Science.gov

Sample records for limestone exploration play

  1. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30

    The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted

  2. Current Soviet exploration plays: Success and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Soviet hydrocarbon exploration in the 1980s took four distinct directions. First was extension exploration and the search for smaller new fields in discrete traps in traditional producing regions, such as the Apsheron Peninsula, North Caucasus, and Volga-Urals. This strategy produced a large number of small discoveries close to established infrastructure. Second was new field exploration in West Siberia in the stratigraphically complex Jurassic and the lower Neocomian sections. Third was expansion of the prolific gas plays in northern West Siberia. Exploratory success in West Siberia has created a backlog of several hundred discoveries awaiting full delineation and development. Most of these fields are distant from the established oil production center in the Middle Ob region and, therefore, may remain in inventory. Fourth was initial tests of new exploration frontiers, most important, the Paleozoic and Mesozoic plays of the Barents and Kara seas and the subsalt plays of the North Caspian basin. While these plays have yielded very important discoveries, significant technological barriers impede their development. The outlook for Soviet oil exploration in the 1990s is for significant opportunities for discovery of large volumes of oil, but at radically increasing exploration and production costs. In established regions, these costs arise from small field sizes and low well productivities. In frontier regions, exploitation of new fields will require technology not currently available in the USSR. The outlook for gas exploration continues to be very bright, as the onshore northern West Siberia is not fully explored and initial results from the Barents and Kara seas promise more very large gas discoveries.

  3. Exploring Young Children's Literacy Development through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2001-01-01

    This exploratory study examined effects of literacy- enriched play centers and the emergent literacy of 5-year-old kindergartners. Qualitative analysis indicated that a language or literacy component can be integrated into kindergartners' play activities. Play activities promoted the invented symbols and messages in children's writing. Teachers…

  4. Playful Invention and Exploration. Final Evaluation Report: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John; Mark; Carroll, Becky; Helms, Jen; Smith, Anita

    2008-01-01

    PIE (Playful Invention and Exploration) is a unique approach to learning that centers on the use of technology and design challenges to create powerful learning experiences in informal education settings. The Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) Institute project was funded in 2005 by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Overall, 150…

  5. Cyrenaican platform: structure, stratigraphy, and exploration play concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.M.; Zegaar, M.N.

    1985-02-01

    The structural and stratigraphic history of the Cyrenaican platform of eastern Libya is closely related to that of both the Sirte basin and the Western Desert of Egypt. At the end of the Paleozoic Hercynian orogeny, this area comprised the eastern end of the Sirte arch, the precursor of the Sirte basin. When the arch collapsed in the mid-Cretaceous, initiating the Sirte basin, the Cyrenaican area remained relatively high. A northwest-southeast trending high, the Gabboub arch, formed on the platform in the early Mesozoic, dividing the region into three areas: the high itself, a deep on the southwestern flank related to the Sirte basin, and a deep on the northeastern flank, which plunges into the offshore and appears to relate to the downwarped offshore area of the Western Desert of Egypt. Sediments of every age, except Triassic, are found in Cyrenaica. Paleozoic sediments are composed primarily of quartzitic sandstones and shales with lesser amounts of limestone, dolomites, and anhydrites. Mesozoic sediments are a mixture of clastics and carbonates. Cenozoic sediments are predominantly limestones, dolomites, and anhydrites with some sandstones and shales. Environments of deposition range from continental to deep marine. The Cyrenaican area has not been heavily explored and, until recently, no commercial hydrocarbons were found. Drilling on surface structures of some of the first wells in Libya resulted in one Devonian gas well. A reported 5600 BOPD Cretaceous discovery offshore Benghazi in mid-1984 demonstrates that hydrocarbon potential exists where thick sediments have been preserved.

  6. Contexts of Childhood and Play: Exploring Parental Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Asha; Gupta, Deepa

    2012-01-01

    The article explores cross-cultural notions of play in childhood among parents based on empirical investigations in two economically diverse residential areas in a metropolis in India. All parents had an unquestionable belief in an epistemic grounding of play in children's lives. However, parents begin to question play timings and children's…

  7. Multidimensional Correlates of Individual Variability in Play and Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship between play and environmental and biological factors and individual differences. Explores correlates of morbidity, nutrition, and caregiving environments on toddlers' play sophistication in Egypt. Suggests that variability in children's object versus social play may be a function of the goodness of fit between child and…

  8. Fractured carboniferous: A new play in a mature exploration region

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, K.; Nieberding, F.; Stahl, E.; Bachmann, G. )

    1993-09-01

    The northwest German Permian and Carboniferous has been an exploration target for some 30 yr. The search for naturally fractured reservoirs has become increasingly important after most of the conventional plays with porous reservoirs have been tested. Recent gas discoveries in heavily fractured Carboniferous and Zechstein 40 km northwest of Hannover, Germany, serve as a case study for additional exploration potential of significant extent in mature exploration areas. Advanced techniques, e.g., three-dimensional seismic methods, fracture detection, and experimental tectonics led to a new exploration play in this mature region.

  9. Exploring Language Awareness through Students' Engagement in Language Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, So-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores Korean students' demonstration of language awareness through their engagement in language play. Grounded in the understanding of the relationship between language play and an "engagement with language" (EWL) perspective, this ethnographic and discourse analytic study investigates how Korean students aged 11-15…

  10. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the

  11. The southern Bonaparte Gulf, northwest Australia - New exploration plays

    SciTech Connect

    Dauzacker, M.V.; Durrant, J.M.; France, R. ); Nilsen, T. )

    1990-05-01

    Integration of regional exploration data with new basin model concepts has generated new exploration plays in the offshore area defined as the Southern Bonaparte Gulf. This area represents a unique hydrocarbon habitat significantly different from adjacent areas. Early exploration (seven wells), targeting structural highs, encountered numerous hydrocarbon shows. Of most recent significance, Turtle-1 (1984) targeted a midbasin MS-I high recovering degraded oils in the MS-III section. Turtle-2 (1989) tested an additional 320-m-thick, MS-II onlap, encountering within fractured intervals significant oil and gas influx accompanied by massive lost circulation. Significant live oil (nondegraded) was produced on test despite formation damage inflicted during the 14-day well control period. Within the MS-III section thin incompetent seals and meteoric waters have resulted in small, degraded, low-GOR (gas/oil ratio) oil accumulations. In contrast the MS-II section has competent seals and exhibits high-GOR live oil. In consequence, given suitable models for porosity development, MS-II is highly prospective, indicating new exploratory plays: (1) MS-II fractured, stratigraphic pinch-outs flanking MS-I structures, (2) MS-II stacked turbidites and basin floor fans deposited in salt withdrawal subbasins, (3) MS-II carbonate banks within the subbasin's marginal carbonate complexes, (4) MS-I reefs localized over early salt structures and onlapped by MS-II sediments, and (5) MS-II structural and stratigraphic traps associated with diapiric salt. By virtue of the stratigraphic and structural relationship of MS-U sediments, generally onlapping the flanks of the structural highs originally targeted, these new plays have not been tested in optimal locations. A new phase of exploration specifically targeted at these plays is planned.

  12. Understanding Positive Play: An Exploration of Playing Experiences and Responsible Gambling Practices.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard T A; Griffiths, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    This study is one of the first to explore in detail the behaviors, attitudes and motivations of players that show no signs of at-risk or problem gambling behavior (so-called 'positive players'). Via an online survey, 1484 positive players were compared with 209 problem players identified using the Lie/Bet screen. The study identified two distinct groups of positive players defined according to their motivations to play and their engagement with responsible gambling (RG) practices. Those positive players that played most frequently employed the most personal RG strategies. Reasons that positive players gave for gambling were focused on leisure (e.g., playing for fun, being entertained, and/or winning a prize). By contrast, problem gamblers were much more focused upon modifying mood states (e.g., excitement, relaxation, depression and playing when bored or upset). The present study also suggests that online gambling is not, by default, inherently riskier than gambling in more traditional ways, as online gambling was the most popular media by which positive players gambled. Furthermore, most positive players reported that it was easier to stick to their limits when playing the National Lottery online compared to traditional retail purchasing of tickets. Problem players were significantly more likely than positive players to gamble with family and friends, suggesting that, contrary to a popular RG message, social play may not be inherently safer than gambling alone. It is proposed that players (generally) may identify more with the term 'positive play' than the term 'RG' which is frequently interpreted as being aimed at people with gambling problems, rather than all players. PMID:25209455

  13. Gulf Coast ``Sub-Salt`` play exploration strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Pratsch, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    Successful exploration strategies in the new offshore Gulf Coast Mio-Pliocene oil and gas (``Sub-Salt-) play will include the entire Petroleum System involved from pre-Miocene source bed deposition onward. On the shelf, primary accumulations occurred in pre-Late Miocene time and reservoirs; in deep-water areas, hydrocarbon generation, migration, and entrapment occurred just during the last few million years. In both scenarios, deep (pre-Miocene) structural configuration is decisive for the selection of most prospective acreage blocks, using established regional hydrocarbon migration principles.

  14. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the

  15. Changing the game: exploring infants' participation in early play routines

    PubMed Central

    Fantasia, Valentina; Fasulo, Alessandra; Costall, Alan; López, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Play has proved to have a central role in children's development, most notably in rule learning (Piaget, 1965; Sutton-Smith, 1979) and negotiation of roles and goals (Garvey, 1974; Bruner et al., 1976). Yet very little research has been done on early play. The present study focuses on early social games, i.e., vocal-kinetic play routines that mothers use to interact with infants from very early on. We explored 3-month-old infants and their mothers performing a routine game first in the usual way, then in two violated conditions: without gestures and without sound. The aim of the study is to investigate infants' participation and expectations in the game and whether this participation is affected by changes in the multimodal format of the game. Infants' facial expressions, gaze, and body movements were coded to measure levels of engagement and affective state across the three conditions. Results showed a significant decrease in Limbs Movements and expressions of Positive Affect, an increase in Gaze Away and in Stunned Expression when the game structure was violated. These results indicate that the violated game conditions were experienced as less engaging, either because of an unexpected break in the established joint routine, or simply because they were weaker versions of the same game. Overall, our results suggest that structured, multimodal play routines may constitute interactional contexts that only work as integrated units of auditory and motor resources, representing early communicative contexts which prepare the ground for later, more complex multimodal interactions, such as verbal exchanges. PMID:24936192

  16. Exploring Play/Playfulness and Learning in the Adult and Higher Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Play and playfulness and their role in learning are researched extensively in early childhood education. However, as the child matures into an adult, play and playfulness are given less attention in the teaching and learning process. In adult education, there is very little research about play/playfulness and its significance for learning. Despite…

  17. New oil exploration play in Florida: The upper Fredericksberg Dollar Bay Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell-Tapping, H.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The Fredericksberg of South Florida may have a great oil potential that has been overlooked as a primary target in past decades. Previous exploration in the area has targeted the Lower Cretaceous oil-producing Sunniland Formation lower in the stratigraphic section. The Fredericksberg Dollar Bay Formation has hydrocarbon shows in many wells occurring in limestone biohermal deposits as well as in an upper dolomitic section. The Dollar Bay Formation is part of the Big Cypress Group of the Comanchean Series of the Lower Cretaceous. The Lower Cretaceous lithology is composed of evaporitic-carbonate cycles consisting of anhydrites, dolomites, and limestones. There are also present some calcareous shales, mudstones, salt, lignitic material, and carbonaceous material, especially in the anhydrite and limestone intervals. The limestones are usually micritic, chalky, calcarenitic, sometimes argillaceous, containing skeletal particles of gastropods, pelecypods, ostracods, algae, and forams together with ooids, oncolites, grapestones, and fecal pellets. The color of the limestone ranges from white to gray to tan to dark brown. The anhydrite is usually nodular, microcrystalline, or crystalline and is usually bedded. The dolomite crystals range from euhedral to sucrosic and occur in about 30% of the formation. The expected production in the Dollar Bay Formation will be from a leached calcarenite or a dolomite. Petrological examination of core and cuttings samples show a trapping mechanism and reservoir quality and content similar to the oil pay-zone of the Sunniland Formation in Felda field. In the wells examined the reservoir porosities range from 13.6% to 28.7% with permeabilities ranging from 4.9 md to 119.0 md in a dolomite section, while in the limestone the porosities range from 9.2% to 32.7% with permeabilities from 5.2 md to 59.0 md. More than 20 wells have been evaluated for lithology, porosity, diagenesis, cementation, and the direction of hydrocarbon migration.

  18. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  19. Limestone geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Trudgill, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book focuses on recent work on geomorphological processes and relates them to established theories of landform development. Special attention is paid to soil processes, marine geomorphology, chemical processes and future work on process-form relationships in the context of dated sequences of cave deposits. There are discussions of limestone landforms and other carbonate rocks, caves, hydrological networks, features of karst, morphometry, and coastal landforms and solution chemistry of limestones.

  20. Does CMC Promote Language Play? Exploring Humor in Two Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandergriff, Ilona; Fuchs, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    In view of the growing body of research on humor and language play in computer-mediated communication (CMC) which--more than any other medium--has been associated with goofing off, joking, and other nonserious communication, this paper compares spontaneous foreign language play (L2 play) in text-only synchronous computer-mediated versus…

  1. Exploring the Uncanny Valley to Find the Edge of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    Play often rewards us with a thrill or a sense of wonder. But, just over the edge of play, uncanny objects like dolls, automata, robots, and realistic animations may become monstrous rather than marvelous. Drawing from diverse sources, literary evidence, psychological and psychoanalytic theory, new insights in neuroscience, marketing literature,…

  2. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  3. Exploring the Concept of Sustainable Development through Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchs, Arnaud; Blanchard, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development is used in everyday life by the general public, alongside researchers, institutions, and private companies. Nevertheless, its definition is far from being unequivocal. Clarifying the outline of the concept seems necessary. We have created a role-play for this purpose. Our article aims at depicting its main…

  4. Outcrop Analogue Studies in Geothermal Exploration - Characterization of fault zones in Triassic Muschelkalk limestones of the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, S.; Bauer, J. F.; Philipp, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of fault zones is of particular importance in geothermal reservoirs since there may be great effects on fluid flow. Fault zones generally consist of two major hydromechanical units: the fault core and the damage zone, surrounded by the host rock. To improve predictions of fracture system parameters for each unit and resulting estimations of reservoir permeabilities at depths we perform outcrop analogue studies. We analyze Middle Triassic Muschelkalk limestones that form one geothermal reservoir formation in the Upper Rhine Graben (southwest Germany) in quarries on its eastern graben shoulder. We measure the orientations and displacements of various fault zones and characterize the fracture systems within the fault zone units and in the host rock. Our studies show that damage zones are well developed even in smaller fault zones. Their fault cores, however, are narrow compared with that of fault zones with large displacements and comprise brecciated material, clay smear, host rock lenses or zones of mineralization. Based on the field data we use analytical models to estimate the permeabilities of the analyzed fracture systems. Results show increased fracture frequencies in the fault zone damage zones and larger fracture apertures parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike that lead to enhanced permeability compared with other orientations. Mineralized fractures accumulated in this direction in the 'Nussloch'-quarry indicate that these fractures were pathways for fault zone parallel fluid flow in the past. This shows that open fractures with orientations parallel to fault zones may be pathways for fault zone parallel fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs. By contrast, well-developed fault cores may be potential barriers for fluid flow in inactive fault zones. To build numerical models to analyze local stress fields and effects on fracture propagation for different fault zone types and geometries information on rock mechanical properties is

  5. Playing with Porn: Greek Children's Explorations in Pornography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaliki, Liza

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on the research findings of the Greek Kids Go Online project and the EU Kids Online I network research on children and online technologies in Europe, funded by the European Commission Safer Internet Programme, 2006-2009. It explores the experiences of young people aged between 9 and 17 with pornographic texts online, and…

  6. Playful Collaborative Exploration: New Research Practice in Participatory Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Martin; Linde, Per

    2005-01-01

    Within the Participatory Design community as well as the Computer Supported Cooperative Work tradition, a lot of effort has been put into the question of letting field studies inform design. In this paper, we describe how game-like approaches can be used as a way of exploring a practice from a design point of view. Thinking of ethnographic…

  7. Major new foreign exploration plays during 1983-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Emmet, P.A.; Hedberg, J.D.; McIver, N.U.; Tyrrell, W.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    About 30 billion bbl of recoverable oil have been found in new foreign plays during the last 5 years; significant gas reserves also were found. Most of the foreign oil discoveries are in Mesozoic sandstone reservoirs onshore, but Marlim, the largest single field with estimated reserves of 2.5 billion bbl, is located offshore in the deep-water part of the Campos basin, Brazil. Approximately 8-10 billion bbl of oil were found in South America, 6 billion in the Near East, 5 billion in western Europe, 5 billion in Africa, 2 billion in Asia (outside the USSR), and 0.5-0.7 billion in Australasia. Some of the giant discoveries include: Cano Limo, Colombia (1983); Alif, North Yemen, and Draugen, Norway (1984); Marlim, Brazil, and Heidrun, Norway (1985); El Furrial, Venezuela (1986); and Musipan-1, Venezuela (1987). Most of these and several smaller discoveries are in new plays or trends.

  8. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  9. Using production-based plays in the northern Gulf of Mexico as a hydrocarbon exploration tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, G.L.; Batchelder, E.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Minerals Management Service has described more than 100 plays in the northern Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf encompassing approximately 1,100 fields and over 9,500 productive sands. Plays are defined by a combination of production, chronostratigraphy, lighostratigraphy, and structural style. Cumulative production from these plays as of December 1993 is 9.01 billion barrels of oil and 107.7 trillion cubic feet of gas, with remaining proved reserves of 2.14 billion barrels of oil and 29.1 trillion cubic feet of gas. The information associated with these plays can be used by explorationists as a qualitative tool to target areas of potential exploration interest and as a quantitative tool to test the potential economic viability of both plays and individual prospects. Specific examples of each of these potential uses are provided. Qualitatively, the play maps target areas for future exploration in two ways. The first is to identify conceptual deep-sea fan plays located downdip from plays established in sediments of shallow water depositional environments. The second is to emphasize areas for both future exploration and infill potential around and within established plays. The extensive data sets associated with each play provide valuable quantitative information that can be used to assess the possible number and size of undiscovered accumulations in a play of exploration interest. At the individual prospect level, data related to reach productive sand and pool can be used to perform detailed geologic and economic evaluations.

  10. Exploring Kindergarten Teachers' Views and Roles Regarding Children's Outdoor Play Environments in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Qaryouti, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore kindergarten teachers' views and roles regarding outdoor play environments in Omani kindergartens. Thirty kindergarten teachers from 15 private kindergartens were observed and interviewed. The results indicated that teachers recognize the importance of outdoor play in children's development and learning.…

  11. The Red Hat Society: Exploring the role of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives.

    PubMed

    Mackay Yarnal, Careen

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on play. Yet, the role of play in older adults' lives has received limited attention. Strikingly absent is research on play and older women. Missing from the literature is how older women use play as a liminal context for social interaction and communitas. This is odd because by 2030 one in four American women will be over the age of sixty-five. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the roles of play, liminality, and communitas in older women's lives. The focus is the Red Hat Society, a social group for women over age 50 that fosters play and fun. Using qualitative interviews with focus groups and participant observation of a regional Red Hat Society event, the study highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of current conceptualizations of play, liminality, and communitas. PMID:17000619

  12. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  13. Play-Based Interview Methods for Exploring Young Children's Perspectives on Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koller, Donna; San Juan, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education provides learning opportunities for children with disabilities in regular settings with other children. Despite the prevalence of inclusive education, few qualitative studies have adequately explored young children's perspectives on inclusion. This paper reviews the findings of a preliminary qualitative study where play-based…

  14. The Ethanol Project: Exploring Alternative Energy with Role-Play and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a project that includes a two-week series of researching, essay writing, and speaking lessons exploring the broader implications of using ethanol as a fuel. The author, a chemistry teacher, describes how she uses a senate hearing discussion of ethanol fuel subsidies as the forum for a role-play. The four components of the…

  15. Exploring Game Experiences and Game Leadership in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, YeiBeech; Ryu, SeoungHo

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the in-game experiences of massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) players focusing on game leadership and offline leadership. MMORPGs have enormous potential to provide gameplayers with rich social experiences through various interactions along with social activities such as joining a game community, team play…

  16. Diagnostic expert systems: Encoding geological knowledge for an exploration play analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is currently exploring the feasibility of applying diagnostic expert systems and knowledge-based acquisition techniques to the geologic analysis of sedimentary basins and petroleum exploration plays. This paper describes a unique approach to the design and application of a rule-based expert system to the analysis of exploration plays, a methodology commonly used to assess petroleum resources in a basin. This technique consists of using various geologic models and Monte Carlo simulation or probabilistic methods for analyzing geologic and reservoir conditions favorable to the occurrence of petroleum resources. Work is in progress to adapt the geologic model used in the play analysis to an expert-systems and knowledge base, the object being to capture the logic and reasoning used to characterize the geologic model and to evaluate the play. Expert systems techniques now being developed are capable of dealing with inexact reasoning or reasoning under uncertainty by incorporating degrees of uncertainty to deal effectively with incomplete, inferred, or interpretive data involved in the knowledge base. The goal of this study is to provide an embedded diagnostic expert-system approach for characterizing the geologic model to expand upon the play-analysis system. Such a system provides the geologist with capabilities to document major basin components, such as stratigraphy, structural geology, and sedimentation, and to analyze the traditional concepts of source, reservoir, and trapping mechanisms. This expert system will assist the geologist in compiling and interpreting the geologic and reservoir engineering data necessary for running the probabilistic methods to calculate the amount of probable petroleum resources within each play. Diagnostic expert-systems technology can provide challenging new tools in knowledge acquisition and data interpretation in petroleum geology.

  17. Play-fairway analysis for geothermal exploration: Examples from the Great Basin, western USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E

    2013-10-27

    Elevated permeability within fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Future geothermal development depends on precise and accurate location of such fluid flow pathways in order to both accurately assess geothermal resource potential and increase drilling success rates. The collocation of geologic characteristics that promote permeability in a given geothermal system define the geothermal ‘fairway’, the location(s) where upflow zones are probable and where exploration efforts including drilling should be focused. We define the geothermal fairway as the collocation of 1) fault zones that are ideally oriented for slip or dilation under ambient stress conditions, 2) areas with a high spatial density of fault intersections, and 3) lithologies capable of supporting dense interconnected fracture networks. Areas in which these characteristics are concomitant with both elevated temperature and fluids are probable upflow zones where economic-scale, sustainable temperatures and flow rates are most likely to occur. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we test this ‘play-fairway’ exploration methodology on two Great Basin geothermal systems, the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These analyses, based on 3D structural and stratigraphic framework models, reveal subsurface characteristics about each system, well beyond the scope of standard exploration methods. At Brady’s, the geothermal fairways we define correlate well with successful production wells and pinpoint several drilling targets for maintaining or expanding production in the field. In addition, hot-dry wells within the Brady’s geothermal field lie outside our defined geothermal fairways. At Astor Pass, our play-fairway analysis provides for a data-based conceptual model of fluid flow within the geothermal system and indicates several targets for exploration drilling.

  18. Exploring the Impact of Role-Playing on Peer Feedback in an Online Case-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the impact of role-playing on the quality of peer feedback and learners' perception of this strategy in a case-based learning activity with VoiceThread in an online course. The findings revealed potential positive impact of role-playing on learners' generation of constructive feedback as role-playing was associated…

  19. Playing with Shadows--Playing with Words: Exploring Teachers' Ownership through Poetic Inquiry in a Norwegian-Nepalese Preschool Teacher Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mjanger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the use of poetic inquiry in a transnational competence-building Shadow Play Project. Based on journals from four Nepalese preschool teacher educators, I present and interpret examples of data poems that portray the teachers' experiences of ownership in the project. My discussion intends to make explicit some aspects of the…

  20. Drug Use as Boundary Play: A Qualitative Exploration of Gay Circuit Parties

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Research findings have revealed that gay circuit parties may be locations that are disproportionately responsible for the increasing rates of many STIs/HIV among gay/bisexual men. Theories have been put forth that this may be the case because circuit parties are locales of prevalent drug use and unsafe sex. To explore the relationship between these two phenomena, in-depth qualitative interviews were undertaken with 17 men who (1) have sex with other men, (2) attended gay circuit parties in Montréal, Canada, in 2007. These revealed that drugs (including alcohol) were used intentionally to engage in unsafe sex, and then to justify this behavior after the fact. This process we called boundary play. PMID:21692603

  1. Natural fracture characterization: A key to success in an exploration play, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, S.L.; Gale, M.S.; Bradley, P.J.; Mount, V.S.

    1996-06-01

    Numerous vertical wells drilled in the southern Powder River basin have encountered fractured, tight, overpressured, Cretaceous hydrocarbon reservoirs. These reservoirs demonstrate enhanced productivity and ultimate recovery with little to no water production. Effective exploration and development of these reservoirs includes a systematic approach to characterization and prediction of the fracture system. Surface mapping within Cretaceous units along the southern and western margins of the basin revealed multiple fracture sets related to both regional and local tectonic events. A pre-Laramide regional fracture set oriented at approximately N70{degrees}E is dominant over the mapped 500 square mile area. This set displays a consistent frequency, direction, height. and morphology both in the surface and subsurface. Fractures in early Tertiary rocks within the basin are unidirectionally oriented along a WNW azimuth, a direction also found in the Cretaceous units. Vaster Resources, Inc. is actively exploring fractured reservoirs in the Powder River basin with horizontal wells targeting the Niobrara and Frontier formations. Integration of the detailed surface outcrop studies with regional cross-sections, Landsat lineament analysis, FMS log data, 2D multicomponent/multisource shear wave seismic, and borehole breakouts (to determine present day stress) have been used to successfully predict the orientation, frequency, and degree of openness of the subsurface fracture system. The consistency of the fracture system and its positive impact on reservoir productivity significantly enhance the prospectiveness of Cretaceous plays throughout the southern Powder River basin.

  2. Exploring the Tactfulness of Implementing Play in the Classroom: A Hong Kong Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pui-Wah, Doris Cheng

    2010-01-01

    "Learning through play" in early childhood education is widely advocated, but studies show that play is not easily enacted in classrooms. The quality of learning through play has been questioned in various countries, especially when learning outcomes are a global concern. This paper examines how one teacher implemented learning through play within…

  3. A Longitudinal Study Exploring the Relationship of Representational Levels of Three Aspects of Preschool Sociodramatic Play and Early Academic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanline, Mary Frances; Milton, Sande; Phelps, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the predictive relationship between the level of symbolic representation in preschoolers' sociodramatic play and reading and mathematics abilities and rate of growth in early elementary grades for children with and without disabilities. The relationship of three aspects of sociodramatic play--symbolic…

  4. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core

  5. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin

  6. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  7. Exploring Natural Pedagogy in Play with Preschoolers: Cues Parents Use and Relations among Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara; Baldwin, Dare

    2012-01-01

    Recent developmental work demonstrates a range of effects of pedagogical cues on childhood learning. The present work investigates natural pedagogy in informal parent-child play. Preschool-aged children participated in free play and a toy task with a parent in addition to a toy task with an experimenter. Sessions were extensively coded for use of…

  8. What Students Need: Exploring Teachers' Views via Imagined Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Nejad, Masomeh Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Role-playing is an unscripted dramatic technique that encourages participants to improvise behaviors that illustrate expected actions of persons involved in defined situations. However, among various uses in developing professionals, the use of role-playing in teacher education is rather rare. To give all students the opportunity to participate in…

  9. Exploring the Game of "Julirde": A Mathematical-Educational Game Played by Fulbe Children in Cameroon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Paulus

    2001-01-01

    Presents an educational mathematical activity from Africa. Shows how one child explored the game of Julirde, a game of the mosque emphasizing problem solving and symmetry. Offers several suggestions for exploring the game from the central African country of Cameroon in the elementary school mathematics classroom. (ASK)

  10. Math Academy: Play Ball! Explorations in Data Analysis & Statistics. Book 3: Supplemental Math Materials for Grades 3-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimbey, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    Created by teachers for teachers, the Math Academy tools and activities included in this booklet were designed to create hands-on activities and a fun learning environment for the teaching of mathematics to the students. This booklet contains the "Math Academy--Play Ball! Explorations in Data Analysis & Statistics," which teachers can use to…

  11. Servant Leadership: How does NASA Serve the Interests of Humankind in Aerospace Exploration and the Role STEM Plays in it?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides a description of technology efforts illustrative of NASA Glenn Research Center Core competencies and which exemplifies how NASA serves the interest of humankind in aerospace exploration. Examples are provided as talking points to illustrate the role that career paths in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) plays in the aforementioned endeavor.

  12. Keeping It Real: Exploring an Interdisciplinary Breaking Bad News Role-Play as an Integrative Learning Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; McCarthy, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is a complex area of healthcare best delivered by an interdisciplinary team approach. Breaking bad news is an inherent part of caring for people with life-limiting conditions. This study aims to explore an interdisciplinary breaking bad news role-play in a palliative care module. Participants were undergraduate medical and nursing…

  13. Role Play in Blended Learning: A Case Study Exploring the Impact of Story and Other Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dracup, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Role play is an increasingly popular technique in tertiary education, being student centred, constructivist and suitable for a range of subject areas. The choice of formats is wide open, with options ranging from the traditional face to face performance through to multi-user online computer games. Some teachers prefer to take advantage of features…

  14. More than Child's Play: North Carolina Professor Explores the History of Dolls and Their Sociological Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Eleanor Lee

    2004-01-01

    For Dr. Sabrina Thomas, dolls are not just child's play. In fact, they are the subject of her research, which recently landed her a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Thomas, an assistant professor of family and consumer sciences at North Carolina Central University, was awarded the grant to write a book on the history…

  15. Play as a Resource for Children Facing Adversity: An Exploration of Indicative Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearn, Maggie; Howard, Justine

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest that the ability and opportunity to play affords children a natural resource to meet intellectual and emotional challenge. Analysis of case studies focusing on interventions with children caught in the bombing of Beirut, children abandoned to the state system in Romania, and the street children in Rio de Janeiro and Cali…

  16. Exploring Performativity and Resistance in Qualitative Research Interviews: A Play in Four Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaunae, Cathrine; Wu, Chiu-Hui; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2011-01-01

    This play describes how the authors become aware of the complexities of resistance and performativity in the qualitative interview process. It also illustrates how this awareness and subsequent acquisition of knowledge changed and informed the way they viewed qualitative research interviewing. More specifically, performativity is put into work in…

  17. Trading Spaces: An Educator's Ethnographic Exploration of Adolescents' Digital Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes-Moore, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the author examines a digital role-play in which participants composed an alternate version of "The Hunger Games" (Collins, 2008). Participants imagined characters and posted more than 400 scenes in the online collaboration. The author draws upon ethnographic methods (Merriam, 2009) to describe her participant-observer…

  18. "Curriculum", "National", "English"...? A Critical Exploration of Key Terms with Some Seriously Playful Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This opens with a critical and historical exploration of the terms that make up the phrase "English National Curriculum", breaking them down to build them up differently. This prompts a critique of the nominally singular subject "English" that stresses its plurality ("Englishes") and introduces the concept "Englishing" to highlight its ongoing…

  19. Playing with Heutagogy: Exploring Strategies to Empower Mature Learners in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    Mature learners often invest a great deal of emotional energy in starting a higher education qualification. They have complex needs which are often less to do with their ability to learn and more to do with aspects of confidence and levels of self-belief about achieving or feeling "good enough" to participate. This article explores the…

  20. Why Do We Play the Games? Exploring Institutional and Political Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardon, Thibaut; Josserand, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore why digital games based learning (DGBL) is spreading rapidly in all educational settings, when the literature does not provide clear empirical evidence of the pedagogical benefits. The paper seeks to understand why DGBL is constantly developing despite this lack of consensus about the learning…

  1. Precambrian Chuar source rock play: An exploration case history in southern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Uphoff, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Source rock potential of the Upper Proterozoic Chuar Group, specifically the Walcott Member of the Kwagunt Formation, provides the basis for a petroleum play in southern Utah. Analyses of Chuar black shales from outcrops in the Grand Canyon show total organic carbon values of 3-9%, hydrogen indices up to 255, and maximum maturity within the oil window. Modeling indicates a potential 150 mi{sup 2} (400 km{sup 2}) area with a minimum generative potential of 2700 MBO{sup *}. Chuar source rocks are proposed as one part of a petroleum system that includes reservoirs in the Cambrian Tapeats Sandstone and seal in the overlying Bright Angel Shale. Prospective structures include anticlines of Laramide age not drilled through the Tapeats interval. One such structure is the Circle Cliffs uplift, which exhibits an area under closure of 9000 mi{sup 2} (2300 km{sup 2}) at the top of the Devonian. In 1994, BHP Petroleum drilled the 28-1 Federal well on the Circle Cliffs structure. The well logged 142 ft (43 m) of Tapeats porosity (>7%) and flowed CO{sub 2} gas at rates up to 5.0 Mcf{sup *} per day. Analysis of bitumen in the reservoir indicated an earlier hydrocarbon charge and suggested a new oil type for the region.

  2. Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

  3. High temperature H{sub 2}S removal using limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Lynn, S.

    1995-12-31

    This project is exploring the technical and economic feasibility of using limestone in a high determine process for cleaning coal gas prior to combustion in a gas turbine. In one version of the process the coal gas would pass counter-currently through a nearly-isothermal, moving bed of limestone that would serve to remove particulates (by filtration), and hydrogen sulfide (by chemisorption), and ammonia (by catalysis). Alternative process configurations include the use of limestone in a cocurrently moving bed, in a fluidized bed, or in an entrained flow sorption system. The objectives of this research have been to define the range of temperatures at which these goals can best be realized at a given pressure, to determine the effect of the magnesium content of the limestone on sulfidation kinetics and calcium utilization, to use the kinetic data to model the various types of sorption systems, and to develop a process for converting calcium sulfide to elemental sulfur and calcium carbonate.

  4. Scaling on a limestone flooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Quiroga, P. M.; Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    2012-04-01

    Natural stone can be use on nearly every surface, inside and outside buildings, but decay is more commonly reported from the ones exposed to outdoor aggressively conditions. This study instead, is an example of limestone weathering of uncertain origin in the interior of a residential building. The stone, used as flooring, started to exhibit loss of material in the form of scaling. These damages were observed before the building, localized in the South of Spain (Málaga), was inhabited. Moreover, according to the company the limestone satisfies the following European standards UNE-EN 1341: 2002, UNE-EN 1343: 2003; UNE-EN 12058: 2004 for floorings. Under these circumstances the main objective of this study was to assess the causes of this phenomenon. For this reason the composition of the mortar was determined and the stone was characterized from a mineralogical and petrological point of view. The last material, which is a fossiliferous limestone from Egypt with natural fissure lines, is mainly composed of calcite, being quartz, kaolinite and apatite minor phases. Moreover, under different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques (FTIR, micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, etc) samples of the weathered, taken directly from the buildings, and unweathered limestone tiles were examined and a new mineralogical phase, trona, was identified at scaled areas which are connected with the natural veins of the stone. In fact, through BSE-mapping the presence of sodium has been detected in these veins. This soluble sodium carbonate would was dissolved in the natural waters from which limestone was precipitated and would migrate with the ascendant capilar humidity and crystallized near the surface of the stone starting the scaling phenomenon which in historic masonry could be very damaging. Therefore, the weathering of the limestone would be related with the hygroscopic behaviour of this salt, but not with the constructive methods used. This makes the limestone unable to be used on restoration

  5. Using Cross-Cultural, Intergenerational Play Narratives to Explore Issues of Social Justice and Equity in Discourse on Children's Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimpi, Priya Mariana; Nicholson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Discussion of children's play in international and diverse communities requires careful consideration of social, cultural and political contexts impacting children's lives, as well as recognition of the complexities revealed when these variables are identified and analysed. Using diverse conceptual frameworks represented in the research…

  6. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  7. The age of the Ocala limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Charles Wythe

    1916-01-01

    In 1881 Eugene A. Smith announced the presence, underlying large areas in both western and peninsular Florida, of limestone which he correlated with the Vicksburg limestone of Mississippi and Alabama and designated by the term Vicksburg limestone. Among the localities he mentioned specifically are Marianna, in Jackson County, and Ocala, in Marion County.

  8. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  9. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  10. Where to Next for School Playground Interventions to Encourage Active Play? An Exploration of Structured and Unstructured School Playground Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyndman, Brendon

    2015-01-01

    An emerging public health priority is to enhance children's opportunities for active play. Children spend a large proportion of weekdays in schools, making schools an influential and suitable setting to promote children's active play. Rather than continually increasing the burdens placed upon busy teaching staff, the use of school playground…

  11. Exploring the Role Played by Error Correction and Models on Children's Reported Noticing and Output Production in a L2 Writing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Yvette; Roca de Larios, Julio

    2014-01-01

    This article reports an empirical study in which we explored the role played by two forms of feedback--error correction and model texts--on child English as a foreign language learners' reported noticing and written output. The study was carried out with 11- and 12-year-old children placed in proficiency-matched pairs who engaged in a…

  12. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  13. Playing in School or at Home? An Exploration of the Effects of Context on Educational Game Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grove, Frederik; Van Looy, Jan; Neys, Joyce; Jansz, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to gain insight into the effects of context on educational game experience. Using a quasi-experimental setup, it compares the playing and learning experiences of adolescent players of the awareness-raising game PING in a domestic (N=135) and a school (N=121) context. Results indicate that both gaming (identification,…

  14. SNiPlay3: a web-based application for exploration and large scale analyses of genomic variations.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, Alexis; Homa, Felix; Andres, Gwendoline; Sempere, Guilhem; Sarah, Gautier; Hueber, Yann; Dufayard, Jean-François; Ruiz, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    SNiPlay is a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of genetic variants including both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and InDels. Version 3 now extends functionalities in order to easily manage and exploit SNPs derived from next generation sequencing technologies, such as GBS (genotyping by sequencing), WGRS (whole gre-sequencing) and RNA-Seq technologies. Based on the standard VCF (variant call format) format, the application offers an intuitive interface for filtering and comparing polymorphisms using user-defined sets of individuals and then establishing a reliable genotyping data matrix for further analyses. Namely, in addition to the various scaled-up analyses allowed by the application (genomic annotation of SNP, diversity analysis, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium), SNiPlay3 proposes new modules for GWAS (genome-wide association studies), population stratification, distance tree analysis and visualization of SNP density. Additionally, we developed a suite of Galaxy wrappers for each step of the SNiPlay3 process, so that the complete pipeline can also be deployed on a Galaxy instance using the Galaxy ToolShed procedure and then be computed as a Galaxy workflow. SNiPlay is accessible at http://sniplay.southgreen.fr. PMID:26040700

  15. Exploring the Behavioral Patterns of Learners in an Educational Massively Multiple Online Role-Playing Game (MMORPG)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Huei-Tse

    2012-01-01

    Massively multiple online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are very popular among students. Educational MMORPGs, however, are very rare, as are studies on gamers' behavioral patterns during such games. The current study is an empirical observation and analysis of the behavioral patterns of 100 gamers participating in an educational MMORPG called…

  16. SNiPlay3: a web-based application for exploration and large scale analyses of genomic variations

    PubMed Central

    Dereeper, Alexis; Homa, Felix; Andres, Gwendoline; Sempere, Guilhem; Sarah, Gautier; Hueber, Yann; Dufayard, Jean-François; Ruiz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    SNiPlay is a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of genetic variants including both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and InDels. Version 3 now extends functionalities in order to easily manage and exploit SNPs derived from next generation sequencing technologies, such as GBS (genotyping by sequencing), WGRS (whole gre-sequencing) and RNA-Seq technologies. Based on the standard VCF (variant call format) format, the application offers an intuitive interface for filtering and comparing polymorphisms using user-defined sets of individuals and then establishing a reliable genotyping data matrix for further analyses. Namely, in addition to the various scaled-up analyses allowed by the application (genomic annotation of SNP, diversity analysis, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium), SNiPlay3 proposes new modules for GWAS (genome-wide association studies), population stratification, distance tree analysis and visualization of SNP density. Additionally, we developed a suite of Galaxy wrappers for each step of the SNiPlay3 process, so that the complete pipeline can also be deployed on a Galaxy instance using the Galaxy ToolShed procedure and then be computed as a Galaxy workflow. SNiPlay is accessible at http://sniplay.southgreen.fr. PMID:26040700

  17. Meteoric stabilization and preservation of limestone within late Proterozoic Beck Spring Dolomite of eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Zempolich, W.G.; Wilkinson, B.H.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1989-04-01

    Petrographic and geochemical study of limestone, silicified carbonate, and dolostone indicates that meteoric diagenetic processes and paleogeographic position played important roles in the stabilization and preservation of limestone within the pervasively dolomitized Beck Spring Dolomite. The authors conclude that Beck Spring marine cement allochems precipitated as aragonite and high-magnesium calcite. In the vicinity of Saratoga Spring, these metastable mineralogies were dissolved, eroded, stabilized to calcite, and replaced by silica through interaction with meteoric waters. Early stabilization of limestone components along the margin of the Amargosa basin apparently decreased susceptibility to subsequent dolomitization.

  18. 'Why are there so many drums playing until dawn?' Exploring the role of Gamba spirits and healers in the post-war recovery period in Gorongosa, Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Victor

    2003-12-01

    In the wake of a civil war, local resources can play a potential role in shaping the recovery process by providing both old and new exegeses for the disturbing effects of the past. Using the case of Gorongosa, this article aims to explore the ways in which the war has impacted upon traditional medicine by creating Gamba spirits that cause havoc but can also transform the psychosocial hurts of war survivors. Historically, traditional healing practice was under the sole responsibility of the Dzoca, an ancestral spirit that for generations was embodied in living people through lineage descent to exercise its healing powers. There is consensus among healers that the Gamba spirit and healers emerged after the war and are rapidly spreading throughout Gorongosa. I explore the emic theories to explain the Gamba's puzzling origins and the role they are currently playing in Gorongosa. PMID:14979463

  19. A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

    2008-06-30

    This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New

  20. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  1. Watching brain TV and playing brain ball exploring novel BCI strategies using real-time analysis of human intracranial data.

    PubMed

    Jerbi, Karim; Freyermuth, Samson; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe; Berthoz, Alain; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    A large body of evidence from animal studies indicates that motor intention can be decoded via multiple single-unit recordings or from local field potentials (LFPs) recorded not only in primary motor cortex, but also in premotor or parietal areas. In humans, reports of invasive data acquisition for the purpose of BCI developments are less numerous and signal selection for optimal control still remains poorly investigated. Here we report on our recent implementation of a real-time analysis platform for the investigation of ongoing oscillations in human intracerebral recordings and review various results illustrating its utility for the development of novel brain-computer and brain-robot interfaces. Our findings show that the insight gained both from off-line experiments and from online functional exploration can be used to guide future selection of the sites and frequency bands to be used in a translation algorithm such as the one needed for a BCI-driven cursor control. Overall, the findings reported with our online spectral analysis platforms (Brain TV and Brain Ball) indicate the feasibility of online functional exploration via intracranial recordings in humans and outline the direct benefits of this approach for the improvement of invasive BCI strategies in humans. In particular, our findings suggest that current BCI performance may be improved by using signals recorded from various systems previously unexplored in the context of BCI research such as the oscillatory activity recorded in the oculomotor networks as well as higher cognitive processes including working memory, attention, and mental calculation networks. Finally, we discuss current limitations of the methodology and outline future paths for innovative BCI research. PMID:19607998

  2. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  3. LIMESTONE SCRUBBER SLURRY AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report utilizes current understanding of limestone scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to develop an effort into the optimization of automatic control for the recirculating slurry processes. The acknowledged methods of mathematical modeling, computer simulation, and ...

  4. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL: CO22+ + CaCO3 + H2O ??? Ca2+ + 2HCO3- as a low-tech, inexpensive, high-capacity, environmentally-friendly CO2 capture and sequestration technology was evaluated. With access to seawater and limestone being essential to this approach, significant limestone resources were close to most CO2-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Waste fines, representing > 20% of current US crushed limestone production (> 109 tons/yr), could be used as an inexpensive source of AWL carbonate. AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean would significantly reduce effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct atmospheric or ocean CO2 disposal. Indeed, the increase in ocean Ca2+ and bicarbonate offered by AWL should enhance growth of corals and other calcifying marine organisms.

  5. War, Conflict and Play. Debating Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyder, Tina

    2004-01-01

    Young refugees from many parts of the world are increasingly present in UK early years settings. This book explores the crucial importance of play for young refugee children's development. It considers the implications of war and conflict on young children and notes how opportunities for play are denied. It provides a framework for early years…

  6. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alexander

    A philosophical analysis of play and games is undertaken in this paper. Playful gaming, which is shown to be a synthesis of play and games, is utilized as a category for undertaking the examination of play and games. The significance of playful gaming to education is demonstrated through analyses of Plato's, Dewey's, Sartre's, and Marcuse's…

  7. New Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lersten, Kenneth C.

    There have been many theories and hypotheses about play, one of which is the equation of play with "transcendence." Play may have the ingredients to allow us to transcend and, for a moment, remythologize life. There have been recent authors who have given play the status of theology, indicating that play contains elements also found in religion.…

  8. Crystalline marble beats limestone for fluegas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    NovaCon Energy Systems, Inc. (Bedford, NY) has developed an alternative to conventional limestone sorbents. The new process uses a class of marble, selected with a proprietary model. Recent pilot- and full-scale demonstrations in pulverized-coal (PC) and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers suggest that these patented sorbents outperform conventional limestone for the simultaneous control of SOx, NOx, and particulates during the combustion of coal and sulfur-rich fuels, such as oil, mixed municipal waste and used tires. Dubbed thermally active marbles (TAMs), these sorbents are chemically identical to grainy limestone (whose main constituent is calcium carbonate or calcite). However, thanks to the increased pressures and temperatures experienced during their geologic history, these metamorphic minerals have a regular crystalline structure that offers some advantages in the combustion zone. TAMs, on the other hand, enjoy better calcium-utilization rates because upon heating, they cleave along inter- and intra-crystalline faces, continuously exposing fresh surfaces. By minimizing the self-extinguishment suffered by limestone sorbents, TAMs are effective over operating temperatures from 1,200 F to 2,800 F, which is 400 F higher than other calcium-based sorbents. This allows them to be injected closer to the burner or combustion grate to maximize residence time in the unit.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1409 - Ground limestone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 173, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ground limestone. 184.1409 Section 184.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  10. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environments in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    Gravimetric changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment at five sites in the eastern United States have been monitored since 1984. An earlier report describes procedures and results obtained in 1984--1988. This report presents the results of the exposure period 1984--1988 and reviews and summarizes those of prior years. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period or rain depth. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 14 to 24 {mu}m/yr for marble and twice that for limestone. Variations in recession among the various exposure sites can be ascribed to differences in rain depth and hydrogen ion concentration. The annual recession rates obtained from gravimetry yielded rates that were for marble twice those obtained from runoff experiments, and more than three times those for limestone; this indicates that physical erosion plays an important role. Gravimetric monitoring of exposed briquettes is continuing in a planned 10-yr program.

  11. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CRUSHED LIMESTONE, STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of atmospheric emissions from the crushed limestone industry. Crushed limestone plants emit particulates from drilling, blasting, transport on unpaved roads, crushing, screening, conveying, and stockpiling. The emission factor for total particulate f...

  12. Acidic stream mitigation by limestone sand addition

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, D.L.; Marich, A.J. Jr.; Largent, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Town Line Run watershed comprises an area of 3,600 wooded acres. The tributaries feeding the stream consist of sandstone springs that do not contribute alkalinity to the watershed, leaving the stream susceptible to acid precipitation. This has a negative affect on Iser`s Run, a native brook trout fishery above the confluence with Town Line Run. The objective in stream liming is to improve water chemistry by increasing pH, alkalinity, and reducing acidity, aluminum, and iron. Introducing crushed limestone directly into a stream from a dump truck is an inexpensive but temporary solution to accomplish this objective. In this type of liming operation, a bed of limestone is spread down the stream channel by the momentum of the stream from the introduction point, rather than manually. Water moving across this bed dissolves the limestone, increasing the pH, alkalinity, and calcium while decreasing the acidity, iron, and aluminum concentrations of the water. The size of the limestone particles is important for this purpose because particles that are too small (<150 microns) will carried away, while particles that are too large (>1000 microns) will remain at the introduction point. Our study placed 80 tons of sand-sized limestone (85% calcite) in the stream channel at a single point. Water samples were collected monthly at the following sites (1) directly upstream of the addition site, (2) 100 yards downstream of the site, and (3) 2500 yards downstream of the site. Other sample locations include (4) upstream and (5) downstream of the Town Line Run- Iser`s Run confluence and the Casselman River upstream (6) and downstream (7) of Town Line Run. The samples were analyzed for pH. Specific conductivity, Alkalinity, Acidity, Iron, Manganese, Aluminum, and Sulfate.

  13. Mineralogical characterization of the Shelburne marble and the Salem limestone

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Shelburne marble and Salem limestone were selected to represent marbles and limestones used in buildings and monuments. The Royal variety of Shelburne marble is a white marble predominantly composed of calcite but has heterogeneously distributed gray inclusions. The select buff Salem limestone is a beige, homogeneous, fossiliferous limestone, predominantly composed of fragments of echinoderms and bryozoans. The author reports that both samples are appropriate test stones for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program stone exposure studies.

  14. Physicochemical characterizations of limestone for fluidized-bed coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Yoos, T.R. III; Walia, D.S.

    1981-05-01

    This study is an investigation of the physicochemical characteristics of three limestone samples, Quincy limestone (-20 + 60), Franklin limestone (-12 + 30), and Franklin limestone (-6 + 16), currently being tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in a fluidized-bed coal combustion unit. By correlating the chemistry, mineralogy, and surface area of these samples with empirical data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory, the sulfur capture ability and performance of these limestones can be loosely predicted. X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis revealed a very high calcium content and very low concentrations of other elements in the three samples. X-ray diffraction patterns and petrographic examination of the limestone grains detected essentially no dolomite in the Quincy limestone or the fine Franklin limestone samples. The coarse Franklin limestone sample showed dolomite to be present in varying amounts up to maximum of 2.75%. Limited surface chemistry investigations of the samples were undertaken. Limestone and dolostone resources of the Tennessee Valley Authority region are widespread and abundant, and judged sufficient to meet industrial demand for many years. No problems are anticipated in securing limestone or dolostone supplies for a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant in the Tennessee Valley Authority region. Transportation facilities and costs for limestone or dolostone will influence the siting of such a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant. The most promising location in the Tennessee Valley Authority region at this time is Paducah, Kentucky.

  15. Drenov Grič black limestone as a heritage stone from Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Rožič, Boštjan; Žbona, Nina; Bedjanič, Mojca; Mladenović, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The limestone known as Drenov Grič black limestone is considered one of the most beautiful Slovenian natural stones due to its homogenous black colour interwoven with white veins. Over the centuries it has been exploited from three major quarries west of Ljubljana, with the main quarry at Drenov Grič playing the primary role in supplying building material for the central parts of Slovenia. All the quarries are currently not active. In the area of Drenov grič, one locality of black limestone is protected - Kuclerjev kamnolom quarry. It has the status of 'valuable natural feature of national importance' and is protected as a natural monument. This well-stratified micritic limestone of Triassic (Carnian) age occurs in 10-80 cm thick beds, with thin marl interlayers. The stone contains abundant fossil bivalves and ostracods. Apart from calcite as the main component, dolomite, quartz, illite/muscovite and pyrite are also present. The limestone is relatively rich in carbonaceous and bituminous organic matter, which is responsible for the black colour of the stone. This component does not have any adverse effect on mechanical and physical characteristics. As the lime¬stone is dense, thus facilitating a good polish, it has been commercially considered as marble. The stone has been widely used in Slovenian monuments, not only in Ljubljana but also in other regions of Slovenia. Many inner and outdoor architectural elements were made of this limestone, particularly in the baroque period, which was known for the extensive use of black limestones also in other European countries. The most significant use of this limestone has been recorded in sculptured portals and altars. Some of the important buildings decorated utilising this stone, are the Ljubljana Cathedral, the St. James's Parish Church, and the Franciscan Church of the Annunciation, all of which are located in Ljubljana, some of them having been declared as cultural monuments of local or national importance. When

  16. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  17. Kinematic hardening of a porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatham, J. B.; Allen, M. B.; Celle, C. C.

    1984-10-01

    A concept for a kinematic hardening yield surface in stress space for Cordova Cream limestone (Austin Chalk) developed by Celle and Cheatham (1981) has been improved using Ziegler's modification of Prager's hardening rule (Ziegler, 1959). Data to date agree with the formulated concepts. It is shown how kinematic hardening can be used to approximate the yield surface for a wide range of stress states past the initial yield surface. The particular difficulty of identifying the yield surface under conditions of unloading or extension is noted. A yield condition and hardening rule which account for the strain induced anisotropy in Cordova Cream Limestone were developed. Although the actual yield surface appears to involve some change of size and shape, it is concluded that true kinematic hardening provides a basis for engineering calculations.

  18. Adult Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John M.

    In its broadest context, play can be interpreted as any pleasurable use of discretionary time. Playfulness is an intrinsic feature of being human, and should be viewed in the light of a total lifestyle, not as an occurrence in an isolated time of life. Adult play appears to be an indefinable and controversial concept. A holistic approach should be…

  19. Wanna Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenfeld, Mimi Brodsky

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the importance of play in the lives of children and describes how games and imaginative play contribute to the development of children. From her decades-old collection of countless incidents demonstrating children's love for self-directed, informal, imaginative play, the author shares three incidents that…

  20. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  1. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  2. Simulation of Hypervelocity Penetration in Limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T; Glenn, L; Walton, O; Goldstein, P; Lomov, I; Liu, B

    2005-05-31

    A parameter study was performed to examine the (shock) damage obtained with long-rod and spherical mono-material penetrators impacting two varieties of limestone. In all cases, the impacts were assumed to be normal to the plane of the rock and at zero angle of attack (in the case of the rods). Impact velocities ranged to 15 km/s but most calculations were performed at 4 and 6 km/s and the penetrator mass was fixed at 1000 kg. For unlined underground structures, incipient damage was defined to occur when the peak stress, {sigma}{sub pk}, exceeds 1 kb (100 MPa) and the applied impulse per unit area, I{sub pk}, exceeds 1 ktap (1 kb-{micro}s). Severe damage was assumed to occur when {sigma}{sub pk} exceeds 1 kb and I{sub pk} exceeds 1000 ktaps. Using the latter definition it was found that severe damage in hard, non-porous limestone with spherical impactors extended to a depth of 9 m on-axis for an impact velocity of 4 km/s and 12 m at 6 km/s. Cylinders with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 8.75 achieved depth to severe damage of 23 m and 40 m, respectively under the same conditions. For a limestone medium with 2% initial gas porosity, the latter numbers were reduced to 12 m and 18 m.

  3. Oil reservoirs in grainstone aprons around Bryozoan Mounds, Upper Harrodsburg Limestone, Mississippian, Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, H.; Saller, A.

    1995-06-01

    Several oil pools have been discovered recently in the upper Harrodsburg Limestone (middle Mississippian) of the Illinois basin. A depositional model for bryozoan mound complexes has allowed more successful exploration and development in this play. In the Johnsonville area of Wayne County, Illinois, three lithofacies are dominant in the upper Harrodsburg: (1) bryozoan boundstones, (2) bryozoan grainstones, and (3) fossiliferous wackestones. Bryozoan boundstones occur as discontinuous mounds and have low porosity. Although bryozoan boundstones are not the main reservoir lithofacies, they are important because they influenced the distribution of bryozoan grainstones and existing structure. Bryozoan grainstones have intergranular porosity and are the main reservoir rock. Bryozoan fragments derived from bryozoan boundstone mounds were concentrated in grainstones around the mounds. Fossiliferous wackestones are not porous and form vertical and lateral seals for upper Harrodsburg grainstones. Fossiliferous wackestones were deposited in deeper water adjacent to bryozoan grainstone aprons, and above grainstones and boundstones after the mounds were drowned. Upper Harrodsburg oil reservoirs occur where grainstone aprons are structurally high. The Harrodsburg is a good example of a carbonate mound system where boundstone cores are not porous, but adjacent grainstones are porous. Primary recovery in these upper Harrodsburg reservoirs is improved by strong pressure support from an aquifer in the lower Harrodsburg. Unfortunately, oil production is commonly decreased by water encroaching from that underlying aquifer.

  4. Quantifying micron-scale grain detachment during weathering experiments on limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Yael; Emmanuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Weathering in carbonate rocks is often assumed to be governed by chemical dissolution. Nevertheless, chemical processes can be coupled to mechanical mechanisms, with small grains undergoing partial dissolution along grain boundaries, followed by detachment from the rock surface. Crucially, this process can even extend down to the micron-scale. Although chemo-mechanical detachment could be critical for the understanding of carbonate weathering at the global scale, the role it plays has not been directly quantified. To calculate the contribution of grain detachment to surface retreat rates, and to determine the impact of the flow regime, we carried out a series of flow-through weathering experiments on micritic limestone. Using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high resolution in situ data of surface topography for reacting rock surfaces. In all the experiments, both grain detachment and chemical dissolution were observed. Under the laminar flow conditions we explored, we found no clear correlation between flow rate and the size of detached grains, or between the flow rate and the frequency of grain detachment events. Importantly, our results establish that grain detachment contributes significantly to the overall surface retreat, on average accelerating mass loss by 38%. In addition to speeding up weathering, this micron-scale mechanism could also influence the evolution of porosity in aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs, and provide a natural flux of colloids that could transport heavy metals or radionuclides in groundwater.

  5. Play: early and eternal.

    PubMed Central

    Mears, C E; Harlow, H F

    1975-01-01

    A systematic 12-week investigation of development of play behavior was conducted with eight socially reared rhesus monkey infants. A new, basic and primary play form termed self-motion play or peragration was identified and examined. This behavior follows a human model which includes a wide range of pleasurable activities involving motion of the body through space, e.g., rocking, swinging, running, leaping, and water or snow skiing. It can be argued that self-motion play is the initial primate play form and because of its persistence constitutes a reinforcing agent for maintaining many complex patterns and even pastimes. Monkey self-motion play in the present study was divided into five separate patterns in order to compare the relative importance of social and individual peragration play, the role of apparatus and the overall developmental relationships between the different individual and social self-motion play patterns. The data showed that from 90 to 180 days of age self-motion play was independent of other forms of play, that individual self-motion play appeared earlier and with significantly greater increases in frequency than did social self-motion play, and that apparatus was a necessary component for significant increases in social self-motion play. Other findings were that self-motion play existed independent of locomotion and, though initiated by exploration, was separate from it. Therapeutic implications of self-motion play were discussed. Images PMID:1057178

  6. Early evolution of the southern margin of the Neuquén Basin, Argentina: Tectono-stratigraphic implications for rift evolution and exploration of hydrocarbon plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, Leandro; Bilmes, Andrés; Franzese, Juan R.; Veiga, Gonzalo D.; Hernández, Mariano; Muravchik, Martín

    2015-12-01

    Long-lived rift basins are characterized by a complex structural and tectonic evolution. They present significant lateral and vertical stratigraphic variations that determine diverse basin-patterns at different timing, scale and location. These issues cause difficulties to establish facies models, correlations and stratal stacking patterns of the fault-related stratigraphy, specially when exploration of hydrocarbon plays proceeds on the subsurface of a basin. The present case study corresponds to the rift-successions of the Neuquén Basin. This basin formed in response to continental extension that took place at the western margin of Gondwana during the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. A tectono-stratigraphic analysis of the initial successions of the southern part of the Neuquén Basin was carried out. Three syn-rift sequences were determined. These syn-rift sequences were located in different extensional depocentres during the rifting phases. The specific periods of rifting show distinctly different structural and stratigraphic styles: from non-volcanic to volcanic successions and/or from continental to marine sedimentation. The results were compared with surface and subsurface interpretations performed for other depocentres of the basin, devising an integrated rifting scheme for the whole basin. The more accepted tectono-stratigraphic scheme that assumes the deposits of the first marine transgression (Cuyo Cycle) as indicative of the onset of a post-rift phase is reconsidered. In the southern part of the basin, the marine deposits (lower Cuyo Cycle) were integrated into the syn-rift phase, implying the existence of different tectonic signatures for Cuyo Cycle along the basin. The rift climax becomes younger from north to south along the basin. The post-rift initiation followed the diachronic ending of the main syn-rift phase throughout the Neuquén Basin. Thus, initiation of the post-rift stage started in the north and proceeded towards the south, constituting a

  7. Pretend play.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2015-01-01

    Pretend play is a form of playful behavior that involves nonliteral action. Although on the surface this activity appears to be merely for fun, recent research has discovered that children's pretend play has connections to important cognitive and social skills, such as symbolic thinking, theory of mind, and counterfactual reasoning. The current article first defines pretend play and then reviews the arguments and evidence for these three connections. Pretend play has a nonliteral correspondence to reality, hence pretending may provide children with practice with navigating symbolic relationships, which may strengthen their language skills. Pretend play and theory of mind reasoning share a focus on others' mental states in order to correctly interpret their behavior, hence pretending and theory of mind may be mutually supportive in development. Pretend play and counterfactual reasoning both involve representing nonreal states of affairs, hence pretending may facilitate children's counterfactual abilities. These connections make pretend play an important phenomenon in cognitive science: Studying children's pretend play can provide insight into these other abilities and their developmental trajectories, and thereby into human cognitive architecture and its development. PMID:26263228

  8. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in two allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-fong

    2012-10-01

    To investigate inelastic compaction in limestone we deformed in conventional triaxial configuration samples of two allochemical limestones: Indiana and Majella limestone with porosity of 14-16% and 30%, respectively. We described the microstructures associated with the damage evolution. Inelastic compaction in both limestones was associated with pore collapse that seemed to initiate from stress concentrations at the surface of a pore. Cataclasis appeared to develop preferentially around the macropores, in agreement with a recent study on a micritic limestone. Our new observations however showed that the spatial distribution of damage in the allochemical limestones can be complicated by its uneven partitioning among the allochems, micrite and sparite. In Indiana limestone, many allochems remain relatively intact even after the cement has undergone significant microcracking, with the implication that significant strength contrast exists between the allochems and cement. In Majella limestone, the asymmetry in damage intensity is not as pronounced, suggesting a less pronounced mechanical contrast between allochems and cement. In both limestones, significant mechanical twinning was observed in samples deformed to relatively high level of strain. We applied to our data a model, that treats a limestone as a dual porosity medium, with the total porosity partitioned between macroporosity and microporosity.

  9. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  10. Reducing Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Using Accelerated Limestone Weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K

    2004-04-27

    Following earlier descriptions, the use and impacts of accelerated weathering of limestone AWL; reaction: CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + CaCO{sub 3} {yields} Ca{sup 2+} + 2(HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) as a CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration method is further explored. Since ready access to the ocean is likely an essential requirement for AWL, it is shown that significant limestone resources are relatively close to a majority of CO{sub 2}-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Furthermore, waste fines, representing more than 20% of current US crushed limestone production (>10{sup 9} tonnes/yr), could be used in many instances as an inexpensive or free source of AWL carbonate. With limestone transportation to coastal sites then as the dominant cost variable, CO{sub 2} sequestration (plus capture) costs of $3-$4/tonne are achievable in certain locations. While there is vastly more limestone and water on earth than that required for AWL to capture and sequester all fossil fuel CO{sub 2} production, the transportation cost of bringing limestone, seawater, and waste CO{sub 2} into contact likely limits the method's applicability to perhaps 10-20% of US point-source emissions. Using a bench-scale laboratory reactor, it is shown that CO{sub 2} sequestration rates of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5} moles/sec per m{sup 2} of limestone surface area are readily achievable using seawater. This translates into reaction densities as high as 2 x 10{sup -2} tonnes CO{sub 2} m{sup -3}day{sup -1}, highly dependent on limestone particle size, solution turbulence and flow, and CO{sub 2} concentration. Modeling of AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean shows significantly reduced effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct CO{sub 2} disposal into the atmosphere or ocean. In fact the increase in ocean Ca{sup 2+} and bicarbonate offered by AWL should significantly enhance the growth of corals and other marine calcifiers whose health is currently being threatened by

  11. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  12. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  13. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  14. Limestone types used from the classic Karst region in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Mirtič, Breda; Mladenović, Ana; Rožič, Boštjan; Bedjanič, Mojca; Kortnik, Jože; Šmuc, Andrej

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a variety of limestones from the Karst Region that is one of the most interesting areas containing reserves of natural stones in Slovenia. The region is mainly composed of Cretaceous shallow-water limestone, with the most common type currently excavated being the rudist limestone of the Lipica Formation, which dates to the Santonian to Campanian. Limestones of this formation are mainly represented by a light grey, thick-bedded to massive Lipica limestone rich in (largely fragmented) rudists. Rudist shells can be either relatively well preserved (such as in Lipica Fiorito quarried limestone) or almost completely disintegrated and intensively endolitised (Lipica Unito quarried limestone). Beside the Lipica Formation, natural stone types have been excavated from two other formations or members in the Karst region: the Repen Formation (Repen and Kopriva limestones), and the Tomaj Limestone (dark, laminated limestone within the Lipica Formation). As documented, the region has been associated with the quarrying and processing of stone at least for over two thousand years, i.e. since the Roman period. Although a large number of quarries in all mentioned formations are documented in the Karst region, many are inactive nowadays. Some of the quarries are declared as geological monuments of national importance or officially protected as a natural monument. Karst limestones are considered the highest quality calcareous natural stones in Slovenia. They are characterised by high density, low water absorption and low open porosity; consequently they also exhibit high frost and salt resistance as well as high compressive and flexural strength. Besides in the Karst region and other parts of Slovenia, the Karst limestones were used in the construction of several important buildings and monuments in many other European Countries, and worldwide. Nowadays, they are most commonly used in the construction of façade cladding, pavements, window sills, staircases, indoor

  15. Play concepts-northwest Palawan, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Harold H.

    The offshore area of northwest Palawan, Philippines, contains a number of provenexploration plays. These include • pinnacle reefs developed on Nido carbonate platforms (e.g. Nido, Matinloc, Cadlao);• a seaward horst block reef fairway with large pinnacle reefs (e.g. Malampaya—Camago trend);• early Miocene Galoc Clastic Unit turbidites (e.g. Octon, Galoc); and• four-way dip closures (e.g. West Linapacan, Octon). The recent discovery by Fletcher Challenge Petroleum at Calauit Field has shown a potentialexploration play in deep-water Nido Limestone turbidites. The traditional and, to date, only economically productive play in northwest Palawan has been the Nido Limestone reefs. This paper presents a review of the old play types and presents new untested play types. These new play types include • pre-Nido syn-rift plays;• pre-Nido marine turbidite play: and• mid-Miocene reefs. It also presents new insights into factors controlling reef development on the carbonate platforms where four reef types are now recognized. The Galoc Clastic Unit turbidite play is discussed and new play fairways presented.

  16. Learning English Speaking through Mobile-Based Role-Plays: The Exploration of a Mobile English Language Learning App Called Engage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Bowen; Zhou, Shijun; Ju, Weijie

    2013-01-01

    Engage is a new form of mobile application that connects students studying English with teachers in real-time via their smartphones. Students receive target language through preparation dialogues, and then apply it to a role-play with a teacher. The conceptualization and development of Engage follows the user-centred design approach; and the…

  17. Exploring Young People's Civic Identities through Gamification: A Case Study of Finnish, Swedish and Norwegian Adolescents Playing a Social Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eränpalo, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on a case study where groups of Finnish, Swedish and Norwegian young people played a simulation game that stimulated collective deliberation on social issues. The game has been designed to provoke students to deliberate and to reflect on social problems relating to issues of citizenship and democracy. The analysis of the…

  18. Music Learning and Child's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littleton, Danette

    1998-01-01

    Reviews various studies on childs play and its relation to young childrens development in music learning processes and explores the role that cognitive and social play categories have in studying childrens play with music. Provides strategies for initiating music-play opportunities in a preschool classroom. (CMK)

  19. Playing the Field(s): An Exploration of Change, Conformity and Conflict in Girls' Understandings of Gendered Physicality in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Laura A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on data from a year-long ethnographic study of a group of 12- to 13-year-old girls that explored the processes through which they negotiated gendered physicality within the context of physical education. Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and social fields and McNay's extension of his work underpin a discussion of three contexts where…

  20. Experimental Investigation of Flash Weakening in Limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Tisato, N.; Quaresimin, M.; de Rossi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties of limestone and dolostone are crucial to understand earthquake mechanics where seismic ruptures nucleate and propagate in carbonate rocks (e.g., Mw 6.3 L’Aquila 2009 earthquake). We performed 27 rock friction experiments in a compression-torsion apparatus on ring-shaped (50/60 and 70/80 mm int/ext diameter) 100% CaCO3-samples at sub-seismic to seismic slip rates (0.05 to 350 mm/s), small displacements (50-60 mm) and under normal stresses of 3-8 MPa. The experiments involved four steps: 1) loading step to apply the normal stress, 2) “low-speed” step to verify the low-speed behavior, 3) “high-speed” step to determine the velocity dependence and, 4) final deceleration step to stop the experiment. The friction coefficient gradually increased during the low-speed step (0.05 mm/s and 7 mm displacement) from 0 to 0.7-0.8, a typical value for friction in limestone. During the high-speed step, slip rate was abruptly (< 0.04 s) increased in about 5 mm of slip to 250 mm/s (for 30 mm displacement, samples 50/60 mm in diameter) and to 350 mm/s (for 40 mm displacement, samples 70/80 mm in diameter). All experiments show a dramatic decrease, up to 60%, in friction for slip rates > 100 mm/s. During the final deceleration step (< 7 mm of slip in < 0.04 s), the friction coefficient recovered its initial value (0.7). A possible weakening mechanism is flash heating-induced thermal decomposition of calcite (CaCO3 -> CaO + CO2) at asperity contacts. In the experiments, weakening was contemporaneous with a peripheral temperature increase of 60-170°C measured with an infrared camera. This temperature range yields a lower limit to the temperature achieved in the slipping zone and at the asperity contacts. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy equipped with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), X-Ray powder diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy analyses did not detect decarbonation products (CaO, Ca(OH)2) in the slipping zone. Instead, FE

  1. Playing Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.

    The acceptance of animation technologies is increasing. Video games, such as Sony PlayStation (SONY, 2002), have become part of the culture for young people from kindergarten through undergraduate school. Animation technologies have been implemented into educational systems in the form of animated pedagogical agents (Johnson, 2000). The research…

  2. Game playing.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Christopher D

    2014-03-01

    Game playing has been a core domain of artificial intelligence research since the beginnings of the field. Game playing provides clearly defined arenas within which computational approaches can be readily compared to human expertise through head-to-head competition and other benchmarks. Game playing research has identified several simple core algorithms that provide successful foundations, with development focused on the challenges of defeating human experts in specific games. Key developments include minimax search in chess, machine learning from self-play in backgammon, and Monte Carlo tree search in Go. These approaches have generalized successfully to additional games. While computers have surpassed human expertise in a wide variety of games, open challenges remain and research focuses on identifying and developing new successful algorithmic foundations. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:193-205. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1278 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304308

  3. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  4. [Analysis of trace elements in limestone for archeological functions

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the Paris Basin provided stone for the building and the decoration of monuments from antiquity to the present. To determine the origin of stone used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 samples. Petrographic and paleontologic examination of thin sections allows geologists to distinguish Lutetian limestones from Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. Geologists also seek to formulate hypotheses regarding the origin of Lutetian limestones used for building and sculpture in the Paris region. In the search for the sources of building and sculptural stone, the analytical methods of geologists are limited because often several quarries produce the same lithofacies. A new tool is now available, however, to attack questions of provenance raised by art historians. Because limestones from different sources have distinctive patterns of trace-element concentrations, compositional analysis by neutron activation allows one to compare building or sculptural stone from one monument with stone from quarries or other monuments. This analytical method subjects a powdered limestone sample to standard neutron activation analysis procedures at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the help of computer programs, the compositional fingerprints of Lutetian limestones can be determined and stored in a database. The limestone database contains data for approximately 2,100 samples from monuments, sculptures and quarries. It is particularly rich in samples from the Paris Basin.

  5. STEAM INJECTION INTO FRACTURED LIMESTONE AT LORING AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research project on steam injection for the remediation of spent chlorinated solvents from fractured limestone was recently undertaken at the former Loring AFB in Limestone, ME. Participants in the project include the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, EPA Region I,...

  6. REACTION OF H2S AND SULFUR WITH LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the direct-displacement reaction of limestone with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) over the temperature range 570-850 C in a differential reactor. It is one of several possible mechanisms of sulfur capture in limestone-injection multistage burners whi...

  7. LOW NOX COMBUSTION SYSTEMS WITH SO2 CONTROL USING LIMESTONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes EPA work on low NOx combustion systems with SO2 control using limestone. Although SO2 control in low NOx systems for both stoker and pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is under investigation at EPA, most of the current work is with pulverized coal. EPA's Limestone...

  8. Microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone, Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Almadani, Sattam A.; Al-Dabbagh, Mohammad E.

    2016-03-01

    In order to document the microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone in the uppermost part of the Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation at Khashm Al-Qaddiyah area, central Saudi Arabia, scleractinian corals and rock samples were collected and thin sections were prepared. Coral framestone, coral floatstone, pelloidal packstone, bioclastic packstone, bioclastic wacke/packstone, algal wackestone and bioclastic foraminiferal wacke/packstone were the recorded microfacies types. Cementation, recrystallization, silicification and dolomitization are the main diagenetic alterations affected the aragonitic skeletons of scleractinian corals. All coral skeletons were recrystallized, while some ones were dolomitized and silicified. Microfacies types, as well as the fossil content of sclearctinian corals, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and foraminifera indicated a deposition in environments ranging from shelf lagoon with open circulation in quiet water below wave base to shallow reef flank and organic build up for the uppermost reefal part of the Tuwaiq Formation in the study area.

  9. Field trial of a pulsed limestone diversion well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Denholm, C.; Dunn, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of limestone diversion wells to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) is well-known, but in many cases, acid neutralization is not as complete as would be desired. Reasons for this include channeling of the water through the limestone bed, and the slow reaction rate of the limestone gravel. A new approach to improve the performance of the diversion well was tested in the field at the Jennings Environmental Education Center, near Slippery Rock, PA. In this approach, a finer size distribution of limestone was used so as to allow fluidization of the limestone bed, thus eliminating channeling and increasing particle surface area for faster reaction rates. Also, water flow was regulated through the use of a dosing siphon, so that consistent fluidization of the limestone sand could be achieved. Testing began late in the summer of 2010, and continued through November of 2011. Initial system performance during the 2010 field season was good, with the production of net alkaline water, but hydraulic problems involving air release and limestone sand retention were observed. In the summer of 2011, a finer size of limestone sand was procured for use in the system. This material fluidized more readily, but acid neutralization tapered off after several days. Subsequent observations indicated that the hydraulics of the system was compromised by the formation of iron oxides in the pipe leading to the limestone bed, which affected water distribution and flow through the bed. Although results from the field trial were mixed, it is believed that without the formation of iron oxides and plugging of the pipe, better acid neutralization and treatment would have occurred. Further tests are being considered using a different hydraulic configuration for the limestone sand fluidized bed.

  10. Faunas of Mississippian oolitic limestones: Evidence from Salem Limestone, southern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, H.R. )

    1989-08-01

    In the Salem Limestone of southern Indiana, a correlation exists between the faunal assemblage and abundance of grains with superficial oolitic coatings in grainstones. Coarse, poorly sorted fossiliferous grainstones are dominated by an echinoderm-bryozoan-brachiopod assemblage of fossils with few mollusks. The presence of large whole fossils, such as articulated crinoid calyces, suggest limited transport of skeletal components. Grainstones, dominated by grains with superficial coatings, and foraminifers tend to contain a diverse mollusk-dominated assemblage of gastropods, bivalves, rostroconchs, chitins, and scaphopods. These fossils are disarticulated, but generally are not fragmented even though many of them are thin and delicate. Echinoderms, brachiopods, and bryozoans are repsented in the mollusk-domdinated assemblage almost exclusively by well-rounded and coated fragments, suggesting that they are not in situ. The presence of similar molluscan assemblages in other Mississippian coated-grain grainstones from Alabama (the Monteagle Limestone) and Oklahoma (an unnamed limestone) indicates that the assemblage may have been wide-spread. Mississippian grainstones dominated by oolites (which are not prominent in the Salem) generally have very few fossils.

  11. Biological effects of long term fine limestone tailings discharge in a fjord ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Lucy; Melsom, Fredrik; Glette, Tormod

    2015-07-15

    Benthic infaunal data collected from 1993 to 2010 were analysed to examine the effect of long term discharge of fine limestone tailings on macrofaunal species assemblages in a fjord. Relative distance from the outfall and proportion of fine tailings in the sediment were correlated with benthic community structure. Diversity decreased with increasing proportion of fine tailings. Biological Traits Analysis (BTA) was used to explore the temporal and spatial effects of the tailings gradient on macrofaunal functional attributes. BTA revealed that all stations along a pressure gradient of fine limestone tailings were dominated by free-living species. As the proportion of fine tailings in the sediment increased, there was an increase in fauna that were smaller, highly mobile, living on or nearer the surface sediment, with shorter lifespans. There was a decrease in permanent tube dwellers, those fauna with low or no mobility, that live deeper in the sediment and have longer lifespans (>5 yrs). PMID:25960275

  12. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust

  13. Limestone dissolution in flue gas scrubbing: Effect of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T. )

    1992-07-01

    Batch limestone dissolution experiments were carried out in a pH stat apparatus at 55 C with CO{sub 2} sparging and dissolved sulfite. Particle size distribution, utilization, sulfite in solution, limestone type, and the approach to calcite equilibrium were all found to contribute to the limestone reactivity. In the absence of sulfite, limestone dissolution was controlled solely by mass transfer. For a given stone under mass transfer control, film thickness was found to be independent of pH. The dissolution rate in the presence of sulfite was controlled by a combined surface kinetics/mass transfer regime. SEM micrographs supported this conclusion. A surface rate correlation was developed which accounted for observed inhibition by an inverse dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone surface. While the form of the rate expression was applicable to all stones, the surface rate constant was stone dependent. A computer code which accounted for mass transfer with surface kinetics was tested against experimental observations of four limestone types. Changes in pH and the concentrations of calcium, carbonate, sulfite, sulfate, and adipic acid were accurately modeled.

  14. United Arab Emirates limestones: impact of petrography on thermal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaabed, Sulaiman; Soltan, Abdel Monem; Abdelghany, Osman; Amin, Bahaa Eldin Mahmoud; El Tokhi, Mohamed; Khaleel, Abbas; Musalim, Abdullah

    2014-12-01

    The thermal behavior of selected limestones from representative localities of the United Arab Emirates is investigated for their suitability for soft-burnt lime production. The limestone samples were collected from the Ghalilah, Musandam, Shauiba, Muthaymimah, Dammam and Asmari formations. The samples were characterized for petrography, mineral and chemical composition, together with physico-mechanical characteristics. Investigative methods included transmitted light microscopy (TLM), cathodoluminescence (CLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as X-ray micro-tomography (μ-CT), XRD, XRF and Archimedes method. The limestone samples were fired in an electrical muffle furnace for 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 hours at 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 °C. After firing the lime grains were tested to determine their hydration rate and microfabric. The Ghalilah and Musandam limes show the lowest and highest maximum hydration rates, respectively, due mainly to the impure nature of the former, and the smaller lime crystallites and dominance of post-calcination micro-cracks of the latter. The Dammam and Asmari limes preserve a "ghost" microfabric of the original limestone. Higher allochem contents impose lower activation energy requirements for calcination, which implies earlier calcination of the allochems. The Musandam, Shauiba and Muthaymimah limestones may be useful for the production of reactive soft-burnt lime under the applied firing conditions, however, the Dammam and Asmari limestones need more advanced calcination conditions than the applied ones. The Ghalilah limestone was found to be unsuitable for the production of lime.

  15. Biocalcifying Bacillus subtilis cells effectively consolidate deteriorated Globigerina limestone.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Roderick; Vella, Daniel; Sinagra, Emmanuel; Zammit, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation occurs naturally on ancient limestone surfaces in Maltese hypogea. We exploited this phenomenon and treated deteriorated limestone with biocalcifying bacteria. The limestone was subjected to various mechanical and physical tests to present a statistically robust data set to prove that treatment was indeed effective. Bacillus subtilis conferred uniform bioconsolidation to a depth of 30 mm. Drilling resistance values were similar to those obtained for freshly quarried limestone (9 N) and increased up to 15 N. Treatment resulted in a high resistance to salt deterioration and a slow rate of water absorption. The overall percentage porosity of treated limestone varied by ±6 %, thus the pore network was preserved. We report an eco-friendly treatment that closely resembles the mineral composition of limestone and that penetrates into the porous structure without affecting the limestones' natural properties. The treatment is of industrial relevance since it compares well with stone consolidants available commercially. PMID:27072564

  16. A procedure to evaluate environmental rehabilitation in limestone quarries.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ana Claudia; Sánchez, Luis Enrique

    2010-11-01

    A procedure to evaluate mine rehabilitation practices during the operational phase was developed and validated. It is based on a comparison of actually observed or documented practices with internationally recommended best practices (BP). A set of 150 BP statements was derived from international guides in order to establish the benchmark. The statements are arranged in six rehabilitation programs under three categories: (1) planning (2) operational and (3) management, corresponding to the adoption of the plan-do-check-act management systems model to mine rehabilitation. The procedure consists of (i) performing technical inspections guided by a series of field forms containing BP statements; (ii) classifying evidences in five categories; and (iii) calculating conformity indexes and levels. For testing and calibration purposes, the procedure was applied to nine limestone quarries and conformity indexes were calculated for the rehabilitation programs in each quarry. Most quarries featured poor planning practices, operational practices reached high conformity levels in 50% of the cases and management practices scored moderate conformity. Despite all quarries being ISO 14001 certified, their management systems pay low attention to issues pertaining to land rehabilitation and biodiversity. The best results were achieved by a quarry whose expansion was recently submitted to the environmental impact assessment process, suggesting that public scrutiny may play a positive role in enhancing rehabilitation practices. Conformity indexes and levels can be used to chart the evolution of rehabilitation practices at regular intervals, to establish corporate goals and for communication with stakeholders. PMID:20630648

  17. Playing the role of a science student: Exploring the meaning of the science student role and its relationship to students' identification in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    Learning and succeeding in school is a process that involves the whole person and is situated within the social context of the school and classroom. As science educators, this means exploring how and why individuals come to see themselves as science students. To examine this process, I have used a framework of role identity theory, which takes the perspective that in all situations there are roles that carry with them behavioural and attitudinal expectations. Individuals develop role identities when they are able to match their self-perceptions with the meanings of the role. This study explores the meaning of the science student role and its impact on student identification in science using a three-phase, mixed-methods design. In Phase 1, an exploratory qualitative phase, student responses ( n = 95) were collected through open-ended questionnaires and follow-up interviews and used to create a framework for understanding the role and the expectations associated with it. Phase 2 used this framework to create a questionnaire asking students (n = 129) to compare the expectations in science to those in other classes. Phase 3 took the role components from Phase 2 and asked students (n = 292) to rate themselves and ideal science students with respect to these expectations. Regression was used to understand how students' comparisons of themselves to the role related to their definitions of themselves as science students and to their future plans in science. The results suggest a clearly defined science student role that is dominated by traditional understandings of scientific attitudes. The Phase 2 results suggest that the expectations can be represented by four subscales: intelligence, scientific mindedness, scientific skill, and appropriate behaviour. The results of Phase 3 demonstrate that student ratings of themselves as intelligent and scientifically minded were strong predictors of their self-reported identification with science, accounting for almost half of the

  18. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ("THE OLD PIT") WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  19. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ('THE OLD PIT') WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER. - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  20. Estimating mass of crushed limestone particles from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Larry E.; Cheng, Ken; Zaniewski, John P.

    2002-02-01

    In the construction of asphalt pavements, the stability of the asphalt is determined in large part by the gradation, or size distribution of the mineral aggregates that make up the matrix. Gradation is specified on the basis of sieve sizes and percent passing, where the latter is a cumulative measure of the mass of the aggregate passing the sieve as fraction of the total mass in the batch. In this paper, an approach for predicting particle mass based on 2D electronic images is explored. Images of crushed limestone aggregates were acquired using backlighting to create silhouettes. A morphological erosion process was used to separate touching and overlapping particles. Useful features of the particle silhouettes, such as area, centroid and shape descriptors were collected. Several dimensionless parameters were defined and were used as regressor variables in a multiple linear regression model to predict particle mass. Regressor coefficients were found by fitting to a sample of 501 particles ranging in size from 4.75 mm < particle sieve size < 25 mm. When tested against a different aggregate sample, the model predicted the mass of the batch to within +/- 2%.

  1. The conservation of Britain's limestone cave resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, P.; Gunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Limestone caves are an important scientific and recreational resource in Britain. During the mid- to late 1970s, cavers and statutory conservation bodies cooperated in a review of cave resources which resulted in the designation of 48 caves or cave areas as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). During the same period, the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 was introduced to provide more effective planning controls on activities such as agriculture carried out within SSSI boundaries. In one case, at Priddy in the Mendip Hills of Somerset, landowners prevented access to a number of caves in protest over the new, tougher restrictions on agriculture. Faced with the closure, and perceiving that their recreational use of caves might also be controlled, local cavers joined the landowners in opposing the proposals for SSSI designation. As a result the proposals were reviewed, three caves were excluded from the site and controls on the remaining area were relaxed. The case emphasized a need for an effective system to take account of all factors affecting cave conservation, a need which has led to a more constructive dialogue between nature conservation bodies, caver organizations and other interested parties.

  2. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers. PMID:23167314

  3. Acid mine treatment with open limestone channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Brant, D.L.; Skousen, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often associated with mining of pyritic coal and metal deposits. Typical AMD associated with coal mines in the eastern US can have acidity and iron concentrations ranging from the teens to the thousands of mg/l. Aluminum and manganese can be present in concentrations ranging from zero to the low hundreds of mg/l. Much attention has been devoted to developing inexpensive, limestone (LS)-based systems for treating AMID with little or no maintenance. However, LS tends to coat with metal hydroxides when exposed to AMID in an oxidized state, a process known as {open_quotes}armoring{close_quotes}. It is generally assumed that once armored, LS ceases to neutralize acid. Another problem is that the hydroxides tend to settle into plug the pore spaces in LS beds forcing water to move around rather than through the LS. While both are caused by the precipitation of metal hydroxides, armoring and plugging are two different problems. Plugging of LS pores can be avoided by maintaining a high flushing rate through the LS bed. Armoring, however, occurs regardless of water velocity. This study investigated the influence of armoring on LS solubility and the implications of armoring and plugging on the construction of open (oxidizing) LS channels for treating AMD. We evaluated the AMID treatment performance of armored and unarmored LS in oxidizing environments both in laboratory and field studies.

  4. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BLANC,A.; HOLMES,L.L.; HARBOTTLE,G.

    1998-06-11

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  5. Lutetian limestones in the Paris region: Petrographic and compositional examination

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists have investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemistry whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  6. LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBERS: USER'S HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook, intended for use of utility project managers and project engineers, provides guidance in selection, installation, and operation of a limestone FGD system, covering all phases from inception of the project through design, procurement, operation, and maintenance of th...

  7. Limestone - A Crucial and Versatile Industrial Mineral Commodity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Orris, Greta J.

    2008-01-01

    Limestone, as used by the minerals industry, is any rock composed mostly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Although limestone is common in many parts of the United States, it is critically absent from some. Limestone is used to produce Portland cement, as aggregate in concrete and asphalt, and in an enormous array of other products, making it a truly versatile commodity. Portland cement is essential to the building industry, but despite our Nation's abundance of limestone, there have been cement shortages in recent years. These have been caused in part by a need to find new areas suitable for quarrying operations. To help manage our Nation's resources of such essential mineral commodities, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides crucial data and scientific information to industry, policymakers, and the public.

  8. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in micritic and allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Zhu, Wei; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies on the transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow in carbonate rocks revealed that while compact carbonate rocks display appreciable dilatancy when undergoing cataclastic flow, inelastic compaction was observed in their more porous counterparts. In their compactive behavior the porous carbonate rocks are more akin to porous siliciclastic rocks such as sandstone. Whilst for sandstone the micromechanics of inelastic compaction and cataclastic flow have been studied extensively, little is known about these processes in porous limestone. To fill this gap we performed experiments on Tavel, Indiana and Majella limestones with respective porosities 10-14%, 16-18% and 31%. Tavel limestone is a micritic limestone with a small number of sparry grains embedded in a microcrystalline matrix. Indiana and Majella limestones are allochemical limestones. In Indiana limestone allochems (fossils, ooids and peloids) form some 65% of bulk volume. In Majella limestone the allochems (represented by rudist fragments) have grain size somewhat smaller than that in Indiana limestone and form about half of the bulk volume. Samples of the three rocks were deformed in a conventional triaxial apparatus at confining pressures up to 150 MPa. Samples were loaded to various stages of deformation and microstructures associated with the damage evolution were investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. For a reference, a study on an intact sample and a sample deformed under hydrostatic conditions was also performed on each rock. Despite the phenomenological similarities between cataclastic flow in siliciclastic rocks and porous carbonate rocks, we showed that the micromechanics can be very different. In a clastic rock such as sandstone, inelastic compaction derives primarily from grain crushing initiated by stress concentrations at grain contacts that induce cracks to radiate in a conical pattern towards the interior of the impinging grains. In contrast

  9. Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at North corner of Administration Building site - Huey P. Long Bridge, Administration Building, 5100 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  10. VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON SOUTH ELEVATION. RESHOOT OF MD-979-13 AFTER REMOVAL OF RAILING. - Greenbelt Community Building, 15 Crescent Road, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  11. 1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND USED AS LOCKPORTS CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOR MORE THAN SIXTY YEARS. - Lockport Historic District, Central High School, Lockport, Will County, IL

  12. Mid-continent natural gas reservoirs and plays

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G. )

    1993-09-01

    Natural gas reservoirs of the mid-continent states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas (northern part) have produced 103 trillion cubic ft (tcf) of natural gas. Oklahoma has produced the most, having a cumulative production of 71 tcf. The major reservoirs (those that have produced more than 10 billion ft[sup 3]) have been identified and organized into 28 plays based on geologic age, lithology, and depositional environment. The Atlas of Major Midcontinent Gas Reservoirs, published in 1993, provides the documentation for these plays. This atlas was a collaborative effort of the Gas Research Institute; Bureau of Economic Geology. The University of Texas at Austin; Arkansas Geological Commission; Kansas Geological survey; and Oklahoma Geological Survey. Total cumulative production for 530 major reservoirs is 66 tcf associated and nonassociated gas. Oklahoma has the highest production with 39 tcf from 390 major reservoirs, followed by Kansas with 26 tcf from 105 major reservoirs. Most of the mid-continent production is from Pennsylvanian (46%) and Permian (41%) reservoirs; Mississippian reservoirs account for 10% production, and lower Paleozoic reservoirs, 3%. The largest play by far is the Wolfcampian Shallow Shelf Carbonate-Hugoton Embayment play with 25 tcf cumulative production, most of which is from the Hugoton and Panoma fields in Kansas and Guymon-Hugoton gas area in Oklahoma. A total of 53% of the mid-continent gas production is from dolostone and limestone reservoirs; 39% is from sandstone reservoirs. The remaining 8% is from chert conglomerate and granite-wash reservoirs. Geologically based plays established from the distribution of major gas reservoirs provide important support for the extension of productive trends, application of new resource technology to more efficient field development, and further exploration in the mid-continent region.

  13. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  14. Genesis of Upper Cretaceous marl-limestone bedding, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.T. Jr. )

    1990-09-01

    In Alabama, marl-limestone bedding couplets and correlative coeval prograding clastic barrier-shoreline facies occur in the upper 20 m of a high-stand systems tract within the lower Campanian Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence. The Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence is terminated by a type-2 unconformity biostratigraphically dated at about 80 million years before present. Based on estimates using long-term sedimentation rate, the average periodicity of the marl-limestone couplets is approximately 100,000 years. Taken at face value, the apparent 100,000-year periodicity would suggest a climate-forced (or Milankovitch) origin of the marl-limestone couplets owing to cycles of productivity and dilution. However, significant variations in marl-limestone couplet thickness (ranging from less than 1 m to several meters) both within and between couplets suggests that average periodicity is not a meaningful figure with respect to these couplets. Further, climate-forcing is not favored because coarse clastic material fines upward in the marl beds and the petrography of the beds shows that the primary mode of biochemical deposition switched from pelagic nannofossils (in the marl) to benthic algal calcispheres (in the limestone). In order to adequately explain the petrographic and thickness observations, changing relative sea level is suggested as a viable hypothesis. Tectonic effects related directly to early stages of the Laramide orogeny (about 80 million years before present) may have affected relative sea level as far east as the Gulf Coastal Plain, thus producing the marl-limestone sequences. Marl-limestone sequences may reflect either short-term buildup and relaxation of intraplate stresses or short-term eustatic changes that resulted from slight variations in Farallon spreading rates.

  15. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  16. Outdoor Play: Combating Sedentary Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thigpen, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly sedentary lifestyles are contributing to overweight and other health concerns as children spend less and less time outside engaged in active play. Outdoor play provides important opportunities to explore the natural world, interact with peers, engage in vigorous physical activity, and learn about our environment. However, outdoor…

  17. Sand and Water Table Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  18. Engaging Families through Artful Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how aligned arts and play experiences can extend child and family engagement in a public outdoor space. The importance of outdoor play for children is strongly advocated and in response local governments provide playgrounds and recreational open spaces. To extend further the experiences afforded in such spaces some local…

  19. Leaching of clay minerals in a limestone environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1959-01-01

    Water saturated with CO2 at about 25??C was percolated through mixed beds of limestone or marble fragments and montmorillonite, "illite" and kaolinite in polyethylene tubes for six and fortyfive complete runs. The leachates were analysed for SiO2, A12O3 and Fe2O3, but only SiO2 was found. The minerals lost SiO2 in this order: montmorillonite > kaolinite > "illite". The differential removal of SiO2 during the short period of these experiments suggests a mechanism for the accumulation of bauxite deposits associated with limestones. ?? 1959.

  20. The Ançã limestones, Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinta-Ferreira, Mário; Gil Catarino, Lídia; Delgado Rodrigues, José

    2016-04-01

    Ançã is located in the Lusitanian Basin (western Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basin), in the municipality of Cantanhede, close to Coimbra, Portugal. This constitutes the northernmost Dogger (Bajocian) limestone sequence in Portugal. The use of the Ançã limestones is documented since the Roman occupation of the Iberian Peninsula. It was used for the construction of houses, palaces, churches, fine sculptures, carving, paving and for the production of lime. These limestones vary from white and very soft varieties, with very high porosity used for sculpture and carving to white and hard varieties used for masonry and as aggregates and to white to bluish with low porosity and high strength varieties, mainly used for paving. The softer and whiter variety is worldwide known as Ançã Stone (Pedra de Ançã) exhibiting a porosity of 26-29 %. It became famous after being largely used by Coimbra most famous Renaissance sculptors like João de Ruão and Nicolau de Chanterenne. The Pedra de Ançã was used mainly in the region of Coimbra, but also in several other places in Portugal, in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and Brazil. Some examples of heritage in Coimbra using the Pedra de Ançã are the renaissance portal of the Saint Cross Church, the tombs of the first two Portuguese kings located in this church, the altar of the Saint Cross Church or of the Old Cathedral, or in sculptures at the University of Coimbra. It is quite prone to deteriorate when exposed to atmospheric agents and to soluble salts, mainly due to its high porosity. Deteriorated surfaces needing treatment constitute difficult conservation problems, especially when consolidation and protection treatments are required. The less porous varieties of the Ançã limestones (< 20 % porosity) were mainly used for masonry, paving and production of lime. The royal Palace of Buçaco is a remarkable masonry building constructed at the end of the XIX century with the less porous varieties of the Ançã limestones

  1. Building Math through Play Everyday

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on how young children build math skills in everyday play and activities. Children focus on six categories of mathematical content including classifying, exploring magnitude, enumerating, investigating dynamics, studying patterns, and exploring spatial relations. The article gives advice to both teachers and parents on how they…

  2. Limestone calcination with CO{sub 2} capture (III): characteristics of coal combustion during limestone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Wang; Shiying Lin; Yoshizo Suzuki

    2009-05-15

    In this study, the combustion characteristics of coal in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres were investigated during limestone decomposition in a continuously operating fluidized bed reactor for CO{sub 2} capture. The results show that the variations and concentrations of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} in the exhaust gas of the reactor in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were smaller than those in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Because of steam dilution, the CO{sub 2} concentration in the bed was lower in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the effect of differential pressure variation on limestone decomposition in the fluidized bed was less pronounced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Additionally, N{sub 2}O emission was detected only in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the conversion of N to NO in the steam dilution atmosphere was of a smaller magnitude than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. We also found that the conversion of S to SO{sub 2} in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere was lower than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The contents of sulfur, SiO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were much higher in solid samples located in the cyclone than in the overflow holder in both steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres. Finally, the hydration and carbonation reactivities of CaO produced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were better than those produced in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Depositional and tectonic interpretation of limestone insoluble residues from modern and ancient carbonate rocks, Caribbean and southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C.; Bundy, M.E.; George, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    Mineral compositions have long been used as indicators of the provenance and tectonic setting of source rocks for sandstones and shales. Extraction of the same information from limestones is less common because of the general paucity of the non-carbonate phase and the greater processing time that is required to concentrate the frequently encountered small quantities of detrital (and authigenic) minerals. The insoluble component, however, contains a great deal of valuable information and should not be ignored. The clays and other insoluble minerals in limestones from southeastern United States and the Caribbean region, for example, clearly reflect the volcanic activity that was associated with formation of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rift system and the opening of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Similarly, major periods of orogeny during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic have left their signature, even in carbonate rocks that originated far from the sites where uplift was taking place. In other cases, the insoluble residue component clearly manifests periods of quiescence in adjacent land areas or testifies to the airborne transport of insoluble components from sources as far distant as the Saharan Desert of Africa. Similarly, insoluble components have convincingly shown that the origin of the extensive bauxite deposits found in Jamaican limestones are the result of alteration of interbedded volcanic ash units and have not resulted from accumulation of the detritus in the limestones. Residue analysis in Gulf Coast limestones can be successfully used for subsurface identification and correlation of carbonate units in the exploration for hydrocarbons, to reconstruct sedimentary environments, to identify missing sections, and to identify paraconformable realtionships between adjacent carbonate units that are otherwise similar in appearance. The latter is especially useful where extensive recrystallization has taken place and fossils have been destroyed.

  4. Young Children's Playfully Complex Communication: Distributed Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on research exploring young children's playful and humorous communication. It explores how playful activity mediates and connects children in complex activity systems where imagination, cognition, and consciousness become distributed across individuals. Children's playfulness is mediated and distributed via artefacts (tools, signs…

  5. Soil respiration patterns and controls in limestone cedar glades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Hui, Dafeng

    2015-01-01

    Soil depth, SOM, and vegetation cover were important drivers of Rs in limestone cedar glades. Seasonal Rs patterns reflected those for mesic temperate grasslands more than for semi-arid ecosystems, in that Rs primarily tracked temperature for most of the year.

  6. Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note cut off valves at base of stump in right foreground, and utility tunnel in middle distance, superindent's house at right, looking NW. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  7. LIMESTONE AND LIME NEUTRALIZATION OF FERROUS IRON ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted a 2-yr study on hydrated lime and rock-dust limestone neutralization of acid mine drainage containing ferrous iron at the EPA Crown Mine Drainage Control Field Site near Rivesville, West Virginia. The study investigated optimizat...

  8. DEVELOPMENTS IN LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the most recent results from the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) program, results from the wall-fired demonstration. Tests were conducted to determine the efficacy of commercial calcium hydroxide--Ca(OH)2--supplied by Marblehead Lime Co. and of ca...

  9. GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  10. EVALUATION OF GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  11. View of the main entrance with basrelief limestone panel designed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the main entrance with bas-relief limestone panel designed by C. Paul Jennwein upon which is inscribed "Lege Atque Ordine Omnia Fiunt" (translated as by law and order all is accomplished) - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. LABORATORY STUDY OF LIMESTONE REGENERATION IN DUAL ALKALI SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of open- and closed-loop laboratory bench scale experiments which were carried out to study parameters which affect the reaction of limestone with dual alkali flue gas desulfurization system process liquors. It gives details of several sets of operat...

  13. The Solnhofen Limestone: A stony heritage of many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kölbl-Ebert, Martina; Kramar, Sabina; Cooper, Barry J.

    2016-04-01

    High above the valley of the River Altmühl (Bavaria, Germany), between Solnhofen to the west and Kelheim to the east, numerous quarries give access to thinly plated limestone from the Upper Jurassic, some 150 million years before the present. The main quarry areas lie around the town of Eichstätt and between the villages of Solnhofen, Langenaltheim and Mörnsheim. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for several hundred years, some even in Roman times. Solnhofen Limestone is famous worldwide; not only because it is a beautiful building stone of high quality, but also because of the exceptionally well-preserved fossils it contains -among them the early bird Archaeopteryx. The quarry industry between Solnhofen and Eichstätt has shaped a cultural landscape, with old and new quarries sunk into the plain and numerous spoil heaps rising above it, for the rock is not all economically useful. But many of the spoil heaps and the old quarries are environmentally protected as they provide a habitat for some rare plants and animals. It is not necessary to cut the Solnhofen Limestone with a saw: it is split by hand into thin and even slabs or sheets which are used for flagstones and wall covers, which since centuries are sold world-wide. Locally it also serves as roof tiles for traditional houses. Thick slabs of especially fine quality may be found near Solnhofen and Mörnsheim and are used for lithography printing.

  14. CALCINATION KINETICS AND SURFACE AREA OF DISPERSED LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the rates of calcination of two types of limestones, ranging in particle size from 1 to 90 micrometers, and over the temperature range of 516 to 1000 C. A kinetic model, based on the B.E.T. (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the Ca...

  15. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  16. Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels depicting one of the agencies of the Commerce Department, here the Lighthouse Service - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Radial flow permeability testing of an argillaceous limestone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, A P S; Jenner, L

    2013-01-01

    Argillaceous Lindsay limestone is the geologic storage formation that will be encountered at the site for the construction of a deep ground repository in Ontario, Canada, for the storage of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. The permeability of the Lindsay limestone is a key parameter that will influence the long-term movement of radionuclides from the repository to the geosphere. This paper describes the use of both steady-state and transient radial flow laboratory tests to determine the permeability of this argillaceous limestone. The interpretation of the tests is carried out using both analytical results and computational models of flow problems that exhibit radial symmetry. The results obtained from this research investigation are compared with the data available in the literature for similar argillaceous limestones mainly found in the Lindsay (Cobourg) formation. The experiments give permeabilities in the range of 1.0 × 10(-22) to 1.68 × 10(-19) m(2) for radial flows that are oriented along bedding planes under zero axial stress. The factors influencing transient pulse tests in particular and the interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:22489872

  18. COMPUTERIZED SHAWNEE LIME/LIMESTONE SCRUBBING MODEL USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual gives a general description of a computerized model for estimating design and cost of lime or limestone scrubber systems for flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It supplements PB80-123037 by extending the number of scrubber options which can be evaluated. It includes spray...

  19. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environments in the eastern United States. Results of exposures, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    Gravimetric changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment at five sites in the eastern United States have been monitored since 1984. An earlier report describes procedures and results obtained in 1984--1988. This report presents the results of the exposure period 1984--1988 and reviews and summarizes those of prior years. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period or rain depth. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 14 to 24 {mu}m/yr for marble and twice that for limestone. Variations in recession among the various exposure sites can be ascribed to differences in rain depth and hydrogen ion concentration. The annual recession rates obtained from gravimetry yielded rates that were for marble twice those obtained from runoff experiments, and more than three times those for limestone; this indicates that physical erosion plays an important role. Gravimetric monitoring of exposed briquettes is continuing in a planned 10-yr program.

  20. Overview of Trenton exploration and development in New York state

    SciTech Connect

    Drazan, D.J.

    1987-09-01

    Exploration and development of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Limestone has occurred in New York state since the late 1800s. From the early days of exploration to the present, the Trenton has proven to be an elusive target for developers. However, renewed interest and current activity, coupled with improved drilling and completion techniques, may yet prove the Trenton Limestone in New York to be an important reservoir.

  1. APPLICATION OF LIMB TO PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS - A SYSTEMS ANALYSIS: LIMESTONE FEED AND BOILER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a systems analysis of the application of Limestone Injection Multistaged Burner (LIMB) technology to pulverized-coal boilers. It evaluates alternative limestone handling, preparation, and injection methods and boiler system impacts associated with LIMB...

  2. Limestone: high-throughput candidate phenotype generation via tensor factorization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joyce C; Ghosh, Joydeep; Steinhubl, Steve R; Stewart, Walter F; Denny, Joshua C; Malin, Bradley A; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of electronic health records (EHRs) from multiple heterogeneous sources has spearheaded the adoption of data-driven approaches for improved clinical research, decision making, prognosis, and patient management. Unfortunately, EHR data do not always directly and reliably map to medical concepts that clinical researchers need or use. Some recent studies have focused on EHR-derived phenotyping, which aims at mapping the EHR data to specific medical concepts; however, most of these approaches require labor intensive supervision from experienced clinical professionals. Furthermore, existing approaches are often disease-centric and specialized to the idiosyncrasies of the information technology and/or business practices of a single healthcare organization. In this paper, we propose Limestone, a nonnegative tensor factorization method to derive phenotype candidates with virtually no human supervision. Limestone represents the data source interactions naturally using tensors (a generalization of matrices). In particular, we investigate the interaction of diagnoses and medications among patients. The resulting tensor factors are reported as phenotype candidates that automatically reveal patient clusters on specific diagnoses and medications. Using the proposed method, multiple phenotypes can be identified simultaneously from data. We demonstrate the capability of Limestone on a cohort of 31,815 patient records from the Geisinger Health System. The dataset spans 7years of longitudinal patient records and was initially constructed for a heart failure onset prediction study. Our experiments demonstrate the robustness, stability, and the conciseness of Limestone-derived phenotypes. Our results show that using only 40 phenotypes, we can outperform the original 640 features (169 diagnosis categories and 471 medication types) to achieve an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.720 (95% CI 0.715 to 0.725). Moreover, in

  3. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  4. Noise suppression using preconditioned least-squares prestack time migration: application to the Mississippian limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiguang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Qing; Cabrales-Vargas, Alejandro; Marfurt, Kurt J.

    2016-08-01

    Conventional Kirchhoff migration often suffers from artifacts such as aliasing and acquisition footprint, which come from sub-optimal seismic acquisition. The footprint can mask faults and fractures, while aliased noise can focus into false coherent events which affect interpretation and contaminate amplitude variation with offset, amplitude variation with azimuth and elastic inversion. Preconditioned least-squares migration minimizes these artifacts. We implement least-squares migration by minimizing the difference between the original data and the modeled demigrated data using an iterative conjugate gradient scheme. Unpreconditioned least-squares migration better estimates the subsurface amplitude, but does not suppress aliasing. In this work, we precondition the results by applying a 3D prestack structure-oriented LUM (lower–upper–middle) filter to each common offset and common azimuth gather at each iteration. The preconditioning algorithm not only suppresses aliasing of both signal and noise, but also improves the convergence rate. We apply the new preconditioned least-squares migration to the Marmousi model and demonstrate how it can improve the seismic image compared with conventional migration, and then apply it to one survey acquired over a new resource play in the Mid-Continent, USA. The acquisition footprint from the targets is attenuated and the signal to noise ratio is enhanced. To demonstrate the impact on interpretation, we generate a suite of seismic attributes to image the Mississippian limestone, and show that the karst-enhanced fractures in the Mississippian limestone can be better illuminated.

  5. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Behaviour of Limestone: Role of the Clay Minerals Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherblanc, F.; Berthonneau, J.; Bromblet, P.; Huon, V.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical characteristics of various sedimentary stones significantly depend on the water content, where 70 % loss of their mechanical strengths can be observed when saturated by water. Furthermore, the clay fraction has been shown to be a key factor of their hydro-mechanical behaviour since it governs for instance the hydric dilation. This work aims at investigating the correlations between the clay mineral content and the mechanical weakening experienced by limestones when interacting with water. The experimental characterization focuses on five different limestones that exhibit very different micro-structures. For each of them, we present the determination of clay mineral composition, the sorption isotherm curve and the dependences of tensile and compressive strengths on the water content. It emerges from these results that, first, the sorption behaviour is mainly governed by the amount of smectite layers which exhibit the larger specific area and, second, the rate of mechanical strength loss depends linearly on the sorption capacity. Indeed, the clay fraction plays the role of a retardation factor that delays the appearance of capillary bridges as well as the mechanical weakening of stones. However, no correlation was evidenced between the clay content and the amplitude of weakening. Since the mechanisms whereby the strength decreases with water content are not clearly established, these results would help to discriminate between various hypothesis proposed in the literature.

  6. Magnetic resonance sounding and radiomagnetotelluric measurements used to characterize a limestone aquifer in Gotland, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perttu, Nils; Persson, Lena; Erlström, Mikael; Elming, Sten-Åke

    2012-03-01

    SummaryAlmost all drinking water in Gotland is groundwater and is mainly found in karst limestone. However, the unpredictable location and geometry of the karst cracks and caverns makes it very difficult to estimate groundwater storage and movement, as well as contaminant transport. The aim of this study was to test the performance of different geophysical techniques like Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS), Radiomagnetotelluric (RMT), Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to characterize aquifers in Gotland, in respect to geometry and storage as well as connectivity over a wider area. The investigated area is located on the south-eastern part of Gotland. The geology here is dominated by 50-60 m thick successions of limestone that gradually turn into marlstone. The use of multiple techniques has shown to give a more coherent interpretation. However, the shallow penetration depth of GPR and the lack of soil cover in some places of the investigated area limit the use of geoelectrical methods and GPR. With MRS, water are found down to 60 m in depth, with a maximum water content at depths of 20-30 m. This coincides with the most resistive sections of the limestone. The water content varies between 0% and 3%, with a relaxation time (T1MRS) less than 400 ms suggesting that the aquifer is hosted in small fractures, molds and vugs rather than larger karst fractures and caverns. Two potential aquifers were identified with MRS, possibly separated by marlstone. From modeling it can be seen that such boundary separating two aquifer apart can be more easily discriminated in the N/S-, than in the E/W direction. In summary, MRS is therefore the only method in this survey that can detect and determine the vertical and lateral distribution of water within the aquifer together with the total volume of free water. The RMT method has shown to be effective in characterizing the limestone/marl interface, but also to locate anomalous low resistive zones

  7. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Coupled Modeling of Geothermal Doublet Systems in Limestones -revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Heldmann, Claus-Dieter; Pei, Liang; Bartels, Jörn; Weinert, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Limestone aquifers in Southern Germany have been used within the last decade very successfully for geothermal heating and - to a lesser extent - for power generation. As an example the region around Munich has been extensively explored. While the extent of usage of this reservoir is increasing there is also an increased interest in better understanding of the reservoir properties and its change in the course of operation. For instance, the observed production and injection pressures are partly hard to explain. They may be related to mechanical or chemical processes, or both. Based on extensive data of outcrop studies and drillings, a data-base for the relevant physical properties of the respective limestones has been complied. The data include thermal conductivity, density, specific heat capacity, permeability, as well as mechanical properties like thermal expansion coefficient and elasticity modules. By using the hydro-thermo-chemical simulator FEFLOW together with an extension for thermo- and hydro-mechanical coupling the relevant processes are studied and compared with observed data. At the EGU Meeting in 2015 results of an initial study have been presented. This time results based on a completely new model setup and also using newly developed code will be presented. As a conclusion main challenges while modeling THMC fracture flow by using a multi-continua approach will be discussed.

  9. Origin and Age of the Yemi Limestone Breccia, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOH, Hee Jae

    2015-04-01

    The Yemi Limestone Breccia (YLB), which has been argued for its age and depositional origin, occurs sporadically in the upper part of the Cambro-Ordovician Chosun Supergroup (CS) in Korean Peninsula. The YLB is characterized by a carbonate breccia with calcareous and carbonaceous shale matrix. Based on occurrence and composition of breccia and matrix, the YLB can be classified into Type-I and Type-II carbonate breccia. Type-I carbonate breccia comprises dark gray to light gray limestone and lime-mudstone breccia with calcareous matrix and is commonly constrained within the upper part of the CS as a lens-shaped zonal occurrence. The Type-I carbonate breccia results in syn-depositional solution-collapsed brecciation through karstification during intermittent subareal exposure of platform carbonate in Middle Ordovician. Type-II carbonate breccia mainly occurs in the uppermost part of the CS showing an irregular-shaped distribution rather than sheet-like layering parallel to bedding. Type-II carbonate breccia consists of gray to dark gray limestone and lime-mudstone breccia and shale matrix. Matrix is typically purple to reddish and gray to dark gray shale with minor amount of sandstone, and partly carbonaceous indicating organic origin. Most of Type-II carbonate breccia is morphologically classified into chaotic breccia. Matrix and breccia display considerable difference of composition and deformational structures. Breccia preserves various penetrative ductile to brittle deformation structures such as cleavage superimposing bedding, minor fold structure, minor faults crosscutting both dolomite and calcite veins, and fracture zones filled in calcite. However, these deformational structures of breccia do not continuously extended into matrix. Especially Type-II carbonate breccia is well observed in limestone of the lower part of unconformity between CS and clastic rocks of the Jurassic Bansong Group (BS). Fractured and solution zones of brecciated limestone of the CS

  10. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Akinpelu, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  11. The Role of Adults in Facilitating the Play of Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that adults have a responsibility and opportunity to support preschoolers' play by: (1) manifesting positive attitudes toward play; (2) establishing exciting play environments; and (3) offering ideas and play objects. Explores how best to accomplish these supports. (HTH)

  12. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  13. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  14. Remanent magnetization of a Pliensbachian limestone sequence at Bakonycsernye (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, E.; Márton, P.; Heller, F.

    1980-06-01

    Remanent coercivity spectra derived from IRM acquisition curves and thermal demagnetization of the IRM indicate that magnetite, haematite and minor amounts of goethite determine the magnetic properties of the Pliensbachian limestones at Bakonycsernye. These limestones have been sampled at approximately 7-cm intervals along a 10-m stratigraphic section which covers the whole Pliensbachian stage (Lower Jurassic) without any recognizable break in sedimentation. The primary natural remanent magnetization (NRM) is carried by detrital particles of magnetite and haematite, but it is seriously overprinted by a normal magnetization which originates from secondary haematite with a wide range of blocking temperatures. This haematite is believed to have formed diagenetically during one of the Mesozoic periods of normal polarity. However, the reversal pattern obtained after NRM thermal demagnetization at temperatures ≥450°C is thought to be characteristic of the Pliensbachian stage.

  15. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, M.; Rossen, J.; Martirena, F.; Scrivener, K.

    2012-12-15

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  16. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel A; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO(2) emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from 'breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO(2)/H(2)O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  17. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from `breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation.

  18. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from ‘breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  19. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  20. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  1. Dolomitization of Quaternary reef limestones, Aitutaki, Cook Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Gray, S.C.; Richmond, B.M.; White, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    The primary reef framework is considered to have been deposited during several highstands of sea level. Following partial to local recrystallization of the limestone, a signle episode of dolomitization occurred. Both tidal and thermal pumping drove large quantities of seawater through the porous rocks and perhaps maintained a wide mixing zone. However, the isotopic, geochemical and petrographic data do not clearly indicate the extent of seawater mixing. -from Authors

  2. National conference on agricultural limestone. Bulletin Y-166

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-three papers were presented on various facets of the agricultural limestone (aglime) industry - from the quarry to the farmers. They are organized under the following section headings: introduction and overview; status of current use and need; agronomic situation; a total approach to marketing aglime, producing aglime; and a look to the future. Panel discussions were held on the topics, responding to the seasonal nature of aglime use and regional reviews of the status and opportunities for aglime use. (JGB)

  3. Full-scale results for TAM limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, S.

    1996-12-31

    Information is outlined on the use of thermally active marble (TAM) sorbents in boilers. Data are presented on: the comparison of TAM to limestone; NOVACON process development history; CFB test history; CFB pilot scale test; full-scale CFB trial; August, 1996 CFB demonstration; Foster Wheeler Mount Carmel sorbent feed rate comparison and Ca:S comparison; unburned carbon is ash; and advantages and savings in CFB boilers.

  4. Thickness of the Tertiary limestone aquifer system, southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1982-01-01

    The Tertiary limestone aquifer system of the southeastern United States is a thick sequence of carbonate rocks that vary in age and that are hydraulically connected in varying degrees. A map is presented that shows the thickness of the aquifer system. Several types of geologic structures have had an effect on the thickness of the system. The magnitude of this effect varies with the type and size of the structure. (USGS)

  5. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  6. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed

  7. Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of Florida. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm Beach County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm Beach County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm Beach County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.

  8. Mechanism of CaO sulfation in boiler limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, M.R.; Yoon, H.; Burke, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Pilot and industrial-scale tests of boiler limestone injection (BLI) have demonstrated flue gas SO/sub 2/ reductions of around 50% at sorbent utilization efficiencies of 15-20%. The objective of the laboratory research program described in this paper was to improve BLI sorbent utilization through an understanding of the limestone calcination and CaO sulfation reaction mechanisms. This paper describes the laboratory sulfation studies. The laboratory work used a differential reactor operated at 700-1000/degree/C and lab-produced calcines from limestones, dolomites, and hydrated limes, having particle sizes in a range applicable to BLI. The lab work determined the intrinsic sulfation reaction rate and rate-controlling steps over this temperature range. The intrinsic rate increased with the square of calcine surface area and was rate controlling only at temperatures below 800/degree/C. At the higher temperatures more applicable to BLI, the sulfation rate was limited by pore diffusion of SO/sub 2/ and pore plugging by the sulfate product. Therefore, the reaction rate and the saturated sorbent efficiency depended strongly on particle size and calcine pore structure. The lab data indicate that an optimum calcine pore structure can be obtained by appropriately evaluating sorbents, controlling calcination conditions and incorporating alkali additives in the sorbent.

  9. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  10. Calcium looping spent sorbent as a limestone replacement in the manufacture of portland and calcium sulfoaluminate cements.

    PubMed

    Telesca, Antonio; Marroccoli, Milena; Tomasulo, Michele; Valenti, Gian Lorenzo; Dieter, Heiko; Montagnaro, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    The calcium looping (CaL) spent sorbent (i) can be a suitable limestone replacement in the production of both ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement, and (ii) promotes environmental benefits in terms of reduced CO2 emission, increased energy saving and larger utilization of industrial byproducts. A sample of CaL spent sorbent, purged from a 200 kWth pilot facility, was tested as a raw material for the synthesis of two series of OPC and CSA clinkers, obtained from mixes heated in a laboratory electric oven within temperature ranges 1350°-1500 °C and 1200°-1350 °C, respectively. As OPC clinker-generating mixtures, six clay-containing binary blends were investigated, three with limestone (reference mixes) and three with the CaL spent sorbent. All of them showed similar burnability indexes. Moreover, three CSA clinker-generating blends (termed RM, MA and MB) were explored. They included, in the order: (I) limestone, bauxite and gypsum (reference mix); (II) CaL spent sorbent, bauxite and gypsum; (III) CaL spent sorbent plus anodization mud and a mixture of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly and bottom ashes. The maximum conversion toward 4CaO·3Al2O3·SO3, the chief CSA clinker component, was the largest for MB and almost the same for RM and MA. PMID:25915150

  11. Thermo-poroelastic response of an argillaceous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Najari, Meysam

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous limestones are now being considered by many countries that intend to develop deep geologic storage facilities for siting both high-level and intermediate- to low-level nuclear fuel wastes. In deep geologic settings for high level nuclear wastes, the heating due to radioactive decay is transmitted through an engineered barrier, which consists of the waste container and an engineered geologic barrier, which consists of an encapsulating compacted bentonite. The heat transfer process therefore leads to heating of the rock mass where the temperature of the rock is substantially lower than the surface temperature of the waste container. This permits the use of mathematical theories of poroelastic media where phase transformations, involving conversion of water to a vapour form are absent. While the thermo-poroelastic responses of geologic media such as granite and porous tuff have been investigated in the literature, the investigation of thermo-poroelastic responses of argillaceous limestones is relatively new. Argillaceous limestones are considered to be suitable candidates for siting deep geologic repositories owing to the ability to accommodate stress states with generation of severe defects that can influence their transmissivity characteristics. Also the clay fraction in such rocks can contribute to long term healing type phenomena, which is a considerable advantage. This research presents the results of a laboratory investigation and computational modelling of the same that examines the applicability of the theory of thermo-poroelasticity, which extend Biot's classical theory of poroelasticity to include uncoupled heat conduction. The experimental configuration involves the boundary heating of a cylinder of the Cobourg Limestone from southern Ontario, Canada. The cylinder measuring 150 mm in diameter and 278 mm in length contains an axisymmetric fluid-filled cylindrical cavity measuring 26 mm in diameter and 139 mm in length. Thermo-poroelastic effects

  12. Structural characterization of a karstified limestone formation using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel - Pays d'Apt, France, is an Inter-disciplinary Underground Science and Technology Laboratory buried in a karstified limestone formation. A multidisciplinary program focused on water circulation monitoring is presently performed inside the tunnels. This program comprises the investigation of faults, fractures, karstification and stratigraphy ofthe limestone massif using GPR. We present the main results obtained from these data. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity which results in generally very low attenuation of electro-magnetic waves. 90% of the tunnels floor are made of concrete whereas other are made of bare limestone. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The whole 3km long tunnel has been investigated using single offset shielded 250 MHz antennas in May 2009. Processing includes : DC and very low frequency removal, amplitude compensation preserving lateral variations, migration and time to depth conversion. When necessary predictive deconvolution has been applied to remove ringing effects. These data sets are characterized by good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration down to 18 meters. These data allow us to accurately map the stratigraphy of the surrounding rocks across the concrete walls of the tunnel. Some 20 m deep vertical wells have been drilled inside the tunnel through observed reflectors. This is a strong validation of the GPR images. The estimated resolution is centimetric to decimetric and matches the required geologic accuracy. The GPR data set allows to extend previous geological results in depth, particularly in the concrete coated parts of the tunnel where conventional geological surveying is impossible. Thanks to the processing which preserves lateral amplitude variations, GPR sections exhibit prominent

  13. Children's Gendered Drawings of Play Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akseer, Tabasum; Lao, Mary Grace; Bosacki, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    According to child psychologists, vital links exist between children's drawings and their emotional, social, and cognitive development. Previous research has explored the important relations between drawings and play in educational settings. Given the vast research that explores the ambiguous topic of children's play, according to Richer (1990),…

  14. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  15. The Denial of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Well meaning parents and teachers often use children's play for the purposes of literacy and socialization. Yet, these attempts may deny play to children by subordinating play to some other concept. Evidence shows that even when parents play with their very young children they generally play games like shopping, cooking, and eating; whereas when…

  16. Middle Triassic shallow-water limestones from the Upper Muschelkalk of eastern France: the origin and depositional environment of some early Mesozoic fine-grained limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duringer, Philippe; Vecsei, Adam

    1998-10-01

    We have analyzed the sedimentary structures, depositional geometries, and petrography of a Middle Triassic fine-grained limestone succession from the Upper Muschelkalk in the intracratonic Germanic Basin. The limestones occur in a unit, several metres thick, that extends over an area of at least 2500 km 2 in eastern France. The geometry of specific wave ripples and small channels filled by lateral-accretion bedded limestones, and the cyclic sedimentation of the Upper Muschelkalk in eastern France indicate deposition on a very shallow subtidal shelf, commonly under the influence of relatively strong currents. The limestones mostly consist of microspar with a few skeletal grains. The formation of current ripples in the fine-grained limestones appear to be incompatible with an originally muddy grain size. The major part of the microsparite may thus have originated from the recrystallization of silt-size carbonate grains, e.g., calcispheres or peloids.

  17. Bibliography on Play Therapy and Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary Brown; L'Abate, Luciano

    The references listed are: (1) journals, (2) dissertation abstracts, (3) books, (4) reports, and (5) monographs. The main subjects covered are: (1) children's play, (2) psychotherapy with disturbed children through the medium of play therapy, and (3) various aspects of child development, both normal and abnormal. The materials listed date from…

  18. Playing the Play: What the Children Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Jo Anne

    2006-01-01

    Playing the Play describes the experiences of a storyteller and teacher of literature who created a literature-based literacy program at Concourse House, a homeless shelter in Bronx, New York, for women and their young children. This program is based on the belief that pleasure is the primary reason children want to learn to read, and that where…

  19. The Uses of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabaniss, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Teaching artists have techniques for keeping play alive and vital in their work. But how do they think of play as TAs? In this article, the author examines the role of play in the work and life of teaching artists.

  20. Children in Play, Story, and School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goncu, Artin, Ed.; Klein, Elisa L.

    In honor of the contributions of Greta G. Fein to the fields of developmental psychology and early childhood education, a community of scholars prepared this volume to explore how social play arises, social play's developmental and educational significance, and the ways in which social play can be promoted in early childhood settings. In addition,…

  1. Play at the Art Table: A Study of Children's Play Behaviors while Drawing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobedo, Theresa H.

    This descriptive study examined children's drawings and related language episodes to differentiate drawings exhibiting play from those exhibiting exploratory behavior. Drawings categorized as play were further analyzed to identify constructive and imaginary play. The play theory used as the basis of the study proposes that exploration and…

  2. Inelastic compaction of a quartz-rich limestone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Schubnel, A.; rolland, A.; Heap, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of deformation and failure in many sedimentary settings hinges upon a fundamental understanding of inelastic behavior and failure mode of porous carbonate rocks. Previous studies on porous carbonate focused primarily on relatively pure limestone (composed in majority of calcite). Inelastic compaction in these carbonates was reported to be associated to cataclastic pore collapse and in most cases homogeneous cataclastic flow. Recent experimental results however revealed the development of compaction localization in the more porous end-members. The analysis of strain localization and complex failure modes in limestone has proved to be significantly more challenging than in sandstone because acoustic emissions (AE) cannot usually be used to guide systematic microstructural analysis. Recent studies have therefore relied on X-ray Computed Tomography, a technique that can to date only be used in situ in relatively limited systems. In this study we investigated the development of inelastic damage in a quartz-rich limestone with two main objectives: (1) quantify the impact of a secondary mineral such as quartz on the strength and strain localization in porous carbonate, (2) try to follow the development of inelastic damage using AE in such a quartz-rich rock. Saint-Maximin limestone of 37% porosity and composed of 80% calcite and 20% quartz was selected for this study. Two series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed in parallel at room temperature, constant strain rate in both nominally dry and wet conditions at confining pressures between 3 and 50 MPa. Wet experiments were carried out with water in drained conditions at 10 MPa of pore pressure. The first series of experiments were performed at IPG Strasbourg on relatively small samples. The failure modes and spatial distribution of damage were studied systematically in these samples. The second series of experiments were performed on larger samples at ENS Paris. Acoustic emission activity was

  3. "The Woods Is a More Free Space for Children to Be Creative; Their Imagination Kind of Sparks out There": Exploring Young Children's Cognitive Play Opportunities in Natural, Manufactured and Mixed Outdoor Preschool Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor preschools are critical for children's play and development. Integrating observational and interview methods, this study examined four-to-five-year-old children's cognitive play experiences in an outdoor preschool with natural, mixed and manufactured zones. The observational results indicated that the natural and mixed zones offered a…

  4. Elucidation of denitrification mechanism in karstic Ryukyu limestone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijikawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in public water supplies have risen above acceptable levels in many areas of the world including Japan, largely as a result of contamination by human and animal waste and overuse of fertilizers. A previous study has characterized nitrate concentrations in groundwater in this area is a higher than the upper value (44mgL-1) of environmental quality criteria on one hands. On the other hand, there exists points where the concentration of nitric acid is not detected, which suggests the possibility of denitrification. During early 2000, a new analytical procedure for nitrate isotopic measurement, termed the "denitrifier method", was established. With the development of the nitrate isotope tracer method, much research has been reported detailing sources of groundwater nitrate and denitrification mechanisms. This study presents a pilot case study (in the southern part of Okinawa Main Island, Japan, where Ryukyu limestone is extensively distributed) using the combined stable isotope ratios of major elements (C, N and S) as net recorders of the biogeochemical reactions with the aim of elucidation of denitrification mechanism in Ryukyu limestone aquifer. As a result, significant decreases in nitrate concentrations due to denitrification were observed in groundwater at some locations, which induced increases in isotope ratios up to 59.7‰ for δ15NNO3. These points of groundwater were located above the cutoff wall of the underground dam and near the fault. It is considered that the residence time of the groundwater is longer than the other points at these denitrification points, and that reduction condition tends to be formed in the groundwater. However, the rapid rise of the groundwater level due to rainfall is likely to occur in the Ryukyu limestone aquifer, where the ground water was found to have changed dynamically from the reduction condition to the oxidation condition which a denitrification (has not occured)does not occur. Moreover, the

  5. Penetration into limestone targets with ogive-nose steel projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, D.J.; Green, M.L.; Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments into limestone targets with 3.0 caliber-radius-head, 4340 Rc 45 steel projectiles. Powder guns launched two projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios of ten to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.5 km/s. Projectiles had diameters and masses of 12.7 mm, 0. 117 kg and 25.4 mm, 0.610 kg. Based on data sets with these two projectile scales, we proposed an empirical penetration equation that described the target by its density and an empirical strength constant determined from penetration depth versus striking velocity data.

  6. Water transport in limestone by X-ray CAT scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossoti, Victor G.; Castanier, Louis M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of water through the interior of Salem limestone test briquettes can be dynamically monitored by computer aided tomography (commonly called CAT scanning in medical diagnostics). Most significantly, unless evaporation from a particular face of the briquette is accelerated by forced air flow (wind simulation), the distribution of water in the interior of the briquette remains more or less uniform throughout the complete drying cycle. Moreover, simulated solar illumination of the test briquette does not result in the production of significant water gradients in the briquette under steady-state drying conditions.

  7. Southern hemisphere origin of the Cretaceous Laytonville Limestone of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Sliter, W.V.; Cook, H.E.; Blake, M.C., Jr.; Premoli-Silva, I.

    1986-01-01

    New paleomagnetic, paleontologic, and stratigraphic data from outcrops of the Laytonville Limestone (101 to 88 million years old) support a Southern Hemisphere orgin. A paleomagnetic megaconglomerate test is statistically significant and suggests magnetization at 14?? ?? 5?? south, predating Late Cretaceous to Eocene (70 to 50 million years ago) accretion. Rapid Kula plate movement or the existence and demise of a now vanished oceanic plate (or both) are required to accommodate the greater than 50?? of poleward displacement implied by the paleomagnetic data. This rapid motion brings into question the validity of a "speed limit" for absolute plate velocity based on present-day plate motions.

  8. Simultaneous removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution by natural limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdiri, Ali; Higashi, Teruo

    2013-03-01

    Two natural limestone samples, collected from the Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones, Tunisia, were used as adsorbents for the removal of toxic metals in aqueous systems. The results indicated that high removal efficiency could be achieved by the present natural limestones. Among the metal ions studied, Pb2+ was the most preferably removed cation because of its high affinity to calcite surface. In binary system, the presence of Cu2+ effectively depressed the sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+. Similarly Cu2+ strongly competed with Pb2+ to limestone surface. In ternary system, the removal further decreased, but considerable amount of Pb2+ and Cu2+ still occurred regardless of the limestone sample. The same behavior was observed in quadruple system, where the selectivity sequence was Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+. From these results, it was concluded that the studied limestones have the required technical specifications to be used for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  9. Effect of water treatment chemicals on limestone/sulfur dioxide reaction in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    A simple laboratory test has been developed which simulates the reaction between limestone/water and sulfur dioxide in flue gas desulfurization systems. By adding various chemicals, in differing concentrations, to the limestone/water mixture, the quantitative impact on the sulfur dioxide/limestone reaction can be qualified and quantified. This paper will present the impact of several water treatment chemicals on the reaction of limestone and sulfur dioxide. An attempt has been made to predict the effect through mathematical correlations. All of the additive chemicals tend to decrease the rate of dissolution of limestone to various degrees. Some of the chemicals retard crystal growth thus adversely impacting solids separation in the thickener. The physical appearance of the crystal growth retarded limestone absorber slurry approaches a colloidal suspension.

  10. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  11. Two people playing together: some thoughts on play, playing, and playfulness in psychoanalytic work.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Children's play and the playfulness of adolescents and adults are important indicators of personal growth and development. When a child is not able to play, or an adolescent/adult is not able to be playful with thoughts and ideas, psychotherapy can help to find a more playful and creative stance. Elaborating Winnicott's (1968, p. 591) statement that "psychotherapy has to do with two people playing together," three perspectives on play in psychotherapy are discussed. In the first point of view, the child gets in touch with and can work through aspects of his or her inner world, while playing in the presence of the therapist. The power of play is then rooted in the playful communication with the self In a second perspective, in play the child is communicating aspects of his or her inner world to the therapist as a significant other. In a third view, in "playing together" child and therapist are coconstructing new meanings. These three perspectives on play are valid at different moments of a therapy process or for different children, depending on the complex vicissitudes of the child's constitution, life experiences, development, and psychic structure. Concerning these three perspectives, a parallel can be drawn between the therapist's attitude toward the child's play and the way the therapist responds to the verbal play of an adolescent or adult. We illustrate this with the case of Jacob, a late adolescent hardly able to play with ideas. PMID:20578437

  12. Child's Play: Therapist's Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rajakumari P.; Hirisave, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Play has been recognized as an essential component to children's healthy development. Schools of play therapy differ philosophically and technically, but they all embrace the therapeutic and developmental properties of play. This case report is an illustration of how a 6-year-old child with emotional disorder was facilitated to express concerns in child-centered play therapy. The paper discusses the therapist's narration of the child's play. PMID:24860228

  13. Styles of trap development in Caddo limestone in Bend Arch area, north-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, J.L. )

    1987-02-01

    The Lower Pennsylvanian Caddo limestone has been a prolific hydrocarbon producer in the Bend arch area of north-central Texas since the early 1900s and continues to be a major exploration target although it is in a mature province. Early explorationists understood the Caddo's large potential when the James pool was discovered in Young County in 1917. Initial flows were greater than 1,000 BOPD in some wells, and field development with additional infill drilling and waterfloods continued into the early 1980s. James pool has produced more than 2 million bbl of oil as of December 1985. Fields in jack, Throckmorton, and Archer Counties had recorded similar successes by the 1940s. The early caddo discoveries were made before singlefold seismic mapping was available, and were based on sparse subsurface control. By the 1950s and 1960s, seismic and subsurface data were more commonly used in the hunt for Caddo reservoirs. Most exploration concepts held that all Caddo traps were structural. Recent studies showed that structural, stratigraphic, and combination traps are common in the Caddo. This study presents examples of each trap type in the Bend arch area, where 49 million bbl of oil has been discovered in the Caddo, and focuses on the current exploration methods.

  14. Analysis of medieval limestone sculpture from southwestern France and the Paris Basin by NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1994-12-31

    Compositional characterization of limestone from sources known to medieval craftsmen and from the monuments they built can be used in conjunction with stylistic and iconographic criteria to infer geographic origin of sculptures that have lost their histories. Limestone from 47 quarrying locations in France and from numerous medieval monuments have been subjected to neutron activation analysis (NAA) to form the nucleus of the Brookhaven Limestone Database. Even though the method and techniques of NAA are well established, this paper briefly summarizes the parameters and experimental conditions useful for determining those concentration variables for which limestone from different sources exhibits significant and reproducible differences.

  15. Limestones of western Newfoundland that magnetized before Devonian folding but after Middle Ordovician lithification

    SciTech Connect

    Hodych, J.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A positive fold test and a negative conglomerate test help determine when and how stable remanence was acquired in the Middle Ordovician Table Head Group limestones of the Port au Port Peninsula of Newfoundland. The limestones magnetized after lithification and incorporation as clasts into a Middle Ordovician breccia. Hence, the limestones do not carry a detrital or other primary remanence despite their very low conodont color alteration index. The remanence may be thermoviscous or diagenetic and was acquired before Devonian folding. This suggests the need for caution in interpreting paleomagnetic results from other early Paleozoic limestones whose remanence resides in magnetite of blocking temperature lower than 400C.

  16. Geostatistical three-dimensional modeling of oolite shoals, St. Louis Limestone, southwest Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, L.; Carr, T.R.; Goldstein, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    In the Hugoton embayment of southwestern Kansas, reservoirs composed of relatively thin (<4 m; <13.1 ft) oolitic deposits within the St. Louis Limestone have produced more than 300 million bbl of oil. The geometry and distribution of oolitic deposits control the heterogeneity of the reservoirs, resulting in exploration challenges and relatively low recovery. Geostatistical three-dimensional (3-D) models were constructed to quantify the geometry and spatial distribution of oolitic reservoirs, and the continuity of flow units within Big Bow and Sand Arroyo Creek fields. Lithofacies in uncored wells were predicted from digital logs using a neural network. The tilting effect from the Laramide orogeny was removed to construct restored structural surfaces at the time of deposition. Well data and structural maps were integrated to build 3-D models of oolitic reservoirs using stochastic simulations with geometry data. Three-dimensional models provide insights into the distribution, the external and internal geometry of oolitic deposits, and the sedimentologic processes that generated reservoir intervals. The structural highs and general structural trend had a significant impact on the distribution and orientation of the oolitic complexes. The depositional pattern and connectivity analysis suggest an overall aggradation of shallow-marine deposits during pulses of relative sea level rise followed by deepening near the top of the St. Louis Limestone. Cemented oolitic deposits were modeled as barriers and baffles and tend to concentrate at the edge of oolitic complexes. Spatial distribution of porous oolitic deposits controls the internal geometry of rock properties. Integrated geostatistical modeling methods can be applicable to other complex carbonate or siliciclastic reservoirs in shallow-marine settings. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Vertical distribution of soil organic carbon in limestone Mediterranean mountains areas, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Juan; Jordan, Antonio; Martínez-Zavala, Lorena; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz

    2015-04-01

    Normally, soil organic carbon (SOC) investigations are related to fertility and/or soil quality so refer to surface horizon. In other cases, soil control sections or soil horizons are used to study soil carbon pool, especially in forest areas. In this line, in order to provide quantitative data of organic carbon in soils and sediments in relation to depth, the organic carbon vertical distribution was studied in selected areas of southern Spain. Significant variations in depth of organic carbon may be related with different vegetation and/or land use changes, so it can be used to select sampling points for studying these changes through pollen analysis. For this study, ten sinkholes in hard limestone Mediterranean mountains areas of southern Spain have been selected following scientific interest criteria and/or minimal human influence. Soil and sediment samples extraction was carried out using tensile steel drills up to four meters in deep driven by an electric striking hammer. Once extracted the soil columns, soil control sections are taken every 5 cm, obtaining 470 samples in the ten sinkholes selected and making four replications for each soil control section. The soil and sediments exploration in different sinkholes highlights the karst heterogeneity formations, especially in terms of its depth. Thus, it was possible to take samples of varying depth, ranging between 1 and 5 m, being the limiting factor the hard pan forming which can be soil nature (petrocalcic horizon) or lithological nature (hard limestone). SOC in every sampling point varied between 2.5 and 16.7 g kg-1. In general, SOC concentrations decreases progressively in depth, although in some sampling point 10 g kg-1 were obtained at 200 cm in depths. On the other hand, it had been observed significant increases at 100 cm in deep, sometimes repeating at high deep, which could be related to ancient sedimentary past or with edaphogenic processes past. Definitely more comprehensive studies could shed new

  18. Deep-to-shallow carbonate ramp transition in Viola Limestone (Ordovician), southwest Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Glavin, P.K.

    1983-03-01

    The Viola Limestone (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of the southwest Arbuckle Mountains was deposited on a carbonate ramp within the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Depositional environments include (1) anaerobic, deep-ramp setting represented by microfacies RL, CH, CGL, and A, (2) dysaerobic, mid-ramp setting represented by microfacies B, and (3) aerobic, shallow-ramp setting represented by microfacies C and D. Deposition in the deep- and mid-ramp environments was dominated by bottom-hugging currents produced by off-platform flow of denser waters. Primary sedimentary structures include millimeter-size laminations, starved ripples, and concave-up and inclined erosional surfaces. Shelly benthic fauna are rare in A and B; trace fossils are common only in B. Deposits associated with the line-source gully, microfacies RL, CH, and CGL, are laterally confined; they have been observed only in the southwest Arbuckle Mountains. Primary sedimentary structures present in RL include wavy and ripple-cross laminae. Microfacies CH, contained within RL and interpreted as a submarine channel deposit, is present only at one locality. Primary sedimentary structures present in CH include an erosional base and several internal erosional surfaces, lateral accretionary sets, and imbricated, locally derived intraclasts. High total organic carbon (TOC) values have been reported for the lower Viola. TOC values of 1% have been reported from microfacies A, and TOC values of 5% have been reported from microfacies RL. These high values suggest that A and RL may act as hydrocarbon source rocks. Recognition of these microfacies in the subsurface will contribute to our knowledge of the Viola Limestone as an exploration target.

  19. Hydrogeology of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from 35 new test coreholes and aquifer-test, water-level, and water-quality data were combined with existing hydrogeologic data to define the extent, thickness, hydraulic properties, and degree of confinement of the gray limestone aquifer in southern Florida. This aquifer, previously known to be present only in southeastern Florida (Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties) below, and to the west of, the Biscayne aquifer, extends over most of central-south Florida, including eastern and central Collier County and southern Hendry County; it is the same as the lower Tamiami aquifer to the north, and it becomes the water-table aquifer and the upper limestone part of the lower Tamiami aquifer to the west. The aquifer generally is composed of gray, shelly, lightly to moderately cemented limestone with abundant shell fragments or carbonate sand, abundant skeletal moldic porosity, and minor quartz sand. The gray limestone aquifer comprises the Ochopee Limestone of the Tamiami Formation, and, in some areas, the uppermost permeable part of an unnamed formation principally composed of quartz sand. Underlying the unnamed formation is the Peace River Formation of the upper Hawthorn Group, the top of which is the base of the surficial aquifer system. Overlying the aquifer and providing confinement in much of the area is the Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation. The thickness of the aquifer is comparatively uniform, generally ranging from 30 to 100 feet. The unnamed formation part of the aquifer is up to 20 feet thick. The Ochopee Limestone accumulated in a carbonate ramp depositional system and contains a heterozoan carbonate-particle association. The principal rock types of the aquifer are pelecypod lime rudstones and floatstones and permeable quartz sands and sandstones. The pore types are mainly intergrain and separate vug (skeletal-moldic) pore spaces. The rock fabric and associated primary and secondary pore spaces combine to form a dual diffuse

  20. Bird species diversity in the padawan limestone area, sarawak.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Mohammad Saiful; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Koon, Lim Chan; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul

    2011-12-01

    Bird surveys were conducted in the Padawan Limestone Area for seven days at each of two study sites, Giam and Danu, from August to December 2008. The purpose of the study was to compare the area's bird species richness and abundance of bird species in other limestone areas and in other forest types. The study also compared the species richness and relative abundance of birds in undisturbed and disturbed areas at both study sites. Twenty mist nets were deployed for 12 hours daily. During this study period, direct observations of birds were also made. In all, 80 species from 34 families were recorded at both sites. At Giam, 120 birds were mist-netted. These birds represented 31 species from 16 families. The direct observations at Giam recorded 13 species from 11 families. In the undisturbed area, 21 species from 13 families were mist-netted, whereas in the disturbed area, 21 species from 10 families were mist-netted. In Danu, a total of 48 birds, representing 25 species from 12 families, were mist-netted. The observations at Danu recorded 34 species from 19 families. Twelve species from 7 families were mist-netted in the undisturbed area, whereas 18 species from 11 families were mist-netted in the disturbed area. Statistical analysis showed that the species diversity index differed significantly between undisturbed and disturbed areas. PMID:24575218

  1. Bird Species Diversity in the Padawan Limestone Area, Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Mohammad Saiful; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Koon, Lim Chan; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Bird surveys were conducted in the Padawan Limestone Area for seven days at each of two study sites, Giam and Danu, from August to December 2008. The purpose of the study was to compare the area’s bird species richness and abundance of bird species in other limestone areas and in other forest types. The study also compared the species richness and relative abundance of birds in undisturbed and disturbed areas at both study sites. Twenty mist nets were deployed for 12 hours daily. During this study period, direct observations of birds were also made. In all, 80 species from 34 families were recorded at both sites. At Giam, 120 birds were mist-netted. These birds represented 31 species from 16 families. The direct observations at Giam recorded 13 species from 11 families. In the undisturbed area, 21 species from 13 families were mist-netted, whereas in the disturbed area, 21 species from 10 families were mist-netted. In Danu, a total of 48 birds, representing 25 species from 12 families, were mist-netted. The observations at Danu recorded 34 species from 19 families. Twelve species from 7 families were mist-netted in the undisturbed area, whereas 18 species from 11 families were mist-netted in the disturbed area. Statistical analysis showed that the species diversity index differed significantly between undisturbed and disturbed areas. PMID:24575218

  2. Enhancement of indirect sulphation of limestone by steam addition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael C; Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J; Macchi, Arturo

    2010-11-15

    The effect of water (H₂O(g)) on in situ SO₂ capture using limestone injection under (FBC) conditions was studied using a thermobalance and tube furnace. The indirect sulphation reaction was found to be greatly enhanced in the presence of H₂O(g). Stoichiometric conversion of samples occurred when sulphated with a synthetic flue gas containing 15% H₂O(g) in under 10 h, which is equivalent to a 45% increase in conversion as compared to sulphation without H₂O(g). Using gas pycnometry and nitrogen adsorption methods, it was shown that limestone samples sulphated in the presence of H₂O(g) undergo increased particle densification without any significant changes to pore area or volume. The microstructural changes and observed increase in conversion were attributed to enhanced solid-state diffusion in CaO/CaSO₄ in the presence of H₂O(g). Given steam has been shown to have such a strong influence on sulphation, whereas it had been previously regarded as inert, may prompt a revisiting of the classically accepted sulphation models and phenomena. These findings also suggest that steam injection may be used to enhance sulfur capture performance in fluidized beds firing low-moisture fuels such as petroleum coke. PMID:20958025

  3. Characterizing and modelling 'ghost-rock' weathered limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Caroline; Goderniaux, Pascal; Deceuster, John; Poulain, Angélique; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    'Ghost-rock' karst aquifer has recently been highlighted. In this particular type of aquifer, the karst is not expressed as open conduits but consists in zones where the limestone is weathered. The in-situ weathering of limestone leaves a soft porous material called 'alterite'. The hydro-mechanical properties of this material differs significantly from those of the host rock: the weathering enhances the storage capacity and the conductivity of the rock. This type of weathered karst aquifer has never been studied from a hydrogeological point of view. In this study, we present the hydraulic characterization of such weathered zones. We also present a modelling approach derived from the common Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach, but including the spatial distribution of hydrogeological properties through the weathered features, from the hard rock to the alterite, according to a weathering index. Unlike the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approaches, which enable to take into account a limited number of fractures, this new approach allows creating models including thousands of weathered features. As the properties of the alterite have to be considered at a centimeter scale, it is necessary to upscale these properties to carry out simulations over large areas. Therefore, an upscaling method was developed, taking into account the anisotropy of the weathered features. Synthetic models are built, upscaled and different hydrogeological simulations are run to validate the method. This methodology is finally tested on a real case study: the modelling of the dewatering drainage flow of an exploited quarry in a weathered karst aquifer in Belgium.

  4. Treatment of mining acidic leachates with indigenous limestone, Zimapan Mexico.

    PubMed

    Labastida, I; Armienta, M A; Lara-Castro, R H; Aguayo, A; Cruz, O; Ceniceros, N

    2013-11-15

    An experimental study to evaluate the potential of using indigenous limestones in a passive system to treat acid mine drainage, at a mining zone of Mexico was carried out. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of four types of native rocks (KIT1, KIT2, KSS, QZ) showed distinct CaCO3 contents. Synthetic aqueous leachates from an old tailings impoundment had a pH of 2.18, 34 mg/L As, 705 mg/L Fetotal, and 3975 mg/L SO4(2-). To evaluate dissolution behavior of rocks, kinetic batch experiments with an acid Fe-rich solution were performed. Decaying kinetic constants adjusting H(+) concentration to a first order exponential process were: KIT1 (k = 2.89), KIT2 (k = 0.89) and KSS (k = 0.47). Infrared spectrum and XRD of precipitates showed schwertmannite formation. To determine As and heavy metals (Fe, Cd, Zn, Al) removal from the synthetic leachates, batch experiments using KIT1 were developed. Arsenic decreased from 34.00 mg/L to 0.04 mg/L, Fe and Al were totally removed, and concentrations of Zn and Cd decreased 88% and 91% respectively. Analyses by IR and SEM-EDS indicate that co-precipitation with Fe-Hydroxides formed upon leachate interaction with limestone is the main As removal process. Chamosite, identified by XRD may participate in the removal of Al, SiO2 and a fraction of Fe. PMID:22819958

  5. Colmenar limestone as a resource for built heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Rafael; Álvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Varas-Muriel, MªJosé; Mercedes Pérez-Monserrat, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The Colmenar stone (or Colmenar limestone) has been used in the construction of significant builidings of the Central area of Spain, such as the Royal Palace of Aranjuez (16th -18th centuries) or the Royal Palace of Madrid (18th century). Nowadays this building stone is still widely used, both for new construction and restoration works, as well as for the indoor ornamentation of emblematic buildings such as the Royal Theater of Madrid (20th century). There are many quarries from where this stone was exploited, being the most prestigious ones those located in Colmenar de Oreja, at 50 km Southeast the city of Madrid. The high quality of the stone in these quarries, its whiteness and pureness, made this locality the most relevant in these stonés extractive activities, concentrating the most relevant exploitations and providing the stone the denomination of the municipality (Colmenar). It was an underground mining extraction until the 20th century in order to reach the highest quality level of the mine, the so called "Banco Gordo" (Thick Bank). Generically known as moorland limestone, this rock belongs to the fluvial-lacustrine carbonates of the Upper Miocene Unit of the Tertiary Madrid's Basin. Its tonality mainly ranges from white to cream and even light grey. Under a petrographic point of view, this limestone is constituted by 40% of bioclasts (characea, ostracods and gasteropods), 20-30% of micritic matrix and 30-40% of sparitic cement. Therefore, it can be classified as a biomicrite/biosparite limestone or as a bioclastic packstone. Some particularities of these limestones regarding their appearance are related to some karstic processes they underwent linked to some dissolution phenomena during the Pliocene. All of this resulted on an abundance of cavities with terra rossa fillings, a non-soluble clayey residue, iron enriched, which is the responsible for the reddish and pinkish color that the Colmenar stone sometimes shows. These petrographic characteristics

  6. GPR investigations in galleries buried inside a karstified limestone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-04-01

    A large scientific program of geophysical investigations is presently performed inside the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit / LSBB, Rustrel, France) which is an decomissioned underground missile control center, buried in a karstified limestone formation. One of the goals of this project is the understanding of the water circulation inside the structure. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity. The dip is around 25 degrees and vertical faults locally affect the structure. The studied zone is located in south-eastern France (Provence) and is characterized by a mediterranean climate with long dry periods and strong, short events of rain. This phenomenon induces large variations of water content within the karstified limestone from dry to saturated conditions. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variations of the water flow in a karstified limestones needs to define the geological context and the adequate geophysical methods. GPR offers a good tradeoff between resolution and ease of use on one hand and investigation depth on the other hand. We present some GPR profiles which have been acquired in April 2008 after a quite long and strong period of rain, inducing a complete water saturation inside the karstified massif. We used several RAMAC shielded antennas from 100 to 500 MHz. The longest profile is around 600 m long, with a 20 cm spacing, running from a raw to a concrete gallery. These data sets are characterized by a very good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration, up to 18 meters. Signal processing includes very low frequency filtering, amplitude compensation, keeping lateral relative attenuation and ringing suppression. Final sections includes migration and time to depth conversion or depth migration. The estimated

  7. Learning through Role Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    Explains how role playing can provide enriching experiences that develop children's literacy and numeracy skills. Lists key ingredients of good role playing and suggests ways to plan them and prepare space for them. (SK)

  8. Adlerian Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry; Warlick, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Describes Adlerian method of play therapy. Claims Adlerian therapy represents an integration of the concepts and techniques of individual psychology into a method of using play to help troubled children. (Author/ABL)

  9. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  10. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play that, taken…