Science.gov

Sample records for limited feedback multi-antenna

  1. A General Design Framework for MIMO Wireless Energy Transfer With Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Zhang, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Multi-antenna or multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) technique can significantly improve the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) signal enabled wireless energy transfer (WET). To fully exploit the energy beamforming gain at the energy transmitter (ET), the knowledge of channel state information (CSI) is essential, which, however, is difficult to be obtained in practice due to the hardware limitation of the energy receiver (ER). To overcome this difficulty, under a point-to-point MIMO WET setup, this paper proposes a general design framework for a new type of channel learning method based on the ER's energy measurement and feedback. Specifically, the ER measures and encodes the harvested energy levels over different training intervals into bits, and sends them to the ET via a feedback link of limited rate. Based on the energy-level feedback, the ET adjusts transmit beamforming in subsequent training intervals and obtains refined estimates of the MIMO channel by leveraging the technique of analytic center cutting plane method (ACCPM) in convex optimization. Under this general design framework, we further propose two specific feedback schemes termed energy quantization and energy comparison, where the feedback bits at each interval are generated at the ER by quantizing the measured energy level at the current interval and comparing it with those in the previous intervals, respectively. Numerical results are provided to compare the performance of the two feedback schemes. It is shown that energy quantization performs better when the number of feedback bits per interval is large, while energy comparison is more effective with small number of feedback bits.

  2. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  3. PHOTON FEEDBACK: SCREENING AND THE EDDINGTON LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle; Sironi, Lorenzo E-mail: lsironi@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-08-01

    Bright star-forming galaxies radiate well below their Eddington limits. The value of the flux-mean opacity that mediates the radiation force onto matter is orders of magnitude smaller than the UV or optical dust opacity. On empirical grounds, it is shown that high-redshift ULIRGs radiate at two orders of magnitude below their Eddington limits, while the local starbursters M82 and Arp 220 radiate at a few percent of their Eddington limits. A model for the radiative transfer of UV and optical light in dust-rich environments is considered. Radiation pressure on dust does not greatly affect the large-scale gas dynamics of star-forming galaxies.

  4. Stromal phosphate concentration is low during feedback limited photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Vanderveer, P.J. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that photosynthesis can be feedback limited when the phosphate concentration cannot be both low enough to allow starch and sucrose synthesis at the required rate and high enough for ATP synthesis at the required rate. We have measured the concentration of phosphate in the stroma and cytosol of leaves held under feedback conditions. We used nonaqueous fractionation techniques with freeze-clamped leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris plants grown on reduced phosphate nutrition. Feedback was induced by holding leaves in low O{sub 2} or high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. We found 7 millimolar phosphate in the stroma of leaves in normal oxygen but just 2.7 millimolar phosphate in leaves held in low oxygen. Because 1 to 2 millimolar phosphate in the stroma may be metabolically inactive, we estimate that in low oxygen, the metabolically active pool of phosphate is between negligible and 1.7 millimolar. We conclude that halfway between these extremes, 0.85 millimolar is a good estimate of the phosphate concentration in the stroma of feedback-limited leaves and that the true concentration could be even lower. The stromal phosphate concentration was also low when leaves were held in high CO{sub 2}, which also induces feedback-limited photosynthesis, indicating that the effect is related to feedback limitation, not to low oxygen per se. We conclude that the concentration of phosphate in the stroma is usually in excess and that it is sequestered to regulate photosynthesis, especially starch synthesis. The capacity for this regulation is limited by the coupling factor requirement for phosphate.

  5. Acoustic fiber laser array architecture with reduced optical feedback limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, S.; Bouffaron, R.; Peigné, A.; Doisy, M.; Mugnier, A.; Pureur, D.

    2014-05-01

    Many sensing applications would benefit of multiplexing a maximum number of Distributed FeedBack Fiber Lasers (DFB FLs) on the same optical fiber. However, in such configurations, some physical mechanisms may impact DFB FLs stable operation, limiting, for instance, the number of DFB FLs spliced on the same fiber and the distance between them. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of optical feedback on DFB FLs stability. The results of our study are used to propose possible associated architectures.

  6. Fronthaul Compression and Transmit Beamforming Optimization for Multi-Antenna Uplink C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhan; Yu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the joint fronthaul compression and transmit beamforming design for the uplink cloud radio access network (C-RAN), in which multi-antenna user terminals communicate with a cloud-computing based centralized processor (CP) through multi-antenna base-stations (BSs) serving as relay nodes. A compress-and-forward relaying strategy, named the VMAC scheme, is employed, in which the BSs can either perform single-user compression or Wyner-Ziv coding to quantize the received signals and send the quantization bits to the CP via capacity-limited fronthaul links; the CP performs successive decoding with either successive interference cancellation (SIC) receiver or linear minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) receiver. Under this setup, this paper investigates the joint optimization of the transmit beamformers at the users and the quantization noise covariance matrices at the BSs for maximizing the network utility. A novel weighted minimum-mean-square-error successive convex approximation (WMMSE-SCA) algorithm is first proposed for maximizing the weighted sum rate under the user transmit power and fronthaul capacity constraints with single-user compression. Assuming a heuristic decompression order, the proposed algorithm is then adapted for optimizing the transmit beamforming and fronthaul compression under Wyner-Ziv coding. This paper also proposes a low-complexity separate design consisting of optimizing transmit beamformers for the Gaussian vector multiple-access channel along with per-antenna quantizers with uniform quantization noise levels across the antennas at each BS. Numerical results show that with optimized beamforming and fronthaul compression, C-RAN can significantly outperform conventional cellular networks. Furthermore, the low complexity separate design already performs very close to the optimized joint design in regime of practical interest.

  7. Channel direction information probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Villardi, Gabriel Porto; Kojima, Fumihide; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the problem of channel direction information (CDI) probing for multi-antenna cognitive radio system. The CDI of the channel from the secondary transmitter (ST) to primary receiver (PR) is elementary information in designing the beamforming at the ST for mitigating the interference to the PR. However, lacking the explicit cooperation between primary and secondary systems, the CDI has to be acquired by probing at the ST, which is challenging. To solve this, we consider the line of sight (LoS) channel between the ST and the PR, and propose one CDI probing scheme for the ST. Specifically, the ST sends two types of probing signals by beamforming towards an interested region where both the secondary receiver (SR) and the PR are located and then actively learns the hidden feedback information from the primary system to acquire the CDI. The proposed scheme has a closed-form solution, and avoids the iteration between the probing and acquisition, which is desirable for practical system. Moreover, we show that the proposed probing scheme can be extended for primary systems working under multi-access channel and broadcasting channel. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can improve the accuracy of the acquired CDI at the ST in cognitive ratio system remarkably.

  8. Strong feedback limit of the Goodwin circadian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woller, Aurore; Gonze, Didier; Erneux, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The three-variable Goodwin model constitutes a prototypical oscillator based on a negative feedback loop. It was used as a minimal model for circadian oscillations. Other core models for circadian clocks are variants of the Goodwin model. The Goodwin oscillator also appears in many studies of coupled oscillator networks because of its relative simplicity compared to other biophysical models involving a large number of variables and parameters. Because the synchronization properties of Goodwin oscillators still remain difficult to explore mathematically, further simplifications of the Goodwin model have been sought. In this paper, we investigate the strong negative feedback limit of Goodwin equations by using asymptotic techniques. We find that Goodwin oscillations approach a sequence of decaying exponentials that can be described in terms of a single-variable leaky integrated-and-fire model.

  9. On some limitations of adaptive feedback measurement algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalski, Leszek J.

    2015-09-01

    The brilliant idea of Adaptive Feedback Control Systems (AFCS) makes possible creation of highly efficient adaptive systems for estimation, identification and filtering of signals and physical processes. The research problem considered in this paper is: how performance of AFCS changes if some of the assumptions used to formulate iterative estimation algorithm are not fulfilled exactly. To limit the scope of research a particular implementation of the AFCS concept was considered, i.e. an adaptive feedback measurement system (AFMS). The iterative measurement algorithm used was derived under some idealized conditions, notably with perfect knowledge of the system model and Gaussian communication channels. The selected non-idealities of interest are non-zero mean value of noise processes and non-ideal calibration of transmission gain in the forward channel - because they are related to intrinsic non-idealities of analog building blocks, used for the AFMS implementation. The presented original analysis of the iterative measurement algorithm provides quantitative information on speed of convergence and limit behavior. The analysis should be useful for AFCS implementors in the measurement area - since the results are presented in terms of accuracy and precision of iterative measurement process.

  10. Feedbacks, climate sensitivity, and the limits of linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugenstein, M.; Knutti, R.

    2015-12-01

    The term "feedback" is used ubiquitously in climate research, but implies varied meanings in different contexts. From a specific process that locally affects a quantity, to a formal framework that attempts to determine a global response to a forcing, researchers use this term to separate, simplify, and quantify parts of the complex Earth system. We combine large (>120 member) ensemble GCM and EMIC step forcing simulations over a broad range of forcing levels with a historical and educational perspective to organize existing ideas around feedbacks and linear forcing-feedback models. With a new method overcoming internal variability and initial condition problems we quantify the non-constancy of the climate feedback parameter. Our results suggest a strong state- and forcing-dependency of feedbacks, which is not considered appropriately in many studies. A non-constant feedback factor likely explains some of the differences in estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity from different methods and types of data. We discuss implications for the definition of the forcing term and its various adjustments. Clarifying the value and applicability of the linear forcing feedback framework and a better quantification of feedbacks on various timescales and spatial scales remains a high priority in order to better understand past and predict future changes in the climate system.

  11. Design of Massive-MIMO-NOMA With Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiguo; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a low-feedback non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) scheme using massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission is proposed. In particular, the proposed scheme can decompose a massive-MIMO-NOMA system into multiple separated single-input single-output NOMA channels, and analytical results are developed to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme for two scenarios, with perfect user ordering and with one-bit feedback, respectively.

  12. Feedbacks, climate sensitivity and the limits of linear models.

    PubMed

    Knutti, Reto; Rugenstein, Maria A A

    2015-11-13

    The term 'feedback' is used ubiquitously in climate research, but implies varied meanings in different contexts. From a specific process that locally affects a quantity, to a formal framework that attempts to determine a global response to a forcing, researchers use this term to separate, simplify and quantify parts of the complex Earth system. We combine new model results with a historical and educational perspective to organize existing ideas around feedbacks and linear models. Our results suggest that the state- and forcing-dependency of feedbacks are probably not appreciated enough, and not considered appropriately in many studies. A non-constant feedback parameter likely explains some of the differences in estimates of equilibrium climate sensitivity from different methods and types of data. Clarifying the value and applicability of the linear forcing feedback framework and a better quantification of feedbacks on various timescales and spatial scales remains a high priority in order to better understand past and predict future changes in the climate system. PMID:26438287

  13. Surpassing the shot-noise limit by homodyne-mediated feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhu, Hanjie

    2016-09-01

    Entangled systems with large quantum Fisher information (QFI) can be used to outperform the standard quantum limit of the separable systems in quantum metrology. However, the interaction between the system and the environments inevitably leads to decoherence and decrease of the QFI, and it is not clear whether the entanglement systems can be a better resource than separable systems in the realistic physical condition. In this work, we study the steady QFI of two driven and collectively damped qubits with homodyne-mediated feedback. We show that the steady QFI can be significantly enhanced both in the cases of symmetric feedback and nonsymmetric feedback, and the shot-noise limit of separable states can be surpassed in both cases. The QFI can even achieve the Heisenberg limit for appropriate feedback parameters and initial conditions in the case of symmetric feedback. We also show that an initial-condition-independent steady QFI can be obtained by using nonsymmetric feedback. PMID:27607940

  14. Multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver and its advantages in high-precision positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Danan; Chen, Wen; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Yu, Chao; Zheng, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuanfei

    2016-02-01

    The multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver is a high precision, low cost, and widely used emerging receiver. Using this type of receiver, the satellite and receiver clock errors can be eliminated simultaneously by forming between antenna single-differences, which is equivalent to the conventional double-difference model. However, current multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receiver products have not fully realized their potential to achieve better accuracy, efficiency, and broader applications. This paper introduces the conceptual design and derivable products of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers involving the aspects of attitude determination, multipath effect mitigation, phase center variation correction, and ground-based carrier phase windup calibration. Through case studies, the advantages of multi-antenna synchronized global navigation satellite system receivers in high-precision positioning applications are demonstrated.

  15. Quantised output feedback control via limited capacity communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Jin, Fang

    2012-12-01

    This article addresses the output feedback stability problem for single-input single-output (SISO) linear systems with quantised measurements of the plant output, where sensors and controllers are connected via errorless digital channels carrying a finite number of bits per unit time. The main idea here is to present a lower bound of data rates, above which there exists a quantisation, coding and control scheme to guarantee both stability and a prescribed control performance of the unstable plant. A quantisation and coding scheme, which is based on the distribution of measurements and the dynamics of the plant, is proposed. The proof techniques rely on both information-theoretic and control-theoretic tools. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  16. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y. E-mail: oka@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shoji, T.

    2014-02-15

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm{sup 2}. The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  17. Theoretical Limits of Damping Attainable by Smart Beams with Rate Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1997-01-01

    Using a generally accepted model we present a comprehensive analysis (within the page limitation) of an Euler- Bernoulli beam with PZT sensor-actuator and pure rate feedback. The emphasis is on the root locus - the dependence of the attainable damping on the feedback gain. There is a critical value of the gain beyond which the damping decreases to zero. We construct the time-domain response using semigroup theory, and show that the eigenfunctions form a Riesz basis, leading to a 'modal' expansion.

  18. Feedback localization of freely diffusing fluorescent particles near the optical shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Andrew J.; McHale, Kevin; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We report near-optimal tracking of freely diffusing fluorescent particles in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry via photon counting and real-time feedback. We present a quantitative statistical model of our feedback network and find excellent agreement with the experiment. We monitor the motion of a single fluorescent particle with a sensitivity of 15 nm/sqrt Hz while collecting fewer than 5000 fluorescence photons/s. Fluorescent microspheres (diffusion coefficient 1.3 μm2/s) are tracked with a root-mean-square tracking error of 170 nm, within a factor of 2 of the theoretical limit set by photon counting shot noise.

  19. Performance limitations of joint variable-feedback controllers due to manipulator structural flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cetinkunt, Sabri; Book, Wayne J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance limitations of manipulators under joint variable-feedback control are studied as a function of the mechanical flexibility inherent in the manipulator structure. A finite-dimensional time-domain dynamic model of a two-link two-joint planar manipulator is used in the study. Emphasis is placed on determining the limitations of control algorithms that use only joint variable-feedback information in calculations of control decisions, since most motion control systems in practice are of this kind. Both fine and gross motion cases are studied. Results for fine motion agree well with previously reported results in the literature and are also helpful in explaining the performance limitations in fast gross motions.

  20. The performance of a reduced-order adaptive controller when used in multi-antenna hyperthermia treatments with nonlinear temperature-dependent perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kung-Shan; Yuan, Yu; Li, Zhen; Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo; Joines, William T; Dewhirst, Mark W; Das, Shiva K

    2009-04-01

    In large multi-antenna systems, adaptive controllers can aid in steering the heat focus toward the tumor. However, the large number of sources can greatly increase the steering time. Additionally, controller performance can be degraded due to changes in tissue perfusion which vary non-linearly with temperature, as well as with time and spatial position. The current work investigates whether a reduced-order controller with the assumption of piecewise constant perfusion is robust to temperature-dependent perfusion and achieves steering in a shorter time than required by a full-order controller. The reduced-order controller assumes that the optimal heating setting lies in a subspace spanned by the best heating vectors (virtual sources) of an initial, approximate, patient model. An initial, approximate, reduced-order model is iteratively updated by the controller, using feedback thermal images, until convergence of the heat focus to the tumor. Numerical tests were conducted in a patient model with a right lower leg sarcoma, heated in a 10-antenna cylindrical mini-annual phased array applicator operating at 150 MHz. A half-Gaussian model was used to simulate temperature-dependent perfusion. Simulated magnetic resonance temperature images were used as feedback at each iteration step. Robustness was validated for the controller, starting from four approximate initial models: (1) a 'standard' constant perfusion lower leg model ('standard' implies a model that exactly models the patient with the exception that perfusion is considered constant, i.e., not temperature dependent), (2) a model with electrical and thermal tissue properties varied from 50% higher to 50% lower than the standard model, (3) a simplified constant perfusion pure-muscle lower leg model with +/-50% deviated properties and (4) a standard model with the tumor position in the leg shifted by 1.5 cm. Convergence to the desired focus of heating in the tumor was achieved for all four simulated models. The

  1. Piecewise Function Feedback Strategy in Intelligent Traffic Systems with a Speed Limit Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bokui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wei, Hua; Dong, Chuanfei; Wang, Binghong

    The road capacity can be greatly improved if an appropriate and effective information feedback strategy is adopted in the traffic system. In this paper, a strategy called piecewise function feedback strategy (PFFS) is introduced and applied into an asymmetrical two-route scenario with a speed limit bottleneck in which the dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the information board to guide road users to make a choice. Meanwhile, the velocity-dependent randomization (VDR) mechanism is adopted which can better reflect the dynamic behavior of vehicles in the system than NS mechanism. Simulation results adopting PFFS have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the previous strategies.

  2. Anti-collision protocols for RFID systems exploiting multi-antenna readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yimin; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    In conventional RFID systems, only one tag can be identified at a time. Tag collisions occur if more than one tag simultaneously occupies the shared RF channel, resulting in low identification efficiency and long delay, particularly when the population of tags is large. In this paper, we propose two RFID anti-collision protocols, both are based on framed slotted ALOHA (FSA), to concurrently identify multiple tags by using a multi-antenna reader. The first one is Blind Identification Protocol, which relies on blind estimation of the channel between the activated tags and the reader and, as such, does not require redesign of the existing RFID tags. The second one is Orthogonal ID-aided Identification Protocol which estimates the channels with the use of temporary orthogonal IDs, which are randomly selected by the tags and are inserted at the head of each tag's reply signal. The use of orthogonal IDs facilitates both the detection of activated tags and the channel estimation. Unlike code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques which rely on the use of excessive bandwidth and require redesign of tags, the proposed protocols use multiple antennas at the reader to support concurrent identification of multiple tags without the requirement of additional bandwidth and no or minimal modifications to the existing tags. As a result, the proposed techniques yield significant improvement of the identification efficiency and reduction of the identification delay. We analyze, in an analytical framework, the identification efficiency of the proposed protocols, and the optimum frame size is derived.

  3. A close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2012-02-15

    A newly close coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source is tested for the purpose of essentially improving plasma coupling on the basis of our old type ion source, which reuses a NNBI (negative ion source for neutral beam injection) ion source used in 1/5th scale of the Large Helical Device NNBI. The ion source and the antenna structure are described, and the efficient plasma production in terms of the positive ion saturation current (the current density) is studied. The source is made of a metal-walled plasma chamber which is desirable from the point of view of the structural toughness for fusion and industrial application, etc. At around 160 kW of rf input power, the ion saturation current density successfully reaches the 5 A/cm{sup 2} level with a gas pressure of 0.6-2 Pa in hydrogen for 10 ms pulse duration. The rf power efficiency of the plasma production with a close coupling configuration of the antenna is improved substantially compared to that with the previous antenna unit in the old type ion source. The power efficiency is assessed as competing with that of other types of sources.

  4. Feedback Activation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Limits Response to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanlin; Qu, Jia; Jin, Nan; Xu, Jun; Lin, Chenchu; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xinying; He, Xiang; Tang, Shuai; Lan, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaotong; Chen, Ziqi; Huang, Min; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2016-09-12

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical benefits in subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors remains uncertain. This study takes breast cancer as a model to understand mechanisms accounting for limited response of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors and to seek combination solutions. We discover that feedback activation of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) signaling in breast cancer limits the response to HDAC inhibition. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibition increases histone acetylation at the LIFR gene promoter, which recruits bromodomain protein BRD4, upregulates LIFR expression, and activates JAK1-STAT3 signaling. Importantly, JAK1 or BRD4 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer to HDAC inhibitors, implicating combination inhibition of HDAC with JAK1 or BRD4 as potential therapies for breast cancer. PMID:27622335

  5. On the optimal minimum order observer-based compensator and the limited state variable feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorens-Ortiz, B.

    1976-01-01

    Four design problems are considered: two on the optimal minimum order observer-based compensator design and two on the optimal limited state variable feedback controller. The problem of designing an optimal discrete time linear time-invariant observer-based compensator for the regulation of an n dimensional linear discrete time time-invariant plant with m independent outputs is considered. This is a stochastic design problem to the extent that the initial plant state is assumed to be a random vector with known first and second order statistics. The compensator parameters are obtained by minimizing the expectation, with respect to the initial conditions, of the standard cost, quadratic in the state and control vectors with the inclusion of cross terms.

  6. Space-Frequency Block Code with Matched Rotation for MIMO-OFDM System with Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Abhayapala, Thushara D.; Jayalath, Dhammika; Smith, David; Athaudage, Chandra

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel matched rotation precoding (MRP) scheme to design a rate one space-frequency block code (SFBC) and a multirate SFBC for MIMO-OFDM systems with limited feedback. The proposed rate one MRP and multirate MRP can always achieve full transmit diversity and optimal system performance for arbitrary number of antennas, subcarrier intervals, and subcarrier groupings, with limited channel knowledge required by the transmit antennas. The optimization process of the rate one MRP is simple and easily visualized so that the optimal rotation angle can be derived explicitly, or even intuitively for some cases. The multirate MRP has a complex optimization process, but it has a better spectral efficiency and provides a relatively smooth balance between system performance and transmission rate. Simulations show that the proposed SFBC with MRP can overcome the diversity loss for specific propagation scenarios, always improve the system performance, and demonstrate flexible performance with large performance gain. Therefore the proposed SFBCs with MRP demonstrate flexibility and feasibility so that it is more suitable for a practical MIMO-OFDM system with dynamic parameters.

  7. Student Self-Assessment and Multisource Feedback Assessment: Exploring Benefits, Limitations, and Remedies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    It has become common practice for management students to participate in some sort of self-assessment or multisource feedback assessment (MSF; also called 360-degree assessment or multirater assessment) during their management degree program. These assessments provide students invaluable feedback about themselves and assist students in their…

  8. TELAER: a multi-mode/multi-antenna interferometric airborne SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, Stefano; Amaral, Tiago; Berardino, Paolo; Esposito, Carmen; Jackson, Giuseppe; Pauciullo, Antonio; Vaz Junior, Eurico; Wimmer, Christian; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    a degradation of the geometric resolution, which in this case becomes equal to 5m. Such an operational flexibility, added to the above discussed single-pass interferometric capability and to the intrinsic flexibility of airborne platforms, renders the TELAER airborne SAR system a powerful instrument for fast generation of high resolution Digital Elevation Models, even in natural disaster scenarios. Accordingly, this system can play today a key role not only for strictly scientific purposes, but also for the monitoring of natural hazards, especially if properly integrated with other remote sensing sensors. [1] S. Perna et al., "Capabilities of the TELAER airborne SAR system upgraded to the multi-antenna mode", In Proceedings IGARSS 2012 Symposium, Munich, 2012. [2] G. Franceschetti, and R.Lanari, Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing, CRC PRESS, New York, 1999.

  9. Nutrient Limitations Constrain the Feedback Capacity of Landscapes in the High Arctic: Nonlinearities and Synergism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, S. J.; Sullivan, P. F.; Welker, J. M.; Rogers, M. C.; Holland, K.; Schimel, J.; Persson, K.

    2006-12-01

    Nutrient availability appears to be a controlling factor in the structure and function of High Arctic terrestrial systems as depicted by biological hot spots such as bird cliffs which are found throughout the arctic. Understanding the processes by which nutrients control plant production, canopy structure, and ecosystem carbon cycling have been well studied in the Low Arctic, where fertilization experiments have been employed for decades. Few studies have examined how the amount and type of nutrient augmentations (fertilization) affects the magnitude and pattern of CO2 exchange, species composition and optical properties of prostrate dwarf-shrub, herb tundra, the largest ecosystem in the High Arctic. In this study, amendments of three levels of nitrogen (N) (0.5 g/m2, 1.0 g/m2 and 5.0 g/m2) phosphorus (P) (2.5 g/m2) were initiated in prostrate dwarf- shrub, herb tundra near Pituffik (Thule), Greenland (76¢ªN, 68¢ªW). Species composition, net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), gross primary photosynthesis (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and plot-level normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were used to quantify changes in ecosystem structure and function. Non- linear responses to the addition of different levels of N were observed. CO2 gas exchange and NDVI showed indicated the strongest response at middle levels of N addition (1.0 g/m2). Strong and synergystic responses to the combined addition of nitrogen and phosphorus were observed. Increases in vegetation density and a shift in species composition were observed when N and P were added to these systems, partially explaining the near doubling of NDVI values from 0.3 to 0.6. Rates of NEE, GPP and ER were significantly higher when N and P were combined compared to independent additions of each or when compared to non-fertilized areas. Our results indicate that feedback processes such as CO2 exchange, optical properties and vegetation composition and structure are co-limited by N and P and that the addition

  10. Design of a feedback-feedforward steering controller for accurate path tracking and stability at the limits of handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapania, Nitin R.; Gerdes, J. Christian

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a feedback-feedforward steering controller that simultaneously maintains vehicle stability at the limits of handling while minimising lateral path tracking deviation. The design begins by considering the performance of a baseline controller with a lookahead feedback scheme and a feedforward algorithm based on a nonlinear vehicle handling diagram. While this initial design exhibits desirable stability properties at the limits of handling, the steady-state path deviation increases significantly at highway speeds. Results from both linear and nonlinear analyses indicate that lateral path tracking deviations are minimised when vehicle sideslip is held tangent to the desired path at all times. Analytical results show that directly incorporating this sideslip tangency condition into the steering feedback dramatically improves lateral path tracking, but at the expense of poor closed-loop stability margins. However, incorporating the desired sideslip behaviour into the feedforward loop creates a robust steering controller capable of accurate path tracking and oversteer correction at the physical limits of tyre friction. Experimental data collected from an Audi TTS test vehicle driving at the handling limits on a full length race circuit demonstrates the improved performance of the final controller design.

  11. Limited acquisition and generalisation of rhotics with ultrasound visual feedback in childhood apraxia.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jonathan L; Maas, Edwin; Whittle, Jessica; Leece, Megan C; McCabe, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound visual feedback of the tongue is one treatment option for individuals with persisting speech sound errors. This study evaluated children's performance during acquisition and generalisation of American English rhotics using ultrasound feedback. Three children aged 10-13 with persisting speech sound errors associated with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) were treated for 14 one-hour sessions. Two of the participants increased the accuracy of their rhotic production during practise trials within treatment sessions, but none demonstrated generalisation to untreated words. Lack of generalisation may be due to a failure to acquire the target with sufficient accuracy during treatment, or to co-existing linguistic weaknesses that are not addressed in a motor-based treatment. Results suggest a need to refine the intervention procedures for CAS and/or a need to identify appropriate candidates for intervention to optimise learning. PMID:26237652

  12. Cosmological Galaxy Evolution with Superbubble Feedback II: The Limits of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, B. W.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2016-08-01

    We explore when supernovae can (and cannot) regulate the star formation and bulge growth in galaxies based on a sample of 18 simulated galaxies. The simulations are the first to model feedback superbubbles including evaporation and conduction. These processes determine the mass loadings and wind speeds of galactic outflows. We show that for galaxies with virial masses >1012 M⊙, supernovae alone cannot prevent excessive star formation. This occurs due to a shutdown of galactic winds, with wind mass loadings falling from η ˜ 10 to η < 1. In more massive systems, the ejection of baryons to the circumgalactic medium falters earlier on and the galaxies diverge significantly from observed galaxy scaling relations and morphologies. The decreasing efficiency is due to a deepening potential well preventing gas escape, and is unavoidable if mass-loaded outlflows regulate star formation on galactic scales. This implies that non-supernova feedback mechanisms must become dominant for galaxies with stellar masses greater than ˜4 × 1010 M⊙. The runaway growth of the central stellar bulge, strongly linked to black hole growth, suggests that feedback from active galactic nuclei is the likely mechanism. Below this mass, supernovae alone are able to produce a realistic stellar mass fraction, star formation history and disc morphology.

  13. Entropy Limit and the Cold Feedback Mechanism in Cooling Flow Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-09-01

    I propose an explanation for the finding that star formation and visible filaments strong in Hα emission in cooling flow clusters occur only if the minimum specific entropy and the radiative cooling time of the intracluster medium (ICM) are below a specific threshold. The explanation is based on the cold feedback mechanism. In this mechanism, the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in nonlinear overdense blobs of gas residing in an extended region of the cooling flow region. I use the criterion that the feedback cycle period must be longer than the radiative cooling time of dense blobs, for large quantities of gas to cool to low temperatures. The falling time of the dense blobs is parameterized by the ratio of the infall velocity to the sound speed. Another parameter is the ratio of the blobs' density to that of the surrounding ICM. By taking the values of the parameters as in previous papers on the cold feedback model, I derive an expression that gives the right value of the entropy threshold. Future studies will have to examine in more detail the role these parameters play, and will have to show that the observed sharp change in the behavior of clusters across the entropy, or radiative cooling time, threshold can be reproduced by the model.

  14. Using Doppler shift induced by Galvanometric mirror scanning to reach shot noise limit with laser optical feedback imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, O; Lacot, E; Hugon, O; Guillet de Chatelus, H

    2015-03-10

    This paper proposes what we believe is a new method to remove the contribution of parasitic reflections in the images of the laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) technique. This simple method allows us to extend the LOFI technique to long-distance applications, as imaging through a fog or a smoke. The LOFI technique is an ultrasensitive imaging technique that is interesting for imaging objects through a scattering medium. However, the LOFI sensitivity can be dramatically limited by parasitic optical feedback occurring in the experimental setup. In previous papers [Appl. Opt.48, 64 (2009)10.1364/AO.48.000064APOPAI1559-128X, Opt. Lett.37, 2514 (2012)10.1364/OL.37.002514OPLEDP0146-9592], we already have proposed methods to filter a parasitic optical feedback, but they are not well suited to metric working distances. This new method uses a Doppler frequency shift induced by the moving mirror used to scan the object to be imaged. Using this Doppler frequency shift, we can distinguish the photons reflected by the target and the parasitic photons reflected by the optical components in the experimental setup. In this paper, we demonstrated theoretically and experimentally the possibility to filter the parasitic reflection in LOFI images using the Doppler frequency shift. This method significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor 15 and we can obtain a shot noise limited image through a scattering medium of an object at 3 m from the detector. PMID:25968374

  15. Ultra-high-frequency chaos in a time-delay electronic device with band-limited feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illing, Lucas; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2006-09-01

    We report an experimental study of ultra-high-frequency chaotic dynamics generated in a delay-dynamical electronic device. It consists of a transistor-based nonlinearity, commercially-available amplifiers, and a transmission-line for feedback. The feedback is band-limited, allowing tuning of the characteristic time-scales of both the periodic and high-dimensional chaotic oscillations that can be generated with the device. As an example, periodic oscillations ranging from 48 to 913 MHz are demonstrated. We develop a model and use it to compare the experimentally observed Hopf bifurcation of the steady-state to existing theory [Illing and Gauthier, Physica D 210, 180 (2005)]. We find good quantitative agreement of the predicted and the measured bifurcation threshold, bifurcation type and oscillation frequency. Numerical integration of the model yields quasiperiodic and high dimensional chaotic solutions (Lyapunov dimension ˜13), which match qualitatively the observed device dynamics.

  16. Ultra-high-frequency chaos in a time-delay electronic device with band-limited feedback.

    PubMed

    Illing, Lucas; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2006-09-01

    We report an experimental study of ultra-high-frequency chaotic dynamics generated in a delay-dynamical electronic device. It consists of a transistor-based nonlinearity, commercially-available amplifiers, and a transmission-line for feedback. The feedback is band-limited, allowing tuning of the characteristic time-scales of both the periodic and high-dimensional chaotic oscillations that can be generated with the device. As an example, periodic oscillations ranging from 48 to 913 MHz are demonstrated. We develop a model and use it to compare the experimentally observed Hopf bifurcation of the steady-state to existing theory [Illing and Gauthier, Physica D 210, 180 (2005)]. We find good quantitative agreement of the predicted and the measured bifurcation threshold, bifurcation type and oscillation frequency. Numerical integration of the model yields quasiperiodic and high dimensional chaotic solutions (Lyapunov dimension approximately 13), which match qualitatively the observed device dynamics. PMID:17014224

  17. Short baseline solution from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver and its applications for high-precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Dong, Danan; Cai, Miaomiao; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Minghua; Zheng, Zhengqi; Yu, Chao; Kuang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver (using the same receiver clock) is a new type of receivers with low cost, high accuracy and broad range of applications. Using this receiver, single difference carrier phase observations are able to eliminate both the satellite and receiver clock errors simultaneously, which are equivalent to classical double difference model. However, current commercial products of this type of receivers still adopt the double differencing algorithm and hence do not take full advantage of the receiver clock synchronizing for better accuracy, efficiency and broader applications. In this study, we develop a single differencing algorithm for this emerging receiver, especially for short baseline solutions. Our results indicate that the single differencing algorithm enhances the resolving accuracy and efficiency, it also widens the applications. In addition, this innovate algorithm is able to observe the ground-based carrier phase wind-up (GPWU) effects clearly for the first time. Our major research results are summarized as the followings: (1) A real-time attitude determination algorithm is developed based on single difference carrier phase observations from multi-antenna synchronized GNSS receiver. Comparing with the double differencing algorithm, it has more observations and redundancy. Its solutions show better repeatability and lower correlations among parameters. In this algorithm, we design an ambiguity substitution approach (ASA), which separates the fractional initial phase from the integer parts of single difference ambiguities effectively, thus narrows the searching space of ambiguities and improves the efficiency and correctness of integer ambiguity fixing. (2) We construct a Multipath Hemispherical Model (MHM) to mitigate the multipath effects. The MHM is applicable not only for static environment but also for dynamic carriers with static multipath environment such as ships and airplanes. (3) We also propose the Single Antenna Yaw

  18. Quantum dot microlasers with external feedback: a chaotic system close to the quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Ferdinand; Hopfmann, Caspar; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas; Kamp, Martin; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Forchel, Alfred; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Kanter, Ido

    2012-06-01

    Studying cavity quantum electrodynamical effects is an emerging and important field of research for the understanding of the many body quantum theory as well as for the generation of a new type of efficient lasers. Here we report a dramatic change in the photon statistics of quantum dot based micropillar lasers where a finite fraction of the emission is reflected back into the microcavity after a roundtrip time τ in an external cavity, where τ greatly exceeds the coherence time. Photon bunching was observed above the threshold current where the second order autocorrelation function g(2)(τ) at zero-lag can reach values up to 3.51+/-0.06. The change in the photon statistics of the two non-degenerated fundamental modes were found to be correlated, indicating non-trivial interactions between both cavity modes. Furthermore the optical feedback led to revivals of the bunching signal in integer multiples of the round trip time of the external cavity and to a decrease in the coherence time of the laser. These phenomena compare well with milliwatt chaotic lasers induced by an external feedback, indicating that chaos might occur in the nanowatt lasing regime where fluctuations in the photon statistics are in the leading order.

  19. Photonic-aided pre-coding QAM signal transmission in multi-antenna radio over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying; Zhu, Ming; Xin, Xiangjun; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2015-11-01

    A novel method has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated to provide photonic-aided pre-coding quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal transmission in multi-antenna radio over fiber system to increase the throughput. For downlink, two different multi-level amplitude-shift-keying (M-ASK) modulated signals, such as 4-ASK signals, are applied on two uncorrelated optical Mach-Zehnder modulators at central office. After photonic-aided pre-coding module and photo-detection process, the received M-ASK mm-waves from two remote access units (RAUs) can be synthesized to a M2-QAM signal in the proposed system. Regardless of forward error correction (FEC) coding overhead, the 4-Gb/s and 8-Gb/s 16-QAM mm-wave signals are obtained from two independent 2-Gb/s and 4-Gb/s 4-ASK 40-GHz channels, respectively. The experimental results show that a doubled bit rate of the original 4-ASK one can be achieved without additional digital signal processing (DSP) in small cell RAUs and mobile users.

  20. KILOPARSEC-SCALE SIMULATIONS OF STAR FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES. I. THE UNMAGNETIZED AND ZERO-FEEDBACK LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loo, Sven; Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2013-02-10

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of self-gravitating dense gas on scales of 1 kpc down to {approx}< parsec in a galactic disk, designed to study dense clump formation from giant molecular clouds (GMCs). These structures are expected to be the precursors to star clusters and this process may be the rate limiting step controlling star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We follow the thermal evolution of the gas down to {approx}5 K using extinction-dependent heating and cooling functions. We do not yet include magnetic fields or localized stellar feedback, so the evolution of the GMCs and clumps is determined solely by self-gravity balanced by thermal and turbulent pressure support and the large-scale galactic shear. While cloud structures and densities change significantly during the simulation, GMC virial parameters remain mostly above unity for timescales exceeding the free-fall time of GMCs indicating that energy from galactic shear and large-scale cloud motions continuously cascades down to and within the GMCs. We implement star formation at a slow, inefficient rate of 2% per local free-fall time, but even this yields global star formation rates that are about two orders of magnitude larger than the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt relation due to overproduction of dense gas clumps. We expect a combination of magnetic support and localized stellar feedback is required to inhibit dense clump formation to {approx}1% of the rate that results from the nonmagnetic, zero-feedback limit.

  1. Exponential Scaling Limit of the Single-Particle Anderson Model Via Adaptive Feedback Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-02-01

    We propose a twofold extension of the Germinet-Klein bootstrap multi-scale analysis (BMSA) for the Anderson models on graphs. First, we show, with the help of a single scaling algorithm, that power-law decay bounds at some initial scale imply an asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), even on graphs (of polynomial growth) which do not fulfill the uniform scalability condition required for the existing BMSA techniques. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of the EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than Hölder continuity of any positive order.

  2. Noncanonical Activin A Signaling in PC12 Cells: A Self-Limiting Feedback Loop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao-Qi; Liang, Wen-Zhao; Cui, Yang; He, Jin-Ting; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wang, Yue; Xue, Long-Xing; Ji, Qiu-Ye; Shi, Wei; Shao, Yan-Kun; Mang, Jing; Xu, Zhong-Xin

    2016-05-01

    Activin A (Act A), a member of transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a neuroprotective role in multiple neurological diseases through Act A/Smads signal activation. Traditionally, the up-regulation of Act A gene and extracellular Act A accumulation show the signal activation as a linear pathway. However, one of our discoveries indicated that Act A could lead a loop signaling in ischemic injury. To clarify the characteristic of this loop signaling in a non-pathological state, we up-regulated the expression of Act A, monitored extracellular Act A accumulation and examined the activity of Act A signaling, which was quantified by the expression of phosphorylated Smad3 and the fluorescence intensity of Smad4 in nuclei. The results demonstrated a noncanonical Act A signal loop with self-amplifying property in PC12 cells. Further, it showed self-limiting behavior due to temporary activation and spontaneous attenuation. This periodic behavior of Act A signal loop was found to be regulated by the level of Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA). Moreover, increased activity of Act A signal loop could promote PC12 cell proliferation and enhance the survival rate of cells to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation. These practical discoveries will bring new insight on the functional outcome of Act A signaling in neurological diseases by the further understanding: loop signaling. PMID:26721511

  3. The physical properties of z > 2 Lyman limit systems: new constraints for feedback and accretion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-02-01

    We study the physical properties of a homogeneous sample of 157 optically thick absorption line systems at redshifts ˜1.8-4.4, selected from a high-dispersion spectroscopic survey of Lyman limit systems (LLSs). By means of multiple ionization models and Bayesian techniques, we derive the posterior probability distribution functions for the density, metallicity, temperature and dust content of the absorbing gas. We find that z > 2 LLSs are highly ionized with ionization parameters between -3 ≲ log U ≲ -2, depending on the H I column density. LLSs are characterized by low temperatures (T < 5 × 104K) and reside in dust-poor environments. Between z ˜ 2.5-3.5, ˜80 per cent of the LLSs have physical densities between nH ˜ 10- 3.5-10- 2 cm- 3 for the assumed UV background, but we caution that a degeneracy between the ionization parameter and the intensity of the radiation field prevents robust inference on the density and sizes of LLSs. Conversely, metallicity estimates are less sensitive to the assumptions behind ionization corrections. LLSs at z > 2 are characterized by a broad unimodal distribution over > 4 orders of magnitude, with a peak at log Z/Z⊙ ˜ -2. LLSs are metal poor, significantly less enriched than DLAs, with ˜70 per cent of the metallicity PDF below log Z/Z⊙ ≤ -1.5. The median metallicity of super LLSs with log N_{H I}≥ 19 rapidly evolves with redshift, with a 10-fold increase between z ˜ 2.1-3.6 (˜1.5 Gyr). Based on this sample, we find that LLSs at z = 2.5-3.5 account for ˜15 per cent of all the metals produced by UV-selected galaxies. The implications for theories of cold gas accretion and metal ejection from galaxies are also discussed.

  4. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  5. Investigation, development and application of optimal output feedback theory. Volume 2: Development of an optimal, limited state feedback outer-loop digital flight control system for 3-D terminal area operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.; Halyo, N.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains the development of a digital outer-loop three dimensional radio navigation (3-D RNAV) flight control system for a small commercial jet transport. The outer-loop control system is designed using optimal stochastic limited state feedback techniques. Options investigated using the optimal limited state feedback approach include integrated versus hierarchical control loop designs, 20 samples per second versus 5 samples per second outer-loop operation and alternative Type 1 integration command errors. Command generator tracking techniques used in the digital control design enable the jet transport to automatically track arbitrary curved flight paths generated by waypoints. The performance of the design is demonstrated using detailed nonlinear aircraft simulations in the terminal area, frequency domain multi-input sigma plots, frequency domain single-input Bode plots and closed-loop poles. The response of the system to a severe wind shear during a landing approach is also presented.

  6. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required ‘robustness margin’ for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations. PMID:27493558

  7. Implications of time-delayed feedback control on limit cycle oscillation of a two-dimensional supersonic lifting surface,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Chen, Z.; Librescu, L.; Marzocca, P.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the problem of implications of time delay feedback control of a two-dimensional supersonic lifting surface on the flutter boundary and on its character, that is, benign or catastrophic, is addressed. In this context, the structural and aerodynamic nonlinearities are included in the aeroelastic governing equations. The model and the associated theory are developed for linear and nonlinear plunging and pitching full-state proportional and velocity feedback controls. Center manifold reduction and normal form theory are applied to investigate the stability in the post-flutter flight speed regimes. Numerical simulations are carried out to determine the implications of time delay in the considered controls, but are restricted to the cases of proportional feedback control and no structural damping.

  8. Limited impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine productivity due to biogeochemical feedbacks in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, Christopher J.; Landolfi, Angela; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The impact of increasing anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine biogeochemistry is uncertain. We performed simulations to quantify its effect on nitrogen cycling and marine productivity in a global 3-D ocean biogeochemistry model. Nitrogen fixation provides an efficient feedback by decreasing immediately to deposition, whereas water column denitrification increases more gradually in the slowly expanding oxygen deficient zones. Counterintuitively, nitrogen deposition near oxygen deficient zones causes a net loss of marine nitrogen due to the stoichiometry of denitrification. In our idealized atmospheric deposition simulations that only account for nitrogen cycle perturbations, these combined stabilizing feedbacks largely compensate deposition and suppress the increase in global marine productivity to <2%, in contrast to a simulation that neglects nitrogen cycle feedbacks that predicts an increase of >15%. Our study emphasizes including the dynamic response of nitrogen fixation and denitrification to atmospheric nitrogen deposition to predict future changes of the marine nitrogen cycle and productivity.

  9. Using Statement Banks to Return Online Feedback: Limitations of the Transmission Approach in a Credit-Bearing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Philip; Rowe, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Electronic marking tools that incorporate statement banks have become increasingly prevalent within higher education. In an experiment, printed and emailed feedback was returned to 243 first-year students on a credit-bearing laboratory report assessment. A transmission approach was used, students being provided with comments on their work, but no…

  10. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  11. Thymic regulatory T cell niche size is dictated by limiting interleukin 2 from antigen-bearing dendritic cells and feedback competition

    PubMed Central

    Weist, Brian M.; Kurd, Nadia; Boussier, Jeremy; Chan, Shiao Wei; Robey, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic regulatory T (Treg) cell production requires interleukin 2 (IL-2) and agonist TCR ligands, and is controlled by competition for a limited developmental niche, but the thymic sources of IL-2 and the factors that limit access to the niche are poorly understood. Here we show that IL-2 produced by antigen-bearing dendritic cells plays a key role in Treg cell development, and that existing Treg cells limit new Treg cell development by competing for IL-2. . Our data suggest that antigen-presenting cells that can provide both IL-2 and a TCR ligand comprise the thymic niche, and that competition by existing Treg cells for a limited supply of IL-2 provides negative feedback for new Treg cell production. PMID:25939026

  12. Transform-limited pulse generation in the gigahertz region from a gain-switched distributed-feedback laser diode using spectral windowing.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, M; Suzuki, K; Kimura, Y

    1990-06-15

    For the first time, to our knowledge, transform-limited and high-power picosecond pulses in the gigahertz region are successfully generated from a distributed-feedback laser diode using spectral manipulation with a narrow-band Fabry-Perot resonator and erbium fiber amplifiers. The pulses, which before the optical filtering have a width of 27 psec and a spectral width of 1.24 nm, are transformed to transform-limited pulses with a width of 17 psec and a spectral width of 0.21 nm. The peak power of the pulse at a 6-GHz repetition rate is amplified to greater than 90 mW with an erbium fiber amplifier. PMID:19768057

  13. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light. PMID:24365827

  14. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  15. Prey Vulnerability Limits Top-Down Control and Alters Reciprocal Feedbacks in a Subsidized Model Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, William I.; Palen, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Resource subsidies increase the productivity of recipient food webs and can affect ecosystem dynamics. Subsidies of prey often support elevated predator biomass which may intensify top-down control and reduce the flow of reciprocal subsidies into adjacent ecosystems. However, top-down control in subsidized food webs may be limited if primary consumers posses morphological or behavioral traits that limit vulnerability to predation. In forested streams, terrestrial prey support high predator biomass creating the potential for strong top-down control, however armored primary consumers often dominate the invertebrate assemblage. Using empirically based simulation models, we tested the response of stream food webs to variations in subsidy magnitude, prey vulnerability, and the presence of two top predators. While terrestrial prey inputs increased predator biomass (+12%), the presence of armored primary consumers inhibited top-down control, and diverted most aquatic energy (∼75%) into the riparian forest through aquatic insect emergence. Food webs without armored invertebrates experienced strong trophic cascades, resulting in higher algal (∼50%) and detrital (∼1600%) biomass, and reduced insect emergence (−90%). These results suggest prey vulnerability can mediate food web responses to subsidies, and that top-down control can be arrested even when predator-invulnerable consumers are uncommon (20%) regardless of the level of subsidy. PMID:24465732

  16. High normalized beta plasmas exceeding the ideal stability limit and projected RWM active stabilization performance using newly installed feedback sensors in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Bae, C.; Bae, Y. S.; in, Y. K.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, H. K.; Choi, M. J.; Yun, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    H-mode plasma operation of KSTAR has been expanded to significantly surpass the ideal MHD no-wall beta limit by achieving normalized beta up to 4.3 while reducing plasma internal inductance to near 0.7 exceeding the computed n = 1 ideal no-wall limit by a factor of 1.6. These high normalized beta values have been achieved in discharges having BT in the range 0.9-1.1 T after the plasma reached flattop current of 0.35-0.4 MA, with the highest neutral beam heating power of 4 MW. A significant conclusion of the analysis of these plasmas is that low- n global kink/ballooning or RWMs were not detected, and therefore were not the cause of the plasma termination. Advances from the 2015 run campaign aiming to achieve prolonged pulse duration at maximum normalized beta and to subsequently investigate the MHD stability of these plasmas will be reported. As KSTAR H-mode operation can now routinely surpass the ideal no-wall stability limit, n = 1 RWM active control is planned for the device. RWM active feedback using a newly installed set of poloidal magnetic field sensors mounted on the passive stabilizer plates and designed for optimal performance is analyzed using the VALEN-3D code. The advantages of the new sensors over other device sensors for RWM active control are discussed. Supported by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  17. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  18. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz−1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise. PMID:27312284

  19. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Kanegae, R.

    2016-06-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz‑1/2, which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  20. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, R

    2016-01-01

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz(-1/2), which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise. PMID:27312284

  1. Teleoperator comfort and psychometric stability: Criteria for limiting master-controller forces of operation and feedback during telemanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Steven F.; Hershkowitz, Elaine; Zik, John

    1989-01-01

    The following question is addressed: How much force should operators exert, or experience, when operating a telemanipulator master-controller for sustained periods without encountering significant fatigue and discomfort, and without loss of stability in psychometric perception of force. The need to minimize exertion demands to avoid fatigue is diametrically opposed by the need to present a wide range of force stimuli to enhance perception of applied or reflected forces. For 104 minutes subjects repetitiously performed a series of 15 s isometric pinch grasps; controlled at 5, 15, and 25 percent of their maximum voluntary strength. Cyclic pinch grasps were separated by rest intervals of 7.5 and 15 s. Upon completion of every 10 minute period, subjects interrupted grasping activities to gage the intensity of fatigue and discomfort in the hand and forearm using a cross-modal matching technique. A series of psychometric tests were then conducted to determine accuracy and stability in the subject's perception of force experienced. Results showed that onset of sensations of discomfort and fatigue were dependent upon the magnitude of grasp force, work/rest ratio, and progression of task. Declines in force magnitude estimation slopes, indicating a reduction in force perception sensitivity, occurred with increased grasp force when work/rest ratios were greater than 1.0. Specific recommendations for avoiding discomfort and shifts in force perception, by limiting pinch grasp force required for master-controller operation and range of force reflection or work/rest ratios, are provided.

  2. Magnetic turbulence and pressure gradient feedback effect of the 1/2 mode soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic limit in large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, J.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Ohdachi, S.; Narushima, Y.

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the feedback process between the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradients in Large Helical Device (LHD) inward-shifted configurations as well as its role in the transition between the soft-hard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for instabilities driven by the mode 1/2 in the middle plasma. In the present paper, we summarize the results of two simulations with different Lundquist numbers, S=2.5×10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6}, assuming a plasma in the slow reconnection regime. The results for the high Lundquist number simulation show that the magnetic turbulence and the pressure gradient in the middle plasma region of LHD are below the critical value to drive the transition to the hard MHD regime, therefore only relaxations in the soft MHD limit are triggered (1/2 sawtooth-like events) [Phys. Plasmas 19, 082512 (2012)]. In the case of the simulation with low Lundquist number, the system reaches the hard MHD limit and a plasma collapse is observed.

  3. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  4. Coress feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This issue of CORESS feedback highlights yet again the importance of checking medications before administration and of adequate handover. Documentation of important medical data including drug allergies, as failed to happen in the case described below, is vital. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development.

  5. Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Malgorzata; Romano, David; Herrero, Ana; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; Birtwistle, Marc; Quehenberger, Franz; Hatzl, Stefan; Kholodenko, Boris N; Segatto, Oreste; Kolch, Walter; Zebisch, Armin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed

  6. Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Milewska, Malgorzata; Romano, David; Herrero, Ana; Guerriero, Maria Luisa; Birtwistle, Marc; Quehenberger, Franz; Hatzl, Stefan; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Segatto, Oreste; Kolch, Walter; Zebisch, Armin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed

  7. Feedback and the Reconstruction of Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Philip; And Others

    This investigation of the impact of feedback upon scrambled discourse was intended to show the effects of idiosyncratic processing and to provide a more sensitive indicator of feedback usefulness. Learner schemata, text organization, and feedback strategies interact in processing discourse, although past research has favored limited models…

  8. CORESS feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This edition of CORESS feedback reinforces the very basic principles of obtaining and using an accurate history and examination to make an appropriate diagnosis in the face of equivocal or uninformative investigations and failing equipment. Case 126 illustrates once again the potential deleterious consequences of failing to check a drug correctly prior to administration. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development. CORESS relies heavily on the expertise of the specialty members of the Advisory Board in the preparation of feedback reports and dissemination of safety information related to surgical practice. The organisation is grateful to the following members of the Advisory Board and Board of Directors who have contributed to published reports in 2010 and 2011: Board of Directors: Viscount Bridgeman, Mr Chris Chilton, Mr Martin Else, Professor Nicholas Gair, Mr Adam Lewis CVO, Miss Clare Marx, Mr Andrew May, Lord Bernard Ribeiro, Mr Frank Smith, Mr Peter Tait, Mr Denis Wilkins. Advisory Board: Ms E Baird, Mr Daryl I Baker, Mr Ken Catchpole, Dr Lauren Morgan, Mr Stephen Clark, Mr Robert Davies, Mr Mark Deakin, Ms D Eastwood, Mr Barry Ferris, Mr Mark Fordham, Mr Paul J Gibbs, Mr Grey Giddins, Mr Robert Greatorex, Mr Mervyn Griffiths, Mr John Hammond, Mr William Harkness, Mr M Hemadri, Mr Richard Holdsworth, Miss Claire Hopkins, Professor Zygmunt Krukowski, Mr N Mamode, Mr Ian Martin, Surgeon Commander Mark Midwinter, Mr J Richard Novell, Professor Gerald O’Sullivan, Dr Gerard Panting, Mr Mike Pittam, Dr Mike Powers QC, Ms Patricia Scott, Professor Alastair Thompson, Dr J P van Besouw, Mr Mark Vipond, Mr David Webster, Mr Michael Wyatt.

  9. Numerical Studies of Fluid Leakage from a Geologic DisposalReservoir for CO2 Show Self-Limiting Feedback between Fluid Flow and HeatTransfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-22

    Leakage of CO2 from a hypothetical geologic storage reservoir along an idealized fault zone has been simulated, including transitions between supercritical, liquid, and gaseous CO2. We find strong non-isothermal effects due to boiling and Joule-Thomson cooling of expanding CO2. Leakage fluxes are limited by limitations in conductive heat transfer to the fault zone. The interplay between multiphase flow and heat transfer effects produces non-monotonic leakage behavior.

  10. The Use of 360-Degree Feedback Compared to Traditional Evaluative Feedback for the Professional Growth of Teachers in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahar, Jo-Anne; Strobert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Empirical research on the use of 360-degree feedback in elementary and secondary educational settings is quite limited. This study sought to understand teachers' perceptions of the quality of feedback they received from the traditional administrative evaluative feedback to feedback they received from a multi-source feedback process. Results from…

  11. Student Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  12. Feedback between interacting transport channels.

    PubMed

    Brandes, T

    2015-05-01

    A model of particle transport through a large number of channels is introduced. Interactions among the particles can lead to a strong suppression of fluctuations in the particle number statistics. Within a mean-field-type limit, this becomes equivalent to a time-dependent (nonautonomous) collective feedback control mechanism. The dynamics can be interpreted as a diffusive spreading of a feedback signal across the channels that displays scaling, can be quantified via the flow of information, and becomes visible, e.g., in the spectral function of the particle noise. PMID:26066161

  13. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  14. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  15. Feedback on Feedback--Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speicher, Oranna; Stollhans, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that providing assessment feedback through the medium of screencasts is favourably received by students and encourages deeper engagement with the feedback given by the language teacher (inter alia Abdous & Yoshimura, 2010; Brick & Holmes, 2008; Cann, 2007; Stannard, 2007). In this short paper we will report the…

  16. A Content Analysis of Peer Feedback in Triadic Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avent, Janeé R.; Wahesh, Edward; Purgason, Lucy L.; Borders, L. DiAnne; Mobley, A. Keith

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research on the types of peer feedback exchanged during triadic supervision. Through a content analysis, the authors found that students provided feedback about counseling performance and cognitive counseling skills most often in supervision sessions. However, there were differences in the types of feedback exchanged across three…

  17. Feedback: All that Effort, but What Is the Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Margaret; Handley, Karen; Millar, Jill; O'Donovan, Berry

    2010-01-01

    Constraints in resourcing and student dissatisfaction with assessment feedback mean that the effectiveness of our feedback practices has never been so important. Drawing on findings from a three-year study focused on student engagement with feedback, this paper reveals the limited extent to which effectiveness can be accurately measured and…

  18. Teachers' Classroom Feedback: Still Trying to Get It Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore

    2012-01-01

    This article examines feedback traditionally given by teachers in schools. Such feedback tends to focus on children's acquisition and retrieval of externally prescribed knowledge which is then assessed against mandated tests. It suggests that, from a sociocultural learning perspective, feedback directed towards such objectives may limit children's…

  19. Using "Signals" for Appropriate Feedback: Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanes, Zeynep; Arnold, Kimberly E.; King, Abigail Selzer; Remnet, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is a crucial form of information for learners. With the availability of new educational technologies, the manner in which feedback is delivered has changed tremendously. Existing research on the learning outcomes of the content and nature of computer mediated feedback is limited and contradictory. "Signals" is an educational data-mining…

  20. Quantum Feedback Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Quantum amplification is essential for various quantum technologies such as communication and weak-signal detection. However, its practical use is still limited due to inevitable device fragility that brings about distortion in the output signal or state. This paper presents a general theory that solves this critical issue. The key idea is simple and easy to implement: just a passive feedback of the amplifier's auxiliary mode, which is usually thrown away. In fact, this scheme makes the controlled amplifier significantly robust, and furthermore it realizes the minimum-noise amplification even under realistic imperfections. Hence, the presented theory enables the quantum amplification to be implemented at a practical level. Also, a nondegenerate parametric amplifier subjected to a special detuning is proposed to show that, additionally, it has a broadband nature.

  1. Distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Andrews, J. T.; Evans, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A ridge waveguide distributed feedback laser was developed in InGaAsP. These devices have demonstrated CW output powers over 7 mW with threshold currents as low as 60 mA at 25 C. Measurements of the frequency response of these devices show a 3 dB bandwidth of about 2 GHz, which may be limited by the mount. The best devices have a single mode spectra over the entire temperature range tested with a side mode suppression of about 20 dB in both CW and pulsed modes. The design of this device, including detailed modeling of the ridge guide structure, effective index calculations, and a discussion of the grating configuration are presented. Also, the fabrication of the devices is presented in some detail, especially the fabrication of and subsequent growth over the grating. In addition, a high frequency fiber pigtailed package was designed and tested, which is a suitable prototype for a commercial package.

  2. The Mythology of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  3. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  4. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  5. Chromaticity Feedback at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-05-23

    Chromaticity feedback during the ramp to high beam energies has been demonstrated in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report we review the feedback design and measurement technique. Commissioning experiences including interaction with existing tune and coupling feedback are presented together with supporting experimental data.

  6. Combining AZD8931, a novel EGFR/HER2/HER3 signalling inhibitor, with AZD5363 limits AKT inhibitor induced feedback and enhances antitumour efficacy in HER2-amplified breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Crafter, Claire; Vincent, John P; Tang, Eric; Dudley, Phillippa; James, Neil H; Klinowska, Teresa; Davies, Barry R

    2015-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling network is frequently de-regulated in breast cancer and has been shown to mediate resistance to anti-HER2 agents. Whilst constitutive activation of this pathway is emerging as a marker of sensitivity to various PI3K pathway inhibitors, activity of these agents in the clinic may be limited by the presence of feedback loops, leading to reactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as HER2/HER3. To determine whether inhibition of HER2 could increase the efficacy of AZD5363, a novel AKT inhibitor, a panel of breast cancer cells was dosed with AZD5363 in combination with AZD8931, an inhibitor of EGFR/HER2/HER3 signalling. We show that the combined treatment resulted in synergistic growth inhibition and enhanced cell death, specifically in the HER2-amplified cell lines. Investigation of the mechanism by western blot analysis revealed that the addition of AZD8931 prevented the induction of HER2/HER3 phosphorylation induced by AZD5363 and resulted in concomitant inhibition of both the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signalling pathways and induction of apoptosis. Using the HCC1954 xenograft model, which is resistant to trastuzumab, we show that the combination of AZD5363 and AZD8931 is more efficacious than either agent alone, resulting in profound tumour regressions. We conclude that the activity of AZD5363 in HER2-amplified breast cancer cells is enhanced by the addition of AZD8931 and that dual targeting of AKT and EGFR/HER2/HER3 signalling is an attractive treatment option to be explored in the clinic. PMID:26095475

  7. Feedbacks in Human-Landscape Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L.; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change.

  8. Neural cryptography with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  9. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  10. From Copying to Learning: Using Exemplars to Engage Students with Assessment Criteria and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Karen; Williams, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to pedagogic theory, and if feedback is to be effective, students need to engage with it and apply it at some point in the future. However, student dissatisfaction with feedback--as evidenced in the National Student Survey--suggests that there are problems which limit student engagement with feedback, such as their perception…

  11. Four perspectives on climate feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldl, N.; Roe, G. H.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial pattern of climate feedbacks depends on how the feedbacks are defined. We employ an idealized aquaplanet simulation with radiative kernels diagnosed for the precise model setup and characterize the meridional structure of feedbacks under four different definitions: local feedbacks, global feedbacks, nondimensional feedback factors, and relative humidity feedbacks. First, the spatial pattern of the reference response (i.e., the Planck feedback) is found to vary with definition, largely as a consequence of polar-amplified warming, which affects other high-latitude feedbacks as well. Second, locally defined feedbacks allow for decomposition of the surface temperature response as a function of feedbacks, forcing, and heat transport. Third, different insights into the dynamical and thermodynamical underpinnings of the subtropical moisture response are gained by comparing different versions of humidity feedbacks. Thus, alternative approaches to the conventional, global definition of feedbacks offer several advantages for understanding patterns of warming and, ultimately, regional climate predictability.

  12. The Power of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John; Timperley, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but this impact can be either positive or negative. Its power is frequently mentioned in articles about learning and teaching, but surprisingly few recent studies have systematically investigated its meaning. This article provides a conceptual analysis of feedback and…

  13. Linear quantum feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, J. E.; Gohm, R.; Yanagisawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    The mathematical theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed [J. Gough and M. R. James, e-print arXiv:0804.3442v2] for general open quantum dynamical systems interacting with bosonic input fields. In this article we show, for the special case of linear dynamical Markovian systems with instantaneous feedback connections, that the transfer functions can be deduced and agree with the algebraic rules obtained in the nonlinear case. Using these rules, we derive the transfer functions for linear quantum systems in series, in cascade, and in feedback arrangements mediated by beam splitter devices.

  14. Global Feedback Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Serrano, Lawrence Doolittle

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as the ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.

  15. Global Feedback Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as themore » ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.« less

  16. Nursing students' perceptions regarding the amount and type of written feedback required to enhance their learning.

    PubMed

    Giles, Tracey M; Gilbert, Sandra; McNeill, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Effective feedback can enhance student learning, but limited evidence exists on whether nursing students actually use and learn from written feedback. This descriptive survey explored nursing students' perceptions regarding the amount and type of written feedback required to enhance their learning. In stage one, 362 students completed a 28-item questionnaire regarding feedback experiences and preferences; in stage two, 227 students selected a preferred feedback option for a final topic assignment. Findings revealed that many of the students wished to be engaged with the feedback process and believed effective written feedback can and does enhance their learning. However many students also reported learning barriers-including absent, inadequate, ambiguous, inconsistent, and ineffective feedback-indicating a significant disconnect between desired and actual feedback. Recommendations include a greater focus on engaging nursing students in the feedback process and evaluating the effectiveness of written feedback for individual students. PMID:24308536

  17. Ambulatory Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Herbert; Weeks, Bill

    1985-01-01

    This presentation discusses instrumentation that will be used for a specific event, which we hope will carry on to future events within the Space Shuttle program. The experiment is the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) scheduled for Spacelab 3, currently scheduled to be launched in November, 1984. The objectives of the AFTE are to determine the effectiveness of autogenic feedback in preventing or reducing space adaptation syndrome (SAS), to monitor and record in-flight data from the crew, to determine if prediction criteria for SAS can be established, and, finally, to develop an ambulatory instrument package to mount the crew throughout the mission. The purpose of the Ambulatory Feedback System (AFS) is to record the responses of the subject during a provocative event in space and provide a real-time feedback display to reinforce the training.

  18. Haptic Feedback in Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS) holds great promise for improving the accuracy and dexterity of a surgeon while minimizing trauma to the patient. However, widespread clinical success with RMIS has been marginal. It is hypothesized that the lack of haptic (force and tactile) feedback presented to the surgeon is a limiting factor. This review explains the technical challenges of creating haptic feedback for robot-assisted surgery and provides recent results that evaluate the effectiveness of haptic feedback in mock surgical tasks. Recent Findings Haptic feedback systems for RMIS are still under development and evaluation. Most provide only force feedback, with limited fidelity. The major challenge at this time is sensing forces applied to the patient. A few tactile feedback systems for RMIS have been created, but their practicality for clinical implementation needs to be shown. It is particularly difficult to sense and display spatially distributed tactile information. The cost-benefit ratio for haptic feedback in RMIS has not been established. Summary The designs of existing commercial RMIS systems are not conducive for force feedback, and creative solutions are needed to create compelling tactile feedback systems. Surgeons, engineers, and neuroscientists should work together to develop effective solutions for haptic feedback in RMIS. PMID:19057225

  19. Remote feedback stabilization of tokamak instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K. )

    1994-05-01

    A novel remote suppressor consisting of an injected ion beam has been used for the stabilization of plasma instabilities. A collisionless curvature-driven trapped-particle instability, an [bold E][times][bold B] flute mode and an ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability have been successfully suppressed down to noise levels using this scheme. Furthermore, the first experimental demonstration of a multimode feedback stabilization with a single sensor--suppressor pair has been achieved. Two modes (an [bold E][times][bold B] flute and an ITG mode) were simultaneously stabilized with a simple state-feedback-type method where more state'' information was generated from a single-sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing. The above experiments may be considered as paradigms for controlling several important tokamak instabilities. First, feedback suppression of edge fluctuations in a tokamak with a suitable form of insulated segmented poloidal limiter sections used as Langmuir-probe-like suppressors is proposed. Other feedback control schemes are proposed for the suppression of electrostatic core fluctuations via appropriately phased ion density input from a modulated neutral beam. Most importantly, a scheme to control major disruptions in tokamaks via feedback suppression of kink (and possibly) tearing modes is discussed. This may be accomplished by using a modulated neutral beam suppressor in a feedback loop, which will supply a momentum input of appropriate phase and amplitude. Simple theoretical models predict modest levels of beam energy, current, and power.

  20. Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The term "feedback" is often used to describe all kinds of comments made after the fact, including advice, praise, and evaluation. But none of these are feedback, strictly speaking. Basically, feedback is information about how one is doing in his or her efforts to reach a goal. Whether feedback is just there to be grasped or is provided by another…

  1. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change. PMID:23592016

  2. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  3. A Cognitively Oriented Psychologist Looks at Bio-feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Richard S.

    1975-01-01

    It is advocated that bio-feedback research be approached within the larger context of emotion and adaption and oriented to the wide variety of mediators that affect the reaction pattern, rather than be treated as a special or unique kind of process limited to the bio-feedback laboratory. (EH)

  4. Using Technology to Enhance Feedback to Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Lenwood; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2016-01-01

    The importance of effective and efficient feedback is paramount during the student teaching experience. This experience is a vital component of many teacher preparation programs. During these limited experiences, supervisors deliver performance feedback that is designed to improve the way student teachers implement evidence-based practices and/or…

  5. Video-Based Feedback on Student Assessment: Scarily Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael; Phillips, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Assessment feedback is an important part of students' learning experiences; however, text-based feedback has limitations. This article proposes an alternative in the form of individualised video recordings of the lecturer discussing each assignment. This research reports on 126 undergraduate and postgraduate students' reactions to 5-minute videos…

  6. Baseband feedback for SAFARI-SPICA using Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounab, A.; de Korte, P.; Cros, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Monna, B.; Mossel, R.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ravera, L.

    We report on the performance of the digital baseband feedback circuit developed to readout and process signals from arrays of transition edge sensors for SPICA-SAFARI in frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). The standard procedure to readout the SQUID current amplifiers is to use a feedback loop (flux-locked loop: FLL). However the achievable FFL bandwidth is limited by the cable transport delay t_d, which makes standard feedback inconvenient. A much better approach is to use baseband feedback. We have developed a model of the electronic readout chain for SPICA-SAFARI instrument by using an Anlog-digital co-simulation based on Simulink-System Generator environment.

  7. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  8. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  9. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  10. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  11. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  12. Feedback cooling of currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Sean

    1989-02-01

    Just as feedback can be used to correct errors in the output voltages of amplifiers, it can also be used to remove noise from the current through a resistor. Such a feedback amplifier behaves as a refrigerator cooling the electrons in a resistor connnected to it. This principle has been recognized since the 1940s but has been largely ignored because the cooling power available from such refrigerators is miniscule. It is pointed out here that the method might be practical for cooling the currents in the microscopic circuits that are typical of modern electrical engineering and recent studies in transport physics.

  13. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less

  14. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  15. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    We consider the task of deterministically entangling two remote qubits using joint measurement and feedback, but no directly entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Finally, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  16. Review of Assessment Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  17. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  18. Giving Students Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Some of the special challenges associated with evaluation and grading in the large class are discussed. Suggestions for evaluation methods include seeking clarity, reducing the stress of test administration, giving feedback, guarding against errors in record keeping, and returning exams efficiently and with respect. (MLW)

  19. Feedback at 360 Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatt, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Multirater or 360-degree feedback is a sampling technique that can be used at three levels: for developmental purposes, appraisal, and compensation. It was designed to be small-scale, personalized, and occasional. Implementation tips and pitfalls for districts are described. (MLH)

  20. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  1. Feedback: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James

    2007-01-01

    The usefulness of the feedback received on assessments undertaken by accounting students during their degree programme is an area about which little has been written. Given the increasing significance of transparency in the academic process, as evidenced through the development of explicit programme and module learning outcomes, it seems anomalous…

  2. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  3. Real, Fast, Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To better comprehend the needs of your clientele and colleagues, it is essential to use survey website applications. Doing so will help you become more efficient in obtaining constructive, timely feedback in order to adjust programming, therefore optimizing the impacts of Extension activities. Citing the most influential survey experts both in and…

  4. Investigation of rank 2 and higher output feedback for pole placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, B.

    1974-01-01

    A common feature of several pole placement techniques is discussed and the use of a dyadic feedback matrix is presented. The limitation of this design is examined and a design involving output feedback matrices of Rank greater than one is developed as a logical extension of the dyadic feedback design. An example is presented to illustrate the design procedure.

  5. Feedback: Part of a System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Just as a thermostat adjusts room temperature, effective feedback helps maintain a supportive environment for learning. Because of the many factors affecting how recipients respond to feedback, research offers no simple prescription for making feedback work effectively. What works in one classroom for one teacher will not work for another teacher.…

  6. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  7. Reward feedback accelerates motor learning.

    PubMed

    Nikooyan, Ali A; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2015-01-15

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reward feedback alone can drive motor learning. However, it is not yet clear whether reward feedback alone can lead to learning when a perturbation is introduced abruptly, or how a reward gradient can modulate learning. In this study, we provide reward feedback that decays continuously with increasing error. We asked whether it is possible to learn an abrupt visuomotor rotation by reward alone, and if the learning process could be modulated by combining reward and sensory feedback and/or by using different reward landscapes. We designed a novel visuomotor learning protocol during which subjects experienced an abruptly introduced rotational perturbation. Subjects received either visual feedback or reward feedback, or a combination of the two. Two different reward landscapes, where the reward decayed either linearly or cubically with distance from the target, were tested. Results demonstrate that it is possible to learn from reward feedback alone and that the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning. An analysis of the underlying mechanisms reveals that although reward feedback alone does not allow for sensorimotor remapping, it can nonetheless lead to broad generalization, highlighting a dissociation between remapping and generalization. Also, the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning without compromising sensorimotor remapping. These findings suggest that the use of reward feedback is a promising approach to either supplement or substitute sensory feedback in the development of improved neurorehabilitation techniques. More generally, they point to an important role played by reward in the motor learning process. PMID:25355957

  8. Feedback: Focusing Attention on Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Margaret; Handley, Karen; Millar, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Within many higher education systems there is a search for means to increase levels of student satisfaction with assessment feedback. This article suggests that the search is under way in the wrong place by concentrating on feedback as a product rather than looking more widely to feedback as a long-term dialogic process in which all parties are…

  9. How to Give Professional Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  10. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  11. Cloud CCN feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result.

  12. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  13. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  14. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  15. Regional feedbacks under changing climate and land-use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle Bayer, L.; van den Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Strengers, B. J.; van Minnen, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Ecosystem responses to a changing climate and human-induced climate forcings (e.g. deforestation) might amplify (positive feedback) or dampen (negative feedback) the initial climate response. Feedbacks may include the biogeochemical (e.g. carbon cycle) and biogeophysical feedbacks (e.g. albedo and hydrological cycle). Here, we first review the most important feedbacks and put them into the context of a conceptual framework, including the major processes and interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and climate. We explore potential regional feedbacks in four hot spots with pronounced potential changes in land-use/management and local climate: sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Europe, the Amazon Basin and South and Southeast Asia. For each region, the relevant human-induced climate forcings and feedbacks were identified based on published literature. When evapotranspiration is limited by a soil water deficit, heat waves in Europe are amplified (positive soil moisture-temperature feedback). Drought events in the Amazon lead to further rainfall reduction when water recycling processes are affected (positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback). In SSA, the adoption of irrigation in the commonly rainfed systems can modulate the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback. In contrast, future water shortage in South and Southeast Asia can turn the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback into a positive one. Further research including advanced modeling strategies is needed to isolate the dominant processes affecting the strength and sign of the feedbacks. In addition, the socio-economic dimension needs to be considered in the ecosystems-climate system to include the essential role of human decisions on land-use and land-cover change (LULCC). In this context, enhanced integration between Earth System (ES) and Integrated Assessment (IA) modeling communities is strongly recommended.

  16. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  17. Effect of optical feedback on a VCSEL TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujanic, D.; Jaeger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the effects of optical feedback on the sensitivity of VCSEL tunable-diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS). Three VCSELs, emitting at different wavelengths in the near-infrared, were used. A TDLS system, subjected to optical feedback, exhibited a common signal-to-noise ratio profile for all three lasers. A catastrophic degradation of TDLS sensitivity occurred when feedback exceeded a level which we associate with coherence collapse. The TDLS system had a CH4 minimum detection limit of 7.5 ppmm without optical feedback. Optical feedback of less than ten percent reduced this sensitivity by two orders of magnitude. This reduction of system sensitivity was accompanied by a second-harmonic absorption signal baseline shift which degraded the system accuracy.

  18. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  19. Models of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Françcoise

    2015-02-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  20. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  1. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  2. A comparative study of AGN feedback algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, J.; Thacker, R. J.

    2013-05-01

    Modelling active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in numerical simulations is both technically and theoretically challenging, with numerous approaches having been published in the literature. We present a study of five distinct approaches to modelling AGN feedback within gravitohydrodynamic simulations of major mergers of Milky Way-sized galaxies. To constrain differences to only be between AGN feedback models, all simulations start from the same initial conditions and use the same star formation algorithm. Most AGN feedback algorithms have five key aspects: the black hole accretion rate, energy feedback rate and method, particle accretion algorithm, black hole advection algorithm and black hole merger algorithm. All models follow different accretion histories, and in some cases, accretion rates differ by up to three orders of magnitude at any given time. We consider models with either thermal or kinetic feedback, with the associated energy deposited locally around the black hole. Each feedback algorithm modifies the region around the black hole to different extents, yielding gas densities and temperatures within r ˜ 200 pc that differ by up to six orders of magnitude at any given time. The particle accretion algorithms usually maintain good agreement between the total mass accreted by dot{M} dt and the total mass of gas particles removed from the simulation, although not all algorithms guarantee this to be true. The black hole advection algorithms dampen inappropriate dragging of the black holes by two-body interactions. Advecting the black hole a limited distance based upon local mass distributions has many desirably properties, such as avoiding large artificial jumps and allowing the possibility of the black hole remaining in a gas void. Lastly, two black holes instantly merge when given criteria are met, and we find a range of merger times for different criteria. This is important since the AGN feedback rate changes across the merger in a way that is dependent

  3. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K.; Menon, S.; Bartlein, P. J.; Feichter, J.; Korhola, A.; Kulmala, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sorvari, S.; Vesala, T.

    2010-08-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a key regulator of atmospheric chemistry and climate. During past periods of climate change, vegetation cover and interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere changed within decades. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemistry to anthropogenically forced climate change and air pollution. Although interactions between the carbon cycle and climate have been a central focus, other biogeochemical feedbacks could be as important in modulating future climate change. Total positive radiative forcings resulting from feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere are estimated to reach up to 0.9 or 1.5 W m-2 K-1 towards the end of the twenty-first century, depending on the extent to which interactions with the nitrogen cycle stimulate or limit carbon sequestration. This substantially reduces and potentially even eliminates the cooling effect owing to carbon dioxide fertilization of the terrestrial biota. The overall magnitude of the biogeochemical feedbacks could potentially be similar to that of feedbacks in the physical climate system, but there are large uncertainties in the magnitude of individual estimates and in accounting for synergies between these effects.

  4. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla

  5. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  6. The need for faculty training programs in effective feedback provision

    PubMed Central

    Al Wahbi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    An important aspect of professional teaching practice is a practitioner’s ability to critically evaluate the performances of subordinates for whom he or she is responsible. This is a common practice within social sciences as well as for professionals from applied specialties. The literature on professional clinical expertise identifies reflective practice as perfect when they are thoroughly accepted by practitioners. In health-related professions, critical reflection in the form of feedback that serves as the bridge between theory and practice is endorsed. The aims and objectives of this study were directed toward the application of a mixed methodology approach in order to evaluate the requirements for a feedback training program and to detect the present feedback provision skills of clinical mentors in practice. The quantitative analysis measured the effectiveness of clinical teachers’ feedback in order to understand whether their understanding of and skills for giving feedback to promote students were adequate. On the other hand, the qualitative methods explored self-perceptions of feedback skills and efficacy in enabling students to improve their clinical practice. Effective feedback from faculty and the learner provides a useful and meaningful experience for absorbing knowledge and critical thinking into clinical practice. Nonadherence and limited expertise of mentors in giving feedback are the main themes of this study, and were evaluated and acknowledged through systematic analysis. PMID:25170287

  7. Managing uncertainty in soil carbon feedbacks to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Mark A.; Wieder, William R.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Fierer, Noah; Raymond, Peter A.; Crowther, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Planetary warming may be exacerbated if it accelerates loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere. This carbon-cycle-climate feedback is included in climate projections. Yet, despite ancillary data supporting a positive feedback, there is limited evidence for soil carbon loss under warming. The low confidence engendered in feedback projections is reduced further by the common representation in models of an outdated knowledge of soil carbon turnover. 'Model-knowledge integration' -- representing in models an advanced understanding of soil carbon stabilization -- is the first step to build confidence. This will inform experiments that further increase confidence by resolving competing mechanisms that most influence projected soil-carbon stocks. Improving feedback projections is an imperative for establishing greenhouse gas emission targets that limit climate change.

  8. Portable Dextrous Force Feedback Master for robot telemanipulation (PDMFF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdea, Grigore C.; Speeter, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    A major drawback of open loop masters is a lack of force feedback, limiting their ability to perform complex tasks such as assembly and repair. Researchers present a simple dextrous force feedback master for computer assisted telemanipulation. The device is compact, portable and can be held in the operator hand, without the need for a special joystick or console. The system is capable of both position feed forward and force feedback, using electronic position sensors and a pneumatic micro-actuator. The level of forces exercised by the pneumatic actuator is such that near rigidity may be attained. Experimental results showing good system linearity and small time lag are given.

  9. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  10. Feedback control of waiting times.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions. PMID:27176250

  11. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  12. Feedback control of canards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Joseph; Moehlis, Jeff

    2008-03-01

    We present a control mechanism for tuning a fast-slow dynamical system undergoing a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to be in the canard regime, the tiny parameter window between small and large periodic behavior. Our control strategy uses continuous feedback control via a slow control variable to cause the system to drift on average toward canard orbits. We apply this to tune the FitzHugh-Nagumo model to produce maximal canard orbits. When the controller is improperly configured, periodic or chaotic mixed-mode oscillations are found. We also investigate the effects of noise on this control mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that a sensor tuned in this way to operate near the canard regime can detect tiny changes in system parameters.

  13. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  14. Managing Residential Electricity Demand Through Provision of Better Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Myles

    New and affordable technology for providing detailed feedback on household electricity usage presents a host of opportunities for utilities and policy-makers to manage demand. This dissertation examines ways to use these devices to reduce - and shift the timing of - energy use in the residential sector by influencing consumers' behavior. The first portion of the study analyzes the impact of programmable thermostats (PTs) on energy use, focusing on residents' knowledge of climate control settings in the dwelling. I found that of households with natural gas heating systems, young households with PTs used 17 percent less heating energy on average. In addition, residents who did not know their thermostat settings tended to use 10 percent more energy for heating. The main portion of the dissertation focuses specifically on the potential for better feedback on electricity usage to reduce household energy consumption. The existing literature suggests that feedback can reduce electricity consumption in homes by 5 to 20 percent, but that significant uncertainties remain in our knowledge of the effectiveness of feedback. These uncertainties include the variation in feedback effectiveness between demographic groups and consumers in different climate regions. This analysis uses these uncertainties to perform an exploratory analysis to determine the conditions under which the benefits of feedback outweigh the costs and to compare the cost-effectiveness of providing feedback against that of other DSM programs. I found that benefits would likely outweigh costs for enhanced monthly billing and real-time feedback and that cost-effectiveness was superior to that of other DSM programs for these types of feedback. For feedback that is disaggregated by appliance type, cost effectiveness was competitive with other DSM programs under a limited set of cases. This study also examines how energy consumption devices should display feedback on GHG emissions from electricity use under a real

  15. The Technology of Measurement Feedback Systemsi

    PubMed Central

    Bickman, Leonard; Kelley, Susan Douglas; Athay, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Usual care in the community is far from optimal. Sufficient evidence exists that dropout rates are significant, treatment is effective for only a small proportion of clients, and that the translation of evidence-based treatments to the real world is problematic. Technology has been shown to be helpful in health care in improving the effectiveness of treatment. A relatively new technology being used in mental health is measurement feedback systems (MFSs). MFSs are particularly applicable to couple and family psychology (CFP) because of its ability to provide information on the multiple perspectives involved in treatment. The Contextualized Feedback Systemstm (CFS®), developed at Vanderbilt University is used as an example of what can be accomplished with an MFS. The advantages and limitations of this technology are described as well as the anticipated reimbursement requirements that mental health services will need. PMID:24066274

  16. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  17. Fine-Tuning Corrective Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of "fine-tuning" in connection with the corrective feedback process. Describes a longitudinal case study, conducted in the context of Norwegian as a second a language, that shows how fine-tuning and lack thereof in the provision of written corrective feedback differentially affects a second language learner's restructuring of…

  18. Legitimate Talk in Feedback Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copland, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on performance is a feature of professional training. Much feedback is delivered in post-observation conferences where a "trainer" will discuss the "trainee's" performance with him/her. What transpires in these conferences, however, is "hidden from view" (Heritage and Sefi 1992: 362) and the norms of interaction are largely unexamined in…

  19. Using Computer Networking for Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Two studies involving 27 learning-disabled middle-school students and 30 mildly handicapped junior high students investigated use of Teacher Net, a computer networking system that facilitates immediate feedback. Teacher Net reduced the teachers' administrative workload, effectively monitored student understanding, provided feedback to teachers,…

  20. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  1. Multi-Antenna Radar Systems for Doppler Rain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen; Tanelli, Simone; Siqueira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Use of multiple-antenna radar systems aboard moving high-altitude platforms has been proposed for measuring rainfall. The basic principle of the proposed systems is a variant of that of along-track interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems used previously to measure ocean waves and currents.

  2. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  3. Attributes of an Effective Feedback Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Not all feedback is created equal. It is actually quite uneven in its design and effectiveness. Feedback forms typically used by educators and the feedback process used to support learning have markedly different attributes. Understanding the key attributes of effective feedback is important for those involved in the feedback process. The tools…

  4. The Sound of Feedback in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback…

  5. Feedback Is a Two-Way Street

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovani, Cris

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience that illustrates that the feedback students give is just as important as the feedback they get. For her, the idea that students giving her feedback was more powerful than her giving them feedback sounded too good to be true. If she could come up with a system to regularly collect feedback that did…

  6. Feedback: Implications for Further Research and Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishikawa, Sue S.

    This report reviews current literature on feedback and suggests practical implications of feedback research for educators. A definition of feedback is offered, and past definitions in prior research are noted. An analysis of the current state of knowledge of feedback discusses the historical development of feedback theory and suggests that…

  7. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  8. Sparse feedback structures for wireless control of civil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoljak, Reuben D.; Linderman, Lauren E.

    2015-03-01

    Although originally popularized for structural health monitoring, wireless smart sensors are an attractive alternative to traditional tethered systems for structural control. Their onboard sensing, processing, and wireless communication offer all the components of a feedback control system. However, wireless smart sensors pose unique challenges for the application of centralized control, which is common in most modern control systems. Decentralized control offers several advantages to wireless structural control, including limiting the wireless communication required and the associated slow sampling rate and time delays in the control system. Previous decentralized structural control algorithms, both Ad-Hoc and Heuristic, enforce a spatial sparsity pattern during the design, which is assumed a priori. Therefore, the optimal feedback structure is not considered in the design. This work explores a decentralized optimal LQR design algorithm where the sparsity of the feedback gain is incorporated into the objective function. The control approach is compared to previous decentralized control techniques on the 20-Story control benchmark structure. Sparsity and control requirements are compared to centralized designs. The optimal sparse feedback design offers the best balance of performance, measurement feedback, and control effort. Additionally, the feedback structure identified is not easily identifiable a priori; thus, highlighting the significance of particular measurements in this feedback framework.

  9. Feedback on the Feedback: Sociocultural Interpretation of Saudi ESL Learners' Opinions about Writing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustafa, Rami F.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study employed informal conversational interviews and semi-structured individual interviews to capture the Saudi students' opinions about the feedback they receive, and about their perceptions on what constitutes helpful feedback. Sociocultural theory was used as the framework of this study. The findings suggest that the Saudi…

  10. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  11. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. PMID:24702034

  12. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, A.E.; Horowitz, I. ||; Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J.

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  13. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  14. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  15. Feedback: Theory and Accelerator Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himel, T.

    The use of feedback to stabilize the beam and improve the performance of accelerators is becoming more common. The methods used to design the feedback algorithms are introduced and some practical implementation details are described. The design of a PID loop using classical control techniques is covered as is the design of an optimal controller using modern control theory. Some adaptive control techniques are also briefly described. Examples are given of multiple-input-multiple-output loops and of how to handle systems of many interacting feedback loops.

  16. Global Orbit Feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.

    2010-05-23

    For improved reproducibility of good operating conditions and ramp commissioning efficiency, new dual-plane slow orbit feedback during the energy ramp was implemented during run-10 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The orbit feedback is based on steering the measured orbit, after subtraction of the dispersive component, to either a design orbit or to a previously saved reference orbit. Using multiple correctors and beam position monitors, an SVD-based algorithm is used for determination of the applied corrections. The online model is used as a basis for matrix computations. In this report we describe the feedback design, review the changes made to realize its implementation, and assess system performance.

  17. The roles of feedback and working memory in children's reference production.

    PubMed

    Wardlow, Liane; Heyman, Gail D

    2016-10-01

    Children's communicative perspective-taking ability was investigated in a sample of 62 5- and 6-year-olds using a spoken production referential communication task in which speakers identify target objects for listeners. We assessed whether children would make use of non-verbal negative feedback to improve their future production of referring expressions, which involve words or phrases that function in discourse to identify individual objects. We also examined whether the use of such feedback is related to cognitive resources. Results indicated that children who were given feedback from addressees produced more informative referring expressions than those who received no feedback. Furthermore, this tendency to effectively make use of feedback was greatest among children with higher working memory. These findings demonstrate that feedback can facilitate learning about referential communication and suggest that one limitation in using such feedback is the ability to hold it in mind so that it can be used to guide the production of referring expressions. PMID:27322727

  18. Phase-Shifted Laser Feedback Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Benjie

    1999-01-01

    Phase-shifted, laser feedback interferometry is a new diagnostic tool developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program directed by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Research Division. It combines the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce an instrument that can quantify both optical path length changes and sample reflectivity variations. In a homogenous medium, the optical path length between two points is the product of the index of refraction and the geometric distance between the two points. LFI differs from other forms of interferometry by using the laser as both the source and the phase detector. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. The combination of PSI and LFI has produced a robust instrument, based on a low-power helium-neon (HeNe) gas laser, with a high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static or oscillatory changes of the optical path length. Small changes in optical path length are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured; we can measure nonoscillatory changes with a root mean square (rms) error of the wavelength/1000 without averaging.

  19. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  20. Backtracking quantum trajectories with analog feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange*, G.; Ristè*, D.; Tiggelman, M. J.; Eichler, C.; Tornberg, L.; Johansson, G.; Wallraff, A.; Schouten, R. N.; Dicarlo, L.

    2014-03-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics offers a nearly ideal platform for the fundamental study of continuous quantum measurement. A nondemolition measurement of a superconducting qubit can be performed via homodyne detection of microwave transmission through a dispersively coupled cavity. By boosting the homodyne signal with a nearly noiseless phase-sensitive parametric amplifier, we experimentally show that a form of measurement backaction, consisting of stochastic quantum phase kicks on the measured qubit, is highly correlated with the fluctuations in the continuous homodyne record. We demonstrate a real-time analog feedback scheme that counteracts these phase kicks and thereby reduces measurement-induced dephasing. We develop a numerical optimization technique to overcome the bandwidth limitations of the amplification chain and provide a theoretical model for the optimization result. A quantum efficiency of 50% is extracted for the complete analog feedback loop. Finally, we discuss the integration of this analog feedback technique to improve performance in our recent demonstration of entanglement by dispersive parity measurement. *equal contribution. Research funded by NWO and the EU projects SOLID and SCALEQIT.

  1. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Kawata, D.; de Bennassuti, M.; Maselli, A.

    2015-05-01

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline that implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post-process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the red-shift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the formation of the Milky Way and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along with the merger-tree assembly. The resulting red-shift evolution for the Local Group of star-formation rates, reionization and metal enrichment along with the predicted metallicity distribution function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We discuss the merits and limitations of the first release of GAMESH, which also opens new directions to a full implementation of feedback processes in galaxy-formation models by combining semi-analytic and numerical methods.

  2. Feedback Augmented Sub-Ranging (FASR) Quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guilligan, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is intended to reduce the size, power, and complexity of pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) that require high resolution and speed along with low power. Digitizers are important components in any application where analog signals (such as light, sound, temperature, etc.) need to be digitally processed. The innovation implements amplification of a sampled residual voltage in a switched capacitor amplifier stage that does not depend on charge redistribution. The result is less sensitive to capacitor mismatches that cause gain errors, which are the main limitation of such amplifiers in pipeline ADCs. The residual errors due to mismatch are reduced by at least a factor of 16, which is equivalent to at least 4 bits of improvement. The settling time is also faster because of a higher feedback factor. In traditional switched capacitor residue amplifiers, closed-loop amplification of a sampled and held residue signal is achieved by redistributing sampled charge onto a feedback capacitor around a high-gain transconductance amplifier. The residual charge that was sampled during the acquisition or sampling phase is stored on two or more capacitors, often equal in value or integral multiples of each other. During the hold or amplification phase, all of the charge is redistributed onto one capacitor in the feedback loop of the amplifier to produce an amplified voltage. The key error source is the non-ideal ratios of feedback and input capacitors caused by manufacturing tolerances, called mismatches. The mismatches cause non-ideal closed-loop gain, leading to higher differential non-linearity. Traditional solutions to the mismatch errors are to use larger capacitor values (than dictated by thermal noise requirements) and/or complex calibration schemes, both of which increase the die size and power dissipation. The key features of this innovation are (1) the elimination of the need for charge redistribution to achieve an accurate closed-loop gain of two

  3. Oscillation onset in neural delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper studies dynamical aspects of neural systems with delayed negative feedback modelled by nonlinear delay-differential equations. These systems undergo a Hopf bifurcation from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle oscillation as certain parameters are varied. We show that their frequency of oscillation is robust to parameter variations and noisy fluctuations, a property that makes these systems good candidates for pacemakers. The onset of oscillation is postponed by both additive and parametric noise in the sense that the state variable spends more time near the fixed point. Finally, we show that a distributed delay (rather than a fixed delay) also stabilizes the fixed point solution. 40 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications.

  5. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Braun, David J

    2016-01-29

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications. PMID:26871336

  6. Revalidation: practice-related feedback.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Katerina

    Obtaining and reflecting on feedback provides an opportunity for professionals to engage with one another to discuss what good care looks like. The NMC believes that reflecting on feedback will be crucial in helping everyone on the register to analyse the way in which they deliver care, and to help them make small changes to their working practice that could make a big difference to patients. PMID:26665633

  7. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developed in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. With the help of Meteo France datas and experts, Predict services helps local communities and companies in decision making for flood management. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which

  8. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developped in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which are responsible of the transmission of meteorological alert and of rescue actions. In the crossing of the géo-information stemming from the

  9. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool. PMID:21841396

  10. Effects of invalid feedback on learning and feedback-related brain activity in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2015-10-01

    For adaptive decision-making it is important to utilize only relevant, valid and to ignore irrelevant feedback. The present study investigated how feedback processing in decision-making is impaired when relevant feedback is combined with irrelevant and potentially invalid feedback. We analyzed two electrophysiological markers of feedback processing, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300, in a simple decision-making task, in which participants processed feedback stimuli consisting of relevant and irrelevant feedback provided by the color and meaning of a Stroop stimulus. We found that invalid, irrelevant feedback not only impaired learning, it also altered the amplitude of the P300 to relevant feedback, suggesting an interfering effect of irrelevant feedback on the processing of relevant feedback. In contrast, no such effect on the FRN was obtained. These results indicate that detrimental effects of invalid, irrelevant feedback result from failures of controlled feedback processing. PMID:26263382

  11. Is sensorimotor BCI performance influenced differently by mono, stereo, or 3-D auditory feedback?

    PubMed

    McCreadie, Karl A; Coyle, Damien H; Prasad, Girijesh

    2014-05-01

    Imagination of movement can be used as a control method for a brain-computer interface (BCI) allowing communication for the physically impaired. Visual feedback within such a closed loop system excludes those with visual problems and hence there is a need for alternative sensory feedback pathways. In the context of substituting the visual channel for the auditory channel, this study aims to add to the limited evidence that it is possible to substitute visual feedback for its auditory equivalent and assess the impact this has on BCI performance. Secondly, the study aims to determine for the first time if the type of auditory feedback method influences motor imagery performance significantly. Auditory feedback is presented using a stepped approach of single (mono), double (stereo), and multiple (vector base amplitude panning as an audio game) loudspeaker arrangements. Visual feedback involves a ball-basket paradigm and a spaceship game. Each session consists of either auditory or visual feedback only with runs of each type of feedback presentation method applied in each session. Results from seven subjects across five sessions of each feedback type (visual, auditory) (10 sessions in total) show that auditory feedback is a suitable substitute for the visual equivalent and that there are no statistical differences in the type of auditory feedback presented across five sessions. PMID:24691154

  12. Providing Students with Formative Audio Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brearley, Francis Q.; Cullen, W. Rod

    2012-01-01

    The provision of timely and constructive feedback is increasingly challenging for busy academics. Ensuring effective student engagement with feedback is equally difficult. Increasingly, studies have explored provision of audio recorded feedback to enhance effectiveness and engagement with feedback. Few, if any, of these focus on purely formative…

  13. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  14. Feedback Revolution: What Gets in the Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback in writing has in recent years attracted the attention of an increasing number of writing researchers. While much feedback research focuses on the act of feedback per se, little attention has been paid to the issue of teacher readiness to implement change in feedback. Using data gathered from Hong Kong secondary teachers attending a…

  15. Dynamics of Team Reflexivity after Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabelica, Catherine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A great deal of work has been generated on feedback in teams and has shown that giving performance feedback to teams is not sufficient to improve performance. To achieve the potential of feedback, it is stated that teams need to proactively process this feedback and thus collectively evaluate their performance and strategies, look for…

  16. Electromyograph Feedback as a Relaxation Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coursey, Robert D.

    1975-01-01

    An electromyograph (EMG) feedback group of 10 normal undergraduate males received variable-tone feedback from the frontalis muscle. Comparisons showed that the feedback group achieved significantly lower EMG scores than the two control groups, but only one of the six measures of state anxiety favored the feedback group over the controls. (Author)

  17. Audiotape Feedback for Essays in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twelve students writing essays for a photochemistry course at the Open University of the Netherlands received either audiocasette or written feedback. Time spent in recording versus writing feedback differed minimally. Recorded feedback was considerably greater in amount. Students' final grades did not differ, but recorded feedback was more…

  18. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  19. Leadership in Libraries--Feedback as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dianne H.

    This paper focuses on the role of feedback in effective communication and ways in which feedback can assist library managers at all levels in performing their role as leaders. The various kinds and sources of feedback are discussed, and the relationship between feedback and goal setting are considered, as well as the effects of goal setting and…

  20. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  1. Does visual augmented feedback reduce local dynamic stability while walking?

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Daniel; Hamacher, Dennis; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Augmented feedback is frequently used in gait training to efficiently correct specific gait patterns in patients with different disorders. The patients use this external augmented feedback to align actual movements in a way that predefined gait characteristics can be achieved. Voluntary changes of gait characteristics are reported to reduce local dynamic stability (LDS) which in turn is associated with increased risk of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of visual feedback, provided to help patients to correct frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements, on the LDS of pelvis and trunk. Kinematic gait data was captured in ten women with gait disorders. The effect of visual feedback on LDS, quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent, of walking was examined. We found a significant decreased LDS (e.g. pelvis: p=.009) in our subjects when they were using visual augmented feedback. Our data suggest that the use of visual augmented feedback causes less stable gait patterns indicating a reduced ability to respond to small perturbations which might increase risk of falling. Therefore, researchers or clinicians who aim to correct gait patterns through real time based external augmented feedback should consider the potential negative effect on gait stability. It should be evaluated if the possible increased fall risk provoked by visual feedback exceeds possible increases in fall risk induced by conventional gait-retraining interventions. The external validity of the study is limited because of the low sample size and inhomogeneous group characteristics. Thus, further studies including homogeneous cohorts are required. PMID:26296676

  2. Seeing the risks of multiple Arctic amplifying feedbacks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are several potentially very large sources of Arctic amplifying feedbacks that have been identified. They present a great risk to the future as they could become self and inter-reinforcing with uncontrollable knock-on, or cascading risks. This has been called a domino effect risk by Carlos Duarte. Because of already committed global warming and the millennial duration of global warming, these are highly policy relevant. These Arctic feedback processes are now all operant with emissions of carbon dioxide methane and nitrous oxide detected. The extent of the risks from these feedback sources are not obvious or easy to understand by policy makers and the public. They are recorded in the IPCC AR5 as potential tipping points, as is the irreversibility of permafrost thaw. Some of them are not accounted for in the IPCC AR5 global warming projections because of quantitative uncertainty. UNEP issued a 2012 report (Policy Implications of Thawing Permafrost) advising that by omitting carbon feedback emissions from permafrost, carbon budget calculations by err on the low side. There is the other unassessed issue of a global warming safety limit for preventing uncontrollable increasing Arctic feedback emissions. Along with our paper, we provide illustrations of the Arctic feedback sources and processes from satellite imagery and flow charts that allows for their qualitative consideration. We rely on the IPCC assessments, the 2012 paper Possible role of wetlands permafrost can methane hydrates in the methane cycle under future climate change; a review, by Fiona M. O'Connor et al., and build on the WWF 2009 Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications. The potential sources of Arctic feedback processes identified include: Arctic and Far North snow albedo decline, Arctic summer sea ice albedo decline, Greenland summer ice surface melting albedo loss, albedo decline by replacement of Arctic tundra with forest, tundra fires, Boreal forest fires, Boreal forest die

  3. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities. PMID:18274573

  4. Constructing a Multimedia Mobile Classroom Using a Novel Feedback System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Wen-Chen; Chen, Ching-Wen; Weng, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the conventional classroom, many obstacles hinder interaction between an instructor and students, such as limited class hours, fixed seating, and inadequate time for meetings after class. This work develops a novel multimedia mobile classroom feedback system (MMCFS) that instantly displays students' responses, such as class-related questions or…

  5. Efficiency at maximum power of a discrete feedback ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarillo, Javier; Tangarife, Tomás; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency at maximum power is found to be of the same order for a feedback ratchet and for its open-loop counterpart. However, feedback increases the output power up to a factor of five. This increase in output power is due to the increase in energy input and the effective entropy reduction obtained as a consequence of feedback. Optimal efficiency at maximum power is reached for time intervals between feedback actions two orders of magnitude smaller than the characteristic time of diffusion over a ratchet period length. The efficiency is computed consistently taking into account the correlation between the control actions. We consider a feedback control protocol for a discrete feedback flashing ratchet, which works against an external load. We maximize the power output optimizing the parameters of the ratchet, the controller, and the external load. The maximum power output is found to be upper bounded, so the attainable extracted power is limited. After, we compute an upper bound for the efficiency of this isothermal feedback ratchet at maximum power output. We make this computation applying recent developments of the thermodynamics of feedback-controlled systems, which give an equation to compute the entropy reduction due to information. However, this equation requires the computation of the probability of each of the possible sequences of the controller's actions. This computation becomes involved when the sequence of the controller's actions is non-Markovian, as is the case in most feedback ratchets. We here introduce an alternative procedure to set strong bounds to the entropy reduction in order to compute its value. In this procedure the bounds are evaluated in a quasi-Markovian limit, which emerge when there are big differences between the stationary probabilities of the system states. These big differences are an effect of the potential strength, which minimizes the departures from the Markovianicity of the sequence of control actions, allowing also to

  6. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  7. Guidance on feedback of outcome data to improve performance in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Mimi M; Shalhoub, Joseph; Davies, Alun H; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2016-08-01

    Feedback of performance data is a well-established method of performance improvement in the health-care setting, although guidance has been limited in the context of surgical performance. This article outlines how optimal feedback can be achieved using surgeon outcome data. PMID:27487059

  8. Peer Feedback to Facilitate Project-Based Learning in an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui; Hsu, Yu-Chang

    2013-01-01

    There has been limited research examining the pedagogical benefits of peer feedback for facilitating project-based learning in an online environment. Using a mixed method approach, this paper examines graduate students' participation and perceptions of peer feedback activity that supports project-based learning in an online instructional…

  9. Flemish Primary Teachers' Use of School Performance Feedback and the Relationship with School Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhoof, Jan; Verhaeghe, Goedele; Van Petegem, Peter; Valcke, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Schools are increasingly confronted with the challenges that information about school performance brings with it. It is common for schools' use of performance feedback to be limited. Equally, however, there are documented cases in which school performance feedback is meaningfully used. Purpose: This study looks at how Flemish primary…

  10. Individual Differences and the Effectiveness of Visual Feedback on Reflexive Binding in L2 Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Rebecca Raewyn

    2011-01-01

    Second language acquisition research into the effects of corrective feedback has investigated a variety of learning targets using a wide range of implicit and explicit feedback types (Li, 2010). To date, however, its linguistic focus has been limited to theoretically noticeable surface features (Carroll, 2001; Schmidt, 2001), and researchers have…

  11. Using Computer-Based Technology to Improve Feedback to Staff and Students on MCQ Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malau-Aduli, Bunmi S.; Assenheimer, Dwight; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Zimitat, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The massification of higher education (HE) has led to an unprecedented increase in the number of students in the classrooms, resulting in increased workload for teaching staff, sometimes leading to a great reliance on Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) examinations with limited feedback provided to students. The central role of feedback in student…

  12. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  13. A stratospheric water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in stratospheric water vapor play a role in the evolution of our climate. We show here that variations in water vapor since 2004 can be traced to tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature perturbations from at least three processes: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the troposphere. The connection between stratospheric water vapor and the temperature of the troposphere implies the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the feedback in a chemistry-climate model to have a magnitude of +0.3 W/m2/K, which could be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. About two-thirds of the feedback comes from the extratropical stratosphere below ~16 km (the lowermost stratosphere), with the rest coming from the stratosphere above ~16 km (the overworld).

  14. Feedback Amplification of Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-06-01

    As the first line of innate immune defense, neutrophils need to mount a rapid and robust antimicrobial response. Recent studies implicate various positive feedback amplification processes in achieving that goal. Feedback amplification ensures effective migration of neutrophils in shallow chemotactic gradients, multiple waves of neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, and the augmentation of various effector functions of the cells. We review here such positive feedback loops including intracellular and autocrine processes, paracrine effects mediated by lipid (LTB4), chemokine, and cytokine mediators, and bidirectional interactions with the complement system and with other immune and non-immune cells. These amplification mechanisms are not only involved in antimicrobial immunity but also contribute to neutrophil-mediated tissue damage under pathological conditions. PMID:27157638

  15. Parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian

    2013-12-15

    We present a parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometer based on spatial multiplexing which avoids the signal crosstalk in the former feedback interferometer. The interferometer outputs two close parallel laser beams, whose frequencies are shifted by two acousto-optic modulators by 2Ω simultaneously. A static reference mirror is inserted into one of the optical paths as the reference optical path. The other beam impinges on the target as the measurement optical path. Phase variations of the two feedback laser beams are simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with two different detectors. Their subtraction accurately reflects the target displacement. Under typical room conditions, experimental results show a resolution of 1.6 nm and accuracy of 7.8 nm within the range of 100 μm.

  16. ASDTIC: A feedback control innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  17. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  18. Impact of a 360-degree Professionalism Assessment on Faculty Comfort and Skills in Feedback Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Korenstein, Deborah; Karani, Reena

    2008-01-01

    Background Professionalism is identified as a competency of resident education. Best approaches to teaching and evaluating professionalism are unknown, but feedback about professionalism is necessary to change practice and behavior. Faculty discomfort with professionalism may limit their delivery of feedback to residents. Objectives A pilot program to implement a 360-degree evaluation of observable professionalism behaviors and determine how its use impacts faculty feedback to residents. Design Internal Medicine (IM) residents were evaluated during ambulatory rotations using a 360-degree assessment of professional behaviors developed by the National Board of Medical Examiners®. Faculty used evaluation results to provide individual feedback to residents. Patients/Participants Fifteen faculty members. Measurements and Main Results Faculty completed pre- and post-intervention surveys. Using a 7-point Likert scale, faculty reported increased skill in giving general feedback (4.85 vs 4.36, p < .05) and feedback about professionalism (4.71 vs 3.57, p < .01) after the implementation of the 360-degree evaluation. They reported increased comfort giving feedback about professionalism (5.07 vs 4.35, p < .05) but not about giving feedback in general (5.43 vs 5.50). Conclusions A 360-degree professionalism evaluation instrument used to guide feedback to residents improves faculty comfort and self-assessed skill in giving feedback about professionalism. PMID:18612726

  19. Dynamic Feedback in Ferromagnet-Spin Hall Metal Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-08-26

    In ferromagnet-normal-metal heterostructures, spin pumping and spin-transfer torques are two reciprocal processes that occur concomitantly. Their interplay introduces a dynamic feedback effect interconnecting energy dissipation channels of both magnetization and current. By solving the spin diffusion process in the presence of the spin Hall effect in the normal metal, we show that the dynamic feedback gives rise to (i) a nonlinear magnetic damping that is crucial to sustain uniform steady-state oscillations of a spin Hall oscillator at large angles and (ii) a frequency-dependent spin Hall magnetoimpedance that reduces to the spin Hall magnetoresistance in the dc limit. PMID:27610880

  20. Giving feedback - an integral part of education.

    PubMed

    Schartel, Scott A

    2012-03-01

    Feedback is an integral part of the educational process. It provides learners with a comparison of their performance to educational goals with the aim of helping them achieve or exceed their goals. Effective feedback is delivered in an appropriate setting, focusses on performance and not the individual, is specific, is based on direct observation or objective date, is delivered using neutral, non-judgemental language and identifies actions or plans for improvement. For best results, the sender and receiver of feedback must work as allies. Negative feedback can create an emotional response in the learner, which may interfere with the effectiveness of the feedback due to dissonance between self-evaluation and external appraisal. Reflection can help learners process negative feedback and allow them to develop and implement improvement plans. Both delivering and receiving feedback are skills that can be improved with training. Teachers have a duty to provide meaningful feedback to learners; learners should expect feedback and seek it. PMID:22559958

  1. Neural correlates of feedback processing in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Bekkering, Harold; Janssen, Denise J C; de Bruijn, Ellen R A; Hunnius, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    External feedback provides essential information for successful learning. Feedback is especially important for learning in early childhood, as toddlers strongly rely on external signals to determine the consequences of their actions. In adults, many electrophysiological studies have elucidated feedback processes using a neural marker called the feedback-related negativity (FRN). The neural generator of the FRN is assumed to be the ACC, located in medial frontal cortex. As frontal brain regions are the latest to mature during brain development, it is unclear when in early childhood a functional feedback system develops. Is feedback differentiated on a neural level in toddlers and in how far is neural feedback processing related to children's behavioral adjustment? In an EEG experiment, we addressed these questions by measuring the brain activity and behavioral performance of 2.5-year-old toddlers while they played a feedback-guided game on a touchscreen. Electrophysiological results show differential brain activity for feedback with a more negative deflection for incorrect than correct outcomes, resembling the adult FRN. This provides the first neural evidence for feedback processing in toddlers. Notably, FRN amplitudes were predictive of adaptive behavior: the stronger the differential brain activity for feedback, the better the toddlers' adaptive performance during the game. Thus, already in early childhood toddlers' feedback-guided performance directly relates to the functionality of their neural feedback processing. Implications for early feedback-based learning as well as structural and functional brain development are discussed. PMID:24392905

  2. Electrorheological Fluid Based Force Feedback Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeiffer, Charles; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Dolgin, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Parallel to the efforts to develop fully autonomous robots, it is increasingly being realized that there are applications where it is essential to have a fully controlled robot and "feel" its operating conditions, i.e. telepresence. This trend is a result of the increasing efforts to address tasks where humans can perform significantly better but, due to associated hazards, distance, physical limitations and other causes, only robots can be employed to perform these tasks. Such robots need to be assisted by a human that remotely controls the operation. To address the goal of operating robots as human surrogates, the authors launched a study of mechanisms that provide mechanical feedback. For this purpose, electrorheological fluids (ERF) are being investigated for the potential application as miniature haptic devices. This family of electroactive fluids has the property of changing the viscosity during electrical stimulation. Consequently, ERF can be used to produce force feedback haptic devices for tele-operated control of medical and space robotic systems. Forces applied at the robot end-effector due to a compliant environment are reflected to the user using an ERF device where a change in the system viscosity will occur proportionally to the transmitted force. Analytical model and control algorithms are being developed taking into account the non-linearities of these type of devices. This paper will describe the concept and the developed mechanism of ERF based force feedback. The test process and the physical properties of this device will be described and the results of preliminary tests will be presented.

  3. The Secret of Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    "The only important thing about feedback is what students do with it," declares Dylan Wiliam in this article. The standard school procedure (in which a teacher looks at a piece of student work and writes something on it, and the student later looks at what the teacher has written) does not necessarily increase student learning. Teachers…

  4. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  5. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  6. Feedback Processes and Climate Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, Albert

    1990-01-01

    The response of the climate system to an external perturbation--e.g., a change in solar irradiance or a change in atmospheric opacity due to an increase in CO2--depends rather strongly on feedback processes in the system, which either amplify or dampen the effects of the initial perturbation. A simple representation of the climate system is used to compare several important feedbacks, based upon general circulation model (GCM) simulations by various investigators. The models are in general agreement with respect to water vapor feedback, but in wide disagreement with respect to cloud feedback. Because of the arguments raised by Lindzen (1990)--that the processes which determine water vapor mixing ratio in the upper atmosphere are quite different from those which operate in the planetary boundary layer, and that upper tropospheric water vapor might actually decrease even when the boundary layer is getting warmer and more moist--researchers undertook a study to determine the sensitivity of climate to changes in water vapor at various levels in the troposphere. The result is that climate is just as sensitive to percentage changes in upper tropospheric water vapor, where the mixing ratio is very small, as it is to percentage changes in the boundary layer, which contains the bulk of total column water vapor.

  7. Educational Accountability and Policy Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, accountability policies have become more prominent in public K-12 education and have changed how teaching and learning are organized. It is less clear the extent to which these policies have altered the politics of education. This article begins to address that question through the lens of policy feedback. It identifies…

  8. ODISEES Availability and Feedback Request

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-06

    ... are reaching out to you for candid feedback regarding this ontology driven search tool. Ontologies are a formal way to organize knowledge. ... The ASDC is pleased to announce that a beta-version of the Ontology-Driven Interactive Search Environment for Earth Science (ODISEES) is ...

  9. Feedback as the source of imperfection in lossy perfect lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblatt, Gilad; Bartal, Guy; Orenstein, Meir

    2016-02-01

    The major barrier to realizing a perfect lens with left-handed materials is perceived to be their intrinsic loss. Here we show that only specific designs of perfect lenses are limited by loss—those in which material loss is translated to internal feedback. The asymptotically uniform transmission required for perfect lensing is hindered by such feedback, which generates resonances that lead to a spatial cutoff in the lens transmission. Moreover, uniform transmission and its resonant deterioration stem from completely separate classes of modal excitations. A perfect lens made of lossy left-handed materials is therefore not forbidden in principle. Pursuing perfect lens designs that avoid internal feedback offers a path towards realization of practical perfect lenses.

  10. Deterministic Squeezed States with Joint Measurements and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Graham P.; Cox, Kevin C.; Wu, Baochen; Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Joint measurement of many qubits or atoms is a powerful way to create entanglement for precision measurement and quantum information science. However, the random quantum collapse resulting from the joint measurement also leads to randomness in which entangled state is created. We present an experiment in which we apply real-time feedback to eliminate the randomness generated during the joint measurement of 5 ×104 laser-cooled Rb atoms. The feedback effectively steers the quantum state to a desired squeezed state. After feedback, the final state achieves a directly observed phase resolution variance up to 7.4(6) dB below the standard quantum limit for unentangled atoms. The entanglement and improved measurement capability of these states can be realized without retaining knowledge of the joint measurement's outcome, possibly opening new applications for spin squeezed states generated via joint measurement.

  11. Negative feedback in genetic circuits confers evolutionary resilience and capacitance.

    PubMed

    Marciano, David C; Lua, Rhonald C; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Amin, Shivas R; Herman, Christophe; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2014-06-26

    Natural selection for specific functions places limits upon the amino acid substitutions a protein can accept. Mechanisms that expand the range of tolerable amino acid substitutions include chaperones that can rescue destabilized proteins and additional stability-enhancing substitutions. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that is simple and uses a frequently encountered network motif. Computational and experimental evidence shows that the self-correcting, negative-feedback gene regulation motif increases repressor expression in response to deleterious mutations and thereby precisely restores repression of a target gene. Furthermore, this ability to rescue repressor function is observable across the Eubacteria kingdom through the greater accumulation of amino acid substitutions in negative-feedback transcription factors compared to genes they control. We propose that negative feedback represents a self-contained genetic canalization mechanism that preserves phenotype while permitting access to a wider range of functional genotypes. PMID:24910431

  12. Adaptive output feedback control of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun

    Neural network-based adaptive output feedback approaches that augment a linear control design are described in this thesis, and emphasis is placed on their real-time implementation with flexible systems. Two different control architectures that are robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics are presented. The unmodelled effects can consist of minimum phase internal dynamics of the system together with external disturbance process. Within this context, adaptive compensation for external disturbances is addressed. In the first approach, internal model-following control, adaptive elements are designed using feedback inversion. The effect of an actuator limit is treated using control hedging, and the effect of other actuation nonlinearities, such as dead zone and backlash, is mitigated by a disturbance observer-based control design. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through simulation and experimental testing with a three-disk torsional system, which is subjected to control voltage limit and stiction. While the internal model-following control is limited to minimum phase systems, the second approach, external model-following control, does not involve feedback linearization and can be applied to non-minimum phase systems. The unstable zero dynamics are assumed to have been modelled in the design of the existing linear controller. The laboratory tests for this method include a three-disk torsional pendulum, an inverted pendulum, and a flexible-base robot manipulator. The external model-following control architecture is further extended in three ways. The first extension is an approach for control of multivariable nonlinear systems. The second extension is a decentralized adaptive control approach for large-scale interconnected systems. The third extension is to make use of an adaptive observer to augment a linear observer-based controller. In this extension, augmenting terms for the adaptive observer can be used to achieve adaptation in

  13. Feedback During Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    We present models of photoionization of massive protostellar cores, and show the impact of this ionization feedback on the efficiency of star formation and its observational features. Based on the Core Accretion scenario, we construct the collapse model of rotating massive-protostellar cloud cores together with a protostellar evolutional calculation, including feedback effects from a MHD disk wind, photoionization and radiation pressure. First, the MHD wind creates a bipolar outflow whose opening angle increases over the timescale of mass accretion. The ionizing luminosity dramatically increases after the protostar reaches ~ 5 Msun due to Kelvin-Helmholz contraction, and the MHD wind is photoionized when the protostellar mass reaches ~ 10 - 20 Msun. As the ionizing and bolometric luminosities increase, the outflow opening angle becomes wider due to radiation pressure feedback. By this combination of feedback processes, the envelope is eroded and the mass infall rate is significantly reduced to that arriving only from the disk-shielded equatorial region. At a protostellar mass of ~ 50 - 100 Msun, depending on the initial core properties, the mass accretion is halted by disk photoevaporation. In this way, feedback significantly reduces the star formation efficiency when forming massive stars from massive cloud cores, which could produce a cutoff at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. Along this evolutionary calculation, we also compute the detailed structure of the photoionized regions using a ray-tracing radiative transfer code and evaluate their emission signatures. Their free-free continuum and recombination line emissions are consistent with the variety of observed radio sources associated with massive protostars, i.e., jets and ultra/hyper-compact HII regions. The comparison between our models and such observations enables us to better define the evolutionary sequence of massive star formation.

  14. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  15. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  16. Feedback between Accelerator Physicists and magnet builders

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1995-12-31

    Our task is not to record history but to change it. (K. Marx (paraphrased)) How should Accelerator Physicists set magnet error specifications? In a crude social model, they place tolerance limits on undesirable nonlinearities and errors (higher order harmonics, component alignments, etc.). The Magnet Division then goes away for a suitably lengthy period of time, and comes back with a working magnet prototype that is reproduced in industry. A better solution is to set no specifications. Accelerator Physicists begin by evaluating expected values of harmonics, generated by the Magnet Division, before and during prototype construction. Damaging harmonics are traded off against innocuous harmonics as the prototype design evolves, lagging one generation behind the evolution of expected harmonics. Finally, the real harmonics are quickly evaluated during early industrial production, allowing a final round of performance trade-offs, using contingency scenarios prepared earlier. This solution assumes a close relationship and rapid feedback between the Accelerator Physicists and the magnet builders. What follows is one perspective of the way that rapid feedback was used to `change history` (improve linear and dynamic aperture) at RHIC, to great benefit.

  17. Delayed feedback induced multirhythmicity in the oscillatory electrodissolution of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Timea; Verner, Erika; Gáspár, Vilmos; Kori, Hiroshi; Kiss, István Z.

    2015-06-01

    Occurrence of bi- and trirhythmicities (coexistence of two or three stable limit cycles, respectively, with distinctly different periods) has been studied experimentally by applying delayed feedback control to the copper-phosphoric acid electrochemical system oscillating close to a Hopf bifurcation point under potentiostatic condition. The oscillating electrode potential is delayed by τ and the difference between the present and delayed values is fed back to the circuit potential with a feedback gain K. The experiments were performed by determining the period of current oscillations T as a function of (both increasing and decreasing) τ at several fixed values of K. With small delay times, the period exhibits a sinusoidal type dependence on τ. However, with relatively large delays (typically τ ≫ T) for each feedback gain K, there exists a critical delay τcrit above which birhythmicity emerges. The experiments show that for weak feedback, Kτcrit is approximately constant. At very large delays, the dynamics becomes even more complex, and trirhythmicity could be observed. Results of numerical simulations based on a general kinetic model for metal electrodissolution were consistent with the experimental observations. The experimental and numerical results are also interpreted by using a phase model; the model parameters can be obtained from experimental data measured at small delay times. Analytical solutions to the phase model quantitatively predict the parameter regions for the appearance of birhythmicity in the experiments, and explain the almost constant value of Kτcrit for weak feedback.

  18. Flexible electronic feedback using the virtues of progress testing.

    PubMed

    Muijtjens, Arno M M; Timmermans, Ilske; Donkers, Jeroen; Peperkamp, Robert; Medema, Harro; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Thoben, Arnold; Wenink, Arnold C G; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2010-01-01

    The potential richness of the feedback for learners and teachers is one of the educational advantages of progress tests (PTs). Every test administration yields information on a student's knowledge level in each sub-domain of the test (cross-sectional information), and it adds a next point to the corresponding knowledge growth curve (longitudinal information). Traditional paper-based feedback has severe limitations and requires considerable effort from the learners to give meaning to the data. We reasoned that the PT data should be flexibly accessible in all pathways and with any available comparison data, according to the personal interest of the learner. For that purpose, a web-based tool (Progress test Feedback, the ProF system) was developed. This article presents the principles and features of the generated feedback and shows how it can be used. In addition to enhancement of the feedback, the ProF database of longitudinal PT-data also provides new opportunities for research on knowledge growth, and these are currently being explored. PMID:20515379

  19. Feedback, Surveys, and Soviet Communication Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickiewicz, Ellen

    1983-01-01

    Reports on how traditional feedback channels in the Soviet Union work and how public opinion surveys have caused Communist party leaders to assess and expand their feedback channels, particularly in the area of letters from private citizens. (PD)

  20. Feedback control of wave propagation in a rectangular panel, part 2: Experimental realization using clustered velocity and displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Nobuo; Hill, Simon G.

    2012-10-01

    This study presents the feedback control of flexural waves propagating in a rectangular panel. The objective of this paper (part 2) is to experimentally implement the feedback wave control method which was proposed in part 1 of the two series papers. Firstly, based on the collocation of sensors and actuators, clustered velocity and displacement feedback (C-VDFB) is newly proposed. Next, linking C-VDFB with the active wave control proposed in part 1, it is clarified that the active wave control system can be realized to a limited extent. Then, from a viewpoint of numerical simulations, the characteristics of the feedback gains of C-VDFB and its control performance are clarified. It is shown that C-VDFB enables the inactivation of vibration modes at the target frequencies. Furthermore, it is clarified that even at the non-target frequencies, the proposed method sufficiently reduces the structural vibration. Finally, experiments on the reflected wave absorbing control using clustered direct velocity and displacement feedback are carried out. The experimental results show good agreement with those obtained in the simulation.

  1. Use of the "Stop, Start, Continue" Method Is Associated with the Production of Constructive Qualitative Feedback by Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Alice; Oliver, Emily; Szpakowska, Kasia; Newton, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Students in higher education are increasingly asked to give feedback on their education experience, reflecting an increase in the importance attached to that feedback. Existing literature demonstrates that qualitative student feedback is valued and important, yet there has been limited evaluation of the means by which qualitative student feedback…

  2. What's Stopping Them? A Study of Teachers' Use of Formative Feedback with Students Learning in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Acknowledging the powerful that role formative feedback plays in learning, students who are training for professions in the clinical setting and learn while working alongside professionals in their field report that they receive limited feedback. Formative feedback helps students gauge progress, identify weaknesses, and improve performance as well…

  3. Synthesis of oscillating adaptive feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smay, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A synthesis theory is developed which allows system design to proceed from practical specifications on system command and/or disturbance response to a design which is very nearly optimal in terms of feedback sensor noise effects. The approach taken is to replace the nonlinear element by a mean square error minimizing approximation (dual-input describing function), and then use linear frequency domain synthesis techniques subject to additional constraints imposed by the limit cycle and the approximator. Synthesis techniques are also developed for a similar system using an externally excited oscillating signal with the above approach. The results remove the design of the systems considered from the realm of simulation and experimentation, permitting true synthesis and the optimization that accompanies it.

  4. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  5. Mirror visual feedback therapy. A practical approach.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Candy

    2011-01-01

    Mirror visual feedback (MVF) was first proposed as a therapy to relieve amputee phantom limb pain in the early 1990s. It is increasingly used to treat a range of other chronic pain conditions. The evidence base to date is limited. Much of the literature consists of pilot projects or case study designs although larger randomized controlled trails are now emerging. However, the described protocols for MVF are inadequate to adapt to clinical practice. In addition, the therapist sees a heterogeneous population whose characteristics may fall outside those of the tight inclusion/exclusion criteria of research studies. This article provides the theoretical background to MVF and a detailed description of applying this therapy in clinical practice. PMID:21106347

  6. Feedback: The Key to Effective Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    It is clear that feedback is critical to effective teaching and learning. In fact, it might be said that without feedback, learning does not occur. Coaches must deliver instruction and then provide feedback for the athlete to receive, retain, comprehend and show their learning through proper execution. Coaches must incorporate the use of effective…

  7. Why Receiving Feedback Collides with Self Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Cate, Olle Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    Providing feedback to trainees in clinical settings is considered important for development and acquisition of skill. Despite recommendations how to provide feedback that have appeared in the literature, research shows that its effectiveness is often disappointing. To understand why receiving feedback is more difficult than it appears, this paper…

  8. A Typology of Written Corrective Feedback Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    2009-01-01

    As a basis for a systematic approach to investigating the effects of written corrective feedback, this article presents a typology of the different types available to teachers and researchers. The typology distinguishes two sets of options relating to (1) strategies for providing feedback (for example, direct, indirect, or metalinguistic feedback)…

  9. Conative Feedback in Computer-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Anastasios A.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback is an important educational tool that can support learning and assessment. This article describes types of conative feedback that can support the student's conation, will, volition, or motivation. Any of these types of feedback can be presented to the student before, during, or after an educational activity or a test question.…

  10. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  11. Changing Teachers' Feedback Practices: A Workshop Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Jesuína; Carvalho, Carolina; Conboy, Joseph; Valente, Maria Odete; Gama, Ana Paula; Salema, Maria Helena; Fiúza, Edite

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can promote teacher-student relations and student academic involvement, performance and self-regulation. However, some research indicates that teachers do not always employ feedback effectively. There is a need to promote teachers' appropriate use of feedback in the classroom. We describe a long-term workshop designed to enhance teachers'…

  12. The Impact of Feedback Training for Inspectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbelaer, Marjoleine J.; Prins, Frans J.; van Dongen, Dre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether oral feedback by inspectors of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education is an adequate method to support the professional development of teachers in primary education. This study aims to examine the impact of short feedback training for inspectors (focused on effective feedback conversations) on…

  13. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  14. Effective Feedback Design Using Free Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Jiangmei; Kim, ChanMin

    2015-01-01

    Feedback plays a critical role in student learning and performance. However, providing students with effective feedback is challenging in online environments because of physical separation between students and instructors. Technologies can be used to enhance the effectiveness of feedback in online courses. In this article, we propose effective…

  15. Feedback loop compensates for rectifier nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Signal processing circuit with two negative feedback loops rectifies two sinusoidal signals which are 180 degrees out of phase and produces a single full-wave rectified output signal. Each feedback loop incorporates a feedback rectifier to compensate for the nonlinearity of the circuit.

  16. Engaging Students with Feedback through Adaptive Release

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Brian; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Parkin, Helen J.; Thorpe, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Feedback to students has been highlighted in the literature as an area where improvements are needed. Students need high quality, prompt feedback, but they also need guidance and tools to help them engage with and learn from that feedback. This case study explores staff and student perceptions of a tool at Sheffield Hallam University which…

  17. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  18. The Courage to Seek Authentic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Educators assess students' work and behavior every day. They are professional feedback-givers, dispensing grades, advice, support, and red ink. They believe in the power of feedback to communicate what students are doing well and how they can do better. However, some teachers shy away from opportunities for feedback on their own work. Some don't…

  19. Cost Analysis, Evaluation and Feedback. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on cost analysis, evaluation, and feedback in human resource development. "Training Evaluation with 360-Degree Feedback" (Froukje A. Jellema) reports on a quasi-experimental study that examined the effectiveness of 360-degree feedback in evaluating the training received by nurses in a Dutch…

  20. Effectiveness of Feedback: The Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Ann; Mahony, Mary Jane

    2008-01-01

    While effective feedback has frequently been identified as a key strategy in learning and teaching, little known research has focused on students' perceptions of feedback and the contribution feedback makes to students' learning and teaching. This reported qualitative study aims to enrich our understanding of these perceptions and importantly to…

  1. A Survey of Psychological Assessment Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.; Wiggins, Chauntel M.; Gorske, Tad T.

    2007-01-01

    There have been no previous studies on how often psychologists conduct feedback and whether they view this practice as a useful component of assessment. To explore psychologists' feedback practices and their perception of the effects of feedback on their clients, the authors examined survey data from 719 psychologist members of the International…

  2. Sample-Clock Phase-Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    To demodulate a communication signal, a receiver must recover and synchronize to the symbol timing of a received waveform. In a system that utilizes digital sampling, the fidelity of synchronization is limited by the time between the symbol boundary and closest sample time location. To reduce this error, one typically uses a sample clock in excess of the symbol rate in order to provide multiple samples per symbol, thereby lowering the error limit to a fraction of a symbol time. For systems with a large modulation bandwidth, the required sample clock rate is prohibitive due to current technological barriers and processing complexity. With precise control of the phase of the sample clock, one can sample the received signal at times arbitrarily close to the symbol boundary, thus obviating the need, from a synchronization perspective, for multiple samples per symbol. Sample-clock phase-control feedback was developed for use in the demodulation of an optical communication signal, where multi-GHz modulation bandwidths would require prohibitively large sample clock frequencies for rates in excess of the symbol rate. A custom mixedsignal (RF/digital) offset phase-locked loop circuit was developed to control the phase of the 6.4-GHz clock that samples the photon-counting detector output. The offset phase-locked loop is driven by a feedback mechanism that continuously corrects for variation in the symbol time due to motion between the transmitter and receiver as well as oscillator instability. This innovation will allow significant improvements in receiver throughput; for example, the throughput of a pulse-position modulation (PPM) with 16 slots can increase from 188 Mb/s to 1.5 Gb/s.

  3. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  4. Using a Dialogical Approach to Examine Peer Feedback During Chemistry Investigative Task Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan Joo Seng, Mark; Hill, Mary

    2014-10-01

    Peer feedback is an inherent feature of classroom collaborative learning. Students invariably turn to their peers for feedback when carrying out an investigative task, and this feedback is usually implicit, unstructured and may positively or negatively influence students' learning when they work on a task. This study explored the characteristics of verbal peer feedback during a collaborative investigative chemistry task involving New Zealand Year 13 students. During the planning stage of the students' investigation, the discussions of five pairs of students were recorded and then transcribed. Analysis of transcribed verbal data focused on interactions that involved peer feedback along two dimensions, interactive/non-interactive and dialogic/authoritative (Mortimer and Scott, 2003). The findings indicated that although students adopted a predominantly interactive/authoritative communicative approach, with peer feedback as confirmation or evaluation, they are also capable of a more interactive/dialogic exchange, characterised by elaborative peer feedback. We discuss how this dialogic perspective on peer feedback provides an alternative approach to the analysis and study of student-student interactions during science investigations. The findings should be interpreted in light of the limitations in terms of sample size, grouping and specificity of the coding scheme. Implications for teacher practice are discussed in relation to facilitating peer feedback discourse in the science classroom.

  5. Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Using 3-Degree-of-Freedom Skin Deformation Feedback.

    PubMed

    Quek, Zhan Fan; Schorr, Samuel B; Nisky, Ilana; Provancher, William R; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    During tool-mediated interaction with everyday objects, we experience kinesthetic forces and tactile sensations in the form of vibration and skin deformation at the fingerpad. Fingerpad skin deformation is caused by forces applied tangentially and normally to the fingerpad skin, resulting in tangential and normal skin displacement. We designed a device to convey 3-degree-of-freedom (DoF) force information to the user via skin deformation, and conducted two experiments to determine the devices effectiveness for force-feedback substitution and augmentation. For sensory substitution, participants used 1-DoF and 3-DoF skin deformation feedback to locate a feature in a 3-DoF virtual environment. Participants showed improved precision and shorter completion time when using 3-DoF compared to 1-DoF skin deformation feedback. For sensory augmentation, participants traced a path in space from an initial to a target location, while under guidance from force and/or skin deformation feedback. When force feedback was augmented with skin deformation, participants reduced their path-following error over the cases when force or skin deformation feedback are used separately. We conclude that 3-DoF skin deformation feedback is effective in substituting or augmenting force feedback. Such substitution or augmentation could be used when force feedback is unattainable or attenuated due to device limitations or system instability. PMID:25647582

  6. Toward a Complete Accounting of Energy and Momentum from Stellar Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  7. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. I.; Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Delayed auditory feedback disrupts the production of speech, causing an increase in speech duration as well as many articulatory errors. To determine whether prolonged exposure to delayed auditory feedback (DAF) leads to adaptive compensations in speech production, 10 subjects were exposed in separate experimental sessions to both incremental and constant-delay exposure conditions. Significant adaptation occurred for syntactically structured stimuli in the form of increased speaking rates. After DAF was removed, aftereffects were apparent for all stimulus types in terms of increased speech rates. A carry-over effect from the first to the second experimental session was evident as long as 29 days after the first session. The use of strategies to overcome DAF and the differences between adaptation to DAF and adaptation to visual rearrangement are discussed.

  8. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Feedback stitching for gigapixel video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Bange, Lauren M.; Brady, David J.

    2015-11-01

    Methods of stitching static panoramas are unsuitable for video-rate stitching from camera arrays, because these methods are too computationally intensive for real-time operation and do not take advantage of prior knowledge of camera positions or the coherence between successive frames of a video sequence. We propose feedback stitching, which embeds the stitching process in a feedback loop, so that as new frames are captured, any new stitching errors occurring in the video sequence are analyzed and corrected as the sequence progresses. These algorithms are suitable for multiscale cameras, a camera array technology proven to be capable of gigapixel snapshot and video imaging, to allow for real-time compensation of any registration or parallax errors.

  10. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  11. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  12. Tailoring Feedback: Effective Feedback Should Be Adjusted Depending on the Needs of the Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    All students deserve effective feedback. General principles for effective feedback should be adjusted depending on the learner's needs. Feedback to struggling students should include focusing on the process, selecting only one or just a few points, giving self-referenced feedback to describe progress or capability, being very clear, and checking…

  13. The Nature of Feedback: How Different Types of Peer Feedback Affect Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    Although providing feedback is commonly practiced in education, there is no general agreement regarding what type of feedback is most helpful and why it is helpful. This study examined the relationship between various types of feedback, potential internal mediators, and the likelihood of implementing feedback. Five main predictions were developed…

  14. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of…

  15. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  16. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  18. Physiological Feedback Method and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Severance, Kurt E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and system provide physiological feedback for a patient and/or physician. At least one physiological effect experienced by a body part of a patient is measured noninvasively. A three-dimensional graphics model serving as an analogous representation of the body part is altered in accordance with the measurements. A binocular image signal representative of the three-dimensional graphics model so-altered is displayed for the patient and/or physician in a virtual reality environment.

  19. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  20. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  1. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  2. An experimental study about haptic feedback in robotic surgery: may visual feedback substitute tactile feedback?

    PubMed

    Meccariello, Giuseppe; Faedi, Federico; AlGhamdi, Saleh; Montevecchi, Filippo; Firinu, Elisabetta; Zanotti, Claudia; Cavaliere, Davide; Gunelli, Roberta; Taurchini, Marco; Amadori, Andrea; Vicini, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the hypothesis that the experience of the surgeon is sufficient to partially compensate for the lack of haptic feedback of the robotic system da Vinci Si HD (Intuitive (®) ). Twenty-five international surgeons belonging to different areas of surgical specialization were divided into two groups of investigation: experts and non-experts in the use of da Vinci Platform. This allocation was made on the basis of the following criteria: the number of performed procedures, the number of robotic working days and the number of true console hours. All participants underwent a specific test to assess their ability to recognize the thickness of custom-made membranes, without the availability of haptic feedback. After the performance of the surgeons, score was given according to an appropriate evaluation system (time, preciseness, force of tension and finding a metallic object). The analysis of the performances of participants provided the following results: an average score of 8.87 for the experts compared to 3.57 of non-experts with significant difference (P < 0.05). Other parameters of interest as the average time to conduct the test showed a result of 28.8 s for experts and 71.3 s of non-experts. After our results, a significant difference between the two groups in terms of performance was found. Our hypothesis that the expertise ability of the experts might partially overcome the lack of haptic feedback was confirmed. Probably visual feedback may play a role. PMID:26559538

  3. Deterministic Squeezed States with Collective Measurements and Feedback.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kevin C; Greve, Graham P; Weiner, Joshua M; Thompson, James K

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the creation of entangled, spin-squeezed states using a collective, or joint, measurement and real-time feedback. The pseudospin state of an ensemble of N=5×10^{4} laser-cooled ^{87}Rb atoms is deterministically driven to a specified population state with angular resolution that is a factor of 5.5(8) [7.4(6) dB] in variance below the standard quantum limit for unentangled atoms-comparable to the best enhancements using only unitary evolution. Without feedback, conditioning on the outcome of the joint premeasurement, we directly observe up to 59(8) times [17.7(6) dB] improvement in quantum phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit for N=4×10^{5}  atoms. This is one of the largest reported entanglement enhancements to date in any system. PMID:26991175

  4. Deterministic Squeezed States with Collective Measurements and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Kevin C.; Greve, Graham P.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Thompson, James K.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the creation of entangled, spin-squeezed states using a collective, or joint, measurement and real-time feedback. The pseudospin state of an ensemble of N =5 ×104 laser-cooled 87Rb atoms is deterministically driven to a specified population state with angular resolution that is a factor of 5.5(8) [7.4(6) dB] in variance below the standard quantum limit for unentangled atoms—comparable to the best enhancements using only unitary evolution. Without feedback, conditioning on the outcome of the joint premeasurement, we directly observe up to 59(8) times [17.7(6) dB] improvement in quantum phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit for N =4 ×105 atoms . This is one of the largest reported entanglement enhancements to date in any system.

  5. Response and fluctuations of a two-state signaling module with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Borowski, Peter; Jülicher, Frank; Zapotocky, Martin

    2007-08-01

    We study the stochastic kinetics of a signaling module consisting of a two-state stochastic point process with negative feedback. In the active state, a product is synthesized which increases the active-to-inactive transition rate of the process. We analyze this simple autoregulatory module using a path-integral technique based on the temporal statistics of state flips of the process. We develop a systematic framework to calculate averages, autocorrelations, and response functions by treating the feedback as a weak perturbation. Explicit analytical results are obtained to first order in the feedback strength. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to test the analytical results in the weak feedback limit and to investigate the strong feedback regime. We conclude by relating some of our results to experimental observations in the olfactory and visual sensory systems.

  6. Active Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode on the DIII-D Device

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M; Bialek, J; Chance, M S; Chu, M S; Fredrickson, E D; Garofalo, A M; Gryaznevich, M; Hatcher, R E; Jensen, T H; Johnson, L C; Lahaye, R J; Lazarus, E A; Makowski, M A; Manickam, J; Navratil, G A; Scoville, J T; Strait, E J; Turnbull, A D; Walker, M L

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  7. Design and Validation of Optimized Feedforward with Robust Feedback Control of a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, Roman; He Weidong; Edwards, Robert M.

    2004-08-15

    Design applications for robust feedback and optimized feedforward control, with confirming results from experiments conducted on the Pennsylvania State University TRIGA reactor, are presented. The combination of feedforward and feedback control techniques complement each other in that robust control offers guaranteed closed-loop stability in the presence of uncertainties, and optimized feedforward offers an approach to achieving performance that is sometimes limited by overly conservative robust feedback control. The design approach taken in this work combines these techniques by first designing robust feedback control. Alternative methods for specifying a low-order linear model and uncertainty specifications, while seeking as much performance as possible, are discussed and evaluated. To achieve desired performance characteristics, the optimized feedforward control is then computed by using the nominal nonlinear plant model that incorporates the robust feedback control.

  8. Multiple-Try Feedback and Higher-Order Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Koul, Ravinder

    2005-01-01

    Although feedback is an important component of computer-based instruction (CBI), the effects of feedback on higher-order learning outcomes are not well understood. Several meta-analyses provide two rules of thumb: any feedback is better than no feedback and feedback with more information is better than feedback with less information. …

  9. Pilot-optimal multivariable control synthesis by output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Innocenti, M.

    1981-01-01

    A control system design approach for optimal stability augmentation, systems, using limited state feedback theory with the specific inclusion of the human pilot in the loop is presented. The methodology is especially suitable for application to flight vehicles exhibiting nonconventional dynamic characteristics and for which quantitative handling qualities specifications are not available. The design is based on a correlation between pilot ratings and objective function of the optimal control model of the human pilot. Simultaneous optimization for augmentation and pilot gains are required.

  10. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  11. Efferent feedback slows cochlear aging.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M Charles; Liberman, Leslie D; Maison, Stéphane F

    2014-03-26

    The inner ear receives two types of efferent feedback from the brainstem: one pathway provides gain control on outer hair cells' contribution to cochlear amplification, and the other modulates the excitability of the cochlear nerve. Although efferent feedback can protect hair cells from acoustic injury and thereby minimize noise-induced permanent threshold shifts, most prior studies focused on high-intensity exposures (>100 dB SPL). Here, we show that efferents are essential for long-term maintenance of cochlear function in mice aged 1 year post-de-efferentation without purposeful acoustic overexposure. Cochlear de-efferentation was achieved by surgical lesion of efferent pathways in the brainstem and was assessed by quantitative analysis of immunostained efferent terminals in outer and inner hair cell areas. The resultant loss of efferent feedback accelerated the age-related amplitude reduction in cochlear neural responses, as seen in auditory brainstem responses, and increased the loss of synapses between hair cells and the terminals of cochlear nerve fibers, as seen in confocal analysis of the organ of Corti immunostained for presynaptic and postsynaptic markers. This type of neuropathy, also seen after moderate noise exposure, has been termed "hidden hearing loss", because it does not affect thresholds, but can be seen in the suprathreshold amplitudes of cochlear neural responses, and likely causes problems with hearing in a noisy environment, a classic symptom of age-related hearing loss in humans. Since efferent reflex strength varies among individuals and can be measured noninvasively, a weak reflex may be an important risk factor, and prognostic indicator, for age-related hearing impairment. PMID:24672005

  12. On limit and limit setting.

    PubMed

    Gorney, J E

    1994-01-01

    This article investigates the role of limit and limit setting within the psychoanalytic situation. Limit is understood to be a boundary between self and others, established as an interactional dimension of experience. Disorders of limit are here understood within the context of Winnicott's conception of the "anti-social tendency." Limit setting is proposed as a necessary and authentic response to the patient's acting out via holding and empathic responsiveness, viewed here as a form of boundary delineation. It is proposed that the patient attempts to repair his or her boundary problem through a seeking of secure limits within the analyst. The setting of secure and appropriate limits must arise from a working through of the analyst's own countertransference response to the patient. It is critical that this response be evoked by, and arise from, the immediate therapeutic interaction so that the patient can experience limit setting as simultaneously personal and authentic. PMID:7972580

  13. Auditory categories with separable decision boundaries are learned faster with full feedback than with minimal feedback.

    PubMed

    Yi, Han Gyol; Chandrasekaran, Bharath

    2016-08-01

    During visual category learning, full feedback (e.g., "Wrong, that was a category 4."), relative to minimal feedback (e.g., "Wrong."), enhances performance when the relevant dimensions are separable. This pattern is reversed with inseparable dimensions. Here, the interaction between trial-by-trial feedback and separability of dimensions in the auditory domain is examined. Participants were trained to categorize auditory stimuli along separable or inseparable dimensions. One group received full feedback, while the other group received minimal feedback. In the separable-dimensions condition, the full-feedback group achieved higher accuracy than did the minimal-feedback group. In the inseparable-dimensions condition, performance was equivalent across the feedback groups. These results altogether suggest that trial-by-trial feedback affects auditory category learning performance differentially for separable and inseparable categories. PMID:27586759

  14. Functional observer and state feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we show the relation between state space approach and transfer function approach for functional observer and state feedback design. Two approaches can be transformed into each other, based on this result. More importantly, we find that the state space approach introduces some severe, unnecessary restrictions in solving the problem. The restrictions are, however, reduced to be a trivial condition in transfer function approach. It is believed that the result presented in this paper will be useful in developing both approaches, and motivate some new results for solving the problem.

  15. Visual feedback in stuttering therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Elzbieta

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results concerning the influence of visual echo and reverberation on the speech process of stutterers. Visual stimuli along with the influence of acoustic and visual-acoustic stimuli have been compared. Following this the methods of implementing visual feedback with the aid of electroluminescent diodes directed by speech signals have been presented. The concept of a computerized visual echo based on the acoustic recognition of Polish syllabic vowels has been also presented. All the research nd trials carried out at our center, aside from cognitive aims, generally aim at the development of new speech correctors to be utilized in stuttering therapy.

  16. Leadership, personality and social feedback

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tzo Zen; Sweetman, Gemma; Johnstone, Rufus A; Manica, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In a recent paper, we showed that leadership arises from individual behavioral differences in pairs of foraging stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Foraging data from randomly combined pairs of fish were analyzed using Markov Chain models to infer the individual movement rules underlying joint behavior. While both fish responded to partner movement, bolder individuals were the least responsive and showed greater individual initiative. Shy partners were more faithful followers and were also found to bring about greater leadership tendencies in their bold partners. The ability of such followers to inspire bolder fish suggests that leadership may be dependent on individual temperament differences, reinforced by social feedback. PMID:19721883

  17. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  18. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier.

    PubMed

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants' comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)-no feedback-was on average "slightly uncomfortable", the other three conditions were "slightly comfortable" (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  19. Age differences in feedback reactions: The roles of employee feedback orientation on social awareness and utility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mo; Burlacu, Gabriela; Truxillo, Donald; James, Keith; Yao, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Organizations worldwide are currently experiencing shifts in the age composition of their workforces. The workforce is aging and becoming increasingly age-diverse, suggesting that organizational researchers and practitioners need to better understand how age differences may manifest in the workplace and the implications for human resource practice. Integrating socioemotional selectivity theory with the performance feedback literature and using a time-lagged design, the current study examined age differences in moderating the relationships between the characteristics of performance feedback and employee reactions to the feedback event. The results suggest that older workers had higher levels of feedback orientation on social awareness, but lower levels of feedback orientation on utility than younger workers. Furthermore, the positive associations between favorability of feedback and feedback delivery and feedback reactions were stronger for older workers than for younger workers, whereas the positive association between feedback quality and feedback reactions was stronger for younger workers than for older workers. Finally, the current study revealed that age-related differences in employee feedback orientation could explain the different patterns of relationships between feedback characteristics and feedback reactions across older and younger workers. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications for building theory about workplace aging and improving ways that performance feedback is managed across employees from diverse age groups. PMID:25546265

  20. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Thomas W; Thomas, Stephen M; Maynard, Daniel S; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, Kristofer; Frey, Serita D; van Diepen, Linda T A; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Decomposition of organic material by soil microbes generates an annual global release of 50-75 Pg carbon to the atmosphere, ∼7.5-9 times that of anthropogenic emissions worldwide. This process is sensitive to global change factors, which can drive carbon cycle-climate feedbacks with the potential to enhance atmospheric warming. Although the effects of interacting global change factors on soil microbial activity have been a widespread ecological focus, the regulatory effects of interspecific interactions are rarely considered in climate feedback studies. We explore the potential of soil animals to mediate microbial responses to warming and nitrogen enrichment within a long-term, field-based global change study. The combination of global change factors alleviated the bottom-up limitations on fungal growth, stimulating enzyme production and decomposition rates in the absence of soil animals. However, increased fungal biomass also stimulated consumption rates by soil invertebrates, restoring microbial process rates to levels observed under ambient conditions. Our results support the contemporary theory that top-down control in soil food webs is apparent only in the absence of bottom-up limitation. As such, when global change factors alleviate the bottom-up limitations on microbial activity, top-down control becomes an increasingly important regulatory force with the capacity to dampen the strength of positive carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. PMID:26038557

  1. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Thomas W.; Thomas, Stephen M.; Maynard, Daniel S.; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, Kristofer; Frey, Serita D.; van Diepen, Linda T. A.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of organic material by soil microbes generates an annual global release of 50–75 Pg carbon to the atmosphere, ∼7.5–9 times that of anthropogenic emissions worldwide. This process is sensitive to global change factors, which can drive carbon cycle–climate feedbacks with the potential to enhance atmospheric warming. Although the effects of interacting global change factors on soil microbial activity have been a widespread ecological focus, the regulatory effects of interspecific interactions are rarely considered in climate feedback studies. We explore the potential of soil animals to mediate microbial responses to warming and nitrogen enrichment within a long-term, field-based global change study. The combination of global change factors alleviated the bottom-up limitations on fungal growth, stimulating enzyme production and decomposition rates in the absence of soil animals. However, increased fungal biomass also stimulated consumption rates by soil invertebrates, restoring microbial process rates to levels observed under ambient conditions. Our results support the contemporary theory that top-down control in soil food webs is apparent only in the absence of bottom-up limitation. As such, when global change factors alleviate the bottom-up limitations on microbial activity, top-down control becomes an increasingly important regulatory force with the capacity to dampen the strength of positive carbon cycle–climate feedbacks. PMID:26038557

  2. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  3. Shrub expansion and climate feedbacks in Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranty, Michael M.; Goetz, Scott J.

    2012-03-01

    Arctic tundra ecosystems stand to play a substantial role in both the magnitude and rate of global climate warming over the coming decades and centuries. The exact nature of this role will be determined by the combined effects of currently amplified rates of climate warming in the Arctic (Serreze et al 2000) and a series of related positive climate feedbacks that include mobilization of permafrost carbon (Schuur et al 2008), decreases in surface albedo (Chapin et al 2005) and evapotranspiration (ET) mediated increases in atmospheric water vapor (Swann et al 2010). Conceptually, these feedback mechanisms are intuitive and readily comprehensible: warming-induced permafrost thaw will make new soil carbon pools accessible for microbial respiration, and increased vegetation productivity, expansion of shrubs in particular, will lower surface reflectance and increase ET. However, our current understanding of these feedback mechanisms relies largely on limited and local field studies and, as such, the quantitative estimates of feedback effects on regional and global climate require spatial upscaling and uncertainty estimates derived from models. Moreover, the feedback mechanisms interact and their combined net effect on climate is highly variable and not well characterized. A recent study by Bonfils et al (2012) is among the first to explicitly examine how shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems will impact regional climate. Using an Earth system model, Bonfils et al find that an idealized 20% increase in shrub cover north of 60°N latitude will lead to annual temperature increases of 0.66 °C and 1.84 °C, respectively, when the shrubs are 0.5 m and 2 m tall. The modeled temperature increases arise from atmospheric heating as a combined consequence of decreased albedo and increased ET. The primary difference between the two cases is associated with the fact that tall shrubs protrude above the snow, thus reducing albedo year round, whereas short shrubs are completely

  4. Speech Production as State Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Houde, John F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker's brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has been the use of state feedback control (SFC) theory to explain the role of the CNS in motor control. SFC postulates that the CNS controls motor output by (1) estimating the current dynamic state of the thing (e.g., arm) being controlled, and (2) generating controls based on this estimated state. SFC has successfully predicted a great range of non-speech motor phenomena, but as yet has not received attention in the speech motor control community. Here, we review some of the key characteristics of speech motor control and what they say about the role of the CNS in the process. We then discuss prior efforts to model the role of CNS in speech motor control, and argue that these models have inherent limitationslimitations that are overcome by an SFC model of speech motor control which we describe. We conclude by discussing a plausible neural substrate of our model. PMID:22046152

  5. Observing chaos for quantum-dot microlasers with external feedback.

    PubMed

    Albert, Ferdinand; Hopfmann, Caspar; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas; Kamp, Martin; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Forchel, Alfred; Kanter, Ido

    2011-01-01

    Chaos presents a striking and fascinating phenomenon of nonlinear systems. A common aspect of such systems is the presence of feedback that couples the output signal partially back to the input. Feedback coupling can be well controlled in optoelectronic devices such as conventional semiconductor lasers that provide bench-top platforms for the study of chaotic behaviour and high bit rate random number generation. Here we experimentally demonstrate that chaos can be observed for quantum-dot microlasers operating close to the quantum limit at nW output powers. Applying self-feedback to a quantum-dot microlaser results in a dramatic change in the photon statistics wherein strong, super-thermal photon bunching is indicative of random-intensity fluctuations associated with the spiked emission of light. Our experiments reveal that gain competition of few quantum dots in the active layer enhances the influence of self-feedback and will open up new avenues for the study of chaos in quantum systems. PMID:21694714

  6. A cognitive neuroprosthetic that uses cortical stimulation for somatosensory feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaes, Christian; Shi, Ying; Kellis, Spencer; Minxha, Juri; Revechkis, Boris; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Present day cortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have made impressive advances using decoded brain signals to control extracorporeal devices. Although BMIs are used in a closed-loop fashion, sensory feedback typically is visual only. However medical case studies have shown that the loss of somesthesis in a limb greatly reduces the agility of the limb even when visual feedback is available. Approach. To overcome this limitation, this study tested a closed-loop BMI that utilizes intracortical microstimulation to provide ‘tactile’ sensation to a non-human primate. Main result. Using stimulation electrodes in Brodmann area 1 of somatosensory cortex (BA1) and recording electrodes in the anterior intraparietal area, the parietal reach region and dorsal area 5 (area 5d), it was found that this form of feedback can be used in BMI tasks. Significance. Providing somatosensory feedback has the poyential to greatly improve the performance of cognitive neuroprostheses especially for fine control and object manipulation. Adding stimulation to a BMI system could therefore improve the quality of life for severely paralyzed patients.

  7. Evaluation of feedback-reduction algorithms for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J E; Zurek, P M; Brantley, M

    2000-11-01

    Three adaptive feedback-reduction algorithms were implemented in a laboratory-based digital hearing aid system and evaluated with dynamic feedback paths and hearing-impaired subjects. The evaluation included measurements of maximum stable gain and subjective quality ratings. The continuously adapting CNN algorithm (Closed-loop processing with No probe Noise) provided the best performance: 8.5 dB of added stable gain (ASG) relative to a reference algorithm averaged over all subjects, ears, and vent conditions. Two intermittently adapting algorithms, ONO (Open-loop with Noise when Oscillation detected) and ONQ (Open-loop with Noise when Quiet detected), provided an average of 5 dB of ASG. Subjects with more severe hearing losses received greater benefits: 13 dB average ASG for the CNN algorithm and 7-8 dB average ASG for the ONO and ONQ algorithms. These values are conservative estimates of ASG because the fitting procedure produced a frequency-gain characteristic that already included precautions against feedback. Speech quality ratings showed no substantial algorithm effect on pleasantness or intelligibility, although subjects informally expressed strong objections to the probe noise used by the ONO and ONQ algorithms. This objection was not reflected in the speech quality ratings because of limitations of the experimental procedure. The results clearly indicate that the CNN algorithm is the most promising choice for adaptive feedback reduction in hearing aids. PMID:11108377

  8. Exploring Patients’ Views Toward Giving Web-Based Feedback and Ratings to General Practitioners in England: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Rebecca; Neailey, Kevin; Hooberman, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient feedback websites or doctor rating websites are increasingly being used by patients to give feedback about their health care experiences. There is little known about why patients in England may give Web-based feedback and what may motivate or dissuade them from giving Web-based feedback. Objective The aim of this study was to explore patients’ views toward giving Web-based feedback and ratings to general practitioners (GPs), within the context of other feedback methods available in primary care in England, and in particular, paper-based feedback cards. Methods A descriptive exploratory qualitative approach using face-to-face semistructured interviews was used in this study. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 18 participants from different age groups in London and Coventry. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using applied thematic analysis. Results Half of the participants in this study were not aware of the opportunity to leave feedback for GPs, and there was limited awareness about the methods available to leave feedback for a GP. The majority of participants were not convinced that formal patient feedback was needed by GPs or would be used by GPs for improvement, regardless of whether they gave it via a website or on paper. Some participants said or suggested that they may leave feedback on a website rather than on a paper-based feedback card for several reasons: because of the ability and ease of giving it remotely; because it would be shared with the public; and because it would be taken more seriously by GPs. Others, however, suggested that they would not use a website to leave feedback for the opposite reasons: because of accessibility issues; privacy and security concerns; and because they felt feedback left on a website may be ignored. Conclusions Patient feedback and rating websites as they currently are will not replace other mechanisms for patients in England to leave feedback for a GP. Rather, they may motivate a

  9. Grip force control during virtual object interaction: effect of force feedback,accuracy demands, and training.

    PubMed

    Gibo, Tricia L; Bastian, Amy J; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-03-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, people are able to efficiently modulate their grip force according to the experienced load force. Effective grip force control involves providing enough grip force to prevent the object from slipping, while avoiding excessive force to avoid damage and fatigue. During indirect object manipulation via teleoperation systems or in virtual environments, users often receive limited somatosensory feedback about objects with which they interact. This study examines the effects of force feedback, accuracy demands, and training on grip force control during object interaction in a virtual environment. The task required subjects to grasp and move a virtual object while tracking a target. When force feedback was not provided, subjects failed to couple grip and load force, a capability fundamental to direct object interaction. Subjects also exerted larger grip force without force feedback and when accuracy demands of the tracking task were high. In addition, the presence or absence of force feedback during training affected subsequent performance, even when the feedback condition was switched. Subjects' grip force control remained reminiscent of their employed grip during the initial training. These results motivate the use of force feedback during telemanipulation and highlight the effect of force feedback during training. PMID:24845744

  10. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages. PMID:26958217

  11. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  12. Mechanisms controlling the SST air-sea heat flux feedback and its dependence on spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Ute; Czaja, Arnaud; Marshall, John

    2016-05-01

    The turbulent air-sea heat flux feedback (α , in {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} ) is a major contributor to setting the damping timescale of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. In this study we compare the spatial distribution and magnitude of α in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, as estimated from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The comparison is rationalized in terms of an upper bound on the heat flux feedback, associated with "fast" atmospheric export of temperature and moisture anomalies away from the marine boundary layer, and a lower bound associated with "slow" export. It is found that regions of cold surface waters (≤ 10° C) are best described as approaching the slow export limit. This conclusion is not only valid at the synoptic scale resolved by the reanalysis data, but also on basin scales. In particular, it applies to the heat flux feedback acting as circumpolar SST anomaly scales are approached in the Southern Ocean, with feedbacks of ≤ 10 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . In contrast, the magnitude of the heat flux feedback is close to that expected from the fast export limit over the Gulf Stream and its recirculation with values on the order of ≈40 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . Further analysis suggests that this high value reflects a compensation between a moderate thermodynamic adjustment of the boundary layer, which tends to weaken the heat flux feedback, and an enhancement of the surface winds over warm SST anomalies, which tend to enhance the feedback.

  13. Quantum Feedback and Traveling-wave Parametric Amplification in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macklin, Christopher Stewart

    Feedback control in classical systems is an indispensable, ubiquitous tool. The theoretical basis for achieving optimal classical control is well understood, and crucially relies on a very classical assumption: that measurements of the state of a system under control need not perturb that state. In a quantum context this assumption is fundamentally invalid. Although many aspects of the theory of quantum feedback control are relatively well developed, the technological basis for feedback control of a single quantum system has only very recently matured. We demonstrate the experimental realization of a quantum feedback control protocol, perpetually stabilizing the coherent Rabi oscillations of a superconducting qubit. This is the first utilization of quantum feedback control for stabilizing a dynamical process, and the first application of quantum feedback in a solid-state system of any kind. This demonstration comprises the first half of this thesis. The feedback protocol is predicated on the ability to make high-fidelity quantum measurements, which are enabled by quantum-limited Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs). The design and realization of the novel Josephson traveling-wave parametric amplifier (JTWPA) comprises the second half of this thesis. The JTWPA achieves order-of-magnitude improvements over state of the art JPAs in bandwidth and signal power handling while providing quantum-limited noise performance, potentially enabling the simultaneous readout of dozens of superconducting qubits and the generation of broadband multi-mode squeezing in the microwave domain.

  14. Corrective Feedback and Student Uptakes in English Immersion Classrooms in Japan: Is the Counter-Balance Hypothesis Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakurai, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of studies on teachers' corrective feedback and students' uptakes in immersion settings, but the majority is carried out in the North American context. Based on limited data, "the counter­-balance hypothesis" was proposed by Lyster and Mori (2006) to explain distributions of teacher feedback and…

  15. Not Seeing the Wood for the Trees: Developing a Feedback Analysis Tool to Explore Feed Forward in Modularised Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Gwyneth; Smith, Holly; Creese, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers feedback in the context of modularised programmes in higher education in the UK. It is argued that the self-contained nature of modular assessment may limit feedback dialogue between staff and students to assignment-specific issues, and may impede student progress towards holistic programme-level aims and outcomes. A feedback…

  16. Invasive grasses consistently create similar plant-soil feedback types in soils collected from geographically distant locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive PSF is limited by soil type. Most, but not all, plant species exhibit negative plant soil feedback (PSF), wherein plants perform poorly in soils formerly occupied (conditioned) by conspecifics. This dynamic has led to the Plant-Soil Feedback Hypothesis of Invasion which posits that plant sp...

  17. Galaxy-scale AGN feedback - theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Umemura, M.; Sutherland, R. S.; Silk, J.

    2016-02-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative and positive feedback depend strongly on interstellar medium properties, especially the column depth and spatial distribution of clouds. Negative feedback is most effective if clouds are distributed spherically and individual clouds have small column depths, while positive feedback is most effective if clouds are predominantly in a disc-like configuration.

  18. Reducing the uncertainty in subtropical cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Timothy A.; Norris, Joel R.

    2016-03-01

    Large uncertainty remains on how subtropical clouds will respond to anthropogenic climate change and therefore whether they will act as a positive feedback that amplifies global warming or negative feedback that dampens global warming by altering Earth's energy budget. Here we reduce this uncertainty using an observationally constrained formulation of the response of subtropical clouds to greenhouse forcing. The observed interannual sensitivity of cloud solar reflection to varying meteorological conditions suggests that increasing sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the future climate will have largely canceling effects on subtropical cloudiness, overall leading to a weak positive shortwave cloud feedback (0.4 ± 0.9 W m-2 K-1). The uncertainty of this observationally based approximation of the cloud feedback is narrower than the intermodel spread of the feedback produced by climate models. Subtropical cloud changes will therefore complement positive cloud feedbacks identified by previous work, suggesting that future global cloud changes will amplify global warming.

  19. MHD computation of feedback of resistive-shell instabilities in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Zita, E.J.; Prager, S.C. . Plasma Physics Research); Ho, Y.L.; Schnack, D.D )

    1992-05-01

    MHD computation demonstrates that feedback can sustain reversal and reduce loop voltage in resistive-shell reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. Edge feedback on {approximately}2R/a tearing modes resonant near axis is found to restore plasma parameters to nearly their levels with a close-fitting conducting shell. When original dynamo modes are stabilized, neighboring tearing modes grow to maintain the RFP dynamo more efficiently. This suggests that experimentally observed limits on RFP pulselengths to the order of the shell time can be overcome by applying feedback to a few helical modes.

  20. Design study of a feedback control system for the Multicyclic Flap System rotor (MFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbrich, R.; Perley, R.; Howes, H.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of automatically providing higher harmonic control to a deflectable control flap at the tip of a helicopter rotor blade through feedback of selected independent parameter was investigated. Control parameters were selected for input to the feedback system. A preliminary circuit was designed to condition the selected parameters, weigh limiting factors, and provide a proper output signal to the multi-cyclic control actuators. Results indicate that feedback control for the higher harmonic is feasible; however, design for a flight system requires an extension of the present analysis which was done for one flight condition - 120 kts, 11,500 lbs gross weight and level flight.

  1. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Li-Di; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yong-Ji

    2014-01-15

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup −7} rad /√( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2 mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  2. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization.

    PubMed

    Gori, Monica; Vercillo, Tiziana; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014). To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback, or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject's forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially congruent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality. PMID:25368587

  3. AGN and the necessity of feedback.

    PubMed

    Benson, Andrew J

    2005-03-15

    There is now good observational evidence that some type of feedback process must operate within galaxies. Such a process has long been thought to exist on the basis of theoretical studies of galaxy formation. This feedback is responsible for regulating the rate of star formation and thereby preventing the formation of an overabundance of low-mass galaxies. There is gathering evidence that this feedback process must somehow involve the supermassive black holes thought to dwell in the centres of galaxies. PMID:15681287

  4. Fuzzy cloud concepts for assessing radiation feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.

    1995-09-01

    The importance of clouds in the climate system is well-known but poorly understood. Modeling and observational studies have suggested that there may be positive feedbacks associated with certain cloud processes, but it is not known how strong these feedbacks are in the context of the overall system. Examples include ice microphysics feedback, as shown by Liou`s model, and the relationship between SST and cloud cover in the tropics, which is the focus of this research. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Modelling human balance using switched systems with linear feedback control.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Glendinning, Paul; Brown, Martin; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo; Dallali, Houman; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    We are interested in understanding the mechanisms behind and the character of the sway motion of healthy human subjects during quiet standing. We assume that a human body can be modelled as a single-link inverted pendulum, and the balance is achieved using linear feedback control. Using these assumptions, we derive a switched model which we then investigate. Stable periodic motions (limit cycles) about an upright position are found. The existence of these limit cycles is studied as a function of system parameters. The exploration of the parameter space leads to the detection of multi-stability and homoclinic bifurcations. PMID:21697168

  6. Improved feedback amplifier for electromagnetic induction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Waymond R.

    2016-05-01

    A method using feedback is presented that reduces several measurement errors inherent in electromagnetic induction sensors. Errors associated with coupling between receive coils and errors associated with operating near magnetic soils will both be reduced. The method uses feedback that is directly injected into the receive coils and does not require secondary coils. A simple circuit is introduced to perform the feedback and is optimized to reduce the errors and make the circuit stable. Experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the feedback.

  7. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  8. Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Sames, Christian; Kubanek, Alexander; Apel, Matthias; Balbach, Maximilian; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Rempe, Gerhard

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160μK. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the 1 s regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

  9. Contributions of the hippocampus to feedback learning.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Kathryn C; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2015-12-01

    Humans learn about the world in a variety of manners, including by observation, by associating cues in the environment, and via feedback. Across species, two brain structures have been predominantly involved in these learning processes: the hippocampus--supporting learning via observation and paired association--and the striatum--critical for feedback learning. This simple dichotomy, however, has recently been challenged by reports of hippocampal engagement in feedback learning, although the role of the hippocampus is not fully understood. The purpose of this experiment was to characterize the hippocampal response during feedback learning by manipulating varying levels of memory interference. Consistent with prior reports, feedback learning recruited the striatum and midbrain. Notably, feedback learning also engaged the hippocampus. The level of activity in these regions was modulated by the degree of memory interference, such that the greatest activation occurred during the highest level of memory interference. Importantly, the accuracy of information learned via feedback correlated with hippocampal activation and was reduced by the presence of high memory interference. Taken together, these findings provide evidence of hippocampal involvement in feedback learning by demonstrating both its relevance for the accuracy of information learned via feedback and its susceptibility to interference. PMID:26055632

  10. Analytical stability boundaries for quantum cascade lasers subject to optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friart, Gaetan; Van der Sande, Guy; Verschaffelt, Guy; Erneux, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We consider nonlinear rate equations appropriate for a quantum cascade laser subject to optical feedback. We analyze the conditions for a Hopf bifurcation in the limit of large values of the delay. We obtain a simple expression for the critical feedback rate that highlights the effects of key parameters such as the linewidth enhancement factor and the pump. All our asymptotic approximations are validated numerically by using a path continuation technique that allows us to follow Hopf bifurcation points in parameter space.

  11. FBG feedback's effects on distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser's polarization modes' beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunbo; Yu, Kuanglu; Lao, Yiqin; Cheng, Linghao; Wu, Chongqing; Zhao, Yao; Shang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber optic laser has recently been extensively explored as a powerful sensor for various measurands, thanks to its high sensitivity, excellent signal-to-noise ratio, and inherent electronic magnetic immunity. The phase noise and linewidth of the laser's beat note limits this sensor's performances. We report in this letter, our recent experiments on noise reduction employing optical feedback from an external FBG. We also investigated the sensitivity reduction of the DBR sensor after feedback is introduced.

  12. Permafrost-carbon feedbacks and climate stabilization costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Addor, Nans

    2013-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost in recent years is reported at various locations in the arctic. Studies using a range of climate models show that permafrost thawing due to arctic warming and resulting CO2 and CH4 emissions provide feedbacks to the global climate system. However, such permafrost-carbon feedbacks have not been accounted for in the calculations of stabilization emissions scenarios of greenhouse gases and related components to cap the global warming below certain levels (e.g. 2°C target). This raises the following two questions: 1) how permafrost-carbon feedbacks influence the pathways of climate stabilizations and 2) how much permafrost-carbon feedbacks generate additional economic costs to stabilize the temperature. We derive a simple parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks from the results of (Schneider von Deimling et al. 2012) that show the ranges of CO2 and CH4 emissions due to the thawing of permafrost under the RCP8.5 scenario. Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012) developed a process-based model to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral and peatland soils distributed across 50 latitudinal bands in the arctic and varied a large number of parameters stochastically to estimate uncertainty ranges in the output. In contrast, we limit the number of stochastic parameters to several and tune them to reproduce the stochastic behavior of the model of Schneider von Deimling et al. (2012). This simple parameterization is based on a linear dependence of the permafrost thaw on global temperature changes and relies on a system of linear reservoirs to control CO2 and CH4 emissions. It can be easily implemented in Simple Climate Models (SCMs). We implement such a simplified parameterization of permafrost-carbon feedbacks to the Aggregate Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate model (ACC2) (Tanaka et al. 2007), which comprises a box model of the global carbon cycle, simple parameterizations of the atmospheric chemistry and the radiative forcing

  13. EXACT SOLUTION TO FINITE TEMPERATURE SFDM: NATURAL CORES WITHOUT FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T. E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2013-01-20

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword-in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z {sub 2} symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z {sub 2} symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  14. Exact Solution to Finite Temperature SFDM: Natural Cores without Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-quality observations of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies have shown that their dark matter (DM) halos prefer flat central density profiles. However, the standard cold dark matter model simulations predict a more cuspy behavior. One mechanism used to reconcile the simulations with the observed data is the feedback from star formation. While this mechanism may be successful in isolated dwarf galaxies, its success in LSB galaxies remains unclear. Additionally, the inclusion of too much feedback in the simulations is a double-edged sword—in order to obtain a cored DM distribution from an initially cuspy one, the feedback recipes usually require one to remove a large quantity of baryons from the center of the galaxies; however, some feedback recipes produce twice the number of satellite galaxies of a given luminosity and with much smaller mass-to-light ratios from those that are observed. Therefore, one DM profile that produces cores naturally and that does not require large amounts of feedback would be preferable. We find both requirements to be satisfied in the scalar field dark matter model. Here, we consider that DM is an auto-interacting real scalar field in a thermal bath at temperature T with an initial Z 2 symmetric potential. As the universe expands, the temperature drops so that the Z 2 symmetry is spontaneously broken and the field rolls down to a new minimum. We give an exact analytic solution to the Newtonian limit of this system, showing that it can satisfy the two desired requirements and that the rotation curve profile is no longer universal.

  15. Influence of Vibrotactile Feedback on Controlling Tilt Motion After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Rupert, A. H.; Vanya, R. D.; Esteves, J. T.; Clement, G.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the vestibular system are integrated with other sensory information leads to perceptual disturbances and impaired manual control following transitions between gravity environments. The primary goals of this ongoing post-flight investigation are to quantify decrements in manual control of tilt motion following short-duration spaceflight and to evaluate vibrotactile feedback of tilt as a sensorimotor countermeasure. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on 9 astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation (216 deg/s, <20 cm radius) in a darkened room is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant canal or visual cues. A Tilt-Translation Sled (TTS) is capable of synchronizing pitch tilt with fore-aft translation to align the resultant gravitoinertial vector with the longitudinal body axis, thereby eliciting canal reflexes without concordant otolith or visual cues. A simple 4 tactor system was implemented to provide feedback when tilt position exceeded predetermined levels in either device. Closed-loop nulling tasks are performed during random tilt steps or sum-of-sines (TTS only) with and without vibrotactile feedback of chair position. RESULTS. On landing day the manual control performance without vibrotactile feedback was reduced by >30% based on the gain or the amount of tilt disturbance successfully nulled. Manual control performance tended to return to baseline levels within 1-2 days following landing. Root-mean-square position error and tilt velocity were significantly reduced with vibrotactile feedback. CONCLUSIONS. These preliminary results are consistent with our hypothesis that adaptive changes in vestibular processing corresponds to reduced manual control performance following G-transitions. A simple vibrotactile prosthesis improves the ability to null out tilt motion within a

  16. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  17. Biological Feedbacks in Global Desertification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, William H.; Reynolds, James F.; Cunningham, Gary L.; Huenneke, Laura F.; Jarrell, Wesley M.; Virginia, Ross A.; Whitford, Walter G.

    1990-03-01

    Studies of ecosystem processes on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico suggest that long-term grazing of semiarid grasslands leads to an increase in the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water, nitrogen, and other soil resources. Heterogeneity of soil resources promotes invasion by desert shrubs, which leads to a further localization of soil resources under shrub canopies. In the barren area between shrubs, soil fertility is lost by erosion and gaseous emissions. This positive feedback leads to the desertification of formerly productive land in southern New Mexico and in other regions, such as the Sahel. Future desertification is likely to be exacerbated by global climate warming and to cause significant changes in global biogeochemical cycles.

  18. Biological feedbacks in global desertification.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, W H; Reynolds, J F; Cunningham, G L; Huenneke, L F; Jarrell, W M; Virginia, R A; Whitford, W G

    1990-03-01

    Studies of ecosystem processes on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico suggest that longterm grazing of semiarid grasslands leads to an increase in the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water, nitrogen, and other soil resources. Heterogeneity of soil resources promotes invasion by desert shrubs, which leads to a further localization of soil resources under shrub canopies. In the barren area between shrubs, soil fertility is lost by erosion and gaseous emissions. This positive feedback leads to the desertification of formerly productive land in southern New Mexico and in other regions, such as the Sahel. Future desertification is likely to be exacerbated by global climate warming and to cause significant changes in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:17800060

  19. Robust cloud feedback over tropical land in a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Ogura, Tomoo; Watanabe, Masahiro; Xie, Shang-Ping; Ueda, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Cloud-related radiative perturbations over land in a warming climate are of importance for human health, ecosystem, agriculture, and industry via solar radiation availability and local warming amplification. However, robustness and physical mechanisms responsible for the land cloud feedback were not examined sufficiently because of the limited contribution to uncertainty in global climate sensitivity. Here we show that cloud feedback in general circulation models over tropical land is robust, positive, and is relevant to atmospheric circulation change and thermodynamic constraint associated with water vapor availability. In a warming climate, spatial variations in tropospheric warming associated with climatological circulation pattern result in a general weakening of tropical circulation and a dynamic reduction of land cloud during summer monsoon season. Limited increase in availability of water vapor also reduces the land cloud. The reduction of land cloud depends on global-scale oceanic warming and is not sensitive to regional warming patterns. The robust positive feedback can contribute to the warming amplification and drying over tropical land in the future.

  20. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for E×B rotationally driven flute modes.

  2. Disrupting vagal feedback affects birdsong motor control

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Jorge M.; Dall'Asén, Analía G.; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Coordination of different motor systems for sound production involves the use of feedback mechanisms. Song production in oscines is a well-established animal model for studying learned vocal behavior. Whereas the online use of auditory feedback has been studied in the songbird model, very little is known about the role of other feedback mechanisms. Auditory feedback is required for the maintenance of stereotyped adult song. In addition, the use of somatosensory feedback to maintain pressure during song has been demonstrated with experimentally induced fluctuations in air sac pressure. Feedback information mediating this response is thought to be routed to the central nervous system via afferent fibers of the vagus nerve. Here, we tested the effects of unilateral vagotomy on the peripheral motor patterns of song production and the acoustic features. Unilateral vagotomy caused a variety of disruptions and alterations to the respiratory pattern of song, some of which affected the acoustic structure of vocalizations. These changes were most pronounced a few days after nerve resection and varied between individuals. In the most extreme cases, the motor gestures of respiration were so severely disrupted that individual song syllables or the song motif were atypically terminated. Acoustic changes also suggest altered use of the two sound generators and upper vocal tract filtering, indicating that the disruption of vagal feedback caused changes to the motor program of all motor systems involved in song production and modification. This evidence for the use of vagal feedback by the song system with disruption of song during the first days after nerve cut provides a contrast to the longer-term effects of auditory feedback disruption. It suggests a significant role for somatosensory feedback that differs from that of auditory feedback. PMID:21113000

  3. Good Feedback Practices: Prompts and Guidelines for Reviewing and Enhancing Feedback for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Ryan; Baik, Chi; Asmar, Christine; Watty, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is an essential part of learning in any context. Timely, detailed feedback, whether delivered formally or informally, helps people learn more effectively by providing a clear sense of where they are and what they have to do to improve. In the university context, feedback assists students in developing mastery of their disciplines and more…

  4. Feedback Perceptions and Attribution by Secretarial Employees: Effects of Feedback-Content and Sender Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raemdonck, Isabel; Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Theoretical explanations for the diverse reactive feedback from secretarial employees in different career phases are relatively unexplored. However, research examining age differences in the impact of feedback suggests that the effects of performance feedback may differ for employees in the early career phase and employees in the late…

  5. Feedback delay gradually affects amplitude and valence specificity of the feedback-related negativity (FRN).

    PubMed

    Peterburs, Jutta; Kobza, Stefan; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Processing of performance-related feedback is an essential prerequisite for adaptive behavior. Even though in everyday life feedback is rarely immediate, to date very few studies have investigated whether the feedback-related negativity (FRN), a relative negativity in the ERP approximately 200 to 300 ms after feedback that is sensitive to feedback valence and predictability, is modulated by feedback timing, and findings are inconsistent. The present study investigated effects of gradually increasing feedback delays on feedback processing in the FRN time window. Subjects completed a probabilistic learning task in which feedback was provided after short, intermediate, or long delays. Difference wave-based analyses showed that amplitudes decreased linearly with increasing feedback delay. A distinct pattern was observed for the FRN as defined in the original waveforms, with FRN amplitudes being largest for long and smallest for short delays. This pattern of results is consistent with the notion that the neural systems underlying feedback processing vary depending on feedback timing. The gradually reduced difference wave signal might reflect a gradual shift away from processing in frontostriatal circuits toward medial temporal involvement. To what extent increased signal amplitudes for longer delays in the original waveforms are related to processing in certain brain structures will need to be determined in future studies. PMID:26459164

  6. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  7. Closing the Feedback Loop? Iterative Feedback between Tutor and Student in Coursework Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Martin; Pinard, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the case for using feedback iteratively, to improve student engagement and learning. In this model, students were invited to respond to tutor feedback with students' own responses. Among the three courses/modules (three tutors) studied, differences in feedback styles were evident from: (a) thematic analysis of tutor comments and,…

  8. "Are You Listening Please?" The Advantages of Electronic Audio Feedback Compared to Written Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Tom; Curran, John

    2010-01-01

    Feedback on students' work is, probably, one of the most important aspects of learning, yet students' report, according to the National Union of Students (NUS) Survey of 2008, unhappiness with the feedback process. Students were unhappy with the quality, detail and timing of feedback. This paper examines the benefits of using audio, as opposed to…

  9. Effects of Feedback Timing on Second Language Vocabulary Learning: Does Delaying Feedback Increase Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakata, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Feedback, or information given to learners regarding their performance, is found to facilitate second language (L2) learning. Research also suggests that the timing of feedback (whether it is provided immediately or after a delay) may affect learning. The purpose of the present study was to identify the optimal feedback timing for L2 vocabulary…

  10. Feedback Alignment: Effective and Ineffective Links between Tutors' and Students' Understanding of Coursework Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsmond, Paul; Merry, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Tutors' intentions when providing feedback may not be accurately perceived and acted on by students. In this study, 19 biological sciences students and six tutors were interviewed concerning the tutor's intentions when providing specific feedback and the students' perceptions and usage of that feedback. A phenomenological approach was used to…

  11. Feedback processing in children and adolescents: Is there a sensitivity for processing rewarding feedback?

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Nicola K; Becker, Aljoscha M W; Kray, Jutta; Gehring, William J

    2016-02-01

    Developmental studies indicate that children rely more on external feedback than adults. Some of these studies claim that they additionally show higher sensitivity toward positive feedback, while others find they preferably use negative feedback for learning. However, these studies typically did not disentangle feedback valence and expectancy, which might contribute to the controversial results. The present study aimed at examining the neurophysiological correlates of feedback processing in children (8-10 years) and adolescents (12-14 years) in a time estimation paradigm that allows separating the contribution of valence and expectancy. Our results show that in the feedback-related negativity (FRN), an event-related potential (ERP) reflecting the fast initial processing of feedback stimuli, children and adolescents did not differentiate between unexpected positive and negative feedback. Thus, they did not show higher sensitivity to positive feedback. The FRN did also not differentiate between expected and unexpected feedback, as found for adults. In contrast, in a later processing stage mirrored in the P300 component of the ERP, children and adolescents processed the feedback's unexpectedness. Interestingly, adolescents with better behavioral adaptation (high-performers) also had a more frontal P300 expectancy effect. Thus, the recruitment of additional frontal brain regions might lead to better learning from feedback in adolescents. PMID:26772145

  12. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  13. The role of feed-forward and feedback processes for closed-loop prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely believed that both feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms are required for successful object manipulation. Open-loop upper-limb prosthesis wearers receive no tactile feedback, which may be the cause of their limited dexterity and compromised grip force control. In this paper we ask whether observed prosthesis control impairments are due to lack of feedback or due to inadequate feed-forward control. Methods Healthy subjects were fitted with a closed-loop robotic hand and instructed to grasp and lift objects of different weights as we recorded trajectories and force profiles. We conducted three experiments under different feed-forward and feed-back configurations to elucidate the role of tactile feedback (i) in ideal conditions, (ii) under sensory deprivation, and (iii) under feed-forward uncertainty. Results (i) We found that subjects formed economical grasps in ideal conditions. (ii) To our surprise, this ability was preserved even when visual and tactile feedback were removed. (iii) When we introduced uncertainty into the hand controller performance degraded significantly in the absence of either visual or tactile feedback. Greatest performance was achieved when both sources of feedback were present. Conclusions We have introduced a novel method to understand the cognitive processes underlying grasping and lifting. We have shown quantitatively that tactile feedback can significantly improve performance in the presence of feed-forward uncertainty. However, our results indicate that feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms serve complementary roles, suggesting that to improve on the state-of-the-art in prosthetic hands we must develop prostheses that empower users to correct for the inevitable uncertainty in their feed-forward control. PMID:22032545

  14. Feedbacks between air pollution and weather, part 2: Effects on chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makar, P. A.; Gong, W.; Hogrefe, C.; Zhang, Y.; Curci, G.; Žabkar, R.; Milbrandt, J.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Bianconi, R.; Cheung, P.; Forkel, R.; Gravel, S.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Hou, A.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Langer, M.; Moran, M. D.; Pabla, B.; Pérez, J. L.; Pirovano, G.; San José, R.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    Fully-coupled air-quality models running in "feedback" and "no-feedback" configurations were compared against each other and observation network data as part of Phase 2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative. In the "no-feedback" mode, interactions between meteorology and chemistry through the aerosol direct and indirect effects were disabled, with the models reverting to climatologies of aerosol properties, or a no-aerosol weather simulation, while in the "feedback" mode, the model-generated aerosols were allowed to modify the models' radiative transfer and/or cloud formation processes. Annual simulations with and without feedbacks were conducted for domains in North America for the years 2006 and 2010, and for Europe for the year 2010. Comparisons against observations via annual statistics show model-to-model variation in performance is greater than the within-model variation associated with feedbacks. However, during the summer and during intense emission events such as the Russian forest fires of 2010, feedbacks have a significant impact on the chemical predictions of the models. The aerosol indirect effect was usually found to dominate feedbacks compared to the direct effect. The impacts of direct and indirect effects were often shown to be in competition, for predictions of ozone, particulate matter and other species. Feedbacks were shown to result in local and regional shifts of ozone-forming chemical regime, between NOx- and VOC-limited environments. Feedbacks were shown to have a substantial influence on biogenic hydrocarbon emissions and concentrations: North American simulations incorporating both feedbacks resulted in summer average isoprene concentration decreases of up to 10%, while European direct effect simulations during the Russian forest fire period resulted in grid average isoprene changes of -5 to +12.5%. The atmospheric transport and chemistry of large emitting sources such as plumes from forest fires and large cities

  15. Self-Sustained Micromechanical Oscillator with Linear Feedback.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damián H; Guest, Jeffrey R; Czaplewski, David A; López, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Autonomous oscillators, such as clocks and lasers, produce periodic signals without any external frequency reference. In order to sustain stable periodic motion, there needs to be an external energy supply as well as nonlinearity built into the oscillator to regulate the amplitude. Usually, nonlinearity is provided by the sustaining feedback mechanism, which also supplies energy, whereas the constituent resonator that determines the output frequency stays linear. Here, we propose a new self-sustaining scheme that relies on the nonlinearity originating from the resonator itself to limit the oscillation amplitude, while the feedback remains linear. We introduce a model for describing the working principle of the self-sustained oscillations and validate it with experiments performed on a nonlinear microelectromechanical oscillator. PMID:27419587

  16. Delayed feedback control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    We study control of synchronization in weakly coupled oscillator networks by using a phase-reduction approach. Starting from a general class of limit-cycle oscillators we derive a phase model, which shows that delayed feedback control changes effective coupling strengths and effective frequencies. We derive the analytical condition for critical control gain, where the phase dynamics of the oscillator becomes extremely sensitive to any perturbations. As a result the network can attain phase synchronization even if the natural interoscillatory couplings are small. In addition, we demonstrate that delayed feedback control can disrupt the coherent phase dynamic in synchronized networks. The validity of our results is illustrated on networks of diffusively coupled Stuart-Landau and FitzHugh-Nagumo models.

  17. Nonlinear feedback method of robot control - A preliminary experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Ganguly, S.; Li, Z.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear feedback method of robot control has been experimentally implemented on two PUMA 560 robot arms. The feasibility of the proposed controller, which was shown viable through simulation results earlier, is stressed. The servomechanism operates in task space, and the nonlinear feedback takes care of the necessary transformations to compute the necessary joint currents. A discussion is presented of the implementation with details of the experiments performed. The performance of the controller is encouraging but was limited to 100-Hz sampling frequency and to derived velocity information at the time of the experimentation. The setup of the lab, the software aspects, results, and the control hardware architecture that has recently been implemented are discussed.

  18. Self-Sustained Micromechanical Oscillator with Linear Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Zanette, Damián H.; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Czaplewski, David A.; López, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Autonomous oscillators, such as clocks and lasers, produce periodic signals without any external frequency reference. In order to sustain stable periodic motion, there needs to be an external energy supply as well as nonlinearity built into the oscillator to regulate the amplitude. Usually, nonlinearity is provided by the sustaining feedback mechanism, which also supplies energy, whereas the constituent resonator that determines the output frequency stays linear. Here, we propose a new self-sustaining scheme that relies on the nonlinearity originating from the resonator itself to limit the oscillation amplitude, while the feedback remains linear. We introduce a model for describing the working principle of the self-sustained oscillations and validate it with experiments performed on a nonlinear microelectromechanical oscillator.

  19. Linkages of plant-soil feedbacks and underlying invasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inderjit; Cahill, James F

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities and processes have repeatedly been shown to impact plant community assembly and population growth. Soil-driven effects may be particularly pronounced with the introduction of plants to non-native ranges, as introduced plants are not typically accompanied by transference of local soil communities. Here we describe how the mechanisms by which soil community processes influence plant growth overlap with several known and well-described mechanisms of plant invasion. Critically, a given soil community process may either facilitate or limit invasion, depending upon local conditions and the specific mechanisms of soil processes involved. Additionally, as soil communities typically consist of species with short generation times, the net consequences of plant-soil feedbacks for invasion trajectories are likely to change over time, as ecological and evolutionary adjustments occur. Here we provide an overview of the ecological linkages of plant-soil feedbacks and underlying mechanisms of invasion. PMID:25784668

  20. Microgravity vibration isolation: Optimal preview and feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Grodsinsky, C. M.; Allaire, P. E.; Lewis, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to achieve adequate low-frequency vibration isolation for certain space experiments an active control is needed, due to inherent passive-isolator limitations. Proposed here are five possible state-space models for a one-dimensional vibration isolation system with a quadratic performance index. The five models are subsets of a general set of nonhomogeneous state space equations which includes disturbance terms. An optimal control is determined, using a differential equations approach, for this class of problems. This control is expressed in terms of constant, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) feedback gains and constant feedforward (preview) gains. The gains can be easily determined numerically. They result in a robust controller and offers substantial improvements over a control that uses standard LQR feedback alone.

  1. Stability of constant gain systems with vector feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The state space, the controllability, and the observability concepts are discussed in connection with the proposed stability analysis which permits drastic dimensional reductions for a vector feedback problem. Any constant gain system's stability can thus be analyzed in the frequency domain with a single Nyquist plot. The analysis considers the total system with all loops closed, a disturbance vector as input, and the feedback vector as output. All constant gain systems are shown to be decomposable into stable subsystems where the degree of the decomposition determines the dimensions. The maximum decomposition results in the state-space approach which is the limit case. The method is demonstrated with the stability analysis of the pogo phenomenon, an oscillatory interaction between the propulsion and the structure of a space vehicle. This problem, with eigenvalues over a hundred, was drastically but rigorously reduced to a stability analysis of a 4x4 matrix.

  2. Teacher Cognition in Corrective Feedback in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mori, Reiko

    2011-01-01

    Based on qualitative data, the current study explored how the knowledge and beliefs of two EFL professionals shaped their corrective feedback practices. The two teachers teaching in Japan had in common two main agendas that they kept in mind as they provided or opted not to provide corrective feedback. They aimed to teach the language and to…

  3. Integrating Feedback and Reflection in Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines tutor and peer post-teaching practice feedback in the context of short intensive TESOL certificate courses. Outcomes of recent research into such courses suggested that feedback was a contentious and problematic component. The outcomes were considered in the context of the syllabus, and in the light of recent research into…

  4. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  5. Conceptualizing Feedback Literacy: Knowing, Being, and Acting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I seek to reflect upon the process of becoming feedback literate. Feedback literacy is conceptualised as an integral component of a broader academic literacy that has three interrelated dimensions: the epistemological, the ontological and the practical. Learners experience and respond differentially to each of these dimensions which…

  6. Feedback for Teachers: Focused, Specific, and Constructive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerberg, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    Across the country, there is a renewed emphasis on using teacher evaluation not only to rate teachers but also to give them formative feedback that will help them improve classroom instruction. Recent research shows that applying the strategies that teachers use to give students effective feedback to the teacher evaluation process produces…

  7. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  8. Educators' Perceptions of Automated Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debuse, Justin C. W.; Lawley, Meredith; Shibl, Rania

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of student learning is a core function of educators. Ideally students should be provided with timely, constructive feedback to facilitate learning. However, provision of high quality feedback becomes more complex as class sizes increase, modes of study expand and academic workloads increase. ICT solutions are being developed to…

  9. Feedback control of pulsed laser deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, S. J. P.; Stark, E. F.

    1993-10-01

    Implementation of closed loop feedback on PLD (pulsed laser deposition) requires actuators and sensors. Improvements in quality and reproducibility of material depositions are achieved by actuating the process towards desired operating regions. Empirical relationships are experimentally determined for describing the complex dynamical interactions of laser parameters. Feedback control based on this description can then be implemented to reduce process disorder.

  10. Immediate Feedback to Students and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A study reported by The National Center for Fair and Open Testing (Black & William, 2007) found that low achievers do particularly well when provided high quality feedback about their work. The type of feedback, as well as the information provided to students about their assignments, can positively impact student learning. Providing students with…

  11. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  12. Peer Feedback on Language Form in Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige D.; O'Dowd, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We performed a two-phase, year-long research project that explored the impact of peer feedback on language development. We investigated specifically how and when post-secondary learners of English and Spanish provide corrective feedback on their partners' use of the target language in weekly asynchronous discussions by assigning them to one of two…

  13. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  14. Supporting Second Language Writing Using Multimodal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elola, Idoia; Oskoz, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The educational use of computer-based feedback in the classroom is becoming widespread. However, less is known about (1) the extent to which tools influence how instructors provide written and oral comments, and (2) whether receiving oral or written feedback influences the nature of learners' revisions. This case study, which expands existing…

  15. Electrometer preamplifier has drift correction feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labarthe, L. C.

    1965-01-01

    Negative feedback circuit corrects output drift in an electrometer. The negative feedback is used in the no signal state to maintain the output level at zero reference. Drift voltage storage in the signal on state is also used to provide a drift-free readout.

  16. Preregulator feedback circuit utilizes Light Actuated Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayser, T. P.

    1966-01-01

    Preregulator feedback circuit employing a Light Actuated Switch /LAS/ provides a simple and efficient feedback device in a power supply preregulator which maintains dc isolation between input and output grounds. The LAS consists of a diode PN junction infrared source close to, but electrically isolated from, a photodetector.

  17. Students' Reflections on Mathematics Homework Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Mara; Reinholz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Homework is considered an important aspect of learning mathematics, but little research has considered how students utilize feedback as part of the homework process. This mixed methods, quasi-experimental study examines how community college students in a developmental intermediate algebra course participated in a feedback reflection activity…

  18. Improving Principal Leadership through Feedback and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickman, Leonard; Goldring, Ellen; De Andrade, Ana Regina; Breda, Carolyn; Goff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a feedback and coaching intervention designed to improve the quality of principal leadership. Principals received feedback from teachers on their instructional leadership, and their teachers' trust of them. Principals also provided self-ratings and they compared their teachers' ratings to…

  19. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  20. Survey/Feedback. Basic School PR Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banach, William J.

    To help improve school public relations programs, this handbook tells how to use survey and feedback techniques and how to interpret survey results. The first chapter gives a brief overview of the usefulness of surveys for getting community feedback. Chapter 2 recommends beginning by deciding what one wants to know from a survey, what human and…

  1. Feedback on Learning Achievement: Rhetoric and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orrell, Janice

    2006-01-01

    Assessment theorists and academics alike espouse the importance of feedback on performance assessment tasks for supporting improvement and progress in student learning achievement. Despite these espoused ideals, students claim a lack of adequate, timely feedback and their teachers claim that students fail to heed the advice given. This paper…

  2. Improving Performance with 360-Degree Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santeusanio, Richard

    1998-01-01

    A Connecticut superintendent convinced his staff to try 360-degree feedback by using it first on himself. Having the collective opinion of several stakeholders made appraisal conference more meaningful. Additionally, 360-degree feedback identified and measured standards, stimulated collegiality and trust among administrators and teachers,…

  3. A User Guide to 360 Degree Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, David

    1996-01-01

    Describes 360-degree feedback that provides performance data from multiple points of reference. Topics include reasons for performance improvement; what needs improvement; how to improve; choosing a reliable 360-degree instrument; and applications of 360-degree feedback, including personal development, team development, change, and needs…

  4. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  5. Guidelines for Using Videotaped Feedback Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Katherine A.; Kopf, Jerry M.

    1993-01-01

    Guidelines for using videotaped feedback are as follows: (1) provide written models of skill performance; (2) create trust; (3) use multiple sessions; (4) do not excuse trainees who are nervous or embarrassed; (5) do not give feedback in a group; (6) do not let trainees evaluate themselves; and (7) combine video with other techniques. (SK)

  6. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  7. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  8. Feedback Processes in Multimedia Language Learning Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Feedback has been one of the important elements of learning and teaching theories and still pervades the literature and instructional models, especially computer and web-based ones. However, the mechanisms about feedback dominating the fundamentals of all the instructional models designed for self-learning have changed considerably with the…

  9. Student Views on the Value of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Jenny A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the value that a sample of students placed on feedback, what they valued it for and the conditions that affected this value judgement. I show that not all students value feedback particularly highly, especially when considered in relation to other factors in their education and when considered for its intrinsic value as…

  10. The Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce Wayne

    Originally designed to provide teachers with feedback and also used as a quantitative tool for specifying teacher behavior consistent with a psychological model of teaching described by Tuckman (1974), the Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF) is a 28-item semantic differential which generates four scores in the areas of creativity, dynamism…

  11. Advanced Feedback Methods in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salton, G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In this study, automatic feedback techniques are applied to Boolean query statements in online information retrieval to generate improved query statements based on information contained in previously retrieved documents. Feedback operations are carried out using conventional Boolean logic and extended logic. Experimental output is included to…

  12. Measurement-feedback formalism meets information reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Matsumoto, Takumi; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    There have been two distinct formalisms of thermodynamics of information: one is the measurement-feedback formalism, which concerns bipartite systems with measurement and feedback processes, and the other is the information reservoir formalism, which considers bit sequences as a thermodynamic fuel. In this paper, we derive a second-law-like inequality by applying the measurement-feedback formalism to information reservoirs, which provides a stronger bound of extractable work than any other known inequality in the same setup. In addition, we demonstrate that the Mandal-Jarzynski model, which is a prominent model of the information reservoir formalism, is equivalent to a model obtained by the contraction of a bipartite system with autonomous measurement and feedback. Our results provide a unified view on the measurement-feedback and the information-reservoir formalisms.

  13. Feedbacks and landscape-level vegetation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Perry, George L W; Marston, J B

    2015-05-01

    Alternative stable-state theory (ASS) is widely accepted as explaining landscape-level vegetation dynamics, such as switches between forest and grassland. This theory argues that webs of feedbacks stabilise vegetation composition and structure, and that abrupt state shifts can occur if stabilising feedbacks are weakened. However, it is difficult to identify stabilising feedback loops and the disturbance thresholds beyond which state changes occur. Here, we argue that doing this requires a synthetic approach blending observation, experimentation, simulation, conceptual models, and narratives. Using forest boundaries and large mammal extinctions, we illustrate how a multifaceted research program can advance understanding of feedback-driven ecosystem change. Our integrative approach has applicability to other complex macroecological systems controlled by numerous feedbacks where controlled experimentation is impossible. PMID:25837918

  14. Enhancing robotic gait training via augmented feedback.

    PubMed

    Patritti, Benjamin; Sicari, Monica; Deming, Lynn; Romaguera, Fernanda; Pelliccio, Marlena; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Nimec, Donna; Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has examined the feasibility of robotic-assisted gait training in pediatric patients, including children with cerebral palsy (CP). Herein we present a case series describing clinical outcomes in four children with CP who underwent gait training using a robotic driven gait orthosis (DGO) (Pediatric Lokomat©). Children had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia due to CP. They were paired based on functional abilities and observed gait characteristics. Two children had a GMFCS of III and showed excessive ankle plantarflexion during stance. The other two children had a GMFCS of II and displayed a crouch gait pattern. Each subject participated in a 6-week intervention of robotic-assisted gait training that involved three 30-minute sessions per week. Pre-and post-training evaluations were performed including clinical tests of standing and walking function, walking speed, and walking endurance. Clinical gait analysis was also performed using a motion capture system to assess changes in gait mechanics. All subjects showed an improvement in locomotor function. For lower functioning children, this may be mediated by improved trunk control. The use of augmented feedback was associated with larger. However, these results have to be considered with caution because of the limited sample size of the study. PMID:21097013

  15. Students’ perceptions on feedback module in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Varsha J.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Rana, Devang A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Feedback is an integral part of formative assessment though underutilized in medical education. The objective of this study was to review our feedback module through students’ perceptions. Methodology: We have developed a feedback module which is practiced by us for last 10 years for term ending examination that gives collective feedback to the whole class, followed by individual student-teacher interactions. Students were also exposed to 6–7 multiple choice questions (MCQs) based assessment during the course of pharmacology. Immediately after each MCQ test the answer keys is displayed along with an explanation. Two classes of students were requested to give their perceptions about the feedback by responding on Likert scale for the statements in the questionnaire. All the 206 students who volunteered for the study were enrolled in the study. Mann–Whitney test was used to calculate the difference in perceptions. Results: Of 278 students of two classes, 206 responded (74%). Students’ agreement varied from 93% to 98% for 5 items in the questionnaire for the feedback after term ending examinations. Perception of students attending one or more than one feedback session did not differ significantly. For MCQs, tests agreement was 91% to 98% for the 4 items. There was no significant difference between two classes in their perceptions regarding feedback practices (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Students gave a favorable opinion for our feedback module. In the medical colleges with a large number of students, this module is feasible for feedback in formative assessment in the form of written tests. PMID:27500170

  16. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  17. Look who's judging-Feedback source modulates brain activation to performance feedback in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Peterburs, Jutta; Sandrock, Carolin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    It is as yet unknown if behavioral and neural correlates of performance monitoring in socially anxious individuals are affected by whether feedback is provided by a person or a computer. This fMRI study investigated modulation of feedback processing by feedback source (person vs. computer) in participants with high (HSA) (N=16) and low social anxiety (LSA) (N=16). Subjects performed a choice task in which they were informed that they would receive positive or negative feedback from a person or the computer. Subjective ratings indicated increased arousal and anxiety in HSA versus LSA, most pronounced for social and negative feedback. FMRI analyses yielded hyperactivation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)/anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula for social relative to computer feedback, and in mPFC/ventral ACC for positive relative to negative feedback in HSA as compared to LSA. These activation patterns are consistent with increased interoception and self-referential processing in social anxiety, especially during processing of positive feedback. Increased ACC activation in HSA to positive feedback may link to unexpectedness of (social) praise as posited in social anxiety disorder (SAD) psychopathology. Activation in rostral ACC showed a reversed pattern, with decreased activation to positive feedback in HSA, possibly indicating altered action values depending on feedback source and valence. The present findings corroborate a crucial role of mPFC for performance monitoring in social anxiety. PMID:27033687

  18. Host behaviour-parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Archie, Elizabeth A; Craft, Meggan E; Hawley, Dana M; Martin, Lynn B; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-04-13

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour-disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour-parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour-parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  19. Host behaviour–parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology

    PubMed Central

    Archie, Elizabeth A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Hawley, Dana M.; Martin, Lynn B.; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour–disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour–parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour–parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  20. Simulation Results of a Feedback Control System to Damp Electron Cloud Single-Bunch Transverse Instabilities In The Cern SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Secondo, R.; Vay, J. L.; Venturini, M.; Fox, J. D.; Rivetta, C. H.; Hofle, W.

    2011-03-28

    Transverse Single-Bunch Instabilities due to the Electron Cloud effect are limiting the operation at high current of the SPS at CERN. Recently a high-bandwidth Feedback System has been proposed as a possible solution to stabilize the beam and is currently under study. We analyze the dynamics of the bunch actively damped with a simple model of the Feedback in the macro-particle code WARP, in order to investigate the limitations of the System such as the minimum amount of power required to maintain stability. We discuss the feedback model, report on simulation results and present our plans for further development of the numerical model.

  1. Feedback and assessment for clinical placements: achieving the right balance

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    During clinical placements, the provision of feedback forms an integral part of the learning process and enriches students’ learning experiences. The purpose of feedback is to improve the learner’s knowledge, skills, or behavior. Receipt of accurate feedback can help to narrow the gap between actual and desired performance. Effective and regular feedback has the potential to reinforce good practice and motivate the learner toward the desired outcome. Despite the obvious role of feedback in effective teaching and learning, a common complaint from students is that they do not receive adequate feedback. Unfortunately, skills in giving and receiving feedback are rarely taught to students or clinicians. This study aims to provide an understanding of the role of feedback within the learning process, consider consequences of inadequate or poorly given feedback, consider the barriers to the feedback process, provide practical guidelines for providing feedback, and consider the need for student and faculty development in feedback skills. PMID:26056511

  2. Failure to learn from feedback underlies word learning difficulties in toddlers at risk for autism.

    PubMed

    Bedford, R; Gliga, T; Frame, K; Hudry, K; Chandler, S; Johnson, M H; Charman, T

    2013-01-01

    Children's assignment of novel words to nameless objects, over objects whose names they know (mutual exclusivity; ME) has been described as a driving force for vocabulary acquisition. Despite their ability to use ME to fast-map words (Preissler & Carey, 2005), children with autism show impaired language acquisition. We aimed to address this puzzle by building on studies showing that correct referent selection using ME does not lead to word learning unless ostensive feedback is provided on the child's object choice (Horst & Samuelson, 2008). We found that although toddlers aged 2;0 at risk for autism can use ME to choose the correct referent of a word, they do not benefit from feedback for long-term retention of the word-object mapping. Further, their difficulty using feedback is associated with their smaller receptive vocabularies. We propose that difficulties learning from social feedback, not lexical principles, limits vocabulary building during development in children at risk for autism. PMID:23217290

  3. [The effect of visual feedback exercises on balance in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Barona, R; Zapater, E; Montalt, J; Armengot, M; Basterra, J

    1994-01-01

    The effects of visual feedback exercises on balance was studied in normal individuals, to evaluate the efficacy of visual feedback of postural oscillation in improving stability. A DINAS-CAN dynamometric platform designed by the Valencian Institute of Biomechanics (IBv) was used. Before to commencing training sessions, we determined the following parameters in each individual: (a) static stability, via posturography; and (b) individual ability to displace and voluntarily maintain the center of gravity within the limits of stability. All static measures were poorer after training, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.01). In contrast, the exercises performed via visual feedback of postural control improved significantly (p < 0.01). Training by visual feedback facilitates integration of visual, somatosensory, and vestibular information. In normal individuals, stability improves under excentric conditions, but no improvement is seen in the central resting position. PMID:8068357

  4. The feedback phenomenon applied to underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Jordan, Jason E.; Kuperman, W. A.

    2002-11-01

    People are familiar with the feedback phenomenon that results in the loud sound heard when a musician plays an electric instrument directly into a speaker. Feedback occurs when a source and a receiver are connected both acoustically through the propagation medium and electrically through an amplifier in such way that the received signal is simultaneously and continuously added to the emitted signal. A resonance is then obtained when the emitter and the receiver are in phase. The resonant frequency appears to be highly sensitive to fluctuations of the propagation medium. The feedback phenomenon has been experimentally demonstrated as a means to monitor the temperature fluctuation of a shallow water environment [''Acoustic monitoring of the sea medium variability: experimental testing of new methods,'' by A. V. Furduev, Acoust. Phys. 47, No. 3, 361-368 (2001)]. The goal of our work is to reproduce the feedback experiment using an alternative method that decomposes the feedback phenomenon into an iterative process. Successful reproduction of the feedback is accomplished using a step-by-step algorithm which details the evolution of the system from the initial signal to its steady-state form. These experimental and numerical results illustrate the potential of the feedback process for use in narrow-band acoustical tomography.

  5. Physical and biological feedbacks of deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyan, Christiane W.; D'Odorico, Paolo; Lawrence, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Forest vegetation can interact with its surrounding environment in ways that enhance conditions favorable for its own existence. Removal of forest vegetation has been shown to alter these conditions in a number of ways, thereby inhibiting the reestablishment of the same community of woody plants. The effect of vegetation on an environmental variable along with vegetation susceptibility to the associated environmental conditions may imply a positive feedback: Changes in the internal conditions controlling this variable such as deforestation could inhibit the reestablishment of woody vegetation cover that in turn would act to further degrade the conditions necessary for forest regeneration. Understanding these feedbacks is important because in some cases where these feedbacks are present, deforestation can lead to irreversible state shifts where the forest vegetation cannot recover. In this review, we examine the different cases in which deforestation can lead to a loss of conditions necessary to sustain forest vegetation. We examine the spatial scale and extent of each feedback in addition to considering the temporal scale over which a feedback may be considered irreversible. Juxtaposing the spatial extent of these feedbacks with a map of deforestation enables the identification and discussion of at-risk areas to state changes following deforestation. Last, we discuss the economic implications of these feedbacks and how socioeconomic factors can affect the convergence of a system to a given stable state.

  6. Migration towards periodicity in systems with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotherspoon, Timothy David

    2009-12-01

    We study adaptation to the edge of chaos in dynamical systems as caused by feedback mechanisms between the state variables and the parameters. We begin by examining a system know for exhibiting chaotic dynamics and then move on to a spatially extended system. First, we study the effect of low-pass band filters on the dynamics of a non-isothermal autocatalator by selecting Fourier coefficients for the modes in the pass band according to a uniform distribution. Numerical simulations over many realizations of feedback are compared to theoretical predictions for the feedback size as a function of the parameter. We find that the variance in the feedback is non-zero only nearby to and within chaotic regimes in the parameter space. We numerically calculate the probability density for the parameter showing that the system adapts to the edge of chaos. We attempt to expand on this work to a spatially extended system. Although an analytical description of the natural dynamics for video feedback is beyond the scope of this work, we model video feedback in one-dimension and examine the effects of spatially averaging feedback mechanism onto a system parameter. While the unfiltered dynamics approach a fixed point for the entire parameter range, we also identify parameter ranges where the filtered system adapts to non-linear oscillations as well as fixed points.

  7. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    As human interactions with Earth systems intensify in the "Anthropocene", understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes is increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of "feedbacks" in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling these interactions. Deciphering interacting human-landscape feedbacks extends our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Enormous challenges exist, however, in quantifying impact-feedback loops in landscapes with significant human alterations. This paper illustrates an example of human-landscape interactions following a wildfire in Colorado (USA) that elicited feedback responses. After the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, concerns for heightened flood potential and debris flows associated with post-fire hydrologic changes prompted local landowners to construct tall fences at the base of a burned watershed. These actions changed the sediment transport regime and promoted further landscape change and human responses in a positive feedback cycle. The interactions ultimately increase flood and sediment hazards, rather than dampening the effects of fire. A simple agent-based model, capable of integrating social and hydro-geomorphological data, demonstrates how such interacting impacts and feedbacks could be simulated. Challenges for fully capturing human-landscape feedback interactions include the identification of diffuse and subtle feedbacks at a range of scales, the availability of data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, and the varied metrics and data needed to represent both the physical and human systems. By collaborating with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of landscape change, as well as the human responses to those changes, geoscientists could more fully recognize and anticipate the coupled

  8. Preceptor development: providing effective feedback, part 2.

    PubMed

    Buck, Brian; Wilkinson, Samaneh T; Phillips, Holly

    2014-06-01

    An integral part of providing effective feedback to pharmacy residents occurs during the evaluation process. Residency evaluation involves measuring and documenting performance as it relates to standardized residency outcomes, goals, and learning objectives. Evaluations may be formative or summative and include the preceptor's evaluation of the resident's performance, the resident's self-assessments, and the resident's evaluation of the preceptor and learning experience. Evaluations are more structured than feedback, and they involve documentation of the verbal feedback that was provided throughout the learning experience. This article will focus on the preceptor's role in providing effective resident evaluations based on specific learning activities. PMID:24958969

  9. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  10. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-09-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option on an infinite slab is presented and boundary values on a bounded domain are derived. This bounded, nonlinear, 2 dimensional initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically using a number of standard finite difference schemes and the methods incorporated in the symbolic software Maple{trade mark, serif}.

  11. Pressure Feedback in Rotating Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwer, Douglas; Kailasanath, K.

    2012-11-01

    Rotating detonation engines (RDEs) represent a unique method for obtaining propulsion from the high efficiency detonation cycle. In order for the RDE to be a practical propulsive device, engines must be capable of running efficiently at low pressure ratios, however, this type of injection typically results in a large amount of pressure feedback into the injection system. This paper examines different aspects of the pressure feedback phenomena, and investigates approaches to injecting fresh mixture that reduce the amount of feedback. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research through NRL 6.1 Computational Physics Task Area.

  12. The effects of outcome and process feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Debra Steele

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of process and outcome feedback on performance during a skill acquisition phase and a transfer test phase. The research also examined the role of two moderators: self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Subjects were college students participating for course credit. The task involved using a computerized simulation of the Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulation System (RMS). Results provided evidence of the beneficial effects of process feedback during skill acquisition. Results also provided evidence that self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation moderate the effects of feedback type on performance.

  13. Family Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Dr Robert Smith surveys the history of birth control and sounds a warning for the future of mankind, if the population explosion is allowed to continue unchecked. He stresses the importance of the role of the general practitioner in the limitation of births. Sir Theodore Fox describes the work of the Family Planning Association and stresses that, increasingly, this is a specialist service covering all aspects of fertility. He also feels that the general practitioner has a role in family planning. PMID:5954261

  14. A real-time auditory feedback system for retraining gait.

    PubMed

    Maulucci, Ruth A; Eckhouse, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and the principal cause of major long-term disability, incurring substantial distress as well as medical cost. Abnormal and inefficient gait patterns are widespread in survivors of stroke, yet gait is a major determinant of independent living. It is not surprising, therefore, that improvement of walking function is the most commonly stated priority of the survivors. Although many such individuals achieve the goal of walking, the caliber of their walking performance often limits endurance and quality of life. The ultimate goal of the research presented here is to use real-time auditory feedback to retrain gait in patients with chronic stroke. The strategy is to convert the motion of the foot into an auditory signal, and then use this auditory signal as feedback to inform the subject of the existence as well as the magnitude of error during walking. The initial stage of the project is described in this paper. The design and implementation of the new feedback method for lower limb training is explained. The question of whether the patient is physically capable of handling such training is explored. PMID:22255509

  15. The moderated effects of video feedback for social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Heimberg, Richard G; Schultz, Luke T; Blackmore, Michelle

    2010-10-01

    Despite initially positive results, video feedback for social anxiety has never been shown to reduce social anxiety in a controlled experiment with diagnosed participants, and only once with undiagnosed participants. Previous studies arguably did not detect such an effect because of limited assessment of anxiety and potential moderators. We tested video feedback with cognitive preparation among treatment-seeking participants with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder. In Session 1, participants gave an extemporaneous speech and either received the intervention or not. In Session 2, 6-14 days later, participants gave a second extemporaneous speech. The intervention improved self-perception of performance, particularly for those participants with the most unrealistically negative impressions of their performance (i.e., high self-observer discrepancy). In addition, the intervention reduced anticipatory anxiety for the second speech for participants with high self-observer discrepancy. These findings extend previous results regarding video feedback and suggest that the intervention may be useful for people with social anxiety disorder and higher self-observer discrepancies for a specific task. PMID:20471783

  16. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  17. Effects of Active galactic nuclei feedback in galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, C.; Cora, S.; Padilla, N.

    We analyze the effects of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) on the formation and evolution of galaxies, which is assumed to quench cooling flows in massive halos. With this aim we use an hybrid model that combines a cosmological Lambda CDM simulation with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We consider the semi-analytic model described by Cora (2006) (SAMC06) which has been improved by including AGNs, which are associated with the presence of supermassive black holes (BHs). Modellization of BH includes gas accretion during merger-driven starbursts and black hole mergers (Malbon et al., 2006), accretion during starbursts triggered by disk instabilities (Bower et al. 2006), and accretion of cooling gas from quasi-hydrostatically cooling haloes (Croton et al. 2006); Eddington limit is applied in all accretion processes. It is assumed that feedback from AGNs operates in the later case. We show that this new model can simultaneously explain: (i) the bright-end of the galaxy luminosity function (LF); (ii) the observed older population of stars in massive galaxies, thus reproducing the stellar mass function (SMF); (iii) a star formation rate (SFR) seemingly showing an anti-hierarchical galaxy growth. The success of our model is mainly due to the ability of AGN feedback to suppress further cooling and SF in the most massive structures.

  18. Multiplexing Readout of TES Microcalorimeters Based on Analog Baseband Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N.Y; Mitsuda, K.; Kimura, S.; Hirakoso, W.; Masui, K.; Korte, P. A. J. de; Kuur, J. van der; Gottardi, L.

    2009-12-16

    A TES microcalorimeter array is a promising spectrometer with excellent energy resolution and a moderate imaging capability. To realize a large format array in space, multiplexing the TES signals at the low tempersture stage is mandatory. We are developing frequency division multiplexing (FDM) based on baseband feedback technique. In FDM, each TES is AC-biased with a different carrier frequency. Signals from several pixels are summed and then read out by one SQUID. The maximum number of multiplexed pixels are limited by the frequency band in which the SQUID can be operated in a flux-locked loop, which is {approx}1 MHz with standard flux-locked loop circuit. In the baseband feedback, the signal ({approx}10 kHz band) from the TES is once demodulated. Then a reconstructed copy of the modulated signal with an appropriate phase is fed back to the SQUID input coil to maintain an approximately constant magnetic flux. This can be implemented even for large cable delays and automatically suppresses the carrier. We developed a prototype electronics for the baseband feedback based on an analog phase sensitive detector (PSD) and a multiplier. Combined with Seiko 80-SSA SQUID amp, open-loop gain of 8 has been obtained for 10 kHz baseband signal at 5 MHz carrier frequency, with a moderate noise contribution of 27pA/{radical}(Hz) at input.

  19. The ionospheric outflow feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C.; Garcia-Sage, K.

    2014-08-01

    Following a long period of observation and investigation beginning in the early 1970s, it has been firmly established that Earth's magnetosphere is defined as much by the geogenic plasma within it as by the geomagnetic field. This plasma is not confined to the ionosphere proper, defined as the region within a few density scale heights of the F-region plasma density peak. Rather, it fills the flux tubes on which it is created, and circulates throughout the magnetosphere in a pattern driven by solar wind plasma that becomes magnetically connected to the ionosphere by reconnection through the dayside magnetopause. Under certain solar wind conditions, plasma and field energy is stored in the magnetotail rather than being smoothly recirculated back to the dayside. Its release into the downstream solar wind is produced by magnetotail disconnection of stored plasma and fields both continuously and in the form of discrete plasmoids, with associated generation of energetic Earthward-moving bursty bulk flows and injection fronts. A new generation of global circulation models is showing us that outflowing ionospheric plasmas, especially O+, load the system in a different way than the resistive F-region load of currents dissipating energy in the plasma and atmospheric neutral gas. The extended ionospheric load is reactive to the primary dissipation, forming a time-delayed feedback loop within the system. That sets up or intensifies bursty transient behaviors that would be weaker or absent if the ionosphere did not “strike back” when stimulated. Understanding this response appears to be a necessary, if not sufficient, condition for us to gain accurate predictive capability for space weather. However, full predictive understanding of outflow and incorporation into global simulations requires a clear observational and theoretical identification of the causal mechanisms of the outflows. This remains elusive and requires a dedicated mission effort.

  20. Feedback-Enhanced Parametric Squeezing of Mechanical Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinante, A.; Falferi, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present a single-quadrature feedback scheme able to overcome the conventional 3 dB limit on parametric squeezing. The method is experimentally demonstrated in a micromechanical system based on a cantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is detected at low temperature by a SQUID susceptometer, while parametric pumping is obtained by modulating the magnetic field gradient at twice the cantilever frequency. A maximum squeezing of 11.5 dB and 11.3 dB is observed, respectively, in the response to a sinusoidal test signal and in the thermomechanical noise. So far, the maximum squeezing factor is limited only by the maximum achievable parametric modulation. The proposed technique might be used to squeeze one quadrature of a mechanical resonator below the quantum noise level, even without the need for a quantum limited detector.

  1. On the dynamics of delayed neural feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Sebastian F.

    The computational potential of neural circuits arises from the interconnections and interactions between their elements. Feedback is a universal feature of neuronal organization and has been shown to be a key element in neural signal processing. In biological neural circuits, delays arise from finite axonal conduction speeds and at the synaptic level due to transmitter release dynamics. In this work, the influence of temporal delay on neural network dynamics is investigated. The basic feedback mechanisms involved in the regulation of neural activity consist of small circuits composed of two to three neurons. We analyze a system of two interconnected neurons and show that finite delays can induce oscillations in the system. Employing a perturbative approach in combination with a resummation scheme, we evaluate the limit cycle dynamics of the system. We show that synchronous oscillations can arise when the delays are asymmetric. Furthermore, distributed delays can stabilize the system and lead to an increased range of parameters for which the system converges to a stable fixed point. We next consider a delayed neural triad with a characteristic topology commonly found in neural feedback circuits. We show that the system can be both robust and sensitive in regard to small parameter changes and examine the significance of the different projections We then address the functional role of a particular feedback loop found in the visual system of nonmammalian vertebrates. We show that the system can function as a 'winner-take-all' and novelty detector and examine the influence of temporal delays on the system's performance. Biological systems are subject to stochastic influences and display some degree of disorder. We examine the role of noise and its effect on the stability of the synchronized state in a system of two coupled active rotators. Finally, we show that disordering the driving forces in arrays of coupled oscillators can lead to synchronization in these systems.

  2. Transverse beam feedback system for PLS storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Park, M. K.; Kim, D. T.; Kang, H. S.; Hwang, W. H.; Nam, S. H.

    2001-07-01

    As the stored beam current increases over 240 mA, transverse coupled-beam instability limits higher beam current in Pohang Light Source. A bunch by bunch transverse feedback system has been developed to cure these beam instabilities. It consists of beam oscillation detectors, betatron phase adjuster, power amplifiers and a stripline kicker. Design of each circuit and its functions are described with simple trigonometric equations. The result of the beam test has shown more than 30 dB damping of the beam oscillation in the full bandwidth of the system.

  3. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  4. The Impact of Dermatologist Examination and Biometric Feedback Delivered at the Beach on Skin Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Karen M.; Geller, Alan C.; Puleo, Elaine; Savadatti, Sanghamitra S.; Hu, Stephanie W.; Gorham, Sue; Werchniak, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the effectiveness of skin cancer prevention education and early detection programs at beaches. Objectives We evaluate four strategies for addressing skin cancer prevention in beach settings. Methods This prospective study at four beaches included 4 intervention conditions: (1) education only; or education plus (2) biometric feedback; (3) dermatologist skin examination; or (4) biometric feedback and dermatologist skin examination. Outcomes included sun protection behaviors, sunburns, and skin self-exams. Results There was a significant increase in hat wearing, sunscreen use, and a reduction in sunburns in the education plus biometric feedback group (OR = 1.97, 1.94, 1.07 respectively), as well as greater improvements in knowing what to look for in skin-self examinations (OR=1.13); there were no differences in frequency of self-examinations. Skin examinations plus biometric feedback led to greater reductions in sunburns. The dermatologist exams identified atypical moles in 28% of participants. Limitations Inclusion of only one beach per condition, use of self-report data, and a limited intervention period. Conclusions Education and biometric feedback may be more effective than education alone for impacting sun protective attitudes and behaviors in beach-going, high-risk populations. PMID:21163550

  5. Diffused guides for distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1975-01-01

    Proposed waveguide is hollow cylindrical pipe. Inside channel surface is infused with gas or metal molecules, forming periodic cross sections along entire length. Light is scattered at periodic infusions, resulting in distributed feedback. Configuration is suited for capillary gas lasers.

  6. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  7. Aversive Situational Effects on Alpha Feedback Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orne, Martin T.; Paskeqitz, David A.

    1974-01-01

    Anticipation of electric shock did not depress alpha activity in a feedback situation. Contrary to previous reports, a reduction in alpha activity is not a necessary consequence of apprehension or heightened arousal. (Author)

  8. Novel distributed feedback lightwave circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daǧ, Ceren B.; Anil, Mehmet A.; Serpengüzel, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The devices that are variations of inter-and intracoupled meandering optical waveguides are proposed as the lightwave circuit elements that exhibit distributed feedback. A preliminary transfer matrix method analysis is applied in frequency domain, taking the coupling purely directional and with constant coefficient on geometrically symmetric and anti-symmetric devices. The meandering loop mirror is the building block of all meandering waveguide based lightwave circuit elements. The simplest uncoupled meandering distributed feedback structure exhibits Rabi splitting in the transmittance spectrum. The symmetric and antisymmetric coupled meandering distributed feedback geometries can be utilized as band-pass, Fano, or Lorentzian filters or Rabi splitters. Meandering waveguide distributed feedback structures with a variety of spectral responses can be designed for a variety of lightwave circuit element functions and can be implemented with generality due to the analytic approach taken.

  9. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  10. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  11. Negative feedback system reduces pump oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenmann, W.

    1967-01-01

    External negative feedback system counteracts low frequency oscillations in rocket engine propellant pumps. The system uses a control piston to sense pump discharge fluid on one side and a gas pocket on the other.

  12. Computer automation for feedback system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical techniques and explanations of various steps used by an automated computer program to design feedback systems are summarized. Special attention was given to refining the automatic evaluation suboptimal loop transmission and the translation of time to frequency domain specifications.

  13. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  14. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  15. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  17. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production

    PubMed Central

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  18. On the Role of Auditory Feedback in Robot-Assisted Movement Training after Stroke: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodà, Antonio; Avanzini, Federico; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to address a topic that is rarely investigated in the literature of technology-assisted motor rehabilitation, that is, the integration of auditory feedback in the rehabilitation device. After a brief introduction on rehabilitation robotics, the main concepts of auditory feedback are presented, together with relevant approaches, techniques, and technologies available in this domain. Current uses of auditory feedback in the context of technology-assisted rehabilitation are then reviewed. In particular, a comparative quantitative analysis over a large corpus of the recent literature suggests that the potential of auditory feedback in rehabilitation systems is currently and largely underexploited. Finally, several scenarios are proposed in which the use of auditory feedback may contribute to overcome some of the main limitations of current rehabilitation systems, in terms of user engagement, development of acute-phase and home rehabilitation devices, learning of more complex motor tasks, and improving activities of daily living. PMID:24382952

  19. Assessing AGN feedback models with c iii* measurement and photoionization modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    Mass outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been hypothesized to represent a feedback mechanism through which black hole growth and galaxy formation are linked. In order to assess this claim, typical outflow kinetic luminosities must be compared to calculated minimum values that are needed to produce feedback relevance. We have developed a method for placing lower limits on the kinetic luminosity by combining photoionization modeling with column density measurements of a select few ionic species, including C III* 1175 as a measure of gas density. This method is applied to sample AGNs representative of those observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS). We find that although measured kinetic luminosity lower limits for the quasar SDSS J170322.41+23124.3 and Seyfert galaxy Akn 564 are several orders of magnitude less than that required for feedback relevance, our method can be drastically improved with increased signal to noise ratios.

  20. Nonlinear analysis of a maglev system with time-delayed feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingling; Campbell, Sue Ann; Huang, Lihong

    2011-10-01

    This paper undertakes a nonlinear analysis of a model for a maglev system with time-delayed feedback. Using linear analysis, we determine constraints on the feedback control gains and the time delay which ensure stability of the maglev system. We then show that a Hopf bifurcation occurs at the linear stability boundary. To gain insight into the periodic motion which arises from the Hopf bifurcation, we use the method of multiple scales on the nonlinear model. This analysis shows that for practical operating ranges, the maglev system undergoes both subcritical and supercritical bifurcations, which give rise to unstable and stable limit cycles respectively. Numerical simulations confirm the theoretical results and indicate that unstable limit cycles may coexist with the stable equilibrium state. This means that large enough perturbations may cause instability in the system even if the feedback gains are such that the linear theory predicts that the equilibrium state is stable.

  1. CAN AGN FEEDBACK BREAK THE SELF-SIMILARITY OF GALAXIES, GROUPS, AND CLUSTERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.

    2014-03-01

    It is commonly thought that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback can break the self-similar scaling relations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. Using high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we isolate the impact of AGN feedback on the L {sub x}-T {sub x} relation, testing the two archetypal and common regimes, self-regulated mechanical feedback and a quasar thermal blast. We find that AGN feedback has severe difficulty in breaking the relation in a consistent way. The similarity breaking is directly linked to the gas evacuation within R {sub 500}, while the central cooling times are inversely proportional to the core density. Breaking self-similarity thus implies breaking the cool core, morphing all systems to non-cool-core objects, which is in clear contradiction with the observed data populated by several cool-core systems. Self-regulated feedback, which quenches cooling flows and preserves cool cores, prevents dramatic evacuation and similarity breaking at any scale; the relation scatter is also limited. The impulsive thermal blast can break the core-included L {sub x}-T {sub x} at T {sub 500} ≲ 1 keV, but substantially empties and overheats the halo, generating a perennial non-cool-core group, as experienced by cosmological simulations. Even with partial evacuation, massive systems remain overheated. We show that the action of purely AGN feedback is to lower the luminosity and heat the gas, perpendicular to the fit.

  2. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from high-resolution models.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, Christopher S

    2015-11-13

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Turbulence-resolving models better simulate such cloud regimes and support the GCM consensus that they contribute to positive global cloud feedbacks. Large-eddy simulations using sub-100 m grid spacings over small computational domains elucidate marine boundary-layer cloud response to greenhouse warming. Four observationally supported mechanisms contribute: 'thermodynamic' cloudiness reduction from warming of the atmosphere-ocean column, 'radiative' cloudiness reduction from CO2- and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, 'stability-induced' cloud increase from increased lower tropospheric stratification, and 'dynamical' cloudiness increase from reduced subsidence. The cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback. Cloud-resolving models with horizontal grid spacings of a few kilometres illuminate how cumulonimbus cloud systems affect climate feedbacks. Limited-area simulations and superparameterized GCMs show upward shift and slight reduction of cloud cover in a warmer climate, implying positive cloud feedbacks. A global cloud-resolving model suggests tropical cirrus increases in a warmer climate, producing positive longwave cloud feedback, but results are sensitive to subgrid turbulence and ice microphysics schemes. PMID:26438280

  3. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  4. Sonification and haptic feedback in addition to visual feedback enhances complex motor task learning.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Roland; Rauter, Georg; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Concurrent augmented feedback has been shown to be less effective for learning simple motor tasks than for complex tasks. However, as mostly artificial tasks have been investigated, transfer of results to tasks in sports and rehabilitation remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, the effect of different concurrent feedback was evaluated in trunk-arm rowing. It was then investigated whether multimodal audiovisual and visuohaptic feedback are more effective for learning than visual feedback only. Naïve subjects (N = 24) trained in three groups on a highly realistic virtual reality-based rowing simulator. In the visual feedback group, the subject's oar was superimposed to the target oar, which continuously became more transparent when the deviation between the oars decreased. Moreover, a trace of the subject's trajectory emerged if deviations exceeded a threshold. The audiovisual feedback group trained with oar movement sonification in addition to visual feedback to facilitate learning of the velocity profile. In the visuohaptic group, the oar movement was inhibited by path deviation-dependent braking forces to enhance learning of spatial aspects. All groups significantly decreased the spatial error (tendency in visual group) and velocity error from baseline to the retention tests. Audiovisual feedback fostered learning of the velocity profile significantly more than visuohaptic feedback. The study revealed that well-designed concurrent feedback fosters complex task learning, especially if the advantages of different modalities are exploited. Further studies should analyze the impact of within-feedback design parameters and the transferability of the results to other tasks in sports and rehabilitation. PMID:25511166

  5. Protege Anxiety Attachment and Feedback in Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Poteat, Laura

    2010-01-01

    A model focused on protege anxious attachment and feedback in mentoring relationships was tested with a sample of matched doctoral student proteges and their faculty mentors. Results show that protege anxious attachment was associated with less feedback seeking and less feedback acceptance. Protege feedback acceptance was associated with both the…

  6. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzlaf, Beverley; Perry, Beth; Toffner, Greg; Lamarche, Kimberley; Edwards, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students' perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback ("what should be included in effective feedback?") and the process of effective instructor feedback ("how should effective…

  7. Learning to See: Enhancing Student Learning through Videotaped Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakura, Elaine K.

    2009-01-01

    Feedback is crucial to developing skills, but meaningful feedback is difficult to provide. Classroom videotaping can provide effective feedback on student performance, but for video feedback to be most helpful, students must develop a type of "visual intelligence"--analytical skills that increase critical thinking and self-awareness. The author…

  8. Rethinking Feedback Practices in Higher Education: A Peer Review Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David; Thomson, Avril; Breslin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is a reciprocal process whereby students produce feedback reviews on the work of peers and receive feedback reviews from peers on their own work. Prior research has primarily examined the learning benefits that result from the receipt of feedback reviews, with few studies specifically exploring the merits of producing feedback reviews…

  9. EFL Teachers' Attempts at Feedback Innovation in the Writing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy; Mak, Pauline; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    To date, research on feedback in second language (L2) writing has primarily focused on feedback per se, with little attention paid to the teachers' professional development with regard to feedback in writing. This study aims to explore the ways in which two secondary teachers in Hong Kong attempted to implement feedback innovation in their writing…

  10. Immediate Feedback and Learning in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Context: Immediate feedback has been shown to improve student learning more efficiently than delayed feedback in lower-level general education courses. No research exists examining the effects of immediate feedback on learning in higher-level athletic training coursework. Objective: To determine if using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique…

  11. A Role for Technology in Enhancing Students' Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Helen J.; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Irwin, Brian; Thorpe, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of technology-enabled feedback to improve student learning. "Technology, Feedback, Action!: The impact of learning technology upon students' engagement with their feedback" aimed to evaluate how a range of technical interventions might encourage students to engage with feedback and formulate actions to improve…

  12. Factors Influencing Spanish Instructors' In-Class Feedback Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura

    2016-01-01

    While oral corrective feedback is a principal focus in second language acquisition research, most studies examine feedback once it has been provided. Investigating how instructors make in-class feedback decisions has not been thoroughly explored, despite the fact that classroom feedback occurs at the discretion of the individual language…

  13. Feedback, a Powerful Lever in Teams: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabelica, Catherine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the effects of feedback provided to teams in higher education or organizational settings. This review (59 empirical articles) showed that most of the feedback applications concerned "knowledge of results" (performance feedback). In contrast, there is a relatively small body of research using feedback conveying…

  14. Feedback in Action--The Mechanism of the Iris.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingnet, B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstration experiments. Outlines a demonstration of the general principle of positive and negative feedback and the influence of time delays in feedback circuits. Elucidates the principle of negative feedback with a model of the iris of the eye. Emphasizes the importance of feedback in biological systems. (CW)

  15. Uncovering Embedded Face Threat Mitigation in Landscape Architecture Critique Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housley Gaffney, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving public feedback on academic work may threaten students' face, particularly when such feedback is critical. One way that feedback may be cushioned is through face-threat mitigation techniques. I analyzed the use of such techniques in the feedback given by faculty and professionals to landscape architecture students as preparation for…

  16. Interactive Information Seeking and Retrieving: A Third Feedback Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda

    1996-01-01

    Presents an overview of feedback within the cybernetics and social frameworks. These feedback concepts are then compared with the interactive feedback concept evolving within the framework of information seeking and retrieving, based on their conceptualization of the feedback loop and notion of information. (Author/AEF)

  17. The Use of Performance Feedback in School Improvement in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schildkamp, Kim; Visscher, Adrie

    2010-01-01

    Although school performance feedback is available in schools all over the world, there is a dearth of information about the use made of feedback and about the effects of its use. This paper presents case study research into the use of school performance feedback and its perceived effects. All schools used the feedback in writing school improvement…

  18. Giving Feedback to Subordinates. An Ideas Into Action Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buron, Raoul J.; McDonald-Mann, Dana

    This guidebook describes for managers how and when to give effective feedback. It emphasizes the need for frequent feedback so that employees may feel confident about what they are doing right and can work on areas in which they are less proficient. Feedback should also be used as a tool for development, which means that feedback, which should not…

  19. Feedback Frequency in Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Butalla, Christine E.; Farinella, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of feedback frequency in treatment for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Reducing the frequency of feedback enhances motor learning, and recently, such feedback frequency reductions have been recommended for the treatment of CAS. However, no published studies have explicitly compared different feedback frequencies in…

  20. Exploring Occupational Therapy Students' Meaning of Feedback during Fieldwork Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathgeber, Karen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that students' confidence and performance improve after they receive feedback from clinical supervisors regarding the delivery of quality patient care. Multiple studies of feedback have focused on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if or how students internalized feedback to promote…

  1. Complexity, Cues and Relationships: Student Perceptions of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokorny, Helen; Pickford, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the effectiveness of feedback and the student perspective. The study described provides rich data relating to student perceptions of useful feedback, their perceptions of feedback cues and their feelings about the importance of feedback relationships in the process. The outcomes suggest that written…

  2. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective…

  3. Learning from Feedback: Spacing and the Delay-Retention Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Troy A.; Kimball, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of…

  4. Should 360-Degree Feedback Be Used Only for Developmental Purposes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracken, David W.; Dalton, Maxine A.; Jako, Robert A.; McCauley, Cynthia D.; Pollman, Victoria A.

    This booklet presents five papers that address the issue of whether 360-degree feedback (in which a manager or executive receives feedback on how bosses, peers, and direct reports see him or her) should be used only for development, or whether 360-degree feedback (also known as multi-rater feedback) should be used for administrative purposes such…

  5. Magnetospheric Feedback Effects on Mercury's Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Perez, N.; Heyner, D.; Wicht, J.; Solomon, S. C.; Glassmeier, K.

    2010-12-01

    The internal magnetic field of Mercury has been sampled by the Mariner 10 and MESSENGER spacecraft during a combined total of five flybys to date. The measurements are consistent with a magnetic dipole moment of ~ 250 nT RM3, where RM is the radius of Mercury. The action of high solar wind pressure at Mercury’s solar distance on such a weak internal field produces a small magnetosphere for which the dayside magnetopause is unusually close to the surface of the planet (at a planetocentric distance of about 1.5 RM). Because of this small magnetosphere and Mercury’s relatively thin silicate mantle, it has been proposed that magnetospheric currents may influence the internal dynamo process. From numerical simulations, we have previously demonstrated that magnetic field sources external to the dynamo-generating region may modify core dynamics and that this magnetospheric feedback may have influenced the history of Mercury’s dipole field. Here we combine new results from two types of numerical simulations. First, we estimate the magnitude of magnetospheric surface currents with a semi-empirical Earth model adapted to Mercury’s conditions. These currents are calculated for a range of internal dipole moments to establish the functional dependence of the feedback magnitude on internal field amplitude. Second, we implement this feedback function in the internal dynamo model. Earlier magnetospheric feedback models, such as those by Glassmeier and others and Heyner and others, demonstrated that this process is able to sustain an extremely weak magnetic field. Our new, more realistic feedback function leads to slower secular variation than in previous dynamic feedback models, but the secular variation is still typically faster than for isolated dynamos that neglect the external field altogether. Most generally, magnetospheric feedback is able to stabilize a weak dipole field with characteristics that are consistent in magnitude and form with measurements at Mercury.

  6. The role of feedback in improving the effectiveness of workplace based assessments: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With recent emphasis placed on workplace based assessment (WBA) as a method of formative performance assessment, there is limited evidence in the current literature regarding the role of feedback in improving the effectiveness of WBA. The aim of this systematic review was to elucidate the impact of feedback on the effectiveness of WBA in postgraduate medical training. Methods Searches were conducted using the following bibliographic databases to identify original published studies related to WBA and the role of feedback: Medline (1950-December 2010), Embase (1980-December 2010) and Journals@Ovid (English language only, 1996-December 2010). Studies which attempted to evaluate the role of feedback in WBA involving postgraduate doctors were included. Results 15 identified studies met the inclusion criteria and minimum quality threshold. They were heterogeneous in methodological design. 7 studies focused on multi source feedback, 3 studies were based on mini-clinical evaluation exercise, 2 looked at procedural based assessment, one study looked at workplace based assessments in general and 2 studies looked at a combination of 3 to 6 workplace based assessments. 7 studies originated from the United Kingdom. Others were from Canada, the United States and New Zealand. Study populations were doctors in various grades of training from a wide range of specialties including general practice, general medicine, general surgery, dermatology, paediatrics and anaesthetics. All studies were prospective in design, and non-comparative descriptive or observational studies using a variety of methods including questionnaires, one to one interviews and focus groups. Conclusions The evidence base contains few high quality conclusive studies and more studies are required to provide further evidence for the effect of feedback from workplace based assessment on subsequent performance. There is, however, good evidence that if well implemented, feedback from workplace based

  7. Radiative Transfer, Black Hole Growth, AGN Feedback in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    We have performed 3D hydrodynamic simulations of black hole fueling and AGN feedback using a novel method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method provides a solution to the radiative transfer equation and hence computes forces on the gas self-consistently by first solving for the radiation field taking into account radiation sources, absorption, and scattering. The algorithm gives the correct behavior in all of the relevant limits (dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to UV/optical; optically thick to IR) and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The simulations allow us to study gas flows and feedback processes over length scales from ~1 pc to ~100 kpc. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ULIRGs with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation.

  8. Quantum limits of stochastic cooling of a bosonic gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D.; Wallentowitz, S.; Walmsley, I.A.

    2003-06-01

    The quantum limits of stochastic cooling of trapped atoms are studied. The energy subtraction due to the applied feedback is shown to contain an additional noise term due to atom-number fluctuations in the feedback region. This effect is shown to dominate the cooling efficiency near the condensation point. Furthermore, we show results that indicate that Bose-Einstein condensation could be reached via stochastic cooling.

  9. A method of providing engaging formative feedback to large cohort first-year physiology and anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Weston-Green, Katrina; Wallace, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates a critical role for effective, meaningful feedback to enhance student learning. Effective feedback can become part of the learning cycle that is not only a learning opportunity for the student but can also be used to inform the teacher and ongoing curriculum development. Feedback is considered particularly important during the first year of university and can even be viewed as a retention strategy that can help attenuate student performance anxieties and solidify perceptions of academic support. Unfortunately, the provision of individualized, timely feedback can be particularly challenging in first-year courses as they tend to be large and diverse cohort classes that pose challenges of time and logistics. Various forms of generic feedback can provide rapid and cost-effect feedback to large cohorts but may be of limited benefit to students other than signaling weaknesses in knowledge. The present study describes a method that was used to provide formative task-related feedback to a large cohort of first-year physiology and anatomy students. Based on student evaluations presented in this study, this method provided feedback in a manner that engaged students, uncovered underlying misconceptions, facilitated peer discussion, and provided opportunity for new instruction while allowing the lecturer to recognize common gaps in knowledge and inform ongoing curriculum development. PMID:27503899

  10. Feedback power control strategies in wireless sensor networks with joint channel decoding.

    PubMed

    Abrardo, Andrea; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Martalò, Marco; Perna, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we derive feedback power control strategies for block-faded multiple access schemes with correlated sources and joint channel decoding (JCD). In particular, upon the derivation of the feasible signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region for the considered multiple access schemes, i.e., the multidimensional SNR region where error-free communications are, in principle, possible, two feedback power control strategies are proposed: (i) a classical feedback power control strategy, which aims at equalizing all link SNRs at the access point (AP), and (ii) an innovative optimized feedback power control strategy, which tries to make the network operational point fall in the feasible SNR region at the lowest overall transmit energy consumption. These strategies will be referred to as "balanced SNR" and "unbalanced SNR," respectively. While they require, in principle, an unlimited power control range at the sources, we also propose practical versions with a limited power control range. We preliminary consider a scenario with orthogonal links and ideal feedback. Then, we analyze the robustness of the proposed power control strategies to possible non-idealities, in terms of residual multiple access interference and noisy feedback channels. Finally, we successfully apply the proposed feedback power control strategies to a limiting case of the class of considered multiple access schemes, namely a central estimating officer (CEO) scenario, where the sensors observe noisy versions of a common binary information sequence and the AP's goal is to estimate this sequence by properly fusing the soft-output information output by the JCD algorithm. PMID:22291536

  11. Students' Perceptions of Electronic Feedback as an Alternative to Handwritten Feedback: One University's Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edeiken-Cooperman, Nanette; Berenato, Carolyn L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the area of effective feedback and whether undergraduate students prefer electronic or handwritten feedback. In teacher training programs this determination has become crucial because of the escalation in the number of formative assessments replacing summative assessments. A mixed methodology design was completed that involved…

  12. Investigating Feedback on Practice among Teachers: Coherence of Observed and Perceived Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Despite that benefits of feedback in student learning are reported in much research, little has been reported regarding the use of feedback from teachers to other teachers--a key tool in professional development. In this study, we triangulated data from videotaped peer coaching sessions, questionnaires, and interviews regarding 12 primary school…

  13. Partial Compensation for Altered Auditory Feedback: A Tradeoff with Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katseff, Shira; Houde, John; Johnson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Talkers are known to compensate only partially for experimentally-induced changes to their auditory feedback. In a typical experiment, talkers might hear their F1 feedback shifted higher (so that /[epsilon]/ sounds like /[ash]/, for example), and compensate by lowering F1 in their subsequent speech by about a quarter of that distance. Here, we…

  14. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  15. Enhancing the Impact of Formative Feedback on Student Learning through an Online Feedback System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatziapostolou, Thanos; Paraskakis, Iraklis

    2010-01-01

    Formative feedback is instrumental in the learning experience of a student. It can be effective in promoting learning if it is timely, personal, manageable, motivational, and in direct relation with assessment criteria. Despite its importance, however, research suggests that students are discouraged from engaging in the feedback process primarily…

  16. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical.

  17. Writing Helpful Feedback: The Influence of Feedback Type on Students' Perceptions and Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, April L.; Taylor, Alyssa; Pychyl, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Written feedback on students' assignments is a common method that instructors and teaching assistants use to inform students about their performance or guide revisions. Despite its frequency of use, written feedback often lacks sufficient detail to be beneficial to students, and additional empirical research should examine its effectiveness as a…

  18. Assessment and Feedback: Institutional Experiences of Student Feedback, 1996 to 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James; Kane, David

    2009-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on sectoral concern with assessment and feedback as a result of the National Student Survey. Government, the higher education agencies and the NUS have called for urgent action to address this concern. Existing data from institutional student feedback surveys, using the Student Satisfaction Approach, some dating back…

  19. Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in Australian Universities: They're Less than Impressed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate accounting students in Australian universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they currently receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of Australian university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…

  20. Differential Memory Effects for Immediate and Delayed Feedback: A Delta Rule Explanation of Feedback Timing Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This paper describes the possible effects of feedback on learning (associations) using a connectionist tool, the delta rule. Feedback in instruction can be described in terms of the interaction of stimulus inputs and response outputs, an associationist perspective. Here the delta rule is applied to each instance that an input and an output likely…

  1. A Comparative Study of Peer and Teacher Feedback and of Various Peer Feedback Forms in a Secondary School Writing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gielen, Sarah; Tops, Lies; Dochy, Filip; Onghena, Patrick; Smeets, Stijn

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether peer feedback can be a substitute for teacher feedback and which measures can be taken to improve its effectiveness. A pre-test post-test control group design examined the long-term learning effects of individual peer feedback and of collective teacher feedback on writing assignments in secondary education. Moreover, it…

  2. Prompting Secondary Students' Use of Criteria, Feedback Specificity and Feedback Levels during an Investigative Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Mark J. S.; Hattie, John

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of prompting on secondary students' written peer feedback in chemistry investigation reports. In particular, we examined students' feedback features in relation to the use of criteria, feedback specificity, and feedback levels. A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was adopted. Reviewers in…

  3. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  4. Student Voice: Using Qualitative Feedback from Students to Enhance Their University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Shah, Mahsood

    2013-01-01

    Many performance indicators in Australian higher education are based on the quantitative data from student feedback surveys, while the qualitative data usually generated by these surveys receive relatively limited attention. This paper argues that these data, if collected and analysed in a systematic way, can be used as an effective and robust…

  5. Video Feedback in the Classroom: Development of an Easy-to-Use Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Poorter, John; De Jaegher, Lut; De Cock, Mieke; Neuttiens, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Video feedback offers great potential for use in teaching but the relative complexity of the normal set-up of a video camera, a special tripod and a monitor has limited its use in teaching. The authors have developed a computer-webcam set-up which simplifies this. Anyone with an ordinary computer and webcam can learn to control the video feedback…

  6. Structural learning in feedforward and feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    For smooth and efficient motor control, the brain needs to make fast corrections during the movement to resist possible perturbations. It also needs to adapt subsequent movements to improve future performance. It is important that both feedback corrections and feedforward adaptation need to be made based on noisy and often ambiguous sensory data. Therefore, the initial response of the motor system, both for online corrections and adaptive responses, is guided by prior assumptions about the likely structure of perturbations. In the context of correcting and adapting movements perturbed by a force field, we asked whether these priors are hard wired or whether they can be modified through repeated exposure to differently shaped force fields. We found that both feedback corrections to unexpected perturbations and feedforward adaptation to a new force field changed, such that they were appropriate to counteract the type of force field that participants had experienced previously. We then investigated whether these changes were driven by a common mechanism or by two separate mechanisms. Participants experienced force fields that were either temporally consistent, causing sustained adaptation, or temporally inconsistent, causing little overall adaptation. We found that the consistent force fields modified both feedback and feedforward responses. In contrast, the inconsistent force field modified the temporal shape of feedback corrections but not of the feedforward adaptive response. These results indicate that responses to force perturbations can be modified in a structural manner and that these modifications are at least partly dissociable for feedback and feedforward control. PMID:22896725

  7. CLIMATE FEEDBACKS AND FUTURE REMOTE SENSING OBSERVATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J.

    2009-12-01

    Water vapor and cloud - climate feedbacks are two fundamental feedbacks in the context of climate change. Although more realistic in terms of water vapor, present-day climate models fail to properly represent the physical processes associated with cloud-climate feedbacks. Remote sensing from space of these small-scale processes, such as clouds, turbulence and convection, is notoriously difficult and is still not good enough in order to provide the necessary constraints that would lead to a better understanding of the climate system and to improved climate prediction. A Program on ‘Climate Feedbacks and Future Remote Sensing Observations’ was organized under the auspices of the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS). The goals of this Program were: i) To bring together scientists from different branches of the climate research community (theory, models, observations) to address key problems in the physics of climate feedbacks; ii) To promote the use of remote sensing observational data in the climate physics and climate modeling community; iii) To provide guidance on future research and future missions regarding the physics of climate change. The main conclusions and recommendations from this KISS Program will be presented in detail.

  8. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal's wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  9. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  10. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  11. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne L.

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays.

  12. Acceleration feedback improves balancing against reflex delay

    PubMed Central

    Insperger, Tamás; Milton, John; Stépán, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    A model for human postural balance is considered in which the time-delayed feedback depends on position, velocity and acceleration (proportional–derivative–acceleration (PDA) feedback). It is shown that a PDA controller is equivalent to a predictive controller, in which the prediction is based on the most recent information of the state, but the control input is not involved into the prediction. A PDA controller is superior to the corresponding proportional–derivative controller in the sense that the PDA controller can stabilize systems with approximately 40 per cent larger feedback delays. The addition of a sensory dead zone to account for the finite thresholds for detection by sensory receptors results in highly intermittent, complex oscillations that are a typical feature of human postural sway. PMID:23173196

  13. Time-Delayed Quantum Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L

    2015-08-01

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious series of cascaded quantum systems, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time delays. PMID:26296104

  14. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations. PMID:18048653

  15. Practice teaching and the importance of feedback.

    PubMed

    Lally, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Practice teachers play a key role in ensuring health visitors, school nurses and occupational health nurses are capable of delivering safe and effective practice to the public. The practice teacher is a significant member of the learning team during the specialist community public health nursing programme. This paper discusses the role of feedback in facilitating students' learning while in practice. Its purpose is to raise awareness for those working as practice teachers to the issues they may experience when giving feedback and discusses the theories of transactional analysis, transference and counter-transference and the impact these may have on the practice teachers' ability to give constructive feedback to specialist community public health nursing students. PMID:23427710

  16. Preceptor Development: Providing Effective Feedback, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Samaneh T.; Phillips, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An integral part of providing effective feedback to pharmacy residents occurs during the evaluation process. Residency evaluation involves measuring and documenting performance as it relates to standardized residency outcomes, goals, and learning objectives. Evaluations may be formative or summative and include the preceptor’s evaluation of the resident’s performance, the resident’s self-assessments, and the resident’s evaluation of the preceptor and learning experience. Evaluations are more structured than feedback, and they involve documentation of the verbal feedback that was provided throughout the learning experience. This article will focus on the preceptor’s role in providing effective resident evaluations based on specific learning activities. PMID:24958969

  17. Operation of the PEP transverse beam feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, C. W.; Paterson, J. M.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Rees, J. R.

    1981-02-01

    The PEP storage ring was equipped with a wide band beam feedback system capable of damping the vertical and horizontal motion of six bunches. The oscillation detection is done at a symmetry point on the storage ring and feedback is applied at the same location one orbital period later. The signal is synchronously gated and the system appears as twelve independent feedback loops, operating on the two coordinates of each of the six bunches. Two beam deflection electrodes are driven each by a low Q push-pull amplifier which is tuned at the 72nd harmonic of the revolution frequency and suppressed carrier modulation is generated by a sequence of the detected bunch oscillations. The design parameters are reviewed as well as the machine operation is evaluated in the light of experimental results.

  18. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.; Chin, M.; Doolittle, L.; Akre, R.

    2005-05-09

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx(R) ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  19. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Chin, M.J.; Doolittle, L.R.; Akre, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx{reg_sign} ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  20. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903