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Sample records for limestone injection dry

  1. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  2. Enhanced limestone injection dry scrubbing (E-LIDS{trademark}) development as part of B&W`s combustion 2000 LEBS

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, D.A.; Musiol, W.F.

    1997-07-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently developing the Enhanced Limestone Injection with Dry Scrubbing (E-LIDS{trademark}, patent pending) system to be capable of reducing SO{sub x} and particulate emissions significantly below that allowed under the current New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) while addressing the concerns of solid waste generation and air toxics regulation. The work is being performed as an integral part of B&W`s development of an advanced low-emission boiler system in a project entitled, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low Emission Boiler Systems (Combustion 2000 - LEBS).{close_quotes} The program is sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The overall goal of the DOE`s program is to dramatically improve environmental performance and thermal efficiency of conventional coal-fired power plants. The B&W E-LIDS process is a limestone-based, furnace injection/dry scrubbing SO{sub 2} removal process. The process comprises the cost-effective integration of three commercially-proven flue ps cleanup technologies furnace limestone injection, dry scrubbing, and pulse-jet fabric filtration. Specific LEBS goals that are addressed by the E-LIDS system are (1) sulfur dioxide emissions less than 0.10 lb/SO{sub 2} MBtu, (2) particulate emissions less than 0.005 lb particulates/MBtu, (3) air toxics emissions significantly reduced, and (4) solid by-product minimized and/or utilized. This paper introduces results of 10 MW E-LIDS testing performed in B&W`s world-class Clean Environment Development Facility to demonstrate the LEBS project SO{sub 2} removal goal of 98% under cost-effective operating conditions. Air toxics measurements of mercury, trace metals, and acid gases are also covered.

  3. STEAM INJECTION INTO FRACTURED LIMESTONE AT LORING AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research project on steam injection for the remediation of spent chlorinated solvents from fractured limestone was recently undertaken at the former Loring AFB in Limestone, ME. Participants in the project include the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, EPA Region I,...

  4. DEVELOPMENTS IN LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the most recent results from the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) program, results from the wall-fired demonstration. Tests were conducted to determine the efficacy of commercial calcium hydroxide--Ca(OH)2--supplied by Marblehead Lime Co. and of ca...

  5. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  6. Mechanism of CaO sulfation in boiler limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, M.R.; Yoon, H.; Burke, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Pilot and industrial-scale tests of boiler limestone injection (BLI) have demonstrated flue gas SO/sub 2/ reductions of around 50% at sorbent utilization efficiencies of 15-20%. The objective of the laboratory research program described in this paper was to improve BLI sorbent utilization through an understanding of the limestone calcination and CaO sulfation reaction mechanisms. This paper describes the laboratory sulfation studies. The laboratory work used a differential reactor operated at 700-1000/degree/C and lab-produced calcines from limestones, dolomites, and hydrated limes, having particle sizes in a range applicable to BLI. The lab work determined the intrinsic sulfation reaction rate and rate-controlling steps over this temperature range. The intrinsic rate increased with the square of calcine surface area and was rate controlling only at temperatures below 800/degree/C. At the higher temperatures more applicable to BLI, the sulfation rate was limited by pore diffusion of SO/sub 2/ and pore plugging by the sulfate product. Therefore, the reaction rate and the saturated sorbent efficiency depended strongly on particle size and calcine pore structure. The lab data indicate that an optimum calcine pore structure can be obtained by appropriately evaluating sorbents, controlling calcination conditions and incorporating alkali additives in the sorbent.

  7. EPA'S LIMB (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes and discusses key design features of the retrofit of EPA's Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) system to an operating, wallfired utility boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station, based on the preliminary engineering design. It further describes resul...

  8. Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

  9. Full-scale results for TAM limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, S.

    1996-12-31

    Information is outlined on the use of thermally active marble (TAM) sorbents in boilers. Data are presented on: the comparison of TAM to limestone; NOVACON process development history; CFB test history; CFB pilot scale test; full-scale CFB trial; August, 1996 CFB demonstration; Foster Wheeler Mount Carmel sorbent feed rate comparison and Ca:S comparison; unburned carbon is ash; and advantages and savings in CFB boilers.

  10. ENGINEERING APPLICATION AND ECONOMICS OF LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION/MULTISTAGE BURNERS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the use of an EPA LIMB cost model, in conjunction with cost and performance models for flue gas desulfurization (FGD), to compare these two technologies under similar premises. (NOTE: The performance goals of LIMB, EPA's acronym for Limestone Injection/Multist...

  11. EPA'S LIMB (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes and discusses key design features of the retrofit of EPA's Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) system to an operating, wall-fired utility boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station, based on the preliminary engineering design. The full-scale demonstrat...

  12. EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF LOW-COST RETROFIT LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses program objectives, approaches, current status and results, future activities, and schedules for EPA's program for research and development, field evaluation, and demonstration of Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) technology. Primary emphasis is on:...

  13. Use of borehole radar tomography to monitor steam injection in fractured limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Borehole radar tomography was used as part of a pilot study to monitor steam-enhanced remediation of a fractured limestone contaminated with volatile organic compounds at the former Loring Air Force Base, Maine, USA. Radar tomography data were collected using 100-MHz electric-dipole antennae before and during steam injection to evaluate whether cross-hole radar methods could detect changes in medium properties resulting from the steam injection. Cross-hole levelrun profiles, in which transmitting and receiving antennae are positioned at a common depth, were made before and after the collection of each full tomography data set to check the stability of the radar instruments. Before tomographic inversion, the levelrun profiles were used to calibrate the radar tomography data to compensate for changes in traveltime and antenna power caused by instrument drift. Observed changes in cross-hole radar traveltime and attenuation before and during steam injection were small. Slowness- and attenuation-difference tomograms indicate small increases in radar slowness and attenuation at depths greater than about 22 m below the surface, consistent with increases in water temperature observed in the boreholes used for the tomography. Based on theoretical modelling results, increases in slowness and attenuation are interpreted as delineating zones where steam injection heating increased the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix and fluid. The results of this study show the potential of cross-hole radar tomography methods to monitor the effects of steam-induced heating in fractured rock environments. ?? 2006 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  14. ACID DEPOSITION STRATEGIES, THE LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION/MULTISTAGE BURNERS) PROGRAM AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTROL TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the various acid deposition bills introduced in the U.S. Congress during the past 2 years and discusses emission sources. A rapidly emerging technology called Limestone Injection/Multistage Burners (LIMB), which has the potential for simultaneous SO2 and NOx ...

  15. STATUS OF EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AT OHIO EDISON'S EDGEWATER UNIT 4

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes and discusses the key design features of the retrofit of EPA's Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) system to an operating, wall-fired utility boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. It further describes results of the pertinent projects in EPA's LI...

  16. Laboratory study of SO2 dry deposition on limestone and marble: Effects of humidity and surface variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hosker, R.P., Jr.; Weintraub, V.C.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3, nitrogen oxides) can be held constant. An airfoil sample holder holds up to eight stone samples (3.8 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick) in nearly identical exposure conditions. SO2 deposition on limestone was found to increase exponentially with increasing relative humidity (RH). Marble behaves similarly, but with a much lower deposition rate. Trends indicate there is little deposition below 20% RH on clean limestone and below 60% RH on clean marble. This large difference is due to the limestone's greater porosity, surface roughness, and effective surface area. These results indicate surface variables generally limit SO2 deposition below about 70% RH on limestone and below at least 95% RH on marble. Aerodynamic variables generally limit deposition at higher relative humidity or when the surface is wet.The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3

  17. In Situ Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus Strains Injected into a Limestone Petroleum Reservoir▿

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, N.; Simpson, D. R.; Duncan, K. E.; McInerney, M. J.; Folmsbee, M.; Fincher, T.; Knapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery may be an economic approach for recovery of significant amounts of oil entrapped in reservoirs, but evidence that biosurfactants can be produced in situ at concentrations needed to mobilize oil is lacking. We tested whether two Bacillus strains that produce lipopeptide biosurfactants can metabolize and produce their biosurfactants in an oil reservoir. Five wells that produce from the same Viola limestone formation were used. Two wells received an inoculum (a mixture of Bacillus strain RS-1 and Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii NRRL B-23049) and nutrients (glucose, sodium nitrate, and trace metals), two wells received just nutrients, and one well received only formation water. Results showed in situ metabolism and biosurfactant production. The average concentration of lipopeptide biosurfactant in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells was about 90 mg/liter. This concentration is approximately nine times the minimum concentration required to mobilize entrapped oil from sandstone cores. Carbon dioxide, acetate, lactate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol were detected in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells. Only CO2 and ethanol were detected in the produced fluids of the nutrient-only-treated wells. Microbiological and molecular data showed that the microorganisms injected into the formation were retrieved in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells. We provide essential data for modeling microbial oil recovery processes in situ, including growth rates (0.06 ± 0.01 h−1), carbon balances (107% ± 34%), biosurfactant production rates (0.02 ± 0.001 h−1), and biosurfactant yields (0.015 ± 0.001 mol biosurfactant/mol glucose). The data demonstrate the technical feasibility of microbial processes for oil recovery. PMID:17172458

  18. Determining the distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured limestone aquifer by simultaneous injection and geophysical logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Hess, A.E.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    A field technique for assessing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer was applied to a fractured carbonate formation in southeastern Nevada. The technique combines the simultaneous use of fluid injection and geophysical logging to measure in situ vertical distributions of fluid velocity and hydraulic head down the borehole; these data subsequently are analyzed to arrive at quantitative estimates of hydraulic conductivity across discrete intervals in the aquifer. The results of this analysis identified the contact margin between the Anchor and Dawn Members of the Monte Cristo Limestone as being the dominant transmissive unit. -from Authors

  19. Steam injection pilot study in a contaminated fractured limestone (Maine, USA): Modeling and analysis of borehole radar reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, C.; Lane, J.W., Jr.; Joesten, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Steam-enhanced remediation (SER) has been successfully used to remove DNAPL and LNAPL contaminants in porous media. Between August and November 2002, SER was tested in fractured limestone at the former Loring Air Force Base, in Maine, USA. During the SER investigation, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a series of borehole radar surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of radar methods for monitoring the movement of steam and heat through the fractured limestone. The data were collected before steam injection, 10 days after the beginning of injection, and at the end of injection. In this paper, reflection-mode borehole radar data from wells JBW-7816 and JBW-7817A are presented and discussed. Theoretical modeling was performed to predict the variation of fracture reflectivity owed to heating, to show displacement of water and to assess the effect of SER at the site. Analysis of the radar profile data indicates some variations resulting from heating (increase of continuity of reflectors, attenuation of deeper reflections) but no substantial variation of traveltimes. Spectral content analysis of several individual reflections surrounding the boreholes was used to investigate the replacement of water by steam in the fractures. Observed decrease in radar reflectivity was too small to be explained by a replacement of water by steam, except for two high-amplitude reflectors, which disappeared near the end of the injection; moreover, no change of polarity, consistent with steam replacing water, was observed. The decrease of amplitude was greater for reflectors near well JBW-7817A and is explained by a greater heating around this well.

  20. Retrofit costs for lime/limestone FGD and lime spray drying at coal-fired utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Emmel, T.E.; Jones, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives results of a research program the objective of which was to significantly improve engineering cost estimates currently being used to evaluate the economic effects of applying SO2 controls to existing coal-fired utility boilers. The costs of retrofitting conventional lime/limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (L/LS FGD) and lime spray drying (LSD) FGD at 100-200 coal-fired power plants are being estimated under this program. The retrofit capital cost estimating procedures used for L/LS FGD and LSD FGD make two cost adjustments to current procedures used to estimate FGD costs: cost adders (for items not normally included in FGD system costs; e.g., demolition and relocation of existing facilities) and cost multipliers (to adjust capital costs for site access, congestion, and underground obstructions).

  1. REACTIVATION OF SOLIDS FROM FURNACE INJECTION OF LIMESTONE FOR SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of post-furnace injection solids and flyash mixtures and their testing in a bench-scale reactor for the removal of SO2. Virtually no SO2 removal was observed with untreated solids. High SO2 capture occurred when the samples were hydra...

  2. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J.; Beittel, R.

    1994-03-01

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  3. Trace metal distribution and control in the pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor equipped with the pulse-jet fabric filter, limestone injection, and the humidification reactor.

    PubMed

    Kouvo, Petri

    2003-04-01

    This work focused on trace metal behavior and removal in a fabric filter or in a humidification reactor during the cofiring of sawdust and refuse-derived fuels (RDFs) in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler. Trace metal emissions measurements before and after the fabric filter revealed that removal efficiency in the fabric filter was in the range of 80-100%, and that the European Union (EU) Directive on Incineration of Waste restrictions for trace metal emissions are easily achieved even if addition of RDFs substantially increases the concentration of trace metals in fuel blends. Limestone injection enhanced the removal of As and Se but had no noticeable effect on the removal of other trace metals. Extensive formation of HgCl2 and condensation on fly ash particles during sawdust plus 40% RDF cofiring resulted in a 92% Hg removal efficiency in the fabric filter. Limestone injection had no effect on the Hg removal in the fabric filter but decreased the Hg removal in a humidification reactor from 40 to 28%. Results of the bed material and fly ash analysis suggested capture of Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn in the bed material but also suggested that these metals may be released from the bed if the fuel characteristics or process conditions are changed. PMID:12708504

  4. Construction and operation of an isothermal flow reactor system for study of SO2 removal by injected limestone sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepola, Jouko

    1990-10-01

    Desulfurization capacity of Finnish limestones was studied with the aid of an isothermal flow reactor at the Laboratory of Fuel and Process Technology of the Technical Research Center of Finland over the years 1985-1989. Construction and operation of this isothermal flow reactor are presented in the article. Reaction temperature, residence time, and flue gas composition can be regulated independently of each other. The flue gas is formed by burning LPG (mixture of propane and propene). Other gases can be mixed with the flue gases to get the desired gas composition. The hot flue gas is led into a vertical reactor. To compensate heat losses the reactor tube is kept at the desired temperature with the aid of an electric resistance heater installed around the tube. Flow in the reactor is laminar. Limestone powder of 1-100 μm in particle size can be fed by a powder feeder at a rate of 0.2-5 g/min into the reactor. Reacted solid matter is collected with an axially movable, water-cooled, and nitrogen-diluted sampling probe in the reactor tube. It is very important to feed the fine powdered limestone as separate particles into the reactor and to sample the solid product so that detrimental reactions in the sampling system are minimized. The residence time of solid matter in the reactor ranges 0.1-1 s, depending on the gas amount flowing in the reactor tube, and on the position of the sampling probe in the tube. The sample is collected in a cyclone or a filter at the end of the probe. Calcium and sulfur compounds, specific surface area, and pore and particle size distributions are analyzed for the sample.

  5. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  6. Limestone geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Trudgill, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book focuses on recent work on geomorphological processes and relates them to established theories of landform development. Special attention is paid to soil processes, marine geomorphology, chemical processes and future work on process-form relationships in the context of dated sequences of cave deposits. There are discussions of limestone landforms and other carbonate rocks, caves, hydrological networks, features of karst, morphometry, and coastal landforms and solution chemistry of limestones.

  7. Permeability impairment of a limestone reservoir triggered by heterogeneous dissolution and particles migration during CO2-rich injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangane, Papa O.; Gouze, Philippe; Luquot, Linda

    2013-09-01

    CO2-rich brine core-flood experiment in calcite limestone for conditions representative of underground storage (P = 12 MPa and T = 100°C) was performed in order to explore the dissolution mechanisms arising at moderate CO2 partial pressure (0.3 MPa). An increase of the total porosity (φT) accompanied by a persistent permeability (k) decrease was measured. The mechanisms controlling this atypical anticorrelated k - φT relationship were investigated from the analysis of high-resolution X-ray microtomography images of the sample acquired before and after the experiment. All the evidences converge to the conclusion that the ubiquitous decrease of permeability measured during the 44 h of dissolution is due to the clogging of a fraction of the macroporosity by microporous material triggered by the rearrangement of the detached undissolved particles. This mechanism results in the development of low permeability zones bridging the macroporosity.

  8. Using laser diagnostics for studying the injection of a dry additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunov, Iu. M.; Zhilin, V. G.; Liuliukin, V. I.; Mostinskii, I. L.; Putin, Iu. A.

    1987-02-01

    In MHD generators using an ionizing additive, the uniform injection of the additive into the combustion chamber and the dispersity of the injected particles are important. Some of the problems associated with the injection of an ionizing additive can be alleviated by using dry additives. In the experiment reported here, an He-Ne laser was used to monitor the injection of potash powder with an average size of 40 microns. It is shown that laser diagnostics can be successfully used to determine the mean particle diameter and variation of the powder flow rate with time.

  9. APPLICATION OF LIMB TO PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS - A SYSTEMS ANALYSIS: LIMESTONE FEED AND BOILER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a systems analysis of the application of Limestone Injection Multistaged Burner (LIMB) technology to pulverized-coal boilers. It evaluates alternative limestone handling, preparation, and injection methods and boiler system impacts associated with LIMB...

  10. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post-furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP.

  11. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES: VOLUME 2. PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a mini-pilot test program to investigate potential new sorbents and processes for dry SO2 removal. Initial tests showed that the 85 cu m/h pilot plant could be used successfully to evaluate both spray dryer and dry injection processes using traditional calciu...

  12. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 2 - PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a mini-pilot test program to investigate potential new sorbents and processes for dry SO2 removal. Initial tests showed that the 85 cu m/h pilot plant could be used successfully to evaluate both spray dryer and dry injection processes using traditional calciu...

  13. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  14. Pilot scale-SO{sub 2} control by dry sodium bicarbonate injection and an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Pliat, M.J.; Wilder, J.M.

    2007-10-15

    A 500 actual cubic feet gas per minute (acfm) pilot-scale SO{sub 2} control study was undertaken to investigate flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by dry sodium sorbents in 400{sup o}F (204.5{sup o}C) flue gases emitted from a coal fired boiler with flue gas concentrations between 350 and 2500 ppm SO{sub 2}. Powdered sodium alkaline reagents were injected into the hot flue gas downstream of the air preheater and the spent reagents were collected using an electrostatic precipitator. Three different sorbents were used: processed sodium bicarbonate of two particle sizes; solution mined sodium bicarbonate, and processed sodium sesquicarbonate. SO{sub 2} concentrations were measured upstream of the reagent injection, 25-ft (7.62 m) downstream of the injection point, and downstream of the electrostatic precipitator. SO{sub 2} collection efficiencies ranged from 40 to 80% using sodium bicarbonate stoichiometric ratios from 0.5 to 3.0. Much of the in-duct SO{sub 2} removal occurred during the first second of reagent reaction time, indicating that the sulfur dioxide-sodium reaction rates may be faster than have been measured for fixed bed measurements reported in the literature.

  15. Simulations of dry-out and halite precipitation due to CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurter, S.; Labregere, D.; Berge, J.

    2007-12-01

    Although H2O is not very soluble in supercritical CO2, a continuous stream of CO2 injected into a formation, will cause a region around the injection well to dry out. As the water of the formation brine is continuously evaporated into the CO2, the irreducible water saturation may attain practically zero. Enhanced injectivity is the result of this process in a low salinity brine environment. In formations saturated with highly saline brine (e.g. Northern German Basin) the outcome is opposite: injectivity is impaired. In this case, the brine becomes supersaturated as continuously H2O evaporates into the CO2 phase and salt (halite) precipitates in the pores. The porosity and permeability diminish, which can lead to the loss of a well. We present simulations of these processes as an example of pre-injection study for a CO2 injection and storage site. The simulation tool consists of a commercial compositional code used extensively in the oil and gas industry to simulate the flow of multiple phases (oil, water, gas) in porous or fractured media. The mutual solubility of CO2 and H2O with a correction for salinity is implemented as described in Spycher and Pruess (2005). The brine salinity is adjusted accordingly until the saturation threshold is reached and halite is precipitated. The distribution of precipitation in the reservoir depends not only of the relationship between permeability change as a function of porosity change, but also on the relative permeability curves for the CO2-brine system. Therefore it is essential to establish relative permeability curves in the laboratory, as well as to obtain a relationship between porosity change and permeability variation with precipitation by laboratory experiments on cores to obtain meaningful results from numerical simulations. References Spycher N. and Pruess, K. (2005), CO2-H2O mixtures in the geological sequestration of CO2, II Partitioning in chloride brines at 12-100° and up to 600 bar, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 69

  16. INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

    1998-10-01

    This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

  17. Viable rat offspring derived from oocytes intracytoplasmically injected with freeze-dried sperm heads.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kato, Megumi; Ito, Junya; Hochi, Shinichi

    2005-02-01

    A 2 x 3 factorial designed experiment was conducted in order to examine whether freeze-dried rat spermatozoa can participate in full-term development following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). A sperm suspension from cauda epididymides of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was prepared with or without ultrasonic treatment. The sonicated and non-sonicated sperm suspensions were processed for freeze-thawing (FT groups; 100 microl sample was cooled in liquid nitrogen vapor, stored for 1 day at--196 degrees C, and thawed in a 25 degrees C water bath) and freeze-drying (FD groups; 100 microl sample was frozen in liquid nitrogen for 20 s, lyophilized for 6 h, stored at 4 degrees C for 2 days, and rehydrated with 100 microl ultrapure water), or were subjected to immediate use for ICSI (fresh control groups). The sperm heads were microinjected into denuded SD oocytes using a piezo-driven micropipette 2-4 microm in diameter. The presumptive zygotes were transferred into oviducts of pseudopregnant Wistar female rats. Viable rat offspring were produced from all six experimental groups. Ultrasonic treatment of rat spermatozoa was effective in increasing the offspring rate (23.3% vs 6.7% in fresh control groups, 35.0% vs 7.6% in FT groups, 9.2% vs 2.5% in FD groups). The acrosomal region appeared to be intact even after ultrasonic FT and FD treatments as well as in the fresh controls, while the lateral dorsal region of the sperm membrane was more or less damaged in the sonicated, FT and FD samples. Thus, the successful participation of freeze-dried spermatozoa in full-term development was demonstrated by applying ICSI in the rat. PMID:15984166

  18. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

    2005-11-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate control device

  19. Determination of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control in utility ESP and baghouses

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, T.; Haythornthwaite, S.; Bell, W.; Selegue, T.; Perry, M.

    1998-12-31

    Domestic coal-fired power plants emit approximately 40 to 80 metric tons of mercury to the atmosphere annually. The mercury concentration in utility flue gas is in the dilute range of 0.1 to 1 parts per billion. The EPA is assessing whether such low concentrations of mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities pose any significant health risk and whether mercury regulations would be necessary or appropriate. In anticipation of possible mercury control regulations, ADA Technologies (ADA) and TDA Research, Inc (TDA) were funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon-based sorbents for mercury control at utility coal-fired power plants. Past investigations of the use of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on pilot-scale utility flue gas applications have shown that these sorbents are capable of removing gas-phase mercury. ADA Technologies field-tested the mercury removal capability of several carbon-based sorbents manufactured by TDA. The test facility was a DOE-owned test facility built and operated by ADA at the Public Service Company of Colorado`s Comanche Station in Pueblo, Colorado. The pilot-scale test fixture is a 600-acfm particulate control module that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse. It extracts a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired utility boiler. Sorbent is injected into the flue gas slipstream upstream of the particulate control module and is removed by the module. ADA evaluated the mercury capture efficiency of the sorbents over a range of flue gas temperatures and injection rates. In addition, the effect of flyash on mercury capture was also investigated. The test facility is configured to take flue gas from either upstream or downstream of Comanche Station`s full-scale reverse-gas baghouse, allowing tests to be conducted with normal-ash or low-ash flue gas.

  20. Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline aquifers: Part 1, Effects of solids precipitation and their mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Muller, Nadja

    2009-02-01

    Injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers may cause formation dry-out and precipitation of salt near the injection well, which may reduce formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity. This paper uses numerical simulation to explore the role of different processes and parameters in the salt precipitation process and to examine injection strategies that could mitigate the effects. The main physical mechanisms affecting the dry-out and salt precipitation process include (1) displacement of brine away from the injection well by injected CO{sub 2}, (2) dissolution (evaporation) of brine into the flowing CO{sub 2} stream, (3) upflow of CO{sub 2} due to gravity effects (buoyancy), (4) backflow of brine toward the injection point due to capillary pressure gradients that oppose the pressure gradient in the CO{sub 2}-rich ('gas') phase, and (5) molecular diffusion of dissolved salt. The different mechanisms operate on a range of spatial scales. CO{sub 2} injection at constant rate into a homogeneous reservoir with uniform initial conditions is simulated in 1-D radial geometry, to resolve multiscale processes by taking advantage of the similarity property, i.e., the evolution of system conditions as a function of radial distance R and time t depends only on the similarity variable R{sup 2}/t. Simulations in 2-D vertical cross sections are used to examine the role of gravity effects. We find that counterflow of CO{sub 2} and brine can greatly increase aqueous phase salinity and can promote substantial salt precipitation even in formations with low dissolved solids. Salt precipitation can accentuate effects of gravity override. We find that injecting a slug of fresh water prior to commencement of CO{sub 2} injection can reduce salt precipitation and permeability loss near the injection well.

  1. EFFECTS OF SORBENT INJECTION FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE REMOVAL ON PARTICULATE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes studies undertaken to quantify the effects of dry SO2 sorbent injection on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) operation with a coal-burning utility boiler. The specific operation of interest was EPA's limestone injection, multistage burners (LIMB) process. The ...

  2. REACTION OF H2S AND SULFUR WITH LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the direct-displacement reaction of limestone with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) over the temperature range 570-850 C in a differential reactor. It is one of several possible mechanisms of sulfur capture in limestone-injection multistage burners whi...

  3. SO sub 2 and NO sub x control by combined dry injection of hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Helfritch, D.J.; Botz, S.J. ); Beittel, R. ); Bergman, P.D. ); Toole-O'Neil, B. )

    1992-01-01

    The dry sorbent injection process for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal form coal-fired boiler flue gas consists of the use of low NO{sub x} burner technology for primary NO{sub x} reduction, injection of hydrated lime at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2} and injection of sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal. This concept has been separately tested at the .25 and 50 MM Btu/hour scales, utilizing test systems that duplicate the flue gas time-temperature profile found in full scale boiler systems. The results of these tests, including the effects of the sorbent injection on particle control devices, are described in this paper.

  4. WALL-FIRED BOILER DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRY SORBENT SO2 CONTROL WITH LOW NOX BURNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report assesses the impact of Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) technology on wall-fired utility boilers for both new and retrofit designs. Recent attention has focused on dry sorbent sulfur dioxide (SO2) control technology which, in conjunction with low-nitrogen-o...

  5. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  6. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Quarterly report No. 3, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post-furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP.

  7. Technical and economic evaluation of dry sorbent injection for SO/sub 2/ control using sodium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Green, G.P.; Carr, R.C.; Hooper, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) has committed to all-dry sorbent injection for SO/sub 2/ control on a new 500 MW coal-fired boiler, Pawnee Unit 2. Although no commitment has been made for construction of Pawnee 2, for engineering and planning purposes it is scheduled to begin service in 1990 burning western, low-sulfur, subbituminous coal. PSCC is currently the only electric utility to announce firm plans to employ this control technology. The purpose of this paper is to present the reasons for this commitment. It is hoped that this discussion will be of benefit to other electric utilities considering SO/sub 2/ control options.

  8. Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline acquifers: Part 2, Analytical model for salt precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2009-02-01

    From a mass balance for water dissolved into the flowing CO{sub 2} stream, and a consideration of saturation profiles from the Buckley-Leverett (1942) fractional flow theory, we derive an equation that directly relates gas saturation S{sub g,d} at the dry-out front to temperature, pressure and salinity dependence of fluid properties. The equation is easily solved by iteration or interpolation. From gas saturation at the front we derive the average gas saturation in the dry-out region, from which we obtain the 'solid saturation' S{sub S}, i.e., the fraction of pore space filled with solid precipitate. Values of S{sub S} derived from this theory show excellent agreement with numerical simulations presented in the preceding companion paper ('Part 1'). Thus, from relative permeabilities and fluid properties at in situ conditions prior to CO{sub 2} injection, it is possible to directly make an accurate estimate of solids precipitation, without having to perform a numerical simulation of the injection process.

  9. Determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J J; Hollingworth, T A; Wekell, M M; Meo, V A; Saba, H H; Etemad-Moghadam, A; Eklund, C; Phillips, J G; Gump, B H

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine by flow injection analysis (FIA) was collaboratively studied by 8 laboratories. In the method, the sample solution is reacted with sodium hydroxide to liberate aldehyde-bound sulfite. The sample stream is acidified to produce SO2 gas, which diffuses across a Teflon membrane in the gas diffusion cell into a flowing stream of malachite green. The degree of discoloration of the malachite green is proportional to the amount of sulfite in the sample solution. Red wine was included in the study but interlaboratory precision for these samples was not satisfactory and correlation with Monier-Williams results was poor. The present method is not recommended for use with these samples. For shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine, average reproducibility (RSDR) of results was 25% for samples at 10 ppm SO2 and 10% for samples at greater than 50 ppm. Overall average reproducibility was 14%. Recoveries of sulfite added to samples averaged 80%. Comparison of FIA with the Monier-Williams method indicated comparable results by the 2 methods. The FIA method has been adopted official first action for determination of greater than or equal to 5 ppm total sulfite in shrimp, potatoes, dried pineapple, and white wine. PMID:2312511

  10. Crystalline marble beats limestone for fluegas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    NovaCon Energy Systems, Inc. (Bedford, NY) has developed an alternative to conventional limestone sorbents. The new process uses a class of marble, selected with a proprietary model. Recent pilot- and full-scale demonstrations in pulverized-coal (PC) and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers suggest that these patented sorbents outperform conventional limestone for the simultaneous control of SOx, NOx, and particulates during the combustion of coal and sulfur-rich fuels, such as oil, mixed municipal waste and used tires. Dubbed thermally active marbles (TAMs), these sorbents are chemically identical to grainy limestone (whose main constituent is calcium carbonate or calcite). However, thanks to the increased pressures and temperatures experienced during their geologic history, these metamorphic minerals have a regular crystalline structure that offers some advantages in the combustion zone. TAMs, on the other hand, enjoy better calcium-utilization rates because upon heating, they cleave along inter- and intra-crystalline faces, continuously exposing fresh surfaces. By minimizing the self-extinguishment suffered by limestone sorbents, TAMs are effective over operating temperatures from 1,200 F to 2,800 F, which is 400 F higher than other calcium-based sorbents. This allows them to be injected closer to the burner or combustion grate to maximize residence time in the unit.

  11. Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    Wohadlo, S; Abbasi, H; Cygan, D

    1993-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

  12. Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Injection Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Carl; Steen, William; Triana, Eugenio; Machalek, Thomas; Davila, Jenny; Schmit, Claire; Wang, Andrew; Temple, Brian; Lu, Yongqi; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Luzheng; Ruhter, David; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud; Sayyah, Maryam; Ito, Brandon; Suslick, Kenneth

    2013-09-30

    This document summarizes the work performed on Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0000465, “Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture,” during the period of performance of January 1, 2010 through September 30, 2013. This project involves the development of a novel technology that combines a dry sorbent-based carbon capture process with the water-gas-shift reaction for separating CO{sub 2} from syngas. The project objectives were to model, develop, synthesize and screen sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture from gasified coal streams. The project was funded by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory with URS as the prime contractor. Illinois Clean Coal Institute and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign were project co-funders. The objectives of this project were to identify and evaluate sorbent materials and concepts that were suitable for capturing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from warm/hot water-gas-shift (WGS) systems under conditions that minimize energy penalties and provide continuous gas flow to advanced synthesis gas combustion and processing systems. Objectives included identifying and evaluating sorbents that efficiently capture CO{sub 2} from a gas stream containing CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at temperatures as high as 650 °C and pressures of 400-600 psi. After capturing the CO{sub 2}, the sorbents would ideally be regenerated using steam, or other condensable purge vapors. Results from the adsorption and regeneration testing were used to determine an optimal design scheme for a sorbent enhanced water gas shift (SEWGS) process and evaluate the technical and economic viability of the dry sorbent approach for CO{sub 2} capture. Project work included computational modeling, which was performed to identify key sorbent properties for the SEWGS process. Thermodynamic modeling was used to identify optimal physical properties for sorbents and helped down-select from the universe of possible sorbent

  13. Investigation of the chemical pathway of gaseous nitrogen dioxide formation during flue gas desulfurization with dry sodium bicarbonate injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Antoinette Weil

    The chemical reaction pathway for the viable flue gas desulfurization process, dry sodium bicarbonate injection, was investigated to mitigate undesirable plume discoloration. Based on a foundation of past findings, a simplified three-step reaction pathway was hypothesized for the formation of the plume-discoloring constituent, NO2. As the first step, it was hypothesized that sodium sulfite formed by sodium bicarbonate reaction with flue gas SO 2. As the second step, it was hypothesized that sodium nitrate formed by sodium sulfite reaction with flue gas NO. And as the third step, it was hypothesized that NO2 and sodium sulfate formed by sodium nitrate reaction with SO2. The second and third hypothesized steps were experimentally investigated using an isothermal fixed bed reactor. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium sulfite was found to be un-reactive with NO and O2. Freshly prepared sodium sulfite, maintained unexposed to moist air, was shown to react with NO and O2 resulting in a mixture of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate together with a significant temperature rise. This reaction was found to proceed only when oxygen was present in the flue gas. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium nitrate was shown to be un-reactive with SO2. But freshly formed sodium nitrate kept unexposed to humidity was found to be reactive with SO2 and O 2 resulting in the formation of NO2 and sodium sulfate polymorphic Form I. The NO2 formation by this reaction was shown to be temperature dependent with maximum formation at 175°C. Plume mitigation methods were studied based on the validated three-step reaction pathway. Mitigation of NO2 was exhibited by limiting oxygen concentration in the flue gas to a level below 5%. It was also shown that significant NO2 mitigation was achieved by operating below 110°C or above 250°C. An innovative NO2 mitigation method was patented as a result of the findings of this study. The patented process incorporated a process step of

  14. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system sodium-based dry sorbent injection test report. Test period: August 4, 1993--July 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.; Shimoto, G.H.; Muzio, L.J.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the sixth phase of the test program, where the performance of dry sorbent injection with sodium compounds was evaluated as a SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection was performed in-duct downstream of the air heater (ahead of the fabric filter), as well as at a higher temperature location between the economizer and air heater. Two sodium compounds were evaluated during this phase of testing: sodium sesquicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate. In-duct sodium injection with low levels of humidification was also investigated. This sixth test phase was primarily focused on a parametric investigation of sorbent type and feed rate, although boiler load and sorbent preparation parameters were also varied.

  15. Effects of brine injection wells, dry holes, and plugged oil/gas wells on chloride, bromide, and barium concentrations in the Gulf Coast Aquifer, southeast Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Hudak, P F; Wachal, D J

    2001-06-01

    Data from 1,122 brine injection wells, 24,515 dry holes, 20,877 plugged oil/gas wells, and 256 water wells were mapped with a geographic information system (GIS) and statistically analyzed. There were 9, 107, and 58 water wells within 750 m of a brine injection well, dry hole, or plugged oil/gas well, respectively. Computed median concentrations were 157 mg/l for chloride, 0.8 mg/l for bromide, and 169 microg/l for barium. The maximum chloride concentration was 2,384 mg/l, close to 10 times the secondary drinking water standard. Shallow water wells and water wells near plugged oil/gas wells had significantly higher chloride and bromide levels. PMID:11485217

  16. Scaling on a limestone flooring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Quiroga, P. M.; Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    2012-04-01

    Natural stone can be use on nearly every surface, inside and outside buildings, but decay is more commonly reported from the ones exposed to outdoor aggressively conditions. This study instead, is an example of limestone weathering of uncertain origin in the interior of a residential building. The stone, used as flooring, started to exhibit loss of material in the form of scaling. These damages were observed before the building, localized in the South of Spain (Málaga), was inhabited. Moreover, according to the company the limestone satisfies the following European standards UNE-EN 1341: 2002, UNE-EN 1343: 2003; UNE-EN 12058: 2004 for floorings. Under these circumstances the main objective of this study was to assess the causes of this phenomenon. For this reason the composition of the mortar was determined and the stone was characterized from a mineralogical and petrological point of view. The last material, which is a fossiliferous limestone from Egypt with natural fissure lines, is mainly composed of calcite, being quartz, kaolinite and apatite minor phases. Moreover, under different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques (FTIR, micro-Raman, SEM-EDX, etc) samples of the weathered, taken directly from the buildings, and unweathered limestone tiles were examined and a new mineralogical phase, trona, was identified at scaled areas which are connected with the natural veins of the stone. In fact, through BSE-mapping the presence of sodium has been detected in these veins. This soluble sodium carbonate would was dissolved in the natural waters from which limestone was precipitated and would migrate with the ascendant capilar humidity and crystallized near the surface of the stone starting the scaling phenomenon which in historic masonry could be very damaging. Therefore, the weathering of the limestone would be related with the hygroscopic behaviour of this salt, but not with the constructive methods used. This makes the limestone unable to be used on restoration

  17. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The LIFAC technology has similarities to other sorbent injection technologies using humidification, but employs a unique patented vertical reaction chamber located down-stream of the boiler to facilitate and control the sulfur capture and other chemical reactions. This chamber improves the overall reaction efficiency enough to allow the use of pulverized limestone rather than more expensive reagents such as lime which are often used to increase the efficiency of other sorbent injection processes. Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers - and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is successful, LIFAC will offer these important advantages over wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems; LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes; LIFAC's overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton S0{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product; and LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  18. Silicic Melt Generation, Segregation, and Injection by Dolerite Partial Melting of Granitic Wall Rock, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersum, T. G.; Simon, A. C.; Marsh, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous, long (100's m), thin (< 30 cm), interconnected fine-grained granitic dikes cut Ferrar dolerite sills in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The source of at least one dike is completely exposed at the upper contact of the Basement Sill and granite country rock. The dike emanates from a thin (5 cm) melt sheet separating chilled dolerite from partially melted granite. Residual interstitial granophyric melt decreases away from the contact from 55% to zero within a distance of < 20 m. Higher than expected dolerite contact temperatures of 900-950°C calculated using two-pyroxene thermometry suggest that the dolerite feeder acted as an open conduit for sustained flux of magma. As a consequence of this flow, the contact temperature was pinned above the `dry' granite minimum, the most restrictive condition necessary to generate granitic melt. Although closed-system partial melting of granite clearly occurred beyond 50 cm from the dolerite chilled margin, compositional moment balances on the feldspar ternary between the orthoclase-enriched melt sheet and granite dike whole-rock compositions are reconciled by melts segregated from increasingly orthoclase-depleted partially melted granite at 12.3 cm and closer to the dolerite chilled margin. Melting models and mass balance calculations predict a range of between 48 to 83% maximum volumes of segregated granitic melt, but these are only estimates as the samples are not exclusively residuum. If granitic melt segregation occurs by viscous compaction of the restitic crystal matrix, then, employing commonly used properties, the compaction length scale is ~3 m. This is an upper bound as the compaction model assumes constant melt fraction, but the result is nevertheless only an order of magnitude larger than the distance over which the partially melted granite has a composition that differs from unmelted granite. Contraction attending cessation of doleritic magma flow and dolerite solidification likely generated deviatoric stresses

  19. Theoretical approach for enhanced mass transfer effects in-duct flue gas desulfurization processes. Volume 1, Dry sorbent injection: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jozewicz, W.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1992-01-29

    This report presents the results of fundamental mass transfer testing for in-duct removal of SO{sub 2}. Following this initial part of an experimental program, it became clear that the amount of initial moisture on the sorbent strongly affected the extent of Ca(OH){sub 2} conversion. Novel techniques aimed at increasing sorbent utilization were investigated and are described. Major novel technique investigated and reported on here was the reaction with SO{sub 2} of sorbents with initial free moisture (damp sorbents). The duct injection process using damp solids has the following steps: preparation of sorbent as a slurry, blending of the slurry with dry recycle materials to create damp solids, injection of the solids into the duct, reaction and drying of the solids with flue gas in the duct, collection in particulate control equipment, and finally recycle of dry solids with some bleed to disposal. The moisture content of the solids at each step affects system performance. Various factors favor high moisture whereas others favor low moisture. (VC)

  20. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  1. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  2. The age of the Ocala limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooke, Charles Wythe

    1916-01-01

    In 1881 Eugene A. Smith announced the presence, underlying large areas in both western and peninsular Florida, of limestone which he correlated with the Vicksburg limestone of Mississippi and Alabama and designated by the term Vicksburg limestone. Among the localities he mentioned specifically are Marianna, in Jackson County, and Ocala, in Marion County.

  3. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  4. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  5. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, July 1, 1996--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.

    1996-11-06

    The overall objective of this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. This information is important to the utility industry in anticipation of pending regulations. During Phase I, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed, built and integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to and mercury concentration measurements will be made to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase II effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale.

  6. Water transport in limestone by X-ray CAT scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossoti, Victor G.; Castanier, Louis M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of water through the interior of Salem limestone test briquettes can be dynamically monitored by computer aided tomography (commonly called CAT scanning in medical diagnostics). Most significantly, unless evaporation from a particular face of the briquette is accelerated by forced air flow (wind simulation), the distribution of water in the interior of the briquette remains more or less uniform throughout the complete drying cycle. Moreover, simulated solar illumination of the test briquette does not result in the production of significant water gradients in the briquette under steady-state drying conditions.

  7. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers -- and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems. LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes. LIFAC's overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton SO[sub 2] removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product. LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  8. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF DRY INJECTION OF CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS FOR S02 CONTROL IN UTILITY BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes research to determine the mechanisms which limit the extent of reaction between SO2 and calcium-based sorbents (CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2) by measuring the in situ physical structure and reactivity of sorbent injected into a combustion environment for residence times...

  9. Experimental investigation of high-temperature, short residence-time calcination and sulfation of limestone and dolostone sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Naiya; Miller, S.F.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1994-12-31

    Sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and furnaces continue to be of significant regulatory concern. One approach to reducing these emissions that has received considerable attention is the injection of dry, pulverized sorbent (limestone or dolostone) into the combustion chamber. This technology has been applied to conventional coal-fired utility boilers and is considered to be a good candidate for use in coal-fired heat engine applications. During the process, the injected limestone or dolostone particles are rapidly heated by the hot combustion gases and calcined by the reactions CaCO{sub 3} {yields} CaO + CO{sub 2} and CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {yields} CaO + MgO + 2CO{sub 2}, respectively. The CaO produced then reacts with SO{sub 2} and excess O{sub 2} in the combustion gases to form CaSO{sub 4}. Experimental data on the rates of calcination, sintering and sulfation have been reported by Borgwardt and others. The physical structure of the calcined sorbents has also been investigated and a number of models have been developed describing the calcination and sulfation processes. The primary application of dry sorbent injection is to conventional coal-fired utility boilers. The sorbent particle size used is either small (in the range of 1 to 30 {mu}m) in pulverized coal applications or large (in the range of 0.25 to 1 mm) for fluidized-bed applications. Few investigations have been carried out using 30 to 100 {mu}m particles, which is the size range of interest for coal-fired heat engine applications. This study investigated the calcination and sulfation behavior of three different sorbents (two limestones and one dolostone) in the size range from 37 to 105 {mu}m. The time required for heating and calcination, the effect of the calcination process on sulfation behavior, and the effect of sorbent type on sulfation behavior were of primary interest.

  10. On the failure mode in dry and hygrothermally aged short fiber-reinforced injection-molded polyarylamide composites by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czigány, T.; Mohd Ishak, Z. A.; Karger-Kocsis, J.

    1995-09-01

    The failure mode in injection-molded short glass (GF) and carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyarylamide (PAR) composites was studied on compact tension (CT) specimens in as-received (AR), hygrothermally aged (HA) and re-dried (RD) states, respectively, using acoustic emission (AE) and fractography. A significant difference was revealed in the failure manner characterized by the cumulative run, amplitude and energy distribution of the AE events as a function of the water content of the composites. Furthermore, a correlation was found between the cumulative AE events up to the maximum load and the fracture toughness of the composites. It was shown that the fracture response and thus the failure behavior of the water-saturated PAR composites can be restored by drying. This fact indicates that the water absorption and desorption are of a purely physical nature, i.e. they are reversible processes. It was established that chopped fiber-reinforced PAR composites fail by matrix deformation along with fiber/matrix debonding in the crack initiation, whereas fiber pull-out becomes dominant in the crack propagation range. Water uptake shifts both the AE amplitude and energy curves toward lower values, a phenomenon attributed to plastification of the PAR matrix by water.

  11. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  12. Origin and Age of the Yemi Limestone Breccia, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KOH, Hee Jae

    2015-04-01

    were filled and injected by sandy and muddy material of the BG. These kinds of evidence of indicate that Type-II carbonate breccia is a product of post-orogenic solution-collapsed brecciation in karst platform framed during exposure in surface through uplift after ductile deformation. The age can be constrained from Karstification of limestone after ductile deformation (the Middle Triassic Indosinian orogeny) to beginning stage of the sedimentation of the BG. Conclusively the YLB has to be re-defined as Type-II carbonate breccia with difference of composition and deformation characteristics between breccia and matrix, except Type-I carbonate breccia belonging to the CS stratigraphically.

  13. Novel preparation method of macroporous lime from limestone for high-temperature desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaoka, Eiji; Uddin, M.A.; Nojima, Shigeru

    1997-09-01

    Limestone is a very important material as a high temperature desulfurization sorbent: limestone is used for in-bed SO{sub 2} capture in fluidized bed combustors of coal and can be used in coal gasifiers for the in-bed removal of H{sub 2}S. In order to develop a highly active calcium oxide high-temperature desulfurization sorbent, macroporous calcium oxides were directly prepared from limestone. This method is composed of two steps: swelling of the limestone in the gas phase followed by drying and calcination of the swelled samples. The swelling was found when limestone was exposed to a vapor of aqueous acetic acid. The swelling of the sample resulted from an increase of calcium acetate formation in the sample. It was then converted to macroporous calcium oxides by heating the sample to 850 C. The reactivity of the macroporous calcium oxide for the removal of SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S under coexisting H{sub 2}O vapor was higher than that of the calcined raw limestone. In particular, its SO{sub 2} removal capacity and oxidative character of CaS to CaSO{sub 4} and CaO were greatly improved by the swelling method.

  14. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post- furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the US DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the fifth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1991 through the end of December 1991. Due to the power plant's planned outage schedule, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

  15. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... One Type of Insulin Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ... syringe before injecting it. Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ...

  16. BENCH SCALE STUDIES OF LIMESTONE INJECTION FOR SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of experiments in a boiler simulator furnace, indicating that the parameters of major importance to SO2 capture are thermal environment, calcium/sulfur ratio, and sorbent composition. Thermal environment (local temperature) had a strong effect on the util...

  17. Enhancement of indirect sulphation of limestone by steam addition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael C; Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J; Macchi, Arturo

    2010-11-15

    The effect of water (H₂O(g)) on in situ SO₂ capture using limestone injection under (FBC) conditions was studied using a thermobalance and tube furnace. The indirect sulphation reaction was found to be greatly enhanced in the presence of H₂O(g). Stoichiometric conversion of samples occurred when sulphated with a synthetic flue gas containing 15% H₂O(g) in under 10 h, which is equivalent to a 45% increase in conversion as compared to sulphation without H₂O(g). Using gas pycnometry and nitrogen adsorption methods, it was shown that limestone samples sulphated in the presence of H₂O(g) undergo increased particle densification without any significant changes to pore area or volume. The microstructural changes and observed increase in conversion were attributed to enhanced solid-state diffusion in CaO/CaSO₄ in the presence of H₂O(g). Given steam has been shown to have such a strong influence on sulphation, whereas it had been previously regarded as inert, may prompt a revisiting of the classically accepted sulphation models and phenomena. These findings also suggest that steam injection may be used to enhance sulfur capture performance in fluidized beds firing low-moisture fuels such as petroleum coke. PMID:20958025

  18. LIMESTONE SCRUBBER SLURRY AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report utilizes current understanding of limestone scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to develop an effort into the optimization of automatic control for the recirculating slurry processes. The acknowledged methods of mathematical modeling, computer simulation, and ...

  19. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL: CO22+ + CaCO3 + H2O ??? Ca2+ + 2HCO3- as a low-tech, inexpensive, high-capacity, environmentally-friendly CO2 capture and sequestration technology was evaluated. With access to seawater and limestone being essential to this approach, significant limestone resources were close to most CO2-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Waste fines, representing > 20% of current US crushed limestone production (> 109 tons/yr), could be used as an inexpensive source of AWL carbonate. AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean would significantly reduce effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct atmospheric or ocean CO2 disposal. Indeed, the increase in ocean Ca2+ and bicarbonate offered by AWL should enhance growth of corals and other calcifying marine organisms.

  20. Limestone calcination during pulsating combustion

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.E. III ); Richards, G.A. )

    1992-01-01

    METC is currently conducting research on enhanced calcination during pulsating combustion as part of the Heat Engines program. It has been shown elsewhere that rapid, high temperature calcination will result in a calcined product with relatively large surface area, as desired for sulfur capture. It is proposed that such a process may occur during pulsating combustion where the oscillating pressure/velocity field around a particle increases the heat/mass transfer to and from the particle. To test this hypothesis, calcination tests in progress at METC use a novel form of pulse combustion called thermal'' pulse combustion, operating at 60000 BTUH, 100 Hz, and 5--15 psig peak-to- peak amplitude. Two configurations are being studied during the testing: one configuration is injection of sorbent into a refractory lined drop tube being heated by the pulse combustor, and the other configuration is injection of the sorbent into the pulse combustor through its centerbody and along the tailpipe at various positions. To understand the observed behavior, a characterization study of the pulse combustor is being conducted. Different flow rates, equivalence ratios, and injection positions are being tested.

  1. Inelastic compaction of a quartz-rich limestone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Schubnel, A.; rolland, A.; Heap, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of deformation and failure in many sedimentary settings hinges upon a fundamental understanding of inelastic behavior and failure mode of porous carbonate rocks. Previous studies on porous carbonate focused primarily on relatively pure limestone (composed in majority of calcite). Inelastic compaction in these carbonates was reported to be associated to cataclastic pore collapse and in most cases homogeneous cataclastic flow. Recent experimental results however revealed the development of compaction localization in the more porous end-members. The analysis of strain localization and complex failure modes in limestone has proved to be significantly more challenging than in sandstone because acoustic emissions (AE) cannot usually be used to guide systematic microstructural analysis. Recent studies have therefore relied on X-ray Computed Tomography, a technique that can to date only be used in situ in relatively limited systems. In this study we investigated the development of inelastic damage in a quartz-rich limestone with two main objectives: (1) quantify the impact of a secondary mineral such as quartz on the strength and strain localization in porous carbonate, (2) try to follow the development of inelastic damage using AE in such a quartz-rich rock. Saint-Maximin limestone of 37% porosity and composed of 80% calcite and 20% quartz was selected for this study. Two series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed in parallel at room temperature, constant strain rate in both nominally dry and wet conditions at confining pressures between 3 and 50 MPa. Wet experiments were carried out with water in drained conditions at 10 MPa of pore pressure. The first series of experiments were performed at IPG Strasbourg on relatively small samples. The failure modes and spatial distribution of damage were studied systematically in these samples. The second series of experiments were performed on larger samples at ENS Paris. Acoustic emission activity was

  2. Forest seasonality shapes diet of limestone-living rhesus macaques at Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuangbin; Huang, Libin; Huang, Zhonghao; Krzton, Ali; Lu, Changhu; Zhou, Qihai

    2016-01-01

    Limestone forests are an unusual habitat for primates, but little information is available for the genus Macaca in such habitats, making a comparative understanding of extant limestone primates' behavioral adaptation incomplete. We collected data on the diet of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in a limestone habitat at Nonggang Nature Reserve, southwestern Guangxi, China, and examined the effects of forest seasonality on their diet. Our results indicated that a total of 114 species of plants are consumed by macaques. Young leaves are a preferred food, accounting for 48.9 and 56.9% of the overall diets. One group significantly increased young leaf consumption in response to availability. Fruits contributed to only 27.3 and 28.7% of overall diet. The macaque diet varied according to season. They fed on more fruits in the rainy season. Consumption of mature leaves increased when the availability of young leaves and fruits declined in the dry season, indicating that mature leaves are a fallback food for macaques in a limestone habitat. Similar to sympatric Assamese macaques, Bonia saxatilis, a shrubby, karst-endemic bamboo was consumed by rhesus macaques throughout the year, and was the top food species through most of the year, suggesting that bamboo consumption represents a key factor in the macaque's dietary adaptation to limestone habitat. PMID:26530218

  3. Influence of clay swelling on the mechanical behaviour of Egyptian Helwan limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin

    2016-04-01

    Clay minerals exist naturally in the majority of different Egyptian limestones types. Changes in the dimensions of clays during swelling / shrinking process induced by changes in the environmental conditions can result in acceleration the deterioration of the hosting stone. Petrographic investigation by scanning - electron microscope (SEM) of Helwan limestone (biomicritic limestone) revealed distribution of a typical smectite morphology (curled - leaf shape) beside abundance of glauconite pellets within the stone material. The clay frication extracted from Helwan reached 10% and oriented aggregates samples were analyzed by X- ray diffraction (XRD) and confirmed the identification of smectite as the main mineral in the clay frication. To study the effect of the clay content on the mechanical behavior of Helwan limestone, hygric swelling test was performed at first by using displacement sensor and then the effect of multiple wetting/ drying cycles on the stone strength was determined using unconfined compressive strength (UCS). Results revealed that there was a significant correlation between degree of swelling of the clay and strength of the limestone.

  4. GPR investigations in galleries buried inside a karstified limestone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-04-01

    A large scientific program of geophysical investigations is presently performed inside the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit / LSBB, Rustrel, France) which is an decomissioned underground missile control center, buried in a karstified limestone formation. One of the goals of this project is the understanding of the water circulation inside the structure. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity. The dip is around 25 degrees and vertical faults locally affect the structure. The studied zone is located in south-eastern France (Provence) and is characterized by a mediterranean climate with long dry periods and strong, short events of rain. This phenomenon induces large variations of water content within the karstified limestone from dry to saturated conditions. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variations of the water flow in a karstified limestones needs to define the geological context and the adequate geophysical methods. GPR offers a good tradeoff between resolution and ease of use on one hand and investigation depth on the other hand. We present some GPR profiles which have been acquired in April 2008 after a quite long and strong period of rain, inducing a complete water saturation inside the karstified massif. We used several RAMAC shielded antennas from 100 to 500 MHz. The longest profile is around 600 m long, with a 20 cm spacing, running from a raw to a concrete gallery. These data sets are characterized by a very good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration, up to 18 meters. Signal processing includes very low frequency filtering, amplitude compensation, keeping lateral relative attenuation and ringing suppression. Final sections includes migration and time to depth conversion or depth migration. The estimated

  5. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 6, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The LIFAC technology has similarities to other sorbent injection technologies using humidification, but employs a unique patented vertical reaction chamber located down-stream of the boiler to facilitate and control the sulfur capture and other chemical reactions. This chamber improves the overall reaction efficiency enough to allow the use of pulverized limestone rather than more expensive reagents such as lime which are often used to increase the efficiency of other sorbent injection processes. Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers - and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is successful, LIFAC will offer these important advantages over wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems; LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes; LIFAC`s overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton S0{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product; and LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  6. Comparison between intralesional injection of zinc sulfate 2 % solution and intralesional meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of acute old world dry type cutaneous leishmaniasis: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Saeedeh; Hakimi Parizi, Maryam; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Mohebbi, Azadeh; Mohammadi, Saman; Pardakhty, Abbas; Eybpoosh, Sana; Heshmatkhah, Amireh; Vares, Behrooz; Saryazdi, Simin; Fekri, Ali Reza; Mohebbi, Elham

    2016-09-01

    Zinc sulfate (ZS) has been used for the treatment of acute cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in both forms of in vivo and in vitro recently. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intralesional injection of ZS 2 % solution with intralesional glucantime in the treatment of acute CL. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 80 cases with acute old world dry type CL were enrolled in the study. The treatment protocol in the first group consisted of intralesional injection of ZS 2 % vials once a week for 10 weeks or sooner in case of complete resolution of the lesions. In the second group, intralesional glucantime once a week for 10 weeks or sooner in case of complete resolution of the lesions were used. In both groups cryotherapy was performed once every other week for 10 weeks. In ZS versus second group, partial and complete clinical response was observed with fewer injections although this difference was not statistically significant. In addition, we found that the trend of treatment in second group was faster but again it was not significant [partial treatment: hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, 95 % CI 0.7-2.9; complete treatment: HR 1.3, 95 % CI 0.6-2.8]. The results of this study showed that the intralesional injection of ZS 2 % solution was as effective as glucantime on the healing of the acute old world dry type CL. PMID:27605813

  7. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  8. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal vein occlusion-intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone-intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone-intravitreal injection; Lucentis-intravitreal injection; Avastin-intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab-intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab- ...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1409 - Ground limestone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 173, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are available from the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ground limestone. 184.1409 Section 184.1409 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  10. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: CRUSHED LIMESTONE, STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study of atmospheric emissions from the crushed limestone industry. Crushed limestone plants emit particulates from drilling, blasting, transport on unpaved roads, crushing, screening, conveying, and stockpiling. The emission factor for total particulate f...

  11. MECHANISMS OF DRY SO2 CONTROL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses physical and chemical processes and reaction mechanisms for lime spray drying and dry injection of sodium compounds in dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. It includes: chemical reactions, physical changes, proposed reaction mechanisms and mathematic...

  12. In situ calcite formation in limestone-saturated water leaching of acid rock waste.

    PubMed

    Smart, Roger St C; Miller, Stuart D; Stewart, Warwick S; Rusdinar, Yuni; Schumann, Russell E; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Li, Jun

    2010-07-15

    The result of leaching of a 75% acid rock/25% limestone column with limestone-saturated solution has shown that the pH of the effluent recovered from 2.5, after apparent loss of acid neutralizing capacity after 4 years with water leaching, to pH 7 in less than 3 years. Bulk assay results, XRD and SEM/EDS analyses of samples from the column at 384 weeks (pH 3.6) and 522 weeks (pH 6.9) during this recovery have suggested that this is due to formation in situ of fine calcite. Calcite, initially blended to the column material at 25 wt.% was not found in the XRD of the 384 week sample but is clearly found in the 522 week XRD. This increased calcite content appears to be derived from the limestone-saturated water as finely divided solid precipitated in the drying cycles in the column. This result is confirmed by assessment of the 522 week sample as non-acid forming. Loss of some reactive aluminosilicate minerals, formation of secondary, precipitated, surface-attached gypsum and loss of fine secondary jarosite occurs across this pH range but fine, surface-attached jarosite is still found in the 522 week sample implying relatively slow dissolution kinetics. In comparison with the 384 week sample, armouring of highly reacted pyrite particles by surface layers of iron oxyhydroxides and aluminosilicates has become more extensive at 522 weeks after return of the pH to neutral values. This is consistent with results from Freeport field samples from limestone blended test pads where pyrite armouring was also substantially increased at higher pH. The results suggest that it may be possible to effectively maintain neutral pH and passivate pyrite, reducing oxidation rates by more than an order of magnitude, using limestone-saturated solution dump feed rather than bulk limestone blending or covers. PMID:20452647

  13. Acidic stream mitigation by limestone sand addition

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, D.L.; Marich, A.J. Jr.; Largent, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Town Line Run watershed comprises an area of 3,600 wooded acres. The tributaries feeding the stream consist of sandstone springs that do not contribute alkalinity to the watershed, leaving the stream susceptible to acid precipitation. This has a negative affect on Iser`s Run, a native brook trout fishery above the confluence with Town Line Run. The objective in stream liming is to improve water chemistry by increasing pH, alkalinity, and reducing acidity, aluminum, and iron. Introducing crushed limestone directly into a stream from a dump truck is an inexpensive but temporary solution to accomplish this objective. In this type of liming operation, a bed of limestone is spread down the stream channel by the momentum of the stream from the introduction point, rather than manually. Water moving across this bed dissolves the limestone, increasing the pH, alkalinity, and calcium while decreasing the acidity, iron, and aluminum concentrations of the water. The size of the limestone particles is important for this purpose because particles that are too small (<150 microns) will carried away, while particles that are too large (>1000 microns) will remain at the introduction point. Our study placed 80 tons of sand-sized limestone (85% calcite) in the stream channel at a single point. Water samples were collected monthly at the following sites (1) directly upstream of the addition site, (2) 100 yards downstream of the site, and (3) 2500 yards downstream of the site. Other sample locations include (4) upstream and (5) downstream of the Town Line Run- Iser`s Run confluence and the Casselman River upstream (6) and downstream (7) of Town Line Run. The samples were analyzed for pH. Specific conductivity, Alkalinity, Acidity, Iron, Manganese, Aluminum, and Sulfate.

  14. Limestone treatment for sulfur dioxide removal. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of limestone for the control of sulfur dioxide emmisions in flue gases. The various designs for flue gas desulfurization are discussed, including dry fluidized beds and wet scrubbers. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Mineralogical characterization of the Shelburne marble and the Salem limestone

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Shelburne marble and Salem limestone were selected to represent marbles and limestones used in buildings and monuments. The Royal variety of Shelburne marble is a white marble predominantly composed of calcite but has heterogeneously distributed gray inclusions. The select buff Salem limestone is a beige, homogeneous, fossiliferous limestone, predominantly composed of fragments of echinoderms and bryozoans. The author reports that both samples are appropriate test stones for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program stone exposure studies.

  16. Physicochemical characterizations of limestone for fluidized-bed coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Yoos, T.R. III; Walia, D.S.

    1981-05-01

    This study is an investigation of the physicochemical characteristics of three limestone samples, Quincy limestone (-20 + 60), Franklin limestone (-12 + 30), and Franklin limestone (-6 + 16), currently being tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in a fluidized-bed coal combustion unit. By correlating the chemistry, mineralogy, and surface area of these samples with empirical data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory, the sulfur capture ability and performance of these limestones can be loosely predicted. X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis revealed a very high calcium content and very low concentrations of other elements in the three samples. X-ray diffraction patterns and petrographic examination of the limestone grains detected essentially no dolomite in the Quincy limestone or the fine Franklin limestone samples. The coarse Franklin limestone sample showed dolomite to be present in varying amounts up to maximum of 2.75%. Limited surface chemistry investigations of the samples were undertaken. Limestone and dolostone resources of the Tennessee Valley Authority region are widespread and abundant, and judged sufficient to meet industrial demand for many years. No problems are anticipated in securing limestone or dolostone supplies for a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant in the Tennessee Valley Authority region. Transportation facilities and costs for limestone or dolostone will influence the siting of such a commercial fluidized-bed combustion plant. The most promising location in the Tennessee Valley Authority region at this time is Paducah, Kentucky.

  17. Acidification-neutralization processes in a lignite mine spoil amended with fly ash or limestone.

    PubMed

    Seoane, S; Leirós, M C

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the longterm effects of amending sulfide-rich lignite mine spoil with fly ash (originating from a coal-fired power station and largely comprised of aluminosilicates) and/or agricultural limestone. The experiment was carried out with soil moisture maintained at field capacity or alternate cycles of wetting and drying. Results obtained suggest that the principal acidification processes were oxidation of sulfide and formation of hydroxysulfate (FeOHSO4), whereas the main neutralization processes were weathering of aluminosilicates in fly ash-treated samples and dissolution of calcium carbonate in limestone-treated samples. The highest dose of limestone rapidly raised the pH of the spoil, but this increase was not maintained throughout the one-year experiment. In contrast, fly ash-treated samples showed a more sustained increase in pH, attributable to the gradual weathering of aluminosilicates. The best results (i.e., good short- and long-term neutralization) were obtained in samples treated with both fly ash and limestone. The low liming capacity of the fly ash (47.85 cmol kg(-1)) means that it must be used in large quantities, an advantage in achieving the further aim of disposing of the fly ash. PMID:11476521

  18. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  19. Kinematic hardening of a porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatham, J. B.; Allen, M. B.; Celle, C. C.

    1984-10-01

    A concept for a kinematic hardening yield surface in stress space for Cordova Cream limestone (Austin Chalk) developed by Celle and Cheatham (1981) has been improved using Ziegler's modification of Prager's hardening rule (Ziegler, 1959). Data to date agree with the formulated concepts. It is shown how kinematic hardening can be used to approximate the yield surface for a wide range of stress states past the initial yield surface. The particular difficulty of identifying the yield surface under conditions of unloading or extension is noted. A yield condition and hardening rule which account for the strain induced anisotropy in Cordova Cream Limestone were developed. Although the actual yield surface appears to involve some change of size and shape, it is concluded that true kinematic hardening provides a basis for engineering calculations.

  20. Simulation of Hypervelocity Penetration in Limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T; Glenn, L; Walton, O; Goldstein, P; Lomov, I; Liu, B

    2005-05-31

    A parameter study was performed to examine the (shock) damage obtained with long-rod and spherical mono-material penetrators impacting two varieties of limestone. In all cases, the impacts were assumed to be normal to the plane of the rock and at zero angle of attack (in the case of the rods). Impact velocities ranged to 15 km/s but most calculations were performed at 4 and 6 km/s and the penetrator mass was fixed at 1000 kg. For unlined underground structures, incipient damage was defined to occur when the peak stress, {sigma}{sub pk}, exceeds 1 kb (100 MPa) and the applied impulse per unit area, I{sub pk}, exceeds 1 ktap (1 kb-{micro}s). Severe damage was assumed to occur when {sigma}{sub pk} exceeds 1 kb and I{sub pk} exceeds 1000 ktaps. Using the latter definition it was found that severe damage in hard, non-porous limestone with spherical impactors extended to a depth of 9 m on-axis for an impact velocity of 4 km/s and 12 m at 6 km/s. Cylinders with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 8.75 achieved depth to severe damage of 23 m and 40 m, respectively under the same conditions. For a limestone medium with 2% initial gas porosity, the latter numbers were reduced to 12 m and 18 m.

  1. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control systems: Advanced retractable injection lance SNCR test report. NOELL ARIL test period: April 20, 1995--December 21, 1995; DPSC test period: August 16--26, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Muzio, L.J.; Smith, R.A.; Hunt, T.

    1997-04-01

    The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emission through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the third phase of SNCR tests, where an additional injection location was installed to increase the low-load NOx removal performance. The new injectors consist of a pair of retractable in-furnace lances which were designed to provide a high degree of load following flexibility through on-line adjustments of the injection angle. With the new lances, NOx removals in excess of 35% are achievable at the same load and HN{sub 3} slip limit. At loads of 43 to 60 MWe, NOx removals with the lances range from 37--52%. At loads greater than 60 MWe, the wall-injection location is more efficient, and at loads of 70 to 100 MWe, NOx removals range from 37--41%. The coal mill-in-service pattern was found to have a large effect on both NOx removal and NH{sub 3} slip for injection at the new lance location. At 60 MWe, the NOx removal at the 10 ppm NH{sub 3} slip limit ranges from 28--52% depending on the mill-in-service pattern. Biasing the coal mills to provide uniform combustion conditions ahead of the injection location was found to be the best option for improving SNCR system performance under these conditions.

  2. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 9, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Sorbent injection is a potentially important alternative to conventional wet lime and limestone scrubbing, and this project is another effort to test alternative sorbent injection approaches. In comparison to wet systems, LIFAC, with recirculation of the sorbent, removes less sulfur dioxide - 75--85% relative to 90% or greater for conventional scrubbers -- and requires more reagent material. However, if the demonstration is wet scrubbing systems: LIFAC is relatively easy to retrofit to an existing boiler and requires less area than conventional wet FGD systems. LIFAC is less expensive to install than conventional wet FGD processes. LIFAC`s overall costs measured on a dollar-per-ton SO{sub 2} removed basis are less, an important advantage in a regulatory regime with trading of emission allocations. LIFAC produces a dry, readily disposable waste by-product versus a wet product. LIFAC is relatively simple to operate.

  3. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in two allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-fong

    2012-10-01

    To investigate inelastic compaction in limestone we deformed in conventional triaxial configuration samples of two allochemical limestones: Indiana and Majella limestone with porosity of 14-16% and 30%, respectively. We described the microstructures associated with the damage evolution. Inelastic compaction in both limestones was associated with pore collapse that seemed to initiate from stress concentrations at the surface of a pore. Cataclasis appeared to develop preferentially around the macropores, in agreement with a recent study on a micritic limestone. Our new observations however showed that the spatial distribution of damage in the allochemical limestones can be complicated by its uneven partitioning among the allochems, micrite and sparite. In Indiana limestone, many allochems remain relatively intact even after the cement has undergone significant microcracking, with the implication that significant strength contrast exists between the allochems and cement. In Majella limestone, the asymmetry in damage intensity is not as pronounced, suggesting a less pronounced mechanical contrast between allochems and cement. In both limestones, significant mechanical twinning was observed in samples deformed to relatively high level of strain. We applied to our data a model, that treats a limestone as a dual porosity medium, with the total porosity partitioned between macroporosity and microporosity.

  4. Dynamic properties of Indiana, Fort Knox and Utah test range limestones and Danby Marble over the stress range 1 to 20 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.

    1994-12-01

    The responses of the following carbonate materials to shock loading and release have been measured: Indiana limestone (18% porosity; saturated and dry), Jeffersonville/Louisville Limestones (Fort Knox limestone) (variable dolomitization, low porosity), Danby Marble (essentially pure calcite; low porosity), and a limestone from the Utah Test and Training Range (low porosity, with 22% silica). Various experimental configurations were used, some optimized to yield detailed waveform information, others to yield a clean combination of Hugoniot states and release paths. All made use of velocity interferometry as a primary diagnostic. The stress range of 0 - 20 GPa was probed (in most cases, emphasizing the stress range 0 -10 GPa). The primary physical processes observed in this stress regime were material strength, porosity, and polymorphic phase transitions between the CaCO{sub 3} phases I, II, III and VI. Hydration was also a significant reaction under certain conditions. The Indiana Limestone studies in particular represent a significant addition to the low-pressure database for porous limestone. Temperature dependence and the effect of freezing were assessed for the Fort Knox limestone. Experimental parameters and detailed results are provided for the 42 impact tests in this series.

  5. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  6. Limestone types used from the classic Karst region in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Sabina; Mirtič, Breda; Mladenović, Ana; Rožič, Boštjan; Bedjanič, Mojca; Kortnik, Jože; Šmuc, Andrej

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a variety of limestones from the Karst Region that is one of the most interesting areas containing reserves of natural stones in Slovenia. The region is mainly composed of Cretaceous shallow-water limestone, with the most common type currently excavated being the rudist limestone of the Lipica Formation, which dates to the Santonian to Campanian. Limestones of this formation are mainly represented by a light grey, thick-bedded to massive Lipica limestone rich in (largely fragmented) rudists. Rudist shells can be either relatively well preserved (such as in Lipica Fiorito quarried limestone) or almost completely disintegrated and intensively endolitised (Lipica Unito quarried limestone). Beside the Lipica Formation, natural stone types have been excavated from two other formations or members in the Karst region: the Repen Formation (Repen and Kopriva limestones), and the Tomaj Limestone (dark, laminated limestone within the Lipica Formation). As documented, the region has been associated with the quarrying and processing of stone at least for over two thousand years, i.e. since the Roman period. Although a large number of quarries in all mentioned formations are documented in the Karst region, many are inactive nowadays. Some of the quarries are declared as geological monuments of national importance or officially protected as a natural monument. Karst limestones are considered the highest quality calcareous natural stones in Slovenia. They are characterised by high density, low water absorption and low open porosity; consequently they also exhibit high frost and salt resistance as well as high compressive and flexural strength. Besides in the Karst region and other parts of Slovenia, the Karst limestones were used in the construction of several important buildings and monuments in many other European Countries, and worldwide. Nowadays, they are most commonly used in the construction of façade cladding, pavements, window sills, staircases, indoor

  7. The Surface of a Limestone-Rich World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Carl; Dufour, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the dust- and gas-enshrouded, polluted white dwarf star SDSSJ104341.53+085558.2 (hereafter SDSSJ1043). Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet spectra combined with deep Keck HIRES optical spectroscopy reveal the elements C, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Fe, and Ni and enable useful limits for Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn in the photosphere of SDSSJ1043. From this suite of elements we determine that the parent body being accreted by SDSSJ1043 is dry, rocky, and iron-poor. Synthesizing all available heavily-polluted white dwarf measurements, we find a trend in the Fe/Mg vs Fe/Si abundance ratio-space suggestive of whether accreted material originates from the inner or outer regions of a rocky body; we use this trend to identify the material being accreted by SDSSJ1043 as likely to have come from the outermost layers of a differentiated object. Enhanced levels of Ca and C in this object can be explained by the presence of significant amounts of calcium-carbonate and, if definitive, could be suggestive of a world with a crust rich in limestone.

  8. Local facies variability in the Mission Canyon Limestone, west flank, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Vice, M.A.; Utgaard, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Comparison of two sections of the Mission Canyon Limestone (Madison Group, Mississippian) located approximately one-half mile (850-900 m) apart and at opposite ends of a single flatiron reveals significant lateral facies variations. The southern section, Dry Fork of Horse Creek, is 83 ft (25 m) thicker than the northern Horse Creek section. This substantial difference in thickness cannot be attributed solely to pre-Amsden erosion and solution collapse: all three members are thicker and more variable lithologically at Dry Fork. The lower (Big Goose) member is composed mostly of cherty, dolomitized lime mudstones at both locations. At Dry Fork, it contains numerous skeletal facies, particularly in the upper part. Skeletal facies are insignificant at Horse Creek. The two upper members are composed mainly of skeletal limestones; however, grain-supported facies are much more abundant at Dry Fork. Dolomitized mudstones predominate in the major breccia at the base of the middle (Little Tongue) member at Horse Creek, and lime mudstones predominate at Dry Fork. Additional breccias occur at other horizons: five at Dry Fork, four at Horse Creek. Conclusions drawn from the initial study of these two outcrops follow: (1) the local extent of grainstones and packstones suggests that the shoals were geographically less extensive than the subtidal muddy bottoms and intertidal-supratidal mud flats. (2) The limited geographic and vertical extent of some breccias suggests evaporiate deposition in localized muddy facies. (3) Conditions favoring dolomitization were limited mainly to the mudstones and occurred during and shortly after deposition of the Big Goose Member.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Flash Weakening in Limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Tisato, N.; Quaresimin, M.; de Rossi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Frictional properties of limestone and dolostone are crucial to understand earthquake mechanics where seismic ruptures nucleate and propagate in carbonate rocks (e.g., Mw 6.3 L’Aquila 2009 earthquake). We performed 27 rock friction experiments in a compression-torsion apparatus on ring-shaped (50/60 and 70/80 mm int/ext diameter) 100% CaCO3-samples at sub-seismic to seismic slip rates (0.05 to 350 mm/s), small displacements (50-60 mm) and under normal stresses of 3-8 MPa. The experiments involved four steps: 1) loading step to apply the normal stress, 2) “low-speed” step to verify the low-speed behavior, 3) “high-speed” step to determine the velocity dependence and, 4) final deceleration step to stop the experiment. The friction coefficient gradually increased during the low-speed step (0.05 mm/s and 7 mm displacement) from 0 to 0.7-0.8, a typical value for friction in limestone. During the high-speed step, slip rate was abruptly (< 0.04 s) increased in about 5 mm of slip to 250 mm/s (for 30 mm displacement, samples 50/60 mm in diameter) and to 350 mm/s (for 40 mm displacement, samples 70/80 mm in diameter). All experiments show a dramatic decrease, up to 60%, in friction for slip rates > 100 mm/s. During the final deceleration step (< 7 mm of slip in < 0.04 s), the friction coefficient recovered its initial value (0.7). A possible weakening mechanism is flash heating-induced thermal decomposition of calcite (CaCO3 -> CaO + CO2) at asperity contacts. In the experiments, weakening was contemporaneous with a peripheral temperature increase of 60-170°C measured with an infrared camera. This temperature range yields a lower limit to the temperature achieved in the slipping zone and at the asperity contacts. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy equipped with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), X-Ray powder diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy analyses did not detect decarbonation products (CaO, Ca(OH)2) in the slipping zone. Instead, FE

  10. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-16

    This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  11. [Analysis of trace elements in limestone for archeological functions

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the Paris Basin provided stone for the building and the decoration of monuments from antiquity to the present. To determine the origin of stone used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 samples. Petrographic and paleontologic examination of thin sections allows geologists to distinguish Lutetian limestones from Jurassic and Cretaceous limestones. Geologists also seek to formulate hypotheses regarding the origin of Lutetian limestones used for building and sculpture in the Paris region. In the search for the sources of building and sculptural stone, the analytical methods of geologists are limited because often several quarries produce the same lithofacies. A new tool is now available, however, to attack questions of provenance raised by art historians. Because limestones from different sources have distinctive patterns of trace-element concentrations, compositional analysis by neutron activation allows one to compare building or sculptural stone from one monument with stone from quarries or other monuments. This analytical method subjects a powdered limestone sample to standard neutron activation analysis procedures at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the help of computer programs, the compositional fingerprints of Lutetian limestones can be determined and stored in a database. The limestone database contains data for approximately 2,100 samples from monuments, sculptures and quarries. It is particularly rich in samples from the Paris Basin.

  12. LOW NOX COMBUSTION SYSTEMS WITH SO2 CONTROL USING LIMESTONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes EPA work on low NOx combustion systems with SO2 control using limestone. Although SO2 control in low NOx systems for both stoker and pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is under investigation at EPA, most of the current work is with pulverized coal. EPA's Limestone...

  13. Microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone, Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Almadani, Sattam A.; Al-Dabbagh, Mohammad E.

    2016-03-01

    In order to document the microfacies and diagenesis of the reefal limestone in the uppermost part of the Callovian Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone Formation at Khashm Al-Qaddiyah area, central Saudi Arabia, scleractinian corals and rock samples were collected and thin sections were prepared. Coral framestone, coral floatstone, pelloidal packstone, bioclastic packstone, bioclastic wacke/packstone, algal wackestone and bioclastic foraminiferal wacke/packstone were the recorded microfacies types. Cementation, recrystallization, silicification and dolomitization are the main diagenetic alterations affected the aragonitic skeletons of scleractinian corals. All coral skeletons were recrystallized, while some ones were dolomitized and silicified. Microfacies types, as well as the fossil content of sclearctinian corals, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods and foraminifera indicated a deposition in environments ranging from shelf lagoon with open circulation in quiet water below wave base to shallow reef flank and organic build up for the uppermost reefal part of the Tuwaiq Formation in the study area.

  14. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    ... or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive ... or twice a week Add conditioners Avoid blow drying and harsh styling products

  15. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of dry hair are: Anorexia nervosa Excessive hair washing, or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive parathyroid ( ...

  16. Field trial of a pulsed limestone diversion well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Denholm, C.; Dunn, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of limestone diversion wells to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) is well-known, but in many cases, acid neutralization is not as complete as would be desired. Reasons for this include channeling of the water through the limestone bed, and the slow reaction rate of the limestone gravel. A new approach to improve the performance of the diversion well was tested in the field at the Jennings Environmental Education Center, near Slippery Rock, PA. In this approach, a finer size distribution of limestone was used so as to allow fluidization of the limestone bed, thus eliminating channeling and increasing particle surface area for faster reaction rates. Also, water flow was regulated through the use of a dosing siphon, so that consistent fluidization of the limestone sand could be achieved. Testing began late in the summer of 2010, and continued through November of 2011. Initial system performance during the 2010 field season was good, with the production of net alkaline water, but hydraulic problems involving air release and limestone sand retention were observed. In the summer of 2011, a finer size of limestone sand was procured for use in the system. This material fluidized more readily, but acid neutralization tapered off after several days. Subsequent observations indicated that the hydraulics of the system was compromised by the formation of iron oxides in the pipe leading to the limestone bed, which affected water distribution and flow through the bed. Although results from the field trial were mixed, it is believed that without the formation of iron oxides and plugging of the pipe, better acid neutralization and treatment would have occurred. Further tests are being considered using a different hydraulic configuration for the limestone sand fluidized bed.

  17. Faunas of Mississippian oolitic limestones: Evidence from Salem Limestone, southern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, H.R. )

    1989-08-01

    In the Salem Limestone of southern Indiana, a correlation exists between the faunal assemblage and abundance of grains with superficial oolitic coatings in grainstones. Coarse, poorly sorted fossiliferous grainstones are dominated by an echinoderm-bryozoan-brachiopod assemblage of fossils with few mollusks. The presence of large whole fossils, such as articulated crinoid calyces, suggest limited transport of skeletal components. Grainstones, dominated by grains with superficial coatings, and foraminifers tend to contain a diverse mollusk-dominated assemblage of gastropods, bivalves, rostroconchs, chitins, and scaphopods. These fossils are disarticulated, but generally are not fragmented even though many of them are thin and delicate. Echinoderms, brachiopods, and bryozoans are repsented in the mollusk-domdinated assemblage almost exclusively by well-rounded and coated fragments, suggesting that they are not in situ. The presence of similar molluscan assemblages in other Mississippian coated-grain grainstones from Alabama (the Monteagle Limestone) and Oklahoma (an unnamed limestone) indicates that the assemblage may have been wide-spread. Mississippian grainstones dominated by oolites (which are not prominent in the Salem) generally have very few fossils.

  18. Limestone dissolution in flue gas scrubbing: Effect of sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T. )

    1992-07-01

    Batch limestone dissolution experiments were carried out in a pH stat apparatus at 55 C with CO{sub 2} sparging and dissolved sulfite. Particle size distribution, utilization, sulfite in solution, limestone type, and the approach to calcite equilibrium were all found to contribute to the limestone reactivity. In the absence of sulfite, limestone dissolution was controlled solely by mass transfer. For a given stone under mass transfer control, film thickness was found to be independent of pH. The dissolution rate in the presence of sulfite was controlled by a combined surface kinetics/mass transfer regime. SEM micrographs supported this conclusion. A surface rate correlation was developed which accounted for observed inhibition by an inverse dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone dependence on calcium sulfite concentration at the limestone surface. While the form of the rate expression was applicable to all stones, the surface rate constant was stone dependent. A computer code which accounted for mass transfer with surface kinetics was tested against experimental observations of four limestone types. Changes in pH and the concentrations of calcium, carbonate, sulfite, sulfate, and adipic acid were accurately modeled.

  19. United Arab Emirates limestones: impact of petrography on thermal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaabed, Sulaiman; Soltan, Abdel Monem; Abdelghany, Osman; Amin, Bahaa Eldin Mahmoud; El Tokhi, Mohamed; Khaleel, Abbas; Musalim, Abdullah

    2014-12-01

    The thermal behavior of selected limestones from representative localities of the United Arab Emirates is investigated for their suitability for soft-burnt lime production. The limestone samples were collected from the Ghalilah, Musandam, Shauiba, Muthaymimah, Dammam and Asmari formations. The samples were characterized for petrography, mineral and chemical composition, together with physico-mechanical characteristics. Investigative methods included transmitted light microscopy (TLM), cathodoluminescence (CLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as X-ray micro-tomography (μ-CT), XRD, XRF and Archimedes method. The limestone samples were fired in an electrical muffle furnace for 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 hours at 800, 900, 1,000 and 1,100 °C. After firing the lime grains were tested to determine their hydration rate and microfabric. The Ghalilah and Musandam limes show the lowest and highest maximum hydration rates, respectively, due mainly to the impure nature of the former, and the smaller lime crystallites and dominance of post-calcination micro-cracks of the latter. The Dammam and Asmari limes preserve a "ghost" microfabric of the original limestone. Higher allochem contents impose lower activation energy requirements for calcination, which implies earlier calcination of the allochems. The Musandam, Shauiba and Muthaymimah limestones may be useful for the production of reactive soft-burnt lime under the applied firing conditions, however, the Dammam and Asmari limestones need more advanced calcination conditions than the applied ones. The Ghalilah limestone was found to be unsuitable for the production of lime.

  20. Biocalcifying Bacillus subtilis cells effectively consolidate deteriorated Globigerina limestone.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Roderick; Vella, Daniel; Sinagra, Emmanuel; Zammit, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation occurs naturally on ancient limestone surfaces in Maltese hypogea. We exploited this phenomenon and treated deteriorated limestone with biocalcifying bacteria. The limestone was subjected to various mechanical and physical tests to present a statistically robust data set to prove that treatment was indeed effective. Bacillus subtilis conferred uniform bioconsolidation to a depth of 30 mm. Drilling resistance values were similar to those obtained for freshly quarried limestone (9 N) and increased up to 15 N. Treatment resulted in a high resistance to salt deterioration and a slow rate of water absorption. The overall percentage porosity of treated limestone varied by ±6 %, thus the pore network was preserved. We report an eco-friendly treatment that closely resembles the mineral composition of limestone and that penetrates into the porous structure without affecting the limestones' natural properties. The treatment is of industrial relevance since it compares well with stone consolidants available commercially. PMID:27072564

  1. Experimental characterization of porosity structure and transport properties changes in limestone undergoing different dissolution regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouze, P.; Luquot, L.; Rodriguez, O.; Mangane, P. O.

    2013-12-01

    Limestone rock dissolution induces geometrical parameters changes such as porosity, pore size distribution (connectivity), or tortuosity which may consequently modify transport properties (permeability, diffusion coefficient). Characterizing these changes is essential for modeling flow and CO2 transport during and after the CO2 injection. Indeed, these changes can affect the storage capacity and the injectivity of the formation. We report experimental results from CO2 rich-brine injection into limestone core samples of 9 mm diameter, 18 mm length. Experiments were performed at in situ conditions (T = 100°C and P = 12 MPa) and with four different CO2 partial pressures (PCO2) varying from 0.034 to 3.4 MPa. X-ray microtomography (XMT) images are used to characterize, from pore scale to Darcy scale, the changes in the structural properties induced by the percolation of the CO2-rich brine. Coupling imaging techniques with sample scale measurements of the time-resolved permeability and chemical fluxes, allows determining the change in the chemical and physical parameters of the sample induced by the dissolution processes. The experiment results show localized dissolution features (wormhole formation) for the highest PCO2, whereas homogeneous dissolution is observed for the lower. The higher the CO2 concentration is the more ramifications at macro scale have growth into the sample and consequently the higher the permeability has increased. During low CO2 concentration injections, the dissolution processes may include transport of fine particles, which locally clog the porous space. This process is controlled by the differential dissolution rate of the calcite cement and calcite grains. This mechanism induces a decrease of permeability (while porosity increases) that may alter the CO2 injectivity.

  2. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ("THE OLD PIT") WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  3. EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, OF THIS 400' DEEP LIMESTONE QUARRY PIT ('THE OLD PIT') WITH LEDGE PREPARED FOR LIMESTONE EXTRACTION. AN ELEVEN-HOLE SHOT WILL DISLODGE APPROXIMATELY 25,000 TONS OF LIMESTONE WHICH, AFTER LOADING AND CRUSHING, WILL BE USED FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION. THE CALERA QUARRY IS ONE OF FOUR ACTIVE VULCAN MATERIALS COMPANY QUARRIES IN THE DISTRICT. VULCAN MATERIALS, A FORTUNE 500 FIRM, ESTABLISHED IN BIRMINGHAM IN 1906 AS BIRMINGHAM SLAG COMPANY, VULCAN MATERIALS IS THE NATION'S FOREMOST PRODUCER OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATE AND A LEADING CHEMICALS MANUFACTURER. - Vulcan Material Company, Calera Quarry, 1614 Highway 84, Calera, Shelby County, AL

  4. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... it.Golimumab injection comes in prefilled syringes and auto-injection devices for subcutaneous injection. Use each syringe ... method.Do not remove the cap from the auto-injection device or the cover from the prefilled ...

  5. LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project. Quarterly report No. 5, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    LIFAC combines upper-furnace limestone injection followed by post- furnace humidification in an activation reactor located between the air preheater and the ESP. The process produces a dry and stable waste product that is partially removed from the bottom of the activation reactor and partially removed at the ESP. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the US DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the fifth Technical Progress Report covering the period October 1, 1991 through the end of December 1991. Due to the power plant`s planned outage schedule, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

  6. The conservation of Britain's limestone cave resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, P.; Gunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Limestone caves are an important scientific and recreational resource in Britain. During the mid- to late 1970s, cavers and statutory conservation bodies cooperated in a review of cave resources which resulted in the designation of 48 caves or cave areas as Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). During the same period, the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 was introduced to provide more effective planning controls on activities such as agriculture carried out within SSSI boundaries. In one case, at Priddy in the Mendip Hills of Somerset, landowners prevented access to a number of caves in protest over the new, tougher restrictions on agriculture. Faced with the closure, and perceiving that their recreational use of caves might also be controlled, local cavers joined the landowners in opposing the proposals for SSSI designation. As a result the proposals were reviewed, three caves were excluded from the site and controls on the remaining area were relaxed. The case emphasized a need for an effective system to take account of all factors affecting cave conservation, a need which has led to a more constructive dialogue between nature conservation bodies, caver organizations and other interested parties.

  7. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers. PMID:23167314

  8. Acid mine treatment with open limestone channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Brant, D.L.; Skousen, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is often associated with mining of pyritic coal and metal deposits. Typical AMD associated with coal mines in the eastern US can have acidity and iron concentrations ranging from the teens to the thousands of mg/l. Aluminum and manganese can be present in concentrations ranging from zero to the low hundreds of mg/l. Much attention has been devoted to developing inexpensive, limestone (LS)-based systems for treating AMID with little or no maintenance. However, LS tends to coat with metal hydroxides when exposed to AMID in an oxidized state, a process known as {open_quotes}armoring{close_quotes}. It is generally assumed that once armored, LS ceases to neutralize acid. Another problem is that the hydroxides tend to settle into plug the pore spaces in LS beds forcing water to move around rather than through the LS. While both are caused by the precipitation of metal hydroxides, armoring and plugging are two different problems. Plugging of LS pores can be avoided by maintaining a high flushing rate through the LS bed. Armoring, however, occurs regardless of water velocity. This study investigated the influence of armoring on LS solubility and the implications of armoring and plugging on the construction of open (oxidizing) LS channels for treating AMD. We evaluated the AMID treatment performance of armored and unarmored LS in oxidizing environments both in laboratory and field studies.

  9. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BLANC,A.; HOLMES,L.L.; HARBOTTLE,G.

    1998-06-11

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  10. Lutetian limestones in the Paris region: Petrographic and compositional examination

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, A.; Holmes, L.L.; Harbottle, G.

    1998-12-31

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists have investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemistry whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries.

  11. LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBERS: USER'S HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook, intended for use of utility project managers and project engineers, provides guidance in selection, installation, and operation of a limestone FGD system, covering all phases from inception of the project through design, procurement, operation, and maintenance of th...

  12. Limestone - A Crucial and Versatile Industrial Mineral Commodity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, James D.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Orris, Greta J.

    2008-01-01

    Limestone, as used by the minerals industry, is any rock composed mostly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Although limestone is common in many parts of the United States, it is critically absent from some. Limestone is used to produce Portland cement, as aggregate in concrete and asphalt, and in an enormous array of other products, making it a truly versatile commodity. Portland cement is essential to the building industry, but despite our Nation's abundance of limestone, there have been cement shortages in recent years. These have been caused in part by a need to find new areas suitable for quarrying operations. To help manage our Nation's resources of such essential mineral commodities, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides crucial data and scientific information to industry, policymakers, and the public.

  13. High temperature H{sub 2}S removal using limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Lynn, S.

    1995-12-31

    This project is exploring the technical and economic feasibility of using limestone in a high determine process for cleaning coal gas prior to combustion in a gas turbine. In one version of the process the coal gas would pass counter-currently through a nearly-isothermal, moving bed of limestone that would serve to remove particulates (by filtration), and hydrogen sulfide (by chemisorption), and ammonia (by catalysis). Alternative process configurations include the use of limestone in a cocurrently moving bed, in a fluidized bed, or in an entrained flow sorption system. The objectives of this research have been to define the range of temperatures at which these goals can best be realized at a given pressure, to determine the effect of the magnesium content of the limestone on sulfidation kinetics and calcium utilization, to use the kinetic data to model the various types of sorption systems, and to develop a process for converting calcium sulfide to elemental sulfur and calcium carbonate.

  14. Micromechanics of inelastic compaction in micritic and allochemical limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdova, Veronika; Baud, Patrick; Zhu, Wei; Wu, Lily; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies on the transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow in carbonate rocks revealed that while compact carbonate rocks display appreciable dilatancy when undergoing cataclastic flow, inelastic compaction was observed in their more porous counterparts. In their compactive behavior the porous carbonate rocks are more akin to porous siliciclastic rocks such as sandstone. Whilst for sandstone the micromechanics of inelastic compaction and cataclastic flow have been studied extensively, little is known about these processes in porous limestone. To fill this gap we performed experiments on Tavel, Indiana and Majella limestones with respective porosities 10-14%, 16-18% and 31%. Tavel limestone is a micritic limestone with a small number of sparry grains embedded in a microcrystalline matrix. Indiana and Majella limestones are allochemical limestones. In Indiana limestone allochems (fossils, ooids and peloids) form some 65% of bulk volume. In Majella limestone the allochems (represented by rudist fragments) have grain size somewhat smaller than that in Indiana limestone and form about half of the bulk volume. Samples of the three rocks were deformed in a conventional triaxial apparatus at confining pressures up to 150 MPa. Samples were loaded to various stages of deformation and microstructures associated with the damage evolution were investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. For a reference, a study on an intact sample and a sample deformed under hydrostatic conditions was also performed on each rock. Despite the phenomenological similarities between cataclastic flow in siliciclastic rocks and porous carbonate rocks, we showed that the micromechanics can be very different. In a clastic rock such as sandstone, inelastic compaction derives primarily from grain crushing initiated by stress concentrations at grain contacts that induce cracks to radiate in a conical pattern towards the interior of the impinging grains. In contrast

  15. Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Limestone and bronze "Mississippi River Crossing" Bridge plaque located at North corner of Administration Building site - Huey P. Long Bridge, Administration Building, 5100 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  16. VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LIMESTONE BAS RELIEF "PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE" ON SOUTH ELEVATION. RESHOOT OF MD-979-13 AFTER REMOVAL OF RAILING. - Greenbelt Community Building, 15 Crescent Road, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  17. 1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH FACADE. CONSTRUCTED (ca. 1895) OF INDIGENOUS LIMESTONE AND USED AS LOCKPORTS CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOR MORE THAN SIXTY YEARS. - Lockport Historic District, Central High School, Lockport, Will County, IL

  18. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  19. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  20. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  1. Genesis of Upper Cretaceous marl-limestone bedding, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.T. Jr. )

    1990-09-01

    In Alabama, marl-limestone bedding couplets and correlative coeval prograding clastic barrier-shoreline facies occur in the upper 20 m of a high-stand systems tract within the lower Campanian Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence. The Mooreville-Demopolis depositional sequence is terminated by a type-2 unconformity biostratigraphically dated at about 80 million years before present. Based on estimates using long-term sedimentation rate, the average periodicity of the marl-limestone couplets is approximately 100,000 years. Taken at face value, the apparent 100,000-year periodicity would suggest a climate-forced (or Milankovitch) origin of the marl-limestone couplets owing to cycles of productivity and dilution. However, significant variations in marl-limestone couplet thickness (ranging from less than 1 m to several meters) both within and between couplets suggests that average periodicity is not a meaningful figure with respect to these couplets. Further, climate-forcing is not favored because coarse clastic material fines upward in the marl beds and the petrography of the beds shows that the primary mode of biochemical deposition switched from pelagic nannofossils (in the marl) to benthic algal calcispheres (in the limestone). In order to adequately explain the petrographic and thickness observations, changing relative sea level is suggested as a viable hypothesis. Tectonic effects related directly to early stages of the Laramide orogeny (about 80 million years before present) may have affected relative sea level as far east as the Gulf Coastal Plain, thus producing the marl-limestone sequences. Marl-limestone sequences may reflect either short-term buildup and relaxation of intraplate stresses or short-term eustatic changes that resulted from slight variations in Farallon spreading rates.

  2. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  3. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... at golimumab injection before injecting it. Check the expiration date printed on the auto-injection device or carton and do not use the medication if the expiration date has passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe ...

  4. Evaluation of Transport Through Sandstone and Limestone Cores of PAHs Dissolved Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseigne, A. E.; Blanford, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    In this study, data on the transport characteristics within the rock matrix of limestone and sandstone of naphthalene dissolved in groundwater has been gathered. This information has been collected from miscible displacement studies executed with cores of Berea Sandstone and Edwards Aquifer Limestone. This entailed placing 2 inch diameter by 1 and 3 inch long cores in a Hassler type 2 core holder and flooding with aqueous solutions of naphthalene and for comparison bromide and penta-fluorinated benzoic acid. The results of these tracer studies were compared to 1D and 3D numerical simulations based on characteristics of the tracers and analysis of the compositional and hydraulic properties of the cores. Bulk mineral composition was determine with X-ray diffraction and organic matter content with a total organic carbon analyzer. Mean porosity was determined through comparison of precise dry and wet masses, and variability in porosity of the rock samples was determined by impregnation with epoxy and analysis of backscatter images from scanning electron microscope (SEM). Saturated hydraulic conductivity was determined by measuring differential pressures across rock columns under a range of flow rates from 0.49 to 0.87 ml/min. Using 1D numerical program STANMOD, dispersivity coefficients for the sandstone cores were determined through inverse models of the bromide and PFBA data. With this value, the naphthalene tracer results were found to be most closely simulated with a model with mixture of 10% equilibrium mass transfer and 90% rate- limited sorption sites. This analysis also yielded an R = 1.6 for naphthalene. Multi-dimensional modeling of sandstone using MODFLOW and MT3DMS and modeling of the limestone tracer studies is currently underway and will be presented.

  5. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  6. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 2. Chemical retention from diffusion and slow advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Zygnerski, M.R.; Metge, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    A tracer experiment, using a nonreactive tracer, was conducted as part of an investigation of the potential for chemical and pathogen migration to public supply wells that draw groundwater from the highly transmissive karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The tracer was injected into the formation over approximately 1 h, and its recovery was monitored at a pumping well approximately 100 m from the injection well. The first detection of the tracer occurred after approximately 5 h, and the peak concentration occurred at about 8 h after the injection. The tracer was still detected in the production well more than 6 days after injection, and only 42% of the tracer mass was recovered. It is hypothesized that a combination of chemical diffusion and slow advection resulted in significant retention of the tracer in the formation, despite the high transmissivity of the karst limestone. The tail of the breakthrough curve exhibited a straight-line behavior with a slope of -2 on a log-log plot of concentration versus time. The -2 slope is hypothesized to be a function of slow advection, where the velocities of flow paths are hypothesized to range over several orders of magnitude. The flow paths having the slowest velocities result in a response similar to chemical diffusion. Chemical diffusion, due to chemical gradients, is still ongoing during the declining limb of the breakthrough curve, but this process is dwarfed by the magnitude of the mass flux by slow advection.

  7. Evolution of flow properties in homogeneously altered limestone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinsmeister, L.; Dautriat, J.; Dimanov, A.; Raphanel, J.; Bornert, M.; Gland, N.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers is a way to limit the anthropogenic part of the greenhouse effect. The injection of supercritical CO2 in aquifer leads to geochemical reactions with the host rock, resulting for instance in dissolution and precipitation processes. These phenomena impact the flow properties of the porous network. To study this impact, we make use of thermally activated retarded acid. This treatment allows us to realize an homogeneous alteration. The materiel is an oolitic limestone from the Lavoux quarry in the Paris basin. We analyse the evolution of flow properties using porosity and permeability measurements in connection with the micro-structural evolution, studied with mercury porosimetry, NMR, medical scanner, laser diffraction, SEM and thin section analyses. A particular attention has been paid to the permeability evolution and the distribution of fines. Intact samples show a bimodal porosity distribution, with a micro-porosity ranging from 0.5µm to 3µm, a macro-porosity ranging from 10µm to 100µm, and a total porosity exceeding 20%. Permeability is about 100mD. Porosity increases by 0.4% per alteration cycle together with the proportion of micro pore throats and the size of the macro pore throat, as evidenced by mercury porosimetry. The permeability is measured using a differential pressure sensor before and after alteration, back and forth in the axis direction of the plug. The results show that while the alteration in general results in an increase of the permeability, some complex non monotoneous behaviour can be observed. We infer that fines are mobilized in the porous network, clogging some pore throats. We also analyse the outgoing fluids after alteration with laser diffraction. A familly of particles ranging from 3µm to 10µm is detected, suggesting that bigger fines remain stuck in the porosity. These larger particles can be observed using comparative µ-CT imaging. Thin sections and SEM analyses do not show any evidence of

  8. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Coupled Modeling of Geothermal Doublet Systems in Limestones -revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Heldmann, Claus-Dieter; Pei, Liang; Bartels, Jörn; Weinert, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Limestone aquifers in Southern Germany have been used within the last decade very successfully for geothermal heating and - to a lesser extent - for power generation. As an example the region around Munich has been extensively explored. While the extent of usage of this reservoir is increasing there is also an increased interest in better understanding of the reservoir properties and its change in the course of operation. For instance, the observed production and injection pressures are partly hard to explain. They may be related to mechanical or chemical processes, or both. Based on extensive data of outcrop studies and drillings, a data-base for the relevant physical properties of the respective limestones has been complied. The data include thermal conductivity, density, specific heat capacity, permeability, as well as mechanical properties like thermal expansion coefficient and elasticity modules. By using the hydro-thermo-chemical simulator FEFLOW together with an extension for thermo- and hydro-mechanical coupling the relevant processes are studied and compared with observed data. At the EGU Meeting in 2015 results of an initial study have been presented. This time results based on a completely new model setup and also using newly developed code will be presented. As a conclusion main challenges while modeling THMC fracture flow by using a multi-continua approach will be discussed.

  9. Leaching of clay minerals in a limestone environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, D.; Starkey, H.C.

    1959-01-01

    Water saturated with CO2 at about 25??C was percolated through mixed beds of limestone or marble fragments and montmorillonite, "illite" and kaolinite in polyethylene tubes for six and fortyfive complete runs. The leachates were analysed for SiO2, A12O3 and Fe2O3, but only SiO2 was found. The minerals lost SiO2 in this order: montmorillonite > kaolinite > "illite". The differential removal of SiO2 during the short period of these experiments suggests a mechanism for the accumulation of bauxite deposits associated with limestones. ?? 1959.

  10. The Ançã limestones, Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinta-Ferreira, Mário; Gil Catarino, Lídia; Delgado Rodrigues, José

    2016-04-01

    Ançã is located in the Lusitanian Basin (western Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basin), in the municipality of Cantanhede, close to Coimbra, Portugal. This constitutes the northernmost Dogger (Bajocian) limestone sequence in Portugal. The use of the Ançã limestones is documented since the Roman occupation of the Iberian Peninsula. It was used for the construction of houses, palaces, churches, fine sculptures, carving, paving and for the production of lime. These limestones vary from white and very soft varieties, with very high porosity used for sculpture and carving to white and hard varieties used for masonry and as aggregates and to white to bluish with low porosity and high strength varieties, mainly used for paving. The softer and whiter variety is worldwide known as Ançã Stone (Pedra de Ançã) exhibiting a porosity of 26-29 %. It became famous after being largely used by Coimbra most famous Renaissance sculptors like João de Ruão and Nicolau de Chanterenne. The Pedra de Ançã was used mainly in the region of Coimbra, but also in several other places in Portugal, in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and Brazil. Some examples of heritage in Coimbra using the Pedra de Ançã are the renaissance portal of the Saint Cross Church, the tombs of the first two Portuguese kings located in this church, the altar of the Saint Cross Church or of the Old Cathedral, or in sculptures at the University of Coimbra. It is quite prone to deteriorate when exposed to atmospheric agents and to soluble salts, mainly due to its high porosity. Deteriorated surfaces needing treatment constitute difficult conservation problems, especially when consolidation and protection treatments are required. The less porous varieties of the Ançã limestones (< 20 % porosity) were mainly used for masonry, paving and production of lime. The royal Palace of Buçaco is a remarkable masonry building constructed at the end of the XIX century with the less porous varieties of the Ançã limestones

  11. Dry socket

    MedlinePlus

    ... care for the dry socket at home: Take pain medicine and antibiotics as directed Apply a cold pack to the outside of your jaw Carefully rinse the dry socket as directed by your dentist If taking antibiotics, avoid smoking or using tobacco and alcohol

  12. Limestone calcination with CO{sub 2} capture (III): characteristics of coal combustion during limestone decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Wang; Shiying Lin; Yoshizo Suzuki

    2009-05-15

    In this study, the combustion characteristics of coal in CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres were investigated during limestone decomposition in a continuously operating fluidized bed reactor for CO{sub 2} capture. The results show that the variations and concentrations of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} in the exhaust gas of the reactor in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were smaller than those in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Because of steam dilution, the CO{sub 2} concentration in the bed was lower in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the effect of differential pressure variation on limestone decomposition in the fluidized bed was less pronounced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere than that in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. Additionally, N{sub 2}O emission was detected only in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere, and the conversion of N to NO in the steam dilution atmosphere was of a smaller magnitude than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. We also found that the conversion of S to SO{sub 2} in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere was lower than that observed in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The contents of sulfur, SiO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were much higher in solid samples located in the cyclone than in the overflow holder in both steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmospheres. Finally, the hydration and carbonation reactivities of CaO produced in the steam/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere were better than those produced in the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere. 13 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Habitat use and locomotion of the François' langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) in limestone habitats of Nonggang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qihai; Luo, Bang; Wei, Fuwen; Huang, Chengming

    2013-12-01

    We collected data on habitat use and locomotion of the François' langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) between August 2003 and July 2004 at Nonggang Nature Reserve, China. A total of 739 h of behavioral data were collected during this study. We tested 2 predictions: (1) that the langurs may have special patterns of habitat use and locomotion adaptive to the limestone habitat, and (2) the langurs may exhibit different patterns of habitat use and locomotion among different zones of limestone hill. Our results indicated that François- langurs spent more time in the low-risk, relatively food-poor cliff-hilltop areas. When young leaves and fruit were scarce in the dry season, the langurs increased their time in the high-risk, food-rich valley basin. François- langurs were semi-terrestrial, and leaping and climbing were their main locomotor modes. These behavioral patterns are considered to be related to characteristics of topography and vegetation in limestone habitat, such as large areas of cliff and discontinuous canopy. Our results also supported Prediction 2. The langurs confined locomotion to the main canopy and frequently adopted leaping while traveling in the hillside and valley basin. While traveling in cliff-hilltop areas, they tended to stay in the lower stratus (≤5 m) or move on the ground, and walking and climbing were their dominant traveling modes. PMID:24344958

  14. STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN SURFACTANT-MODIFIED SORBENTS DURING FURNACE INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] sorbent modified by the addition of calcium lignosulfonate has recently been developed for use in the Environmental Protection Agency's limestone injection multistage burner process. The increased reactivity with sulfur dioxide (SO2) displayed by thi...

  15. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 9, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-16

    This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  16. Isotopic labeling for the understanding of the alteration of limestone used in built cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Mandana; Chabas, Anne; Mertz, Jean-Didier; Rozenbaum, Olivier; Verney-Carron, Aurélie

    2015-04-01

    This project belongs to a specific work aiming at developing isotopic tools to better understand the alteration of materials used in the built cultural heritage. It is focused on the study of the alteration of limestone used in the facades of historic buildings subject to atmospheric polluted environment. Actually in the elevated parts of the buildings, water as rainfall (runoff or wet deposition) or in vapor form (condensation or dry deposition) is the main agent of alteration. Thus, the rock/water interactions need to be well understood to propose adapted solution to better preserve the buildings. To identify the water transfer within the porous limestone and locate the reaction preferential sites, two isotopic tracers (D and 18O) are used to monitor the alteration solution (D) and locate the zones containing the secondary phases (18O). The Saint-Maximin limestone used in many monuments in the suburbs of Paris (France) as a building and restoration stone has been specifically studied. Pristine materials, stones from monuments (monuments in the Paris area) and samples altered in laboratory constitute the analytical corpus to compare different stages of alteration. In a first step the stones are characterized at different scales to identify the alteration pattern (SEM-EDS, Raman microspectrometry, XRD, rugosimetry) and study the water transfers (X-ray tomography, mercury porosimetry, imbibition kinetics). The samples are then altered in the laboratory by realistic and controlled wet or dry deposition using isotopically labeled solutions to locate the reaction zones by SIMS. The multiscale characterization of the alteration pattern has allowed proposing alteration mechanisms linked to the properties of the stones and their location inside the building. Moreover, the location of the reactive zones inside the materials determined by the isotopic experiments helps examining the role of the evolution of porosity and formation of alteration products within the material

  17. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Carl Lawton; Stephen Pennell; Peter Swett; Huishan Duan; Michael Woods

    2005-11-01

    This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by fine particles. In previous semi-annual reports we described the formation of stable C/W emulsions using pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), flyash, beach sand, shale and lizardite, a rock rich in magnesium silicate. For the creation of these emulsions we used a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) equipped with view windows for illumination and video camera recording. For deep ocean sequestration, a C/W emulsion using pulverized limestone may be the most suitable. (a) Limestone (mainly CaCO{sub 3}) is cheap and plentiful; (b) limestone is innocuous for marine organisms (in fact, it is the natural ingredient of shells and corals); (c) it buffers the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in water. For large-scale sequestration of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion a device is needed that mixes the ingredients, liquid carbon dioxide, seawater, and a slurry of pulverized limestone in seawater continuously, rather than incrementally as in a batch reactor. A practical mixing device is a Kenics-type static mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts, and the shear force for mixing is provided by the hydrostatic pressure of liquid CO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3} slurry in the delivery pipes from the shore to the disposal depth. This semi-annual progress report is dedicated to the description of the static mixer and the results that have been obtained using a bench-scale static mixer for the continuous formation of a CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer has an ID of 0.63 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} in artificial seawater (3.5% by weight NaCl) and liquid CO{sub 2} are co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flows into a Jerguson cell with two oblong windows on opposite sides, then it is vented. A fully ported ball valve inserted after the Jerguson

  18. Soil respiration patterns and controls in limestone cedar glades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Hui, Dafeng

    2015-01-01

    Soil depth, SOM, and vegetation cover were important drivers of Rs in limestone cedar glades. Seasonal Rs patterns reflected those for mesic temperate grasslands more than for semi-arid ecosystems, in that Rs primarily tracked temperature for most of the year.

  19. Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Curved limestone wall at east end of rail yard. Note cut off valves at base of stump in right foreground, and utility tunnel in middle distance, superindent's house at right, looking NW. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  20. LIMESTONE AND LIME NEUTRALIZATION OF FERROUS IRON ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted a 2-yr study on hydrated lime and rock-dust limestone neutralization of acid mine drainage containing ferrous iron at the EPA Crown Mine Drainage Control Field Site near Rivesville, West Virginia. The study investigated optimizat...

  1. GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  2. EVALUATION OF GYPSUM CRYSTALLIZATION FOR LIMESTONE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of pilot plant tests using a double draw-off crystallizer as the hold tank to improve the gypsum dewatering properties of a forced oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization process. A hydroclone was used as the size classification device for solids sepa...

  3. View of the main entrance with basrelief limestone panel designed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the main entrance with bas-relief limestone panel designed by C. Paul Jennwein upon which is inscribed "Lege Atque Ordine Omnia Fiunt" (translated as by law and order all is accomplished) - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. LABORATORY STUDY OF LIMESTONE REGENERATION IN DUAL ALKALI SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of open- and closed-loop laboratory bench scale experiments which were carried out to study parameters which affect the reaction of limestone with dual alkali flue gas desulfurization system process liquors. It gives details of several sets of operat...

  5. The Solnhofen Limestone: A stony heritage of many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kölbl-Ebert, Martina; Kramar, Sabina; Cooper, Barry J.

    2016-04-01

    High above the valley of the River Altmühl (Bavaria, Germany), between Solnhofen to the west and Kelheim to the east, numerous quarries give access to thinly plated limestone from the Upper Jurassic, some 150 million years before the present. The main quarry areas lie around the town of Eichstätt and between the villages of Solnhofen, Langenaltheim and Mörnsheim. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for several hundred years, some even in Roman times. Solnhofen Limestone is famous worldwide; not only because it is a beautiful building stone of high quality, but also because of the exceptionally well-preserved fossils it contains -among them the early bird Archaeopteryx. The quarry industry between Solnhofen and Eichstätt has shaped a cultural landscape, with old and new quarries sunk into the plain and numerous spoil heaps rising above it, for the rock is not all economically useful. But many of the spoil heaps and the old quarries are environmentally protected as they provide a habitat for some rare plants and animals. It is not necessary to cut the Solnhofen Limestone with a saw: it is split by hand into thin and even slabs or sheets which are used for flagstones and wall covers, which since centuries are sold world-wide. Locally it also serves as roof tiles for traditional houses. Thick slabs of especially fine quality may be found near Solnhofen and Mörnsheim and are used for lithography printing.

  6. CALCINATION KINETICS AND SURFACE AREA OF DISPERSED LIMESTONE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of the rates of calcination of two types of limestones, ranging in particle size from 1 to 90 micrometers, and over the temperature range of 516 to 1000 C. A kinetic model, based on the B.E.T. (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the Ca...

  7. The influence of additives on rheological properties of limestone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworska, B.; Bartosik, A.

    2014-08-01

    Limestone slurry appears in the lime production process as the result of rinsing the processed material. It consists of particles with diameter smaller than 2 mm and the water that is a carrier of solid fraction. Slurry is directed to the settling tank, where the solid phase sediments and the excess water through the transfer system is recovered for re-circulation. Collected at the bottom of the tank sludge is deposited in a landfill located on the premises. Rheological properties of limestone slurry hinder its further free transport in the pipeline due to generated flow resistance. To improve this state of affairs, chemical treatment of drilling fluid, could be applied, of which the main task is to give the slurry properties suitable for the conditions encountered in hydrotransport. This treatment consists of applying chemical additives to slurry in sufficient quantity. Such additives are called as deflocculants or thinners or dispersants, and are chemical compounds which added to aqueous solution are intended to push away suspended particles from each other. The paper presents the results of research allowing reduction of shear stress in limestone slurry. Results demonstrate rheological properties of limestone slurry with and without the addition of modified substances which causes decrease of slurry viscosity, and as a consequence slurry shear stress for adopted shear rate. Achieving the desired effects increases the degree of dispersion of the solid phase suspended in the carrier liquid and improving its ability to smooth flow with decreased friction.

  8. Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show one of the limestone relief panels depicting one of the agencies of the Commerce Department, here the Lighthouse Service - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Radial flow permeability testing of an argillaceous limestone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, A P S; Jenner, L

    2013-01-01

    Argillaceous Lindsay limestone is the geologic storage formation that will be encountered at the site for the construction of a deep ground repository in Ontario, Canada, for the storage of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. The permeability of the Lindsay limestone is a key parameter that will influence the long-term movement of radionuclides from the repository to the geosphere. This paper describes the use of both steady-state and transient radial flow laboratory tests to determine the permeability of this argillaceous limestone. The interpretation of the tests is carried out using both analytical results and computational models of flow problems that exhibit radial symmetry. The results obtained from this research investigation are compared with the data available in the literature for similar argillaceous limestones mainly found in the Lindsay (Cobourg) formation. The experiments give permeabilities in the range of 1.0 × 10(-22) to 1.68 × 10(-19) m(2) for radial flows that are oriented along bedding planes under zero axial stress. The factors influencing transient pulse tests in particular and the interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:22489872

  10. COMPUTERIZED SHAWNEE LIME/LIMESTONE SCRUBBING MODEL USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual gives a general description of a computerized model for estimating design and cost of lime or limestone scrubber systems for flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It supplements PB80-123037 by extending the number of scrubber options which can be evaluated. It includes spray...

  11. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  12. Limestone: high-throughput candidate phenotype generation via tensor factorization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joyce C; Ghosh, Joydeep; Steinhubl, Steve R; Stewart, Walter F; Denny, Joshua C; Malin, Bradley A; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of electronic health records (EHRs) from multiple heterogeneous sources has spearheaded the adoption of data-driven approaches for improved clinical research, decision making, prognosis, and patient management. Unfortunately, EHR data do not always directly and reliably map to medical concepts that clinical researchers need or use. Some recent studies have focused on EHR-derived phenotyping, which aims at mapping the EHR data to specific medical concepts; however, most of these approaches require labor intensive supervision from experienced clinical professionals. Furthermore, existing approaches are often disease-centric and specialized to the idiosyncrasies of the information technology and/or business practices of a single healthcare organization. In this paper, we propose Limestone, a nonnegative tensor factorization method to derive phenotype candidates with virtually no human supervision. Limestone represents the data source interactions naturally using tensors (a generalization of matrices). In particular, we investigate the interaction of diagnoses and medications among patients. The resulting tensor factors are reported as phenotype candidates that automatically reveal patient clusters on specific diagnoses and medications. Using the proposed method, multiple phenotypes can be identified simultaneously from data. We demonstrate the capability of Limestone on a cohort of 31,815 patient records from the Geisinger Health System. The dataset spans 7years of longitudinal patient records and was initially constructed for a heart failure onset prediction study. Our experiments demonstrate the robustness, stability, and the conciseness of Limestone-derived phenotypes. Our results show that using only 40 phenotypes, we can outperform the original 640 features (169 diagnosis categories and 471 medication types) to achieve an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.720 (95% CI 0.715 to 0.725). Moreover, in

  13. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  14. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Chloramphenicol injection is used to treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  16. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  17. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palonosetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may occur within 24 hours after receiving ... occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called ...

  18. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal number of red blood cells) caused by uterine fibroids (noncancerous growths in the uterus). Leuprolide injection is ... Your doctor will tell you how long your treatment with leuprolide injection will last. When used in ...

  19. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  20. Posaconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Posaconazole injection is used to prevent fungal infections in people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Posaconazole injection is in a class of medications called azole antifungals. It works ...

  1. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  2. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... become pregnant during your treatment, stop using mipomersen injection and call your doctor immediately. ... Mipomersen injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... and tiredness that are most likely to occur during the first 2 days ...

  3. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Levofloxacin injection is in ...

  4. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used to prevent or treat anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Ciprofloxacin injection is in ...

  5. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with at least one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a ... antifungals such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and voriconazole (Vfend); cisapride (Propulsid) (not available in the U.S.); ...

  6. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  7. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  8. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  9. Daratumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ... a blood transfusion, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ...

  10. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need to take folic acid and vitamin B12 during your treatment with pralatrexate injection to help ... that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your ...

  11. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  12. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  13. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. Oxacillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work ...

  14. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Nafcillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work ...

  15. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  16. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  17. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxycycline injection is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. ... certain skin, genital, intestine, and urinary system infections. Doxycycline injection may be used to treat or prevent ...

  18. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Ferumoxytol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  19. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... using fondaparinux injection while you are in the hospital at least 6 to 8 hours after your ... you will continue to use fondaparinux after your hospital stay, you can inject fondaparinux yourself or have ...

  20. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Adrenalin® Chloride Solution ... a pre-filled automatic injection device containing a solution (liquid) to inject under the skin or into ... device when this date passes. Look at the solution in the device from time to time. If ...

  1. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Trastuzumab injection is used along with other medications or after other medications have been used to treat ... has spread to other parts of the body. Trastuzumab injection is also used during and after treatment ...

  2. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  3. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  4. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  5. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  7. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  8. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  9. Long-term calcination/carbonation cycling and thermal pretreatment for CO{sub 2} capture by limestone and dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongxiang Chen; Hoon Sub Song; Miguel Portillo; C. Jim Lim; John R. Grace; E.J. Anthony

    2009-03-15

    Capturing carbon dioxide is vital for the future of climate-friendly combustion, gasification, and steam-re-forming processes. Dry processes utilizing simple sorbents have great potential in this regard. Long-term calcination/carbonation cycling was carried out in an atmospheric-pressure thermogravimetric reactor. Although dolomite gave better capture than limestone for a limited number of cycles, the advantage declined over many cycles. Under some circumstances, decreasing the carbonation temperature increased the rate of reaction because of the interaction between equilibrium and kinetic factors. Limestone and dolomite, after being pretreated thermally at high temperatures (1000 or 1100{sup o}C), showed a substantial increase in calcium utilization over many calcination/carbonation cycles. Lengthening the pretreatment interval resulted in greater improvement. However, attrition was significantly greater for the pretreated sorbents. Greatly extending the duration of carbonation during one cycle was found to be capable of restoring the CO{sub 2} capture ability of sorbents to their original behavior, offering a possible means of countering the long-term degradation of calcium sorbents for dry capture of carbon dioxide. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Remanent magnetization of a Pliensbachian limestone sequence at Bakonycsernye (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, E.; Márton, P.; Heller, F.

    1980-06-01

    Remanent coercivity spectra derived from IRM acquisition curves and thermal demagnetization of the IRM indicate that magnetite, haematite and minor amounts of goethite determine the magnetic properties of the Pliensbachian limestones at Bakonycsernye. These limestones have been sampled at approximately 7-cm intervals along a 10-m stratigraphic section which covers the whole Pliensbachian stage (Lower Jurassic) without any recognizable break in sedimentation. The primary natural remanent magnetization (NRM) is carried by detrital particles of magnetite and haematite, but it is seriously overprinted by a normal magnetization which originates from secondary haematite with a wide range of blocking temperatures. This haematite is believed to have formed diagenetically during one of the Mesozoic periods of normal polarity. However, the reversal pattern obtained after NRM thermal demagnetization at temperatures ≥450°C is thought to be characteristic of the Pliensbachian stage.

  11. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, M.; Rossen, J.; Martirena, F.; Scrivener, K.

    2012-12-15

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  12. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel A; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO(2) emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from 'breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO(2)/H(2)O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  13. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from `breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation.

  14. Preservation of York Minster historic limestone by hydrophobic surface coatings

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rachel A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Woodford, Julia; Grassian, Vicki H.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Cibin, Giannantonio; Dent, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Magnesian limestone is a key construction component of many historic buildings that is under constant attack from environmental pollutants notably by oxides of sulfur via acid rain, particulate matter sulfate and gaseous SO2 emissions. Hydrophobic surface coatings offer a potential route to protect existing stonework in cultural heritage sites, however, many available coatings act by blocking the stone microstructure, preventing it from ‘breathing' and promoting mould growth and salt efflorescence. Here we report on a conformal surface modification method using self-assembled monolayers of naturally sourced free fatty acids combined with sub-monolayer fluorinated alkyl silanes to generate hydrophobic (HP) and super hydrophobic (SHP) coatings on calcite. We demonstrate the efficacy of these HP and SHP surface coatings for increasing limestone resistance to sulfation, and thus retarding gypsum formation under SO2/H2O and model acid rain environments. SHP treatment of 19th century stone from York Minster suppresses sulfuric acid permeation. PMID:23198088

  15. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  16. Dry sand foam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Edgley, K.D.; Stromberg, J.L.

    1988-10-25

    A method of generating a foam containing particulate material for treating a subsurface earth formation penetrated by a well bore, the method comprising: (a) introducing a first stream of pressurized gas having dry particulate material entrained therein into a vessel, the particulate material flowing vertically downward into the vessel, at least in part due to the action of gravity; (b) introducing a second stream of liquid into the vessel; (c) varying the second stream into a self-impinging conical jet; (d) impinging the conical jet onto the first stream and thereby forming a foam containing particulate material; and (e) injecting such a foam into the well bore.

  17. Dolomitization of Quaternary reef limestones, Aitutaki, Cook Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Gray, S.C.; Richmond, B.M.; White, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    The primary reef framework is considered to have been deposited during several highstands of sea level. Following partial to local recrystallization of the limestone, a signle episode of dolomitization occurred. Both tidal and thermal pumping drove large quantities of seawater through the porous rocks and perhaps maintained a wide mixing zone. However, the isotopic, geochemical and petrographic data do not clearly indicate the extent of seawater mixing. -from Authors

  18. National conference on agricultural limestone. Bulletin Y-166

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-three papers were presented on various facets of the agricultural limestone (aglime) industry - from the quarry to the farmers. They are organized under the following section headings: introduction and overview; status of current use and need; agronomic situation; a total approach to marketing aglime, producing aglime; and a look to the future. Panel discussions were held on the topics, responding to the seasonal nature of aglime use and regional reviews of the status and opportunities for aglime use. (JGB)

  19. Thickness of the Tertiary limestone aquifer system, southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James A.

    1982-01-01

    The Tertiary limestone aquifer system of the southeastern United States is a thick sequence of carbonate rocks that vary in age and that are hydraulically connected in varying degrees. A map is presented that shows the thickness of the aquifer system. Several types of geologic structures have had an effect on the thickness of the system. The magnitude of this effect varies with the type and size of the structure. (USGS)

  20. Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The upper Pleistocene Miami Limestone is probably the most stratigraphically-complex formation in the Cenozoic of Florida. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Ft. Thompson Formation to the west in southeast Palm Beach County (west of I-95); to the west in Broward County (west of the Turnpike); and to the north in south Broward County (along U.S. 27). The Miami overlies and very locally vertically grades into the Ft. Thompson in all of Dade County. The Miami overlies and vertically/laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Anastasia Formation to the north and east in southeast Palm Beach County (east of I-95), and to the northeast in east Broward County (east of the Turnpike). The Miami laterally grades into the upper Pleistocene Key Largo Limestone to the southeast in extreme southeast Dade County, and overlies and locally vertically grades into the Key Largo in the Lower Keys, south Monroe County. The Miami unconformably overlies the Pliocene Tamiami Formation and pinches out to the west in northeast mainland Monroe and southeast Collier Counties, and also pinches out to the north in east-central Palm Beach County. In all areas, the Miami Limestone is either overlain unconformably by very discontinuous undifferentiated surficial sediments or forms land surface.

  1. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  2. INITIAL TEST RESULTS OF THE LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER (LIMB) DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses SO2 removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO2 remov...

  3. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies. PMID:20039220

  4. Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, called punctal cautery, is recommended to permanently close the drainage holes. The procedure helps keep the limited volume of tears on the eye for a longer period of time. In some patients with dry eye, supplements or dietary sources (such as tuna fish) of omega-3 fatty ...

  5. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

    2008-09-30

    Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed

  6. Injection molding ceramics to high green densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, J. A.; Williams, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The injection molding behavior of a concentrated suspension of Si powder in wax was studied. It was found that the injection molding behavior was a function of the processing techniques used to generate the powder. Dry ball-milled powders had the best molding behavior, while air classified and impact-milled powders demonstrated poorer injection moldability. The relative viscosity of these molding batches was studied as a function of powder properties: distribution shape, surface area, packing density, and particle morphology. The experimental behavior, in all cases, followed existing theories. The relative viscosity of an injection molding composition composed of dry ball-milled powders could be expressed using Farris' relation.

  7. Thermo-poroelastic response of an argillaceous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Najari, Meysam

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous limestones are now being considered by many countries that intend to develop deep geologic storage facilities for siting both high-level and intermediate- to low-level nuclear fuel wastes. In deep geologic settings for high level nuclear wastes, the heating due to radioactive decay is transmitted through an engineered barrier, which consists of the waste container and an engineered geologic barrier, which consists of an encapsulating compacted bentonite. The heat transfer process therefore leads to heating of the rock mass where the temperature of the rock is substantially lower than the surface temperature of the waste container. This permits the use of mathematical theories of poroelastic media where phase transformations, involving conversion of water to a vapour form are absent. While the thermo-poroelastic responses of geologic media such as granite and porous tuff have been investigated in the literature, the investigation of thermo-poroelastic responses of argillaceous limestones is relatively new. Argillaceous limestones are considered to be suitable candidates for siting deep geologic repositories owing to the ability to accommodate stress states with generation of severe defects that can influence their transmissivity characteristics. Also the clay fraction in such rocks can contribute to long term healing type phenomena, which is a considerable advantage. This research presents the results of a laboratory investigation and computational modelling of the same that examines the applicability of the theory of thermo-poroelasticity, which extend Biot's classical theory of poroelasticity to include uncoupled heat conduction. The experimental configuration involves the boundary heating of a cylinder of the Cobourg Limestone from southern Ontario, Canada. The cylinder measuring 150 mm in diameter and 278 mm in length contains an axisymmetric fluid-filled cylindrical cavity measuring 26 mm in diameter and 139 mm in length. Thermo-poroelastic effects

  8. Structural characterization of a karstified limestone formation using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, D.; Sénéchal, G.; Gaffet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit (LSBB) at Rustrel - Pays d'Apt, France, is an Inter-disciplinary Underground Science and Technology Laboratory buried in a karstified limestone formation. A multidisciplinary program focused on water circulation monitoring is presently performed inside the tunnels. This program comprises the investigation of faults, fractures, karstification and stratigraphy ofthe limestone massif using GPR. We present the main results obtained from these data. The tunnel has been dug in lower cretaceous limestone which is characterized by a low clay content, high electrical resistivity which results in generally very low attenuation of electro-magnetic waves. 90% of the tunnels floor are made of concrete whereas other are made of bare limestone. This experimental site offers a unique opportunity of perfoming measurements within an unweathered limestone massif. The whole 3km long tunnel has been investigated using single offset shielded 250 MHz antennas in May 2009. Processing includes : DC and very low frequency removal, amplitude compensation preserving lateral variations, migration and time to depth conversion. When necessary predictive deconvolution has been applied to remove ringing effects. These data sets are characterized by good signal to noise ratio and a signal penetration down to 18 meters. These data allow us to accurately map the stratigraphy of the surrounding rocks across the concrete walls of the tunnel. Some 20 m deep vertical wells have been drilled inside the tunnel through observed reflectors. This is a strong validation of the GPR images. The estimated resolution is centimetric to decimetric and matches the required geologic accuracy. The GPR data set allows to extend previous geological results in depth, particularly in the concrete coated parts of the tunnel where conventional geological surveying is impossible. Thanks to the processing which preserves lateral amplitude variations, GPR sections exhibit prominent

  9. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. ... Before using lacosamide injection,tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to lacosamide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in lacosamide injection. Ask your pharmacist for a ...

  10. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body inappropriate happiness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep extreme ... increased appetite injection site pain or redness Some side effects can ...

  11. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and colorless. The liquid may contain small white particles, but should not contain large or colored particles. Do not use a syringe or dosing pen ... liquid is cloudy or contains large or colored particles.The best place to inject etanercept injection is ...

  12. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... you that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your first ... tests to check your body's response to pralatrexate injection.Ask your ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  13. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of vitamin B12 or inability to absorb vitamin B12. Your doctor will not prescribe leucovorin injection to treat this type of anemia.tell your ... tests to check your body's response to leucovorin injection.It is ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  14. 21 CFR 522.2424 - Sodium thiamylal for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 522.2424 Sodium thiamylal for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a sterile dry powder. It is reconstituted aseptically with sterile distilled water, water for injection, or sodium chloride injection, to a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium thiamylal for injection. 522.2424...

  15. 21 CFR 522.2424 - Sodium thiamylal for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 522.2424 Sodium thiamylal for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a sterile dry powder. It is reconstituted aseptically with sterile distilled water, water for injection, or sodium chloride injection, to a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium thiamylal for injection. 522.2424...

  16. 21 CFR 522.2424 - Sodium thiamylal for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 522.2424 Sodium thiamylal for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a sterile dry powder. It is reconstituted aseptically with sterile distilled water, water for injection, or sodium chloride injection, to a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium thiamylal for injection. 522.2424...

  17. 21 CFR 522.2424 - Sodium thiamylal for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 522.2424 Sodium thiamylal for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a sterile dry powder. It is reconstituted aseptically with sterile distilled water, water for injection, or sodium chloride injection, to a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium thiamylal for injection. 522.2424...

  18. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  19. Middle Triassic shallow-water limestones from the Upper Muschelkalk of eastern France: the origin and depositional environment of some early Mesozoic fine-grained limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duringer, Philippe; Vecsei, Adam

    1998-10-01

    We have analyzed the sedimentary structures, depositional geometries, and petrography of a Middle Triassic fine-grained limestone succession from the Upper Muschelkalk in the intracratonic Germanic Basin. The limestones occur in a unit, several metres thick, that extends over an area of at least 2500 km 2 in eastern France. The geometry of specific wave ripples and small channels filled by lateral-accretion bedded limestones, and the cyclic sedimentation of the Upper Muschelkalk in eastern France indicate deposition on a very shallow subtidal shelf, commonly under the influence of relatively strong currents. The limestones mostly consist of microspar with a few skeletal grains. The formation of current ripples in the fine-grained limestones appear to be incompatible with an originally muddy grain size. The major part of the microsparite may thus have originated from the recrystallization of silt-size carbonate grains, e.g., calcispheres or peloids.

  20. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M E; Blaschke, A P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S; Ahmed, W; van Driezum, I H; Sommer, R; Kirschner, A K T; Cervero-Aragó, S; Farnleitner, A H; Pang, L

    2015-07-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water. PMID:25888174

  1. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, A. P.; Toze, S.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Ahmed, W.; van Driezum, I. H.; Sommer, R.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Cervero-Aragó, S.; Farnleitner, A. H.; Pang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water. PMID:25888174

  2. Weight losses of marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the eastern United States: Results of exposure 1988--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1995-04-01

    Monitoring continued on weight changes in marble and limestone briquettes exposed to the outdoor environment at sites in the eastern US. This report presents data for the exposure period 1988--1992 and summarizes results for the entire period from 1984. Since 1989, only three exposure sites have remained active, but briquettes from preexposed material were added at those sites. A linear relationship was found between cumulative gravimetric losses and exposure period. These losses resulted in an average recession rate of 11 to 21 {micro}m/yr for marble and 21 to 45 {micro}m/yr for limestone. The recession rates are site-dependent and can be described with respect to rain depth and other atmospheric conditions, as evidenced by the very low rates at the Ohio site on the movable rack, dry regime. Weight monitoring is continuing in a planned 10-year program.

  3. Tocilizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... after use. Throw away used syringes in a puncture-resistant container and ask your pharmacist how to ... but do not freeze. Keep the prefilled syringes dry. Throw away any medication that is outdated or ...

  4. Clofarabine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider right away if you feel anxious or restless while you are receiving the medication. ... irritability pain in the back, joints, arms, or legs drowsiness dry, itchy, or irritated skin flushing Some ...

  5. Isavuconazonium Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... overdose may include the following: headache dizziness pain, burning, or tingling in the hands or feet drowsiness difficulty focusing change in sense of taste dry mouth numbness in the mouth diarrhea vomiting sudden reddening ...

  6. Fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyoshi, A.; Vogoshi, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering report on three types of pellet injectors which have different applications: injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle for magnetic confinement; injection of a pellet into a vacuum chamber for an inertial confinement experiment; and injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle where the pellet is ionized by high-power laser irradiation for target plasma production. The requirements of pellet injectors are summarized in a table. Theoretical studies on pellet ablation in hot plasma and ablated particle diffusion are underway.

  7. Elucidation of denitrification mechanism in karstic Ryukyu limestone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijikawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in public water supplies have risen above acceptable levels in many areas of the world including Japan, largely as a result of contamination by human and animal waste and overuse of fertilizers. A previous study has characterized nitrate concentrations in groundwater in this area is a higher than the upper value (44mgL-1) of environmental quality criteria on one hands. On the other hand, there exists points where the concentration of nitric acid is not detected, which suggests the possibility of denitrification. During early 2000, a new analytical procedure for nitrate isotopic measurement, termed the "denitrifier method", was established. With the development of the nitrate isotope tracer method, much research has been reported detailing sources of groundwater nitrate and denitrification mechanisms. This study presents a pilot case study (in the southern part of Okinawa Main Island, Japan, where Ryukyu limestone is extensively distributed) using the combined stable isotope ratios of major elements (C, N and S) as net recorders of the biogeochemical reactions with the aim of elucidation of denitrification mechanism in Ryukyu limestone aquifer. As a result, significant decreases in nitrate concentrations due to denitrification were observed in groundwater at some locations, which induced increases in isotope ratios up to 59.7‰ for δ15NNO3. These points of groundwater were located above the cutoff wall of the underground dam and near the fault. It is considered that the residence time of the groundwater is longer than the other points at these denitrification points, and that reduction condition tends to be formed in the groundwater. However, the rapid rise of the groundwater level due to rainfall is likely to occur in the Ryukyu limestone aquifer, where the ground water was found to have changed dynamically from the reduction condition to the oxidation condition which a denitrification (has not occured)does not occur. Moreover, the

  8. Penetration into limestone targets with ogive-nose steel projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, D.J.; Green, M.L.; Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments into limestone targets with 3.0 caliber-radius-head, 4340 Rc 45 steel projectiles. Powder guns launched two projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios of ten to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.5 km/s. Projectiles had diameters and masses of 12.7 mm, 0. 117 kg and 25.4 mm, 0.610 kg. Based on data sets with these two projectile scales, we proposed an empirical penetration equation that described the target by its density and an empirical strength constant determined from penetration depth versus striking velocity data.

  9. Southern hemisphere origin of the Cretaceous Laytonville Limestone of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Sliter, W.V.; Cook, H.E.; Blake, M.C., Jr.; Premoli-Silva, I.

    1986-01-01

    New paleomagnetic, paleontologic, and stratigraphic data from outcrops of the Laytonville Limestone (101 to 88 million years old) support a Southern Hemisphere orgin. A paleomagnetic megaconglomerate test is statistically significant and suggests magnetization at 14?? ?? 5?? south, predating Late Cretaceous to Eocene (70 to 50 million years ago) accretion. Rapid Kula plate movement or the existence and demise of a now vanished oceanic plate (or both) are required to accommodate the greater than 50?? of poleward displacement implied by the paleomagnetic data. This rapid motion brings into question the validity of a "speed limit" for absolute plate velocity based on present-day plate motions.

  10. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is for intravenous (into a vein) use only. Giving ganciclovir through intramuscular (into a muscle) or ... the storage of ganciclovir solution. Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand what you ...