12. Performance of a low-cost methane sensor for ambient concentration measurements in preliminary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, W.; Kling, G. W.

    2012-08-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after CO2 and contributes to global warming. Its sources are not uniformly distributed across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and most of the methane flux is expected to stem from hotspots which often occupy a very small fraction of the total landscape area. Continuous time-series measurements of CH4 concentrations can help identify and locate these methane hotspots. Newer, low-cost trace gas sensors such as the Figaro TGS 2600 can detect CH4 even at ambient concentrations. Hence, in this paper we tested this sensor under real-world conditions over Toolik Lake, Alaska, to determine its suitability for preliminary studies before placing more expensive and service-intensive equipment at a given locality. A reasonably good agreement with parallel measurements made using a Los Gatos Research FMA 100 methane analyzer was found after removal of the strong sensitivities for temperature and relative humidity. Correcting for this sensitivity increased the absolute accuracy required for in-depth studies, and the reproducibility between two TGS 2600 sensors run in parallel is very good. We conclude that the relative CH4 concentrations derived from such sensors are sufficient for preliminary investigations in the search of potential methane hotspots.

  13. A spectrometric method for hydrogen peroxide concentration measurement with a reusable and cost-efficient sensor.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lo, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Yu-Chian; Shi, Yi-Cen; Li, Pang-Lung

    2015-01-01

    In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H₂O₂ can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10(-)⁵% to 1 × 10(-3)% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm) and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/%) and 3.49 × 10(-5)% (0.35 ppm), respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance. PMID:26473862

  14. A Spectrometric Method for Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration Measurement with a Reusable and Cost-Efficient Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lo, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Yu-Chian; Shi, Yi-Cen; Li, Pang-Lung

    2015-01-01

    In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H2O2 can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10−5% to 1 × 10−3% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm) and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/%) and 3.49 × 10−5% (0.35 ppm), respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance. PMID:26473862

  15. LED based evanescent wave fiber optic sensor technique to detect Fe+2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, V. K.; Bendigeri, H. H.; Kulkarni, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we have reported the development of a very easy and cost effective fiber optic sensor on the basis of evanescent wave absorption technique to detect ferrous Fe+2 using high quality light emitting diode (LED). In this method, unclad portion of the fiber was used as sensing element which is exploited to surrounding media consisting Fe+2 ions. Highly sensitive detector has been used to detect the output power of light guided through unclad optical fiber. Graph revealed that, developed sensor is highly sensitive over the dynamic range of concentration from 0.1ppm to 100ppm

  16. [Development of a piezoelectric sensor for detection of low endotoxin concentration].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingliang; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Shaoxi

    2005-10-01

    Endotoxin is an important factor which can lead to endotoxemia and complication. Accurate detection of its concentration is very useful for the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. A piezoelectric biosensor for detecting endotoxin was developed, which was based on liquid damping effect of quartz crystal resonator. The test results showed that the maximal frequency shift of sensor is linearly dependent on the logarithm value of concentration of endotoxin (0.1 pg/m - 10 ng/ml). The time which d (deltaf)/dt(maax) appeared in frequency shift curve was also linearly dependent on the logarithm value of concentration of endotoxin (0.01 pg/ml - 10 ng/ml). The detection time was shortened and the minimal limit of detection was decreased using the second method. Thus the proposed sensor is much simpler, more precise and has more lower limit of detecting detection of endotoxin when compared with the conventional methods. PMID:16294749

  17. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  18. Extracting lignins from mill wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Addition of quaternary ammonium compound and activated charcoal to pulp and mill wastes precipitates lignins in sludge mixture. Methanol dissolves lignins for separation from resulting slurry. Mineral acid reprecipitates lignins in filtered solution. Quaternary ammonium compound, activated charcoal, as well as water may be recovered and recycled from this process.

  19. Starch-Lignin Baked Foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin foams were prepared by a baking process. Replacing up to 20% of the starch with lignin has no effect on foam density or overall morphology. At 10% replacement, lignin marginally increases water resistance and modulus of elasticity but decreases strain at maximum stress. At 20% re...

  20. Utilizing an open-microcavity optoacoustic sensor for spectroscopic determination of methemoglobin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ralph W.; Kadugodinandareddy, Kavya; Karunakaran, Vinitha; Whitney, Casey; Ling, Jian; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple, non-destructive photoacoustic spectroscopy method utilizing a unique open-microcavity optoacoustic sensor to measure the concentration ratio of Methemoglobin (MetHb) in an optically scattering medium. Elevated levels of MetHb, present for example in the blood disorder Methemeglobinemia, cannot be detected by conventional pulse oximetry, and may result in inaccurate arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Samples with different ratios of Oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2), Deoxygenated Hemoglobin (HHb), and MetHb were obtained and mixed with nanoscale latex beads to present an optical scattering effect. Polymer encapsulated hemoglobin (PEH) samples were also studied. A sample chamber containing 20 μL of each sample was positioned directly underneath our patented optoacoustic sensor. Unlike a piezoelectric transducer, our optoacoustic sensor allows an excitation laser beam from an OPO laser to pass through and be absorbed by the sample to produce a photoacoustic signal. The cavity layer of the optoacoustic sensor is exposed directly to the resulting ultrasound signal, which causes an intensity modulation of a HeNe laser that is used to monitor the resonance condition of the sensor. A probe laser beam is total internally reflected off of the sensor and detected with a fiber-coupled APD detector. Three wavelengths are chosen for our excitation laser based on the absorption peaks and isobestic points of HHb, HbO2, and MetHb. Using established values of the molar extinction coefficients of HbO2, HHb, and MetHb a set of three simultaneous equations can be solved to accurately determine the concentration ratio of MetHb.

  1. High-sensitivity in situ QCLAS-based ammonia concentration sensor for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W. Y.; Sur, R.; Strand, C. L.; Spearrin, R. M.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption sensor is presented for high-sensitivity in situ measurements of ammonia (hbox {NH}_3) in high-temperature environments, using scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with first-harmonic-normalized second-harmonic detection (scanned WMS-2 f/1 f) to neutralize the effect of non-absorption losses in the harsh environment. The sensor utilized the sQ(9,9) transition of the fundamental symmetric stretch band of hbox {NH}_3 at 10.39 {\\upmu }hbox {m} and was sinusoidally modulated at 10 kHz and scanned across the peak of the absorption feature at 50 Hz, leading to a detection bandwidth of 100 Hz. A novel technique was used to select an optimal WMS modulation depth parameter that reduced the sensor's sensitivity to spectral interference from hbox {H}_2hbox {O} and hbox {CO}_2 without significantly sacrificing signal-to-noise ratio. The sensor performance was validated by measuring known concentrations of hbox {NH}_3 in a flowing gas cell. The sensor was then demonstrated in a laboratory-scale methane-air burner seeded with hbox {NH}_3, achieving a demonstrated detection limit of 2.8 ± 0.26 ppm hbox {NH}_3 by mole at a path length of 179 cm, equivalence ratio of 0.6, pressure of 1 atm, and temperatures of up to 600 K.

  2. [Phenolic foam prepared by lignin from a steam-explosion derived biorefinery of corn stalk].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanhua; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-06-01

    To increase the integral economic effectiveness, biorefineries of lignocellulosic materials should not only utilize carbohydrates hydrolyzed from cellulose and hemicellulose but also use lignin. We used steam-exploded corn stalk as raw materials and optimized the temperature and alkali concentration in the lignin extraction process to obtain lignin liquor with higher yield and purity. Then the concentrated lignin liquor was used directly to substitute phenol for phenolic foam preparation and the performances of phenolic foam were characterized by microscopic structure analysis, FTIR, compression strength and thermal conductivity detection. The results indicated that, when steam-exploded corn stalk was extracted at 120 degrees C for 2 h by 1% NaOH with a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10, the extraction yield of lignin was 79.67%. The phenolic foam prepared from the concentrated lignin liquor showed higher apparent density and compression strength with the increasing substitution rate of lignin liquor. However, there were not significant differences of thermal conductivity and flame retardant properties by the addition of lignin, which meant that the phenolic foam substituted by lignin liquor was approved for commercial application. This study, which uses alkali-extracted lignin liquor directly for phenolic foam preparation, provides a relatively simple way for utilization of lignin and finally increases the overall commercial operability ofa lignocellulosic biorefinery derived by steam explosion. PMID:25212007

  3. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  4. Hemispherical concentrators and spectral filters for planar sensors in diffuse radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Savicki, J P; Morgan, S P

    1994-12-01

    A dielectric hemisphere of refractive index N can act as an N(2) concentrator of isotropic diffuse radiation under appropriate conditions. We give an analytic expression for the gain of a concentrator of arbitrary radius, neglecting surface reflections, and numerical methods for calculating the gain when the surface transmissivity is an arbitrary function of incidence angle. The theory is applied to the design of multilayer spectral filters for hemispherical concentrators. When an appropriate wavelength shift is incorporated into the design process, an 11-layer, coupled-cavity spectral filter on the surface of a hemisphere of index 1.5 shows excellent bandpass performance with a concentrator radius as small as 3 times the sensor radius. This concentrator-filter combination shows a peak response of 97% of the ideal N(2) response at 950 nm, together with a FWHM of 55 nm. PMID:20963025

  5. Conversion of lignin into a precursor for the production of graphitic carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.M.; Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.

    1995-11-01

    Lignin is the most abundant renewable aromatic material. There are roughly 25 x 10{sup 6} tons of lignin produced each year as a byproduct of pulp and papermaking which has a fuel value of between $0.00 and $0.04 per pound. Carbon materials are among the highest value products can be produced from lignin. Consequently, the development of processes which can utilize lignins for carbon fibers or the production of other high value carbon materials has the potential for a high payoff. It would also result in the utilization of lignin as a raw material for high technology, internationally competitive industries. The ability to form graphitic carbon materials from pitch depends on the development of a liquid crystal system called mesophase. A major problem with using lignin as a precursor for the production of mesophase pitch is the high oxygen functional group concentration of lignin which makes it reactive toward crosslinking. Hydrothermal treatment of lignin allows for selective removal of the reactive oxygen functional groups from lignin which normally prevent extensive mesophase formation. Hydrothermal pretreatment of lignin substantially increases the mesophase content of lignin-derived pitch. This development will make lignin a suitable precursor for a range of carbon materials applications.

  6. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-01-25

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  7. Biosynthsis of Lignin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the effects of up- and down-regulating genes on the lignin biosynthetic pathway, the intracacies of the pathway should be known. Many of the genes are long-known, although the actual substrates of some have been clarified in planta. Others are surprisingly new. All of the majo...

  8. Lignin-Based Thermoplastic Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kelley, Stephen S; Venditti, Richard A

    2016-04-21

    Lignin-based thermoplastic materials have attracted increasing interest as sustainable, cost-effective, and biodegradable alternatives for petroleum-based thermoplastics. As an amorphous thermoplastic material, lignin has a relatively high glass-transition temperature and also undergoes radical-induced self-condensation at high temperatures, which limits its thermal processability. Additionally, lignin-based materials are usually brittle and exhibit poor mechanical properties. To improve the thermoplasticity and mechanical properties of technical lignin, polymers or plasticizers are usually integrated with lignin by blending or chemical modification. This Review attempts to cover the reported approaches towards the development of lignin-based thermoplastic materials on the basis of published information. Approaches reviewed include plasticization, blending with miscible polymers, and chemical modifications by esterification, etherification, polymer grafting, and copolymerization. Those lignin-based thermoplastic materials are expected to show applications as engineering plastics, polymeric foams, thermoplastic elastomers, and carbon-fiber precursors. PMID:27059111

  9. Fiber-type sensor of refractive indices and concentration of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weigang; Xu, Zhaowen; Yang, Xiang-Peng; Kai, Guiyun; Yuan, Shou-Zhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2001-10-01

    A portable and practical fiber-type sensor, with which can determine the refractive index and the concentration of the liquid, has been designed and realized. The method combines simplicity of structure, facility of operation, wide range of measurement and low price. It can be used either by immersing the liquid or by pouring one drop of liquid into the sensing head. The measuring resolution of the refractive index is 1.41 X 10-4 for the refractive indices of 1.33 - 1.70, and the measuring resolution of the concentration is 2.67 X 10-4 for the salt solution and the sugar solution.

  10. Development of New Optical Sensors for Measurements of Mercury Concentrations, Speciation, and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Lucht

    2008-09-28

    A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for elemental mercury was developed and applied for measurements in a high-temperature flow reactor and in the exhaust stream of a coal-fired combustor. The final version of the sensor incorporates a 375-nm single-mode laser and a 784-nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The output of these lasers is sum-frequency mixed in a non-linear beta-barium borate crystal to generate a 254-nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency is tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7-nm. The tuning range is large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. Because of this large tuning range, the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Broadband absorption is a major concern for lamp-based mercury sensor, and the sample to be monitored must be chemically treated prior to analysis to remove species such as SO{sub 2} that absorb near 253.7 nm. No pretreatment is required when our diode-laser-based sensor is used for elemental mercury measurements. Our laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA), and were generally in good agreement except that the insitu diode-laser-based sensor measurements tended to give somewhat higher concentrations than the CMA measurements, presumably due to absorption of elemental mercury in the sampling lines needed for the CMA measurements. At Texas A&M University, the homogeneous oxidation of elemental mercury was studied using a high-temperature flow reactor.

  11. Tunable Pickering emulsions with polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs).

    PubMed

    Silmore, Kevin S; Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2016-03-15

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer that has native interfacial functions but aggregates strongly in aqueous media. Polyacrylamide was grafted onto kraft lignin nanoparticles using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) chemistry to form polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs) that tune aggregation strength while retaining interfacial activities in forming Pickering emulsions. Polymer graft density on the particle surface, ionic strength, and initial water and cyclohexane volume fractions were varied and found to have profound effects on emulsion characteristics, including emulsion volume fraction, droplet size, and particle interfacial concentration that were attributed to changes in lignin aggregation and hydrophobic interactions. In particular, salt concentration was found to have a significant effect on aggregation, zeta potential, and interfacial tension, which was attributed to changes in solubility of both the kraft lignin and the polyacrylamide grafts. Dynamic light scattering, UV-vis spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and tensiometry were used to quantify emulsion properties and nanoparticle behavior. Under all conditions, the emulsions exhibited relatively fast creaming but were stable against coalescence and Ostwald ripening for a period of months. All emulsions were also oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions, as predicted by the Bancroft rule, and no catastrophic phase inversions were observed for any nanoparticle compositions. We conclude that lower grafting density of polyacrylamide on a lignin core resulted in high levels of interfacial activity, as characterized by higher concentration at the water-cyclohexane interface with a corresponding decrease in interfacial tension. These results indicate that the interfacial properties of polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles are primarily due to the native hydrophobic interactions of the lignin core. These results suggest that the forces that drive aggregation are also correlated with interfacial

  12. Using Bayesian Inference Framework towards Identifying Gas Species and Concentration from High Temperature Resistive Sensor Array Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yixin; Zhou, Kai; Lei, Yu

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas sensors have been highly demanded for combustion process optimization and toxic emissions control, which usually suffer from poor selectivity. In order to solve this selectivity issue and identify unknown reducing gas species (CO, CH 4 , and CH 8 ) and concentrations, a high temperature resistive sensor array data set was built in this study based on 5 reported sensors. As each sensor showed specific responses towards different types of reducing gas with certain concentrations, based on which calibration curves were fitted, providing benchmark sensor array response database, then Bayesian inference framework was utilized to processmore » the sensor array data and build a sample selection program to simultaneously identify gas species and concentration, by formulating proper likelihood between input measured sensor array response pattern of an unknown gas and each sampled sensor array response pattern in benchmark database. This algorithm shows good robustness which can accurately identify gas species and predict gas concentration with a small error of less than 10% based on limited amount of experiment data. These features indicate that Bayesian probabilistic approach is a simple and efficient way to process sensor array data, which can significantly reduce the required computational overhead and training data.« less

  13. Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Multivalent Ion Concentrations in Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Zink; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson; Ben F. Cowan; Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li

    2010-07-01

    Electrorefining of spent metallic nuclear fuel in high temperature molten salt systems is a core technology in pyroprocessing, which in turn plays a critical role in the development of advanced fuel cycle technologies. In electrorefining, spent nuclear fuel is treated electrochemically in order to effect separations between uranium, noble metals, and active metals, which include the transuranics. The accumulation of active metals in a lithium chloride-potassium chloride (LiCl-KCl) eutectic molten salt electrolyte occurs at the expense of the UCl3-oxidant concentration in the electrolyte, which must be periodically replenished. Our interests lie with the accumulation of active metals in the molten salt electrolyte. The real-time monitoring of actinide concentrations in the molten salt electrolyte is highly desirable for controlling electrochemical operations and assuring materials control and accountancy. However, real-time monitoring is not possible with current methods for sampling and chemical analysis. A new solid-state electrochemical sensor is being developed for real-time monitoring of actinide ion concentrations in a molten salt electrorefiner. The ultimate function of the sensor is to monitor plutonium concentrations during electrorefining operations, but in this work gadolinium was employed as a surrogate material for plutonium. In a parametric study, polycrystalline sodium beta double-prime alumina (Na-ß?-alumina) discs and tubes were subject to vapor-phase exchange with gadolinium ions (Gd3+) using a gadolinium chloride salt (GdCl3) as a precursor to produce gadolinium beta double-prime alumina (Gd-ß?-alumina) samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and microstructural analysis were performed on the ion-exchanged discs to determine the relationship between ion exchange and Gd3+ ion conductivity. The ion-exchanged tubes were configured as potentiometric sensors in order to monitor real-time Gd3+ ion concentrations in mixtures of gadolinium

  14. Highly Sensitive Multi-Channel IDC Sensor Array for Low Concentration Taste Detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we designed and developed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based taste sensor array to detect different taste substances. The designed taste sensing array has four IDC sensing elements. The four IDC taste sensing elements of the array are fabricated by incorporating four different types of lipids into the polymer, dioctyl phenylphosphonate (DOPP) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) to make the respective dielectric materials that are individually placed onto an interdigitated electrode (IDE) via spin coating. When the dielectric material of an IDC sensing element comes into contact with a taste substance, its dielectric properties change with the capacitance of the IDC sensing element; this, in turn, changes the voltage across the IDC, as well as the output voltage of each channel of the system. In order to assess the effectiveness of the sensing system, four taste substances, namely sourness (HCl), saltiness (NaCl), sweetness (glucose) and bitterness (quinine-HCl), were tested. The IDC taste sensor array had rapid response and recovery times of about 12.9 s and 13.39 s, respectively, with highly stable response properties. The response property of the proposed IDC taste sensor array was linear, and its correlation coefficient R2 was about 0.9958 over the dynamic range of the taste sensor array as the taste substance concentration was varied from 1 μM to 1 M. The proposed IDC taste sensor array has several other advantages, such as real-time monitoring capabilities, high sensitivity 45.78 mV/decade, good reproducibility with a standard deviation of about 0.029 and compactness, and the circuitry is based on readily available and inexpensive electronic components. The proposed IDC taste sensor array was compared with the potentiometric taste sensor with respect to sensitivity, dynamic range width, linearity and response time. We found that the proposed IDC sensor array has better performance. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to

  15. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, Larry A.; Malito, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

  16. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

    1996-01-23

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

  17. Bioaerosol standoff detection and correlation assessment with concentration and viability point sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Rowsell, Susan; Roy, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    A standoff bioaerosol sensor based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence was used to spectrally characterize bioaerosol simulants during in-chamber and open-air releases at Suffield, Canada, in August 2008 from a standoff position. In total, 42 in-chamber Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly Bacillus subtilis var globigii; BG) cloud and 27 open-air releases of either BG, Pantoea agglomerans (formerly Erwinia herbicola; EH), MS2 and ovalbumin (OV) were generated. The clouds were refereed by different point sensors including Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and slit or impingers samplers. The APS monitored the particle size distribution and concentration and the samplers characterized the viable portion of the cloud. The extracted spectral signatures show robustness to different degree. The correlation assessment showed good results in most cases where the LIF signal to noise ratio was significant. The sensor 4σ sensitivity was evaluated to 1 300, 600, 100 and 30 ppl for BG, OV, MS2 and EH respectively. Correlation results are presented by plotting the SINBAHD metric versus the corresponding particle concentration, in which case, the obtained slope is proportional to the material fluorescence cross-section. The different acquired signal is hence compared in terms of their fluorescence cross-section additionally to their spectral characteristics.

  18. Dissolved Vanillin as Tracer for Estuarine Lignin Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelkraut, F.

    1996-12-01

    Lignin is produced only by vascular plants and therefore can be used as a tracer for terrestrial organic carbon input to the estuarine and marine environments. Lignin measurements have been done by analyses of the oxidation products such as vanillin or 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. In the Elbe Estuary, free dissolved vanillin was analysed in order to test whether such measurements yield information on terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary and on the vanillin derived from lignin oxidation. In the period 1990-1992, concentrations of dissolved vanillin in the Elbe ranged from 0 to 60 μ g l -1(mean: 8 μg l -1). Higher values were found in areas of increased microbial activity such as the turbidity zone and the river mouth where the water chemistry is influenced by large tidal flats. No correlation was found between dissolved vanillin and suspended matter concentrations, although lignin is normally associated with suspended particulate matter, nor was a covariance seen between dissolved vanillin and the terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary. Apparently, biological conversion of lignin was faster than the transport processes, and local sources were more dominant for the vanillin concentration than riverine sources. The dissolved vanillin turnover was fast and, consequently, a significant amount of lignin may be converted within an estuary. In sediments from the Estuary, the concentrations of dissolved vanillin were similar to those found in the water phase and showed no clear vertical profile. The sediment is unlikely to be the source for vanillin.

  19. Three-dimensional model of lignin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jurasek, L.

    1995-12-01

    An attempt to build a three-dimensional model of lignin structure using a computer program is described. The program simulates the biosynthesis of spruce lignin by allowing coniferyl alcohol subunits to be added randomly by six different types of linkages, assumed to be most common. The simulated biosynthesis starts from a number of seed points within restricted space, corresponding to 50 mM initial concentration of coniferyl alcohol. Rules of three-dimensional packing of the subunits within the lignin macro-molecule are observed during the simulated biosynthetic process. Branched oligomeric structures thus generated form crosslinks at those positions where the chains grow close enough to form a link. Inter-chain crosslinking usually joins the oligomers into one macromolecule. Intra-chain crosslinks are also formed and result in closed loops. Typically, a macromolecule with molecular weight of approx. 2 x 105 is formed, with internal density of 1.35g/cm3. Various characteristics of the internal structure, such as branching, crosslinking, bond frequencies, and chain length distribution are described. Breakdown of the polymer was also simulated and the effect of closed loops on the weight average molecular weight is shown. The effect of the shape of the biosynthetic space on the degree of crosslinking is discussed and predictions of the overall molecular shape of lignin particles are made.

  20. Improved magnetoelectric effect in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composite with flux concentration effect for sensitive magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Xiao, Yingjie; Gui, Junguo; Lin, Chenhui; Xiao, Yong

    2015-04-01

    The magnetoelectric (ME) composite with the flux concentration effect is designed, fabricated, and characterized for detecting weak ac magnetic-field. The high-permeability Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils act as flux concentrators and are bonded at the free ends of traditional ME laminates. With the improved ME responses in the proposed ME composite based on the flux concentration effect, the output sensitivities under zero-biased magnetic field can reach 7 V/Oe and 15.8 mV/Oe under the resonance frequency of 177.36 kHz and the off-resonance frequency of 1 kHz, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed ME composites show promising applications for high-sensitivity self-biased magnetic field sensors and ME transducers.

  1. Azo Dye Biodecolorization Enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii Cultured with Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase–aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  2. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  3. Azo dye biodecolorization enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii cultured with lignin.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuling; Shi, Lili; Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase-aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  4. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein.

  5. An array sensor consisting of a single indicator with multiple concentrations and its application in ion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Jia, Mingyan; Askim, Jon R; Zhang, Yu; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng; Feng, Liang

    2014-12-18

    Optical sensor arrays typically require a large set of chemically responsive colorants to enhance discrimination capability. Conversely, we have proven that by using multiple concentrations of one indicator, the discrimination of various analytes could be realized. PMID:25350153

  6. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to measure carboxy- and methemoglobin concentration non-invasively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Gewiss, Helge; Kamysek, Svend; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    This paper will describe a novel multi-wavelength photometric method to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. COHb and MetHb are so called dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives and they are not able to carry oxygen. Standard pulse oximeters are only able to measure two derivatives, namely oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) but the presence of other derivatives in the blood may distort the readings. The paper presents a new approach of a noninvasive sensor system to measure COHb and MetHb and the validation in vivo and in vitro.

  7. On-chip pressure sensor using single-layer concentric chambers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Kaneko, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    A vision-based on-chip sensor for sensing local pressure inside a microfluidic device is proposed and evaluated in this paper. The local pressure is determined from the change of color intensity in the sensing chamber which is pre-filled with colored fluid. The working principle of the sensor is based on polydimethylsiloxane deformation. The pressure at the point of interest is guided into a deformation chamber, where the structural stiffness is softened by chamber geometry, and thus, the chamber deforms as a result of pressure changes. Such deformation is transmitted to the sensing chamber, a same-layer concentric inside the deformation chamber. The deformation in the sensing chamber causes the colored fluid flowing in or out the chamber and leads to different color intensity from the top view through a microscope. Experimental evaluations on static and dynamic responses by regulated input pressures were conducted. The correlation in static response is 0.97 while the dynamic responses are successfully observed up to 16 Hz. The greatest advantage is that the local pressure can be directly seen without any additional hardware or electricity. The whole sensor is on a single-layer microfluidic design, so that the fabrication is simple, consistent, and low-cost. The single-layer design also provides the convenience of easy integration for existing microfluidic systems. PMID:27076864

  8. Effects of suspended sediment concentration and grain size on three optical turbidity sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Gustavo Henrique; Capel, Paul D.; Minella, Jean P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Optical turbidity sensors have been successfully used to determine suspended sediment flux in rivers, assuming the relation between the turbidity signal and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) has been appropriately calibrated. Sediment size, shape and colour affect turbidity and are important to incorporate into the calibration process. Materials and methods: This study evaluates the effect of SSC and particle size (i.e. medium sand, fine sand, very fine sand, and fines (silt + clay)) on the sensitivity of the turbidity signal. Three different turbidity sensors were used, with photo detectors positioned at 90 and 180 degrees relative to the axis of incident light. Five different sediment ratios of sand:fines (0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0) were also evaluated for a single SSC (1000 mg l-1). Results and discussion: The photo detectors positioned at 90 degrees were more sensitive than sensor positioned at 180 degrees in reading a wide variety of grain size particles. On average for the three turbidity sensors, the sensitivity for fines were 170, 40, and 4 times greater than sensitivities for medium sand, fine sand, and very fine sand, respectively. For an SSC of 1000 mg l-1 with the treatments composed of different proportions of sand and fines, the presence of sand in the mixture linearly reduced the turbidity signal. Conclusions: The results indicate that calibration of the turbidity signal should be carried out in situ and that the attenuation of the turbidity signal due to sand can be corrected, as long as the proportion of sand in the SSC can be estimated.

  9. Active/passive microwave sensor comparison of MIZ-ice concentration estimates. [Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, B. A.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Keller, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Active and passive microwave data collected during the 1984 summer Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in the Fram Strait (MIZEX 84) are used to compare ice concentration estimates derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to those obtained from passive microwave imagery at several frequencies. The comparison is carried out to evaluate SAR performance against the more established passive microwave technique, and to investigate discrepancies in terms of how ice surface conditions, imaging geometry, and choice of algorithm parameters affect each sensor. Active and passive estimates of ice concentration agree on average to within 12%. Estimates from the multichannel passive microwave data show best agreement with the SAR estimates because the multichannel algorithm effectively accounts for the range in ice floe brightness temperatures observed in the MIZ.

  10. Design of reflective optical fiber sensor for determining refractive index and sugar concentration of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Ahmad; Wulan Sari, Nila; Riatun

    2016-02-01

    A reflective optical fiber sensor designed for measuring refractive index and sugar concentration of aqueous solutions is described. Two strains of parallel polymer optical fibers (POF) were wrapped in a bundle such that one of their fiber's end cross-sections had the same distance to the mirror surface. The light coming out from one strain of the fiber was reflected by the mirror to the second fiber. Sugar concentration of the aqueous solution filling the space between the fiber ends and the mirror was varied (1.0 M, 1.5 M, 2.0 M, 2.5 M, 3.0 M, 4.0 M, and 5.0 M). It was shown from the experiment that light intensity detected by photo-detector is linearly related to the percentage of the dissolved sugar in the solution as well as the variation of the sugar solution refractive index (R2 = 0.987).

  11. Membrane Technology for the Recovery of Lignin: A Review.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Daniel; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of renewable resources is becoming increasingly important, and only sustainable processes that convert such resources into useful products can achieve environmentally beneficial economic growth. Wastewater from the pulp and paper industry is an unutilized resource offering the potential to recover valuable products such as lignin, pigments, and water [1]. The recovery of lignin is particularly important because it has many applications, and membrane technology has been investigated as the basis of innovative recovery solutions. The concentration of lignin can be increased from 62 to 285 g∙L(-1) using membranes and the recovered lignin is extremely pure. Membrane technology is also scalable and adaptable to different waste liquors from the pulp and paper industry. PMID:27608047

  12. Lignin Valorization: Improving Lignin Processing in the Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur; Beckham, Gregg; Biddy, Mary J; Chandra, Richard; Chen, Fang; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard; Gilna, Paul; Keller, Martin; Langan, Paul; Naskar, Amit K; Saddler, Jack N; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wyman, Charles E,; Harber, Karen S

    2014-01-01

    Research and development activities directed toward commercial production of cellulosic ethanol have created the opportunity to dramatically increase the transformation of lignin to value-added products. Here we highlight recent advances in this lignin valorization effort. Discovery of genetic variants in native populations of bioenergy crops and direct manipulation of biosynthesis pathways have produced lignin feedstocks with favorable properties for recovery and downstream conversion. Advances in analytical chemistry and computational modeling detail the structure of the modified lignin and direct bioengineering strategies for future targeted properties. Refinement of biomass pretreatment technologies has further facilitated lignin recovery, and this coupled with genetic engineering will enable new uses for this biopolymer, including low-cost carbon fibers, engineered plastics and thermoplastic elastomers, polymeric foams, fungible fuels, and commodity chemicals.

  13. Lignin valorization: improving lignin processing in the biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ragauskas, Arthur J; Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J; Chandra, Richard; Chen, Fang; Davis, Mark F; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard A; Gilna, Paul; Keller, Martin; Langan, Paul; Naskar, Amit K; Saddler, Jack N; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wyman, Charles E

    2014-05-16

    Research and development activities directed toward commercial production of cellulosic ethanol have created the opportunity to dramatically increase the transformation of lignin to value-added products. Here, we highlight recent advances in this lignin valorization effort. Discovery of genetic variants in native populations of bioenergy crops and direct manipulation of biosynthesis pathways have produced lignin feedstocks with favorable properties for recovery and downstream conversion. Advances in analytical chemistry and computational modeling detail the structure of the modified lignin and direct bioengineering strategies for future targeted properties. Refinement of biomass pretreatment technologies has further facilitated lignin recovery, and this coupled with genetic engineering will enable new uses for this biopolymer, including low-cost carbon fibers, engineered plastics and thermoplastic elastomers, polymeric foams, fungible fuels, and commodity chemicals. PMID:24833396

  14. Comparison of XAD with other dissolved lignin isolation techniques and a compilation of analytical improvements for the analysis of lignin in aquatic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Dyda, R.Y.; Butler, K.D.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Hernes, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript highlights numerous incremental improvements in dissolved lignin measurements over the nearly three decades since CuO oxidation of lignin phenols was first adapted for environmental samples. Intercomparison of the recovery efficiency of three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques, namely XAD, C18 with both CH3OH (C18M) and CH3CN (C18A) used independently for priming and elution steps, and tangential flow filtration (TFF) for a range of aquatic samples including fresh, estuarine and marine waters, was undertaken. With freshwater samples XAD8-1, C18M and TFF were all observed to recover ca. 80-90% of the lignin phenols and showed no fractionation effects with respect to diagnostic lignin parameters. With estuarine and marine samples more lignin phenols were recovered with C18M and XAD8-1 than TFF because of the increased prevalence of low molecular weight lignin phenols in marine influenced samples. For marine systems, differences were also observed between diagnostic lignin parameters isolated via TFF vs. C18M and XAD8-1 as a result of the high molecular weight lignin phenols being less degraded than the bulk. Therefore, it is recommended for future studies of marine systems that only one technique is utilized for ease of intercomparison within studies. It is suggested that for studies solely aimed at recovering bulk dissolved lignin in marine environments that C18M and XAD8-1 appear to be more suitable than TFF as they recover more lignin. Our results highlight that, for freshwater samples, all three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques are comparable to whole water concentrated by rotary evaporation (i.e. not isolated) but, that for marine systems, the choice of concentration and isolation techniques needs to be taken into consideration with respect to both lignin concentration and diagnostic parameters. Finally, as the study highlights XAD8-1 to be a suitable method for the isolation of dissolved lignin

  15. A Multifunctional Sensor for Concentrations of Ternary Solution with NaCl and Sucrose Employed in Osmotic Dehydration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guo; Shida, Katsunori

    2003-08-01

    Ternary solution with NaCl and sucrose is widely employed in the osmotic dehydration process of food. In this paper we present a multifunctional sensor capable of directly sensing temperature and two physical parameters of solutions, namely ultrasonic velocity and electrical conductivity. By combination measurement of these three measurable parameters, the concentrations of various components in ternary solution with NaCl and sucrose can be simultaneously determined. A regression algorithm based on natural cubic spline interpolation and the least squares method is developed to estimate the concentrations of NaCl and sucrose, which considers the temperature influence on the multifunctional sensor and then enables decoupling of the reconstruction of concentrations in 4D space into 3D space. This sensor could prove valuable as a process control sensor in food industry.

  16. Lignin amine microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    DaGue, M.G.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation having at least one injection well and at least one production well. It comprises injecting into the formation through an injection well a microemulsion comprising an internal phase of a primary amine having from about 8 to about 22 carbon atoms, lignin, a water soluble anionic surfactant, a solubilizer and an oil; and an external phase of brine comprising greater than about 90% by weight of the microemulsion; driving the microemulsion through the formation; and producing hydrocarbons through a production well.

  17. Lignin nanotubes as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells.

    PubMed

    Ten, Elena; Ling, Chen; Wang, Yuan; Srivastava, Arun; Dempere, Luisa Amelia; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2014-01-13

    Lignin nanotubes (LNTs) synthesized from the aromatic plant cell wall polymer lignin in a sacrificial alumina membrane template have as useful features their flexibility, ease of functionalization due to the availability of many functional groups, label-free detection by autofluorescence, and customizable optical properties. In this report we show that the physicochemical properties of LNTs can be varied over a wide range to match requirements for specific applications by using lignin with different subunit composition, a function of plant species and genotype, and by choosing the lignin isolation method (thioglycolic acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid (Klason), sodium hydroxide lignin), which influences the size and reactivity of the lignin fragments. Cytotoxicity studies with human HeLa cells showed that concentrations of up to 90 mg/mL are tolerated, which is a 10-fold higher concentration than observed for single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Confocal microscopy imaging revealed that all LNT formulations enter HeLa cells without auxiliary agents and that LNTs made from NaOH-lignin penetrate the cell nucleus. We further show that DNA can adsorb to LNTs. Consequently, exposure of HeLa cells to LNTs coated with DNA encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) leads to transfection and expression of GFP. The highest transfection efficiency was obtained with LNTs made from NaOH-lignin due to a combination of high DNA binding capacity and DNA delivery directly into the nucleus. These combined features of LNTs make LNTs attractive as smart delivery vehicles of DNA without the cytotoxicity associated with CNTs or the immunogenicity of viral vectors. PMID:24308459

  18. Model pathways in lignin thermolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Virk, P.S.

    1981-02-01

    A fundamental description of lignin thermolysis was attempted. Analysis of the chemical topology of lignin suggested likely reaction pathways of import to lignin pyrolysis. In turn, 20 model compound pyrolysis substrates were selected to mimic the important reactive functional groups present in whole-lignin thermolysis. The more salient models were: phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE), which depicts the most prevalent lignin interunit linkage, guaiacol, model of the predominant aromatic methoxyl, and saligenol and cinnamyl alcohol, models of important propanoid side chains. Detailed pathway and kinetic analyses and determination of reaction Arrhenius parameters provided mechanistic insights into the model compound pyrolyses. Several pericyclic reaction mechanisms, hitherto not mentioned in the lignin pyrolysis literature, were suggested. In particular, PPE likely pyrolyses via a concerted retro-ene mechanism, whereas guaiacol and saligenol may respectively eliminate methane and water by concerted group transfers. A statistical interpretation of the lignin substrate coupled with the experimental model compound pyrolyses allowed simulation of whole-lignin thermolysis. The simulations were in substantial agreement with experimental pyrolyses reported in the literature in regard to overall gas, methane, carbon monoxide, individual phenols, and carbonaceous residue yields. Weight loss kinetics deduced from the time dependency of the latter yield also accorded well with the experimental literature.

  19. The Structure of Ca2+ Sensor Case16 Reveals the Mechanism of Reaction to Low Ca2+ Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Leder, Lukas; Stark, Wilhelm; Freuler, Felix; Marsh, May; Meyerhofer, Marco; Stettler, Thomas; Mayr, Lorenz M.; Britanova, Olga V.; Strukova, Lydia A.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first crystal structure of a high-contrast genetically encoded circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP)-based Ca2+ sensor, Case16, in the presence of a low Ca2+ concentration. The structure reveals the positioning of the chromophore within Case16 at the first stage of the Ca2+-dependent response when only two out of four Ca2+-binding pockets of calmodulin (CaM) are occupied with Ca2+ ions. In such a “half Ca2+-bound state”, Case16 is characterized by an incomplete interaction between its CaM-/M13-domains. We also report the crystal structure of the related Ca2+ sensor Case12 at saturating Ca2+ concentration. Based on this structure, we postulate that cpGFP-based Ca2+ sensors can form non-functional homodimers where the CaM-domain of one sensor molecule binds symmetrically to the M13-peptide of the partner sensor molecule. Case12 and Case16 behavior upon addition of high concentrations of free CaM or M13-peptide reveals that the latter effectively blocks the fluorescent response of the sensor. We speculate that the demonstrated intermolecular interaction with endogenous substrates and homodimerization can impede proper functioning of this type of Ca2+ sensors in living cells. PMID:22163646

  20. Cation-pi interactions as a mechanism in technical lignin adsorption to cationic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Karthik V; Renneckar, Scott

    2009-04-13

    The assembly of dissolved technical lignins in aqueous and organic medium has been studied at the solid-liquid interface. Adsorption of alkali lignin onto gold coated crystals treated with a cationic polymer was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Complete coverage of the cationic surface with alkali lignin occurred at low solution concentration, revealing a high affinity coefficient under both alkali and neutral conditions. With additional adsorption studies from organosolv lignin in organic solvent and spectroscopic analysis of mixtures of cationic polymer and alkali lignin, a noncovalent interaction between lignin's aromatic rings and the cation of the quaternary ammonium group was shown to exist. The work underscores how polyphenolic biopolymers can strongly interact with cations through noncovalent interactions to control molecular architecture. PMID:19226174

  1. Synthesis and properties of lignin peroxidase from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A

    SciTech Connect

    Lodha, S.J.; Korus, R.A.; Crawford, D.L.

    1991-12-31

    The production of lignin peroxidase by Streptomyces viridosporus T7A was studied in shake flasks and under aerobic conditions in a 7.5-L batch fermentor. Lignin peroxidase synthesis was found to be strongly affected by catabolite repression. Lignin peroxidase was a non-growth-associated, secondary metabolite. The maximum lignin peroxidase activity was 0.064 U/mL at 36 h. In order to maximize lignin peroxidase activity, optimal conditions were determined. The optimal incubation temperature, pH, and substrate (2,4-dichlorophenol) concentration for the enzyme assays were 45{degrees}C, 6, and 3 m-M, respectively. Stability of lignin peroxidase was determined at 37, 45, and 60{degrees}C, and over the pH range 4-9.

  2. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  3. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  4. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  5. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  6. 21 CFR 573.600 - Lignin sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lignin sulfonates. 573.600 Section 573.600 Food... Additive Listing § 573.600 Lignin sulfonates. Lignin sulfonates may be safely used in animal feeds in... feeds, as liquid lignin sulfonate, in an amount not to exceed 11 percent of the molasses. (4) As...

  7. Compositional dynamics of dissolved lignin in watersheds: small temperate streams to large tropical rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N. D.; Keil, R. G.; Medeiros, P. M.; Brito, D.; Krusche, A. V.; Richey, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The most abundant biochemicals on land are cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin, alone, composes roughly 30% of the organic carbon (OC) in the terrestrial biosphere (Boerjan et al., 2003) and a significant portion of the OC mobilized into stream and river networks worldwide. Here we present a synthesis of several studies examining (i) the mobilization dynamics/compositional changes in dissolved lignin during rapid storm events in small temperate streams (Hood Canal, WA, USA), and (ii) the respiration dynamics/biological overturning of dissolved (and particulate) lignin in the Amazon River mainstem. Rapid sampling (3 hour intervals) during short-term rainfall events has revealed that the concentration of dissolved lignin phenols (as well as DOC) in small temperate streams is strongly correlated with river discharge (Ward et al., 2012). Additionally, rapid discharge increases resulted in an increase in Ad/Al and C/V ratios and decrease in the S/V ratio of dissolved lignin phenols, indicating a mobilization of relatively degraded non-woody/gymnosperm-derived material in the dissolved phase during storms occurring after a long dry period. We hypothesize that sorption to soil surfaces imparts an additional control on lignin mobilization: degraded phenols are relatively more soluble than their non-degraded counterparts and are easily mobilized by rapid flow, whereas non-degraded phenols are slowly mobilized by base flow and continuously degraded in soils. Once lignin is mobilized into the aquatic setting it is often assumed to be refractory. However, evidence in the Amazon River mainstem suggests the contrary. We have assessed the biodegradability of dissolved (and particulate) lignin, as well as a vast suite (~120) of similar phenolic compounds with a series of incubation experiments performed on four Amazon River cruises. We estimate that on average the degradation of lignin and similar phenolic compounds supports 30-50% of bulk respiration rates in the river

  8. NMR CHARACTERIZATION OF LIGNINS ISOLATED FROM FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INSOLUBLE DIETARY FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compositional information for lignins in food is rare and concentrated on cereal grains and brans. As lignins are suspected to have important health roles in the dietary fiber complex, including as antioxidants and carcinogen adsorbants, and may be partially converted to mammalian lignans, the confu...

  9. A coal mine multi-point fiber ethylene gas concentration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Liu, Tongyu

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous combustion of the coal mine goaf is one of the main disasters in the coal mine. The detection technology based on symbolic gas is the main means to realize the spontaneous combustion prediction of the coal mine goaf, and ethylene gas is an important symbol gas of spontaneous combustion in the coal accelerated oxidation stage. In order to overcome the problem of current coal ethylene detection, the paper presents a mine optical fiber multi-point ethylene concentration sensor based on the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Based on the experiments and analysis of the near-infrared spectrum of ethylene, the system employed the 1.62 μm (DFB) wavelength fiber coupled distributed feedback laser as the light source. By using the wavelength scanning technique and developing a stable fiber coupled Herriot type long path gas absorption cell, a ppm-level high sensitivity detecting system for the concentration of ethylene gas was realized, which could meet the needs of coal mine fire prevention goaf prediction.

  10. Increasing the lignin yield of the Alkaline Polyol Pulping process by treating black liquor with laccases of Myceliophthora thermophila.

    PubMed

    Engel, Norman; Hundt, Martin; Schapals, Tino

    2016-03-01

    The Alkaline Polyol Pulping process separates cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass by dissolving lignin to a great extent. Due to the pulping conditions the dissolved lignin depolymerises and only 75% can be precipitated. To increase this amount, a 24 h reaction of laccases of Myceliophthora thermophila with lignin dissolved in black liquor of the AlkaPolP process was investigated. The influence of pH, temperature, enzyme concentration and partial oxygen pressure was examined in a batch stirred tank reactor using a Box-Behnken factorial design. Due to the enzymatic reaction the lignin polymerises which results in an enhanced lignin precipitation. The addition of a mediator improves the polymerisation but decreases the amount of precipitable lignin. The influence of the parameters on precipitation yield and molecular mass can sufficiently be described with a second-order model and optimum conditions can be assessed. FT-IR spectra of the obtained lignins revealed that its typical phenolic structure is preserved. PMID:26722808

  11. Two-color-absorption sensor for time-resolved measurements of gasoline concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Sung Hyun; Porter, Jason M; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K; Montoya, Juan C; Allen, Mark G; Sholes, Kevin R

    2009-11-20

    A midinfrared absorption sensor for crank-angle-resolved in-cylinder measurements of gasoline concentration and gas temperature for spark-ignition internal-combustion engines is reported, and design considerations and validation testing in the controlled environments of a heated cell and shock-heated gases are discussed. Mid-IR laser light was tuned to transitions in the strong absorption bands associated with C-H stretching vibration near 3.4 microm, and time-resolved fuel vapor concentration and gas temperature were determined simultaneously from the absorption at two different wavelengths. These two infrared laser wavelengths were simultaneously produced by difference-frequency generation, which combines a near-IR signal laser with two near-IR pump lasers in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. Injection current modulation of the pump lasers produced intensity modulation of the mid-IR, which allowed the transmitted signals from the two laser wavelengths to be detected on a single detector and separated by frequency demultiplexing. Injection current modulation produced a wavelength modulation synchronous with the intensity modulation for each of the laser wavelengths, and accurate measurement of the gasoline absorption signal required the effects of wavelength modulation to be considered. Validation experiments were conducted for a single-component hydrocarbon fuel (2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane, commonly known as iso-octane) and a gasoline blend in a heated static cell (300 < or = T < or = 600 K) and behind planar shock waves (600 < T < 1100 K) in a shock tube. With a bandwidth of 10 kHz, the measured fuel concentrations agreed within 5% RMS and the measured temperature agreed within 3% RMS to the known values. The 10 kHz bandwidth is sufficient to resolve 1 crank-angle degree at 1600 RPM. PMID:19935971

  12. [Applicability of semi-conductor zinc oxide gas sensors to detection of low ozone concentrations in pressurized modules].

    PubMed

    Eremeev, S I; Krychenkov, D A

    2005-01-01

    Gas analyzers employ a variety of physical-chemical processes including photocalorimetry, electrochemistry, thermal catalysis and others. Most of the analyzers are designed with certain drawbacks like insufficient serviceability of electrochemical or catalytic thermal sensor and, consequently, the requirement of periodic replacement and calibration, the necessity of periodic resupply of expendables (photocalorimetric) etc. utilization of these systems in pressurized modules is complicated because of the necessity of regular resupply and coordination of experiment duration with gas-analyzer maintenance operations. The problem can be resolved by introduction of semi-conductor gas sensors functioning on the principle of reactivity of metal-oxide conduction to a measuring substance. A zinc oxide semi-conductor sensor was tested for ozone with calculation of the dependence of wanted signal on substance concentration. The tests were performed in steady and pulsed mode of sensor operation. PMID:16193928

  13. Fluorescence-based proxies for lignin in freshwater dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Eckard, Robert S.; Spencer, Robert G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Lignin phenols have proven to be powerful biomarkers in environmental studies; however, the complexity of lignin analysis limits the number of samples and thus spatial and temporal resolution in any given study. In contrast, spectrophotometric characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is rapid, noninvasive, relatively inexpensive, requires small sample volumes, and can even be measured in situ to capture fine-scale temporal and spatial detail of DOM cycling. Here we present a series of cross-validated Partial Least Squares models that use fluorescence properties of DOM to explain up to 91% of lignin compositional and concentration variability in samples collected seasonally over 2 years in the Sacramento River/San Joaquin River Delta in California, United States. These models were subsequently used to predict lignin composition and concentration from fluorescence measurements collected during a diurnal study in the San Joaquin River. While modeled lignin composition remained largely unchanged over the diurnal cycle, changes in modeled lignin concentrations were much greater than expected and indicate that the sensitivity of fluorescence-based proxies for lignin may prove invaluable as a tool for selecting the most informative samples for detailed lignin characterization. With adequate calibration, similar models could be used to significantly expand our ability to study sources and processing of DOM in complex surface water systems.

  14. Pulsed corona discharge oxidation of aqueous lignin: decomposition and aldehydes formation.

    PubMed

    Panorel, Iris; Kaijanen, Laura; Kornev, Iakov; Preis, Sergei; Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is the mass waste product of pulp and paper industry mostly incinerated for energy recovery. Lignin is, however, a substantial source of raw material for derivatives currently produced in costly wet oxidation processes. The pulsed corona discharge (PCD) for the first time was applied to lignin oxidation aiming a cost-effective environmentally friendly lignin removal and transformation to aldehydes. The experimental research into treatment of coniferous kraft lignin aqueous solutions was undertaken to establish the dependence of lignin oxidation and aldehyde formation on the discharge parameters, initial concentration of lignin and gas phase composition. The rate and the energy efficiency of lignin oxidation increased with increasing oxygen concentration reaching up to 82 g kW-1 h-1 in 89% vol. oxygen. Oxidation energy efficiency in PCD treatment exceeds the one for conventional ozonation by the factor of two under the experimental conditions. Oxidation at low oxygen concentrations showed a tendency of the increasing aldehydes and glyoxylic acid formation yield. PMID:24600854

  15. Measurement of sucrose and ethanol concentrations in process streams and effluents of sugarcane bioethanol industry by optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Eric; Ono, Eduardo; Manfrim, Tarcio P.; Santos, Juliana S.; Suzuki, Carlos K.

    2011-05-01

    The measurement of process streams and effluents from sugar-ethanol industry by using optical fiber sensor based on Fresnel reflection principle is reported. Firstly, binary sucrose-water and ethanol-water solutions were measured in order to determine the calibration curves. Secondly, the co-products from various processing stages were analyzed in order to identify the sucrose or ethanol concentration. The absolute error was calculated by comparison between the nominal concentration values obtained by plant laboratory analysis and the sensor response, yielding errors <= 5 wt% and <= 5 vol% for sucrose and ethanol content, respectively. The fiber sensor provided reliable results even for samples with more complex compositions than pure sucrose or ethanol solutions, with perspectives of application on the several stages of the plant facility.

  16. A quantitative and qualitative comparison of aquatic and terrestrial plant lignin phenols: Critical information for paleoecological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. K.; Gao, L.; Huang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Currently, lignin phenols are used in marine and lacustrine ecosystems as proxies for terrestrial vegetation inputs. Lignins are found in all vascular plants, where they play a crucial role in conduction of water, nutrients and photosynthates through the vascular system, and where they provide structural support. Furthermore, different types of lignin phenols are found in specific types of vegetation (e.g., both syringyl and vanillyl phenols are in angiosperm wood, but only vanillyl phenols are in gymnosperm wood). The ratio of lignin phenols (e.g. syringyl:vanillyl) is indicative of the type of plant from which the lignin phenols were derived. Studies that examine lignin phenols in sedimentary archives assume that lignin phenols are derived solely from terrestrial plants, and changes in the types of lignin phenols are therefore assumed to mark changes in terrestrial vegetation. These assumptions may be flawed, however, because many aquatic plants, including those that are submerged, are vascular, yet little is known about the type and concentration of lignin phenols present in aquatic vascular plants. This knowledge is imperative to the success of paleoecological studies that utilize lignin phenols as a geochemical proxy for terrestrial vegetation. Furthermore, lignin phenols may be important targets for compound-specific radiocarbon dating, which is useful when suitable macrofossils are unavailable. Knowing the origin of the molecules used for radiocarbon dating, however, (i.e. whether they are terrestrial or aquatic) is critical to obtaining meaningful chronologies. We isolated and analyzed lignin phenol monomers from different types of aquatic vascular plants. All plants analyzed are angiosperms, but they occupy different niches in aquatic plant communities: floating, emergent and submergent. We also analyzed different parts of aquatic plants (i.e., stems and leaves). We found lignin phenols in all aquatic species that we analyzed, which highlights the need for

  17. Sensor for headspace pressure and H2O concentration measurements in closed vials by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tingdong; Wang, Guishi; Cao, Zhensong; Zhang, Weijun; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    The concentration of H2O and the pressure in the headspace of vials are simultaneously measured by a tunable diode laser sensor based on absorption spectroscopy techniques. The 7168.437 cm-1 spectral line of H2O is chosen as the sensing transition for its strong absorption strength and being reasonably far away from its neighboring molecular transitions. In order to prevent interference absorption by ambient water vapor in the room air, a difference between the measured signal and the referenced signal is used to calculate the pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials, eliminating the need for inert gas purges and calibration with known gas. The validation of the sensor is conducted in a static vial, yielding an accuracy of 1.23% for pressure and 3.81% for H2O concentration. The sensitivity of the sensor is estimated to be about 2.5 Torr for pressure and 400 ppm for H2O concentration over a 3 cm absorption path length respectively. Accurate measurements for commercial freeze-dried products demonstrate the in-line applications of the sensor for the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Molecular architecture requirements for polymer-grafted lignin superplasticizers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chetali; Sverdlove, Madeline J; Washburn, Newell R

    2015-04-01

    Superplasticizers are a class of anionic polymer dispersants used to inhibit aggregation in hydraulic cement, lowering the yield stress of cement pastes to improve workability and reduce water requirements. The plant-derived biopolymer lignin is commonly used as a low-cost/low-performance plasticizer, but attempts to improve its effects on cement rheology through copolymerization with synthetic monomers have not led to significant improvements. Here we demonstrate that kraft lignin can form the basis for high-performance superplasticizers in hydraulic cement, but the molecular architecture must be based on a lignin core with a synthetic-polymer corona that can be produced via controlled radical polymerization. Using slump tests of ordinary Portland cement pastes, we show that polyacrylamide-grafted lignin prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization can reduce the yield stress of cement paste to similar levels as a leading commercial polycarboxylate ether superplasticizer at concentrations ten-fold lower, although the lignin material produced via controlled radical polymerization does not appear to reduce the dynamic viscosity of cement paste as effectively as the polycarboxylate superplasticizer, despite having a similar affinity for the individual mineral components of ordinary Portland cement. In contrast, polyacrylamide copolymerized with a methacrylated kraft lignin via conventional free radical polymerization having a similar overall composition did not reduce the yield stress or the viscosity of cement pastes. While further work is required to elucidate the mechanism of this effect, these results indicate that controlling the architecture of polymer-grafted lignin can significantly enhance its performance as a superplasticizer for cement. PMID:25693832

  19. Mechanochemical modification of lignin and application of the modified lignin for thermoplastics and thermosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Zhang, Jinwen; Xin, Junna

    In this work, mechanochemical modification of lignin and use of the modified lignin in thermoplastics and thermosets were studied. Oleated lignin was successfully prepared by transesterification between lignin and methyl, and the oleation reaction was performed in a solvent-free and room temperature ball milling process with a relatively short time. PLA/lignin blends were prepared through melt extrusion. Compared with the PLA/lignin blends, the PLA/oleated lignin blends exhibited finer dispersion of lignin in the blends, increased glass transition temperature and higher tensile properties, suggesting improved compatibility between lignin and PLA. Carboxylic and anhydride groups were also introduced into the structure of lignin via mechanochemical modification, and the resulting lignin derivatives were used as curing agents for epoxies. The dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability of the cured epoxy resins were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  20. Detection of smectites in ppm and sub-ppm concentrations using dye molecule sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofaj, Marcel; Bujdák, Juraj

    2012-03-01

    Methylene blue and rhodamine 6G were used as molecular sensors for the spectrophotometric titrations of the aqueous colloids of clay minerals (montmorillonite, illite and kaolinite). The dyes adsorbed on colloid particles form molecular aggregates, which exhibit spectral properties significantly different from those of dye solutions. Spectrophotometric titrations provide the most sensitive detection of smectites in aqueous colloids (sub-ppm concentrations); and the sensitivity further increases using second derivative spectroscopy. The endpoint of spectrophotometric titrations can be used for the determination of exchange capacity of the mineral in colloids and in this way to estimate its amount. The method is selective only to expandable clays, which was proven by experiments with kaolinite and illite. Spectrophotometric titrations have promising future in the analysis of clays and can be applied in many fields of geology, mineralogy, chemistry, material sciences or in industry. Its application may expand to the analysis of other nanomaterials built from charged particles and exhibiting metachromasy in the systems with organic dyes.

  1. Manganese-dependent cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora in the absence of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.A. Jr.; Bao, W.; Kawai, S.

    1996-10-01

    Many ligninolytic fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), the enzyme generally thought to cleave nonphenolic structures in lignin. However, the fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, is able to degrade these nonphenolic structures. Experiments showed wood block cultures and defined liquid medium cultures of C. subvermispora rapidly deploymerized and mineralized a {sup 14}C-labeled, polyethylene glycol-linked, high-molecular-weight {beta}-O-4 lignin model compound (model I) that represents the major nonphenolic structure of lignin. The fungus cleaved model I between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release benzylic fragments, which were shown in isotope trapping experiments to be major products of model I metabolism. The C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} cleavage of {beta}-O-4 lignin structures to release benzylic fragments is characteristic of LiP catalysis, but no detectable LiP activity. Three results pointed, instead, to the participation of a different enzyme, manganese peroxidase (MnP), in the degradation of nonphenolic lignin structures by C. subvermispora. (1) The degradation of model I and of exhaustively methylated (nonphenolic), {sup 14}C-labeled, synthetic lignin by the fungus in liquid cultures was almost completely inhibited when the Mn concentration of the medium was decreased from 35 {mu}M to approximately 5 {mu}M. (2) The fungus degraded model I and methylated lignin significantly faster in the presence of Tween 80, a source of unsaturated fatty acids, than it did in the presence of Tween 20, which contains only saturated fatty acids. Previous work has shown that nonphenolic lignin structures are degraded during the MnP-mediated peroxidation of unsaturated lipids. (3) In experiments with MnP, Mn(II), and unsaturated lipid in vitro, this system mimicked intact C. subvermispora cultures in that it cleaved nonphenolic {beta}-O-4 lignin model compounds between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release a benzylic fragment. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-12-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure-property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon, are discussed. PMID:26568373

  3. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By application specific pretreatments and manufacturing method, lignin can be converted to a variety of value added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogenitites in lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. In this review, lignin manufacturing process, effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of lignin, properties and applications of various lignin derived carbon materials such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films; are discussed.

  4. Abnormal lignin in a loblolly pine mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, J.; MacKay, J.J.; Hatfield, R.D.

    1997-07-11

    Novel lignin is formed in a mutant loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) severely depleted in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.195), which converts coniferaldehyde to coniferyl alcohol, the primary lignin precursor in pines. Dihydroconiferyl alcohol, a monomer not normally associated with the lignin biosynthetic pathway, is the major component of the mutant`s lignin, accounting for {approximately}30 percent (versus {approximately}3 percent in normal pine) of the units. The level of aldehydes, including new 2-methoxybenzaldehydes, is also increased. The mutant pines grew normally indicating that, even within a species, extensive variations in lignin composition need not disrupt the essential functions of lignin.

  5. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  6. Source to sink: Evolution of lignin composition in the Madre de Dios River system with connection to the Amazon basin and offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Feakins, Sarah J.; Liu, Zongguang; Ponton, Camilo; Wang, Renée. Z.; Karkabi, Elias; Galy, Valier; Berelson, William M.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Meir, Patrick; West, A. Joshua

    2016-05-01

    While lignin geochemistry has been extensively investigated in the Amazon River, little is known about lignin distribution and dynamics within deep, stratified river channels or its transformations within soils prior to delivery to rivers. We characterized lignin phenols in soils, river particulate organic matter (POM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) across a 4 km elevation gradient in the Madre de Dios River system, Peru, as well as in marine sediments to investigate the source-to-sink evolution of lignin. In soils, we found more oxidized lignin in organic horizons relative to mineral horizons. The oxidized lignin signature was maintained during transfer into rivers, and lignin was a relatively constant fraction of bulk organic carbon in soils and riverine POM. Lignin in DOM became increasingly oxidized downstream, indicating active transformation of dissolved lignin during transport, especially in the dry season. In contrast, POM accumulated undegraded lignin downstream during the wet season, suggesting that terrestrial input exceeded in-river degradation. We discovered high concentrations of relatively undegraded lignin in POM at depth in the lower Madre de Dios River in both seasons, revealing a woody undercurrent for its transfer within these deep rivers. Our study of lignin evolution in the soil-river-ocean continuum highlights important seasonal and depth variations of river carbon components and their connection to soil carbon pools, providing new insights into fluvial carbon dynamics associated with the transfer of lignin biomarkers from source to sink.

  7. Analyzer for measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration by ozone content reduction in gas using solid state chemiluminescent sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.; Isaev, L. N.

    2014-05-01

    Role of nitrogen oxide in ambient air is described and analyzed. New method of nitrogen oxide concentration measurement in gas phase is suggested based on ozone concentration measurement with titration by nitrogen oxide. Research of chemiluminescent sensor composition is carried out on experimental stand. The sensor produced on the base of solid state non-activated chemiluminescent composition is applied as ozone sensor. Composition is put on the surface of polymer matrix with developed surface. Sensor compositions includes gallic acid with addition of rodamine-6G. Model of interaction process between sensor composition and ozone has been developed, main products appeared during reaction are identified. The product determining the speed of luminescense appearance is found. This product belongs to quinone class. Then new structure of chemiluminescent composition was suggested, with absence of activation period and with high stability of operation. Experimental model of gas analyzer was constructed and operation algorithm was developed. It was demonstrated that developed NO measuring instrument would be applied for monitoring purposes of ambient air. This work was partially financially supported by Government of Russian Federation, Grant 074-U01

  8. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass benefits from lignin removal, relocation, and/or modification during hydrothermal pretreatment. Phase transition, depolymerization/repolymerization, and solubility effects may all influence these lignin changes. To better understand how lignin is altered, Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides wood samples and cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) isolated from P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides were subjected to batch and flowthrough pretreatments. The residual solids and liquid hydrolysate were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, compositional analysis, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Changes in the structure of the solids recovered after the pretreatment of CEL and the production of aromatic monomers point strongly to depolymerization and condensation being primary mechanisms for lignin extraction and redeposition. The differences in lignin removal and phenolic compound production from native P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides and CEL suggested that lignin-carbohydrate interactions increased lignin extraction and the extractability of syringyl groups relative to guaiacyl groups. Conclusions These insights into delignification during hydrothermal pretreatment point to desirable pretreatment strategies and plant modifications. Because depolymerization followed by repolymerization appears to be the dominant mode of lignin modification, limiting the residence time of depolymerized lignin moieties in the bulk liquid phase should reduce lignin content in pretreated biomass. In addition, the increase in lignin removal in the presence of polysaccharides suggests that increasing lignin-carbohydrate cross-links in biomass would increase delignification during pretreatment. PMID:23902789

  9. Changes to Lignin Phenol and Hydroxy Alkanoic Acid yStable Carbon Isotope Composition and Concentration in ySoil Fractions from a Grassland/Woodland Conversion in ya Subtropical Savannay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T.; Gamblin, D.; Boutton, T.; Liao, J.; Jastrow, J.

    2005-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to changes in land cover during woody yplant encroachment is an issue of great importance to soil carbon modeling as grassland ysoils represent a major Earth C stock. Bulk assessments of carbon turn over in soils can ybe obtained in systems where C4 plants are being replaced by C3 trees using stable yisotope modeling along a chronosequence. Few SOC studies, however, approach the yquestion of carbon storage and turn over at the compound specific level even though ybiopolymers turnover at vastly different rates and have selective affinities for long term ypreservation. Defining what compound classes represent relatively recalcitrant or labile ypools can be made in such systems where intrinsic differences in stable isotope ycomposition and molecular chemistry are very large. We quantified changes in lignin yphenol and hydroxyl alkanoic acid chemistry and stable carbon isotope composition of ysize and density fractionated soil from the Rio Grande Plains of Texas where C4 ygrasslands (δ13C = -14%) have undergone succession to subtropical thorn woodland ydominated by C3 trees/shrubs (δ13C = -27%) over an 80 year chronosequence. yComparison of the extant of conversion of the grassland SOM to C3 carbon by bulk SOC yisotope modeling to that obtained using compound specific isotope analysis of lignin yphenols in the microaggreagate (53-250 microns), macroaggregates (>250 microns), and ythe microaggregated particulate organic matter (<1.8 g/cc) demonstrates faster turn over yfor the average bulk pool than for lignin. Additionally, p-hyroxy lignin converts to C3 at yabout twice the rate as does vanillyl and syringyl lignin phenol pools reflecting both ydifferences in input rate and ease by which the different pools can be degraded by ymicrobes. The relative extent of turn over between the physical fractions remained the ysame in the two analyses with macroaggrgates>microaggregated pom>microaggregates. yThis work adds to a

  10. Augmented Switching Linear Dynamical System Model for Gas Concentration Estimation with MOX Sensors in an Open Sampling System

    PubMed Central

    Di Lello, Enrico; Trincavelli, Marco; Bruyninckx, Herman; De Laet, Tinne

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian time series model approach for gas concentration estimation using Metal Oxide (MOX) sensors in Open Sampling System (OSS). Our approach focuses on the compensation of the slow response of MOX sensors, while concurrently solving the problem of estimating the gas concentration in OSS. The proposed Augmented Switching Linear System model allows to include all the sources of uncertainty arising at each step of the problem in a single coherent probabilistic formulation. In particular, the problem of detecting on-line the current sensor dynamical regime and estimating the underlying gas concentration under environmental disturbances and noisy measurements is formulated and solved as a statistical inference problem. Our model improves, with respect to the state of the art, where system modeling approaches have been already introduced, but only provided an indirect relative measures proportional to the gas concentration and the problem of modeling uncertainty was ignored. Our approach is validated experimentally and the performances in terms of speed of and quality of the gas concentration estimation are compared with the ones obtained using a photo-ionization detector. PMID:25019637

  11. Direct interaction of lignin and lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Johjima, T; Itoh, N; Kabuto, M; Tokimura, F; Nakagawa, T; Wariishi, H; Tanaka, H

    1999-03-01

    Binding properties of lignin peroxidase (LiP) from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium against a synthetic lignin (dehydrogenated polymerizate, DHP) were studied with a resonant mirror biosensor. Among several ligninolytic enzymes, only LiP specifically binds to DHP. Kinetic analysis revealed that the binding was reversible, and that the dissociation equilibrium constant was 330 microM. The LiP-DHP interaction was controlled by the ionization group with a pKa of 5.3, strongly suggesting that a specific amino acid residue plays a role in lignin binding. A one-electron transfer from DHP to oxidized intermediates LiP compounds I and II (LiPI and LiPII) was characterized by using a stopped-flow technique, showing that binding interactions of DHP with LiPI and LiPII led to saturation kinetics. The dissociation equilibrium constants for LiPI-DHP and LiPII-DHP interactions were calculated to be 350 and 250 microM, and the first-order rate constants for electron transfer from DHP to LiPI and to LiPII were calculated to be 46 and 16 s-1, respectively. These kinetic and spectral studies strongly suggest that LiP is capable of oxidizing lignin directly at the protein surface by a long-range electron transfer process. A close look at the crystal structure suggested that LiP possesses His-239 as a possible lignin-binding site on the surface, which is linked to Asp-238. This Asp residue is hydrogen-bonded to the proximal His-176. This His-Asp...proximal-His motif would be a possible electron transfer route to oxidize polymeric lignin. PMID:10051582

  12. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has shown that addition of lignin-derived liquids to coal stirred in tetralin under mild reaction conditions (375{degree}C and 300--500 psig) results in a marked enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization. A mathematical model was developed to study the kinetics of coal depolymerization in the presence of liquid-derived liquids. In the present study, a reaction pathway was formulated to explain the enhancement in coal depolymerization due to lignin (solid) addition. The model postulated assumes that the products of lignin obtained during thermolysis interact with the reactive moieties present in coal while simultaneous depolymerization of coal occurs. A good fit between the experimental data and the kinetic model was found. The results show that in addition to the enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization, lignin also reacts (and enhances the extent of depolymerization of coal) with those reaction sites in coal that are not susceptible to depolymerization when coal alone is reacted in tetralin under identical reaction conditions. Additional work is being carried out to determine a thorough materials balance on the lignin-assisted coal depolymerization process. A number of liquid samples have been obtained which are being studied for their stability in various environments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. ''The control of lignin synthesis''

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, John E.

    2005-04-07

    In this project we tested the hypothesis that regulation of the synthesis of lignin in secondary xylem cells in conifer trees involves the transport of glucosylated lignin monomers to the wall of xylem cells, followed by de-glucosylation in the cell wall by monolignol-specific glucosidase enzymes, which activates the monomers for lignin polymerization. The information we gathered is relevant to the fundamental understanding of how trees make wood, and to the applied goal of more environmentally friendly pulp and paper production. We characterized the complete genomic structure of the Coniferin-specific Beta-glucosidase (CBG) gene family in the conifers loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and partial genomic sequences were obtained in several other tree species. Both pine species contain multiple CBG genes which raises the possibility of differential regulation, perhaps related to the multiple roles of lignin in development and defense. Subsequent projects will need to include detailed gene expression studies of each gene family member during tree growth and development, and testing the role of each monolignol-specific glucosidase gene in controlling lignin content.

  14. Unravelling lignin formation and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.G. . Inst. of Biological Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    During this study, we established that the Fagaceae exclusively accumulate Z-monolignois/glucosides, and not the E-isomers. Evidence for the presence of a novel E{yields}Z isomerse has been obtained. Our pioneering work in lignin biosynthesis and structure in situ has also progressed smoothly. We established the bonding environments of a woody angiosperm, Leucanea leucocephala, as well as wheat (T. aestivum) and tobacco (N. tabacum). A cell culture system from Pinus taeda was developed which seems ideal for investigating the early stages of lignification. These cultures excrete peroxidase isozymes, considered to be specifically involved in lignin deposition. We also studied the effect of the putative lignin-degrading enzyme, lignin peroxidase, on monolignols and dehydropolymerisates therefrom. In all cases, polymerization was observed, and not degradation; these polymers are identical to that obtained with horseradish peroxidases/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. It seems inconceivable that these enzymes can be considered as being primarily responsible for lignin biodegradation.

  15. Fiber Optic Raman Sensor to Monitor Concentration Ratio of Nitrogen and Oxygen in a Cryogenic Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.; SaintCyr, William

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor is developed for a specific need of NASA/SSC for long-term detection and monitoring of the quality of liquid oxygen (LOX) in the delivery line during ground testing of rocket engines. The sensor performance was tested in the laboratory and with different excitation light sources. To evaluate the sensor performance with different excitation light sources for the LOX quality application, we have used the various mixtures of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen as samples. The study of the sensor performance shows that this sensor offers a great deal of flexibility and provides a cost effective solution for the application. However, an improved system response time is needed for the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in harsh environment.

  16. ISSUES IN LIGNIN CHEMISTRY. "THE HELSINKI CONNECTION"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation covers advances in lignin chemistry (and our Helsinki connection) on dibenzodioxocins, spirodienones, and reduced structures in lignins. It also explores the various roles in defending lignification theory (based on Freudenberg's original hypothesis) against a supposed new contende...

  17. Lignin analysis by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, U.P.; Obst, J.R.; Cannon, A.B.

    1996-10-01

    Traditional methods of lignin analysis, such as Klason (acid insoluble) lignin determinations, give satisfactory results, are widely accepted, and often are considered as standard analyses. However, the Klason lignin method is laborious and time consuming; it also requires a fairly large-amount of isolated analyte. FT-Raman spectroscopy offers an opportunity to simplify and speed up lignin analyses. FT-Raman data for a number of hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms) are compared with data obtained using other analytical methods, including Klason lignin (with corrections for acid soluble lignin), acetyl bromide, and FT-IR determinations. In addition, 10 different specimens of Nothofagus dombeyii (chosen because of the widely varying syringyl:guaiacyl monomer compositions of their lignins) were also analyzed. Lignin monomer compositions were determined by thioacidolysis of by nitrobenzene oxidation.

  18. Development of novel assays for lignin degradation: comparative analysis of bacterial and fungal lignin degraders.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mark; Taylor, Charles R; Pink, David; Burton, Kerry; Eastwood, Daniel; Bending, Gary D; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2010-05-01

    Two spectrophotometric assays have been developed to monitor breakdown of the lignin component of plant lignocellulose: a continuous fluorescent assay involving fluorescently modified lignin, and a UV-vis assay involving chemically nitrated lignin. These assays have been used to analyse lignin degradation activity in bacterial and fungal lignin degraders, and to identify additional soil bacteria that show activity for lignin degradation. Two soil bacteria known to act as aromatic degraders, Pseudomonas putida and Rhodococcus sp. RHA1, consistently showed activity in these assays, and these strains were shown in a small scale experiment to breakdown lignocellulose, producing a number of monocyclic phenolic products. Using milled wood lignin prepared from wheat straw, pine, and miscanthus, some bacterial lignin degraders were found to show specificity for lignin type. These assays could be used to identify novel lignin degraders for breakdown of plant lignocellulose. PMID:20567767

  19. Degradation of lignin in pulp mill wastewaters by white-rot fungi on biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Xiao, Ya-Zhong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2005-08-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the lignin-degrading capacity of attached-growth white-rot fungi. Five white-rot fungi, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, Lentinus edodes, Trametes versicolor and S22, grown on a porous plastic media, were individually used to treat black liquor from a pulp and paper mill. Over 71% of lignin and 48% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed from the wastewater. Several factors, including pH, concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and trace elements in wastewater, all had significant effects on the degradation of lignin and the removal of COD. Three white-rot fungi, P. chrysosporium, P. ostreatus and S22, showed high capacity for lignin degradation at pH 9.0-11.0. The addition of 1 g l-1 glucose and 0.2 g l-1 ammonium tartrate was beneficial for the degradation of lignin by the white-rot fungi studied. PMID:15792583

  20. Quantitative cross-sectional measurement of solid concentration distribution in slurries using a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes dos Santos, Eduardo; Schleicher, Eckhard; Reinecke, Sebastian; Hampel, Uwe; Da Silva, Marco Jose

    2016-01-01

    Wire-mesh sensors have so far been widely applied in gas-liquid flows where resistance or capacitance distributions are measured and converted into gas or liquid holdup distributions. In this work we report on the qualification of the wire-mesh imaging technique for the measurement of cross-sectional solid concentrations in solid-liquid mixtures. As the dielectric constants of solid particles are different from those of gas, water or oil in the flow, measuring this property can be used as an indication of solid distribution. Experiments were performed in a stirred tank of 100 mm diameter equipped with a capacitance wire-mesh sensor. The wire-mesh sensor was operated at an acquisition speed of 4000 frames per second and has a spatial resolution of 6.25 mm. As solids we used silica sand particles (diameter ~250 μm) which were suspended in water in a volume concentration range of 1% to 35% to form slurries. By varying the stirring speed, different solid concentration distributions were produced and investigated. In order to convert the measured relative permittivity distribution into a solid concentration distribution, an empirical approach was employed.

  1. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  2. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5460 - Organosolv lignin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organosolv lignin. 721.5460 Section... Substances § 721.5460 Organosolv lignin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an organosolv lignin (PMN P-95-1584; CAS No. 8068-03-9)...

  7. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  8. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  9. A Novel Partially Biobased PAN-Lignin Blend as a Potential Carbon Fiber Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Seydibeyoğlu, M. Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Blends of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and lignin were prepared with three different lignin types by solution blending and solution casting. Among three types of lignin, one type was chosen and different blend concentrations were prepared and casted. The casted blend films were characterized chemically with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermally with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The mechanical properties of the blends were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). FTIR analysis shows an excellent interaction of PAN and lignin. The interaction of the lignins and PAN was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DMA results reveal that the lignin enhance the mechanical properties of PAN at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The blend structure and morphology were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images show that excellent polymer blends were prepared. The results show that it is possible to develop a new precursor material with a blend of lignin and PAN. These studies show that the side product of paper and cellulosic bioethanol industries, namely, lignin can be used for new application areas. PMID:23118513

  10. Enzymatic monitoring of lignin and lignin derivatives biooxidation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Victor; Mamo, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Lignin oxidation was enzymatically monitored by measuring methanol released during the reaction. The methanol was oxidized to formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter used to oxidize ABTS to a product measured spectrophotometrically. The efficiency was comparable to the commonly used gas chromatography method. The assay was fast and inexpensive. PMID:26632344

  11. Mapping the lignin distribution in pretreated sugarcane bagasse by confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delignification pretreatments of biomass and methods to assess their efficacy are crucial for biomass-to-biofuels research and technology. Here, we applied confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using one- and two-photon excitation to map the lignin distribution within bagasse fibers pretreated with acid and alkali. The evaluated spectra and decay times are correlated with previously calculated lignin fractions. We have also investigated the influence of the pretreatment on the lignin distribution in the cell wall by analyzing the changes in the fluorescence characteristics using two-photon excitation. Eucalyptus fibers were also analyzed for comparison. Results Fluorescence spectra and variations of the decay time correlate well with the delignification yield and the lignin distribution. The decay dependences are considered two-exponential, one with a rapid (τ1) and the other with a slow (τ2) decay time. The fastest decay is associated to concentrated lignin in the bagasse and has a low sensitivity to the treatment. The fluorescence decay time became longer with the increase of the alkali concentration used in the treatment, which corresponds to lignin emission in a less concentrated environment. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence spectrum is very sensitive to lignin content and accumulation in the cell wall, broadening with the acid pretreatment and narrowing with the alkali one. Heterogeneity of the pretreated cell wall was observed. Conclusions Our results reveal lignin domains with different concentration levels. The acid pretreatment caused a disorder in the arrangement of lignin and its accumulation in the external border of the cell wall. The alkali pretreatment efficiently removed lignin from the middle of the bagasse fibers, but was less effective in its removal from their surfaces. Our results evidenced a strong correlation between the decay times of the lignin fluorescence and its distribution within the cell

  12. Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Kent, Michael S; He, Lilin; Varanasi, Patanjali; Dibble, Dean; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

  13. Design and application of a class of sensors to monitor Ca2+ dynamics in high Ca2+ concentration cellular compartments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shen; Wong, Hing-Cheung; Wang, Zhong-Min; Huang, Yun; Zou, Jin; Zhuo, You; Pennati, Andrea; Gadda, Giovanni; Delbono, Osvaldo; Yang, Jenny J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of Ca2+ fluctuations in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) is essential to defining the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent signaling under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we developed a unique class of genetically encoded indicators by designing a Ca2+ binding site in the EGFP. One of them, calcium sensor for detecting high concentration in the ER, exhibits unprecedented Ca2+ release kinetics with an off-rate estimated at around 700 s−1 and appropriate Ca2+ binding affinity, likely attributable to local Ca2+-induced conformational changes around the designed Ca2+ binding site and reduced chemical exchange between two chromophore states. Calcium sensor for detecting high concentration in the ER reported considerable differences in ER Ca2+ dynamics and concentration among human epithelial carcinoma cells (HeLa), human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293), and mouse myoblast cells (C2C12), enabling us to monitor SR luminal Ca2+ in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers to determine the mechanism of diminished SR Ca2+ release in aging mice. This sensor will be invaluable in examining pathogenesis characterized by alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:21914846

  14. Comparative geochemistries of lignins and carbohydrates in an anoxic fjord

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, S.E.; Hedges, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    A reducing, varved sediment core and monthly (May-September) plankton and sediment trap samples from Saanich Inlet, B.C., Canada, were analyzed for their elemental, lignin and neutral sugar compositions. Total yields of lignin-derived phenols from both the sediment trap and core samples indicated less than 15% and 30%, respectively, of chemically recognizable vascular plant remains, derived predominantly from gymnosperm wood and nonwoody angiosperm tissues. The elevated vanillyl and syringyl acid/aldehyde ratios of this material compared to fresh plant material indicated that it suffered mild aerobic decomposition prior to introduction to the Inlet. Organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total neutral sugars and lignin phenols all exhibited decreasing concentrations with depth in a region of uniform varving (upper 15 cm) in the sediment core. Neutral sugars were consistently the most reactive chemical class, accounting for roughly 15% of the total organic carbon turnover. Although lignin appeared to be degraded within the sediment core, this degradation was nonselective for different lignin types and did not lead to increased acid/aldehyde ratios as occur during aerobic lignin decomposition. Comparisons of the yields of individual neutral sugars from the sediment and sediment trap samples to those expected from the vascular plant component alone indicated that the vascular plant debris in the upper portion of the sediment core had lost a portion of its initial glucose, lyxose, and mannose. In contrast, rhamnose and fucose were produced by all samples in large excess of total yields expected for chemically intact vascular plant and plankton components and must have additional sources.

  15. VARIABILITY OF GRASS LIGNIN ACYLATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasses are being championed as biomass sources for bioenergy production. Their ultimate use would be as a source of carbohydrate for fermentation to ethanol, conversion to oils via pyrolysis, or direct conversion to energy through combustion. In the latter case, increasing lignin content would enha...

  16. Novel surface-based methodologies for investigating GH11 xylanase-lignin derivative interactions.

    PubMed

    Zeder-Lutz, G; Renau-Ferrer, S; Aguié-Béghin, V; Rakotoarivonina, H; Chabbert, B; Altschuh, D; Rémond, C

    2013-11-21

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose to bioprocessing represents the core problem and remains the limiting factor in creating an economy based on lignocellulosic ethanol production. Lignin is responsible for unproductive interactions with enzymes, and understanding how lignin impairs the susceptibility of biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis represents a significant aim in optimising the biological deconstruction of lignocellulose. The objective of this study was to develop methodologies based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which provide novel insights into the interactions between xylanase (Tx-xyn11) and phenolic compounds or lignin oligomers. In a first approach, Tx-xyn11 was fixed onto sensor surfaces, and phenolic molecules were applied in the liquid phase. The results demonstrated weak affinity and over-stoichiometric binding, as several phenolic molecules bound to each xylanase molecule. This approach, requiring the use of soluble molecules in the liquid phase, is not applicable to insoluble lignin oligomers, such as the dehydrogenation polymer (DHP). An alternative approach was developed in which a lignin oligomer was fixed onto a sensor surface. Due to their hydrophobic properties, the preparation of stable lignin layers on the sensor surfaces represented a considerable challenge. Among the various chemical and physico-chemical approaches assayed, two approaches (physisorption via the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified gold and covalent coupling to a carboxylated dextran matrix) led to stable lignin layers, which allowed the study of its interactions with Tx-xyn11 in the liquid phase. Our results indicated the presence of weak and non-specific interactions between Tx-xyn11 and DHP. PMID:24071685

  17. Interference of condensed tannin in lignin analyses of dry bean and forage crops.

    PubMed

    Marles, M A Susan; Coulman, Bruce E; Bett, Kirstin E

    2008-11-12

    Legumes with high concentrations of condensed tannin (pinto bean [Phaseolus vulgaris L.], sainfoin [Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.], and big trefoil [Lotus uliginosus Hoff.]), were compared to a selection of forages, with low or zero condensed tannin (smooth bromegrass [ Bromus inermis Leyss], Lotus japonicus [Regel] K. Larsen, and alfalfa [Medicago sativa L.]), using four methods to estimate fiber or lignin. Protocols were validated by using semipurified condensed tannin polymers in adulteration assays that tested low-lignin tissue with polyphenolic-enriched samples. The effect on lignin assay methods by condensed tannin concentration was interpreted using a multivariate analysis. There was an overestimation of fiber or lignin in the presence of condensed tannin in the acid detergent fiber (ADF) and Klason lignin (KL) assays compared to that in the thioglycolic acid (TGA) and acid detergent lignin (ADL) methods. Sulfite reagents (present in TGA lignin method) or sequential acidic digests at high temperatures (ADF followed by ADL) were required to eliminate condensed tannin. The ADF (alone) and KL protocols are not recommended to screen nonwoody plants, such as forages, where condensed tannin has accumulated in the tissue. PMID:18841900

  18. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake; Isern, Nancy G.; Markilllie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Robinson, Errol W.

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biofuels are promising as sustainable alternative fuels, but lignin inhibits access of enzymes to cellulose, and by-products of lignin degradation can be toxic to cells. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in the anaerobic litter deconstruction carried out by tropical soil bacteria make these organisms useful templates for improving biofuel production. The facultative anaerobe Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated from Cloud Forest soils in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico, based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolate was tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, where bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes likely play an important role in decomposition. We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to examine the observed increased growth of SCF1 grown on media amended with lignin compared to unamended growth. Proteomics suggested accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, with up-regulation of proteins involved in lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase (GST) proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. This suggested the use of lignin as terminal electron acceptor. We detected significant lignin degradation over time by absorbance, and also used metabolomics to demonstrate moderately significant decreased xylose concentrations as well as increased metabolic products acetate and formate in stationary phase in lignin-amended compared to unamended growth conditions. Our data show the advantages of a multi-omics approach toward providing insights as to how lignin may be used in nature by microorganisms coping

  19. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1.

    PubMed

    Deangelis, Kristen M; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake; Isern, Nancy G; Markilllie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie; Norbeck, Angela D; Taylor, Ronald C; Aldrich, Joshua T; Robinson, Errol W

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biofuels are promising as sustainable alternative fuels, but lignin inhibits access of enzymes to cellulose, and by-products of lignin degradation can be toxic to cells. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in the anaerobic litter deconstruction carried out by tropical soil bacteria make these organisms useful templates for improving biofuel production. The facultative anaerobe Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated from Cloud Forest soils in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico, based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolate was tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, where bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes likely play an important role in decomposition. We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to examine the observed increased growth of SCF1 grown on media amended with lignin compared to unamended growth. Proteomics suggested accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, with up-regulation of proteins involved in lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase (GST) proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. This suggested the use of lignin as terminal electron acceptor. We detected significant lignin degradation over time by absorbance, and also used metabolomics to demonstrate moderately significant decreased xylose concentrations as well as increased metabolic products acetate and formate in stationary phase in lignin-amended compared to unamended growth conditions. Our data show the advantages of a multi-omics approach toward providing insights as to how lignin may be used in nature by microorganisms coping

  20. Bisphenol A Sensors on Polyimide Fabricated by Laser Direct Writing for Onsite River Water Monitoring at Attomolar Concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Shutong; Wu, Jayne; Yu, Yongchao; Li, Ruozhou; Eda, Shigetoshi; Chen, Jiangang; Feng, Guoying; Lawrie, Benjamin; Hu, Anming

    2016-07-20

    This work presents an aptamer-based, highly sensitive and specific sensor for atto- to femtomolar level detection of bisphenol A (BPA). Because of its widespread use in numerous products, BPA enters surface water from effluent discharges during its manufacture, use, and from waste landfill sites throughout the world. On-site measurement of BPA concentrations in water is important for evaluating compliance with water quality standards or environmental risk levels of the harmful compound in the environment. The sensor in this work is porous, conducting, interdigitated electrodes that are formed by laser-induced carbonization of flexible polyimide sheets. BPA-specific aptamer is immobilized on the electrodes as the probe, and its binding with BPA at the electrode surface is detected by capacitive sensing. The binding process is aided by ac electroosmotic effect that accelerates the transport of BPA molecules to the nanoporous graphene-like structured electrodes. The sensor achieved a limit of detection of 58.28 aM with a response time of 20 s. The sensor is further applied for recovery analysis of BPA spiked in surface water. This work provides an affordable platform for highly sensitive, real time, and field-deployable BPA surveillance critical to the evaluation of the ecological impact of BPA exposure. PMID:27351908

  1. Optimization of the concentration optics of the Martian airborne dust sensor for MetNet space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, F.; González, A.; de Castro, A. J.; López, F.

    2012-06-01

    Martian atmosphere contains a significant and rapidly changing load of suspended dust that never drops to zero. The main component of Martian aerosol is micron-sized dust thought to be a product of soil weathering. Although airborne dust plays a key role in Martian climate, the basic physical properties of these aerosols are still poorly known. The scope of Mars MetNet Mission is to deploy several tens of mini atmospheric stations on the Martian surface. MEIGA-MetNet payload is the Spanish contribution in MetNet. Infrared Laboratory of University Carlos III (LIR-UC3M) is in charge of the design and development of a micro-sensor for the characterization of airborne dust. This design must accomplish with a strict budget of mass and power, 45 g and 1 W respectively. The sensor design criteria have been obtained from a physical model specifically developed for optimizing IR local scattering. The model calculates the spectral power density scattered and detected between 1 and 5 μm by a certain particle distribution and sensor configuration. From model calculations a modification based on the insertion of a compound ellipsoidal concentrator (CEC) has appeared as necessary. Its implementation has multiplied up to 100 the scattered optical power detected, significantly enhancing the detection limits of the sensor.

  2. Isolation and structural characterization of the milled wood lignin, dioxane lignin, and cellulolytic lignin preparations from brewer's spent grain.

    PubMed

    Rencoret, Jorge; Prinsen, Pepijn; Gutiérrez, Ana; Martínez, Ángel T; Del Río, José C

    2015-01-21

    The structure of the lignin from brewer's spent grain (BSG) has been studied in detail. Three different lignin preparations, the so-called "milled-wood" lignin (MWL), dioxane lignin (DL), and cellulolytic lignin (CEL), were isolated from BSG and then thoroughly characterized by pyrolysis GC/MS, 2D-NMR, and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC). The data indicated that BSG lignin presents a predominance of guaiacyl units (syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of 0.4-0.5) with significant amounts of associated p-coumarates and ferulates. The flavone tricin was also present in the lignin from BSG, as also occurred in other grasses. 2D-NMR (HSQC) revealed that the main substructures present are β-O-4' alkyl-aryl ethers (77-79%) followed by β-5' phenylcoumarans (11-13%) and lower amounts of β-β' resinols (5-6%) and 5-5' dibenzodioxocins (3-5%). The results from 2D-NMR (HMBC) and DFRC indicated that p-coumarates are acylating the γ-carbon of lignin side chains and are mostly involved in condensed structures. DFRC analyses also indicated a minor degree of γ-acylation with acetate groups, which takes place preferentially on S lignin (6% of S units are acetylated) over G lignin (only 1% of G units are acetylated). PMID:25520237

  3. Elicitor-Induced Spruce Stress Lignin (Structural Similarity to Early Developmental Lignins).

    PubMed Central

    Lange, B. M.; Lapierre, C.; Sandermann, H.

    1995-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Picea abies (L.) Karst released polymeric material into the culture medium when treated with an elicitor preparation from the spruce needle pathogen Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii. The presence of lignin (about 35%, w/w) was demonstrated by phloroglucinol/HCI reactivity and quantitation with thioglycolic acid. Carbohydrate (about 14%, w/w) and protein (about 32%, w/w) were also detected. Amino acid analysis revealed that hydroxyproline and proline predominated. Thioacidolysis and subsequent Raney nickel desulfurization allowed the analysis of lignin-building units and interunit bonds. Compared with spruce wood lignin, an approximately 20-fold higher relative amount of p-hydroxyphenyl units was determined. A high content of p-hydroxyphenyl units is typical for certain developmental lignins, such as conifer compression wood and middle lamella lignins, as well as all induced cell culture lignins so far analyzed. Cross-linkages of the pinoresinol type ([beta]-[beta]) in the excreted cell culture lignin were markedly increased, whereas [beta]-1 interunit linkages were decreased relative to spruce wood lignin. The amount and nature of cross-linkages were shown to be intermediate between those in wood lignin and in enzymatically prepared lignins. In summary, the elicitor-induced stress lignin was excreted as a lignin-extensin complex that closely resembled early developmental lignins. PMID:12228544

  4. Headwater Nutrient Concentration Patterns in Response to Storm Events Across Land Use Types using In Situ Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Wollheim, W. M.; Mulukutla, G. K.; Carey, R. O.; McDowell, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the aquatic biogeochemical impacts of land use change and climate variability will require improved understanding of nutrient variability over temporal scales ranging from storms to seasons. New in situ sensor technology offers the prospect of efficient nutrient measurements over multiple time scales. We quantified nutrient flux patterns in response to storm events across seasons using in situ nutrient sensors deployed in headwater streams draining three land use types (forest, suburban, and agriculture) within the Lamprey River watershed, New Hampshire, between April-December 2012. We utilized two sensor suites, each consisting of a Satlantic Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzer (NO3-N), Turner Designs C6 Multi-Sensor Platform (CDOM, Turbidity, Chl), Hydrolab MS5 (Dissolved Oxygen, pH), WET Labs Cycle P (PO4-P), and Hobo Water Level & Conductivity meters. Preliminary spring/summer comparisons at the suburban site suggest increased baseflow nitrate concentrations and decreased diurnal nitrate variability (~0.05 vs. 0.035 mg/L daily fluctuation) following leaf emergence in spring. Nitrate concentrations were diluted during storms. Hysteresis was evident, suggesting groundwater nitrate sources attributable to septic systems were diluted by surface runoff during spring storms. The agricultural stream showed similar but more extreme patterns of increasing baseflow nitrate during the summer (~2.4 to 4.1 mg/L) and dilution during storms. The compilation of a high-frequency dataset for headwater streams across seasons and land-use types will provide valuable insight into complex land use/water quality relationships in urbanizing watersheds.

  5. Dual role of lignin in plant litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Amy T.; Ballaré, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Plant litter decomposition is a critical step in the formation of soil organic matter, the mineralization of organic nutrients, and the carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems. Biotic decomposition in mesic ecosystems is generally negatively correlated with the concentration of lignin, a group of complex aromatic polymers present in plant cell walls that is recalcitrant to enzymatic degradation and serves as a structural barrier impeding microbial access to labile carbon compounds. Although photochemical mineralization of carbon has recently been shown to be important in semiarid ecosystems, litter chemistry controls on photodegradative losses are not understood. We evaluated the importance of litter chemistry on photodegradation of grass litter and cellulose substrates with varying levels of lignin [cellulose-lignin (CL) substrates] under field conditions. Using wavelength-specific light attenuation filters, we found that light-driven mass loss was promoted by both UV and visible radiation. The spectral dependence of photodegradation correlated with the absorption spectrum of lignin but not of cellulose. Field incubations demonstrated that increasing lignin concentration reduced biotic decomposition, as expected, but linearly increased photodegradation. In addition, lignin content in CL substrates consistently decreased in photodegradative incubations. We conclude that lignin has a dual role affecting litter decomposition, depending on the dominant driver (biotic or abiotic) controlling carbon turnover. Under photodegradative conditions, lignin is preferentially degraded because it acts as an effective light-absorbing compound over a wide range of wavelengths. This mechanistic understanding of the role of lignin in plant litter decomposition will allow for more accurate predictions of carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:20176940

  6. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene. PMID:27486717

  7. Poly(ethylene oxide)-Assisted Macromolecular Self-Assembly of Lignin in ABS Matrix for Sustainable Composite Applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Akato, Kokouvi M.; Tran, Chau D.; Chen, Jihua; Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-11-05

    Here we report the compatibilization of biomass-derived lignin polymer in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic matrix without loss of mechanical properties via poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-mediated macromolecular self-assembly. ABS was blended with lignin in different concentrations, and blends with 10 wt % PEO (relative to lignin) were prepared. The relative tensile strength improved slightly at low lignin content but diminished rapidly as the lignin content was increased. However, the inclusion of PEO as an interfacial adhesion promoter helped avoid deleterious effects. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that PEO plasticized the hard phase and thus lowered the activation energy (Ea) for its relaxationmore » but caused stiffening of the soft phase and increased its Ea. Microscopy revealed that incorporating lignin in ABS led to the statistical dispersion of discrete lignin domains (300–1000 nm) which, after PEO addition, were reduced to smaller interconnected particles (200–500 nm). The lignin-extended partially renewable ABS resins showed shear-thinning behavior and reduced viscosity compared to neat ABS. The preferred lignin-loaded compositions reinforced with 20 vol % chopped carbon fibers exhibited mechanical performances (77–80 MPa) equivalent to those of reinforced ABS materials reportedly used in 3D printing applications. In conclusion, this approach could lower the cost of ABS while reducing its carbon footprint.« less

  8. Poly(ethylene oxide)-Assisted Macromolecular Self-Assembly of Lignin in ABS Matrix for Sustainable Composite Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akato, Kokouvi M.; Tran, Chau D.; Chen, Jihua; Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-11-05

    Here we report the compatibilization of biomass-derived lignin polymer in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic matrix without loss of mechanical properties via poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-mediated macromolecular self-assembly. ABS was blended with lignin in different concentrations, and blends with 10 wt % PEO (relative to lignin) were prepared. The relative tensile strength improved slightly at low lignin content but diminished rapidly as the lignin content was increased. However, the inclusion of PEO as an interfacial adhesion promoter helped avoid deleterious effects. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that PEO plasticized the hard phase and thus lowered the activation energy (Ea) for its relaxation but caused stiffening of the soft phase and increased its Ea. Microscopy revealed that incorporating lignin in ABS led to the statistical dispersion of discrete lignin domains (300–1000 nm) which, after PEO addition, were reduced to smaller interconnected particles (200–500 nm). The lignin-extended partially renewable ABS resins showed shear-thinning behavior and reduced viscosity compared to neat ABS. The preferred lignin-loaded compositions reinforced with 20 vol % chopped carbon fibers exhibited mechanical performances (77–80 MPa) equivalent to those of reinforced ABS materials reportedly used in 3D printing applications. In conclusion, this approach could lower the cost of ABS while reducing its carbon footprint.

  9. Arctic sea ice concentrations from special sensor microwave imager and advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W. J.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nearly coincident data from the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) are used to compute and compare Arctic sea ice concentrations for different regions and times of the year. To help determine overall accuracies and to highlight sources of differences between passive microwave, optical wavelength, and thermal wavelength data, ice concentrations are estimated using two operational SSM/I ice concentration algorithms and with visible- and thermal-infrared wavelength AVHRR data. All algorithms capture the seasonal patterns of ice growth and melt. The ranges of differences fall within the general levels of uncertainty expected for each method and are similar to previous accuracy estimates. The estimated ice concentrations are all highly correlated, with uniform biases, although differences between individual pairs of observations can be large. On average, the NASA Team algorithm yielded 5% higher ice concentrations than the Bootstrap algorithm, while during nonmelt periods the two SSM/I algorithms agree to within 0.5%. These seasonal differences are consistent with the ways that the 19-GHz and 37-GHz microwave channels are used in the algorithms. When compared to the AVHRR-derived ice concentrations, the Team-algorithm results are more similar on average in terms of correlation and mean differences. However, the Team algorithm underestimates concentrations relative to the AVHRR output by 6% during cold months and overestimates by 3% during summer. Little seasonal difference exists between the Bootstrap and AVHRR results, with a mean difference of about 5%. Although the mean differences are less between the SSM/I-derived concentrations and concentrations estimated using AVHRR channel 1, the correlations appear substantially better between the SSM/I data and concentrations derived from AVHRR channel 4, particularly for the Team algorithm output.

  10. Lignin phenols derivatives in lichens.

    PubMed

    Zavarzina, A G; Romankevich, E A; Peresypkin, V I; Ulyantzev, A S; Belyaev, N A; Zavarzin, A A

    2015-01-01

    Lignin monophenols have been measured in the cupric oxide oxidation products from lichens of different systematic groups. It is shown for the first time that syringyl structures in most lichens strongly dominate over vanillyl and p-hydroxyl ones (S/V 7-583, S/P 3-30). This distinguishes lichens from algae and mosses (p-hydroxyl phenols are dominant) and from higher plants (S/V ratios are from 0 in gymnosperms to 1.1-5.2 in angiosperms). Molecular ratios of phenols as well as the ratios of acids to aldehydes in lichens were different from lignin of higher plants, suggesting contribution of non-lignin phenols in CuO oxidation products. The contents of syringyl and vanillyl phenols in some lichen species were comparable to non-woody tissues of higher plants. Results of the study suggest that lichens can be important source of aromatic structures in soils and hydrosphere, particularly in the regions were lichens are abundant. PMID:26728733

  11. Detection of Lignin Peroxidase and Xylanase by Immunocytochemical Labeling in Wood Decayed by Basidiomycetes †

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, R. A.; Abad, A. R.; Farrell, R. L.; Leathers, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    The white rot fungi used in this study caused two different forms of degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium, strain BKM-F-1767, and Phellinus pini caused a preferential removal of lignin from birch wood, whereas Trametes (Coriolus) versicolor caused a nonselective attack of all cell wall components. Use of polyclonal antisera to H8 lignin peroxidase and monoclonal antisera to H2 lignin peroxidase followed by immunogold labeling with protein A-gold or protein G-gold, respectively, showed lignin peroxidase extra-and intracellularly to fungal hyphae and within the delignified cell walls after 12 weeks of laboratory decay. Lignin peroxidase was localized at sites within the cell wall where electron-dense areas of the lignified cell wall layers remained. In wood decayed by Trametes versicolor, lignin peroxidase was located primarily along the surface of eroded cell walls. No lignin peroxidase was evident in brown-rotted wood, but slight labeling occurred within hyphal cells. Use of polyclonal antisera to xylanase followed by immunogold labeling showed intense labeling on fungal hyphae and surrounding slime layers and within the woody cell wall, where evidence of degradation was apparent. Colloidal-gold-labeled xylanase was prevalent in wood decayed by all fungi used in this study. Areas of the wood with early stages of cell wall decay had the greatest concentration of gold particles, while little labeling occurred in cells in advanced stages of decay by brown or white rot fungi. Images PMID:16347939

  12. Lignin as an indicator of the sedimentation conditions on the Arctic shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyantsev, A. S.; Romankevich, E. A.; Peresypkin, V. I.; Belyaev, N. A.; Semiletov, I. P.; Bratskaya, S. Yu.; Vetrov, A. A.; Sergienko, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown for the first time that the proportion of lignin in shelf deposits may range from 1/3 to the total concentration of organic carbon. The distribution of wood residues and lignin in the studied sedimentary formation is very uneven, which reflects the dynamic flux environment of sedimentation and OM supply. The calculated molecular indexes showed that most of the OM in deposits underwent insignificant diagenetic alterations.

  13. Lignin-degrading peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Tien, M

    1993-07-01

    Lignin and manganese peroxidases are secreted by the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium during secondary metabolism. These enzymes play major roles in lignin degradation. The active site amino acid sequence of these lignin-degrading peroxidases is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). The mechanism by which they oxidize substrates also appears to be the similar. pH has a similar effect on lignin peroxidase compound I formation as on HRP or CcP; however, the pKa controlling compound I formation for lignin peroxidase appears to be much lower. Lignin-degrading peroxidases are able to catalyze the oxidation of substrates with high redox potential. This unique ability is consistent with a heme active site of low electron density, which is indicated by high redox potential. PMID:7763834

  14. Lignins of bioenergy crops: a review?

    PubMed

    Guragain, Yadhu N; Herrera, Alvaro I; Vadlani, Praveen V; Prakash, Om

    2015-01-01

    Lignin provides structural support, a mechanical barrier against microbial infestation and facilitates movement of water inside plant systems. It is the second most abundant natural polymer in the terrestrial environments and possesses unique routes for the production of bulk and specialty chemicals with aromatic/phenolic skeletons. The commercial applications of lignin are limited and it is often recognized for its negative impact on the biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. Understanding of the structure of lignin monomers and their interactions among themselves, as well as with carbohydrate polymers in biomass, is vital for the development of innovative biomass deconstruction processes and thereby valorization of all biopolymers of lignocellulosic residues, including lignin. In this paper, we review the major energy crops and their lignin structure, as well as the recent developments in biomass lignin characterization, with special focus on 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. PMID:25920245

  15. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  16. Designer lignins: harnessing the plasticity of lignification.

    PubMed

    Mottiar, Yaseen; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenolic constituent of plant secondary cell walls. Inspired largely by the recalcitrance of lignin to biomass processing, plant engineering efforts have routinely sought to alter lignin quantity, composition, and structure by exploiting the inherent plasticity of lignin biosynthesis. More recently, researchers are attempting to strategically design plants for increased degradability by incorporating monomers that lead to a lower degree of polymerisation, reduced hydrophobicity, fewer bonds to other cell wall constituents, or novel chemically labile linkages in the polymer backbone. In addition, the incorporation of value-added structures could help valorise lignin. Designer lignins may satisfy the biological requirement for lignification in plants while improving the overall efficiency of biomass utilisation. PMID:26775114

  17. Concentration of extracellular L-glutamate released from cultured nerve cells measured with a small-volume online sensor.

    PubMed

    Niwa, O; Torimitsu, K; Morita, M; Osborne, P; Yamamoto, K

    1996-06-01

    An online sensor with a low detection limit for L-glutamate was developed in order to monitor the change in the extracellular L-glutamate concentration as a result of stimulated release from cultured nerve cells. The sensor consisted of a microdialysis (MD) probe fixed at the manipulator, a small-volume L-glutamate oxidase enzymatic reactor (0.75 mm i.d. and 2.5 cm long), and an electrochemical detector in a thin-layer radial flow cell with an active volume of 70-340 nL. Glassy carbon bulk or carbon film ring-disk electrodes were used as detectors by modifying them with Os poly(vinylpyridine) mediator containing horseradish peroxidase. The overall efficiency of L-glutamate detection with the sensor is 94% under optimum conditions, due to an efficient enzymatic reaction in the reactor and a high conversion efficiency in the radial flow cell. As a result, we achieved a sensitivity of 24.3 nA/muM and a detection limit of 7.2 nM (S/N = 3). The effect of interferents such as L-ascorbic acid can be minimized effectively by applying a low potential to the electrode for hydrogen peroxide detection (O mV) and via the ring-disk electrode geometry by using the disk for preoxidation. In the in vitro experiment, an MD probe for sampling was connected to a manipulator that controls distance between the probe and the stimulated cells. The cells were stimulated by KCl in a glass capillary or electrically with microarray film electrodes fabricated on a substrate. By using the sensor, we can monitor L-glutamate concentration changes at the submicromolar level caused by KCl stimulation of a single nerve cell and micromolar L-glutamate concentration increases caused by electrical stimulation of a brain slice. An increase in L-glutamate concentration can also be measured by positioning the probe near the cell that is connected synaptically to the stimulated cell. PMID:8686911

  18. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. PMID:27127053

  19. Flexible electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for instantaneous concentration measurements of NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Ortoneda-Pedrola, M.; Mason, A.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    A novel electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for real-time chlorides concentration analysis is reported. The sensor response to deionized water, NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions at various concentrations was tested. The sensing element, in the form of a silver pattern antenna that emits an electromagnetic field, was printed on a polyimide flexible laminate substrate to form a sensor to suit a broad range of applications, where a sensor could be placed in water reservoirs or fluid-carrying pipes for continuous analysis. The developed system confirmed the viability of using microwaves for real-time chloride solutions monitoring as the reflected signals represented by S11 parameters were unique with clearly observed shifts in the resonant frequencies and amplitude changes when placed in direct contact with 20 µl of each solution. This paper was an invited article at the Sensors and Applications XVII conference.

  20. Lignin phenols used to infer organic matter sources to Sepetiba Bay - RJ, Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, C. E.; Pfeiffer, W. C.; Martinelli, L. A.; Tsamakis, E.; Hedges, J. I.; Keil, R. G.

    2010-04-01

    Lignin phenols were measured in the sediments of Sepitiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in bedload sediments and suspended sediments of the four major fluvial inputs to the bay; São Francisco and Guandu Channels and the Guarda and Cação Rivers. Fluvial suspended lignin yields (Σ8 3.5-14.6 mgC 10 g dw -1) vary little between the wet and dry seasons and are poorly correlated with fluvial chlorophyll concentrations (0.8-50.2 μgC L -1). Despite current land use practices that favor grassland agriculture or industrial uses, fluvial lignin compositions are dominated by a degraded leaf-sourced material. The exception is the Guarda River, which has a slight influence from grasses. The Lignin Phenol Vegetation Index, coupled with acid/aldehyde and 3.5 Db/V ratios, indicate that degraded leaf-derived phenols are also the primary preserved lignin component in the bay. The presence of fringe Typha sp. and Spartina sp. grass beds surrounding portions of the Bay are not reflected in the lignin signature. Instead, lignin entering the bay appears to reflect the erosion of soils containing a degraded signature from the former Atlantic rain forest that once dominated the watershed, instead of containing a significant signature derived from current agricultural uses. A three-component mixing model using the LPVI, atomic N:C ratios, and stable carbon isotopes (which range between -26.8 and -21.8‰) supports the hypothesis that fluvial inputs to the bay are dominated by planktonic matter (78% of the input), with lignin dominated by leaf (14% of the input) over grass (6%). Sediments are composed of a roughly 50-50 mixture of autochthonous material and terrigenous material, with lignin being primarily sourced from leaf.

  1. Evaluation of a Low-Cost Aerosol Sensor to Assess Dust Concentrations in a Swine Building.

    PubMed

    Jones, Samuel; Anthony, T Renée; Sousan, Sinan; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to dust is a known occupational hazard in the swine industry, although efforts to measure exposures are labor intensive and costly. In this study, we evaluated a Dylos DC1100 as a low-cost (~$200) alternative to assess respirable dust concentrations in a swine building in winter. Dust concentrations were measured with collocated monitors (Dylos DC1100; an aerosol photometer, the pDR-1200; and a respirable sampler analyzed gravimetrically) placed in two locations within a swine farrowing building in winter for 18-24-h periods. The particle number concentrations measured with the DC1100 were converted to mass concentration using two methods: Physical Property Method and Regression Method. Raw number concentrations from the DC1100 were highly correlated to mass concentrations measured with the pDR-1200 with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) of 0.85, indicating that the two monitors respond similarly to respirable dust in this environment. Both methods of converting DC1100 number concentrations to mass concentrations yielded strong linear relationships relative to that measured with the pDR-1200 (Physical Property Method: slope = 1.03, R (2) = 0.72; Regression Method: slope = 0.72, R (2) = 0.73) and relative to that measured gravimetrically (Physical Property Method: slope = 1.08, R (2) = 0.64; Regression Method: slope = 0.75, R (2) = 0.62). The DC1100 can be used as a reasonable indicator of respirable mass concentrations within a CAFO and may have broader applicability to other agricultural and industrial settings. PMID:26944922

  2. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Self-assembled Monolayer Coated Sensor Array with Concentration-independent Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have modeled and analyzed affinities and kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption (and desorption) on various surface chemical groups using multiple self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) array. The high-frequency and micro-scale resonator provides improved sensitivity in the detections of VOCs at trace levels. With the study of affinities and kinetics, three concentration-independent intrinsic parameters (monolayer adsorption capacity, adsorption energy constant and desorption rate) of gas-surface interactions are obtained to contribute to a multi-parameter fingerprint library of VOC analytes. Effects of functional group’s properties on gas-surface interactions are also discussed. The proposed sensor array with concentration-independent fingerprint library shows potential as a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for VOCs discrimination and gas-sensitive materials selections.

  3. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Self-assembled Monolayer Coated Sensor Array with Concentration-independent Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have modeled and analyzed affinities and kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption (and desorption) on various surface chemical groups using multiple self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) array. The high-frequency and micro-scale resonator provides improved sensitivity in the detections of VOCs at trace levels. With the study of affinities and kinetics, three concentration-independent intrinsic parameters (monolayer adsorption capacity, adsorption energy constant and desorption rate) of gas-surface interactions are obtained to contribute to a multi-parameter fingerprint library of VOC analytes. Effects of functional group’s properties on gas-surface interactions are also discussed. The proposed sensor array with concentration-independent fingerprint library shows potential as a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for VOCs discrimination and gas-sensitive materials selections. PMID:27045012

  4. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Self-assembled Monolayer Coated Sensor Array with Concentration-independent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have modeled and analyzed affinities and kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption (and desorption) on various surface chemical groups using multiple self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) array. The high-frequency and micro-scale resonator provides improved sensitivity in the detections of VOCs at trace levels. With the study of affinities and kinetics, three concentration-independent intrinsic parameters (monolayer adsorption capacity, adsorption energy constant and desorption rate) of gas-surface interactions are obtained to contribute to a multi-parameter fingerprint library of VOC analytes. Effects of functional group's properties on gas-surface interactions are also discussed. The proposed sensor array with concentration-independent fingerprint library shows potential as a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for VOCs discrimination and gas-sensitive materials selections. PMID:27045012

  5. Low-Concentration NO2 Gas Sensor Based on HfO2 Thin Films Irradiated by Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Barin, Özlem; Özer, Metin; Acar, Selim

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the gas-sensing properties of HfO2 thin films enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. The films were deposited on silicon substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and annealed at 800°C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for characterization of the samples, which revealed that the degree of crystallinity and electrical properties of the HfO2 thin films were affected by the annealing temperature. Different film thicknesses (20 nm and 10 nm) were used for gas-sensing measurements. The gas-sensing properties of the films were affected by the UV irradiation time, with improvements in sensor properties observed for samples with more than 30 min of irradiation. The maximum response was found for the 10-nm sensor annealed at 800°C. Moreover, a linear dependence on NO2 concentration was observed for the response, suggesting that the sensing layer is highly suitable for detecting NO2 gas concentrations as low as 1 ppm.

  6. Chlorophyll pigment concentration using spectral curvature algorithms - An evaluation of present and proposed satellite ocean color sensor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    During the past several years symmetric three-band (460-, 490-, 520-nm) spectral curvature algorithm (SCA) has demonstrated rather accurate determination of chlorophyll pigment concentration using low-altitude airborne ocean color data. It is shown herein that the in-water asymmetric SCA, when applied to certain recently proposed OCI (NOAA-K and SPOT-3) and OCM (ERS-1) satellite ocean color bands, can adequately recover chlorophyll-like pigments. These airborne findings suggest that the proposed new ocean color sensor bands are in general satisfactorily, but not necessarily optimally, positioned to allow space evaluation of the SCA using high-precision atmospherically corrected satellite radiances. The pigment concentration recovery is not as good when existing Coastal Zone Color Scanner bands are used in the SCA. The in-water asymmetric SCA chlorophyll pigment recovery evaluations were performed using (1) airborne laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and (2) concurrent passive upwelled radiances. Data from a separate ocean color sensor aboard the aircraft were further used to validate the findings.

  7. Low-Concentration NO2 Gas Sensor Based on HfO2 Thin Films Irradiated by Ultraviolet Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Barin, Özlem; Özer, Metin; Acar, Selim

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the gas-sensing properties of HfO2 thin films enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. The films were deposited on silicon substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and annealed at 800°C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for characterization of the samples, which revealed that the degree of crystallinity and electrical properties of the HfO2 thin films were affected by the annealing temperature. Different film thicknesses (20 nm and 10 nm) were used for gas-sensing measurements. The gas-sensing properties of the films were affected by the UV irradiation time, with improvements in sensor properties observed for samples with more than 30 min of irradiation. The maximum response was found for the 10-nm sensor annealed at 800°C. Moreover, a linear dependence on NO2 concentration was observed for the response, suggesting that the sensing layer is highly suitable for detecting NO2 gas concentrations as low as 1 ppm.

  8. Rational design of a fluorescent sensor to simultaneously determine both the enantiomeric composition and the concentration of chiral functional amines.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kaili; Yu, Shanshan; Huang, Zeng; Chen, Liming; Xiao, Meng; Yu, Xiaoqi; Pu, Lin

    2015-04-01

    A fluorescent molecular probe, a 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL)-based bis(naphthylimine) compound (R)-4, is designed to exhibit very different fluorescent responses at two emission wavelengths toward a variety of chiral functional amines including diamines, amino alcohols, and amino acids. At one emission wavelength (λ1), it shows high sensitivity toward the substrates, and at another wavelength (λ2), it shows high enantioselectivity. This is the first rational design of such a dual responsive fluorescent sensor which can be used to simultaneously determine both the concentration and the enantiomeric composition of functional chiral amines by one fluorescent measurement. This strategy is potentially generally applicable for the construction of sensors for rapid assay of structurally diverse chiral substrates. When (R)-4 is treated with various chiral functional amines in the presence of Zn(OAc)2, its 2-naphthylamine units are displaced off to show large fluorescent enhancement at λ1 = 427 nm (I1) due to the restored emission of 2-naphthylamine. The combination of the remaining chiral binaphthyl unit with the chiral substrates leads to highly enantioselective fluorescent enhancement at λ2 > 500 nm (I2). Since I1 is only concentration dependent but independent of the chiral configuration, it allows the determination of the substrate concentration. The highly enantioselective I2 allows the determination of the enantiomeric composition. Thus, using one fluorescent probe with one fluorescent measurement, both the concentration and the enantiomeric composition are determined. The dual responsive mechanism of (R)-4 is studied by using various spectroscopic methods including fluorescence, UV-vis, NMR, and mass analyses. PMID:25790271

  9. Accuracy of different sensors for the estimation of pollutant concentrations (total suspended solids, total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand) in wastewater and stormwater.

    PubMed

    Lepot, Mathieu; Aubin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Many field investigations have used continuous sensors (turbidimeters and/or ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrophotometers) to estimate with a short time step pollutant concentrations in sewer systems. Few, if any, publications compare the performance of various sensors for the same set of samples. Different surrogate sensors (turbidity sensors, UV-visible spectrophotometer, pH meter, conductivity meter and microwave sensor) were tested to link concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD), and sensors' outputs. In the combined sewer at the inlet of a wastewater treatment plant, 94 samples were collected during dry weather, 44 samples were collected during wet weather, and 165 samples were collected under both dry and wet weather conditions. From these samples, triplicate standard laboratory analyses were performed and corresponding sensors outputs were recorded. Two outlier detection methods were developed, based, respectively, on the Mahalanobis and Euclidean distances. Several hundred regression models were tested, and the best ones (according to the root mean square error criterion) are presented in order of decreasing performance. No sensor appears as the best one for all three investigated pollutants. PMID:23863442

  10. Development of a novel noninvasive sensor for determination of blood glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeckle, Stefan; Rovati, Luigi; Ansari, Rafat R.

    2001-10-01

    Optical methods represent the most promising techniques to perform non-invasive glucose detection. Glucose concentration in the aqueous humor closely mimics glucose levels in the blood and therefore non-invasive optical measurement of glucose can be performed by an optical beam crossing the eye anterior chamber. We propose a polarimetric method that exploits the Brewster-reflection of circularly polarized light on the lens of the eye. After reflection, the resulting linearly polarized light is subject to rotation by the glucose in the aqueous humor and thus carries the concentration information. A preliminary experimental setup, using glucose samples in a beaker, was realized and investigated.

  11. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

  12. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

  13. Identification of 4-O-5-Units in Softwood Lignins via Definitive Lignin Models and NMR.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengxia; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, Sally; Ralph, John

    2016-06-13

    Lignins are complex and heterogeneous natural polymers in which the major units are characterized by certain prominent interunit linkages. Previous attempts to identify and quantify 4-O-5-linked units in softwood lignins by NMR were not successful. In this work, various lignin model compounds, including the tetramers formed by the 4-O-5-coupling of β-O-4-, β-β-, and β-5-model dimers, were synthesized. Such compounds are better able to model the corresponding structures in lignins than those used previously. 4-O-5-Linked structures could be clearly observed and identified in real softwood lignin samples by comparison of their 2D HSQC NMR spectra with those from the model compounds. When comparing NMR data of phenol-acetylated versus phenol-etherified model compounds with those of acetylated lignins, it was apparent that most of the 4-O-5-linked structures in softwood lignins are present as free-phenolic end units. PMID:27078826

  14. Computing time-series suspended-sediment concentrations and loads from in-stream turbidity-sensor and streamflow data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Doug; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, use of a method for computing suspended-sediment concentration and loads using turbidity sensors—primarily nephelometry, but also optical backscatter—has proliferated. Because an in- itu turbidity sensor is capa le of measuring turbidity instantaneously, a turbidity time series can be recorded and related directly to time-varying suspended-sediment concentrations. Depending on the suspended-sediment characteristics of the measurement site, this method can be more reliable and, in many cases, a more accurate means for computing suspended-sediment concentrations and loads than traditional U.S. Geological Survey computational methods. Guidelines and procedures for estimating time s ries of suspended-sediment concentration and loading as a function of turbidity and streamflow data have been published in a U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods Report, Book 3, Chapter C4. This paper is a summary of these guidelines and discusses some of the concepts, s atistical procedures, and techniques used to maintain a multiyear suspended sediment time series.

  15. Lignin: Characterization of a Multifaceted Crop Component

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a plant component with important implications for various agricultural disciplines. It confers rigidity to cell walls, and is therefore associated with tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses and the mechanical stability of plants. In animal nutrition, lignin is considered an antinutritive component of forages as it cannot be readily fermented by rumen microbes. In terms of energy yield from biomass, the role of lignin depends on the conversion process. It contains more gross energy than other cell wall components and therefore confers enhanced heat value in thermochemical processes such as direct combustion. Conversely, it negatively affects biological energy conversion processes such as bioethanol or biogas production, as it inhibits microbial fermentation of the cell wall. Lignin from crop residues plays an important role in the soil organic carbon cycling, as it constitutes a recalcitrant carbon pool affecting nutrient mineralization and carbon sequestration. Due to the significance of lignin in several agricultural disciplines, the modification of lignin content and composition by breeding is becoming increasingly important. Both mapping of quantitative trait loci and transgenic approaches have been adopted to modify lignin in crops. However, breeding goals must be defined considering the conflicting role of lignin in different agricultural disciplines. PMID:24348159

  16. Effect of Penicillium chrysogenum on Lignin Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, A.; Carnicero, A.; Perestelo, F.; de la Fuente, G.; Milstein, O.; Falcón, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A strain of Penicillium chrysogenum has been isolated from pine forest soils in Tenerife (Canary Islands). This strain was capable of utilizing hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated aromatic compounds, in particular cinnamic acid, as its sole carbon source. In an optimum medium with high levels of nitrogen (25.6 mM) and low levels of glucose (5.5 mM), it was able to decolorize Poly B-411 and to transform kraft, organosolv, and synthetic dehydrogenative polymerisate lignins. After 30 days of incubation, the amount of recovered kraft lignin was reduced to 83.5 and 91.3% of that estimated for uninoculated controls by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. At the same time, the pattern of molecular mass distribution of the lignin remaining in cultures was changed. The amount of organosolv lignin recovered from cultures was reduced to 90.1 and 94.6% of the initial amount as evaluated by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. About 6% of total applied radioactivity of O14CH3-organosolv lignin was recovered as 14CO2 after 30 days of incubation, and 18.5% of radioactivity from insoluble O14CH3-organosolv lignin was solubilized. After 26 days of incubation, 2.9% of 14C-β-dehydrogenative polymerisate and 4.1% of 14C-ring-dehydrogenative polymerisate evolved as 14CO2. PMID:16349361

  17. Development of Lignin-Based Polyurethane Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Jackson, Daniel C; Trammell, Neil E; Hunt, Marcus A; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    In our continued effort to develop value-added thermoplastics from lignin, here we report utilizing a tailored feedstock to synthesize mechanically robust thermoplastic polyurethanes at very high lignin contents (75 65 wt %). The molecular weight and glass transition temperature (Tg) of lignin were altered through cross-linking with formaldehyde. The cross-linked lignin was coupled with diisocyanate-based telechelic polybutadiene as a network-forming soft segment. The appearance of two Tg s, around 35 and 154 C, for the polyurethanes indicates the existence of two-phase morphology, a characteristic of thermoplastic copolymers. A calculated Flory-Huggins interaction parameter of 7.71 also suggests phase immiscibility in the synthesized lignin polyurethanes. An increase in lignin loading increased the modulus, and an increase in crosslink-density increased the modulus in the rubbery plateau region of the thermoplastic. This path for synthesis of novel lignin-based polyurethane thermoplastics provides a design tool for high performance lignin-based biopolymers.

  18. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  19. Method for regulation of plant lignin composition

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clint

    1999-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the regulation of lignin composition in plant tissue. Plants are transformed with a gene encoding an active F5H gene. The expression of the F5H gene results in increased levels of syringyl monomer providing a lignin composition more easily degraded with chemicals and enzymes.

  20. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P.; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C.; Hahn, Klaus M.; MacNevin, Christopher J.; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm2) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R–BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  1. A novel fluorescent sensor protein for detecting changes in airway surface liquid glucose concentration.

    PubMed

    Helassa, Nordine; Garnett, James P; Farrant, Matthew; Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C; Hahn, Klaus M; MacNevin, Christopher J; Tarran, Robert; Baines, Deborah L

    2014-12-01

    Both lung disease and elevation of blood glucose are associated with increased glucose concentration (from 0.4 to ~4.0 mM) in the airway surface liquid (ASL). This perturbation of ASL glucose makes the airway more susceptible to infection by respiratory pathogens. ASL is minute (~1 μl/cm(2)) and the measurement of glucose concentration in the small volume ASL is extremely difficult. Therefore, we sought to develop a fluorescent biosensor with sufficient sensitivity to determine glucose concentrations in ASL in situ. We coupled a range of environmentally sensitive fluorophores to mutated forms of a glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) including H152C and H152C/A213R and determined their equilibrium binding properties. Of these, GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN (Kd 0.86 ± 0.01 mM, Fmax/F0 3.6) was optimal for glucose sensing and in ASL increased fluorescence when basolateral glucose concentration was raised from 1 to 20 mM. Moreover, interpolation of the data showed that the glucose concentration in ASL was increased, with results similar to that using glucose oxidase analysis. The fluorescence of GBP H152C/A213R-BADAN in native ASL from human airway epithelial cultures in situ was significantly increased over time when basolateral glucose was increased from 5 to 20 mM. Overall our data indicate that this GBP is a useful tool to monitor glucose homoeostasis in the lung. PMID:25220254

  2. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging of Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes in Plant Cell Walls and Their Migration During Biomass Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Johnson, David K.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi-You

    2015-04-27

    In lignocellulosic biomass, lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer. In plant cell walls, lignin is associated with polysaccharides to form lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC). LCC have been considered to be a major factor that negatively affects the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by cellulosic enzymes. Here, we report a micro-spectroscopic approach that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy to probe in situ lignin concentration and conformation at each cell wall layer. This technique does not require extensive sample preparation or any external labels. Using poplar as a feedstock, for example, we observe variation of LCC in untreated tracheid poplar cell walls. The redistribution of LCC at tracheid poplar cell wall layers is also investigated when the chemical linkages between lignin and hemicellulose are cleaved during pretreatment. Our study would provide new insights into further improvement of the biomass pretreatment process.

  3. Biodegradation of lignin by Agaricus Bisporus

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.H.; Abbott, G.D.; Head, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    The lignolytic activity of Agaricus bisporus will be addressed in this paper. Sound and fungally degraded lignins were characterized by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FnR) and elemental analysis. Fungally degraded lignins displayed increased wt%N, wt%H and wt%O content and decreased wt%C content The FTIR spectrum of decayed lignin showed an increase in the relative intensity of absorption bands assigned to carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups located on the aliphatic side chain and a decrease in absorption bands assigned to aromatic skeletal vibration modes. Semiquantitative Py-GC-MS revealed an 82% decrease in lignin derived pyrolysis products upon biodegradation. No significant increase in pyrolysis products with an oxygenated aliphatic side chain were detected in the fungally degraded lignin however shortening of the aliphatic side chain via cleavage at the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} positions was observed.

  4. Enzymatic conversion of lignin into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Timothy D H; Rahmanpour, Rahman

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic heteropolymer lignin is a major component of plant cell walls, and is produced industrially from paper/pulp manufacture and cellulosic bioethanol production. Conversion of lignin into renewable chemicals is a major unsolved problem in the development of a biomass-based biorefinery. The review describes recent developments in the understanding of bacterial enzymes for lignin breakdown, such as DyP peroxidases, bacterial laccases, and beta-etherase enzymes. The use of pathway engineering methods to construct genetically modified microbes to convert lignin to renewable chemicals (e.g. vanillin, adipic acid) via fermentation is discussed, and the search for novel applications for lignin (e.g. carbon fibre). PMID:26121945

  5. Improved noncontact optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration and indication of dehydration level

    PubMed Central

    Ozana, Nisan; Arbel, Nadav; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Mico, Vicente; Sanz, Martin; Garcia, Javier; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Epstein, Yoram; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    The ability to extract different bio-medical parameters from one single wristwatch device can be very applicable. The wearable device that is presented in this paper is based on two optical approaches. The first is the extraction and separation of remote vibration sources and the second is the rotation of linearly polarized light by certain materials exposed to magnetic fields. The technique is based on tracking of temporal changes of reflected secondary speckles produced in the wrist when being illuminated by a laser beam. Change in skin’s temporal vibration profile together with change in the magnetic medium that is generated by time varied glucose concentration caused these temporal changes. In this paper we present experimental tests which are the first step towards an in vivo noncontact device for detection of glucose concentration in blood. The paper also shows very preliminary results for qualitative capability for indication of dehydration. PMID:24940550

  6. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to detect total hemoglobin concentration, methemoglobin and oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Gewiss, Helge; Kraitl, Jens; Stuepmann, Kirstin; Hinz, Michael; Koball, Sebastian; Ewald, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    The paper will describe the novel multi-wavelength photometric device OxyTrue Hb® which is capable to measure the hemoglobin (Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. Clinic trails in blood donation centers and during the dialysis are done to prove and demonstrate the performance of the system. The results are compared to the gold standard, the BGA measurement.

  7. Impact assessment of bisphenol A on lignin-modifying enzymes by basidiomycete Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Minako; Magan, Naresh; Warner, Philip J

    2008-06-15

    The impact of different concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) was evaluated on growth of the white-rot basidiomycete, Trametes versicolor, and on the expression of genes encoding lignin-modifying enzyme (LME) activities. Effective doses (EDs) were obtained from fungal growth rate to monitor LME activities and the expression levels of their encoding genes. The fungus showed mycelial growth at concentrations of up to 300 microg ml(-1) of BPA with an ED50 value of 185 microg ml(-1). The LME activities were stimulated by BPA concentrations up to 300 microg ml(-1). The lignin peroxidase (LIP) encoding gene may be sensitive to BPA stress. PMID:17996365

  8. A Portable Low-Power Acquisition System with a Urease Bioelectrochemical Sensor for Potentiometric Detection of Urea Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Jhe; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lin, Jiun-Ling; Chou, Sin-Houng; Chen, Ping-Hung; Syu, Mei-Jywan; Kuo, Shin-Hung; Lai, Shin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a portable low-power battery-driven bioelectrochemical signal acquisition system for urea detection. The proposed design has several advantages, including high performance, low cost, low-power consumption, and high portability. A LT1789-1 low-supply-voltage instrumentation amplifier (IA) was used to measure and amplify the open-circuit potential (OCP) between the working and reference electrodes. An MSP430 micro-controller was programmed to process and transduce the signals to the custom-developed software by ZigBee RF module in wireless mode and UART in able mode. The immobilized urease sensor was prepared by embedding urease into the polymer (aniline-co-o-phenylenediamine) polymeric matrix and then coating/depositing it onto a MEMS-fabricated Au working electrode. The linear correlation established between the urea concentration and the potentiometric change is in the urea concentrations range of 3.16 × 10(-4) to 3.16 × 10(-2) M with a sensitivity of 31.12 mV/log [M] and a precision of 0.995 (R² = 0.995). This portable device not only detects urea concentrations, but can also operate continuously with a 3.7 V rechargeab-le lithium-ion battery (500 mA·h) for at least four days. Accordingly, its use is feasible and even promising for home-care applications. PMID:27049390

  9. A Portable Low-Power Acquisition System with a Urease Bioelectrochemical Sensor for Potentiometric Detection of Urea Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei-Jhe; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lin, Jiun-Ling; Chou, Sin-Houng; Chen, Ping-Hung; Syu, Mei-Jywan; Kuo, Shin-Hung; Lai, Shin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a portable low-power battery-driven bioelectrochemical signal acquisition system for urea detection. The proposed design has several advantages, including high performance, low cost, low-power consumption, and high portability. A LT1789-1 low-supply-voltage instrumentation amplifier (IA) was used to measure and amplify the open-circuit potential (OCP) between the working and reference electrodes. An MSP430 micro-controller was programmed to process and transduce the signals to the custom-developed software by ZigBee RF module in wireless mode and UART in able mode. The immobilized urease sensor was prepared by embedding urease into the polymer (aniline-co-o-phenylenediamine) polymeric matrix and then coating/depositing it onto a MEMS-fabricated Au working electrode. The linear correlation established between the urea concentration and the potentiometric change is in the urea concentrations range of 3.16 × 10−4 to 3.16 × 10−2 M with a sensitivity of 31.12 mV/log [M] and a precision of 0.995 (R2 = 0.995). This portable device not only detects urea concentrations, but can also operate continuously with a 3.7 V rechargeab-le lithium-ion battery (500 mA·h) for at least four days. Accordingly, its use is feasible and even promising for home-care applications. PMID:27049390

  10. Aircraft active and passive microwave validation of sea ice concentration from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Crawford, J. P.; Drinkwater, M. R.; Eppler, D. T.; Farmer, L. D.; Jentz, R. R.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of coordinate special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) underflights that were carried out during March 1988 with NASA and Navy aircraft over portions of the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi seas. NASA DC-8 AMMR data from Bering Sea ice edge crossings were used to verify that the ice edge location, defined as the position of the initial ice bands encountered by the aircraft, corresponds to an SSM/I ice concentration of 15 percent. Direct comparison of SSM/I and aircraft ice concentrations for regions having at least 80 percent aircraft coverage reveals that the SSM/I total ice concentration is lower on average by 2.4 +/-2.4 percent. For multiyear ice, NASA and Navy flights across the Beaufort and Chukchi seas show that the SSM/I algorithm correctly maps the large-scale distribution of multiyear ice: the zone of first-year ice off the Alaskan coast, the large areas of mixed first-year and multiyear ice, and the region of predominantly multiyear ice north of the Canadian archipelago.

  11. Methanol Fractionation of Softwood Kraft Lignin: Impact on the Lignin Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Vautard, Frederic; Meyer III, Harry M; Messman, Jamie M; Tolnai, Balazs; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    The development of technologies to tune lignin properties for high-performance lignin-based materials is crucial for the utilization of lignin in various applications. Here, the effect of methanol (MeOH) fractionation on the molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition, and chemical structure of lignin were investigated. Repeated MeOH fractionation of softwood Kraft lignin successfully removed the low-molecular-weight fraction. The separated high-molecular-weight lignin showed a Tg of 211 C and a char yield of 47%, much higher than those of asreceived lignin (Tg 153 C, char yield 41%). The MeOH-soluble fraction of lignin showed an increased low-molecular-weight fraction and a lower Tg (117 C) and char yield (32%). The amount of low-molecular-weight fraction showed a quantitative correlation with both 1/Tg and char yield in a linear regression. This study demonstrated the efficient purification or fractionation technology for lignin; it also established a theoretical and empirical correlation between the physical characteristics of fractionated lignins.

  12. Design and Test of a Low-Cost RGB Sensor for Online Measurement of Microalgae Concentration within a Photo-Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Micaela; Mailier, Johan; Hantson, Anne-Lise; Muñoz, Gerardo; Vargas, Alejandro; Van Impe, Jan; Wouwer, Alain Vande

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a low-cost RGB sensor is developed to measure online the microalgae concentration within a photo-bioreactor. Two commercially available devices, i.e., a spectrophotometer for offline measurements and an immersed probe for online measurements, are used for calibration and comparison purposes. Furthermore, the potential of such a sensor for estimating other variables is illustrated with the design of an extended Luenberger observer. PMID:25730481

  13. Design and test of a low-cost RGB sensor for online measurement of microalgae concentration within a photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Micaela; Mailier, Johan; Hantson, Anne-Lise; Muñoz, Gerardo; Vargas, Alejandro; Van Impe, Jan; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a low-cost RGB sensor is developed to measure online the microalgae concentration within a photo-bioreactor. Two commercially available devices, i.e., a spectrophotometer for offline measurements and an immersed probe for online measurements, are used for calibration and comparison purposes. Furthermore, the potential of such a sensor for estimating other variables is illustrated with the design of an extended Luenberger observer. PMID:25730481

  14. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  15. [Preparation of spherical lignin cation adsorption resin with black pulping liquor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Hua; Zou, Jin-Guang; Hong, Shu-Nan; Zeng, Zhen-Ou

    2005-09-01

    Spherical lignin cation adsorption resin was obtained by two-step method with black liquor of paper mill and characterized by the Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Firstly, the spherical lignin beads were prepared with black liquor of paper mill by applying reverse-phase suspension polymerization technique, and the preparation conditions were also optimized. The suitable conditions include 200 r/min of stirring speed, 90 degrees C of reaction temperature, 1.0 h of reaction time and use epoxy chloropropane (1.5% by weight of lignin) as cross-linking agent, the ideal volume ratio between oil phase and water phase was 3:1 by using kerosene oil as disperse phase, and the perfect dispersant agent was Tween 80 (3% by weight of lignin). Secondly, the spherical lignin cation adsorption resin was developed by grafting the acrylamide onto the back-bone of the spherical lignin beads. The best concentration of acrylamide was 0.72 mol/L at ambient temperature for 2.0 h, and the ideal initiator system was the Fenton reagent of H2O2/Fe2+. Under the above conditions, the ion exchange capacity of the prepared resin could reach 1.640 5 mmol/g. PMID:16366482

  16. Noncontact speckle-based optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using magneto-optic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally verify a speckle-based technique for noncontact measurement of glucose concentration in the bloodstream. The final device is intended to be a single wristwatch-style device containing a laser, a camera, and an alternating current (ac) electromagnet generated by a solenoid. The experiments presented are performed in vitro as proof of the concept. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an ac magnetic field, it exhibits Faraday rotation, which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle pattern distributions. The temporal frequency resulting from the ac magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role, which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  17. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-05-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 - 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  18. Characterization of asparagus lignin by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, S; Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Waldron, K W; Smith, A C; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-09-01

    Lignin is the cell wall component most frequently associated with hardening. Its characterization and quantification are very important to understand the biochemical modifications related to the changes in texture of vegetables such as asparagus (Asparagus officinalis), in which this organoleptic attribute is a very important quality factor. In this study, asparagus lignin from the basal sections of fresh and stored spears was analyzed using 2 methods, the traditional (Klason lignin) and the recently developed derivatization, followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC) method. The latter is a simple and reproducible technique for lignin characterization based on a degradation procedure that produces analyzable monomers and dimers by cleaving alpha- and beta-aryl ethers in lignins. The primary monomers derived from DFRC degradation of lignins are essentially p-coumaryl peracetate, coniferyl peracetate, and sinapyl peracetate. To evaluate the efficiency of the DFRC method, our investigations have been carried on distinct sample types, including wood (data not shown), straw, and asparagus samples. The results have confirmed that lignin composition is affected by plant nature. It has been found that whereas wood samples mostly contain coniferyl units, plant foods, such as straw and asparagus, contain both coniferyl and guaiacyl units. PMID:18803697

  19. A molecular mechanics force field for lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-02-01

    A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived using the RESP electrostatic potential fitting method supplemented by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. Finally, the force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this lignin force field will enable full simulations of lignocellulose.

  20. Continuous Measurement of CO2 concentration in Arctic Soil by Small Open-path Type CO2 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Oechel, W. C.; Lipson, D.

    2006-12-01

    increased as a result of rain, and this phenomenon was especially pronounced in soils that had been relatively dry before the precipitation. Ground surface CO2 concentration increased when the ground was covered with snow. The level of CO2 in the snow pack at our sites was similar to results of Jones et al. (1999) which was measured in the Canadian arctic tundra. CO2 in the snow pack changed with wind speed suggesting that ventilation during wind was important for CO2 exchange between snow and the atmosphere. Soil CO2 concentration increased quickly and significantly with soil freezing. CO2 at 20cm depth exceeded 20 percent in relatively wet soil. The waterproof filter of the sensor encasement, which is reportedly resistant to 200 mbar of pressure, leaked water when the surrounding water froze suggesting that there is a pressure change (more than 200 mbar) in the soil upon freezing. Such pressure would have significant impacts on gas transport and concentration in the soil. The temperature dependency of soil CO2 concentration changed markedly at -1 degree Celsius and there was considerable hysteresis in temperature dependency of soil CO2 concentration at sub-zero temperatures as temperatures raised or fell suggesting that both biological and physical processes affect differently between the freezing and the thawing periods.

  1. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  2. Phenolic compounds in ectomycorrhizal interaction of lignin modified silver birch

    PubMed Central

    Sutela, Suvi; Niemi, Karoliina; Edesi, Jaanika; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Vuosku, Jaana; Mäkelä, Riina; Tiimonen, Heidi; Chiang, Vincent L; Koskimäki, Janne; Suorsa, Marja; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Häggman, Hely

    2009-01-01

    Background The monolignol biosynthetic pathway interconnects with the biosynthesis of other secondary phenolic metabolites, such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and condensed tannins. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether genetic modification of the monolignol pathway in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) would alter the metabolism of these phenolic compounds and how such alterations, if exist, would affect the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Results Silver birch lines expressing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides L.) caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase (PtCOMT) under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter showed a reduction in the relative expression of a putative silver birch COMT (BpCOMT) gene and, consequently, a decrease in the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl composition ratio. Alterations were also detected in concentrations of certain phenolic compounds. All PtCOMT silver birch lines produced normal ectomycorrhizas with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus (Batsch: Fr.), and the formation of symbiosis enhanced the growth of the transgenic plants. Conclusion The down-regulation of BpCOMT in the 35S-PtCOMT lines caused a reduction in the syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of lignin, but no significant effect was seen in the composition or quantity of phenolic compounds that would have been caused by the expression of PtCOMT under the 35S or UbB1 promoter. Moreover, the detected alterations in the composition of lignin and secondary phenolic compounds had no effect on the interaction between silver birch and P. involutus. PMID:19788757

  3. Deviation Factor and Temperature-Compensation Factor of Simple Industrial Ultrasonic Solution-Concentration Sensor Which Automatically Eliminates Temperature Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kiyoshi

    2002-05-01

    In this study, the author analyzed the deviation factor and the temperature-compensation factor of a new simple ultrasonic solution-concentration sensor which automatically eliminates temperature dependence using the phase-locked loop method (PLLM) and the phase difference method (PDM). The deviation factor is an essential specification for designing a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), a phase detector (PD) and an acoustic cell (AC). It was proved that the deviation factor obtained using the empirical equation is always the same, regardless of the center frequency (fO) of the VCO in the PLLM and the frequency of the driving oscillator (OSC) (fD) for the transmitter in the PDM. The deviation factor for a 0.0-1.0% NaCl solution determined by both PLLM and PDM was 0.0078. Moreover, it became clear that the same temperature-compensation factor can be used for determining the concentrations of both NaCl and sugar solutions; this factor is derived from the empirical equations of sound velocity. Specifically, its value in a 0.0-1.0% NaCl solution at fO=2.15 MHz for PLLM is 3.381 kHz/°C, and that in a 0.0-5.0% sugar solution is 3.379 kHz/°C.

  4. Molecular-Level Transformations of Lignin During Photo-Oxidation and Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Hills, K.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    As the second most abundant component of terrestrial plant residues, lignin plays a key role in regulating plant litter decomposition, humic substance formation, and dissolved organic matter (OM) production from terrestrial sources. Biodegradation is the primary decomposition process of lignin on land. However, photo- oxidation of lignin-derived compounds has been reported in aquatic systems and is considered to play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. With increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to ozone depletion, it is important to understand the biogeochemical fate of lignin exposed to photo-oxidation in terrestrial environments. This study examines and compares the transformation of lignin in a three-month laboratory simulation of biodegradation and photo-oxidation using molecular-level techniques. Lignin-derived monomers extracted by copper oxidation were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) from the water-soluble and insoluble OM of 13C-labeled corn leaves. Biodegradation increased the solubility of lignin monomers in comparison to the control samples, and the acid-to-aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratios increased in both the water-soluble and insoluble OM, indicating a higher degree of side-chain lignin oxidation. Photo-oxidation did not produce a significant change on the solubility or Ad/Al ratios of lignin from corn leaves. However, the ratios of trans-to-cis isomers of both cinnamyl units (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) increased with photo-oxidation and decreased with biodegradation in the insoluble OM. We also investigated the role of photo-oxidation in lignin transformation in soils cropped with 13C-labeled corn. Interestingly, the organic carbon content increased significantly with time in the water-soluble OM from soil/corn residues under UV radiation. An increase in the concentration of lignin monomers and dimers and the Ad/Al ratios was also observed with photo-oxidation. Iso-branched fatty acids of microbial origin remained in

  5. Molecular-level transformations of lignin during photo-oxidation and biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Hills, K.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    As the second most abundant component of terrestrial plant residues, lignin plays a key role in regulating plant litter decomposition, humic substance formation, and dissolved organic matter (OM) production from terrestrial sources. Biodegradation is the primary decomposition process of lignin on land. However, photo-oxidation of lignin-derived compounds has been reported in aquatic systems and is considered to play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. With increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to ozone depletion, it is important to understand the biogeochemical fate of lignin exposed to photo-oxidation in terrestrial environments. This study examines and compares the transformation of lignin in a three-month laboratory simulation of biodegradation and photo-oxidation using molecular-level techniques. Lignin-derived monomers extracted by copper oxidation were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) from the water-soluble and insoluble OM of 13C-labeled corn leaves. Biodegradation increased the solubility of lignin monomers in comparison to the control samples, and the acid-to-aldehyde (Ad/Al) ratios increased in both the water-soluble and insoluble OM, indicating a higher degree of side-chain lignin oxidation. Photo-oxidation did not produce a significant change on the solubility or Ad/Al ratios of lignin from corn leaves. However, the ratios of trans-to-cis isomers of both cinnamyl units (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid) increased with photo-oxidation and decreased with biodegradation in the insoluble OM. We also investigated the role of photo-oxidation in lignin transformation in soils cropped with 13C-labeled corn. Interestingly, the organic carbon content increased significantly with time in the water-soluble OM from soil/corn residues under UV radiation. An increase in the concentration of lignin monomers and dimers and the Ad/Al ratios was also observed with photo-oxidation. Iso-branched fatty acids of microbial origin remained in

  6. EFFECTS OF COFIRING LIGNIN AND BIOSOLIDS WITH COAL ON FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin C. Galbreath

    2002-08-01

    Lignin, derived from municipal solid waste and biosolid feedstocks using Masada Resource Group's patented CES OxyNol{trademark} process, and acidified biosolids were evaluated as supplemental fuels with coal for producing steam and electricity. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale (550,000-Btu/hr [580-MJ/hr]) combustion system to evaluate the effects of coal characteristics, blend mixture (on a dry wt% basis) and furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) on boiler heat-exchange surface slagging and fouling, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} production, fly ash characteristics, and combustion efficiency. The effects of blending lignin and acidified biosolids with coal on fuel handling and pulverization characteristics were also addressed. An 80 wt% Colorado--20 wt% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal blend from the Tennessee Valley Authority Colbert Steam Plant, hereafter referred to as the Colbert coal, and a bituminous Pittsburgh No. 8 coal were tested. The lignin and acidified biosolids were characterized by possessing higher moisture content and lower carbon, hydrogen, and heating values relative to the coals. Ash contents of the fuels were similar. The lignin also possessed higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}, CaO, and SO{sub 3} and lower concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, and N relative to the coals. The sulfur content of lignin could be reduced through a more thorough washing and drying of the lignin in an efficient commercial-scale dewatering device. Acidified biosolids were distinguished by higher concentrations of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MgO and lower SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to the other fuels. Trace element concentrations, especially for Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni, were generally greater in the lignin and acidified biosolid fuels relative to the Colbert coal. Maximum trace element emission factors were calculated for 95:5 Colbert coal--lignin and 90:5:5 Colbert coal--lignin--acidified biosolid blends and compared to U

  7. Sequestration and transport of lignin monomeric precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Miao, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Ke-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant terrestrial biopolymer after cellulose. It is essential for the viability of vascular plants. Lignin precursors, the monolignols, are synthesized within the cytosol of the cell. Thereafter, these monomeric precursors are exported into the cell wall, where they are polymerized and integrated into the wall matrix. Accordingly, transport of monolignols across cell membranes is a critical step affecting deposition of lignin in the secondarily thickened cell wall. While the biosynthesis of monolignols is relatively well understood, our knowledge of sequestration and transport of these monomers is sketchy. In this article, we review different hypotheses on monolignol transport and summarize the recent progresses toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol sequestration and transport across membranes. Deciphering molecular mechanisms for lignin precursor transport will support a better biotechnological solution to manipulate plant lignification for more efficient agricultural and industrial applications of cell wall biomass. PMID:21245806

  8. Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

  9. Sequestration and Transport of Lignin Monomeric Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.J.; Miao, Y.-C.; Zhang, K.-W.

    2011-01-18

    Lignin is the second most abundant terrestrial biopolymer after cellulose. It is essential for the viability of vascular plants. Lignin precursors, the monolignols, are synthesized within the cytosol of the cell. Thereafter, these monomeric precursors are exported into the cell wall, where they are polymerized and integrated into the wall matrix. Accordingly, transport of monolignols across cell membranes is a critical step affecting deposition of lignin in the secondarily thickened cell wall. While the biosynthesis of monolignols is relatively well understood, our knowledge of sequestration and transport of these monomers is sketchy. In this article, we review different hypotheses on monolignol transport and summarize the recent progresses toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol sequestration and transport across membranes. Deciphering molecular mechanisms for lignin precursor transport will support a better biotechnological solution to manipulate plant lignification for more efficient agricultural and industrial applications of cell wall biomass.

  10. Selective electrochemical detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in water based on poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) PSA/SiO2/Fe3O4/AuNPs/lignin-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Khaled A; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Zourob, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A new versatile electrochemical sensor based on poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) PSA/SiO2/Fe3O4/AuNPs/lignin (L-MMS) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was developed for the selective detection of trace trinitrotoluene (TNT) from aqueous media with high sensitivity. The fabricated magnetic microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). L-MMS films were cast on the GCE surface to fabricate the TNT sensing electrode. The limit of detection (LOD) of TNT determined by the amperometric i-t curve reached 35 pM. The lignin film and well packed Fe3O4/AuNPs facilitated the pre-concentration of trace TNT on the electrode surface resulting in a fast amperometric response of 3 seconds near the detection limit. The high sensitivity and excellent catalytic activity of the modified electrode could be attributed to the lignin layer and highly packed Fe3O4/AuNPs on the electrode surface. The total recovery of TNT from tapwater and seawater matrices was 98% and 96%, respectively. The electrode film was highly stable after five repeated adsorption/desorption cycles. The new electrochemical sensing scheme provides a highly selective, sensitive and versatile assay for the in-situ detection of TNT in complex water media. PMID:26540539