Science.gov

Sample records for limited human studies

  1. Studying the lower limit of human vision with a single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rebecca; Christensen, Bradley; Street, Whitney; Wang, Ranxiao; Kwiat, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Humans can detect a visual stimulus of just a few photons. Exactly how few is not known--psychological and physiological research have suggested that the detection threshold may be as low as one photon, but the question has never been directly tested. Using a source of heralded single photons based on spontaneous parametric downconversion, we can directly characterize the lower limit of vision. This system can also be used to study temporal and spatial integration in the visual system, and to study visual attention with EEG. We may eventually even be able to investigate how human observers perceive quantum effects such as superposition and entanglement. Our progress and some preliminary results will be discussed.

  2. Overcoming current limitations in humanized mouse research.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Michael A; Shultz, Leonard D; Luban, Jeremy; Greiner, Dale L

    2013-11-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells and tissues have provided an exciting alternative to in vitro studies with human tissues and nonhuman primates for the study of human immunobiology. A major breakthrough in the early 2000s was the introduction of a targeted mutation in the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor common gamma chain (IL2rg(null)) into mice that were already deficient in T and B cells. Among other immune defects, natural killer (NK) cells are disrupted in these mice, permitting efficient engraftment with human hematopoietic cells that generate a functional human immune system. These humanized mouse models are becoming increasingly important for preclinical studies of human immunity, hematopoiesis, tissue regeneration, cancer, and infectious diseases. In particular, humanized mice have enabled studies of the pathogenesis of human-specific pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, Epstein Barr virus, and Salmonella typhi. However, there are a number of limitations in the currently available humanized mouse models. Investigators are continuing to identify molecular mechanisms underlying the remaining defects in the engrafted human immune system and are generating "next generation" models to overcome these final deficiencies. This article provides an overview of some of the emerging models of humanized mice, their use in the study of infectious diseases, and some of the remaining limitations that are currently being addressed. PMID:24151318

  3. Overcoming Current Limitations in Humanized Mouse Research

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Luban, Jeremy; Greiner, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells and tissues have provided an exciting alternative to in vitro studies with human tissues and nonhuman primates for the study of human immunobiology. A major breakthrough in the early 2000s was the introduction of a targeted mutation in the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor common gamma chain (IL2rgnull) into mice that were already deficient in T and B cells. Among other immune defects, natural killer (NK) cells are disrupted in these mice, permitting efficient engraftment with human hematopoietic cells that generate a functional human immune system. These humanized mouse models are becoming increasingly important for preclinical studies of human immunity, hematopoiesis, tissue regeneration, cancer, and infectious diseases. In particular, humanized mice have enabled studies of the pathogenesis of human-specific pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, Epstein Barr virus, and Salmonella typhi. However, there are a number of limitations in the currently available humanized mouse models. Investigators are continuing to identify molecular mechanisms underlying the remaining defects in the engrafted human immune system and are generating “next generation” models to overcome these final deficiencies. This article provides an overview of some of the emerging models of humanized mice, their use in the study of infectious diseases, and some of the remaining limitations that are currently being addressed. PMID:24151318

  4. The detection limits for estimates of infection intensity in schistosomiasis mansoni established by a study in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Alan Wilson, R; van Dam, Govert J; Kariuki, Thomas M; Farah, Idle O; Deelder, André M; Coulson, Patricia S

    2006-10-01

    In human schistosomiasis mansoni, it is impossible to directly determine worm burden and hence infection intensity, so surrogates must be used. Studies on non-human primates revealed a linear relationship between worm burden and three surrogates, faecal egg output, circulating anodic and circulating cathodic antigens. By regression, the thresholds of detection were determined as 40, 24 and 47 worms, respectively. These observations provide a quantitative basis for the contention that low intensity infections in humans are being missed. The significance for estimates of disease prevalence, evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy and the implementation of vaccine trials is emphasised. PMID:16930605

  5. Limit cycle oscillations in standing human posture.

    PubMed

    Chagdes, James R; Rietdyk, Shirley; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Zelaznik, Howard N; Cinelli, Michael E; Denomme, Luke T; Powers, Kaley C; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) are a hallmark of dynamic instability in time-delayed and nonlinear systems such as climate change models, biological oscillators, and robotics. Here we study the links between the human neuromuscular system and LCOs in standing posture. First, we demonstrate through a simple mathematical model that the observation of LCOs in posture is indicative of excessive neuromuscular time-delay. To test this hypothesis we study LCOs in the postural sway of individuals with multiple sclerosis and concussed athletes representing two different populations with chronically and acutely increased neuromuscular time-delays. Using a wavelet analysis method we demonstrate that 67% of individuals with multiple sclerosis and 44% of individuals with concussion exhibit intermittent LCOs; 8% of MS-controls, 0% of older adults, and 0% of concussion-controls displayed LCOs. Thus, LCOs are not only key to understanding postural instability but also may have important applications for the detection of neuromuscular deficiencies. PMID:27018157

  6. Limits to sustainable human metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, K R

    2001-09-01

    There is a limit to the performance of an organism set by energy intake and energy mobilization. Here, the focus is on humans with unlimited access to food and for whom physical activity can be limited by energy mobilization. The physical activity level (PAL) in the general population, calculated as doubly-labelled-water-assessed average daily metabolic rate as a multiple of basal metabolic rate, has an upper limit of 2.2-2.5. The upper limit of sustainable metabolic rate is approximately twice as high in endurance athletes, mainly because of long-term exercise training with simultaneous consumption of carbohydrate-rich food during exercise. Endurance athletes have an increased fat-free mass and can maintain energy balance at a PAL value of 4.0-5.0. High altitude limits exercise performance as a result of combined effects on nutrient supply and the capacity to process nutrients. Thus, trained subjects climbing Mount Everest reached PAL values of 2.0-2.7, well below the observed upper limit at sea level. PMID:11581332

  7. Phosphorus: a limiting nutrient for humanity?

    PubMed

    Elser, James J

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus is a chemical element that is essential to life because of its role in numerous key molecules, including DNA and RNA; indeed, organisms require large amounts of P to grow rapidly. However, the supply of P from the environment is often limiting to production, including to crops. Thus, large amounts of P are mined annually to produce fertilizer that is applied in support of the 'Green Revolution.' However, much of this fertilizer eventually ends up in rivers, lakes and oceans where it causes costly eutrophication. Furthermore, given increasing human population, expanding meat consumption, and proliferating bioenergy pressures, concerns have recently been raised about the long-term geological, economic, and geopolitical viability of mined P for fertilizer production. Together, these issues highlight the non-sustainable nature of current human P use. To achieve P sustainability, farms need to become more efficient in how they use P while society as a whole must develop technologies and practices to recycle P from the food chain. Such large-scale changes will probably require a radical restructuring of the entire food system, highlighting the need for prompt but sustained action. PMID:22465489

  8. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  9. Circular-dichroism and electron-microscopy studies of human subcomponent C1q before and after limited proteolysis by pepsin.

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky-Doyle, B; Leonard, K R; Reid, K B

    1976-01-01

    1. A fragment of human subcomponent C1q was prepared by limited proteolysis with pepsin at 37 degrees C for 20 h, and at pH4.4, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. This fragment was shown to contain all the collagen-like features known to be present in the intact molecule [Reid (1976) Biochem. J. 155, 5-17]. 2. Circular-dichroism studies showed the presence of positive bands at 230 and 223 nm in the intact subcomponent C1q and pepsin fragment respectively, compared with a positive band at 220 nm obtained for lathyritic rat skin collagen. These bands were abolished by collagenase treatment, which suggested that there may some collagen-like triple-helical structure in subcomponent C1q and that this structure resides in the pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule. However, the 230 and 223 nm bands had a substantially lower magnitude than that obtained for the unaggregated single fibres of totally triple-helical collagen. 3. Thermal-transition temperatures obtained for subcomponent C1q, the pepsin fragment and the reduced and alkylated pepsin fragment were 48 degrees, 48 degrees and 39 degrees C respectively, compared with a value of 38 degrees C obtained for lathyritic rat skin collagen. 4. Only the unreduced pepsin fragment regained significant amounts (up to 60%) of collagen-like structure, after heat denaturation and cooling, as estimated by circular-dichroism measurements. 5. Electron-microscopy studies of subcomponent C1q and the collagen-like pepsin-resistant fragment of subcomponent C1q showed that the six peripheral globular regions of the molecule were fragmented by pepsin leaving the six collagen-like connecting strands and fibril-like central portion intact. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:187173

  10. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Exploration has established a process whereby all NASA field centers and other NASA Headquarters offices participate in the formulation and analysis of a wide range of mission strategies. These strategies were manifested into specific scenarios or candidate case studies. The case studies provided a systematic approach into analyzing each mission element. First, each case study must address several major themes and rationale including: national pride and international prestige, advancement of scientific knowledge, a catalyst for technology, economic benefits, space enterprise, international cooperation, and education and excellence. Second, the set of candidate case studies are formulated to encompass the technology requirement limits in the life sciences, launch capabilities, space transfer, automation, and robotics in space operations, power, and propulsion. The first set of reference case studies identify three major strategies: human expeditions, science outposts, and evolutionary expansion. During the past year, four case studies were examined to explore these strategies. The expeditionary missions include the Human Expedition to Phobos and Human Expedition to Mars case studies. The Lunar Observatory and Lunar Outpost to Early Mars Evolution case studies examined the later two strategies. This set of case studies established the framework to perform detailed mission analysis and system engineering to define a host of concepts and requirements for various space systems and advanced technologies. The details of each mission are described and, specifically, the results affecting the advanced technologies required to accomplish each mission scenario are presented.

  11. Ventilatory control in humans: constraints and limitations.

    PubMed

    Ward, Susan A

    2007-03-01

    Below the lactate threshold ((thetaL)), ventilation (V(E))responds in close proportion to CO(2) output to regulate arterial partial pressure of CO(2) (PaCO2). While ventilatory control models have traditionally included proportional feedback (central and carotid chemosensory) and feedforward (central and peripheral neurogenic) elements, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Regardless, putative control schemes have to accommodate the close dynamic 'coupling' between and V(E) and V(CO2). Above (thetaL), PaCO2 is driven down to constrain the fall of arterial pH by a compensatory hyperventilation, probably of carotid body origin. When V(E) requirements are high (as in highly fit endurance athletes), V(E) can attain limiting proportions. Not only does this impair gas exchange at these work rates, but there may be an associated high metabolic cost for generation of respiratory muscle power, which may be sufficient to divert a fraction of the cardiac output away from the muscles of locomotion to the respiratory muscles, further compromising exercise tolerance. PMID:17234715

  12. Human exposure limits to hypergolic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, H. D.; James, J. T.; Limero, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past four decades, many studies have been conducted on the toxicities of the rocket propellants hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MH). Numerous technical challenges have made it difficult to unambiguously interpret the results of these studies, and there is considerable divergence between results obtained by different investigators on the inhalation concentrations (MAC's) for each toxic effect inducible by exposure to hypergolic fuels in spacecraft atmospheres, NASA undertook a critical review of published and unpublished investigations on the toxicities of these compounds. The current state of the art practices for similar studies. While many questions remain unanswered, MAC's were determined using the best available data for a variety of toxic endpoints for potential continuous exposure durations ranging from 1 hour to 180 days. Spacecraft MAC's (SMAC's) were set for each compound based on the most sensitive toxic endpoint at each exposure duration.

  13. Approaching the Limit of Predictability in Human Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Wetter, Erik; Bharti, Nita; Tatem, Andrew J.; Bengtsson, Linus

    2013-10-01

    In this study we analyze the travel patterns of 500,000 individuals in Cote d'Ivoire using mobile phone call data records. By measuring the uncertainties of movements using entropy, considering both the frequencies and temporal correlations of individual trajectories, we find that the theoretical maximum predictability is as high as 88%. To verify whether such a theoretical limit can be approached, we implement a series of Markov chain (MC) based models to predict the actual locations visited by each user. Results show that MC models can produce a prediction accuracy of 87% for stationary trajectories and 95% for non-stationary trajectories. Our findings indicate that human mobility is highly dependent on historical behaviors, and that the maximum predictability is not only a fundamental theoretical limit for potential predictive power, but also an approachable target for actual prediction accuracy.

  14. Limits to running speed in dogs, horses and humans.

    PubMed

    Denny, Mark W

    2008-12-01

    Are there absolute limits to the speed at which animals can run? If so, how close are present-day individuals to these limits? I approach these questions by using three statistical models and data from competitive races to estimate maximum running speeds for greyhounds, thoroughbred horses and elite human athletes. In each case, an absolute speed limit is definable, and the current record approaches that predicted maximum. While all such extrapolations must be used cautiously, these data suggest that there are limits to the ability of either natural or artificial selection to produce ever faster dogs, horses and humans. Quantification of the limits to running speed may aid in formulating and testing models of locomotion. PMID:19043056

  15. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  16. Teleoperator human factors study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The progress made on the Teleoperator Human Factors Study program is summarized. Technical and programmatic problems that were encountered were discussed along with planned activities. The report contains four sections: Work Performed, Future Work, Problems Encountered, and Cost Information

  17. Teleoperator human factors study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The progress made on the Teleoperator Human Factors Study program is summarized. Technical and programmatic problems that were encountered are discussed along with planned activity. Work performed, future work, problems encountered, and cost information comprise the topics addressed herein.

  18. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  19. The Limits of Narrative: Provocations for the Medical Humanities

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to (re)ignite debate about the role of narrative in the medical humanities. It begins with a critical review of the ways in which narrative has been mobilised by humanities and social science scholars to understand the experience of health and illness. I highlight seven dangers or blind spots in the dominant medical humanities approach to narrative, including the frequently unexamined assumption that all human beings are “naturally narrative.” I then explore this assumption further through an analysis of philosopher Galen Strawson’s influential article “Against Narrativity.” Strawson rejects the descriptive claim that “human beings typically see or live or experience their lives as a narrative” and the normative claim that “a richly Narrative outlook is essential to a well-lived life, to true or full personhood.” His work has been taken up across a range of disciplines but its implications in the context of health and illness have not yet been sufficiently discussed. This article argues that “Against Narrativity” can and should stimulate robust debate within the medical humanities regarding the limits of narrative, and concludes by discussing a range of possibilities for venturing “beyond narrative.” PMID:22038696

  20. Closed Ecological Systems (CES) Functional Stability Limits and Human Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygalov, V.; Nelson, M.; de Silva, S.

    newline Global planet The Earth Closed System stability of functioning is based on principle of statistical regulations and provided by enormous planetary buffer capacities atmosphere water soil time and sources of energy natural and fossilized All current deviations caused by human activity in Earth Biosphere are being easily eliminated and absorbed by these planetary buffers Man-made Closed Ecosystems function at the limits of their natural stability due to insufficient buffer capacities we have to minimize system size and physical mass to get it into the space principle of statistical regulations becomes insufficient for stability maintenance and needs to be replaced by other control approaches It had been indicated qualitatively earlier Gitelson et al 1975 that Human Factor HF purposeful control can increase these systems stability levels if applies algorithms compatible to man-made CES natural functioning mechanisms Theoretical analysis is being done on the basis of the results obtained in different experiments for closed ecosystems of different scale Biosphere of the Earth Biosphere -- 2 BIOS -- 3 etc It is shown that certain limits of functional stability exist for each specific system in terms of average cycle rate and fluctuations range These limits are determined primarily by newline - system s natural buffer capacities newline - rate of slowest material cycle in the system - natural structure of the chemical elements cycles - HF human consumption conversion material load on to the cycles

  1. Independent Human Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Suzanne; Wilson, Gordon

    1978-01-01

    The Independent Human Studies program at Schoolcraft College offers an alternative method of earning academic credits. Students delineate an area of study, pose research questions, gather resources, synthesize the information, state the thesis, choose the method of presentation, set schedules, and take responsibility for meeting deadlines. (MB)

  2. Limits and patterns of cytomegalovirus genomic diversity in humans.

    PubMed

    Renzette, Nicholas; Pokalyuk, Cornelia; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Schleiss, Mark R; Hamprecht, Klaus; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Britt, William J; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2015-07-28

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) exhibits surprisingly high genomic diversity during natural infection although little is known about the limits or patterns of HCMV diversity among humans. To address this deficiency, we analyzed genomic diversity among congenitally infected infants. We show that there is an upper limit to HCMV genomic diversity in these patient samples, with ∼ 25% of the genome being devoid of polymorphisms. These low diversity regions were distributed across 26 loci that were preferentially located in DNA-processing genes. Furthermore, by developing, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide mutation and recombination rate maps for HCMV, we show that genomic diversity is positively correlated with these two rates. In contrast, median levels of viral genomic diversity did not vary between putatively single or mixed strain infections. We also provide evidence that HCMV populations isolated from vascular compartments of hosts from different continents are genetically similar and that polymorphisms in glycoproteins and regulatory proteins are enriched in these viral populations. This analysis provides the most highly detailed map of HCMV genomic diversity in human hosts to date and informs our understanding of the distribution of HCMV genomic diversity within human hosts. PMID:26150505

  3. Transcending the Limitations of the Social Sciences: Insight, Understanding, and the Humanities in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, James

    1994-01-01

    Considers the role of the humanities in the study and practice of educational administration, offering significant insights into the human condition and the philosophical and moral aspects of education. Discusses the limitations of the subject-object dualism underpinning traditional social science. Explains how Slipperjack's "Honor the Sun,"…

  4. Pumped-limiter study for Alcator DCT

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.; Cha, Y.S.; Hassanein, A.M.; Majumdar, S.

    1983-06-01

    A study was performed for a pumped-limiter design for the proposed Alcator DCT device. The study focused on reactor-relevant issues. The main issues examined were configuration, surface erosion, thermal hydraulics, and the choice of structural and surface materials. A bottom, flat limiter, with a copper-alloy substrate, seems to be a reasonable design and should provide an opportunity to test high power and particle loadings. Carbon is recommended as a surface material if acceptable redeposition properties can be demonstrated.

  5. Teleoperator human factors study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, K. Z.; Schappell, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The progress made on the Teleoperator Human Factors Study program during the period of September 7, 1985 to October 6, 1985 is discussed. Technical and programmatic problems that were encountered are discussed along with activity planned for the following month. The main portion of the report has been separated into four sections: Work Performed, Future Work, Problems Encountered, and Cost Information.

  6. Artificial Closed Ecosystems Stability and Human Control Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygalov, Vadim; Casler, James G.; Holubnyak, Yevhen

    The stability of the complex ecological system of the Earth accommodates statistical variation through the existence of extensive planetary buffers in atmosphere, water, soil, time, and energy sources. Variation in the Earth biosphere caused by either natural mechanisms or human activity is readily absorbed by these systemic, planetary buffers. Artificial Closed Ecological Systems (CES) for long-term life support in space are marginally stable to unstable due to insufficient buffer capacities stemming from significantly smaller system size and mass in space adaptations. Manual control can improve stability of such systems if CES system-specific control algorithms are applied. This paper introduces a conceptual model for CES stability and suggests system characteristics to maintain this stability for extended durations. Numerical estimates for CES of various scales and configurations, e.g., Biosphere of the Earth, Biosphere 2 (USA), BIOS 3 (Russia), Closed Ecological Experimental Facility (CEEF, Japan), etc., show that stability limits exist and differ for each specific system. These limits are determined primarily by: 1. The slowest circulating (so called limiting) material cycle in the system; 2. The buffer capacities for this cycle (cycle reservoirs); 3. The natural structure and intensity (rate) of the material turnover. Humans as an element of the system can exert control in a variety of manners. Human control can improve stability significantly but the controller must have a comprehensive understanding of closed material cycles structural (network related) and dynamical (turnover time related) characteristics. This understanding requires better models of the Earth biosphere mechanisms, as well as greater extensive experimentation with these models.

  7. A network model of human aging: Limits, errors, and information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Spencer; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Rutenberg, Andrew

    The Frailty Index (FI) quantifies human aging using the fraction of accumulated age-related deficits. The FI correlates strongly with mortality and accumulates non-linearly and stochastically with age. Clinical data shows a nearly universal limit of FI <= 0 . 7 . We computationally model an aging population using a network model of interacting deficits. Deficits damage and repair at rates that depend upon the average damage of connected nodes. The model is parametrized to fit clinical data. We find that attribution errors, especially false negative, allow the model to recover the frailty limit. Mutual information allows us to assess how well the FI can predict mortality. Mutual information provides a non-parametric measure of how the FI predicts mortality. We find that attribution errors have a small effect on the mutual information when many deficits are included in the model. The mutual information of our model and of the clinical data are comparable.

  8. Limitations on the Analysis of Relaxation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Chad; Mopsik, Frederick

    1998-03-01

    Two issues that are commonly ignored in relaxation studies are examined. The first is the issue of interpolation, extrapolation, and analysis of relaxation data over a limited frequency range. We demonstrate that for data without dispersion or overlap, within experimental uncertainty, a Cole-Cole fit cannot be discerned from a Havriliak-Negami fit over a limited, but typical, frequency range. These results have an obvious impact on many of the theoretical models that attempt to give a physical basis to such fitting functions as the Cole-Cole, the Cole-Davidson, the Havriliak-Negami, and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equations. The second issue that is examined is non-isothermal relaxation studies. We examine the question of whether meaningful information can be obtained from relaxation data obtained while scanning in temperature. The implications of these results are generalized to other experiments such as modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA).

  9. Human Paraoxonase 1 as a Pharmacologic Agent: Limitations and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Tripathy, Rajan K.; Aggarwal, Geetika; Pande, Abhay H.

    2014-01-01

    Human PON1 (h-PON1) is a multifaceted enzyme and can hydrolyze (and inactivate) a wide range of substrates. The enzyme shows anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiatherogenic, ant-diabetic, antimicrobial, and organophosphate (OP)-detoxifying properties. However, there are certain limitations regarding large-scale production and use of h-PON1 as a therapeutic candidate. These include difficulties in producing recombinant h-PON1 (rh-PON1) using microbial expression system, low hydrolytic activity of wild-type h-PON1 towards certain substrates, and low storage stability of the purified enzyme. This review summarizes the work done in our laboratory to address these limitations. Our results show that (a) optimized polynucleotide sequence encoding rh-PON1 can express the protein in an active form in E. coli and can be used to generate variant of the enzyme having enhanced hydrolytic activity, (b) in vitro refolding of rh-PON1 enzyme can dramatically increase the yield of an active enzyme, (c) common excipients can be used to stabilize purified rh-PON1 enzyme when stored under different storage conditions, and (d) variants of rh-PON1 enzyme impart significant protection against OP-poisoning in human blood (ex vivo) and mouse (in vivo) model of OP-poisoning. The rh-PON1 variants and their process of production discussed here will help to develop h-PON1 as a therapeutic candidate. PMID:25386619

  10. The Limits of Human Stereopsis in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Kane, David; Guan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    To encode binocular disparity, the visual system determines the image patches in one eye that yield the highest correlation with patches in the other eye. The computation of interocular correlation occurs after spatiotemporal filtering of monocular signals, which leads to restrictions on disparity variations that can support depth perception. We quantified those restrictions by measuring humans' ability to see disparity variation at a wide range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Lower-disparity thresholds cut off at very low spatiotemporal frequencies, which is consistent with the behavior of V1 neurons. Those thresholds are space–time separable, suggesting that the underlying neural mechanisms are separable. We also found that upper-disparity limits were characterized by a spatiotemporal, disparity-gradient limit; to be visible, disparity variation cannot exceed a fixed amount for a given interval in space–time. Our results illustrate that the disparity variations that humans can see are very restricted compared with the corresponding luminance variations. The results also provide insight into the neural mechanisms underlying depth from disparity, such as why stimuli with long interocular delays can still yield clear depth percepts. PMID:24453329

  11. Limited communication capacity unveils strategies for human interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Cebrian, Manuel; Moro, Esteban

    2013-06-01

    Connectivity is the key process that characterizes the structural and functional properties of social networks. However, the bursty activity of dyadic interactions may hinder the discrimination of inactive ties from large interevent times in active ones. We develop a principled method to detect tie de-activation and apply it to a large longitudinal, cross-sectional communication dataset (~19 months, ~20 million people). Contrary to the perception of ever-growing connectivity, we observe that individuals exhibit a finite communication capacity, which limits the number of ties they can maintain active in time. On average men display higher capacity than women, and this capacity decreases for both genders over their lifespan. Separating communication capacity from activity reveals a diverse range of tie activation strategies, from stable to exploratory. This allows us to draw novel relationships between individual strategies for human interaction and the evolution of social networks at global scale.

  12. Limited communication capacity unveils strategies for human interaction.

    PubMed

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Cebrian, Manuel; Moro, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Connectivity is the key process that characterizes the structural and functional properties of social networks. However, the bursty activity of dyadic interactions may hinder the discrimination of inactive ties from large interevent times in active ones. We develop a principled method to detect tie de-activation and apply it to a large longitudinal, cross-sectional communication dataset (≈19 months, ≈20 million people). Contrary to the perception of ever-growing connectivity, we observe that individuals exhibit a finite communication capacity, which limits the number of ties they can maintain active in time. On average men display higher capacity than women, and this capacity decreases for both genders over their lifespan. Separating communication capacity from activity reveals a diverse range of tie activation strategies, from stable to exploratory. This allows us to draw novel relationships between individual strategies for human interaction and the evolution of social networks at global scale. PMID:23739519

  13. Limited communication capacity unveils strategies for human interaction

    PubMed Central

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Cebrian, Manuel; Moro, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Connectivity is the key process that characterizes the structural and functional properties of social networks. However, the bursty activity of dyadic interactions may hinder the discrimination of inactive ties from large interevent times in active ones. We develop a principled method to detect tie de-activation and apply it to a large longitudinal, cross-sectional communication dataset (≈19 months, ≈20 million people). Contrary to the perception of ever-growing connectivity, we observe that individuals exhibit a finite communication capacity, which limits the number of ties they can maintain active in time. On average men display higher capacity than women, and this capacity decreases for both genders over their lifespan. Separating communication capacity from activity reveals a diverse range of tie activation strategies, from stable to exploratory. This allows us to draw novel relationships between individual strategies for human interaction and the evolution of social networks at global scale. PMID:23739519

  14. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  15. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chirchir, Habiba

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis) in a sample of N = 20 individuals (11 males and 9 females). pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm3) and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm3) displayed significantly greater (p < 0.01) trabecular bone density than other elements, whereas there was no significant variation among the rest of the elements (p > 0.01). The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p > 0.05) suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions. PMID:27148458

  16. Selective abortion and gene therapy: reflections on human limits.

    PubMed

    Post, S G

    1991-01-01

    The potential impact of the Human Genome Project on selective abortion is considered here, as is human gene therapy. Themes of emphasis are broadly humanistic: human suffering, contingency, and perfection. The chief concerns of the article lie with selective abortion for less than serious reasons, and with the importance of avoiding efforts to "enhance" human beings by gene transfer methods. The style is widely interdisciplinary. PMID:1836362

  17. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    The nation's efforts "to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system" was given renewed emphasis in January 1988, when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly when compared with past space activities.

  18. [Research with human embryo stem cells. Foundations and judicial limits].

    PubMed

    Eser, Albin; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Research with human embryos, and particularly, the use for scientific purposes of human embryonic stem cells has given raise to different sort of problems at the international level. One of the most strict regulation in this field, is this lecture Professors Albin Eser and Hans-Georg Koch analyse the german legal framework in relation with the use of embryos and human embryonic stem cells for scientific purposes. PMID:15544142

  19. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  20. Limited interaction between translation and visual motion aftereffects in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    After exposure to a moving sensory stimulus, subsequent perception is often biased in the opposite direction. This phenomenon, known as an aftereffect, has been extensively studied for optic flow stimuli where it is known as the visual motion aftereffect (MAE). Such visual motion can also generate the sensation of self-motion or vection. It has recently been demonstrated that fore-aft translation in darkness also produces an aftereffect. The current study examines the interaction between visual MAE and vestibular translation aftereffects. Human subjects participated in a two-interval experiment in which the first interval (adapter) was visual, translation, or both combined congruently or in conflict. Subjects identified the direction of the second (test) interval of either visual or translation using a forced-choice technique. The translation adapter had no influence on visual test stimulus perception, and the visual adapter did not influence vestibular test stimulus perception in any subjects. However, congruent visual and translation induced a significantly larger perceptual bias on the translation test stimulus than was observed for a translation only adapter. The congruent adapter caused the MAE to be diminished relative to a visual only adapter. Conflicting visual and vestibular adapters produced an aftereffect similar to that seen when the single adapting stimulus was the same modality as the test stimulus. These results suggest that unlike visual and translation stimuli whose combined influence on perception can be predicted based on the effects of each stimulus individually, the effects of combined visual and translation stimuli on aftereffects cannot be predicted from the influences of each stimulus individually. PMID:23064848

  1. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  2. Limited human infection due to recombinant raccoon pox virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Dein, F.J.; Fuchsberger, M.; Fox, B.C.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory accident resulted in human exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) developed as a vaccine vector for antigens of Yersinia pestis for protection of wild rodents (and other animals) against plague. Within 9 days, the patient developed a small blister that healed within 4 weeks. Raccoon poxvirus was cultured from the lesion, and the patient developed antibody to plague antigen (F1) and RCN. This is the first documented case of human exposure to RCN.

  3. Perspectives: Why Study Human Genetics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Barton

    1983-01-01

    Reasons for studying human genetics are discussed. These include philosophical reasons, reasons of health, and social reasons. While content, interpretation, and emphasis of human genetics study will vary depending upon schools, teachers, and developmental stages of students, it is suggested that teachers address these three domains. (Author/JN)

  4. Flight Controllability Limits and Related Human Transfer Functions as Determined from Simulator and Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Day, Richard E.

    1961-01-01

    A simulator study and flight tests were performed to determine the levels of static stability and damping necessary to enable a pilot to control the longitudinal and lateral-directional dynamics of a vehicle for short periods of time. Although a basic set of aerodynamic characteristics was used, the study was conducted so that the results would be applicable to a wide range of flight conditions and configurations. Novel piloting techniques were found which enabled the pilot to control the vehicle at conditions that were otherwise uncontrollable. The influence of several critical factors in altering the controllability limits was also investigated. Several human transfer functions were used which gave fairly good representations of the controllability limits determined experimentally for the short-period longitudinal, directional, and lateral modes. A transfer function with approximately the same gain and phase angle as the pilot at the controlling frequencies along the controllability limits was also derived.

  5. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  6. 47 CFR 5.93 - Limited market studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limited market studies. 5.93 Section 5.93...) Applications and Licenses § 5.93 Limited market studies. Unless otherwise stated in the instrument of authorization, licenses granted for the purpose of limited market studies pursuant to § 5.3(j) of this part...

  7. 47 CFR 5.93 - Limited market studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limited market studies. 5.93 Section 5.93...) Applications and Licenses § 5.93 Limited market studies. Unless otherwise stated in the instrument of authorization, licenses granted for the purpose of limited market studies pursuant to § 5.3(j) of this part...

  8. Limited energy studies, Fort Rucker, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    There are two main areas of work addressed under this contract, an LP gas storage study for Fort Rucker and the evaluation of two energy conservation opportunities for Lyster Army Community Hospital. The objective of this project was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of building and operating a liquified petroleum gas (LPG) storage facility at Fort Rucker. The primary heating fuel at Fort Rucker is natural gas; it is used in central steam plants and in central forced-air furnaces for family housing. Natural gas is purchased from the Southeast Alabama Gas District at their lowest rate. However, Fort Rucker also pays a natural gas demand charge based on the amount of natural gas used during a curtailment period, the natural gas demand is intended to be reduced as much as possible by switching the central steam plants to oil but the family housing area continues to use natural gas.

  9. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  10. Ionic mechanisms limiting cardiac repolarization reserve in humans compared to dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Comtois, Philippe; Ördög, Balázs; Szuts, Viktória; Seprényi, György; Bitay, Miklós; Kohajda, Zsófia; Koncz, István; Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Magyar, János; Kovács, Mária; Puskás, László G; Lengyel, Csaba; Wettwer, Erich; Ravens, Ursula; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Nattel, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The species-specific determinants of repolarization are poorly understood. This study compared the contribution of various currents to cardiac repolarization in canine and human ventricle. Conventional microelectrode, whole-cell patch-clamp, molecular biological and mathematical modelling techniques were used. Selective IKr block (50–100 nmol l−1 dofetilide) lengthened AP duration at 90% of repolarization (APD90) >3-fold more in human than dog, suggesting smaller repolarization reserve in humans. Selective IK1 block (10 μmol l−1 BaCl2) and IKs block (1 μmol l−1 HMR-1556) increased APD90 more in canine than human right ventricular papillary muscle. Ion current measurements in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that IK1 and IKs densities were 3- and 4.5-fold larger in dogs than humans, respectively. IKr density and kinetics were similar in human versus dog. ICa and Ito were respectively ∼30% larger and ∼29% smaller in human, and Na+–Ca2+ exchange current was comparable. Cardiac mRNA levels for the main IK1 ion channel subunit Kir2.1 and the IKs accessory subunit minK were significantly lower, but mRNA expression of ERG and KvLQT1 (IKr and IKsα-subunits) were not significantly different, in human versus dog. Immunostaining suggested lower Kir2.1 and minK, and higher KvLQT1 protein expression in human versus canine cardiomyocytes. IK1 and IKs inhibition increased the APD-prolonging effect of IKr block more in dog (by 56% and 49%, respectively) than human (34 and 16%), indicating that both currents contribute to increased repolarization reserve in the dog. A mathematical model incorporating observed human–canine ion current differences confirmed the role of IK1 and IKs in repolarization reserve differences. Thus, humans show greater repolarization-delaying effects of IKr block than dogs, because of lower repolarization reserve contributions from IK1 and IKs, emphasizing species-specific determinants of repolarization and the limitations of animal models for human disease. PMID:23878377

  11. Problems and Limitations in Studies on Screening for Language Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Marten; Westerlund, Monica; Miniscalco, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses six common methodological limitations in screening for language delay (LD) as illustrated in 11 recent studies. The limitations are (1) whether the studies define a target population, (2) whether the recruitment procedure is unbiased, (3) attrition, (4) verification bias, (5) small sample size and (6) inconsistencies in choice…

  12. Animal models of human colorectal cancer: Current status, uses and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vijay K; Bhullar, Jasneet Singh; Jayant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To make orthotopic colon cancer murine models a more clearly understood subject. The orthotopic tumor models have been found to be more relevant in replicating the human disease process as compared to heterotopic models, many techniques for making orthotopic colorectal murine models have been reported. METHODS: We evaluated the current literature for various reported orthotopic colon cancer models to understand their techniques, advantages and limitations. An extensive literature review was performed by searching the National Library of Medicine Database (PubMed) using MeSH terms animal model; colon cancer; orthotopic model; murine model. Twenty studies related to colon cancer orthotopic xenograft model were evaluated in detail and discussed here. RESULTS: The detailed analysis of all relevant reports on orthotopic model showed tumor take rate between 42%-100%. While models using the enema technique and minimally invasive technique have reported development of tumor from mucosa with tumor take rate between 87%-100% with metastasis in 76%-90%. CONCLUSION: Over the years, the increased understanding of the murine models of human colon cancer has resulted in the development of various models. Each reported model has some limitations. These latest models have opened up new doors for continuing cancer research for not only understanding the colon cancer pathogenesis but also aid in the development of newer chemotherapeutic drugs as they mimic the human disease closely. PMID:26557009

  13. Safe human exposure limits for airborne linear siloxanes during spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    García, Hector D.; McMullin, Tami S.; Tobin, Joseph M.; James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low molecular weight siloxanes are used in industrial processes and consumer products, and their vapors have been detected in the atmospheres of the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for siloxane vapors to protect astronaut health. Since publication of these original SMACs, new studies and new risk assessment approaches have been published that warrant re-examination of the SMACs. Objective To reevaluate SMACs published for octamethyltrisiloxane (L3) for exposures ranging from 1 hour to 180 days, to develop a 1000-day SMAC, and to expand the applicability of those values to the family of linear siloxanes. Methods A literature review was conducted to identify studies conducted since the SMACs for L3 were set in 1994. The updated data were reviewed to determine the sensitive toxicity endpoints, and current risk assessment approaches and methods for dosimetric adjustments were evaluated. Results Recent data were used to update the original 1-hour, 24-hour, 30-day, and 180-day SMACs for L3, and a 1000-day SMAC was developed to protect crewmembers during future exploration beyond Earth orbit. Group SMACs for the linear siloxane family, including hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), L3, decamethyltetrasiloxane (L4), and dodecamethylpentasiloxane (L5), were set for exposures of 1-hour to 1000 days. Conclusion New SMACs, based on acute pulmonary and neurotoxicity at high doses only achievable with L2 and potential liver effects following longer-term exposures to L2 and L3, were established to protect crewmembers from the adverse effects of exposure to linear siloxanes. PMID:24255951

  14. Utility, Limitations, and Future of Non-Human Primates for Dengue Research and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; White, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is considered the most important emerging, human arboviruses, with worldwide distribution in the tropics. Unfortunately, there are no licensed dengue vaccines available or specific anti-viral drugs. The development of a dengue vaccine faces unique challenges. The four serotypes co-circulate in endemic areas, and pre-existing immunity to one serotype does not protect against infection with other serotypes, and actually may enhance severity of disease. One foremost constraint to test the efficacy of a dengue vaccine is the lack of an animal model that adequately recapitulates the clinical manifestations of a dengue infection in humans. In spite of this limitation, non-human primates (NHP) are considered the best available animal model to evaluate dengue vaccine candidates due to their genetic relatedness to humans and their ability to develop a viremia upon infection and a robust immune response similar to that in humans. Therefore, most dengue vaccines candidates are tested in primates before going into clinical trials. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of published studies on dengue vaccine evaluations using the NHP model, and discuss critical parameters affecting the usefulness of the model. In the light of recent clinical data, we assess the ability of the NHP model to predict immunological parameters of vaccine performances in humans and discuss parameters that should be further examined as potential correlates of protection. Finally, we propose some guidelines toward a more standardized use of the model to maximize its usefulness and to better compare the performance of vaccine candidates from different research groups. PMID:25309540

  15. Utility, limitations, and future of non-human primates for dengue research and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sariol, Carlos A; White, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is considered the most important emerging, human arboviruses, with worldwide distribution in the tropics. Unfortunately, there are no licensed dengue vaccines available or specific anti-viral drugs. The development of a dengue vaccine faces unique challenges. The four serotypes co-circulate in endemic areas, and pre-existing immunity to one serotype does not protect against infection with other serotypes, and actually may enhance severity of disease. One foremost constraint to test the efficacy of a dengue vaccine is the lack of an animal model that adequately recapitulates the clinical manifestations of a dengue infection in humans. In spite of this limitation, non-human primates (NHP) are considered the best available animal model to evaluate dengue vaccine candidates due to their genetic relatedness to humans and their ability to develop a viremia upon infection and a robust immune response similar to that in humans. Therefore, most dengue vaccines candidates are tested in primates before going into clinical trials. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of published studies on dengue vaccine evaluations using the NHP model, and discuss critical parameters affecting the usefulness of the model. In the light of recent clinical data, we assess the ability of the NHP model to predict immunological parameters of vaccine performances in humans and discuss parameters that should be further examined as potential correlates of protection. Finally, we propose some guidelines toward a more standardized use of the model to maximize its usefulness and to better compare the performance of vaccine candidates from different research groups. PMID:25309540

  16. Humanities and the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Thomas F., Ed.

    Writers representing diverse backgrounds and professional interests have contributed essays to this collection on the relationship between these two disciplines. Contributors were asked to sketch areas in the humanities which might be used in the social studies, and to discuss how the ideas, attitudes, philosophies, and information might be…

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model.

    PubMed

    Godin, Stephen J; DeVito, Michael J; Hughes, Michael F; Ross, David G; Scollon, Edward J; Starr, James M; Setzer, R Woodrow; Conolly, Rory B; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio

    2010-06-01

    Mirfazaelian et al. developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal (GI) tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump deltamethrin out of the intestinal enterocytes into the GI tract lumen, resulting in minimal net absorption at low concentrations and increasing absorption at higher concentrations. In the present study, the dose dependency in absorption of deltamethrin was examined in male Long Evans rats using po exposures predicted by the Mirfazaelian model to yield different po bioavailability values. No difference in the bioavailability from single po doses of 0.3 and 3.0 mg/kg deltamethrin was observed. Based on this finding, the Mirfazaelian PBPK model was modified to exclude a saturable absorption process. Other changes to the Mirfazaelian model included describing all tissue compartments with diffusion-limited kinetics and a single blood compartment. These changes improved model predictions of deltamethrin tissue concentration data from the present study and the literature. The rat model was then scaled to humans. The model predicted a twofold greater peak deltamethrin brain concentration and threefold greater area under the curve (AUC(0-48 h)) for humans following an po exposure of 1 mg/kg. Based on this model, humans would have greater distribution of deltamethrin to the brain for the same administered po dose compared to rats. The relative sensitivity to deltamethrin between rats and humans depends on both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences. Species differences in the pharmacodynamic responses to deltamethrin between rats and humans remain uncharacterized. PMID:20200215

  18. Effect of intestinal glucuronidation in limiting hepatic exposure and bioactivation of raloxifene in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Dalvie, Deepak; Kang, Ping; Zientek, Michael; Xiang, Cathie; Zhou, Sue; Obach, R Scott

    2008-12-01

    Raloxifene (Evista) is a second generation selective estrogen receptor modulator used in the treatment of osteoporosis and for chemoprevention of breast cancer. It is bioactivated to reactive intermediates, which covalently bind to proteins and form GSH conjugates upon incubation with NADPH and GSH-supplemented human and rat liver microsomes. Despite these in vitro findings, no major raloxifene-related toxic events have been reported upon its oral administration to humans. This disconnect between safety of raloxifene and its in vitro bioactivation is attributed to its presystemic metabolism via glucuronidation. Current studies investigated the effect of hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation in modulating hepatic availability of raloxifene and its subsequent bioactivation, in vitro. The study design involved preincubation of raloxifene with intestinal microsomes followed by a sequential incubation with liver microsomes. The degree of bioactivation of raloxifene was assessed from the percentage of GSH conjugate formed in liver microsomal incubations or the amount of covalent binding of raloxifene-related material to liver microsomal proteins. The results indicated that human intestinal glucuronidation limited the hepatic exposure of raloxifene that underwent bioactivation in the liver. Similar experiments with rat microsomal preparations showed very little effect of intestinal glucuronidation. This effect of intestinal glucuronidation and the observed species difference were explained by comparing the efficiency (Cl(int)) of glucuronidation and oxidation in the two species. These findings suggested that even though the rate of bioactivation in the two species was similar, the Cl(int) of glucuronidation was 7.5-fold higher in the human intestine as compared to rats. These results support the hypothesis that intestinal glucuronidation modulates the amount of raloxifene undergoing bioactivation by liver and corroborate the importance of assessing other competitive metabolic pathways and species differences in metabolism prior to extrapolation of bioactivation results from rats to humans. PMID:19548350

  19. Limitations to the study of man in space in the U.S. space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Greenisen, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Research on humans conducted during spaceflight is fraught both with great opportunities and great obstacles. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the limitations to research in space in the United States with hope that an informed scientific community may lead to more rapid and efficient solution of these problems. Limitations arise because opportunities to study the same astronauts in well-controlled situations on repeated spaceflights are practically non-existent. Human research opportunities are further limited by the necessity of avoiding simultaneous mutually-interfering experiments. Environmental factors, including diet and other physiological perturbations concomitant with spaceflight, also complicate research design and interpretation. Technical limitations to research methods and opportunities further restrict the development of the knowledge base. Finally, Earth analogues of space travel all suffer from inadequacies. Though all of these obstacles will eventually be overcome, creativity, diligence, and persistence are required to further our knowledge of humans in space.

  20. Limitations to the study of man in the United States space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Greenisen, Mike

    1992-01-01

    Research on humans conducted during space flight is fraught both with great opportunities and great obstacles. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the limitations to United States research in space in the hope that an informed scientific community may lead to more rapid and efficient solution of these problems. Limitations arise because opportunities to study the same astronauts in well-controlled situations on repeated space flights are practically non-existent. Human research opportunities are further limited by the necessity of avoiding simultaneous mutually-interfereing experiments. Environmental factors including diet and other physiological perturbations concomitant with space flight also complicates research design and interpretation. Technical limitations to research methods and opportunities further restrict the development of the knowledge base. Finally, earth analogues of space travel all suffer from inadequacies. Though all of these obstacles will eventually be overcome; creativity, diligence, and persistence are required to further our knowledge of humans in space.

  1. Improvements and Limitations of Humanized Mouse Models for HIV Research: NIH/NIAID "Meet the Experts" 2015 Workshop Summary.

    PubMed

    Akkina, Ramesh; Allam, Atef; Balazs, Alejandro B; Blankson, Joel N; Burnett, John C; Casares, Sofia; Garcia, J Victor; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Kashanchi, Fatah; Kitchen, Scott G; Klein, Florian; Kumar, Priti; Luster, Andrew D; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Rao, Mangala; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Shultz, Leonard D; Zack, Jerome A

    2016-02-01

    The number of humanized mouse models for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other infectious diseases has expanded rapidly over the past 8 years. Highly immunodeficient mouse strains, such as NOD/SCID/gamma chain(null) (NSG, NOG), support better human hematopoietic cell engraftment. Another improvement is the derivation of highly immunodeficient mice, transgenic with human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and cytokines that supported development of HLA-restricted human T cells and heightened human myeloid cell engraftment. Humanized mice are also used to study the HIV reservoir using new imaging techniques. Despite these advances, there are still limitations in HIV immune responses and deficits in lymphoid structures in these models in addition to xenogeneic graft-versus-host responses. To understand and disseminate the improvements and limitations of humanized mouse models to the scientific community, the NIH sponsored and convened a meeting on April 15, 2015 to discuss the state of knowledge concerning these questions and best practices for selecting a humanized mouse model for a particular scientific investigation. This report summarizes the findings of the NIH meeting. PMID:26670361

  2. Measuring human locomotor control using EMG and EEG: Current knowledge, limitations and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Enders, Hendrik; Nigg, Benno M

    2016-06-01

    Electrical signals encoding different forms of information can be observed at multiple levels of the human nervous system. Typically, these signals have been recorded in a rather isolated fashion with little overlap between the static recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) commonly used in neuroscience and the typical surface electromyography (EMG) recordings used in biomechanics. However, within the last decade, there has been an emerging need to link the electrical activation patterns of brain areas during movement to the behavior of the musculoskeletal system. This review discusses some of the most recent studies using the EEG and/or EMG to study the neural control of movement and human locomotion as well as studies quantifying the connectivity between brain and muscles. The focus is on rhythmic locomotor-type activities; however, results are discussed within the framework of initial work that has been done in upper and lower limbs during static and dynamic contractions. Limitations and current challenges as well as the possibility and functional interpretation of studying the connectivity between the cortex and skeletal muscles using a measure of coherence are discussed. The manuscript is geared toward scientists interested in the application of EEG in the field of locomotion, sports and exercise. PMID:26238032

  3. Uses and limits of empirical data in measuring and modeling human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mushak, P

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the uses and limits of empirical data in evaluating measurement and modeling approaches to human lead exposure. Empirical data from experiment or observation or both have been used in studies of lead exposure. For example, experimental studies have elucidated and quantified physiologic or biokinetic parameters of lead exposure under controlled conditions. Observation, i.e., epidemiology, has been widely applied to study population exposures to lead. There is growing interest in the use of lead exposure prediction models and their evaluation before use in risk assessment. Empirical studies of lead exposure must be fully understood, especially their limits, before they are applied as "standards" or reference information for evaluation of exposure models, especially the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's lead biokinetic model that is a focus of this article. Empirical and modeled datasets for lead exposure may not agree due to a) problems with the observational data or b) problems with the model; caution should be exercised before either a model or observational data are rejected. There are at least three sources of discordance in cases where there is lack of agreement: a) empirical data are accurate but the model is flawed; b) the model is valid but reference empirical data are inaccurate; or c) neither empirical data nor model is accurate, and each is inaccurate in different ways. This paper evaluates some of the critical empirical input to biokinetic models, especially lead bioavailability. Images Figure 3 PMID:9860906

  4. Limited By Cost: The Case Against Humans In The Scientific Exploration Of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew J.

    2001-11-01

    Human space flight represents a heady mix of bravery and drama which can be inspirational to nations and to humankind but at huge economic cost. Due to the current high launch costs only a handful of people have ventured beyond low Earth orbit and walked on the Moon, propelled by aspirations related more to the Cold War than to science. Problems with reusable launch vehicle development mean that severe launch cost limitations will exist for some time. Meanwhile, cheaper robotic probes have visited all the planets except Pluto, flown by comets, landed on Mars, Venus and an asteroid, have probed Jupiter's atmosphere and studied the Universe beyond our own solar system with telescopes. Using these data we are determining mankind's place in the Universe. Public interest in the historic Eros landing eclipsed a simultaneous space walk at the fledgling International Space Station and the Mars Pathfinder landing generated hundreds of millions of website hits in a few days. Given the fact that hundreds of Mars missions could be flown for the still-escalating cost of the International Space Station, the unsuitability of human bodies for deep space exploration, and the advances in 3-d and virtual reality techniques, we discuss whether human exploration needs a place in a realistic, useful and inspirational space programme.

  5. Deliberate Microbial Infection Research Reveals Limitations to Current Safety Protections of Healthy Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Evers, David L; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T; Mimnall, Rebecca K

    2015-08-01

    Here we identify approximately 40,000 healthy human volunteers who were intentionally exposed to infectious pathogens in clinical research studies dating from late World War II to the early 2000s. Microbial challenge experiments continue today under contemporary human subject research requirements. In fact, we estimated 4,000 additional volunteers who were experimentally infected between 2010 and the present day. We examine the risks and benefits of these experiments and present areas for improvement in protections of participants with respect to safety. These are the absence of maximum limits to risk and the potential for institutional review boards to include questionable benefits to subjects and society when weighing the risks and benefits of research protocols. The lack of a duty of medical care by physician-investigators to research subjects is likewise of concern. The transparency of microbial challenge experiments and the safety concerns raised in this work may stimulate further dialogue on the risks to participants of human experimentation. PMID:25150847

  6. Limitations to Thermoregulation and Acclimatization Challenge Human Adaptation to Global Warming.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Elizabeth G; Tait, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Human thermoregulation and acclimatization are core components of the human coping mechanism for withstanding variations in environmental heat exposure. Amidst growing recognition that curtailing global warming to less than two degrees is becoming increasing improbable, human survival will require increasing reliance on these mechanisms. The projected several fold increase in extreme heat events suggests we need to recalibrate health protection policies and ratchet up adaptation efforts. Climate researchers, epidemiologists, and policy makers engaged in climate change adaptation and health protection are not commonly drawn from heat physiology backgrounds. Injecting a scholarly consideration of physiological limitations to human heat tolerance into the adaptation and policy literature allows for a broader understanding of heat health risks to support effective human adaptation and adaptation planning. This paper details the physiological and external environmental factors that determine human thermoregulation and acclimatization. We present a model to illustrate the interrelationship between elements that modulate the physiological process of thermoregulation. Limitations inherent in these processes, and the constraints imposed by differing exposure levels, and thermal comfort seeking on achieving acclimatization, are then described. Combined, these limitations will restrict the likely contribution that acclimatization can play in future human adaptation to global warming. We postulate that behavioral and technological adaptations will need to become the dominant means for human individual and societal adaptations as global warming progresses. PMID:26184272

  7. Limitations to Thermoregulation and Acclimatization Challenge Human Adaptation to Global Warming

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Elizabeth G.; Tait, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Human thermoregulation and acclimatization are core components of the human coping mechanism for withstanding variations in environmental heat exposure. Amidst growing recognition that curtailing global warming to less than two degrees is becoming increasing improbable, human survival will require increasing reliance on these mechanisms. The projected several fold increase in extreme heat events suggests we need to recalibrate health protection policies and ratchet up adaptation efforts. Climate researchers, epidemiologists, and policy makers engaged in climate change adaptation and health protection are not commonly drawn from heat physiology backgrounds. Injecting a scholarly consideration of physiological limitations to human heat tolerance into the adaptation and policy literature allows for a broader understanding of heat health risks to support effective human adaptation and adaptation planning. This paper details the physiological and external environmental factors that determine human thermoregulation and acclimatization. We present a model to illustrate the interrelationship between elements that modulate the physiological process of thermoregulation. Limitations inherent in these processes, and the constraints imposed by differing exposure levels, and thermal comfort seeking on achieving acclimatization, are then described. Combined, these limitations will restrict the likely contribution that acclimatization can play in future human adaptation to global warming. We postulate that behavioral and technological adaptations will need to become the dominant means for human individual and societal adaptations as global warming progresses. PMID:26184272

  8. MDI Biological Laboratory Arsenic Summit: Approaches to Limiting Human Exposure to Arsenic.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A; Caldwell, Kathleen; Congdon, Clare Bates; Disney, Jane; Donahue, Maria; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Flemings, Elsie; Golden, Meredith; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Highman, Jay; James, Karen; Kim, Carol; Lantz, R Clark; Marvinney, Robert G; Mayer, Greg; Miller, David; Navas-Acien, Ana; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Postema, Sonia; Rardin, Laurie; Rosen, Barry; SenGupta, Arup; Shaw, Joseph; Stanton, Elizabeth; Susca, Paul

    2015-09-01

    This report is the outcome of the meeting "Environmental and Human Health Consequences of Arsenic" held at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine, August 13-15, 2014. Human exposure to arsenic represents a significant health problem worldwide that requires immediate attention according to the World Health Organization (WHO). One billion people are exposed to arsenic in food, and more than 200 million people ingest arsenic via drinking water at concentrations greater than international standards. Although the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a limit of 10 μg/L in public water supplies and the WHO has recommended an upper limit of 10 μg/L, recent studies indicate that these limits are not protective enough. In addition, there are currently few standards for arsenic in food. Those who participated in the Summit support citizens, scientists, policymakers, industry, and educators at the local, state, national, and international levels to (1) establish science-based evidence for setting standards at the local, state, national, and global levels for arsenic in water and food; (2) work with government agencies to set regulations for arsenic in water and food, to establish and strengthen non-regulatory programs, and to strengthen collaboration among government agencies, NGOs, academia, the private sector, industry, and others; (3) develop novel and cost-effective technologies for identification and reduction of exposure to arsenic in water; (4) develop novel and cost-effective approaches to reduce arsenic exposure in juice, rice, and other relevant foods; and (5) develop an Arsenic Education Plan to guide the development of science curricula as well as community outreach and education programs that serve to inform students and consumers about arsenic exposure and engage them in well water testing and development of remediation strategies. PMID:26231509

  9. Patterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disaster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters pose serious threats to large urban areas, therefore understanding and predicting human movements is critical for evaluating a population's vulnerability and resilience and developing plans for disaster evacuation, response and relief. However, only limited research has been conducted into the effect of natural disasters on human mobility. This study examines how natural disasters influence human mobility patterns in urban populations using individuals' movement data collected from Twitter. We selected fifteen destructive cases across five types of natural disaster and analyzed the human movement data before, during, and after each event, comparing the perturbed and steady state movement data. The results suggest that the power-law can describe human mobility in most cases and that human mobility patterns observed in steady states are often correlated with those in perturbed states, highlighting their inherent resilience. However, the quantitative analysis shows that this resilience has its limits and can fail in more powerful natural disasters. The findings from this study will deepen our understanding of the interaction between urban dwellers and civil infrastructure, improve our ability to predict human movement patterns during natural disasters, and facilitate contingency planning by policymakers. PMID:26820404

  10. Patterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters pose serious threats to large urban areas, therefore understanding and predicting human movements is critical for evaluating a population’s vulnerability and resilience and developing plans for disaster evacuation, response and relief. However, only limited research has been conducted into the effect of natural disasters on human mobility. This study examines how natural disasters influence human mobility patterns in urban populations using individuals’ movement data collected from Twitter. We selected fifteen destructive cases across five types of natural disaster and analyzed the human movement data before, during, and after each event, comparing the perturbed and steady state movement data. The results suggest that the power-law can describe human mobility in most cases and that human mobility patterns observed in steady states are often correlated with those in perturbed states, highlighting their inherent resilience. However, the quantitative analysis shows that this resilience has its limits and can fail in more powerful natural disasters. The findings from this study will deepen our understanding of the interaction between urban dwellers and civil infrastructure, improve our ability to predict human movement patterns during natural disasters, and facilitate contingency planning by policymakers. PMID:26820404

  11. Population and prehistory II: Space-limited human populations in constant environments

    PubMed Central

    Puleston, Cedric O.; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    2010-01-01

    We present a population model to examine the forces that determined the quality and quantity of human life in early agricultural societies where cultivable area is limited. The model is driven by the non-linear and interdependent relationships between the age distribution of a population, its behavior and technology, and the nature of its environment. The common currency in the model is the production of food, on which age-specific rates of birth and death depend. There is a single nontrivial equilibrium population at which productivity balances caloric needs. One of the most powerful controls on equilibrium hunger level is fertility control. Gains against hunger are accompanied by decreases in population size. Increasing worker productivity does increase equilibrium population size but does not improve welfare at equilibrium. As a case study we apply the model to the population of a Polynesian valley before European contact. PMID:18598711

  12. Using diagnostic radiology in human evolutionary studies

    PubMed Central

    SPOOR, FRED; JEFFERY, NATHAN; ZONNEVELD, FRANS

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of medical imaging and associated computer graphics techniques to the study of human evolutionary history, with an emphasis on basic concepts and on the advantages and limitations of each method. Following a short discussion of plain film radiography and pluridirectional tomography, the principles of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their role in the investigation of extant and fossil morphology are considered in more detail. The second half of the paper deals with techniques of 3-dimensional visualisation based on CT and MRI and with quantitative analysis of digital images. PMID:10999271

  13. A study of fundamental limitations of small antennas: MIMO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattigiri, S.; Warty, C.

    In this area of high performance systems and sophistication, the antenna size is shrinking drastically. This paper reviews the fundamental limitations in electrically instigated small antennas and their implications on multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. An optimum performance of the antenna can be obtained by considering three main factors. (1) maximum gain for given frequency (2) minimum Q factor (3) maximum ratio of G/Q. It is essential to understand the basic concepts of these small antennas to counter the limitations for next generational systems. In this paper works of three prominent scientists like Wheeler, Hansen and Chu have been studied to understand these limitations. This study can be further expanded to accumulate various space time diverse MIMO systems specified in long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) standards. The impact of limitations of small antennas can be very significant on the performance of the given node.

  14. A limited assessment of the ASEP human reliability analysis procedure using simulator examination results

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, B.R.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.; Mitts, T.M.; Nicholson, W.L.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents a limited assessment of the conservatism of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) human reliability analysis (HRA) procedure described in NUREG/CR-4772. In particular, the, ASEP post-accident, post-diagnosis, nominal HRA procedure is assessed within the context of an individual`s performance of critical tasks on the simulator portion of requalification examinations administered to nuclear power plant operators. An assessment of the degree to which operator perforn:Lance during simulator examinations is an accurate reflection of operator performance during actual accident conditions was outside the scope of work for this project; therefore, no direct inference can be made from this report about such performance. The data for this study are derived from simulator examination reports from the NRC requalification examination cycle. A total of 4071 critical tasks were identified, of which 45 had been failed. The ASEP procedure was used to estimate human error probability (HEP) values for critical tasks, and the HEP results were compared with the failure rates observed in the examinations. The ASEP procedure was applied by PNL operator license examiners who supplemented the limited information in the examination reports with expert judgment based upon their extensive simulator examination experience. ASEP analyses were performed for a sample of 162 critical tasks selected randomly from the 4071, and the results were used to characterize the entire population. ASEP analyses were also performed for all of the 45 failed critical tasks. Two tests were performed to assess the bias of the ASEP HEPs compared with the data from the requalification examinations. The first compared the average of the ASEP HEP values with the fraction of the population actually failed and it found a statistically significant factor of two bias on the average.

  15. Problems and limitations in studies on screening for language delay.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mårten; Westerlund, Monica; Miniscalco, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses six common methodological limitations in screening for language delay (LD) as illustrated in 11 recent studies. The limitations are (1) whether the studies define a target population, (2) whether the recruitment procedure is unbiased, (3) attrition, (4) verification bias, (5) small sample size and (6) inconsistencies in choice of "gold standard". It is suggested that failures to specify a target population, high attrition (both at screening and in succeeding validation), small sample sizes and verification bias in validations are often caused by a misguided focus on screen positives (SPs). Other limitations are results of conflicting methodological goals. We identified three such conflicts. One consists of a dilemma between unbiased recruitment and attrition, another between the comprehensiveness of the applied gold standard and sample size in validation and the third between the specificity of the gold standard and the risk of not identifying co-morbid conditions. PMID:20483561

  16. Human-caused fires limit convection in tropical Africa: First temporal observations and attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, M. G.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    It is well established that smoke particles modify clouds, which in turn affects climate. However, no study has quantified the temporal dynamics of aerosol-cloud interactions with direct observations. Here for the first time, we use temporally offset satellite observations from northern Africa between 2006 and 2010 to quantitatively measure the effect of fire aerosols on convective cloud dynamics. We attribute a reduction in cloud fraction during periods of high aerosol optical depths to a smoke-driven inhibition of convection. We find that higher smoke burdens limit upward vertical motion, increase surface pressure, and increase low-level divergence—meteorological indicators of convective suppression. These results are corroborated by climate simulations that show a smoke-driven increase in regionally averaged shortwave tropospheric heating and decrease in convective precipitation during the fire season. Our results suggest that in tropical regions, anthropogenic fire initiates a positive feedback loop where increased aerosol emissions limit convection, dry the surface, and enable increased fire activity via human ignition.

  17. Human responses to unfairness with primary rewards and their biological limits.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicholas D; Hodgson, Karen; Fleming, Stephen M; Symmonds, Mkael; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Dolan, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Humans bargaining over money tend to reject unfair offers, whilst chimpanzees bargaining over primary rewards of food do not show this same motivation to reject. Whether such reciprocal fairness represents a predominantly human motivation has generated considerable recent interest. We induced either moderate or severe thirst in humans using intravenous saline, and examined responses to unfairness in an Ultimatum Game with water. We ask if humans also reject unfair offers for primary rewards. Despite the induction of even severe thirst, our subjects rejected unfair offers. Further, our data provide tentative evidence that this fairness motivation was traded-off against the value of the primary reward to the individual, a trade-off determined by the subjective value of water rather than by an objective physiological metric of value. Our data demonstrate humans care about fairness during bargaining with primary rewards, but that subjective self-interest may limit this fairness motivation. PMID:22919460

  18. Studies of the limit order book around large price changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, B.; Kertész, J.; Farmer, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the limit order book of liquid stocks after experiencing large intra-day price changes. In the data we find large variations in several microscopical measures, e.g., the volatility the bid-ask spread, the bid-ask imbalance, the number of queuing limit orders, the activity (number and volume) of limit orders placed and canceled, etc. The relaxation of the quantities is generally very slow that can be described by a power law of exponent ≈ 0.4. We introduce a numerical model in order to understand the empirical results better. We find that with a zero intelligence deposition model of the order flow the empirical results can be reproduced qualitatively. This suggests that the slow relaxations might not be results of agents' strategic behaviour. Studying the difference between the exponents found empirically and numerically helps us to better identify the role of strategic behaviour in the phenomena. in here

  19. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G.

    2012-12-21

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  20. Simulations to study the static polarization limit for RHIC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Duan; Qing, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A study of spin dynamics based on simulations with the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC) is reported, exploring the dependence of the static polarization limit on various beam parameters and lattice settings for a practical RHIC lattice. It is shown that the behavior of the static polarization limit is dominantly affected by the vertical motion, while the effect of beam-beam interaction is small. In addition, the “nonresonant beam polarization” observed and studied in the lattice-independent model is also observed in this lattice-dependent model. Therefore, this simulation study gives insights of polarization evolution at fixed beam energies, that are not available in simple spin tracking. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-98CH10886), Hundred-Talent Program (Chinese Academy of Sciences), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105164)

  1. Experimental study on the velocity limits of magnetized rotating plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Catalin; Clary, Ryan; Ellis, Richard; Hassam, Adil; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    An experimental study on the physical limits of the rotation velocity of magnetized plasmas is presented. A comprehensive campaign has been carried out on the MCX, a mirror magnetic field plasma rotating azimuthally, to ascertain what physical effects limit attempts to externally boost the velocity. The externally applied parameters that control the plasma characteristics -- applied voltage, external magnetic field and fill pressure -- are scanned across the entire available range of values. It is found that the plasma rotation velocity does not exceed the Alfven velocity, in complete agreement with the equilibrium requirements of magnetically confined plasmas. As the velocity approaches the average Alfven speed, further applied force does not result in an increase past this critical speed. Diamagnetic loop measurements show that the diamagnetically excluded flux increases as the square of the Alfven Mach number, as predicted by equilibrium MHD theory. Measured rotation velocities are also found to stay below the critical ionization velocity in hydrogen, a limit suggested by Alfven. However, an approach to a definite limit has not been proven yet largely because of voltage and magnetic field upper bounds dictated by the available experimental hardware.

  2. Humanized Mouse Model to Study Bacterial Infections Targeting the Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Melican, Keira; Aubey, Flore; Duménil, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes a severe, frequently fatal sepsis when it enters the human blood stream. Infection leads to extensive damage of the blood vessels resulting in vascular leak, the development of purpuric rashes and eventual tissue necrosis. Studying the pathogenesis of this infection was previously limited by the human specificity of the bacteria, which makes in vivo models difficult. In this protocol, we describe a humanized model for this infection in which human skin, containing dermal microvessels, is grafted onto immunocompromised mice. These vessels anastomose with the mouse circulation while maintaining their human characteristics. Once introduced into this model, N. meningitidis adhere exclusively to the human vessels, resulting in extensive vascular damage, inflammation and in some cases the development of purpuric rash. This protocol describes the grafting, infection and evaluation steps of this model in the context of N. meningitidis infection. The technique may be applied to numerous human specific pathogens that infect the blood stream. PMID:24747976

  3. Mockups and human productivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, T.

    1985-01-01

    Idea outlines are presented concerning mockup candidates, mockup utilization and schedules/sequence in mockup development. Mockup candidates which aid in human productivity investigations and assessment are given. Areas which are considered in the mockups are the safe haven zone, general purpose workstations, maintenance and servicing area, sleep quaters, multiple docking adapter, airlock, hygiene station, food station, habitation zones, group gathering area and lab areas. Some aesthetic concerns in human productivity are also given.

  4. Rate limiting processes in the bohr shift in human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Forster, R. E.; Steen, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. The rates of the Bohr shift of human red cells and some of its constituent reactions have been studied with a modified Hartridge—Roughton rapid reaction apparatus using an oxygen electrode to measure the progress of the reaction. 2. The rate of the Bohr shift was compatible with the hypothesis that the transfer of H+ across the membrane by means of CO2 exchange and reaction with buffers is generally the rate-limiting step. (a) When the Bohr off-reaction was produced by a marked increase in PCO2 around the cells, the half-time at 37° C was 0·12 sec. In this case CO2 was available initially to diffuse into the cells, the process being predominantly limited by the rate of intracellular CO2 hydration. (b) When the Bohr off-shift was produced by an increase of [H+] outside the cell, PCO2 being low and equal within and outside the cells, the half time became 0·31 sec. In this case, even at the start, the H2CO3 formed by the almost instantaneous neutralization reaction of H+ and HCO3- had to dehydrate to form CO2 and this in turn had to diffuse into and react within the red cell before the [HbO2] could change. When a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor was added to slow the CO2 reaction inside the cell, the half-time rose to 10 sec. (c) The Bohr off-shift in a haemolysed cell suspension produced by an increase in PCO2 appeared to be limited by the rate at which the CO2 could hydrate to form H+. 3. The Bohr off-shift has an average Q10 of 2·5 between 42·5 and 28° C with an activation energy of 8000 cal. 4. The pronounced importance of the CO2-bicarbonate system for rapid intracellular pH changes is discussed in connexion with some physiological situations. PMID:5664232

  5. Scientific research and human rights: a response to Kitcher on the limitations of inquiry.

    PubMed

    Victor, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    In his recent work exploring the role of science in democratic societies Kitcher (Science in a democratic society. Prometheus Books, New York, 2011) claims that scientists ought to have a prominent role in setting the agenda for and limits to research. Against the backdrop of the claim that the proper limits of scientific inquiry is John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle (Kitcher in Science, truth, and democracy. Oxford University Press, New York, 2001), he identifies the limits of inquiry as the point where the outcomes of research could cause harm to already vulnerable populations. Nonetheless, Kitcher argues against explicit limitations on unscrupulous research on the grounds that restrictions would exacerbate underlying social problems. I show that Kitcher’s argument in favor of dissuading inquiry through conventional standards is problematic and falls prey to the same critique he offers in opposition to official bans. I expand the conversation of limiting scientific research by recognizing that the actions that count as ‘science’ are located in the space between ‘thinking’ and ‘doing’. In this space, we often attempt to balance freedom of research, as scientific speech, against the disparate impact citizens might experience in light of such research. I end by exploring if such disparate impact justifies limiting research, within the context of the United States, under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or under international human rights standards more generally. PMID:24235027

  6. Use of human tissue explants to study human infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The study of human cell–cell and cell–pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture is critical for deciphering the mechanisms of many normal and pathogenic processes. This protocol describes methods for culturing and infecting explants of human tissues to study the pathogenesis of human infectious agents and their local interactions. The protocol relies on the use of fresh human tissues dissected into small blocks or biopsies that are cultured at the liquid–air interface on collagen rafts. These tissue blocks retain their cytoarchitecture and support productive infection of various pathogens without exogenous stimulation. Experimental details for setting up cultures of human tonsils, lymph nodes and cervicovaginal and rectosigmoid tissues, including protocols for their infection with HIV-1 and other pathogens, are described here. Using this protocol, culture and infections can be set up in 3–6 h and be maintained for 2–3 weeks, depending on the tissue used. PMID:19197269

  7. Carbon and nitrogen limitation increase chitosan antifungal activity in Neurospora crassa and fungal human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Moya, Federico; Colom-Valiente, Maria F; Martinez-Peinado, Pascual; Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E; Puelles, Eduardo; Sempere-Ortells, Jose M; Lopez-Llorca, Luis V

    2015-03-01

    Chitosan permeabilizes plasma membrane and kills sensitive filamentous fungi and yeast. Membrane fluidity and cell energy determine chitosan sensitivity in fungi. A five-fold reduction of both glucose (main carbon (C) source) and nitrogen (N) increased 2-fold Neurospora crassa sensitivity to chitosan. We linked this increase with production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plasma membrane permeabilization. Releasing N. crassa from nutrient limitation reduced chitosan antifungal activity in spite of high ROS intracellular levels. With lactate instead of glucose, C and N limitation increased N. crassa sensitivity to chitosan further (4-fold) than what glucose did. Nutrient limitation also increased sensitivity of filamentous fungi and yeast human pathogens to chitosan. For Fusarium proliferatum, lowering 100-fold C and N content in the growth medium, increased 16-fold chitosan sensitivity. Similar results were found for Candida spp. (including fluconazole resistant strains) and Cryptococcus spp. Severe C and N limitation increased chitosan antifungal activity for all pathogens tested. Chitosan at 100 μg ml(-1) was lethal for most fungal human pathogens tested but non-toxic to HEK293 and COS7 mammalian cell lines. Besides, chitosan increased 90% survival of Galleria mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans. These results are of paramount for developing chitosan as antifungal. PMID:25749367

  8. Interpreting Disasters From Limited Data Availability: A Guatemalan Study Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto Gomez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Guatemala is located in a geographical area exposed to multiple natural hazards. Although Guatemalan populations live in hazardous conditions, limited scientific research is being focused in this particular geographical area. Thorough studies are needed to understand the disasters occurring in the country and consequently enable decision makers and professionals to plan future actions, yet available data is limited. Data comprised in the available data sources is limited by their timespan or the size of the events included and therefore is insufficient to provide the whole picture of the disasters in the country. This study proposes a methodology to use the available data within one of the most important catchments in the country, the Samala River basin, to look for answers to what kind of disasters occurs? Where such events happen? And, why do they happen? Three datasets from different source agencies -one global, one regional, and one local- have been analyzed numerically and spatially using spreadsheets, numerical computing software, and geographic information systems. Analyses results have been coupled in order to search for possible answers to the established questions. It has been found a relation between the compositions of data of two of the three datasets analyzed. The third has shown a very different composition probably because the inclusion criteria of the dataset exclude smaller but more frequent disasters in its records. In all the datasets the most frequent type of disasters are those caused by hydrometeorological hazards i.e. floods and landslides. It has been found a relation between the occurrences of disasters and the records of precipitation in the area, but this relation is not strong enough to affirm that the disasters are the direct result of rain in the area and further studies must be carried out to explore other potential causes. Analyzing the existing data contributes to identify what kind of data is needed and this would be useful to feedback systems towards a collection of higher quality data, an increase in the capacity of studying disasters and improved risk management systems.

  9. Humanized Mice to Study Human T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Sarah; Snauwaert, Sylvia; Vanhee, Stijn; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    While in vitro models exist to study human T cell development, they still lack the precise environmental stimuli, such as the exact combination and levels of cytokines and chemokines, that are present in vivo. Moreover, studying the homing of hematopoietic stem (HSC) and progenitor (HPC) cells to the thymus can only be done using in vivo models. Although species-specific differences exist, "humanized" models are generated to circumvent these issues. In this chapter, we focus on the humanized mouse models that can be used to study early T cell development. Models that study solely mature T cells, such as the SCID-PBL (Tary-Lehmann et al., Immunol Today 16:529-533) are therefore not discussed here, but have recently been reviewed (Shultz et al., Nat Rev Immunol 12:786-798). PMID:26294414

  10. Fundamental limits of optical critical dimension metrology: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Richard; Germer, Thomas; Attota, Ravikiran; Barnes, Bryan M.; Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Marx, Egon; Jun, Jay

    2007-03-01

    This paper is a comprehensive summary and analysis of a SEMATECH funded project to study the limits of optical critical dimension scatterometry (OCD). The project was focused on two primary elements: 1) the comparison, stability, and validity of industry models and 2) a comprehensive analysis of process stacks to evaluate the ultimate sensitivity and limits of OCD. Modeling methods are a requirement for the interpretation and quantitative analysis of scatterometry data. The four models evaluated show good agreement over a range of targets and geometries for zero order specular reflection as well as higher order diffraction. A number of process stacks and geometries representing semiconductor manufacturing nodes from the 45 nm node to the 18 nm node were simulated using several measurement modalities including angle-resolved scatterometry and spectrally-resolved scatterometry, measuring various combinations of intensity and polarization. It is apparent in the results that large differences are observed between those methods that rely upon unpolarized and single polarization measurements. Using the three parameter fits and assuming that the sensitivity of scatterometry must meet the criterion that the 3σ uncertainty in the bottom dimension must be less than 2% of the linewidth, specular scatterometry solutions exist for all but the isolated lines at 18 nm node. Scatterometry does not have sufficient sensitivity for isolated and semi-isolated lines at the 18 nm node unless the measurement uses wavelengths as short as 200 nm or 150 nm and scans over large angle ranges.

  11. Deviation of Zipf's and Heaps' Laws in Human Languages with Limited Dictionary Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Zipf's law on word frequency and Heaps' law on the growth of distinct words are observed in Indo-European language family, but it does not hold for languages like Chinese, Japanese and Korean. These languages consist of characters, and are of very limited dictionary sizes. Extensive experiments show that: (i) The character frequency distribution follows a power law with exponent close to one, at which the corresponding Zipf's exponent diverges. Indeed, the character frequency decays exponentially in the Zipf's plot. (ii) The number of distinct characters grows with the text length in three stages: It grows linearly in the beginning, then turns to a logarithmical form, and eventually saturates. A theoretical model for writing process is proposed, which embodies the rich-get-richer mechanism and the effects of limited dictionary size. Experiments, simulations and analytical solutions agree well with each other. This work refines the understanding about Zipf's and Heaps' laws in human language systems.

  12. Deviation of Zipf's and Heaps' Laws in human languages with limited dictionary sizes.

    PubMed

    L, Linyuan; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Zipf's law on word frequency and Heaps' law on the growth of distinct words are observed in Indo-European language family, but it does not hold for languages like Chinese, Japanese and Korean. These languages consist of characters, and are of very limited dictionary sizes. Extensive experiments show that: (i) The character frequency distribution follows a power law with exponent close to one, at which the corresponding Zipf's exponent diverges. Indeed, the character frequency decays exponentially in the Zipf's plot. (ii) The number of distinct characters grows with the text length in three stages: It grows linearly in the beginning, then turns to a logarithmical form, and eventually saturates. A theoretical model for writing process is proposed, which embodies the rich-get-richer mechanism and the effects of limited dictionary size. Experiments, simulations and analytical solutions agree well with each other. This work refines the understanding about Zipf's and Heaps' laws in human language systems. PMID:23378896

  13. Limits on efficient human mindreading: convergence across Chinese adults and Semai children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Hadi, Nur Shafiqah Abdul; Low, Jason

    2015-11-01

    We tested Apperly and Butterfill's (2009, Psychological Review, 116, 753) theory that humans have two mindreading systems whereby the efficient-system guiding anticipatory glances displays signature limits that do not apply to the flexible system guiding verbal predictions. Experiments 1 and 2 tested urban Mainland-Chinese adults (n = 64) and Experiment 3 tested Semai children living in the rainforests of Peninsular Malaysia (3- to 4-year-olds, n = 60). Participants - across different ages, groups and methods - anticipated others' false-beliefs about object-location but not object-identity. Convergence in signature limits signalled that the early-developing efficient system involved minimal theory-of-mind. Chinese adults and older Semai children showed flexibility in their direct predictions. The flexible mindreading system in ascribing others' beliefs as such was task-sensitive and implicated maturational and cultural contributions. PMID:25631400

  14. Limiting the impact of light pollution on human health, environment and stellar visibility.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Elvidge, Christopher D; Keith, David M; Haim, Abraham

    2011-10-01

    Light pollution is one of the most rapidly increasing types of environmental degradation. Its levels have been growing exponentially over the natural nocturnal lighting levels provided by starlight and moonlight. To limit this pollution several effective practices have been defined: the use of shielding on lighting fixture to prevent direct upward light, particularly at low angles above the horizon; no over lighting, i.e. avoid using higher lighting levels than strictly needed for the task, constraining illumination to the area where it is needed and the time it will be used. Nevertheless, even after the best control of the light distribution is reached and when the proper quantity of light is used, some upward light emission remains, due to reflections from the lit surfaces and atmospheric scatter. The environmental impact of this "residual light pollution", cannot be neglected and should be limited too. Here we propose a new way to limit the effects of this residual light pollution on wildlife, human health and stellar visibility. We performed analysis of the spectra of common types of lamps for external use, including the new LEDs. We evaluated their emissions relative to the spectral response functions of human eye photoreceptors, in the photopic, scotopic and the 'meltopic' melatonin suppressing bands. We found that the amount of pollution is strongly dependent on the spectral characteristics of the lamps, with the more environmentally friendly lamps being low pressure sodium, followed by high pressure sodium. Most polluting are the lamps with a strong blue emission, like Metal Halide and white LEDs. Migration from the now widely used sodium lamps to white lamps (MH and LEDs) would produce an increase of pollution in the scotopic and melatonin suppression bands of more than five times the present levels, supposing the same photopic installed flux. This increase will exacerbate known and possible unknown effects of light pollution on human health, environment and on visual perception of the Universe by humans. We present quantitative criteria to evaluate the lamps based on their spectral emissions and we suggest regulatory limits for future lighting. PMID:21745709

  15. Haplotype-based banking of human pluripotent stem cells for transplantation: potential and limitations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Villard, Jean

    2012-09-01

    High expectations surround the area of stem cells therapeutics. However, the cells' source-adult or embryonic-and the cells' origin-patient-derived autologous or healthy donor genetically unrelated-remain subjects of debate. Autologous origins have the advantage of a theoretical absence of immune rejection by the recipient. However, this approach has several limitations with regard to the disease of the recipient and to potential problems with the generation, expansion, and manipulation of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) preparation. An alternative to using autologous cells is the establishment of a bank of well-characterized adult cells that would be used to generate iPS cells and their derivatives. In the context of transplantation, such cells would come from genetically unrelated donors and the immune system of the recipient would reject the graft without immunosuppressive therapy. To minimize the risk of rejection, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is certainly the best option, and the establishment of an HLA-organized bank would mean having a limited number of stem cells that would be sufficient for a large number of recipients. The concept of haplobanking with HLA homozygous cell lines would also limit the number of HLA mismatches, but such an approach will not necessarily be less immunogenic in terms of selection criteria, because of the limited number of HLA-compatible loci and the level of HLA typing resolution. PMID:22559254

  16. Anxieties of communication: the limits of narrative in the medical humanities.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Claire Charlotte

    2014-12-01

    This paper aims to provide an initial response to Angela Woods's endeavour to '(re)ignite critical debates around this topic' in her recent essay 'The limits of narrative: provocations for the medical humanities' (Medical Humanities 2011). Woods's essay challenges the validity of the notion of the narrative self through her discussion and use of Galen Strawson's seminal 'Against narrativity' (2004). To some extent in dialogue with Woods, this article will examine three exploratory concepts connected with the topic. First, it will explore ways in which we might seek to re-place narrative at the centre of the philosophy of good medicine and medical practice by reassessing the role of the narratee in the narrative process. Second, it will reconsider the three alternative forms of expression Woods puts forward as non-narrative--metaphor, phenomenology and photography--as narrative. Finally, and connected to the first two areas of discussion, it will reflect on ways in which narrative might be used to interpret illness and suffering in medical humanities contexts. What I hope to show, in relation to Woods's work on this subject, is that in order to be interpreted (indeed interpretable) the types of non-narrative representation and communication she discusses in fact require a narrative response. We employ narratology to engage with illness experience because narrative is so fundamental to meaning-making that it is not just required, it is an inherent human response to creative outputs we encounter. This is a quite different approach to the question of narrativity in the medical humanities, and it is therefore related to, but not entirely hinged upon, the work that Woods has done, but it is intended to spark further discussion across the emergent discipline. PMID:24869471

  17. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  18. From Oxford to Hawaii Ecophysiological Barriers Limit Human Progression in Ten Sport Monuments

    PubMed Central

    Desgorces, François-Denis; Berthelot, Geoffroy; El Helou, Nour; Thibault, Valérie; Guillaume, Marion; Tafflet, Muriel; Hermine, Olivier; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants and trends of human performance evolution, we analyzed ten outdoor events among the oldest and most popular in sports history. Best performances of the Oxford-Cambridge boat race (since 1836), the channel crossing in swimming (1875), the hour cycling record (1893), the Elfstedentocht speed skating race (1909), the cross country ski Vasaloppet (1922), the speed ski record (1930), the Streif down-hill in Kitzbühel (1947), the eastward and westward sailing transatlantic records (1960) and the triathlon Hawaii ironman (1978) all follow a similar evolutive pattern, best described through a piecewise exponential decaying model (r2 = 0.95±0.07). The oldest events present highest progression curvature during their early phase. Performance asymptotic limits predicted from the model may be achieved in fourty years (2049±32 y). Prolonged progression may be anticipated in disciplines which further rely on technology such as sailing and cycling. Human progression in outdoor sports tends to asymptotic limits depending on physiological and environmental parameters and may temporarily benefit from further technological progresses. PMID:18985149

  19. Placing confidence limits on the molecular age of the human-chimpanzee divergence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Filipski, Alan; Swarna, Vinod; Walker, Alan; Hedges, S Blair

    2005-12-27

    Molecular clocks have been used to date the divergence of humans and chimpanzees for nearly four decades. Nonetheless, this date and its confidence interval remain to be firmly established. In an effort to generate a genomic view of the human-chimpanzee divergence, we have analyzed 167 nuclear protein-coding genes and built a reliable confidence interval around the calculated time by applying a multifactor bootstrap-resampling approach. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of neutral DNA substitutions show that the human-chimpanzee divergence is close to 20% of the ape-Old World monkey (OWM) divergence. Therefore, the generally accepted range of 23.8-35 millions of years ago for the ape-OWM divergence yields a range of 4.98-7.02 millions of years ago for human-chimpanzee divergence. Thus, the older time estimates for the human-chimpanzee divergence, from molecular and paleontological studies, are unlikely to be correct. For a given the ape-OWM divergence time, the 95% confidence interval of the human-chimpanzee divergence ranges from -12% to 19% of the estimated time. Computer simulations suggest that the 95% confidence intervals obtained by using a multifactor bootstrap-resampling approach contain the true value with >95% probability, whether deviations from the molecular clock are random or correlated among lineages. Analyses revealed that the use of amino acid sequence differences is not optimal for dating human-chimpanzee divergence and that the inclusion of additional genes is unlikely to narrow the confidence interval significantly. We conclude that tests of hypotheses about the timing of human-chimpanzee divergence demand more precise fossil-based calibrations. PMID:16365310

  20. Building local human resources to implement SLMTA with limited donor funding: The Ghana experience

    PubMed Central

    Nkrumah, Bernard; van der Puije, Beatrice; Bekoe, Veronica; Adukpo, Rowland; Kotey, Nii A.; Yao, Katy; Fonjungo, Peter N.; Luman, Elizabeth T.; Duh, Samuel; Njukeng, Patrick A.; Addo, Nii A.; Khan, Fazle N.; Woodfill, Celia J.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2009, Ghana adopted the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme in order to improve laboratory quality. The programme was implemented successfully with limited donor funding and local human resources. Objectives To demonstrate how Ghana, which received very limited PEPFAR funding, was able to achieve marked quality improvement using local human resources. Method Local partners led the SLMTA implementation and local mentors were embedded in each laboratory. An in-country training-of-trainers workshop was conducted in order to increase the pool of local SLMTA implementers. Three laboratory cohorts were enrolled in SLMTA in 2011, 2012 and 2013. Participants from each cohort attended in a series of three workshops interspersed with improvement projects and mentorship. Supplemental training on internal audit was provided. Baseline, exit and follow-up audits were conducted using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist. In November 2013, four laboratories underwent official SLIPTA audits by the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM). Results The local SLMTA team successfully implemented three cohorts of SLMTA in 15 laboratories. Seven out of the nine laboratories that underwent follow-up audits have reached at least one star. Three out of the four laboratories that underwent official ASLM audits were awarded four stars. Patient satisfaction increased from 25% to 70% and sample rejection rates decreased from 32% to 10%. On average, $40 000 was spent per laboratory to cover mentors' salaries, SLMTA training and improvement project support. Conclusion Building in-country capacity through local partners is a sustainable model for improving service quality in resource-constrained countries such as Ghana. Such models promote country ownership, capacity building and the use of local human resources for the expansion of SLMTA.

  1. Study of capabilities and limitations of 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemu, H. G.

    2012-04-01

    3D printing is one of the developments in rapid prototyping technology. The inception and development of the technology has highly assisted the product development phase of product design and manufacturing. The technology is particularly important in educating product design and 3D modeling because it helps students to visualize their design idea, to enhance their creative design process and enables them to touch and feel the result of their innovative work. The availability of many 3D printers on the market has created a certain level of challenge for the user. Among others, complexity of part geometry, material type, compatibility with 3D CAD models and other technical aspects still need in-depth study. This paper presents results of the experimental work on the capabilities and limitations of the Z510 3D printer from Z-corporation. Several parameters such as dimensional and geometrical accuracy, surface quality and strength as a function of model size, orientation and file exchange format are closely studied.

  2. Limitations of quantitative research in the study of structural adjustment.

    PubMed

    Lundy, P

    1996-02-01

    Sociologists and, more recently, critical medical anthropologists have been arguing for a refocusing of the analysis of health and health care towards a perspective which considers the broader global political economy. In the context of the debt crisis and IMF/World Bank-inspired structural adjustment policies, the political economy theoretical perspective is becoming even more relevant in the analysis of health underdevelopment in many 'Third World' countries. This study focuses on the direct and indirect effects of the Jamaican debt crisis and structural adjustment programmes on health care services and health standards. In this paper it is argued that there are methodological problems using quantitative data when studying the effects of structural adjustment. In addition to providing a limited account of the effects, it is argued that the basic problem is a matter of the availability and reliability of the quantitative data in many 'Third World' countries. It is argued that some of these problems could be overcome by the application of qualitative micro-level analysis. This type of methodology is important to ascertain the effects of global processes at the grass roots level and to gain insights into what those working in the health sector are experiencing and what they perceive as the effects, if any, of structural adjustment policies. This has often been missing from the impersonal accounts offered by quantitative research on the subject to date. PMID:8658227

  3. Virtual online consultations: advantages and limitations (VOCAL) study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Vijayaraghavan, Shanti; Wherton, Joe; Shaw, Sara; Byrne, Emma; Campbell-Richards, Desirée; Bhattacharya, Satya; Hanson, Philippa; Ramoutar, Seendy; Gutteridge, Charles; Hodkinson, Isabel; Collard, Anna; Morris, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Remote video consultations between clinician and patient are technically possible and increasingly acceptable. They are being introduced in some settings alongside (and occasionally replacing) face-to-face or telephone consultations. Methods To explore the advantages and limitations of video consultations, we will conduct in-depth qualitative studies of real consultations (microlevel) embedded in an organisational case study (mesolevel), taking account of national context (macrolevel). The study is based in 2 contrasting clinical settings (diabetes and cancer) in a National Health Service (NHS) acute trust in London, UK. Main data sources are: microlevel—audio, video and screen capture to produce rich multimodal data on 45 remote consultations; mesolevel—interviews, ethnographic observations and analysis of documents within the trust; macrolevel—key informant interviews of national-level stakeholders and document analysis. Data will be analysed and synthesised using a sociotechnical framework developed from structuration theory. Ethics approval City Road and Hampstead NHS Research Ethics Committee, 9 December 2014, reference 14/LO/1883. Planned outputs We plan outputs for 5 main audiences: (1) academics: research publications and conference presentations; (2) service providers: standard operating procedures, provisional operational guidance and key safety issues; (3) professional bodies and defence societies: summary of relevant findings to inform guidance to members; (4) policymakers: summary of key findings; (5) patients and carers: ‘what to expect in your virtual consultation’. Discussion The research literature on video consultations is sparse. Such consultations offer potential advantages to patients (who are spared the cost and inconvenience of travel) and the healthcare system (eg, they may be more cost-effective), but fears have been expressed that they may be clinically risky and/or less acceptable to patients or staff, and they bring significant technical, logistical and regulatory challenges. We anticipate that this study will contribute to a balanced assessment of when, how and in what circumstances this model might be introduced. PMID:26826147

  4. Potential and limitation of HLA-based banking of human pluripotent stem cells for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    de Rham, Casimir; Villard, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Great hopes have been placed on human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells for therapy. Tissues or organs derived from hPS cells could be the best solution to cure many different human diseases, especially those who do not respond to standard medication or drugs, such as neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure, or diabetes. The origin of hPS is critical and the idea of creating a bank of well-characterized hPS cells has emerged, like the one that already exists for cord blood. However, the main obstacle in transplantation is the rejection of tissues or organ by the receiver, due to the three main immunological barriers: the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the ABO blood group, and minor antigens. The problem could be circumvented by using autologous stem cells, like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from the patient. But iPS cells have limitations, especially regarding the disease of the recipient and possible difficulties to handle or prepare autologous iPS cells. Finally, reaching standards of good clinical or manufacturing practices could be challenging. That is why well-characterized and universal hPS cells could be a better solution. In this review, we will discuss the interest and the feasibility to establish hPS cells bank, as well as some economics and ethical issues. PMID:25126584

  5. Potential and Limitation of HLA-Based Banking of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Villard, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Great hopes have been placed on human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells for therapy. Tissues or organs derived from hPS cells could be the best solution to cure many different human diseases, especially those who do not respond to standard medication or drugs, such as neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure, or diabetes. The origin of hPS is critical and the idea of creating a bank of well-characterized hPS cells has emerged, like the one that already exists for cord blood. However, the main obstacle in transplantation is the rejection of tissues or organ by the receiver, due to the three main immunological barriers: the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), the ABO blood group, and minor antigens. The problem could be circumvented by using autologous stem cells, like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, derived directly from the patient. But iPS cells have limitations, especially regarding the disease of the recipient and possible difficulties to handle or prepare autologous iPS cells. Finally, reaching standards of good clinical or manufacturing practices could be challenging. That is why well-characterized and universal hPS cells could be a better solution. In this review, we will discuss the interest and the feasibility to establish hPS cells bank, as well as some economics and ethical issues. PMID:25126584

  6. Limits on perceptual encoding can be predicted from known receptive field properties of human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael A; Rhee, Juliana Y; Alvarez, George A

    2016-01-01

    Human cognition has a limited capacity that is often attributed to the brain having finite cognitive resources, but the nature of these resources is usually not specified. Here, we show evidence that perceptual interference between items can be predicted by known receptive field properties of the visual cortex, suggesting that competition within representational maps is an important source of the capacity limitations of visual processing. Across the visual hierarchy, receptive fields get larger and represent more complex, high-level features. Thus, when presented simultaneously, high-level items (e.g., faces) will often land within the same receptive fields, while low-level items (e.g., color patches) will often not. Using a perceptual task, we found long-range interference between high-level items, but only short-range interference for low-level items, with both types of interference being weaker across hemifields. Finally, we show that long-range interference between items appears to occur primarily during perceptual encoding and not during working memory maintenance. These results are naturally explained by the distribution of receptive fields and establish a link between perceptual capacity limits and the underlying neural architecture. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322687

  7. Technological advances for studying human behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1990-01-01

    Technological advances for studying human behavior are noted in viewgraph form. It is asserted that performance-aiding systems are proliferating without a fundamental understanding of how they would interact with the humans who must control them. Two views of automation research, the hardware view and the human-centered view, are listed. Other viewgraphs give information on vital elements for human-centered research, a continuum of the research process, available technologies, new technologies for persistent problems, a sample research infrastructure, the need for metrics, and examples of data-link technology.

  8. Real-Time Human Ambulation, Activity, and Physiological Monitoring: Taxonomy of Issues, Techniques, Applications, Challenges and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khusainov, Rinat; Azzi, Djamel; Achumba, Ifeyinwa E.; Bersch, Sebastian D.

    2013-01-01

    Automated methods of real-time, unobtrusive, human ambulation, activity, and wellness monitoring and data analysis using various algorithmic techniques have been subjects of intense research. The general aim is to devise effective means of addressing the demands of assisted living, rehabilitation, and clinical observation and assessment through sensor-based monitoring. The research studies have resulted in a large amount of literature. This paper presents a holistic articulation of the research studies and offers comprehensive insights along four main axes: distribution of existing studies; monitoring device framework and sensor types; data collection, processing and analysis; and applications, limitations and challenges. The aim is to present a systematic and most complete study of literature in the area in order to identify research gaps and prioritize future research directions. PMID:24072027

  9. Nitrogen limited biobarriers remove atrazine from contaminated water: laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William J; Shaner, Dale L

    2009-01-01

    Atrazine is one of the most frequently used herbicides. This usage coupled with its mobility and recalcitrant nature in deeper soils and aquifers makes it a frequently encountered groundwater contaminant. We formed biobarriers in sand filled columns by coating the sand with soybean oil; after which, we inoculated the barriers with a consortium of atrazine-degrading microorganisms and evaluated the ability of the barriers to remove atrazine from a simulated groundwater containing 1 mg L(-1) atrazine. The soybean oil provided a carbon rich and nitrogen poor substrate to the microbial consortium. Under these nitrogen-limiting conditions it was hypothesized that bacteria capable of using atrazine as a source of nitrogen would remove atrazine from the flowing water. Our hypothesis proved correct and the biobarriers were effective at removing atrazine when the nitrogen content of the influent water was low. Levels of atrazine in the biobarrier effluents declined with time and by the 24th week of the study no detectable atrazine was present (limit of detection<0.005 mg L(-1)). Larger amounts of atrazine were also removed by the biobarriers; when biobarriers were fed 16.3 mg L(-1) atrazine 97% was degraded. When nitrate (5 mg L(-1) N), an alternate source of nitrogen, was added to the influent water the atrazine removal efficiency of the barriers was reduced by almost 60%. This result supports the hypothesis that atrazine was degraded as a source of nitrogen. Poisoning of the biobarriers with mercury chloride resulted in an immediate and large increase in the amount of atrazine in the barrier effluents confirming that biological activity and not abiotic factors were responsible for most of the atrazine degradation. The presence of hydroxyatrazine in the barrier effluents indicated that dehalogenation was one of the pathways of atrazine degradation. Permeable barriers might be formed in-situ by the injection of innocuous vegetable oil emulsions into an aquifer or sandy soil and used to remove atrazine from a contaminated groundwater or to protect groundwater from an atrazine spill. PMID:18848368

  10. Multilocus Genotyping of Human Giardia Isolates Suggests Limited Zoonotic Transmission and Association between Assemblage B and Flatulence in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lebbad, Marianne; Petersson, Ingvor; Karlsson, Lillemor; Botero-Kleiven, Silvia; Andersson, Jan O.; Svenungsson, Bo; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Giardia intestinalis is one of the most common diarrhea-related parasites in humans, where infection ranges from asymptomatic to acute or chronic disease. G. intestinalis consists of eight genetically distinct genotypes or assemblages, designated A–H, and assemblages A and B can infect humans. Giardiasis has been classified as a possible zoonotic disease but the role of animals in human disease transmission still needs to be proven. We tried to link different assemblages and sub-assemblages of G. intestinalis isolates from Swedish human patients to clinical symptoms and zoonotic transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings Multilocus sequence-based genotyping of 207 human Giardia isolates using three gene loci: ß-giardin, glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), and triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) was combined with assemblage-specific tpi PCRs. This analysis identified 73 patients infected with assemblage A, 128 with assemblage B, and six with mixed assemblages A+B. Multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were easily determined for the assemblage A isolates, and most patients with this genotype had apparently been infected through anthroponotic transmission. However, we also found evidence of limited zoonotic transmission of Giardia in Sweden, since a few domestic human infections involved the same assemblage A MLGs previously reported in Swedish cats and ruminants. Assemblage B was detected more frequently than assemblage A and it was also more common in patients with suspected treatment failure. However, a large genetic variability made determination of assemblage B MLGs problematic. Correlation between symptoms and assemblages was found only for flatulence, which was significantly more common in children less than six years of age infected with assemblage B. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that certain assemblage A subtypes are potentially zoonotic and that flatulence is connected to assemblage B infections in young children. Determination of MLGs from assemblages A and B can be a valuable tool in outbreak situations and to help identify possible zoonotic transmission. PMID:21829745

  11. Limitations in the process of transcription and translation inhibit recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yi, Xiaoping; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2015-06-20

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone that exists as a heterodimer with a α subunit and β subunit assembled together with disulfide bridges. This hormone plays an important role in the detection of ovulation induction and in the treatment of certain diseases that cause female infertility. The effects of transcription, subunit expression, assembling and secretion on recombinant hCG expression in CHO cells were studied using stable high-producing and low-producing cell lines generated by the FLP-In™ system. The results indicated that the mRNA and polypeptide levels of the β subunit were always higher than those of the α subunit. Further study confirmed that the differences were caused by the transcription rate rather than by mRNA stability. In the high-producing cell lines, there was obvious transcription level limitation of the α subunit in contrast to the β subunit. In addition, there was obvious limitation of the synthetic steps from mRNA to polypeptide for both the α subunit and the β subunit, especially the β subunit. Significant limitations of the assembly and secretion levels were not observed in this research. This study presents a research methodology for double subunit protein expression and provides valuable evidence for the enhancement of recombinant hCG productivity. PMID:25529346

  12. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  13. Studies of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1991-07-15

    The three objectives of the program are: To isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; To develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of a variant in a child not present in either parent of the child (i.e., a mutation); and, To continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level. For administrative purposes, the program is subdivided into four sections, each under the direction of one of the four co-PIs; the progress during the past year will be summarized in accordance with this sectional structure. 1 tab.

  14. On the generality and limits of abstraction in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ralph R.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we address the question, central to cognition, of whether nonhuman animals such as rats are capable of extracting and extending information from a given learning situation to a new learning situation without generalizing through a physical dimension of the stimuli. This capacity underlies abstraction, which is a hallmark of human cognition and necessary for complex information processing such as language acquisition. We selectively review recent experiments with rats in which systematic changes in information processing of new stimuli are observed after training with different stimuli. These results strongly suggest that this capacity is present in rats. We also review two articles in which clear limitations to this capacity are detected. We conclude that, within specified limits, rats are capable of using prior experience when faced with a learning situation that involves new stimuli. We interpret this ability as a rudimentary form of abstraction. In the face of these provocative results, new theories of learning should be designed to account for these findings. PMID:20012121

  15. Predicting Nursing Human Resources: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2010-01-01

    The nurse-to-population ratio (NPOP) is a standard indicator used to indicate a country’s health care human resources capacity for responding to its disease burden. This study sought to explore if socioeconomic development indicators could predict the NPOP in a country. Mexico served as the case example for this exploratory study, with the final five variables selected based on findings from a qualitative study analyzing the development of nursing human resources in the country. Multiple linear regression showed that two variables proved significant predictors of the NPOP and the model itself explained 70% of the variance (r2 = .7; p = .0000). The findings have multiple implications for nursing human resources policy in Mexico and at a global level as governments attempt to build human capital to respond to population health needs. PMID:19628510

  16. Expanding the limits of human blood metabolite quantitation using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Gowda, Yashas N; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in metabolomics is the reliable quantitation of many metabolites. Limited resolution and sensitivity combined with the challenges associated with unknown metabolite identification have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of blood metabolites. Focused on alleviating this bottleneck in NMR-based metabolomics, investigations of pooled human serum combining an array of 1D/2D NMR experiments at 800 MHz, database searches, and spiking with authentic compounds enabled the identification of 67 blood metabolites. Many of these (∼1/3) are new compared with those reported previously as a part of the Human Serum Metabolome Database. In addition, considering both the high reproducibility and quantitative nature of NMR as well as the sensitivity of NMR chemical shifts to altered sample conditions, experimental protocols and comprehensive peak annotations are provided here as a guide for identification and quantitation of the new pool of blood metabolites for routine applications. Further, investigations focused on the evaluation of quantitation using organic solvents revealed a surprisingly poor performance for protein precipitation using acetonitrile. One-third of the detected metabolites were attenuated by 10-67% compared with methanol precipitation at the same solvent-to-serum ratio of 2:1 (v/v). Nearly 2/3 of the metabolites were further attenuated by up to 65% upon increasing the acetonitrile-to-serum ratio to 4:1 (v/v). These results, combined with the newly established identity for many unknown metabolites in the NMR spectrum, offer new avenues for human serum/plasma-based metabolomics. Further, the ability to quantitatively evaluate nearly 70 blood metabolites that represent numerous classes, including amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and heterocyclic compounds, using a simple and highly reproducible analytical method such as NMR may potentially guide the evaluation of samples for analysis using mass spectrometry. PMID:25485990

  17. Stimulators of Mineralization Limit the Invasive Phenotype of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by a Mechanism Involving Impaired Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cmoch, Anna; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Groves, Patrick; Pikula, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive bone cancer affecting children and young adults. Growing evidence connects the invasive potential of OS cells with their ability to form invadopodia (structures specialized in extracellular matrix proteolysis). Results In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commonly used in vitro stimulators of mineralization limit the invadopodia formation in OS cells. Here we examined the invasive potential of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) and osteolytic-like (143B) OS cells treated with the stimulators of mineralization (ascorbic acid and B-glycerophosphate) and observed a significant difference in response of the tested cells to the treatment. In contrast to 143B cells, osteoblast-like cells developed a mineralization phenotype that was accompanied by a decreased proliferation rate, prolongation of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis. On the other hand, stimulators of mineralization limited osteolytic-like OS cell invasiveness into collagen matrix. We are the first to evidence the ability of 143B cells to degrade extracellular matrix to be driven by invadopodia. Herein, we show that this ability of osteolytic-like cells in vitro is limited by stimulators of mineralization. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that mineralization competency determines the invasive potential of cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which stimulators of mineralization regulate and execute invadopodia formation would reveal novel clinical targets for treating osteosarcoma. PMID:25314307

  18. Limitations to systemic and locomotor limb muscle oxygen delivery and uptake during maximal exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Yoshiga, Chie C; Dalsgaard, Mads K; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2005-01-01

    Reductions in systemic and locomotor limb muscle blood flow and O2 delivery limit aerobic capacity in humans. To examine whether O2 delivery limits both aerobic power and capacity, we first measured systemic haemodynamics, O2 transport and O2 uptake during incremental and constant (372 ± 11 W; 85% of peak power; mean ± s.e.m.) cycling exercise to exhaustion (n = 8) and then measured systemic and leg haemodynamics and during incremental cycling and knee-extensor exercise in male subjects (n = 10). During incremental cycling, cardiac output and systemic O2 delivery increased linearly to 80% of peak power (r2 = 0.998, P < 0.001) and then plateaued in parallel to a decline in stroke volume (SV) and an increase in central venous and mean arterial pressures (P < 0.05). In contrast, heart rate and increased linearly until exhaustion (r2 = 0.993; P < 0.001) accompanying a rise in systemic O2 extraction to 84 ± 2%. In the exercising legs, blood flow and O2 delivery levelled off at 73–88% of peak power, blunting leg per unit of work despite increasing O2 extraction. When blood flow increased linearly during one-legged knee-extensor exercise, per unit of work was unaltered on fatigue. During constant cycling, , SV, systemic O2 delivery and reached maximal values within ∼5 min, but dropped before exhaustion (P < 0.05) despite increasing or stable central venous and mean arterial pressures. In both types of maximal cycling, the impaired systemic O2 delivery was due to the decline or plateau in because arterial O2 content continued to increase. These results indicate that an inability of the circulatory system to sustain a linear increase in O2 delivery to the locomotor muscles restrains aerobic power. The similar impairment in SV and O2 delivery during incremental and constant load cycling provides evidence for a central limitation to aerobic power and capacity in humans. PMID:15860533

  19. Lesson Study by Secondary Humanities Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Jeffrey Paul

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of a group of American secondary humanities teachers engaged in lesson study. Lesson study (LS) is a teacher-driven, collaborative inquiry process grounded in the realities of the classroom. It is an approach to professional development (PD) that originated in Japan, and has been credited there with contributing…

  20. Parasites of importance for human health in Nigerian dogs: high prevalence and limited knowledge of pet owners

    PubMed Central

    Ugbomoiko, Uade Samuel; Ariza, Liana; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    Background Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide. They may harbour a wide range of parasites with zoonotic potential, thus causing a health risk to humans. In Nigeria, epidemiological knowledge on these parasites is limited. Methods In a community-based study, we examined 396 dogs in urban and rural areas of Ilorin (Kwara State, Central Nigeria) for ectoparasites and intestinal helminths. In addition, a questionnaire regarding knowledge and practices was applied to pet owners. Results Nine ectoparasite species belonging to four taxa and six intestinal helminth species were identified: fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, Tunga penetrans), mites (Demodex canis, Otodectes sp., Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis), ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes sp.), and lice (Trichodectes canis); and Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, Taenidae and Strongyloides sp. Overall prevalence of ectoparasites was 60.4% and of intestinal helminths 68.4%. The occurrence of C. canis, R. sanguineus, T. canis, Ancylostoma sp. and T. vulpis was most common (prevalence 14.4% to 41.7%). Prevalence patterns in helminths were age-dependent, with T. canis showing a decreasing prevalence with age of host, and a reverse trend in other parasite species. Knowledge regarding zoonoses was very limited and the diseases not considered a major health problem. Treatment with antiparasitic drugs was more frequent in urban areas. Conclusion Parasites of importance for human health were highly prevalent in Nigerian dogs. Interventions should include health education provided to dog owners and the establishment of a program focusing on zoonotic diseases. PMID:19068110

  1. Risk and maximum residue limits: a study of hops production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper examines how maximum residue limits (MRLs) affect the optimal choice by growers of chemical applications to control pests and diseases. In practice, growers who export balance both yield risk and pesticide residue uncertainty when making chemical application decisions. To address these is...

  2. Background of Civil Defense and Current Damage Limiting Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romm, Joseph

    A brief history of civil defense administration precedes analysis of nuclear attack conditions and the influence of protective measures. Damage limitation procedure is explained in terms of--(1) blast effects, (2) radiation doses, (3) geographical fallout distribution patterns, and (4) national shelter needs. Major concept emphasis relates to--(1)…

  3. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  4. Limits of Human Performance. Annual Meeting (56th, Eugene, Oregon, July 19-26, 1984). American Academy of Physical Education Papers, No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David H., Ed.; Eckert, Helen M., Ed.

    The following papers are included in this collection: (1) "The Scientific Study of Athletes and Athletics" (Henry J. Montoye); (2) "The Limits of Human Performance" (David H. Clarke); (3) "Observations of Extraordinary Performances in an Extreme Environment and in a Training Environment" (E.R. Buskirk); (4) "Metabolic Requirements of Distance

  5. Limits of Human Performance. Annual Meeting (56th, Eugene, Oregon, July 19-26, 1984). American Academy of Physical Education Papers, No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David H., Ed.; Eckert, Helen M., Ed.

    The following papers are included in this collection: (1) "The Scientific Study of Athletes and Athletics" (Henry J. Montoye); (2) "The Limits of Human Performance" (David H. Clarke); (3) "Observations of Extraordinary Performances in an Extreme Environment and in a Training Environment" (E.R. Buskirk); (4) "Metabolic Requirements of Distance…

  6. The neural basis of temporal individuation and its capacity limits in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Tamber-Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Dux, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Individuation refers to individuals' use of spatial and temporal properties to register an object as a distinct perceptual event relative to other stimuli. Although behavioral studies have examined both spatial and temporal individuation, neuroimaging investigations of individuation have been restricted to the spatial domain and at relatively late stages of information processing. In this study we used univariate and multivoxel pattern analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data to identify brain regions involved in individuating temporally distinct visual items and the neural consequences that arise when this process reaches its capacity limit (repetition blindness, RB). First, we found that regional patterns of blood oxygen level-dependent activity in a large group of brain regions involved in “lower-level” perceptual and “higher-level” attentional/executive processing discriminated between instances where repeated and nonrepeated stimuli were successfully individuated, conditions that placed differential demands on temporal individuation. These results could not be attributed to repetition suppression, stimulus or response factors, task difficulty, regional activation differences, other capacity-limited processes, or artifacts in the data or analyses. Consistent with the global workplace model of consciousness, this finding suggests that temporal individuation is supported by a distributed set of brain regions, rather than a single neural correlate. Second, conditions that reflect the capacity limit of individuation (instances of RB) modulated the amplitude, rather than spatial pattern, of activity in the left hemisphere premotor cortex. This finding could not be attributed to response conflict/ambiguity and likely reflects a candidate brain region underlying the capacity-limited process that gives rise to RB. PMID:24198320

  7. Demonstrating the Efficacy of the FoneAstra Pasteurization Monitor for Human Milk Pasteurization in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Coutsoudis, Anna; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Chaudhri, Rohit; Perin, Noah; Mlisana, Koleka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human milk provides crucial nutrition and immunologic protection for infants. When a mother's own milk is unavailable, donated human milk, pasteurized to destroy bacteria and viruses, is a lifesaving replacement. Flash-heat pasteurization is a simple, low-cost, and commonly used method to make milk safe, but currently there is no system to monitor milk temperature, which challenges quality control. FoneAstra, a smartphone-based mobile pasteurization monitor, removes this barrier by guiding users through pasteurization and documenting consistent and safe practice. This study evaluated FoneAstra's efficacy as a quality control system, particularly in resource-limited settings, by comparing bacterial growth in donor milk flash-heated with and without the device at a neonatal intensive care unit in Durban, South Africa. Materials and Methods: For 100 samples of donor milk, one aliquot each of prepasteurized milk, milk flash-heated without FoneAstra, and milk pasteurized with FoneAstra was cultured on routine agar for bacterial growth. Isolated bacteria were identified and enumerated. Results: In total, 300 samples (three from each donor sample) were analyzed. Bacterial growth was found in 86 of the 100 samples before any pasteurization and one of the 100 postpasteurized samples without FoneAstra. None of the samples pasteurized using FoneAstra showed bacterial growth. Conclusions: Both pasteurization methods were safe and effective. FoneAstra, however, provides the additional benefits of user-guided temperature monitoring and data tracking. By improving quality assurance and standardizing the pasteurization process, FoneAstra can support wide-scale implementation of human milk banks in resource-limited settings, increasing access and saving lives. PMID:25668396

  8. Innovation-diffusion: a geographical study of the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ting, T Y

    1984-09-01

    This paper uses map analysis to study the transition of family limitation practice in Taiwan between 1961-80. The innovation-diffusion perspective emphasizes that birth control, particularly contraception, is a recent innovation and is essentially new in human culture. The innovation-diffusion theory assumes that the decline of fertility began in a setting where there was no, or at most very limited, previous practice of birth control. The theory emphasizes the importance of the spread of information. It also assumes that innovation starts in metropolitan centers, diffuses to other urban places with some delay, and penetrates to rural areas still later. Innovation behavior also diffuses from 1 area to another which is culturally and linguistically similar. Although there was some urban to rural diffusion from the Taiwan family planning program, the government supported program provided services more evenly between urban and rural areas, thus somewhat limiting the diffusion effect from the program. For the diffusion of family practice in Taiwan, it is expected that the availability of of information about and means of family limitation practice may effect the rate of the increase of small m values -- an index of family limitation -- in an area. The case study of Pingtung county shows that the demand-side diffusion from urban to rural areas was important in the earlier decade of the transition of family plimitation practice, but distance from urban center was less important as practice became more uniform through diffusion. Ethnicity, whether or not the township was dominated by Hakka or Fukienese, also seems to have played an important role in determining the pace at which the local residents adopted family practice limitation. Hakka townships seem to have adopted family limitation practice more slowly than Fukienese townships about the same distance from the urban center. The map analysis of Pingtung county provides descriptive evidence to support the diffusion of family limitation from urban centers to distant areas, while ethnic variables like Hakka population tend to delay the adoption of family limitation practice. In general, the urban center had higher m values than the surrounding rural areas in Pingtung county and for areas other than the urban center the the level of m values is a negative function of the distance to the urban center. PMID:12266924

  9. Nutrient Limitation Governs Staphylococcus aureus Metabolism and Niche Adaptation in the Human Nose

    PubMed Central

    Krismer, Bernhard; Liebeke, Manuel; Janek, Daniela; Nega, Mulugeta; Rautenberg, Maren; Hornig, Gabriele; Unger, Clemens; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Lalk, Michael; Peschel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Colonization of the human nose by Staphylococcus aureus in one-third of the population represents a major risk factor for invasive infections. The basis for adaptation of S. aureus to this specific habitat and reasons for the human predisposition to become colonized have remained largely unknown. Human nasal secretions were analyzed by metabolomics and found to contain potential nutrients in rather low amounts. No significant differences were found between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers, indicating that carriage is not associated with individual differences in nutrient supply. A synthetic nasal medium (SNM3) was composed based on the metabolomics data that permits consistent growth of S. aureus isolates. Key genes were expressed in SNM3 in a similar way as in the human nose, indicating that SNM3 represents a suitable surrogate environment for in vitro simulation studies. While the majority of S. aureus strains grew well in SNM3, most of the tested coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) had major problems to multiply in SNM3 supporting the notion that CoNS are less well adapted to the nose and colonize preferentially the human skin. Global gene expression analysis revealed that, during growth in SNM3, S. aureus depends heavily on de novo synthesis of methionine. Accordingly, the methionine-biosynthesis enzyme cysteine-γ-synthase (MetI) was indispensable for growth in SNM3, and the MetI inhibitor DL-propargylglycine inhibited S. aureus growth in SNM3 but not in the presence of methionine. Of note, metI was strongly up-regulated by S. aureus in human noses, and metI mutants were strongly abrogated in their capacity to colonize the noses of cotton rats. These findings indicate that the methionine biosynthetic pathway may include promising antimicrobial targets that have previously remained unrecognized. Hence, exploring the environmental conditions facultative pathogens are exposed to during colonization can be useful for understanding niche adaptation and identifying targets for new antimicrobial strategies. PMID:24453967

  10. EVA Health and Human Performance Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, A. F.; Norcross, J.; Jarvis, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple HRP Risks and Gaps require detailed characterization of human health and performance during exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks; however, a rigorous and comprehensive methodology for characterizing and comparing the health and human performance implications of current and future EVA spacesuit designs does not exist. This study will identify and implement functional tasks and metrics, both objective and subjective, that are relevant to health and human performance, such as metabolic expenditure, suit fit, discomfort, suited postural stability, cognitive performance, and potentially biochemical responses for humans working inside different EVA suits doing functional tasks under the appropriate simulated reduced gravity environments. This study will provide health and human performance benchmark data for humans working in current EVA suits (EMU, Mark III, and Z2) as well as shirtsleeves using a standard set of tasks and metrics with quantified reliability. Results and methodologies developed during this test will provide benchmark data against which future EVA suits, and different suit configurations (eg, varied pressure, mass, CG) may be reliably compared in subsequent tests. Results will also inform fitness for duty standards as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  11. Potential Limitations of the NSG Humanized Mouse as a Model System to Optimize Engineered Human T cell Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcantar-Orozco, Erik M.; Gornall, Hannah; Baldan, Vania; Hawkins, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genetic modification of peripheral blood lymphocytes using retroviral vectors to redirect T cells against tumor cells has been recently used as a means to generate large numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive cell therapy protocols. However, commonly used retroviral vector-based genetic modification requires T cells to be driven into cell division; this potent mitogenic stimulus is associated with the development of an effector phenotype that may adversely impact upon the long-term engraftment potential and subsequent antitumor effects of T cells. To investigate whether the cytokines used during culture impact upon the engraftment potential of gene-modified T cells, a humanized model employing T cells engrafted with a MART-1-specific T cell receptor adoptively transferred into NOD/Shi-scid IL-2rγ−/− (NSG) immune-deficient mice bearing established melanoma tumors was used to compare the effects of the common γ chain cytokines IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15 upon gene-modified T cell activity. MART-1-specific T cells cultured in IL-7 and IL-15 demonstrated greater relative in vitro proliferation and viability of T cells compared with the extensively used IL-2. Moreover, the IL-15 culture prolonged the survival of animals bearing melanoma tumors after adoptive transfer. However, the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 produced T cells with improved engraftment potential compared with IL-15 alone; however, a high rate of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease prevented the identification of a clear improvement in antitumor effect of these T cells. These results clearly demonstrate modulation of gene-modified T cell engraftment in the NSG mouse, which supports the future testing of the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 in adoptive cell therapy protocols; however, this improved engraftment is also associated with the long-term maintenance of xenoreactive T cells, which limits the ultimate usefulness of the NSG mouse model in this situation. PMID:23931270

  12. A limited bibliography of the Federal Government-funded human radiation experiments.

    PubMed

    Samei, E; Kearfott, K J

    1995-12-01

    From the early 1940's thousands of U.S. citizens have been the subjects of federally supported scientific experiments that involved the administration of ionizing radiation or radioactive substances. Recently, many questions have been raised regarding the nature, scientific value, and ethics of these experiments. Although the results of many of the early human experiments involving radiation have been crucial to the establishment of nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, and radiological protection standards, the underlying ethical basis for a small number of these studies is being questioned. A thorough analysis of these studies and their ethical basis is beyond the scope of this article. Rather, in order to quickly provide the health physics community with some of the available resources in the open literature, a list of bibliographic citations of the 47 studies primarily funded by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and other predecessors of the Department of Energy is presented and briefly summarized. A classification scheme for the human radiation experiments is also developed. PMID:7493803

  13. Oxidative Damage to RPA Limits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Capacity of Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The replication protein A (RPA) DNA-binding protein has a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation, and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage, and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself, is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  14. Designing and Interpreting Limiting Dilution Assays: General Principles and Applications to the Latent Reservoir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Daniel I. S.; Elliott, Oliver; Hill, Alison L.; Henrich, Timothy J.; Siliciano, Janet M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Limiting dilution assays are widely used in infectious disease research. These assays are crucial for current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 cure research in particular. In this study, we offer new tools to help investigators design and analyze dilution assays based on their specific research needs. Limiting dilution assays are commonly used to measure the extent of infection, and in the context of HIV they represent an essential tool for studying latency and potential curative strategies. Yet standard assay designs may not discern whether an intervention reduces an already miniscule latent infection. This review addresses challenges arising in this setting and in the general use of dilution assays. We illustrate the major statistical method for estimating frequency of infectious units from assay results, and we offer an online tool for computing this estimate. We recommend a procedure for customizing assay design to achieve desired sensitivity and precision goals, subject to experimental constraints. We consider experiments in which no viral outgrowth is observed and explain how using alternatives to viral outgrowth may make measurement of HIV latency more efficient. Finally, we discuss how biological complications, such as probabilistic growth of small infections, alter interpretations of experimental results. PMID:26478893

  15. Hanford study: a review of its limitations and controversial conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-10-01

    The Hanford data set has attracted attention primarily because of analyses conducted by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale (MSK). These investigators claim that the Hanford data provide evidence that our current estimates of cancer mortality resulting from radiation exposure are too low, and advocate replacing estimates based on populations exposed at relatively high doses (such as the Japanese atom bomb survivors) with estimates based on the Hanford data. In this paper, it is shown that the only evidence of association of radiation exposure and mortality provided by the Hanford data is a small excess of multiple myeloma, and that this data set is not adequate for reliable risk estimation. It is demonstrated that confidence limits for risk estimates are very wide, and that the data are not adequate to differentiate among models. The more recent MSK analyses, which claim to provide adequate models and risk estimates, are critiqued. 18 references, 1 table.

  16. Transient disruption of human pursuit-tracking performance for laser exposures below permissible exposure limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, David A.; Lund, David J.; Molchany, Jerome W.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1997-05-01

    The proliferation of lasers for medical care, laser displays, industrial applications and audio- visual presentations has increased the potential for accidental intrabeam exposure to visible laser radiation. The output of these laser devices may be limited to below permissible exposure limits, but they are perceived as bright and can affect performance. The disruption experienced while viewing a laser is related to factors that include the retinal irradiance level, wavelength, ambient light level and mode (continuous wave (CW) and repetitively pulsed (RP)). This report describes studies where these factors were varied to assess the effects of laser light on tracking performance in a laboratory simulator and in a field study. Disruption was determined by measuring maximum error and total time off target. Performance disruption increased as irradiance levels increased and ambient light levels decreased.Under dawn/dusk conditions, relatively low-level laser energy produced performance disruption. Green laser light at the peak of the photopic sensitivity curve was more disruptive than red laser light. Increased error scores during CW and RP trials were attributed to average rather than peak power effects. More than 1500 laser exposures at levels up to MPE/2 have been given to volunteers. Despite transient performance disruption comparison of the pre- and post- laser visual performance tests and fundus evaluations wee unremarkable.

  17. Feasibility study of astronaut standardized career dose limits in LEO and the outlook for BLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Bhardwaj, A.; Ferrari, Franco; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Lal, A. K.; Li, Yinghui; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Nymmik, Rikho; Panasyuk, Michael; Petrov, Vladislav; Reitz, Guenther; Pinsky, Lawrence; Muszaphar Shukor, Sheikh; Singhvi, A. K.; Straube, Ulrich; Tomi, Leena; Townsend, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    Cosmic Study Group SG 3.19/1.10 was established in February 2013 under the aegis of the International Academy of Astronautics to consider and compare the dose limits adopted by various space agencies for astronauts in Low Earth Orbit. A preliminary definition of the limits that might later be adopted by crews exploring Beyond Low Earth Orbit was, in addition, to be made. The present paper presents preliminary results of the study reported at a Symposium held in Turin by the Academy in July 2013. First, an account is provided of exposure limits assigned by various partner space agencies to those of their astronauts that work aboard the International Space Station. Then, gaps in the scientific and technical information required to safely implement human missions beyond the shielding provided by the geomagnetic field (to the Moon, Mars and beyond) are identified. Among many recommendations for actions to mitigate the health risks potentially posed to personnel Beyond Low Earth Orbit is the development of a preliminary concept for a Human Space Awareness System to: provide for crewed missions the means of prompt onboard detection of the ambient arrival of hazardous particles; develop a strategy for the implementation of onboard responses to hazardous radiation levels; support modeling/model validation that would enable reliable predictions to be made of the arrival of hazardous radiation at a distant spacecraft; provide for the timely transmission of particle alerts to a distant crewed vehicle at an emergency frequency using suitably located support spacecraft. Implementation of the various recommendations of the study can be realized based on a two pronged strategy whereby Space Agencies/Space Companies/Private Entrepreneurial Organizations etc. address the mastering of required key technologies (e.g. fast transportation; customized spacecraft design) while the International Academy of Astronautics, in a role of handling global international co-operation, organizes complementary studies aimed at harnessing the strengths and facilities of emerging nations in investigating/solving related problems (e.g. advanced space radiation modeling/model validation; predicting the arrivals of Solar Energetic Particles and shocks at a distant spacecraft). Ongoing progress in pursuing these complementary parallel programs could be jointly reviewed bi-annually by the Space Agencies and the International Academy of Astronautics so as to maintain momentum and direction in globally progressing towards feasible human exploration of interplanetary space.

  18. Genomic approaches to studying the human microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast array of microbes, which form communities of bacteria, viruses and microbial eukaryotes that are specific to each anatomical environment. Every community must be studied as a whole because many organisms have never been cultured independently, and this poses formidable challenges. The advent of next-generation DNA sequencing has allowed more sophisticated analysis and sampling of these complex systems by culture-independent methods. These methods are revealing differences in community structure between anatomical sites, between individuals, and between healthy and diseased states, and are transforming our view of human biology. PMID:22972298

  19. Identification of host miRNAs that may limit human rhinovirus replication

    PubMed Central

    Bondanese, Victor Paky; Francisco-Garcia, Ana; Bedke, Nicole; Davies, Donna E; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether the replication of human rhinovirus (HRV) is regulated by microRNAs in human bronchial epithelial cells. METHODS: For the present study, the human cell line BEAS-2B (derived from normal human bronchial epithelial cells) was adopted. DICER knock-down, by siRNA transfection in BEAS-2B cells, was performed in order to inhibit microRNA maturation globally. Alternatively, antisense oligonucleotides (anti-miRs) were transfected to inhibit the activity of specific microRNAs. Cells were infected with HRV-1B. Viral replication was assessed by measuring the genomic viral RNA by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Association between microRNA-induced-silencing-complex and viral RNA was detected by Ago2 co-immunoprecipitation followed by RT-qPCR. Targetscan v.6 was used to predict microRNA target sites on several HRV strains. RESULTS: Here, we show that microRNAs affect replication of HRV-1B. DICER knock-down significantly reduced the expression of mature microRNAs in a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) and in turn, increased the synthesis of HRV-1B RNA. Additionally, HRV-1B RNA co-immunoprecipitated with argonaute 2 protein, an important effector for microRNA activity suggesting that microRNAs bind to viral RNA during infection. In order to identify specific microRNAs involved in this interaction, we employed bioinformatics analysis, and selected a group of microRNAs that have been reported to be under-expressed in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells and were predicted to target different strains of rhinoviruses (HRV-1B, -16, -14, -27). Our results suggest that, out of this group of microRNAs, miR-128 and miR-155 contribute to the innate defense against HRV-1B: transfection of specific anti-miRs increased viral replication, as anticipated in-silico. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results suggest that pathological changes in microRNA expression, as already reported for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have the potential to affect Rhinovirus replication and therefore may play a role in virus-induced exacerbations. PMID:25426267

  20. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-10-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  1. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-10-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  2. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  3. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Study on Optical Filter Heating in Background Limited Detector Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, J.; de Visser, P. J.; Doyle, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Cryogenic test setups with controlled stray light environments capable of reaching ultra-low radiative background levels are required to test far infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (sub-mm) wave radiation detectors for future space based observatories. In recent experiments (Nature Commun 5:3130, 2014), in which 1.54 THz radiation was coupled onto an antenna-coupled kinetic inductance detector (KID), we found a higher than expected optical loading. We show that this can be explained by assuming heating of the metal mesh IR filters and re-radiation onto the KID. Note that the total power from the cryogenic black body source used in the experiments (at T = - K) is much larger than the power inside the - THz band we use to calibrate our detector. The out-of-band radiation can have up to 5 orders of magnitude more power than inside the - THz band of interest. A strategy to mitigate the filter heating problem is presented, and when it is implemented, the validated upper limit for stray light at the detector level is down to few aW.

  5. Cultural Studies and the Limits of Self-Reflexivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, James F.

    Among the changes that have characterized English studies over the past 25 years is an increase in self-reflection. The rise of various kinds of writing collectively labeled "theory" has influenced this move to scrutinize actions and motives. Composition studies have developed classroom strategies for asking students to reflect on their own…

  6. Tumor promotion by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields below exposure limits for humans.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Alexander; Klose, Melanie; Grote, Karen; Wilhelm, Adalbert F X; Spathmann, Oliver; Fiedler, Thomas; Streckert, Joachim; Hansen, Volkert; Clemens, Markus

    2015-04-17

    The vast majority of in vitro and in vivo studies did not find cancerogenic effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), i.e. emitted by mobile phones and base stations. Previously published results from a pilot study with carcinogen-treated mice, however, suggested tumor-promoting effects of RF-EMF (Tillmann et al., 2010). We have performed a replication study using higher numbers of animals per group and including two additional exposure levels (0 (sham), 0.04, 0.4 and 2 W/kg SAR). We could confirm and extend the originally reported findings. Numbers of tumors of the lungs and livers in exposed animals were significantly higher than in sham-exposed controls. In addition, lymphomas were also found to be significantly elevated by exposure. A clear dose-response effect is absent. We hypothesize that these tumor-promoting effects may be caused by metabolic changes due to exposure. Since many of the tumor-promoting effects in our study were seen at low to moderate exposure levels (0.04 and 0.4 W/kg SAR), thus well below exposure limits for the users of mobile phones, further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Our findings may help to understand the repeatedly reported increased incidences of brain tumors in heavy users of mobile phones. PMID:25749340

  7. Factors which Limit the Value of Additional Redundancy in Human Rated Launch Vehicle Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.; Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Hatfield, Spencer; Kaltz, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on an ambitious program to return humans to the moon and beyond. As NASA moves forward in the development and design of new launch vehicles for future space exploration, it must fully consider the implications that rule-based requirements of redundancy or fault tolerance have on system reliability/risk. These considerations include common cause failure, increased system complexity, combined serial and parallel configurations, and the impact of design features implemented to control premature activation. These factors and others must be considered in trade studies to support design decisions that balance safety, reliability, performance and system complexity to achieve a relatively simple, operable system that provides the safest and most reliable system within the specified performance requirements. This paper describes conditions under which additional functional redundancy can impede improved system reliability. Examples from current NASA programs including the Ares I Upper Stage will be shown.

  8. Limited Transmission of blaCTX-M-9-Type-Positive Escherichia coli between Humans and Poultry in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the blaCTX-M-9-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited. PMID:25779573

  9. Limited transmission of bla(CTX-M-9)-type-positive Escherichia coli between humans and poultry in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shuhei; Ngan, Bui Thi Kim; Huong, Bui Thi Mai; Hirai, Itaru; Tuyen, Le Danh; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether Escherichia coli isolates that produce CTX-M-9-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are transferred between humans and chickens in a Vietnamese community. The phylogenetic group compositions, sequence types, antimicrobial resistance profiles, the prevalence of plasmid antibiotic resistance genes, and the plasmid replicon types generally differed between the human and chicken E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that transmission of the bla(CTX-M-9)-positive E. coli between humans and poultry was limited. PMID:25779573

  10. Overcoming phytoremediation limitations. A case study of Hg contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbafieri, Meri

    2013-04-01

    Phytoremediation is a broad term that comprises several technologies to clean up water and soil. Despite the numerous articles appearing in scientific journals, very few field applications of phytoextraction have been successfully realized. The research here reported on Phytoextraction, the use the plant to "extract" metals from contaminated soil, is focused on implementations to overcome two main drawbacks: the survival of plants in unfavorable environmental conditions (contaminant toxicity, low fertility, etc.) and the often lengthy time it takes to reduce contaminants to the requested level. Moreover, to overcome the imbalance between the technology's potential and its drawbacks, there is growing interest in the use of plants to reduce only the fraction that is the most hazardous to the environment and human health, that is to target the bioavailable fractions of metals in soil. Bioavailable Contaminant Stripping (BCS) would be a remediation approach focused to remove the bioavailable metal fractions. BCS have been used in a mercury contaminated soil from Italian industrial site. Bioavailable fractions were determined by sequential extraction with H2O and NH4Cl.Combined treatments of plant hormone and thioligand to strength Hg uptake by crop plants (Brassica juncea and Helianthus annuus) were tested. Plant biomass, evapotranspiration, Hg uptake and distribution following treatments were compared. Results indicate the plant hormone, cytokinine (CK) foliar treatment, increased evapotranspiration rate in both tested plants. The Hg uptake and translocation in both tested plants increased with simultaneous addition of CK and TS treatments. B. juncea was the most effective in Hg uptake. Application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to an increase in Hg concentration of 232% in shoots and 39% in roots with respect to control. While H. annuus gave a better response in plant biomass production, the application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to an increase in Hg concentration of 248% in shoots and 185% in roots with respect to control plants. The BCS efficiency were evaluated analyzing the labile-Hg residue in the soil after the plant growing. Plants grown with CK and TS in one growing cycle significantly affected labile-Hg pools in soil characterized by sequential extraction, but did not significantly reduce the total metals in the soil. Moreover, if properly optimized, the use of a coupled phytohormone/thioligand system may be a viable strategy to strength Hg uptake by crop plants.

  11. Flow motifs reveal limitations of the static framework to represent human interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-04-01

    Networks are commonly used to define underlying interaction structures where infections, information, or other quantities may spread. Although the standard approach has been to aggregate all links into a static structure, some studies have shown that the time order in which the links are established may alter the dynamics of spreading. In this paper, we study the impact of the time ordering in the limits of flow on various empirical temporal networks. By using a random walk dynamics, we estimate the flow on links and convert the original undirected network (temporal and static) into a directed flow network. We then introduce the concept of flow motifs and quantify the divergence in the representativity of motifs when using the temporal and static frameworks. We find that the regularity of contacts and persistence of vertices (common in email communication and face-to-face interactions) result on little differences in the limits of flow for both frameworks. On the other hand, in the case of communication within a dating site and of a sexual network, the flow between vertices changes significantly in the temporal framework such that the static approximation poorly represents the structure of contacts. We have also observed that cliques with 3 and 4 vertices containing only low-flow links are more represented than the same cliques with all high-flow links. The representativity of these low-flow cliques is higher in the temporal framework. Our results suggest that the flow between vertices connected in cliques depend on the topological context in which they are placed and in the time sequence in which the links are established. The structure of the clique alone does not completely characterize the potential of flow between the vertices.

  12. Physical Limitations on Salmonella typhi Entry into Cultured Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Zhe; Tall, Ben; Schwan, William R.; Kopecko, Dennis J.

    1998-01-01

    Kinetic studies of Salmonella typhi invasion of INT407 cells at different multiplicities of infection (MOIs) have revealed a strict physical limitation on S. typhi entry at MOIs of ≥40. Staining of infected monolayers to distinguish intracellular from extracellular bacteria revealed that all monolayer cells are susceptible to infection and that internalized bacteria are typically contained in one to three separate clusters per cell during the first 60 min. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analyses of time course-infected monolayers showed that at early times postinfection, bacteria bind to shortened, coalesced microvilli in one to three focal aggregate structures per host cell surface. As reported previously for S. typhimurium, focal aggregates progress to conical membrane ruffles that appear to engulf one or a few centrally contained S. typhi cells by a macropinocytic process, which enhanced the entry of simultaneously added Escherichia coli HB101 about 30-fold. Additionally, kinetic studies showed that at an MOI of ≃400, maximal S. typhi entry is virtually completed within 30 to 35 min. Monolayers pretreated with S. typhi for 30 min to saturate the entry process were severely reduced in the ability to internalize subsequently added kanamycin-resistant strains of S. typhi or S. typhimurium, but E. coli HB101(pRI203) expressing the cloned Yersinia inv gene was not reduced in entry. In invasion inhibition assays, anti-β1 integrin antibodies markedly reduced E. coli HB101(pRI203) invasion efficiency but did not reduce S. typhi entry. Collectively, these data provide direct physical and visual evidence which indicates that S. typhi organisms are internalized at a limited number (i.e., two to four) of sites on host cells. S. typhi and S. typhimurium likely share INT407 cell entry receptors which do not appear to be members of the β1 integrin superfamily. PMID:9596769

  13. Challenges in the Management of Disseminated Progressive Histoplasmosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Richard A.; Gounder, Lilishia; Manzini, Thandekile C.; Ramdial, Pratistadevi K.; Castilla, Carmen; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of histoplasmosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus in southern Africa is complicated by the nonspecific presentation of the disease in this patient group and the unavailability of sensitive diagnostics including antigen assays. Treatment options are also limited due to the unavailability of liposomal amphotericin and itraconazole, and the inability to perform therapeutic drug monitoring further confounds management. We present 3 clinical cases to illustrate the limits of diagnosis and management in the southern African context, and we highlight the need for additional diagnostic tools and treatment options in resource-limited settings. PMID:26034774

  14. Genetic studies in human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Human prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by spongiform changes, astrogliosis, and the accumulation of an abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Approximately 10%-15% of human prion diseases are familial variants that are caused by pathogenic mutations in the prion protein gene (PRNP). Point mutations or the insertions of one or more copies of a 24 bp repeat are associated with familial human prion diseases including familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia. These mutations vary significantly in frequency between countries. Here, we compare the frequency of PRNP mutations between European countries and East Asians. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of several candidate genes including PRNP and CJD have been reported. The SNP of PRNP at codon 129 has been shown to be associated with sporadic, iatrogenic, and variant CJD. The SNPs of several genes other than PRNP have been showed contradictory results. Case-control studies and genome-wide association studies have also been performed to identify candidate genes correlated with variant and/or sporadic CJD. This review provides a general overview of the genetic mutations and polymorphisms that have been analyzed in association with human prion diseases to date. PMID:24851016

  15. The Limits of Cultural Competence: An Indigenous Studies Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Taking the Universities Australia report, "National best practice framework for Indigenous cultural competency in Australian universities" (2011) as the starting point for its discussion, this paper examines the applicability of cultural competence in the design and delivery of Australian Indigenous Studies. It argues that both the…

  16. Solution convergence study during launch phase using limited tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premkumar, R. I.

    1988-01-01

    Orbit determination accuracies during critical phases at launch, when data are available from only one station, can be enhanced using angle data with conventional Doppler and range data. A study performed on the forthcoming Japanese ETS-5 mission indicates that this requires correct handling of the angle biases. This was verified using actual tracking data received from the BS-2B launch.

  17. Study made of ductility limitations of aluminum-silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. A.; Frederick, S. F.

    1967-01-01

    Study of the relation between microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys determines the cause of the variations in properties resulting from differences in solidification rate. It was found that variations in strength are a consequence of variations in ductility and that ductility is inversely proportional to dendrite cell size.

  18. Tea and health: studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Tea, next to water is the cheapest beverage humans consume. Drinking the beverage tea has been considered a healthpromoting habit since ancient times. The modern medicinal research is providing a scientific basis for this belief. The evidence supporting the health benefits of tea drinking grows stronger with each new study that is published in the scientific literature. Tea plant Camellia sinensis has been cultivated for thousands of years and its leaves have been used for medicinal purposes. Tea is used as a popular beverage worldwide and its ingredients are now finding medicinal benefits. Encouraging data showing cancer-preventive effects of green tea from cell-culture, animal and human studies have emerged. Evidence is accumulating that black tea may have similar beneficial effects. Tea consumption has also been shown to be useful for prevention of many debilitating human diseases that include maintenance of cardiovascular and metabolic health. Various studies suggest that polyphenolic compounds present in green and black tea are associated with beneficial effects in prevention of cardiovascular diseases, particularly of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. In addition, anti-aging, antidiabetic and many other health beneficial effects associated with tea consumption are described. Evidence is accumulating that catechins and theaflavins, which are the main polyphenolic compounds of green and black tea, respectively, are responsible for most of the physiological effects of tea. This article describes the evidences from clinical and epidemiological studies in the prevention of chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases and general health promotion associated with tea consumption. PMID:23448443

  19. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: Potential rate limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate-limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from 7 healthy exclusively breastfe...

  20. Epidemiological studies of radio frequency exposures and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Elwood, J Mark

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of radio frequency (RF) exposures and human cancers include studies of military and civilian occupational groups, people who live near television and radio transmitters, and users of mobile phones. Many types of cancer have been assessed, with particular attention given to leukemia and brain tumors. The epidemiological results fall short of the strength and consistency of evidence that is required to come to a conclusion that RF emissions are a cause of human cancer. Although the epidemiological evidence in total suggests no increased risk of cancer, the results cannot be unequivocally interpreted in terms of cause and effect. The results are inconsistent, and most studies are limited by lack of detail on actual exposures, short follow-up periods, and the limited ability to deal with other relevant factors. In some studies, there may be substantial biases in the data used. For these same reasons, the studies are unable to confidently exclude any possibility of an increased risk of cancer. Further research to clarify the situation is justified. Priorities include further studies of leukemia in both adults and children, and of cranial tumors in relationship to mobile phone use. PMID:14628307

  1. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  2. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  3. Selenium neurotoxicity in humans: bridging laboratory and epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Mandrioli, Jessica; Borella, Paola; Michalke, Bernhard; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Finkelstein, Yoram

    2014-10-15

    Selenium is a metalloid of considerable interest in the human from both a toxicological and a nutritional perspective, with a very narrow safe range of intake. Acute selenium intoxication is followed by adverse effects on the nervous system with special clinical relevance, while the neurotoxicity of long-term overexposure is less characterized and recognized. We aimed to address this issue from a public health perspective, focusing on both laboratory studies and the few epidemiologic human studies available, with emphasis on their methodological strengths and limitations. The frequently overlooked differences in toxicity and biological activity of selenium compounds are also outlined. In addition to lethargy, dizziness, motor weakness and paresthesias, an excess risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the effect on the nervous system which has been more consistently associated with chronic low-level selenium overexposure, particularly to its inorganic compounds. Additional research efforts are needed to better elucidate the neurotoxic effects exerted by selenium overexposure. PMID:24269718

  4. Human studies of cannabinoids and medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Robson, P

    2005-01-01

    Cannabis has been known as a medicine for several thousand years across many cultures. It reached a position of prominence within Western medicine in the nineteenth century but became mired in disrepute and legal controls early in the twentieth century. Despite unremitting world-wide suppression, recreational cannabis exploded into popular culture in the 1960s and has remained easily obtainable on the black market in most countries ever since. This ready availability has allowed many thousands of patients to rediscover the apparent power of the drug to alleviate symptoms of some of the most cruel and refractory diseases known to humankind. Pioneering clinical research in the last quarter of the twentieth century has given some support to these anecdotal reports, but the methodological challenges to human research involving a pariah drug are formidable. Studies have tended to be small, imperfectly controlled, and have often incorporated unsatisfactory synthetic cannabinoid analogues or smoked herbal material of uncertain composition and irregular bioavailability. As a result, the scientific evaluation of medicinal cannabis in humans is still in its infancy. New possibilities in human research have been opened up by the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, a rapidly expanding knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology, and a more sympathetic political environment in several countries. More and more scientists and clinicians are becoming interested in exploring the potential of cannabis-based medicines. Future targets will extend beyond symptom relief into disease modification, and already cannabinoids seem to offer particular promise in the treatment of certain inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions. This chapter will begin with an outline of the development and current status of legal controls pertaining to cannabis, following which the existing human research will be reviewed. Some key safety issues will then be considered, and the chapter will conclude with some suggestions as to future directions for human research. PMID:16596794

  5. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  6. Telomerase Inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L) Limits the Lifespan of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burchett, Katrina M.; Yan, Ying; Ouellette, Michel M.

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat) is a lipid-conjugated N3′→P5′ thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation), but most lines had very short telomeres (2–3 kb in size). GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM) and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM) resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1) and 69 (CD18) doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX) and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity) and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage). Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24409321

  7. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L) limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burchett, Katrina M; Yan, Ying; Ouellette, Michel M

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat) is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation), but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size). GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM) and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM) resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1) and 69 (CD18) doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX) and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity) and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage). Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24409321

  8. The limits of adaptation: humans and the predator-prey arms race.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2012-07-01

    In the history of life, species have adapted to their consumers by evolving a wide variety of defenses. By contrast, animal species harvested in the wild by humans have not adapted structurally. Nonhuman predators have high failure rates at one or more stages of an attack, indicating that victim species have spatial refuges or phenotypic defenses that permit further functional improvement. A new compilation confirms that species in the wild cannot achieve immunity from human predation with structural defenses. The only remaining options are to become undesirable or to live in or escape to places where harvesting by people is curtailed. Escalation between prey defenses and predators' weapons may be restricted under human dominance to interactions involving those low-level predators that have benefited from human overexploitation of top consumers. PMID:22759280

  9. Tea and Health: Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Tea, next to water is the cheapest beverage humans consume. Drinking the beverage tea has been considered a health-promoting habit since ancient times. The modern medicinal research is providing a scientific basis for this belief. The evidence supporting the health benefits of tea drinking grows stronger with each new study that is published in the scientific literature. Tea plant Camellia sinensis has been cultivated for thousands of years and its leaves have been used for medicinal purposes. Tea is used as a popular beverage worldwide and its ingredients are now finding medicinal benefits. Encouraging data showing cancer-preventive effects of green tea from cell-culture, animal and human studies have emerged. Evidence is accumulating that black tea may have similar beneficial effects. Tea consumption has also been shown to be useful for prevention of many debilitating human diseases that include maintenance of cardiovascular and metabolic health. Various studies suggest that polyphenolic compounds present in green and black tea are associated with beneficial effects in prevention of cardiovascular diseases, particularly of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. In addition, anti-aging, antidiabetic and many other health beneficial effects associated with tea consumption are described. Evidence is accumulating that catechins and theaflavins, which are the main polyphenolic compounds of green and black tea, respectively, are responsible for most of the physiological effects of tea. This article describes the evidences from clinical and epidemiological studies in the prevention of chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases and general health promotion associated with tea consumption. PMID:23448443

  10. Access to human, animal, and environmental journals is still limited for the One Health community*

    PubMed Central

    Vreeland, Carol E.; Alpi, Kristine M.; Pike, Caitlin A.; Whitman, Elisabeth E.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective “One Health” is an interdisciplinary approach to evaluating and managing the health and well-being of humans, animals, and the environments they share that relies on knowledge from the domains of human health, animal health, and the environmental sciences. The authors' objective was to evaluate the extent of open access (OA) to journal articles in a sample of literature from these domains. We hypothesized that OA to articles in human health or environmental journals was greater than access to animal health literature. Methods A One Health seminar series provided fifteen topics. One librarian translated each topic into a search strategy and searched four databases for articles from 2011 to 2012. Two independent investigators assigned each article to human health, the environment, animal health, all, other, or combined categories. Article and journal-level OA were determined. Each journal was also assigned a subject category and its indexing evaluated. Results Searches retrieved 2,651 unique articles from 1,138 journals; 1,919 (72%) articles came from 406 journals that contributed more than 1 article. Seventy-seven (7%) journals dealt with all 3 One Health domains; the remaining journals represented human health 487 (43%), environment 172 (15%), animal health 141 (12%), and other/combined categories 261 (23%). The proportion of OA journals in animal health (40%) differed significantly from journals categorized as human (28%), environment (28%), and more than 1 category (29%). The proportion of OA for articles by subject categories ranged from 25%–34%; only the difference between human (34%) and environment (25%) was significant. Conclusions OA to human health literature is more comparable to animal health than hypothesized. Environmental journals had less OA than anticipated. PMID:27076796

  11. The Human Bitumen Study: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Pesch, Beate; Rühl, Reinhold; Brüning, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Bitumen has attracted attention from the scientific community and regulating agencies. The debate on health effects of exposure to vapours and aerosols of bitumen during the hot application of bitumen ranges from respiratory and neurological effects to carcinogenicity. In 2000, the German Hazardous Substances Committee (AGS), in collaboration with the German Bitumen Forum, initiated the examination of a group of mastic asphalt workers and a same number of construction workers without exposure bitumen using a cross-shift design. The study was then extended to the Human Bitumen Study, and the recruitment was finished in 2008 after examination of 500 workers on 80 construction sites. Three hundred and twenty workers exposed to vapours and aerosols of bitumen at high processing temperatures and 118 workers at outdoor construction sites were included. In the Human Bitumen Study external exposure to vapours and aerosols of bitumen, internal exposure to PAH by analysing urinary 1-hydroxypyrene, the sum of hydroxyphenanthrenes and the sum of 1- and 2-hydroxynaphthalenes, irritative effects in the upper and lower airways and genotoxic effects in blood cells were investigated. The study turned out to be one of the largest investigations of workers exposed to vapours and aerosols of bitumen under current exposure conditions. The present paper summarizes its background and main topics. PMID:21369765

  12. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the Human Transportation System Study. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems (e.g., Shuttle, Titan, etc. ) as well as proposed systems (e.g., PLS, Single-Stage-to-Orbit, etc.) to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  13. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  14. Bioavailability of tocotrienols: evidence in human studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As a minor component of vitamin E, tocotrienols were evident in exhibiting biological activities such as neuroprotection, radio-protection, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and lipid lowering properties which are not shared by tocopherols. However, available data on the therapeutic window of tocotrienols remains controversial. It is important to understand the absorption and bioavailability mechanisms before conducting in-depth investigations into the therapeutic efficacy of tocotrienols in humans. In this review, we updated current evidence on the bioavailability of tocotrienols from human studies. Available data from five studies suggested that tocotrienols may reach its target destination through an alternative pathway despite its low affinity for ?-tocopherol transfer protein. This was evident when studies reported considerable amount of tocotrienols detected in HDL particles and adipose tissues after oral consumption. Besides, plasma concentrations of tocotrienols were shown to be higher when administered with food while self-emulsifying preparation of tocotrienols was shown to enhance the absorption of tocotrienols. Nevertheless, mixed results were observed based on the outcome from 24 clinical studies, focusing on the dosages, study populations and formulations used. This may be due to the variation of compositions and dosages of tocotrienols used, suggesting a need to understand the formulation of tocotrienols in the study design. Essentially, implementation of a control diet such as AHA Step 1 diet may influence the study outcomes, especially in hypercholesterolemic subjects when lipid profile might be modified due to synergistic interaction between tocotrienols and control diet. We also found that the bioavailability of tocotrienols were inconsistent in different target populations, from healthy subjects to smokers and diseased patients. In this review, the effect of dosage, composition and formulation of tocotrienols as well as study populations on the bioavailability of tocotrienols will be discussed. PMID:24410975

  15. Work, Productivity, and Human Performance: Practical Case Studies in Ergonomics, Human Factors and Human Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, T. M.; Pityn, P. J.

    This book contains 12 case histories, each based on a real-life problem, that show how a manager can use common sense, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to solve problems in human performance at work. Each case study describes a worker's problem and provides background information and an assignment; solutions are suggested. The following cases…

  16. Dual rover human habitation field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    For the last 3 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been testing a pressurized rover prototype in the deserts of Arizona to obtain human-in-the-loop performance data. This year's field trial consisted of operating two rovers simultaneously while embarking on two 7-day flight-like exploration missions. During the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) at Black Point Lava Flow and SP Mountain in Arizona, NASA human factors investigators, in cooperation with other engineers and scientists, collected data on both the daily living and working within and around the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). Both objective and subjective data were collected using standard human factors metrics. Over 305 h of crew habitability data were recorded during the field trial with 65 elements of habitation examined. Acceptability of the vehicles over the course of the missions was considered satisfactory by the majority of the crews. As with previous testing, habitation was considered acceptable by the crews, but some issues concerning stowage, Waste Containment System (WCS) volume, and sleep curtains need to be considered for redesign for the next generation vehicle.

  17. A PILOT STUDY TO COMPARE MICROBIAL AND CHEMICAL INDICATORS OF HUMAN FECAL CONTAMINATION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limitations exist in applying traditional microbial methods for the detection of human fecal contamination of water. A pilot study was undertaken to compare the microbial and chemical indicators of human fecal contamination of water. Sixty-four water samples were collected in O...

  18. Assessing the Potential and Limitations of Leveraging Food Sovereignty to Improve Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew D.; Fink Shapiro, Lilly; Wilson, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Food sovereignty has been defined as “the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems.” Human health is an implied component of this definition through the principle of healthy food. In fact, improved human health is commonly cited as a benefit of transforming food production away from the dominant practices of industrial agriculture. Yet, does the use of “ecologically sound and sustainable methods” of food production necessarily translate into better human health outcomes? Does greater choice in defining an agricultural or food system create gains in health and well-being? We elucidate the conceptual linkages between food sovereignty and human health, critically examine the empirical evidence supporting or refuting these linkages, and identify research gaps and key priorities for the food sovereignty-human health research agenda. Five domains of food sovereignty are discussed including: (1) use of agroecological management practices for food production, (2) the localization of food production and consumption, (3) promotion of social justice and equity, (4) valuation of traditional knowledge, and (5) the transformation of economic and political institutions and structures to support self-determination. We find that although there are many plausible linkages between food sovereignty and human health, the empirical evidence in support of the hypothesis that increasing food sovereignty yields improvements to human health is weak. We propose that a concerted effort to generate new empirical evidence on the health implications of these domains of food sovereignty is urgently needed, and suggest areas of research that may be crucial for addressing the gaps in the evidence base. PMID:26636062

  19. Limited Spillover to Humans from West Nile Virus Viremic Birds in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Daniel G.; Kitron, Uriel D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that impacts the health of its passerine bird hosts as well as incidentally infected humans in the United States. Intensive enzootic activity among the hosts and vectors does not always lead to human outbreaks, as is the situation throughout much of the southeastern United States. In Georgia, substantial yearly evidence of WNV in the mosquito vectors and avian hosts since 2001 has only led to 324 human cases. Although virus has been consistently isolated from mosquitoes trapped in Atlanta, GA, little is known about viral activity among the passerine hosts. A possible reason for the suppression of WNV spillover to humans is that viremic birds are absent from high human-use areas of the city. To test this hypothesis, multiseason, multihabitat, longitudinal WNV surveillance for active WNV viremia was conducted within the avian host community of urban Atlanta by collection of blood samples from wild passerine birds in five urban microhabitats. WNV was isolated from the serum of six blood samples collected from 630 (0.95%) wild passerine birds in Atlanta during 2010–2012, a proportion similar to that found in the Chicago, IL, area in 2005, when over 200 human cases were reported. Most of the viremic birds were Northern Cardinals, suggesting they may be of particular importance to the WNV transmission cycle in Georgia. Results indicated active WNV transmission in all microhabitats of urban Atlanta, except in the old-growth forest patches. The number of viremic birds was highest in Zoo Atlanta, where 3.5% of samples were viremic. Although not significant, these observations may suggest a possible transmission reduction effect of urban old-growth forests and a potential role in WNV amplification for Zoo Atlanta. Overall, spillover to humans remains a rare occurrence in urban Atlanta settings despite active WNV transmission in the avian population. PMID:24107200

  20. BrdU immunohistochemistry for studying adult neurogenesis: paradigms, pitfalls, limitations, and validation.

    PubMed

    Taupin, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is a thymidine analog that incorporates DNA of dividing cells during the S-phase of the cell cycle. As such, BrdU is used for birth dating and monitoring cell proliferation. BrdU immunohistochemistry has been instrumental for the study of the development of the nervous system, and to confirm that neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain, including in human. However, the use of BrdU for studying neurogenesis is not without pitfalls and limitations. BrdU is a toxic and mutagenic substance. It triggers cell death, the formation of teratomas, alters DNA stability, lengthens the cell cycle, and has mitogenic, transcriptional and translational effects on cells that incorporate it. All of which have profound consequences on neurogenesis. BrdU is not a marker of the S-phase of the cell cycle. As a thymidine analog, it is a marker of DNA synthesis. Therefore, studying neurogenesis with BrdU requires distinguishing cell proliferation and neurogenesis from other events involving DNA synthesis, like DNA repair, abortive cell cycle reentry and gene duplication. BrdU labeling is currently the most used technique for studying adult neurogenesis in situ. However in many instances, appropriate controls have been overlooked and events reported as the generation of new neuronal cells in the adult brain misinterpreted, which makes BrdU labeling one of the most misused techniques in neuroscience. PMID:17020783

  1. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  2. [Animal protection without limits? Human-animal relations in between anthropomorphism and objectification].

    PubMed

    Grimm, Herwig; Hartnack, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    In view of recent developments in human-animal relations, vets and ethicists face a new problem: On the one hand, animals such as mammals and birds are used extensively and are in danger to be reduced to mere production units e. g. in the agricultural production, measuring devices in laboratories, sports equipment etc. On the other hand, biologically similar animals are perceived as family members or partners and are almost treated like humans. The article summarizes the results of a workshop that dealt with reductionism and anthropomorphism in human-animal relations. Vets and ethicists tackled the question how the unequal treatment of biologically similar animals can be better understood and whether it can be ethically justified. In the first section, the problem of inconsistency in human-animals relations is briefly sketched. The second part of the article addresses the ethics of unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts. The following section inquires possible solutions and the advantages and disadvantages of biological criteria versus social criteria in animal protection. Finally, the background and reasons for our moral intuitions of injustice associated with the inconsistencies in human-animal relations are outlined. This fourth section refers to the presentation of Peter Kunzmann during the workshop on the unequal treatment of equals.The article closes with some general remarks on the issue. One main result of the workshop can be stated as follows: Due to the fact that the various human-animal relations gain their ethical justification from different ethical reasons, the unequal treatment of similar animals in different contexts is not ethically wrong per se. However, every intrusive dealing or interaction with animals is in itself in need of ethical justification. PMID:24199378

  3. A pair of roseate terns fledges three young with limited human assistance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spendelow, J.A.; Zingo, J.M.; Foss, S.

    1997-01-01

    In 1994 when the availability of small fish appeared to be relatively good, the smallest chick from an inadvertantly artificially-created 3-egg clutch received occasional supplemental feedings by humans for two weeks. These supplemental feedings probably prevented this chick from starving. During its period of most rapid growth (after the linear growth phase of its two siblings had ended), however, it did not receive supplemental feedings from humans, but was instead was fed only by the two adult birds attending the nest. All the chicks in this brood eventually fledged, indicating that the pair was capable of meeting the feeding demands of three large chicks.

  4. [Aviation and high-altitude medicine for anaesthetists. Part 4: human performance limitations and crew resource management].

    PubMed

    Egerth, Martin; Pump, Stefan; Graf, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    For pilots and doctors, as well as a variety of other professions the knowledge of human performance limitations is essential, especially in critical situations. Crew resource management was developed in the 1980s in the aviation industry in order to ensure systematic training and support in such instances. Just recently, the value is recognized not only in other high reliability organizations but also in medicine. PMID:23828086

  5. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of cannabinoids. PMID:26970363

  6. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  7. Variation in human brains may facilitate evolutionary change toward a limited range of phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Christine J.; Darlington, Richard B.; Finlay, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Individual variation is the foundation for evolutionary change, but little is known about the nature of normal variation between brains. Phylogenetic variation across mammalian brains is characterized by high inter-correlations in brain region volumes, distinct allometric scaling for each brain region and the relative independence in olfactory and limbic structures volumes from the rest of the brain. Previous work examining brain variation in individuals of some domesticated species showed that these three features of phylogenetic variation were mirrored in individual variation. We extend this analysis to the human brain and 10 of its subdivisions (e.g., isocortex, hippocampus) by using magnetic resonance imaging scans of 90 human brains ranging between 16 to 25 years of age. Human brain variation resembles both the individual variation seen in other species, and variation observed across mammalian species. That is, the relative differences in the slopes of each brain region compared to medulla size within humans and between mammals are concordant, and limbic structures scale with relative independence from other brain regions. This non-random pattern of variation suggests that developmental programs channel the variation available for selection. PMID:23363667

  8. PUSH(ing) Limits: Using Fiction in the Classroom for Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Natasha S.; Bonta, Kimberly; Horn, Philip; Moore, Erin; Gibson, Allison; Simmons, David

    2012-01-01

    The use of fiction and autobiography in social science course work has been shown to enhance students' learning experience. Using the novel PUSH, by Sapphire, we designed a curriculum supplement for the social work course, human behavior and the social environment (HBSE) that encourages students to integrate course content in an innovative way and…

  9. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and...

  10. Reasonable Limits and Exemptions: Victoria's Human Rights Charter and its Implications for Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Many people had great expectations of the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities when it came into effect in January 2008. However, Judith Bessant asks whether the provision for seeking exemptions from the charter has undermined its capacity to effectively counter age-based discrimination and, paradoxically, permitted practices…

  11. Reasonable Limits and Exemptions: Victoria's Human Rights Charter and its Implications for Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Many people had great expectations of the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities when it came into effect in January 2008. However, Judith Bessant asks whether the provision for seeking exemptions from the charter has undermined its capacity to effectively counter age-based discrimination and, paradoxically, permitted practices

  12. Vision of Space Exploration Possibilities and limits of a human space conquest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev

    Few generations of a schoolboys, which later become active and productive space researchers, have been brought up on a science fiction books. These books told us about travels to other Galaxies with velocities larger then velocity of light, meetings with friendly aliens (necessarily with communistic mentalities in Soviet Union books), star wars with ugly space monsters (in the western hemisphere books), etc. Beginning of Space age (4/10/1957) opened the door to a magic box, full of scientific discoveries, made mostly by robotic satellites and spacecraft. However, already the first human space trips clearly demonstrated that space is vigorously hostile to a human beings. Space medicine during the years since Gagarin flight, made an outstanding progress in supporting human presence at orbital stations, but the radiation hazards and problem of hypomagnetism are still opened and there is no visible path to their solution. So the optimistic slogan of 60-ies “Space is Our Place” is not supported by an almost half a century practice. Space never will be a comfortable place for soft and vulnerable humans? There is a general consensus that man will be on Mars during this century (or even its first part). This is very difficult but task it seems to be realistic after the significant advance of modern technologies will be made. But, is there any real need for humans to travel beyond the Mars orbit or to the inner regions of the Solar system? Will the age of Solar system exploration comes to its logical as it was described by Stanislav Lem in his famous book “Return from stars”? The author of this talk has more questions than answers, and thinks that PEX1 Panel on Exploration is just a right place to discuss these usually by passed topics.

  13. A study of the relation between the limit of detection and the limit of quantitation in inductively coupled plasma spectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, M.; Excoffier, S.; Mermet, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    The limit of quantitation based on a repeatability threshold concept is compared with the limit of detection in induction coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and induction coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A 5%-based limit of quantitation would normally correspond to 10 times the 3-σ based limit of detection. However, because of a possible lack of linearity of the calibration graph at low concentrations, some additional noise not taken into consideration and the possible use of time-correlated multichannel detection, this ratio of 10 cannot be used in every case. It is suggested that a suitable way of determining the limit of quantitation is to establish the plot of the percentage relative standard deviation (RSD) of the net signal as a function of the concentration in a range from the limit of detection to 50 times this limit.

  14. In vitro bidirectional permeability studies identify pharmacokinetic limitations of NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Maria D; Schellekens, Harrit; Boylan, Geraldine B; Cryan, John F; Griffin, Brendan T

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that bumetanide, an inhibitor of the Na-K-2Cl co-transporter (NKCC1), may be useful in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, from a physicochemical perspective, bumetanide may not cross the blood-brain barrier to the extent that is necessary for it to be an effective brain NKCC1 inhibitor in vivo. High plasma-protein binding, potentially high brain-tissue binding and putative efflux transporters including organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) contribute to the poor pharmacokinetic profile of bumetanide. Bidirectional permeability assays are an in vitro method to determine the impact of plasma-protein/brain tissue binding, as well as efflux transport, on the permeability of a compound. We established and validated a cell line stably overexpressing human OAT3 using lentiviral cloning techniques for use in in vitro bidirectional permeability assays. Using efflux transport studies, we show that bumetanide is a transported substrate of human OAT3, exhibiting a transport ratio of ?1.5, which is attenuated by OAT3 inhibitors. Bidirectional permeability assays were carried out in the presence and absence of either albumin or brain homogenate to elucidate the effect of plasma-protein/brain tissue binding. These tests confirmed the pharmacokinetic limitations for brain delivery of bumetanide. In this experiment, bumetanide is 53% bound to albumin, 77% bound to brain tissue and accumulates in brain cells. Moreover, we conclusively established that bumetanide is a transported substrate of OAT3. Taken together, these bidirectional permeability studies highlight the potential of efflux transporter inhibition as an augmentation strategy for enhanced delivery of bumetanide to the CNS. PMID:26673740

  15. Epidemiologic studies of behavioral health following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: limited impact or limited ability to measure?

    PubMed

    Teich, Judith L; Pemberton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Two large-scale epidemiologic federal surveys conducted in the Gulf Coast following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and intended to measure its impact on mental disorders and substance use found less dramatic results than had been anticipated. However, several smaller-scale studies conducted shortly after the spill did find increases in the prevalence of certain psychological problems among individuals surveyed. Previous federal studies conducted following two disasters-the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita-found few statistically significant changes in behavioral disorders in the wake of those events, except for individuals displaced from their homes by Katrina for 2 weeks or more. In this commentary, the authors discuss questions raised by these mixed results regarding the limitations of such studies, the behavioral health impact of the Deepwater Horizon spill compared to disasters causing more widespread loss of life and destruction of property, and the ways in which data collection following disasters might be improved to benefit public health planners. PMID:24557855

  16. Katanin p80 Regulates Human Cortical Development by Limiting Centriole and Cilia Number

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen F.; Pomp, Oz; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Kodani, Andrew; Henke, Katrin; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Woodworth, Mollie B.; Bonnard, Carine; Raj, Grace Selva; Tan, Thong Teck; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Shboul, Mohammad; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Alazami, Anas; Alowain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Harris, Matthew P.; Reversade, Bruno; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Katanin is a microtubule-severing complex whose catalytic activities are well characterized, but whose in vivo functions are incompletely understood. Human mutations in KATNB1, which encodes the noncatalytic regulatory p80 subunit of katanin, cause severe microlissencephaly. Loss of Katnb1 in mice confirms essential roles in neurogenesis and cell survival, while loss of zebrafish katnb1 reveals specific roles for katnin p80 in early and late developmental stages. Surprisingly, Katnb1 null mutant mouse embryos display hallmarks of aberrant Sonic hedgehog signaling, including holoprosencephaly. KATNB1-deficient human cells show defective proliferation and spindle structure, while Katnb1 null fibroblasts also demonstrate a remarkable excess of centrioles, with supernumerary cilia but deficient Hedgehog signaling. Our results reveal unexpected functions for KATNB1 in regulating overall centriole, mother centriole, and cilia number, and as an essential gene for normal Hedgehog signaling during neocortical development. PMID:25521379

  17. Human interaural time difference thresholds for sine tones: The high-frequency limit

    PubMed Central

    Brughera, Andrew; Dunai, Larisa; Hartmann, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The smallest detectable interaural time difference (ITD) for sine tones was measured for four human listeners to determine the dependence on tone frequency. At low frequencies, 250–700 Hz, threshold ITDs were approximately inversely proportional to tone frequency. At mid-frequencies, 700–1000 Hz, threshold ITDs were smallest. At high frequencies, above 1000 Hz, thresholds increased faster than exponentially with increasing frequency becoming unmeasurably high just above 1400 Hz. A model for ITD detection began with a biophysically based computational model for a medial superior olive (MSO) neuron that produced robust ITD responses up to 1000 Hz, and demonstrated a dramatic reduction in ITD-dependence from 1000 to 1500 Hz. Rate-ITD functions from the MSO model became inputs to binaural display models—both place based and rate-difference based. A place-based, centroid model with a rigid internal threshold reproduced almost all features of the human data. A signal-detection version of this model reproduced the high-frequency divergence but badly underestimated low-frequency thresholds. A rate-difference model incorporating fast contralateral inhibition reproduced the major features of the human threshold data except for the divergence. A combined, hybrid model could reproduce all the threshold data. PMID:23654390

  18. Drosophila melanogaster in the Study of Human Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative diseases are devastating illnesses that predominantly affect elderly people. The majority of the diseases are associated with pathogenic oligomers from misfolded proteins, eventually causing the formation of aggregates and the progressive loss of neurons in the brain and nervous system. Several of these proteinopathies are sporadic and the cause of pathogenesis remains elusive. Heritable forms are associated with genetic defects, suggesting that the affected protein is causally related to disease formation and/or progression. The limitations of human genetics, however, make it necessary to use model systems to analyse affected genes and pathways in more detail. During the last two decades, research using the genetically amenable fruitfly has established Drosophila melanogaster as a valuable model system in the study of human neurodegeneration. These studies offer reliable models for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and motor neuron diseases, as well as models for trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, including ataxias and Huntington’s disease. As a result of these studies, several signalling pathways including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and target of rapamycin (TOR), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, have been shown to be deregulated in models of proteinopathies, suggesting that two or more initiating events may trigger disease formation in an age-related manner. Moreover, these studies also demonstrate that the fruitfly can be used to screen chemical compounds for their potential to prevent or ameliorate the disease, which in turn can directly guide clinical research and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20522007

  19. Spatial Genetic Structure Patterns of Phenotype-Limited and Boundary-Limited Expanding Populations: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qiang; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Lu, Bin; Fu, Jinzhong; Wang, Qian; Qi, Dunwu

    2014-01-01

    Range expansions may create a unique spatial genetic pattern characterized by alternate genetically homogeneous domains and allele frequency clines. Previous attempts to model range expansions have mainly focused on the loss of genetic diversity during expansions. Using individual-based models, we examined spatial genetic patterns under two expansion scenarios, boundary-limited range expansions (BLRE) and phenotype-limited range expansions (PhLRE). Our simulation revealed that the genetic diversity within populations lost quickly during the range expansion, while the genetic difference accumulated between populations. Consequently, accompanying the expansions, the overall diversity featured a slow decrease. Specifically, during BLREs, high speed of boundary motion facilitated the maintenance of total genetic diversity and sharpened genetic clines. Very slight constraints on boundary motion of BLREs drastically narrowed the homogeneous domains and increased the allele frequency fluctuations from those levels exhibited by PhLREs. Even stronger constraints, however, surprisingly brought the width of homogeneous domains and the allele frequency fluctuations back to the normal levels of PhLREs. Furthermore, high migration rates maintained a higher total genetic diversity than low ones did during PhLREs. Whereas, the total genetic diversities during BLREs showed a contrary pattern: higher when migration was low than those when migration was high. Besides, the increase of migration rates helped maintain a greater number of homogeneous domains during PhLREs, but their effects on the number of homogeneous domains during BLREs were not monotonous. Previous studies have showed that the homogenous domains can merge to form a few broad domains as the expansion went on, leading to fewer homogeneous domains. Our simulations, meanwhile, revealed that the range expansions could also rebuild homogeneous domains from the clines during the range expansion. It is possible that that the number of homogeneous domains was determined by the interaction of merging and newly emerging homogeneous domains. PMID:24465700

  20. Use of a thermoplastic material for identification of human remains is limited.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    There has been a recent effort to promote the use of a thermoplastic bite impression material for the identification of children. The American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO) is a certification board for forensic dentists in the United States and Canada. It is the position of the ABFO that this technique is of limited value when used for the dental identification of children. PMID:15672511

  1. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607...

  2. 40 CFR 26.1606 - Human Studies Review Board review of proposed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of proposed human research. 26.1606 Section 26.1606 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1606...

  3. 40 CFR 26.1607 - Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of completed human research. 26.1607 Section 26.1607 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1607...

  4. 40 CFR 26.1606 - Human Studies Review Board review of proposed human research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human Studies Review Board review of proposed human research. 26.1606 Section 26.1606 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1606...

  5. ERBS human factors analysis: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, K. L.; Weger, C.

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of human factors into the system development process and the benefits derived are discussed. The human factors analysis task for the Earth radiation budget satellite (ERBS) payload operations control center (POCC) is a pathfinder in the new applications approach to this discipline within the mission and data operations directorate. The topics covered include: discussions of the motivation for human factors analysis; the involvement of the human factors research group (HFRG) with project and system developers, and some examples of human factors issues addressed in the ERBS analysis task.

  6. Metabolomic studies of human gastric cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Bar, Nadav S

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is a field of study in systems biology that involves the identification and quantification of metabolites present in a biological system. Analyzing metabolic differences between unperturbed and perturbed networks, such as cancerous and non-cancerous samples, can provide insight into underlying disease pathology, disease prognosis and diagnosis. Despite the large number of review articles concerning metabolomics and its application in cancer research, biomarker and drug discovery, these reviews do not focus on a specific type of cancer. Metabolomics may provide biomarkers useful for identification of early stage gastric cancer, potentially addressing an important clinical need. Here, we present a short review on metabolomics as a tool for biomarker discovery in human gastric cancer, with a primary focus on its use as a predictor of anticancer drug chemosensitivity, diagnosis, prognosis, and metastasis. PMID:25009381

  7. Evaluation of streams in selected communities for the application of limited-detail study methods for flood-insurance studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, Ernest D.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated 2,349 communities in 1984 for the application of limited-detail flood-insurance study methods, that is, methods with a reduced effort and cost compared to the detailed studies. Limited-detail study methods were found to be appropriate for 1,705 communities, while detailed studies were appropriate for 62 communities and no studies were appropriate for 582 communities. The total length of streams for which limited-detail studies are recommended is 9 ,327 miles with a corresponding cost of $23,007,000. This results in average estimated costs for conducting limited-detail studies of $2,500 per mile of studied stream length. The purpose of the report is to document the limited-detail study methods and the results of the evaluation. (USGS)

  8. The Humanized NOD/SCID Mouse as a Preclinical Model to Study the Fate of Encapsulated Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Oberholzer, Jose; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Tuch, Bernard E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite encouraging results in animal models, the transplantation of microencapsulated islets into humans has not yet reached the therapeutic level. Recent clinical trials using microencapsulated human islets in barium alginate showed the presence of dense fibrotic overgrowth around the microcapsules with no viable islets. The major reason for this is limited understanding of what occurs when encapsulated human islets are allografted. This warrants the need for a suitable small animal model. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human PBMCs (called humanized NOD/SCID mice) as a preclinical model. In this model, human T cell engraftment could be achieved, and CD45+ cells were observed in the spleen and peripheral blood. Though the engrafted T cells caused a small fibrotic overgrowth around the microencapsulated human islets, this failed to stop the encapsulated islets from functioning in the diabetic recipient mice. The ability of encapsulated islets to survive in this mouse model might partly be attributed to the presence of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-10, which are known to induce graft tolerance. In conclusion, this study showed that the hu-NOD/SCID mouse is not a suitable preclinical model to study the allograft rejection mechanisms of encapsulated human islets. As another result, the maintained viability of transplanted islets on the NOD/SCID background emphasized a critical role of protective mechanisms in autoimmune diabetes transplanted subjects due to specific immunoregulatory effects provided by IL-4 and IL-10. PMID:20703439

  9. Antiviral Responses by Swine Primary Bronchoepithelial Cells Are Limited Compared to Human Bronchoepithelial Cells Following Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Mary J.; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Culhane, Marie R.; Wentworth, David E.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Swine generate reassortant influenza viruses because they can be simultaneously infected with avian and human influenza; however, the features that restrict influenza reassortment in swine and human hosts are not fully understood. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) act as the first line of defense against influenza virus infection of respiratory epithelium. To determine if human and swine have different capacities to mount an antiviral response the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and normal swine bronchial epithelial (NSBE) cells was evaluated following infection with human (H3N2), swine (H1N1), and avian (H5N3, H5N2, H5N1) influenza A viruses. Expression of IFNλ and ISGs were substantially higher in NHBE cells compared to NSBE cells following H5 avian influenza virus infection compared to human or swine influenza virus infection. This effect was associated with reduced H5 avian influenza virus replication in human cells at late times post infection. Further, RIG-I expression was lower in NSBE cells compared to NHBE cells suggesting reduced virus sensing. Together, these studies identify key differences in the antiviral response between human and swine respiratory epithelium alluding to differences that may govern influenza reassortment. PMID:23875024

  10. Understanding the limits of animal models as predictors of human biology: lessons learned from the sbv IMPROVER Species Translation Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Carole; Dulize, Rémi H. J.; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas; Jeremy Rice, J.; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Meyer, Pablo; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Inferring how humans respond to external cues such as drugs, chemicals, viruses or hormones is an essential question in biomedicine. Very often, however, this question cannot be addressed because it is not possible to perform experiments in humans. A reasonable alternative consists of generating responses in animal models and ‘translating’ those results to humans. The limitations of such translation, however, are far from clear, and systematic assessments of its actual potential are urgently needed. sbv IMPROVER (systems biology verification for Industrial Methodology for PROcess VErification in Research) was designed as a series of challenges to address translatability between humans and rodents. This collaborative crowd-sourcing initiative invited scientists from around the world to apply their own computational methodologies on a multilayer systems biology dataset composed of phosphoproteomics, transcriptomics and cytokine data derived from normal human and rat bronchial epithelial cells exposed in parallel to 52 different stimuli under identical conditions. Our aim was to understand the limits of species-to-species translatability at different levels of biological organization: signaling, transcriptional and release of secreted factors (such as cytokines). Participating teams submitted 49 different solutions across the sub-challenges, two-thirds of which were statistically significantly better than random. Additionally, similar computational methods were found to range widely in their performance within the same challenge, and no single method emerged as a clear winner across all sub-challenges. Finally, computational methods were able to effectively translate some specific stimuli and biological processes in the lung epithelial system, such as DNA synthesis, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, translation, immune/inflammation and growth factor/proliferation pathways, better than the expected response similarity between species. Contact: pmeyerr@us.ibm.com or Julia.Hoeng@pmi.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25236459

  11. The importance of human performance and procedures in limiting severe accident risks

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the defense in depth concept and redundancy in safety systems utilized, complex industrial plants, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) can be operated safely. This capability has been demonstrated by many years of safe operation by numerous NPPs in the US and abroad. However, the occurrence of severe accidents has also demonstrated that constant vigilance in a number of areas is necessary to ensure continued safe operation. The areas noted as particularly important are Design, Organization and Management, Maintenance, and Operations (Human Performance). 18 refs.

  12. "Revolting to humanity": oversights, limitations, and complications of the English Legitimacy Act of 1926.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses three areas that limited the effectiveness of the English Legitimacy Act of 1926. First, re-registration was public, expensive, and time-consuming. Second, the Treasury Office used the change in the law of intestacy to refuse more distant relatives' claims on estates. Third, the law separated legitimacy from nationality, thus denying citizenship to legitimated children born abroad of British fathers and foreign mothers. In short, both because of parliamentary oversights and civil servants' narrow interpretations of the law, relatively few children took advantage of the Act, and the minority who did, rather than being 'illegitimate' or 'legitimate', were a third category, the 'legitimated'. PMID:21299009

  13. [Treatment of the human body : the possibilities and limits of plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermes, C

    2015-01-01

    The desire for authenticity is often cited as a motive for making use of plastic surgery. This article aims to elaborate on the meaning of this particular authenticity. At the same time, it discusses reasons that justify or forbid a plastic surgery intervention in the light of ethics. For this purpose, a distinction is made between "objective body" (Krper) and "subjective body" (Leib), and the objectives of medical actions are questioned. Through the terminological differentiation between integrity (Integritt), prosperity (Wohlergehen), and well-being (Wohlbefinden), these objectives are qualified and the limits of medical actions are determined. PMID:25604537

  14. Study of human sperm motility post cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Bhavni; Kumar, Sushil; Talwar, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a widely used technique to preserve the fertility of males. It can also benefit the armed forces personnel who are to be sent for long recruitments, while leaving their families behind. This study, apart from studying the effects of freezing and thawing, reveals the effect of the post thaw interval on the motility of the human spermatozoa and thus widens the insemination window period. Methods A detailed semen analysis was carried out as per the WHO guidelines for 25 samples. The samples were then washed, analysed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The semen samples were subsequently thawed and similarly analysed after 20 min and 40 min of thawing. This was then followed by statistical analysis of the comparative motilities. Results Motility of sperms is found to decrease after cryopreservation. However, the study revealed that after thawing a significant increase in the motility of the sperms was noted with the progression of time (p < 0.05). Conclusion By simulating conditions similar to the in vivo conditions for the post thaw semen samples, we can safely wait, confirm the parameters like motility and count, and then inseminate the samples instead of blindly inseminating them immediately after thawing. PMID:25382909

  15. Optimizing human apyrase to treat arterial thrombosis and limit reperfusion injury without increasing bleeding risk

    PubMed Central

    Moeckel, Douglas; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Sun, Xiaofeng; Broekman, M. Johan; Nguyen, Annie; Drosopoulos, Joan H. F.; Marcus, Aaron J.; Robson, Simon C.; Chen, Ridong; Abendschein, Dana

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy to restore blood flow through blocked arteries, simultaneous inhibition of platelet P2Y12 receptors with the current standard of care neither completely prevents recurrent thrombosis nor provides satisfactory protection against reperfusion injury. Additionally, these antiplatelet drugs increase the risk of bleeding. To devise a different strategy, we engineered and optimized the apyrase activity of human nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (CD39L3) to enhance scavenging of extracellular adenosine diphosphate, a predominant ligand of P2Y12 receptors. The resulting recombinant protein, APT102, exhibited greater than four times higher adenosine diphosphatase activity and a 50 times longer plasma half-life than did native apyrase. Treatment with APT102 before coronary fibrinolysis with intravenous recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator in conscious dogs completely prevented thrombotic reocclusion and significantly decreased infarction size by 81% without increasing bleeding time. In contrast, clopidogrel did not prevent coronary reocclusion and increased bleeding time. In a murine model of myocardial reperfusion injury caused by transient coronary artery occlusion, APT102 also decreased infarct size by 51%, whereas clopidogrel was not effective. These preclinical data suggest that APT102 should be tested for its ability to safely and effectively maximize the benefits of myocardial reperfusion therapy in patients with arterial thrombosis. PMID:25100739

  16. Senescence occurs with hTERT repression and limited telomere shortening in human oral keratinocytes cultured with feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mo K; Kameta, Ayako; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Baluda, Marcel A; Park, No-Hee

    2004-06-01

    We investigated the phenotypic and molecular alterations in normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK) during in vitro replication in two different culture conditions. The cells were cultured either in chemically defined Keratinocyte Growth Medium (KGM) without feeder layers or in serum-containing flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) medium with feeder layers. Primary NHOK underwent 22 +/- 3 population doublings (PDs) in KGM and 42 +/- 4 PDs in FAD medium, reflecting 52% increase in replication capacity with feeder layers. In both culture conditions, exponentially replicating NHOK demonstrated telomerase activity and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Telomerase activity and hTERT expression were rapidly diminished in senescing NHOK, which exhibited small decrease of telomere length for the remaining limited cellular replications until the complete arrest of cell division. However, telomere length in senescent NHOK was 6.7 +/- 0.5 kilobase pairs (kbps), significantly longer than that (5.12 kbps) of senescent human fibroblasts. The onset of senescence was accompanied with marked induction of p16(INK4A), and this occurred in both culture systems using either KGM or FAD medium. These results indicate that replicative senescence of NHOK is associated with loss of telomerase activity followed by limited telomere shortening. PMID:15095283

  17. Generation of a suite of 3D computer-generated breast phantoms from a limited set of human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported on a three-dimensional computer-generated breast phantom, based on empirical human image data, including a realistic finite-element based compression model that was capable of simulating multimodality imaging data. The computerized breast phantoms are a hybrid of two phantom generation techniques, combining empirical breast CT (bCT) data with flexible computer graphics techniques. However, to date, these phantoms have been based on single human subjects. In this paper, the authors report on a new method to generate multiple phantoms, simulating additional subjects from the limited set of original dedicated breast CT data. The authors developed an image morphing technique to construct new phantoms by gradually transitioning between two human subject datasets, with the potential to generate hundreds of additional pseudoindependent phantoms from the limited bCT cases. The authors conducted a preliminary subjective assessment with a limited number of observers (n= 4) to illustrate how realistic the simulated images generated with the pseudoindependent phantoms appeared. Methods: Several mesh-based geometric transformations were developed to generate distorted breast datasets from the original human subject data. Segmented bCT data from two different human subjects were used as the 'base' and 'target' for morphing. Several combinations of transformations were applied to morph between the 'base' and 'target' datasets such as changing the breast shape, rotating the glandular data, and changing the distribution of the glandular tissue. Following the morphing, regions of skin and fat were assigned to the morphed dataset in order to appropriately assign mechanical properties during the compression simulation. The resulting morphed breast was compressed using a finite element algorithm and simulated mammograms were generated using techniques described previously. Sixty-two simulated mammograms, generated from morphing three human subject datasets, were used in a preliminary observer evaluation where four board certified breast radiologists with varying amounts of experience ranked the level of realism (from 1 ='fake' to 10 ='real') of the simulated images. Results: The morphing technique was able to successfully generate new and unique morphed datasets from the original human subject data. The radiologists evaluated the realism of simulated mammograms generated from the morphed and unmorphed human subject datasets and scored the realism with an average ranking of 5.87 {+-} 1.99, confirming that overall the phantom image datasets appeared more 'real' than 'fake.' Moreover, there was not a significant difference (p > 0.1) between the realism of the unmorphed datasets (6.0 {+-} 1.95) compared to the morphed datasets (5.86 {+-} 1.99). Three of the four observers had overall average rankings of 6.89 {+-} 0.89, 6.9 {+-} 1.24, 6.76 {+-} 1.22, whereas the fourth observer ranked them noticeably lower at 2.94 {+-} 0.7. Conclusions: This work presents a technique that can be used to generate a suite of realistic computerized breast phantoms from a limited number of human subjects. This suite of flexible breast phantoms can be used for multimodality imaging research to provide a known truth while concurrently producing realistic simulated imaging data.

  18. A Brief History of Soils and Human Health Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Sauer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    The idea that there are links between soils and human health is an ancient one. The Bible depicts Moses as understanding that fertile soil was essential to the well-being of his people in approximately 1400 B.C. as they entered Canaan, and in 400 B.C. Hippocrates provided a list of things that should be considered in a proper medical evaluation, including the ground. Moving into the 18th and 19th Centuries, some North American farmers have been documented as recognizing a link between soils and human vitality. However, the recognition of links between soils and human health by these early people was based on casual observations leading to logical conclusions rather than scientific investigation. In the 1900s the idea that soils influence human health gained considerable traction. At least three chapters in the 1938 USDA Yearbook of Agriculture included recognition of the importance of soil as the origin of many of the mineral elements necessary for human health and in the 1957 USDA Yearbook of Agriculture scientists realized that soils were not only important in the supply of essential nutrients, but that they could also supply toxic levels of elements to the human diet. The U.S. Department of Agriculture established the Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research Unit (PSNRU) on the Cornell University campus in 1940 with a mission to conduct research at the interface of human nutrition and agriculture to improve the nutritional quality and health-promoting properties of food crops. A major human health breakthrough in 1940 was the isolation of antibiotic compounds from soil organisms by the research group at Rutgers University lead by Selman Waksman. Soil microorganisms create antibiotic compounds in an effort to gain a competitive advantage in the soil ecosystem. Humans have been able to isolate those compounds and use them advantageously in the fight against bacterial infections. Waksman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1952, the only soil scientist to date to be awarded a Nobel Prize. In the 1940s and 50s William Albrecht of the University of Missouri became interested in links between soils and human health, an interest that lead to the publication of several papers. Albrecht's works focused on links between soil fertility and dental health, with a particular focus on the relationships between soil fertility and dental cavities. However, Albrecht did extend the relationships between soil fertility and human health out to broader, more general health issues in some of his writings as well. Well-known figures such as Sir Albert Howard and J.I. Rodale also published works in the 1940s that included soils and human health components. Then André Voisin published "Soil, Grass, and Cancer" in 1959. Much of Voisin's work focused on nutrient content in soils, including both nutrient deficiencies and imbalances, and how that influences nutrient status in plants and animals that are in turn consumed by humans. Several health problems are discussed, including but not limited to birth defects, goiter, mental illness, diabetes, and cancer. Voisin concluded that the medical profession had largely ignored soils in their efforts to improve human health, but that soil science should be the foundation of preventative medicine. Soils and human health studies continued in the later part of the 20th Century. The health effects of exposures to radioactive elements in soils received considerable attention after the 1986 Chernobyl incident, however, even prior to Chernobyl radionuclides in the soil and how they may affect human health were receiving attention. Investigations into the effects of heavy metals in soils became a common theme as did organic chemicals in soils and the effects of trace elements on human health. Following up on the discovery of antibiotics, soil organisms received increased attention as they related to human health. By the end of the 1900s, M.A. Oliver (1997) noted that "… there is a dearth of quantitative information on the relations between elements in the soil and human health;…there is much speculation and anecdotal evidence." The idea that soils influence human health is not new, it has existed for thousands of years and gained considerable attention in the 20th Century. However, the scientific study of soils and human health is a recent undertaking. Reference Oliver, M.A. 1997. Soil and human health: a review. European Journal of Soil Science 48:573-592.

  19. Brain temperature and limits on transcranial cooling in humans: quantitative modeling results.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D A; Nunneley, S A

    1998-09-01

    Selective brain cooling (SBC) of varying strengths has been demonstrated in a number of mammals and appears to play a role in systemic thermoregulation. Although primates lack obvious specialization for SBC, the possibility of brain cooling in humans has been debated for many years. This paper reports on the use of mathematical modeling to explore whether surface cooling can control effectively the temperature of the human cerebrum. The brain was modeled as a hemisphere with a volume of 1.33 1 and overlying layers of cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. Each component was assigned appropriate dimensions, physical properties and physiological characteristics that were determined from the literature. The effects of blood flow and of thermal conduction were modeled using the steady-state form of the bio-heat equation. Input parameters included core (arterial) temperature: normal (37 degrees C) or hyperthermic (40 degrees C), air temperature: warm (30 degrees C) or hot (40 degrees C), and sweat evaporation rate: 0, 0.25, or 0.50 l x m(-2) x h(-1). The resulting skin temperatures of the model ranged from 31.8 degrees C to 40.2 degrees C, values which are consistent with data obtained from the literature. Cerebral temperatures were generally insensitive to surface conditions (air temperature and evaporation rate), which affected only the most superficial level of the cerebrum (< or =1.5 mm) The remaining parenchymal temperatures were 0.2-0.3 degrees C above arterial temperatures, regardless of surface conditions. This held true even for the worst-case conditions combining core hyperthermia in a hot environment with zero evaporative cooling. Modeling showed that the low surface-to-volume ratio, low tissue conductivity, and high rate of cerebral perfusion combine to minimize the potential impact of surface cooling, whether by transcranial venous flow or by conduction through intervening layers to the skin or mucosal surfaces. The dense capillary network in the brain assures that its temperature closely follows arterial temperature and is controlled through systemic thermoregulation independent of head surface temperature. A review of the literature reveals several independent lines of evidence which support these findings and indicate the absence of functionally significant transcranial venous flow in either direction. Given the fact that humans sometimes work under conditions which produce face and scalp temperatures that are above core temperature, a transcranial thermal link would not necessarily protect the brain, but might instead increase its vulnerability to environmentally induced thermal injury. PMID:9754976

  20. Safety, identity and consent: a limited defense of reproductive human cloning.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Some opponents of reproductive human cloning have argued that, because of its experimental nature, any attempt to create a child by way of cloning would risk serious birth defects or genetic abnormalities and would therefore be immoral. Some versions of this argument appeal to the consent of the person to be conceived in this way. In particular, they assume that if an experimental reproductive technology has not yet been shown to be safe, then, before we use it, we are morally obligated to get either the actual consent or the presumed consent of the person to be conceived. In this article, I attempt to explain the appeal of such consent-based arguments as deriving from a mistaken view of personal identity. I then argue that since this view is false, such arguments are unsound. Finally, I argue that even if reproductive cloning is unsafe, it may still be morally permissible in some circumstances. PMID:17039631

  1. Combined spectrophotometry and tensile measurements of human connective tissues: potentials and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Markus; Sichting, Freddy; Baselt, Tobias; Hartmann, Peter; Aust, Gabriela; Hammer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Strain-dependent transmission data of nine iliotibial tract specimens are determined using a custom-built optical setup with a halogen light source and an industrial norm material testing machine. Polarized light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that lateral contraction of collagen structures is responsible for total intensity variations during a 20-cycle preconditioning and a 5-cycle tensile test. Tensile force progress is opposite to total transmission progress. Due to dehydration, wavelength-specific radiation intensity shifting is determined during the test, primarily noticeable in a water absorption band between 1400 and 1500 nm. The results show the capability of integrating spectrophotometry technology into biomechanics for determining structural alterations of human collagen due to applied strain. Being more sensitive to drying, spectrophotometry may likely serve as a quality control in stress-strain testing of biological structures.

  2. Limited diagnostic usefulness of antibodies to cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella in early-treated human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Baldi, P C; Giambartolomei, G H; Wallach, J C; Velikovsky, C A; Fossati, C A

    2001-01-01

    Antibodies to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella have been shown to be useful for the diagnosis of human brucellosis; however, some early-diagnosed patients lack such an antibody response while having high titers of antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To address which factors determine this serological discrepancy in the early stages of brucellosis we examined the antibody response to CP and LPS of 21 patients involved in an outbreak of B. melitensis infection who had a short duration of clinical illness at diagnosis (3-40 d). At diagnosis, antibodies to LPS (IgM and/or IgG) were found in all patients, while anti-CP antibodies were detected in 16 subjects (76%). At 6 weeks post-diagnosis IgG to CP (with or without IgM) had been detected in 13 patients and IgM alone had been found in 4; however, 4 other patients (19%) had no response to CP. No significant differences were found between these 3 groups in terms of age, gender, antimicrobial agents or factors that could hamper the immune response. Notably, however, the 4 non-responders and 3 of the 4 patients having only IgM to CP had started antibiotic therapy within 14 d post-symptoms, while treatment was started later in 9 of 13 patients who developed anti-CP IgG. In addition, maximum titers of IgG to CP tended to be lower in early-treated patients. These results suggest that very early antibiotic therapy hampers the antibody response to Brucella CP but has little impact on the anti-LPS response. Given the higher specificity of the former and the higher sensitivity of the latter, both reactivities should be measured in order to diagnose human brucellosis. PMID:11303810

  3. Antecedent Avian Immunity Limits Tangential Transmission of West Nile Virus to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jennifer L.; Kluh, Susanne; Reisen, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus maintained and amplified among birds and tangentially transmitted to humans and horses which may develop terminal neuroinvasive disease. Outbreaks typically have a three-year pattern of silent introduction, rapid amplification and subsidence, followed by intermittent recrudescence. Our hypothesis that amplification to outbreak levels is contingent upon antecedent seroprevalence within maintenance host populations was tested by tracking WNV transmission in Los Angeles, California from 2003 through 2011. Methods Prevalence of antibodies against WNV was monitored weekly in House Finches and House Sparrows. Tangential or spillover transmission was measured by seroconversions in sentinel chickens and by the number of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) cases reported to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Results Elevated seroprevalence in these avian populations was associated with the subsidence of outbreaks and in the antecedent dampening of amplification during succeeding years. Dilution of seroprevalence by recruitment resulted in the progressive loss of herd immunity following the 2004 outbreak, leading to recrudescence during 2008 and 2011. WNV appeared to be a significant cause of death in these avian species, because the survivorship of antibody positive birds significantly exceeded that of antibody negative birds. Cross-correlation analysis showed that seroprevalence was negatively correlated prior to the onset of human cases and then positively correlated, peaking at 46 weeks after the onset of tangential transmission. Antecedent seroprevalence during winter (Jan Mar) was negatively correlated with the number of WNND cases during the succeeding summer (JulSep). Conclusions Herd immunity levels within after hatching year avian maintenance host populations <10% during the antecedent late winter and spring period were followed on three occasions by outbreaks of WNND cases during the succeeding summer. Because mosquitoes feed almost exclusively on these avian species, amplification was directly related to the availability of receptive non-immune hosts. PMID:22457819

  4. O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Paolo; National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. 'Lazzaro Spallanzani', Via Portuense 292, I-00149 Roma ; Gullotta, Francesca; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo; Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, Piazza Umberto I 1, I-87100 Bari ; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. {yields} O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. {yields} Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10{sup -5} and 8.3 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, and h = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} and 8.5 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 {sup o}C. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O{sub 2} does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

  5. PLESA: Program for Persons of Limited English-Speaking Ability. Ten Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jack; And Others

    These ten case studies of the Program for Persons of Limited English-Speaking Ability (PLESA) report different approaches to providing training and employment assistance to unemployed persons of limited English-speaking ability. (A summary report of forty-seven projects is available separately. See Note.) The first four describe projects conducted…

  6. Red, Yellow, Blue: A Primary Study of the Strengths, Limitations and Challenges of Arts Magnet Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halquist, Don

    This primary, exploratory study combines the limited literature on arts magnet schools with the writings of arts activists and the narratives of several arts magnet school administrators in an attempt to understand arts magnet schools better. The paper illuminates some of the strengths of arts magnet schools as well as some of the limitations and…

  7. [Seroepidemiologic study of human plague in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Leroy, F

    1997-01-01

    An IgG anti-F1 Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) has been developed for plague diagnosis in the Malagasy republic. The sensitivity of the test was 91.4% and the specificity 98.5%. This technique is cheap and the cross reaction with other infections diseases prevalent in Madagascar is very limited. During the urban plague outbreak (Mahajanga city, 1995), the positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 95.2% and 97% respectively. During this outbreak, the usefulness of the Elisa test for retrospective individual serodiagnosis was confirmed. Furthermore, the test confirmed plague among suspect patients without bacteriological diagnosis. The test was used for a sero-epidemiological study. Eight villages in the endemic area were investigated and 900 persons were studied. The overall seroprevalence was 6 times the officially prevalence of plague, notified at the Central Plague Laboratory. A large disparity of the seroprevalence was observed in the endemic area, with variation from < 1.5% to 15.5%. A high incidence of asymptomatic infections due to Yersinia pestis was found. PMID:9309233

  8. Subjective Quantitative Studies of Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Amartya Sen's writings have articulated the importance of human agency, and identified the need for information on agency freedom to inform our evaluation of social arrangements. Many approaches to poverty reduction stress the need for empowerment. This paper reviews "subjective quantitative measures of human agency at the individual level." It…

  9. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise

    PubMed Central

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power () is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P < 0.05) despite an increase in right atrial pressure (RAP) and a tendency (P = 0.056) for a reduction in left ventricular transmural filling pressure (LVFP). Atrial pacing increased HRmax from 184 ± 2 to 206 ± 3 beats min−1 (P < 0.05), but remained similar to the control condition at all intensities because of a lower SV and LVFP (P < 0.05). No differences in arterial pressure, peripheral haemodynamics, catecholamines or were observed, but pacing increased the rate pressure product and RAP (P < 0.05). Atrial pacing had a similar effect on haemodynamics during KEE, except that pacing decreased RAP. In conclusion, the human heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict close to . Key points During high intensity whole-body exercise, systemic and contracting skeletal muscle O2 delivery and uptake (>) are compromised, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We evaluated the effect of a ∼20 beats min−1 increase in heart rate (HR) by right atrial pacing during incremental cycling and knee-extensor exercise on cardiac output () and stroke volume (SV). An increase in HR during both exercise modalities did not alter due to a proportional decrease in SV. The lower SV during atrial pacing in the cycling trial was associated with a diminished cardiac filling pressure, but similar arterial pressure. The results demonstrate that the human heart can achieve a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit cardiac performance in trained human subjects. Instead, restrictions in ventricular filling appear to compromise cardiac preload, SV and at exercise intensities close to . PMID:24190933

  10. Design and testing of a high-speed treadmill to measure ground reaction forces at the limit of human gait.

    PubMed

    Bundle, Matthew W; Powell, Michael O; Ryan, Laurence J

    2015-09-01

    Investigations focused on the gait and physiological limits of human speed have been on-going for more than a century. However, due to measurement limitation a kinetic understanding of the foot-ground collision and how these dynamics differ between individuals to confer speed and limit gait has only recently begun to come forth. Therefore, we designed and tested an instrumented high-speed force treadmill to measure the forces occurring at the limits of human performance. The treadmill was designed to maximize flexural stiffness and natural frequency by using a honeycomb sandwich panel as the bed surface and a flexible drive shaft between the drive roller and servo motor to reduce the mass of the supported elements which contribute to the system's response frequency. The functional performance of the force treadmill met or exceeded the measurement criteria established for ideal force plates: high natural frequency (z-axis = 113 Hz), low crosstalk between components of the force (Fx/Fz = 0.0020[SD = 0.0010]; Fy/Fz = 0.0016[SD = 0.0003]), a linear response (R(2) > 0.999) for loading with known weights (range: 44-3857 N), and an accuracy of 2.5[SD = 1.7] mm and 2.8[SD = 1.5] mm in the x and y-axes, respectively, for the point of force application. In dynamic testing at running speeds up to 10 m s(-1), the measured durations and magnitudes of force application were similar between the treadmill and over-ground running using a force platform. This design provides a precise instrumented treadmill capable of recording multi-axis ground reaction forces applied during the foot ground contacts of the fastest men and animals known to science. PMID:26143150

  11. Today's ``safe" radiofrequency (RF) exposure limits DON'T protect human health near transmitters!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2005-03-01

    Maxwell's theory implies that electromagnetic (EM) radiation carries both energy and momentum. ``The momentum may have both linear and angular contributions; angular momentum [AM] has a spin part associated with polarization and an orbital part associated with spatial distribution. Any interaction between radiation and matter is inevitably accompanied by an exchange of momentum. This often has mechanical consequences ..."^2 Voluntary consensus standards [ANSI C95; NCRP; INCIRP] protect human health from most thermal [energy transfer] effects, but no standards yet exist to protect health against athermal [momentum transfer] effects, though laboratory transfer of spin AM was reported by 1935^3 and of orbital AM by 1992^2 for an optical vortex [tip of Poynting vector (PV) traces a helix about the beam axis]. In the far field of a dipole RF transmitter, radiation is linearly polarized (minimal spin AM) and locally approximated by a plane wave (zero orbital AM), but in the near field the orbital AM is non-zero [tip of PV traces an ellipse^4 in air] implying an athermal hazard [e.g., brain tumors in cellular phone users] against which no standard now in use anywhere in the world protects! ^2 L. Allen et al. Phys. Rev. A 45:8185-9(1992). ^3 R.A. Beth, Phys. Rev. 48:471(1935); 50:115-25 (1936). ^4 F. Landstorfer, Archiv für Elektronik und übertragungstechnik 26:189-96(1972) [in German].

  12. 78 FR 35031 - Human Studies Review Board Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AGENCY Human Studies Review Board Advisory Committee AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Request for Nominations to the Human Studies Review Board (HSRB) Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The... candidates with expertise in bioethics, biostatistics and human health risk assessment to be considered...

  13. Testing paradigm for prediction of development-limiting barriers and human drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, V G; Lane, J H; Kadambi, V J; Bouchard, P; Lee, F W; Balani, S K; Miwa, G T; Smith, P F; Alden, C L

    2004-11-01

    The financial investment grows exponentially as a new chemical entity advances through each stage of discovery and development. The opportunity exists for the modern toxicologist to significantly impact expenditures by the early prediction of potential toxicity/side effect barriers to development by aggressive evaluation of development-limiting liabilities early in drug discovery. Improved efficiency in pharmaceutical research and development lies both in leveraging "best in class" technology and integration with pharmacologic activities during hit-to-lead and early lead optimization stages. To meet this challenge, a discovery assay by stage (DABS) paradigm should be adopted. The DABS clearly delineates to discovery project teams the timing and type of assay required for advancement of compounds to each subsequent level of discovery and development. An integrative core pathology function unifying Drug Safety Evaluation, Molecular Technologies and Clinical Research groups that effectively spans all phases of drug discovery and development is encouraged to drive the DABS. The ultimate goal of such improved efficiency being the accurate prediction of toxicity and side effects that would occur in development before commitment of the large prerequisite resource. Good justification of this approach is that every reduction of development attrition by 10% results in an estimated increase in net present value by $100 million. PMID:15522258

  14. Studying Food Reward and Motivation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Subramaniam, Naresh; Cambridge, Victoria C.; Medic, Nenad; Farooqi, Ismaa Sadaf; Fletcher, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in studying reward processing in humans is to go beyond subjective self-report measures and quantify different aspects of reward such as hedonics, motivation, and goal value in more objective ways. This is particularly relevant for the understanding of overeating and obesity as well as their potential treatments. In this paper are described a set of measures of food-related motivation using handgrip force as a motivational measure. These methods can be used to examine changes in food related motivation with metabolic (satiety) and pharmacological manipulations and can be used to evaluate interventions targeted at overeating and obesity. However to understand food-related decision making in the complex food environment it is essential to be able to ascertain the reward goal values that guide the decisions and behavioral choices that people make. These values are hidden but it is possible to ascertain them more objectively using metrics such as the willingness to pay and a method for this is described. Both these sets of methods provide quantitative measures of motivation and goal value that can be compared within and between individuals. PMID:24686284

  15. Studying Human Dynamics Through Web Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasco, Jose; Goncalves, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    When Tim Berners Lee, a physicist at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) first conceived the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1990 as a way to facilitate the sharing of scientific information and results among the centers different researchers and groups, even the most ingenious of science fiction writers could not have imagined the role it would come to play in the following decades. The increasing ubiquitousness of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using it to better observe, understand, and even monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Websites with large numbers of frequently returning users, such as search engines, company or university websites, are ideal for this task. The properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University's website is studied. We find that a small number of users is responsible for a finite fraction of the total activity. A saturation phenomenon is observed where, certain connections age, becoming less attractive to new activity over time. Finally, by measuring the average activity as a function of the day of the week, we find that productivity seems to be higher on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, with Sundays being the least active day.

  16. Studies on Lipolysis in Human Adipose Cells *

    PubMed Central

    Galton, David J.; Bray, George A.

    1967-01-01

    Epinephrine stimulated lipolysis and the uptake of oxygen by subcutaneous adipose cells of man. When glucose-14C was present in the medium, its utilization was not increased by epinephrine, although lipolysis was accelerated. Insulin did not reduce the production of fatty acids that had been stimulated by epinephrine. The combination of human growth hormone and cortisol stimulated the production of fatty acids by isolated human adipose cells to a lesser extent than epinephrine. When human growth hormone or cortisol was used singly, or when bovine growth hormone was added in combination with cortisol, no effect on fatty acid production was observed. Furthermore, an acetone-dried preparation of human pituitary glands, which was shown to stimulate lipolysis in rat adipose cells, had no effect on fatty acid formation in human adipose cells. This suggested that the human pituitary gland contained no more potent lipolytic agents than growth hormone and was supported by the lack of response of human adipose cells to purified corticotropin. PMID:6021210

  17. Activated endothelial cells limit inflammatory response, but increase chemoattractant potential and bacterial clearance by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mancilla-Herrera, Ismael; Alvarado-Moreno, José Antonio; Cérbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Prieto-Chávez, Jessica L; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; López-Macías, Constantino; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Isibasi, Armando; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is the normal immune response of vascularized tissues to damage and bacterial products, for which leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is critical. The effects of cell-to-cell contact seen in both leukocyte and endothelial cells include cytoskeleton rearrangement, and dynamic expression of adhesion molecules and metalloproteinases. TEM induces expression of anti-apoptotic molecules, costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation, and pattern recognition receptors (PRR), such as TLR-4, in monocytes. However, little is known about how TLR-4 increment operates in monocytes during an inflammatory response. To understand it better, we used an in vitro model in which monocytes crossed a layer of IL-1β stimulated Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). After TEM, monocytes were tested for the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, their phenotype (CD14, CD16, TLR-4 expression), and TLR-4 canonical [Nuclear Factor kappa B, (NF-κB) pathway] and non-canonical [p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway] signal transduction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Phagocytosis and bacterial clearance were also measured. There was diminished secretion of LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and higher secretion of chemokines (CXCL8/IL-8 and CCL2/MCP-1) in supernatant of TEM monocytes. These changes were accompanied by increases in TLR-4, CD14 (surfaces expression), p38, and ERK1/2 phosphorylated cytoplasmic forms, without affecting NF-κB activation. It also increased bacterial clearance after TEM by an O2 -independent mechanism. The data suggest that interaction between endothelial cells and monocytes fine-tunes the inflammatory response and promotes bacterial elimination. PMID:25598193

  18. Experimental study of plasma properties in the shadow of the T--10 mushroom limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, A.A.; Vershkov, V.A.; Grashin, S.A.; Chankin, A.V.

    1988-04-01

    The plasma properties in the shadow of a mushroom-shaped limiter installed in a lower port of the tokamak have been studied. A study of the asymmetry of the plasma streams on the ion and electron sides of the limiter leads to the conclusion that there are two mechanisms for the occurrence of the asymmetry: the toroidal rotation of the plasma and a predominant escape of plasma to the wall through the outer part of the torus. The asymmetry observed in the plasma floating potentials near the limiter leads to the flow of a current close to the Spitzer value j/sub S/ through the limiter. With increasing plasma density, the plasma density in the channels of the limiter increases, and the temperature of this plasma decreases, so the loss of charged particles to the limiter depends only weakly on the average density. This circumstance is related to the degradation of the plasma confinement with decreasing density. The total flux of charged particles to the limiter is comparable to the flux of these particles out of the plasma column. The plasma stream into the channels is approximately ambipolar, and the power levels drawn by the neutralization plate are on the order of 10j/sub S/T/sub e//e. The behavior of the neutral gas pressure in the volume near the limiter as a function of the plasma streams into the channels is nonlinear. The maximum pressure is 3x10/sup -2/ torr.

  19. Studying Risk Factors Associated with Human Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Ramachandra; Swain, Subhashisa; Pattanshetty, Sanjay; Nair, N Sreekumaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leptospirosis is one of the most under diagnosed and underreported disease in both developed and developing countries including India. It is established that environmental conditions and occupational habit of the individuals put them at risk of acquiring disease, which varies from community to community. Various seroprevalence studies across the world have documented emerging situation of this neglected tropical disease, but limited have probed to identify the risk factors, especially in India. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the environmental and occupational risk factors associated with the disease in Udupi District. Materials and Methods: This population-based case-control study was carried out in Udupi, a District in Southern India from April 2012 until August 2012. Udupi is considered to be endemic for Leptospirosis and reported 116 confirmed cases in the year 2011. Seventy of 116 laboratory confirmed cases and 140 sex matched neighborhood healthy controls participated in the study. A predesigned, semi-structured and validated questionnaire was used for data collection through house to house visit and observations were noted about environmental conditions. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate analysis (back ward conditional logistic regression) was performed by using STATA version 9.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA) to identify potential risk factors. Results: Occupational factors such as outdoor activities (matched odds ratio [OR] of 3.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-13.0), presence of cut or wound at body parts during work (matched OR: 4.88, CI: 1.83-13.02) and environmental factors such as contact with rodents through using the food materials ate by rat (matched OR: 4.29, CI: 1.45-12.73) and contact with soil or water contaminated with urine of rat (matched OR: 4.58, CI: 1.43-14.67) were the risk factors identified to be associated with disease. Conclusion: Leptospirosis is still considered as neglected disease in the district. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of cases can save many lives. However, there is a need of integrated rodent control measures with great effort to increase awareness and education among subjects in controlling the disease. PMID:24741223

  20. Quantifying planetary limits of Earth system processes relevant to human activity using a thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Food, water, and energy play, obviously, a central role in maintaining human activity. In this contribution, I derive estimates for the fundamental limits on the rates by which these resources are provided by Earth system processes and the levels at which these can be used sustainably. The key idea here is that these resources are, directly or indirectly, generated out of the energy associated with the absorption of sunlight, and that the energy conversions from sunlight to other forms ultimately limit the generation of these resources. In order to derive these conversion limits, we need to trace the links between the processes that generate food, water and energy to the absorption of sunlight. The resource "food" results from biomass production by photosynthesis, which requires light and a sufficient magnitude of gas exchange of carbon dioxide at the surface, which is maintained by atmospheric motion which in turn is generated out of differential radiative heating and cooling. The resource "water" is linked to hydrologic cycling, with its magnitude being linked to the latent heat flux of the surface energy balance and water vapor transport in the atmosphere which is also driven by differential radiative heating and cooling. The availability of (renewable) energy is directly related to the generation of different forms of energy of climate system processes, such as the kinetic energy of atmospheric motion, which, again, relates to radiative heating differences. I use thermodynamics and its limits as a basis to establish the planetary limits of these processes and use a simple model to derive first-order estimates. These estimates compare quite well with observations, suggesting that this thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system provides an objective, physical basis to define and quantify planetary boundaries as well as the factors that shape these boundaries.

  1. Understanding Motivation for Study: Human Capital or Human Capability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredman, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Much research into the reasons students undertake tertiary study is at least implicitly based on rational choice theory: students calculate costs in order to maximize direct individual gain. The policy emphasis on pathways has somewhat broader bases including social inclusion as well as economic productivity, but narrowly focuses on institutional…

  2. Retrohoming of a Mobile Group II Intron in Human Cells Suggests How Eukaryotes Limit Group II Intron Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Hewitt, F. Curtis; Hanson, Joseph H.; Cui, Xiaoxia; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile bacterial group II introns are evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a “ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote intron integration into new DNA sites by a mechanism termed “retrohoming”. Although mobile group II introns splice and retrohome efficiently in bacteria, all examined thus far function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where their ribozyme activity is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations, and intron-containing transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) and translational repression. Here, by using RNA polymerase II to express a humanized group II intron reverse transcriptase and T7 RNA polymerase to express intron transcripts resistant to NMD, we find that simply supplementing culture medium with Mg2+ induces the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB intron to retrohome into plasmid and chromosomal sites, the latter at frequencies up to ~0.1%, in viable HEK-293 cells. Surprisingly, under these conditions, the Ll.LtrB intron reverse transcriptase is required for retrohoming but not for RNA splicing as in bacteria. By using a genetic assay for in vivo selections combined with deep sequencing, we identified intron RNA mutations that enhance retrohoming in human cells, but <4-fold and not without added Mg2+. Further, the selected mutations lie outside the ribozyme catalytic core, which appears not readily modified to function efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations. Our results reveal differences between group II intron retrohoming in human cells and bacteria and suggest constraints on critical nucleotide residues of the ribozyme core that limit how much group II intron retrohoming in eukaryotes can be enhanced. These findings have implications for group II intron use for gene targeting in eukaryotes and suggest how differences in intracellular Mg2+ concentrations between bacteria and eukarya may have impacted the evolution of introns and gene expression mechanisms. PMID:26241656

  3. Mars Rotorcraft: Possibilities, Limitations, and Implications For Human/Robotic Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Aiken, Edwin; Lee, Pascal; Briggs, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Several research investigations have examined the challenges and opportunities in the use of small robotic rotorcraft for the exploration of Mars. To date, only vehicles smaller than 150 kg have been studied. This paper proposes to examine the question of maximum Mars rotorcraft size, range, and payload/cargo capacity. Implications for the issue of whether or not (from an extreme design standpoint) a manned Mars rotorcraft is viable are also discussed.

  4. Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Limits in Calculus: A Two-Part Constructivist Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Margaret Smolinka

    2013-01-01

    This case study investigated students' conceptual knowledge of limits in calculus by implementing semi-structured interviews. The constructivist learning principles of Piaget and Inhelder as well as theories of understanding by Skemp guided the study. In Phase I, a pilot study was conducted with 15 students from a Calculus III class. By using…

  5. Enumeration of human alloreactive helper T lymphocyte precursor frequencies by limiting dilution analysis of interleukin-2 production.

    PubMed

    Young, N T; Roelen, D L; Dallman, M J; Wood, K J; Morris, P J; Welsh, K I

    1996-09-01

    We describe a limiting dilution assay for the enumeration of alloreactive interleukin-2 (IL-2) producing helper T lymphocyte precursors (HTLp). In place of the commonly used CTLL cell line, we have employed concanvalin A (ConA) stimulated rat thymocytes as IL-2 responsive indicator cells in a proliferation assay to detect IL-2 levels in limiting dilution microculture supernatants. The proliferation of ConA stimulated thymocytes induced by either recombinant IL-2 or culture supernatants could be blocked by co-incubation with a monoclonal antibody against the rat IL-2 receptor alpha chain, demonstrating the specificity of the response. Our investigations of alloantigen-induced IL-2 production show that (i) a minimum stimulator cell irradiation dose of 50-60 Gy is required to prevent backstimulation of microcultures; (ii) frequencies of alloreactive HTLp are significantly associated with HLA-DR antigen matching between responder and stimulator; (iii) HTLp frequencies detected in assays using B lymphoblastoid cell line stimulators are significantly higher than in assays employing peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulators but possibly reflect a degree of non-specific activation; and (iv) allosensitized responders exhibit altered kinetics of IL-2 production which may permit discrimination between sensitized and naive individuals. Our results both confirm and extend previous reports concerning such features of the alloresponse in humans and demonstrate that ConA stimulated thymocytes are a suitable alternative to CTLL as IL-2 responsive indicator cells in limiting dilution assays for HTLp analysis. PMID:8814317

  6. AN APPROACH TO METHODS DEVELOPMENT FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure assessment studies require methods that are rapid, cost-effective and have a high sample through-put. The development of analytical methods for exposure studies should be based on specific information for individual studies. Human exposure studies suggest that di...

  7. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish. PMID:24718256

  8. Limited Literacy and Mortality in the Elderly: The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Sudore, Rebecca L; Yaffe, Kristine; Satterfield, Suzanne; Harris, Tamara B; Mehta, Kala M; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Newman, Anne B; Rosano, Caterina; Rooks, Ronica; Rubin, Susan M; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Schillinger, Dean

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND While limited literacy is common and its prevalence increases with age, no prospective study has assessed whether limited literacy is associated with mortality in older adults. OBJECTIVE To assess the association of limited literacy with mortality. DESIGN AND SETTING Five-year prospective study from 1999 to 2004 of community-dwelling elders from Memphis, TN, and Pittsburgh, PA, who were from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study. Subjects' literacy was assessed with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. Scores were categorized into limited (0 to 8th grade reading level) or adequate literacy (≥9th grade reading level). PARTICIPANTS Two thousand five hundred and twelve black and white elders without baseline functional difficulties or dementia. MEASUREMENTS Time to death. RESULTS Participants' mean age was 75.6 years, 48% were male, 38% were black, and 24% had limited literacy; the median follow-up time was 4.2 years. Compared with those with adequate literacy, those with limited literacy had a higher risk of death (19.7% vs 10.6%) with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.03 (95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.62 to 2.55). After adjusting for demographics and socioeconomic status, co-morbid conditions, self-rated health status, health-related behaviors, health care access measures, and psychosocial status, limited literacy remained independently associated with mortality (HR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.41). CONCLUSIONS Limited literacy is independently associated with a nearly 2-fold increase in mortality in the elderly. Given the growth of the aging population and the prevalence of chronic diseases, the mechanisms by which limited literacy is associated with mortality in the elderly warrant further investigation. PMID:16881938

  9. Approaches for scaling up human immunodeficiency virus testing and counseling in prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus transmission settings in resource-limited countries.

    PubMed

    Bolu, Omotayo O; Allread, Virginia; Creek, Tracy; Stringer, Elizabeth; Forna, Fatu; Bulterys, Marc; Shaffer, Nathan

    2007-09-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission (PMTCT) programs have nearly eliminated mother-to-child transmission of HIV in developed countries, but progress in resource-limited countries has been slow. A key factor limiting the scale-up of PMTCT programs is lack of knowledge of HIV serostatus. Increasing the availability and acceptability of HIV testing and counseling services will encourage more women to learn their status, providing a gateway to PMTCT interventions. Key factors contributing to the scale-up of testing and counseling include a policy of provider-initiated testing and counseling with right to refuse (opt-out); group pretest counseling; rapid HIV testing; innovative staffing strategies; and community and male involvement. Integration of testing and counseling within the community and all maternal and child health settings are critical for scaling-up and for linking women and their families to care and treatment services. This paper will review best practices needed for expansion of testing and counseling in PMTCT settings in resource-limited countries. PMID:17825654

  10. An epidemiologic study of the human bite.

    PubMed Central

    Marr, J S; Beck, A M; Lugo, J A

    1979-01-01

    The 892 human bites reported to the New York City Department of Health in 1977 were analyzed by time, place, and the victim's characteristics. The bites appeared to have a seasonality, increasing in March and exceeding the mean monthly average through August. The bite rate for the entire city, 10.7 per 100,000 population, was exceeded in 5 of the 10 Brooklyn health districts; one of these districts reported a rate of 60.9 human bites per 100,000 population. Most of the bites with identifiable locations occurred indoors (63.2 percent). In 72.8 percent of the bite episodes in which the activities surrounding them were known, these activities were aggressive in nature. Males exceeded females as bite victims in all age groups except those 10-20 and 55-60 years. Bites of the upper extremity accounted for 61.2 percent of the total bites. Left-sided bites exceeded right-sided, except for the hand. In frequency of reported occurrence, the human bite ranks third, after the dog bite and the cat bite. Human bites may be a useful indicator of antisocial behavior. PMID:515337

  11. Human Fetal Behavior: 100 Years of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Low, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews literature on human fetal behavior. Includes descriptions of coupling of body movements and fetal heart rate and behavior maturation from conception to term. Discusses use of stimulus-induced behavior to examine sensory and cognitive development, and spontaneous and stimulus-induced behavior to assess fetal well-being. Notes research focus…

  12. World History [Humanities]. Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    World history guides students to an understanding of culture, geography, and diversity of expression using a historical chronology that illustrates humankind's connections throughout the world. The state of Idaho mandates a core requirement of two credits to be completed in the field of arts and humanities. To achieve success in this core…

  13. Radical Feminism, Humanism and Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibles, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Feminists now characterize radical feminism as involving sexism, views of the superiority of women over men, and the goal to establish a separate world without men, a gynocracy is discussed. Radical feminism is contrasted with humanism and seen to be antihumanistic. (Author/MLW)

  14. Intrinsic near-24-h pacemaker period determines limits of circadian entrainment to a weak synchronizer in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Hughes, R. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are robust regulators of physiology and behavior. Synchronization or entrainment of biological clocks to environmental time is adaptive and important for physiological homeostasis and for the proper timing of species-specific behaviors. We studied subjects in the laboratory for up to 55 days each to determine the ability to entrain the human clock to a weak circadian synchronizing stimulus [scheduled activity-rest cycle in very dim (approximately 1.5 lux in the angle of gaze) light-dark cycle] at three approximately 24-h periods: 23.5, 24.0, and 24.6 h. These studies allowed us to test two competing hypotheses as to whether the period of the human circadian pacemaker is near to or much longer than 24 h. We report here that imposition of a sleep-wake schedule with exposure to the equivalent of candle light during wakefulness and darkness during sleep is usually sufficient to maintain circadian entrainment to the 24-h day but not to a 23.5- or 24.6-h day. Our results demonstrate functionally that, in normally entrained sighted adults, the average intrinsic circadian period of the human biological clock is very close to 24 h. Either exposure to very dim light and/or the scheduled sleep-wake cycle itself can entrain this near-24-h intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker to the 24-h day.

  15. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting

  16. Teacher Leader Human Relations Skills: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roby, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 142 graduate school teachers working in schools throughout southwestern Ohio assessed their human relation skills. A human relations survey was used for the study, and results were compared with colleagues assessing the teachers in the study. The survey was developed using a Likert-type scale, and was based on key elements affecting…

  17. 2012 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2012 represented the third sequential year of research regarding the limited irrigation 12-200 corn production assessment study at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) with the yield results being improved from that of the 2011 season but less than of the 2010 season. The study's purpose was to ev...

  18. Human olfactory consciousness and cognition: its unusual features may not result from unusual functions but from limited neocortical processing resources

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Richard J.; Attuquayefio, Tuki

    2013-01-01

    Human and animal olfactory perception is shaped both by functional demands and by various environmental constraints seemingly peculiar to chemical stimuli. These demands and constraints may have generated a sensory system that is cognitively distinct from the major senses. In this article we identify these various functional demands and constraints, and examine whether they can be used to account for olfaction's unique cognitive features on a case-by-case basis. We then use this as grounds to argue that specific conscious processes do have functional value, a finding that naturally emerges when a comparative approach to consciousness across the senses is adopted. More generally, we conclude that certain peculiar features of olfactory cognition may owe more to limited neocortical processing resources, than they do to the challenges faced by perceiving chemical stimuli. PMID:24198808

  19. Refinement of a limit cycle oscillator model of the effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Kronauer, R. E.; Brown, E. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In 1990, Kronauer proposed a mathematical model of the effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker. Although this model predicted many general features of the response of the human circadian pacemaker to light exposure, additional data now available enable us to refine the original model. We first refined the original model by incorporating the results of a dose response curve to light into the model's predicted relationship between light intensity and the strength of the drive onto the pacemaker. Data from three bright light phase resetting experiments were then used to refine the amplitude recovery characteristics of the model. Finally, the model was tested and further refined using data from an extensive phase resetting experiment in which a 3-cycle bright light stimulus was presented against a background of dim light. In order to describe the results of the four resetting experiments, the following major refinements to the original model were necessary: (i) the relationship between light intensity (I) and drive onto the pacemaker was reduced from I1/3 to I0.23 for light levels between 150 and 10,000 lux; (ii) the van der Pol oscillator from the original model was replaced with a higher-order limit cycle oscillator so that amplitude recovery is slower near the singularity and faster near the limit cycle; (iii) a direct effect of light on circadian period (tau x) was incorporated into the model such that as I increases, tau x decreases, which is in accordance with "Aschoff's rule". This refined model generates the following testable predictions: it should be difficult to enhance normal circadian amplitude via bright light; near the critical point of a type 0 phase response curve (PRC) the slope should be steeper than it is in a type 1 PRC; and circadian period measured during forced desynchrony should be directly affected by ambient light intensity.

  20. Daily walking and the risk of incident functional limitation in knee OA: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Zhang, Yuqing; Fielding, Roger; LaValley, Michael; Felson, David T.; Gross, K. Douglas; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity is recommended to mitigate functional limitations associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is unclear whether walking on its own protects against the development of functional limitation. Methods Walking over 7 days was objectively measured as steps/day within a cohort of people with or at risk of knee OA from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Incident functional limitation over two years was defined by performance-based (gait speed ≤ 1.0 m/s) and self-report (WOMAC physical function ≥ 28/68) measures. We evaluated the association of steps/day at baseline with developing functional limitation two years later by calculating risk ratios adjusted for potential confounders. The number of steps/day that best distinguished risk for developing functional limitation was estimated from the maximum distance from chance on Receiver Operator Characteristic curves. Results Among 1788 participants (mean age 67, mean BMI 31 kg/m2, female 60%), each additional 1000 steps/day was associated with a 16% and 18% reduction in incident functional limitation by performance-based and self-report measures, respectively. Walking < 6000 and < 5900 steps/day were the best thresholds to distinguish incident functional limitation by performance-based (67.3%/71.8% [sensitivity/specificity]) and self-report (58.7%/68.9%) measures, respectively. Conclusions More walking was associated with less risk of functional limitation over two years. Walking ≥ 6000 steps/day provides a preliminary estimate of the level of walking activity to protect against developing functional limitation in people with or at risk of knee OA. PMID:24923633

  1. Empirical study on human acupuncture point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Shen, Dan; Chang, Hui; He, Da-Ren

    2007-03-01

    Chinese medical theory is ancient and profound, however is confined by qualitative and faint understanding. The effect of Chinese acupuncture in clinical practice is unique and effective, and the human acupuncture points play a mysterious and special role, however there is no modern scientific understanding on human acupuncture points until today. For this reason, we attend to use complex network theory, one of the frontiers in the statistical physics, for describing the human acupuncture points and their connections. In the network nodes are defined as the acupuncture points, two nodes are connected by an edge when they are used for a medical treatment of a common disease. A disease is defined as an act. Some statistical properties have been obtained. The results certify that the degree distribution, act degree distribution, and the dependence of the clustering coefficient on both of them obey SPL distribution function, which show a function interpolating between a power law and an exponential decay. The results may be helpful for understanding Chinese medical theory.

  2. critcial human health issues in connection with future human missions to mMars: the HUMEX study of ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.; Humex Team

    ESA has recently initiated a study of the human responses, limits and needs with regard to the stress environments of interplanetary and planetary missions. Emphasis was laid on human health and performance care as well as Advanced Life Support Developments including Bioregenerative Life Support Systems and environmental monitoring. The overall study goals were as follows: (i) to define reference scenarios for a European participation in human exploration and to estimate their influence on the Life Sciences and Life Support requirements; (ii) for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the limiting factors for human health, wellbeing, and performance and to recommend relevant countermeasures; (iii) for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the potential of Advanced Life Support Developments and to pro-pose a European strategy including terrestrial applications; (iv) to critically assess the feasibility of existing facilities and technologies on ground and in space as test-beds in preparation for human exploratory missions and to develop a test plan for ground and ISS campaigns; (v) to develop a roadmap for a future European strategy towards human exploratory missions, including preparatory activities and terrestrial applications and benefits. Two scenarios for a Mars mission were selected: (i) with a 30 days stay on Mars, and (ii) with about 500 days stay on Mars. The impact on human health, perform-ance and well being has been investigated from the view point of (i) the effects of microgravity (during space travel), reduced gravity (on Mars) and abrupt gravity changes (during launch and landing), (ii) the effects of cosmic radiation including solar particle events, (iii) psychological issues as well as general health care. Coun-termeasures as well as necessary research using ground-based testbeds and/or the ISS have been defined. The need for highly intelligent autonomous diagnostic and therapy systems was emphasized. Advanced life support systems with a high degree of autonomy and regenerative capacity and synergy effects were considered where bioregenerative life support systems and biodiagnostic systems become essential especially for the long-term Mars scenario. The considerations have been incorpo-rated into a roadmap for a future European strategy in human health issues for a potential European participation in a cooperative international exploration of our solar system by humans. Ref. Horneck et al, 2003, HUMEX, study on the Survivability and Adaptation of Humans to Long-Duration Exploratory Missions, ESA SP 1264

  3. Electrophysiological Studies of Face Perception in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bentin, Shlomo; Allison, Truett; Puce, Aina; Perez, Erik; McCarthy, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with face perception were recorded with scalp electrodes from normal volunteers. Subjects performed a visual target detection task in which they mentally counted the number of occurrences of pictorial stimuli from a designated category such us butterflies. In separate experiments, target stimuli were embedded within a series of other stimuli including unfamiliar human faces and isolated face components, inverted faces, distorted faces, animal faces, and other nonface stimuli. Unman faces evoked a negative potential at 172 msec (N170), which was absent from the ERPs elicited by other animate and inanimate nonface stimuli. N170 was largest over the posterior temporal scalp and was larger over the right than the left hemisphere. N170 was delayed when faces were presented upside-down, but its amplitude did not change. When presented in isolation, eyes elicited an N170 that was significantly larger than that elicited by whole faces, while noses and lips elicited small negative ERPs about 50 msec later than N170. Distorted human faces, in which the locations of inner face components were altered, elicited an N170 similar in amplitude to that elicited by normal faces. However, faces of animals, human hands, cars, and items of furniture did not evoke N170. N170 may reflect the operation of a neural mechanism tuned to detect (as opposed to identify) human faces, similar to the structural encoder suggested by Bruce and Young (1986). A similar function has been proposed for the face-selective N200 ERP recorded from the middle fusiform and posterior inferior temporal gyri using subdural electrodes in humans (Allison, McCarthy, Nobre, Puce, & Belger, 1994c). However, the differential sensitivity of N170 to eyes in isolation suggests that N170 may reflect the activation of an eye-sensitive region of cortex. The voltage distribution of N170 over the scalp is consistent with a neural generator located in the occipitotemporal sulcus lateral to the fusiform/inferior temporal region that generates N200. PMID:20740065

  4. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 303-11. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817996

  5. Looking toward the Future: A Case Study of Open Source Software in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quamen, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    In this article Harvey Quamen examines how the philosophy of open source software might be of particular benefit to humanities scholars in the near future--particularly for academic journals with limited financial resources. To this end he provides a case study in which he describes his use of open source technology (MySQL database software and…

  6. Looking toward the Future: A Case Study of Open Source Software in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quamen, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    In this article Harvey Quamen examines how the philosophy of open source software might be of particular benefit to humanities scholars in the near future--particularly for academic journals with limited financial resources. To this end he provides a case study in which he describes his use of open source technology (MySQL database software and

  7. Noncanonical NOTCH Signaling Limits Self-Renewal of Human Epithelial and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells through ROCK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yugawa, Takashi; Nishino, Koichiro; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Goshima, Naoki; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    NOTCH plays essential roles in cell fate specification during embryonic development and in adult tissue maintenance. In keratinocytes, it is a key inducer of differentiation. ROCK, an effector of the small GTPase Rho, is also implicated in keratinocyte differentiation, and its inhibition efficiently potentiates immortalization of human keratinocytes and greatly improves survival of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells. However, the molecular basis for ROCK activation is not fully established in these contexts. Here we provide evidence that intracellular forms of NOTCH1 trigger the immediate activation of ROCK1 independent of its transcriptional activity, promoting differentiation and resulting in decreased clonogenicity of normal human keratinocytes. Knockdown of NOTCH1 abrogated ROCK1 activation and conferred sustained clonogenicity upon differentiation stimuli. Treatment with a ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, or ROCK1 silencing substantially rescued the growth defect induced by activated NOTCH1. Furthermore, we revealed that impaired self-renewal of human induced pluripotent stem cells upon dissociation is, at least in part, attributable to NOTCH-dependent ROCK activation. Thus, the present study unveils a novel NOTCH-ROCK pathway critical for cellular differentiation and loss of self-renewal capacity in a subset of immature cells. PMID:24019071

  8. Community Environmental Factors Are Associated With Disability in Older Adults With Functional Limitations: The MOST Study

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; LaValley, Michael P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James C.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Felson, Dave T.

    2010-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence supporting the hypothesized environmentdisability link. The objectives of this study were to (a) identify the prevalence of community mobility barriers and transportation facilitators and (b) examine whether barriers and facilitators were associated with disability among older adults with functional limitations. Methods Four hundred and thirty-five participants aged 65+ years old with functional limitations were recruited from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, a prospective study of community-dwelling adults with or at risk of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Presence of community barriers and facilitators was ascertained by the Home and Community Environment survey. Two domains of disability, (a) daily activity limitation (DAL) and (b) daily activity frequency (DAF), were assessed with the Late-Life Disability Instrument. Covariates included age, gender, education, race, comorbidity, body mass index, knee pain, and functional limitation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine adjusted associations of community factors with presence of DAL and DAF. Results Approximately one third of the participants lived in a community with high mobility barriers and low transportation facilitators. High mobility barriers was associated with greater odds of DAL (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23.1) after adjusting for covariates, and high transportation facilitators was associated with lower odds of DAL (OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.30.8) but not with DAF in adjusted models. Conclusion People with functional limitations who live in communities that were more restrictive felt more limited in doing daily activities but did not perform these daily activities any less frequently. PMID:19995830

  9. Radium in humans: A review of U.S. studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document was originally conceived as a compilation of activities at Argonne National Laboratory that were directed toward the study of radium in humans. However, it soon became obvious that this was a very limited approach, because such a compilation would include no background on the widespread uses of radium in industry and in the medical profession, nor would it address the early history of the discovery of the hazards of radium. Such an approach would also ignore contributions to the study of radium effects made at other laboratories. This document now addresses these topics, in order to give an overall picture of what might be called the radium era, that period from the early part of this century, when radium was rapidly exploited as a tool and a medication, to the present time, when radium is not generally used and the study of its effects has been terminated. The appendix to this review lists all of the measured radium cases, a total of 2,403 individuals whose records were in the files at the end of 1990. For each case the route of exposure, the dates of exposure, the years of birth and death, the measured body content, the calculated intake and dose, and the cause of death have been listed. 165 refs.

  10. Molecular structural studies of human factor VIII.

    PubMed

    McKee, P A; Andersen, J C; Switzer, M E

    1975-01-20

    Neither normal nor hemophilic factor VIII protein enters a 5% sosium dodecyl sulfate gel; on reduction, however, a single 195 000-molecular-weight peptide is observed. Hemophilic and normal factor VIII contain carbohydrate and appear identical in subunit molecular weight, electrical charge, and major antigenic determinants. Thrombin activation and inactivation of factor VIII does not detectably change the subunit molecular weight. Trypsin causes similar activity changes and obviously cleaves the factor VIII subunit. Human plasmin destroys factor VIII procoagulant activity and degrades the factor VIII subunit to 103 000-, 88 000-, and 17 000-molecular-weight peptides. Both normal and hemophilic factor VIII as well as thrombin-inactivated factor VIII support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Purified factor VIII chromatographed on 4% agarose in 1.0 M sodium chloride shows no dissociation of the procoagulant activity from the void volume protein. Gel chromatography on 4% agarose in 0.25 M calcium chloride results in a procoagulant activity peak removed from the void volume protein; both peaks contain protein which does not enter a 5% SDS gel, but on reduction a 195 000-molecular-weight subunit band is observed for each. Both the void volume protein peak and the procoagulant activity peak from the 0.25 M calcium chloride-agarose gel column support ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. After removal of calcium, a small amount of procoagulant activity is present only in the void volume peak. These data suggest that both the procoagulant and von Willebrand activities are on the same molecule. Thus our previous conclusion remains the same: human factor VIII is a large glycoprotein composed of identical 195 000-molecular-weight subunits jointed by disulfide bonds and is responsible for both antihemophilic and von Willebrand activities in human plasma. PMID:122889

  11. Theoretical assessment of the maximum obtainable power in wireless power transfer constrained by human body exposure limits in a typical room scenario.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Chen XL; De Santis V; Umenei AE

    2014-07-07

    In this study, the maximum received power obtainable through wireless power transfer (WPT) by a small receiver (Rx) coil from a relatively large transmitter (Tx) coil is numerically estimated in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 10 MHz based on human body exposure limits. Analytical calculations were first conducted to determine the worst-case coupling between a homogeneous cylindrical phantom with a radius of 0.65 m and a Tx coil positioned 0.1 m away with the radius ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 m. Subsequently, three high-resolution anatomical models were employed to compute the peak induced field intensities with respect to various Tx coil locations and dimensions. Based on the computational results, scaling factors which correlate the cylindrical phantom and anatomical model results were derived. Next, the optimal operating frequency, at which the highest transmitter source power can be utilized without exceeding the exposure limits, is found to be around 2 MHz. Finally, a formulation is proposed to estimate the maximum obtainable power of WPT in a typical room scenario while adhering to the human body exposure compliance mandates.

  12. Theoretical assessment of the maximum obtainable power in wireless power transfer constrained by human body exposure limits in a typical room scenario.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi Lin; De Santis, Valerio; Umenei, Aghuinyue Esai

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the maximum received power obtainable through wireless power transfer (WPT) by a small receiver (Rx) coil from a relatively large transmitter (Tx) coil is numerically estimated in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 10 MHz based on human body exposure limits. Analytical calculations were first conducted to determine the worst-case coupling between a homogeneous cylindrical phantom with a radius of 0.65 m and a Tx coil positioned 0.1 m away with the radius ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 m. Subsequently, three high-resolution anatomical models were employed to compute the peak induced field intensities with respect to various Tx coil locations and dimensions. Based on the computational results, scaling factors which correlate the cylindrical phantom and anatomical model results were derived. Next, the optimal operating frequency, at which the highest transmitter source power can be utilized without exceeding the exposure limits, is found to be around 2 MHz. Finally, a formulation is proposed to estimate the maximum obtainable power of WPT in a typical room scenario while adhering to the human body exposure compliance mandates. PMID:24889372

  13. Theoretical assessment of the maximum obtainable power in wireless power transfer constrained by human body exposure limits in a typical room scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi Lin; De Santis, Valerio; Esai Umenei, Aghuinyue

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the maximum received power obtainable through wireless power transfer (WPT) by a small receiver (Rx) coil from a relatively large transmitter (Tx) coil is numerically estimated in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 10 MHz based on human body exposure limits. Analytical calculations were first conducted to determine the worst-case coupling between a homogeneous cylindrical phantom with a radius of 0.65 m and a Tx coil positioned 0.1 m away with the radius ranging from 0.25 to 2.5 m. Subsequently, three high-resolution anatomical models were employed to compute the peak induced field intensities with respect to various Tx coil locations and dimensions. Based on the computational results, scaling factors which correlate the cylindrical phantom and anatomical model results were derived. Next, the optimal operating frequency, at which the highest transmitter source power can be utilized without exceeding the exposure limits, is found to be around 2 MHz. Finally, a formulation is proposed to estimate the maximum obtainable power of WPT in a typical room scenario while adhering to the human body exposure compliance mandates.

  14. Two photon microscopy for studies of xenobiotics in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Carl; Smedh, Maria; Jonson, Charlotte; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Ericson, Marica B.

    2007-07-01

    For successful uptake and distribution of drugs from transdermal formulations, it is important to understand the skin barrier function. Innovative advances in modern microscopy have provided valuable tools to study the interaction between the skin and xenobiotics. Two-photon microscopy (TPM) allows non-invasive visualization of fluorescent compounds in the skin. The advantages of TPM over conventional confocal microscopy are better light penetration into highly scattering and absorbing tissue such as human skin, improved detection efficiency, limited out of focus photobleaching and reduced phototoxic effects. We present TPM as an alternative non-invasive in vitro method to study chemical penetration enhancement of fluorescent model drugs. The permeability of sulforhodamine B (SRB) through human epidermis was measured with vertical diffusion cells. The absorption was visualized using TPM after 24 h passive diffusion. We have evaluated variations in physicochemical parameters controlling dermal drug uptake induced by the penetration enhancer oleic acid according to methods previously described by Yu et al. Optical sectioning by TPM was compared with cryosectioning. Oleic acid significantly increased penetration of sulforhodamine. TPM images demonstrate a four-fold increase in the partition coefficient. In addition, a six-fold increase in the concentration gradient was found over stratum corneum. Better light penetration and detection efficiency increase maximum imaging depth in TPM compared to conventional confocal microscopy, however loss of signal due to scattering and absorption is still significant and will affect distribution profiles generated by optical sectioning. A true concentration profile cannot be established without better knowledge about signal losses in the skin.

  15. MEG studies of human vision: Retinotopic organization of V1

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Ranken, D.; Best, E.; Tiee, W.; Vigil, V.; Flynn, E.; Wood, C.; Supek, S.

    1993-12-31

    A primary goal of noninvasive studies of human vision is to identify and characterize multiple visual areas in the human brain analogous to those identified in studies of nonhuman primates. By combining functional MEG measurements with images of individual anatomy derived from MRI, the authors hope to determine the location and arrangement of multiple visual areas in human cortex and to probe their functional significance. The authors have identified several different visual areas thus far which appear to be topographically organized. This paper focuses on the retinotopic characterization of the primary visual area (V1) in humans.

  16. The Texas Successful Schools Study: Quality Education for Limited English Proficient Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    A study by the Texas Education Agency examined the variables contributing to the academic success of economically disadvantaged and language minority students. Data were collected from seven high-achieving elementary schools with high poverty rates and high percentages of limited English proficient (LEP) students via teacher questionnaires;…

  17. Effect of Teacher Specialized Training on Limited English Speaking Students' Assessment Outcomes: Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palaroan, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative study was a comparison of Limited English Proficient (LEP) students' assessment outcomes when taught by a teacher with specialized training and when taught by teachers with no specialized training. The comparison of 2007-2008 Northern Nevada LEP third grade student scores in the content areas of English language arts and…

  18. Review of DIII-D H-Mode Density Limit Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A.

    2005-10-15

    Density limit studies over the past 10 yr on DIII-D have successfully identified several processes that limit plasma density in various operating modes. The recent focus of these studies has been on maintenance of the high-density operational window with good H-mode level energy confinement. We find that detachment and onset of multifaceted axisymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE), fueling efficiency, particle confinement, and magnetohydrodynamic activity can impose density limits in certain regimes. By studying these processes, we have devised techniques with either pellets or gas fueling and divertor pumping to achieve line average density above Greenwald scaling, relying on increasing the ratio of pedestal to separatrix density, as well as density profile peaking. The scaling of several of these processes to next-step devices (e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) has indicated that sufficiently high pedestal density can be achieved with conventional fueling techniques while ensuring divertor partial detachment needed for heat flux reduction. One density limit process requiring further study is neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) onset, and techniques for avoidance/mitigation of NTMs need additional development in present-day devices operated at high density.

  19. Limiting Nonresponse in Longitudinal Research: Three Strategies for School-Based Studies. A RAND Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    Longitudinal studies conducted with children typically experience non-response problems that can make substantial inroads on sample size and introduce bias into the analysis. Three methods for limiting non-response in school-based research programs were assessed: (1) asking parents to return consent forms only if they do not want their children to…

  20. COMPARATIVE KINETIC STUDIES OF NITRATE-LIMITED GROWTH AND NITRATE UPTAKE IN PHYTOPLANKTON IN CONTINUOUS CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparative kinetic study of nitrate-limited growth and nitrate uptake was carried out in chemostat cultures of Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria crotonensis. In each species growth rate (microgram) was related to total cell nitrogen or cell quota (q) by...

  1. 78 FR 76888 - MAP-21 Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... were referenced in a notice published on November 29, 2013, at 78 FR 71707. The original meeting notice..., 2013, at 78 FR 71707, the FHWA published in the Federal Register a notice to announce two upcoming... Federal Highway Administration MAP-21 Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study Materials...

  2. Scientific Study of Malnutrition as a Limiting Factor in the Development of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picasso de Oyague, Alfredo

    This study on malnutrition as a limiting factor in the development of education (and, hence, in socioeconomic development generally) was presented to the UNESCO Seminar on Education, Nutrition, Agriculture and Man. The paper reports on recent research showing that the development of the central nervous system in very young children (including the…

  3. Reconceptualizing Treatment Goals from Language Impairment to Functional Limitations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    This case study of a preadolescent boy with severe expressive and receptive language impairments illustrates treatment focused on the functional limitations on the child's daily academic activities and social participation. Treatment goals incorporated language comprehension objectives into the student's reading program and language use objectives…

  4. Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianglin; Kitajima, Shuji; Watanabe, Teruo; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Enqi; Chen, Y Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in the study of human diseases. Using appropriate animals is critical not only for basic research but also for the development of therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Rabbits are widely used for the study of human atherosclerosis. Because rabbits have a unique feature of lipoprotein metabolism (like humans but unlike rodents) and are sensitive to a cholesterol diet, rabbit models have not only provided many insights into the pathogenesis and development of human atherosclerosis but also made a great contribution to translational research. In fact, rabbit was the first animal model used for studying human atherosclerosis, more than a century ago. Currently, three types of rabbit model are commonly used for the study of human atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism: (1) cholesterol-fed rabbits, (2) Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, analogous to human familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic deficiency of LDL receptors, and (3) genetically modified (transgenic and knock-out) rabbits. Despite their importance, compared with the mouse, the most widely used laboratory animal model nowadays, the use of rabbit models is still limited. In this review, we focus on the features of rabbit lipoprotein metabolism and pathology of atherosclerotic lesions that make it the optimal model for human atherosclerotic disease, especially for the translational medicine. For the sake of clarity, the review is not an attempt to be completely inclusive, but instead attempts to summarize substantial information concisely and provide a guideline for experiments using rabbits. PMID:25277507

  5. Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianglin; Kitajima, Shuji; Watanabe, Teruo; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Enqi; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in the study of human diseases. Using appropriate animals is critical not only for basic research but also for the development of therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Rabbits are widely used for the study of human atherosclerosis. Because rabbits have a unique feature of lipoprotein metabolism (like humans but unlike rodents) and are sensitive to a cholesterol diet, rabbit models have not only provided many insights into the pathogenesis and development of human atherosclerosis but also made a great contribution to translational research. In fact, rabbit was the first animal model used for studying human atherosclerosis, more than a century ago. Currently, three types of rabbit model are commonly used for the study of human atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism: (1) cholesterol-fed rabbits, (2) Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, analogous to human familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic deficiency of LDL receptors, and (3) genetically modified (transgenic and knock-out) rabbits. Despite their importance, compared with the mouse, the most widely used laboratory animal model nowadays, the use of rabbit models is still limited. In this review, we focus on the features of rabbit lipoprotein metabolism and pathology of atherosclerotic lesions that make it the optimal model for human atherosclerotic disease, especially for the translational medicine. For the sake of clarity, the review is not an attempt to be completely inclusive, but instead attempts to summarize substantial information concisely and provide a guideline for experiments using rabbits. PMID:25277507

  6. Anticipated significant work limitation in primary care consulters with osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Ross; Phillipson, Chris; Hay, Elaine M; Pransky, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of expected work limitations (EWL) prior to future retirement age in osteoarthritis consulters, and the associated health, sociodemographic and workplace factors. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting General practices in Staffordshire, England. Participants 297 working adults aged 50–65, who had consulted primary care for osteoarthritis. Outcome EWL was defined using a single question, “Do you think joint pain will limit your ability to work before you reach 69 years old?” Results 51 (17.2%) indicated that joint pain would not limit their ability to work until 69, 79 (26.6%) indicated EWL and 167 (56.2%) did not know if joint pain would limit work before 69. In bivariate analysis, physical function (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.91 to 0.96), depression (4.51; 1.81 to 11.3), cognitive symptom (3.84; 1.81 to 8.18), current smoker (2.75; 1.02 to 7.38), age (0.69; 0.58 to 0.82), physically demanding job (3.18; 1.50 to 6.72), no opportunities to retrain (3.01; 1.29 to 7.05) and work dissatisfaction (3.69; 1.43 to 9.49) were associated with EWL. The final multivariate model included physical function and age. Conclusions Only one in five osteoarthritis consulters expected that joint pain would not limit their work participation before 69 years of age. Given the expectation for people to work until they are older, the results highlight the increasing need for clinicians to include work participation in their consultation and implement strategies to address work loss/limitation. Targeting pain-related functional limitation and effective communication with employers to manage workplace issues could reduce EWL. PMID:25190616

  7. Study of the large reduced density gradient limit for the exchange energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazquez, Jose; Carmona-Espindola, Javier; Vela, Alberto; Trickey, Sam

    The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functional has become widely used in electronic structure calculations of small, medium and large systems, because it provides rather reasonable results with moderate computational effort. Usually the GGA for exchange (X) is expressed in terms of an analytical expression of the X enhancement function, Fx(s), where s is the reduced density gradient. When a non-empirical approach based on constraint satisfaction is followed, the analytical expression of Fx(s) is the result of interpolating between the small- and large-s limits. However, neither of those limits is uniquely defined. In both cases there are several possibilities. The present work is a study of the influence of the several large-s limit possibilities upon the calculation of properties that depend on energy differences, versus those that depend on response functions, and excitation energies.

  8. Z-scan studies and optical limiting of nanosecond laser pulses in neutral red dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Mathew; Muneera, C. I.; Singh, C. P.; Bindra, K. S.; Oak, S. M.

    2008-03-01

    The nonlinear optical absorption, refraction and optical limiting behaviour of an organic dye, neutral red, were investigated under excitation with nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm. The nonlinear optical responses of the material were studied both in solution and solid film, made in methanol and polyvinyl alcohol, respectively, using single-beam Z-scan technique. The open aperture Z-scans of the solution samples displayed a switch over from saturable absorption to enhanced absorption with increase in input intensity. Theoretical fit to the experimental data indicated that the dominant mechanism of nonlinear absorption is two-photon absorption. The closed aperture Z-scans of both the samples denoted positive nonlinearity, which was three orders larger in magnitude in solid film, compared with that in solution. The results of optical limiting experiments revealed that neutral red exhibited strong optical limiting of nanosecond laser pulses with a threshold lower than that of C 60 in toluene.

  9. Preliminary Study of Ideal Operational MHD Beta Limit in HL-2A Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong; Dong, Jiaqi; He, Hongda; D. Turnbull, A.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) n = 1 kink mode with n the toroidal mode number is studied and the operational beta limit, constrained by the mode, is calculated for the equilibrium of HL-2A by using the GATO code. Approximately the same beta limit is obtained for configurations with a value of the axial safety factor q0 both larger and less than 1. Without the stabilization of the conducting wall, the beta limit is found to be 0.821% corresponding to a normalized beta value of βcN = 2.56 for a typical HL-2A discharge with a plasma current Ip = 0.245 MA, and the scaling of βcN ~constant is confirmed.

  10. 78 FR 71707 - MAP-21 Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study Public Meeting and Outreach Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... Federal Highway Administration MAP-21 Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study Public Meeting and... Century Act (MAP-21) Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study. The Transportation Research Board... MAP-21 Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study. The DOT will hold a second public...

  11. Human Needs and Human Interdependence. Social Studies Interim Grade Guide for Grade One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Curriculum Development Branch.

    The social studies curriculum for grade 1 in Manitoba, Canada is presented. The focus of this guide is human needs and human interdependence. Some objectives are to explore: (1) distinctions between needs and wants; (2) various groupings and relationships, such as families, friendships, and communities; (3) ways people are dependent upon their…

  12. Human Ecology. Study Guide and Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Gamal

    An inservice course offered to elementary and secondary teachers and other concerned citizens in Rhode Island was presented in fifteen television programs. This study guide includes a description of the fifteen sessions. For each there is given a brief introduction and summary, an outline, questions for further study, and a bibliography of…

  13. Automated Essay Scoring versus Human Scoring: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jinhao; Brown, Michelle Stallone

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to analyze the relationship between automated essay scoring (AES) and human scoring in order to determine the validity and usefulness of AES for large-scale placement tests. Specifically, a correlational research design was used to examine the correlations between AES performance and human raters' performance.…

  14. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  15. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  16. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  17. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  18. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  19. Human Rights and History Education: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burridge Nina; Buchanan, John; Chodkiewicz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The place of education for and about human rights within the school curriculum remains contested and this paper reports on the first national cross-sectoral investigation of its place in Australian curricula and more specifically in national and state History curriculum documents. Opportunities for the inclusion of human rights based studies were…

  20. Advantages and Limitations of the Use of Optogenetic Approach in Studying Fast-Scale Spike Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Malyshev, Aleksey; Goz, Roman; LoTurco, Joseph J.; Volgushev, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding single-neuron computations and encoding performed by spike-generation mechanisms of cortical neurons is one of the central challenges for cell electrophysiology and computational neuroscience. An established paradigm to study spike encoding in controlled conditions in vitro uses intracellular injection of a mixture of signals with fluctuating currents that mimic in vivo-like background activity. However this technique has two serious limitations: it uses current injection, while synaptic activation leads to changes of conductance, and current injection is technically most feasible in the soma, while the vast majority of synaptic inputs are located on the dendrites. Recent progress in optogenetics provides an opportunity to circumvent these limitations. Transgenic expression of light-activated ionic channels, such as Channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), allows induction of controlled conductance changes even in thin distant dendrites. Here we show that photostimulation provides a useful extension of the tools to study neuronal encoding, but it has its own limitations. Optically induced fluctuating currents have a low cutoff (~70Hz), thus limiting the dynamic range of frequency response of cortical neurons. This leads to severe underestimation of the ability of neurons to phase-lock their firing to high frequency components of the input. This limitation could be worked around by using short (2 ms) light stimuli which produce membrane potential responses resembling EPSPs by their fast onset and prolonged decay kinetics. We show that combining application of short light stimuli to different parts of dendritic tree for mimicking distant EPSCs with somatic injection of fluctuating current that mimics fluctuations of membrane potential in vivo, allowed us to study fast encoding of artificial EPSPs photoinduced at different distances from the soma. We conclude that dendritic photostimulation of ChR2 with short light pulses provides a powerful tool to investigate population encoding of simulated synaptic potentials generated in dendrites at different distances from the soma. PMID:25850004

  1. The limited capacity of humans to identify the components of taste mixtures and taste-odour mixtures.

    PubMed

    Laing, David G; Link, Catherine; Jinks, Anthony L; Hutchinson, Ian

    2002-01-01

    The capacity of humans to identify the components of taste mixtures and odour-taste mixtures was investigated in two experiments. Subjects were trained to identify the components presented alone and to use a 'yes/no' procedure to identify them in mixtures. All stimuli were presented with a retronasal (by mouth) technique. A maximum of three tastants were identified in both types of mixtures, only one tastant was identified in five-component taste mixtures, and no component was identified in four-component odour-taste mixtures. Importantly, in no instance was the olfactory stimulus identified in any mixture with tastes, including binary mixtures. Loss of identity of the odorant in binary and ternary mixtures may have been due to suppression as a consequence of temporal processing, or to the absence of an association between the odorant and tastants that had established an identifiable percept. In contrast, poor identification of the components of the quaternary odour-taste mixture and quinternary taste mixture is attributed to the limited capacity of working memory. Overall, the poorer ability to identify components in odour-taste mixtures than in taste mixtures indicates that interactions occurred between the two senses, challenging the proposal that odours and tastes are processed independently when present in complex chemosensory stimuli. PMID:12044101

  2. Methodological challenges to human medical study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yixin; Liu, Baoyan; Qu, Hua; Xie, Qi

    2014-09-01

    With the transformation of modern medicinal pattern, medical studies are confronted with methodological challenges. By analyzing two methodologies existing in the study of physical matter system and information system, the article points out that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), especially the treatment based on syndrome differentiation, embodies information conception of methodological positions, while western medicine represents matter conception of methodological positions. It proposes a new way of thinking about combination of TCM and western medicine by combinating two kinds of methodological methods. PMID:25159994

  3. All humanity is my ingroup: a measure and studies of identification with all humanity.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Sam; Webb, Matthew; Brown, Derek

    2012-11-01

    To psychologists Adler (1927/1954) and Maslow (1954), fully mature individuals care deeply for all humanity, not just for their own ingroups. This paper reports a series of studies with a new measure of that caring, the Identification With All Humanity Scale (IWAH). These studies together show that identification with all humanity is more than an absence of ethnocentrism and its correlates and more than the presence of dispositional empathy, moral reasoning, moral identity, and the value of universalism. Across these studies, the IWAH predicted concern for global human rights and humanitarian needs (Studies 1 and 2), was temporally stable (Study 3), and correlated with how close others see one as being (Study 4). The IWAH strongly distinguished members of 2 known groups from a general adult sample (Study 5). It predicted valuing the lives of ingroup and outgroup members equally (Study 7), knowledge of global humanitarian concerns (Study 8) and choosing to learn about these concerns (Study 9), and a willingness to contribute to international humanitarian relief (Study 10). In regression analyses, it predicted these results beyond related constructs. Although psychologists have focused extensively upon negative qualities such as ethnocentrism and its roots, we suggest that the positive quality of identification with all humanity also merits extensive study. PMID:22708625

  4. Space station human productivity study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The primary goal was to develop design and operations requirements for direct support of intra-vehicular activity (IVA) crew performance and productivity. It was recognized that much work had already been accomplished which provided sufficient data for the definition of the desired requirements. It was necessary, therefore, to assess the status of such data to extract definable requirements, and then to define the remaining study needs. The explicit objectives of the study were to: review existing data to identify potential problems of space station crew productivity and to define requirements for support of productivity insofar as they could be justified by current information; identify those areas that lack adequate data; and prepare plans for managing studies to develop the lacking data, so that results can be input to the space station program in a timely manner.

  5. Succession of Ephemeral Secondary Forests and Their Limited Role for the Conservation of Floristic Diversity in a Human-Modified Tropical Landscape

    PubMed Central

    van Breugel, Michiel; Hall, Jefferson S.; Craven, Dylan; Bailon, Mario; Hernandez, Andres; Abbene, Michele; van Breugel, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Both local- and landscape-scale processes drive succession of secondary forests in human-modified tropical landscapes. Nonetheless, until recently successional changes in composition and diversity have been predominantly studied at the patch level. Here, we used a unique dataset with 45 randomly selected sites across a mixed-use tropical landscape in central Panama to study forest succession simultaneously on local and landscape scales and across both life stages (seedling, sapling, juvenile and adult trees) and life forms (shrubs, trees, lianas, and palms). To understand the potential of these secondary forests to conserve tree species diversity, we also evaluated the diversity of species that can persist as viable metapopulations in a dynamic patchwork of short-lived successional forests, using different assumptions about the average relative size at reproductive maturity. We found a deterministic shift in the diversity and composition of the local plant communities as well as the metacommunity, driven by variation in the rate at which species recruited into and disappeared from the secondary forests across the landscape. Our results indicate that dispersal limitation and the successional niche operate simultaneously and shape successional dynamics of the metacommunity of these early secondary forests. A high diversity of plant species across the metacommunity of early secondary forests shows a potential for restoration of diverse forests through natural succession, when trees and fragments of older forests are maintained in the agricultural matrix and land is abandoned or set aside for a long period of time. On the other hand, during the first 32 years the number of species with mature-sized individuals was a relatively small and strongly biased sub-sample of the total species pool. This implies that ephemeral secondary forests have a limited role in the long-term conservation of tree species diversity in human-modified tropical landscapes. PMID:24349283

  6. Succession of ephemeral secondary forests and their limited role for the conservation of floristic diversity in a human-modified tropical landscape.

    PubMed

    van Breugel, Michiel; Hall, Jefferson S; Craven, Dylan; Bailon, Mario; Hernandez, Andres; Abbene, Michele; van Breugel, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Both local- and landscape-scale processes drive succession of secondary forests in human-modified tropical landscapes. Nonetheless, until recently successional changes in composition and diversity have been predominantly studied at the patch level. Here, we used a unique dataset with 45 randomly selected sites across a mixed-use tropical landscape in central Panama to study forest succession simultaneously on local and landscape scales and across both life stages (seedling, sapling, juvenile and adult trees) and life forms (shrubs, trees, lianas, and palms). To understand the potential of these secondary forests to conserve tree species diversity, we also evaluated the diversity of species that can persist as viable metapopulations in a dynamic patchwork of short-lived successional forests, using different assumptions about the average relative size at reproductive maturity. We found a deterministic shift in the diversity and composition of the local plant communities as well as the metacommunity, driven by variation in the rate at which species recruited into and disappeared from the secondary forests across the landscape. Our results indicate that dispersal limitation and the successional niche operate simultaneously and shape successional dynamics of the metacommunity of these early secondary forests. A high diversity of plant species across the metacommunity of early secondary forests shows a potential for restoration of diverse forests through natural succession, when trees and fragments of older forests are maintained in the agricultural matrix and land is abandoned or set aside for a long period of time. On the other hand, during the first 32 years the number of species with mature-sized individuals was a relatively small and strongly biased sub-sample of the total species pool. This implies that ephemeral secondary forests have a limited role in the long-term conservation of tree species diversity in human-modified tropical landscapes. PMID:24349283

  7. Study of ultrasonic attenuation in f-electron systems in the paramagnetic limit of Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shadangi, Asit Ku.; Rout, G. C.

    2015-05-15

    We report here a microscopic model study of ultrasonic attenuation in f-electron systems based on Periodic Anderson Model in which Coulomb interaction is considered within a mean-field approximation for a weak interaction. The Phonon is coupled to the conduction band and f-electrons. The phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique of the Green's function method. The temperature dependent ultrasonic attenuation co-efficient is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon self-energy in the dynamic and long wave length limit. The f-electron occupation number is calculated self-consistently in paramagnetic limit of Coulomb interaction. The effect of the Coulomb interaction on ultrasonic attenuation is studied by varying the phonon coupling parameters to the conduction and f-electrons, hybridization strength, the position of f-level and the Coulomb interaction Strength. Results are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  8. Lesson Study as a Human Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine C.; Akita, Kiyomi; Sato, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    Neither experimental nor design research in education is as well developed in Japan as in the United States. Yet Japanese educational practice employs a type of educational research called "lesson study" that is credited for instructional improvements, including the shift from "teaching as telling" to "teaching for understanding" in science and…

  9. Exploring the Limits of Trigonometric Functions: Results and Reflections from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong; Poon, Kin-Keung

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report a pilot study on engaging a group of undergraduate students to explore the limits of sin(x)/x and tan(x)/x as x approaches to 0, with the use of non-graphic scientific calculators. By comparing the results in the pretest and the post-test, we found that the students had improvements in the tested items, which involved the…

  10. A parametric study on the lean misfiring and knocking limits of gas fueled spark ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, O.; Alsayed, N.; Manaf, M.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing emphasis on gaseous fuels as clean, economical and abundant fuels encourages the search for optimum operating conditions of gas fueled internal combustion engines. In this context, this paper presents the experimental results of a parametric study on the lean operational limits of a Ricardo E6 engine using propane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as fuels. The engine is a single cylinder, four stroke, water cooled, unthrottled, supercharged, variable compression, spark ignition engine having a swept volume of 507 cc. Three different criteria for defining the engine lean limit are used. The first is associated with the first detectable misfire on leaning the mixture, the second is the first detectable firing under motoring conditions when the mixture is being enriched slowly, while the third is that when the torque reaches zero on leaning the mixture. In addition, the lean knocking limit is presented for some experiments. The effects of speed, spark timing, compression ratio, intake temperature, intake pressure (supercharging), and relative humidity of intake air on the engine operational limits are presented and discussed in relation to chemical reaction rates, ignition delay, amount of residuals, turbulence, and heat transfer.

  11. A multiple imputation approach to disclosure limitation for high-age individuals in longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    An, Di; Little, Roderick J A; McNally, James W

    2010-07-30

    Disclosure limitation is an important consideration in the release of public use data sets. It is particularly challenging for longitudinal data sets, since information about an individual accumulates with repeated measures over time. Research on disclosure limitation methods for longitudinal data has been very limited. We consider here problems created by high ages in cohort studies. Because of the risk of disclosure, ages of very old respondents can often not be released; in particular, this is a specific stipulation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) for the release of health data for individuals. Top-coding of individuals beyond a certain age is a standard way of dealing with this issue, and it may be adequate for cross-sectional data, when a modest number of cases are affected. However, this approach leads to serious loss of information in longitudinal studies when individuals have been followed for many years. We propose and evaluate an alternative to top-coding for this situation based on multiple imputation (MI). This MI method is applied to a survival analysis of simulated data, and data from the Charleston Heart Study (CHS), and is shown to work well in preserving the relationship between hazard and covariates. PMID:20552576

  12. Human Rights Attitude Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Recep; Yaman, Tugba; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a valid and reliable attitude scale having quality psychometric features that can measure secondary school students' attitudes towards human rights. The study group of the research is comprised by 710 6th, 7th and 8th grade students who study at 4 secondary schools in the centre of Sivas. The study group…

  13. 76 FR 34703 - Human Studies Review Board Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... research (71 FR 24 6138) that called for creating a new, independent human studies review board (i.e., HSRB...; interpersonal, verbal and written communication skills and other attributes that would contribute to the...

  14. S1PR4 Signaling Attenuates ILT 7 Internalization To Limit IFN-α Production by Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dillmann, Christina; Ringel, Christian; Ringleb, Julia; Mora, Javier; Olesch, Catherine; Fink, Annika F; Roberts, Edward; Brüne, Bernhard; Weigert, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) produce large amounts of type I IFN in response to TLR7/9 ligands. This conveys antiviral effects, activates other immune cells (NK cells, conventional DCs, B, and T cells), and causes the induction and expansion of a strong inflammatory response. pDCs are key players in various type I IFN-driven autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus or psoriasis, but pDCs are also involved in (anti-)tumor immunity. The sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signals through five G-protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5) to regulate, among other activities, immune cell migration and activation. The present study shows that S1P stimulation of human, primary pDCs substantially decreases IFN-α production after TLR7/9 activation with different types of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, which occurred in an S1PR4-dependent manner. Mechanistically, S1PR4 activation preserves the surface expression of the human pDC-specific inhibitory receptor Ig-like transcript 7. We provide novel information that Ig-like transcript 7 is rapidly internalized upon receptor-mediated endocytosis of TLR7/9 ligands to allow high IFN-α production. This is antagonized by S1PR4 signaling, thus decreasing TLR-induced IFN-α secretion. At a functional level, attenuated IFN-α production failed to alter Ag-driven T cell proliferation in pDC-dependent T cell activation assays, but shifted cytokine production of T cells from a Th1 (IFN-γ) to a regulatory (IL-10) profile. In conclusion, S1PR4 agonists block human pDC activation and may therefore be a promising tool to restrict pathogenic IFN-α production. PMID:26783340

  15. A Guide to Studying Human Hair Follicle Cycling In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Moonkyu; Paus, Ralf; Plikus, Maksim V

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo lifelong cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative "quiescence" (telogen). Given that HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. Although available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. In this article, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria, and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in suboptimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field. PMID:26763421

  16. Use of human epidermal cells in the study of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Hosomi, J.; Kondo, S. )

    1989-05-01

    Because of the importance of human cells, particularly human epithelial cells, in cancer research, we have studied certain phases or events of carcinogenesis using human epidermal cells in primary culture. (1) We found that human epidermal cells are capable of metabolizing benzo(a)pyrene. Large inter-individual variations are found in the basal and induced arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase activities. (2) UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was demonstrated in human epidermal cells on autoradiographs. We also found that DNA repair is defective in epidermal cells isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum by a new explant-outgrowth culture. (3) Human epidermal cells are unique in that there is a large number of binding sites to phorbol esters compared with mouse epidermal cells, but there is no down-regulation. Further, human epidermal cells show essentially negative responses to tumor promoters, i.e., no stimulation of DNA synthesis, sugar uptake, and no induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity. (4) Human epidermal cells contain 1.5 x 10(5) binding sites per cell for epidermal growth factor (EGF), whereas squamous cell carcinomas of skin and oral cavity have larger amounts of EGF receptors in the order of 10(6) per cell. (5) Based on the above results, we attempted to transform human epidermal cells by the treatment with chemical carcinogens, but until now no transformation was obtained. 16 references.

  17. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  18. Reconstructed human epidermis: A model to study the barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbotteau, Y.; Gontier, E.; Barberet, P.; Cappadoro, M.; De Wever, B.; Habchi, C.; Incerti, S.; Mavon, A.; Moretto, P.; Pouthier, T.; Smith, R. W.; Ynsa, M. D.

    2005-04-01

    The use of in vitro reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries is increasing because of its similar physiological mechanisms to native human skin. With the advent of ethic laws on animal experimentation, RHE provides an helpful alternative for the test of formulations. The aim of this study is to check that the RHE mineral status is comparable to that of human native skin by investigating the elemental distributions in the epidermis strata. In addition, possible deleterious effects of the transport on the epidermis ionic content were studied by nuclear microscopy.

  19. The study of human mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  20. Limitations of the semisynthetic library approach for obtaining human monoclonal autoantibodies to the thyrotropin receptor of Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Heijden, J H W; De Bruin, T W A; Glaudemans, K A F M; De Kruif, J; Banga, J P; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against the TSH-receptor (TSH-R) which are pathogenic and, upon binding to the receptor, trigger intracellular signal transduction. The autoantibodies are oligoclonal and as they are responsible for disease activity, their characterization would lead to a better understanding of the development of GD. Attempts to isolate anti-TSH-R antibodies from patients have proved to be difficult due to the exceedingly low serum levels due to rarity of these B cells, together with difficulties in obtaining purified TSH-R capable of interacting with patients autoantibodies. We employed phage antibody display technology and performed selection with a previously characterized semisynthetic antibody library on the purified extracellular ectodomain of the TSH-R. We report the isolation of six different anti-TSH-R monoclonal phage antibodies (moPhabs) from this library. All the moPhabs recognized TSH-R and its recombinant fragments by Western blotting, but failed to recognize the native TSH-R by flow cytometry. Consequently, the moPhabs did not lead to TSH-R activation. As these were the first moPhabs to TSH-R, they were analysed in terms of nucleotide and amino acid sequence and epitope specificity on the receptor. The moPhabs used immunoglobulin VH1 and VH3 germ line genes, all associated with V?3 genes. Interestingly, the CDR3 regions of all moPhabs were remarkably similar, though not identical. In light of the common CDR3 usage, the epitopes recognized on TSH-R appeared to be restricted to amino acids residues 405411 and 357364. In summary, our results show that semisynthetic libraries may be limited in isolating human monoclonal antibodies that resemble pathogenic antithyrotropin receptor autoantibodies present in patients with GD. It is likely that until preparations of purified TSH-R that can be recognized by patients autoantibodies become available, similar to the recently described glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored TSH-R ectodomain, monoclonal antibodies from phage antibody display to TSH-R will be limited for isolating the rare, pathogenic antibodies of GD. PMID:10540180

  1. Proinsulin multi-peptide immunotherapy induces antigen-specific regulatory T cells and limits autoimmunity in a humanized model.

    PubMed

    Gibson, V B; Nikolic, T; Pearce, V Q; Demengeot, J; Roep, B O; Peakman, M

    2015-12-01

    Peptide immunotherapy (PIT) is a targeted therapeutic approach, involving administration of disease-associated peptides, with the aim of restoring antigen-specific immunological tolerance without generalized immunosuppression. In type 1 diabetes, proinsulin is a primary antigen targeted by the autoimmune response, and is therefore a strong candidate for exploitation via PIT in this setting. To elucidate the optimal conditions for proinsulin-based PIT and explore mechanisms of action, we developed a preclinical model of proinsulin autoimmunity in a humanized HLA-DRB1*0401 transgenic HLA-DR4 Tg mouse. Once proinsulin-specific tolerance is broken, HLA-DR4 Tg mice develop autoinflammatory responses, including proinsulin-specific T cell proliferation, interferon (IFN)-γ and autoantibody production. These are preventable and quenchable by pre- and post-induction treatment, respectively, using intradermal proinsulin-PIT injections. Intradermal proinsulin-PIT enhances proliferation of regulatory [forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+))CD25(high) ] CD4 T cells, including those capable of proinsulin-specific regulation, suggesting this as its main mode of action. In contrast, peptide delivered intradermally on the surface of vitamin D3-modulated (tolerogenic) dendritic cells, controls autoimmunity in association with proinsulin-specific IL-10 production, but no change in regulatory CD4 T cells. These studies define a humanized, translational model for in vivo optimization of PIT to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and indicate that dominant mechanisms of action differ according to mode of peptide delivery. PMID:26206289

  2. Limitations of widely used high-risk human papillomavirus laboratory-developed testing in cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Naryshkin, Sonya; Austin, R Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To increase awareness of the limitations of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) laboratory-developed testing (LDT) widely used in US cervical cancer screening. Methods and results: A young woman in her 30s was diagnosed and treated for stage 1B1 cervical squamous cell carcinoma in which HPV 16 DNA was detected using polymerase chain reaction testing. Both 1 month before and 42 months before cervical cancer diagnosis, the patient had highly abnormal cytology findings; however, residual SurePath™ (Becton, Dickson and Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) vial fluid yielded negative Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen NV, Hilden, Germany) hrHPV LDT results from each of the two specimens. This prompted questions to be asked concerning the performance characteristics of hrHPV LDT. A review of the available data indicates that (1) purification of DNA from SurePath specimens requires complex sample preparation due to formaldehyde crosslinking of proteins and nucleic acids, (2) HC2–SurePath hrHPV testing had not been Food and Drug Administration-approved after multiple premarket approval submissions, (3) detectible hrHPV DNA in the SurePath vial decreases over time, and (4) US laboratories performing HC2–SurePath hrHPV LDT testing are not using a standardized manufacturer-endorsed procedure. Conclusion: Recently updated cervical screening guidelines in the US recommend against the use of hrHPV LDT in cervical screening, including widely used HC2 testing from the SurePath vial. The manufacturer recently issued a technical bulletin specifically warning that use of SurePath samples with the HC2 hrHPV test may provide false negative results and potentially compromise patient safety. Co-collection using a Food and Drug Administration-approved hrHPV test medium is recommended for HPV testing of patients undergoing cervical screening using SurePath samples. PMID:23152707

  3. A radiographic study of the detection limits of bone-cement remnants in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Michael A; Bayers-Thering, Mary; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Krackow, Kenneth A

    2002-12-01

    Management of an infected hip prosthesis typically requires that all associated cement be removed. In the absence of gross mantle loosening, the surgeon frequently resorts to intraoperative radiographs to assess the completeness of removal. For this reason, we undertook a study to determine limits of detection of retained cement by routine radiography. Polymethyl methacrylate bone-cement beads (Simplex-P; Stryker-Howmedica-Osteonics, Allendale, NJ) were fashioned into graduated sizes and placed within cadaver medullary canals using 2 different methods. Standard radiographic images were obtained. Individually and independently, we viewed these images and proposed the limit of resolution to be 2.4 to 3.2 mm. It is difficult to remove all cement based on radiographs alone. These results suggest a need to use techniques that permit visualization of the canal to ensure adequate cement removal. PMID:12478508

  4. A clinicopathological study of human yellow fever*

    PubMed Central

    Francis, T. I.; Moore, D. L.; Edington, G. M.; Smith, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    During an epidemic of yellow fever in the Jos Plateau area of Nigeria, 9 adult males with clinically diagnosed yellow fever were studied by haematological, biochemical, virological, serological, and liver biopsy methods. The ages of the patients ranged from 20 to 55 years and the duration of illness was 3-62 days. No virus was isolated from any patient but all patients should biochemical evidence of severe hepatocellular damage. Leucopenia was a feature of the late acute stage of the disease. Five sera had antibodies to yellow fever at titres greater than 1: 32, 3 of them being monospecific for yellow fever. The classical histological features of yellow fever were present only in the acute or late acute stages, when complement-fixation tests may be negative. With convalescence and the production of complement-fixing antibodies in high titres, the histological features resembled those of a persisting nonspecific hepatitis. In an endemic area, the histological features of yellow fever will depend on the stage of the disease and a picture of nonspecific hepatitis would not exclude yellow fever in the absence of confirmation from serological tests. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2AFig. 2BFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4538039

  5. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: potential rate-limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mahmoud A; Hadsell, Darryl L; Haymond, Morey W

    2012-08-01

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from seven healthy, exclusively breastfeeding women from 6 h to 42 days following delivery to determine the temporal coordination of changes in gene expression in the carbohydrate metabolic processes emphasizing the lactose synthesis pathway in human mammary epithelial cell. We showed that milk lactose concentrations increased from 75 to 200 mM from 6 to 96 h. Milk progesterone concentrations fell by 65% at 24 h and were undetectable by day 3. Milk prolactin peaked at 36 h and then declined progressively afterward. In concordance with lactose synthesis, gene expression of galactose kinase 2, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2 (UGP2), and phosphoglucomutase 1 increased 18-, 10-, and threefold, respectively, between 6 and 72 h. Between 6 and 96 h, gene expression of UDP-galactose transporter 2 (SLC35A2) increased threefold, whereas glucose transporter 1 was unchanged. Gene expression of lactose synthase no. 3 increased 1.7-fold by 96 h, whereas ?-lactalbumin did not change over the entire study duration. Gene expression of prolactin receptor (PRLR) and its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription complex 5 (STAT5) were increased 10- and 2.5-fold, respectively, by 72 h. In summary, lactose synthesis paralleled the induction of gene expression of proteins involved in UDP-galactose synthesis and transport, suggesting that they are potentially rate limiting in lactose synthesis and thus milk production. Progesterone withdrawal may be the signal that triggers PRLR signaling via STAT5, which may in turn induce UGP2 and SLC35A2 expression. PMID:22649065

  6. Etintidine-propranolol interaction study in humans.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Weintraub, H S; Marriott, T B; Marinan, B; Abels, R

    1987-12-01

    Etintidine HCl is a potent H2-blocker. The effect of clinical doses of etintidine on the disposition of a single oral dose of propranolol was investigated in 12 normal subjects. This was a double-blind, two-way crossover study. Each subject received etintidine (400 mg) or placebo twice a day with meals for 4 days on two occasions (separated by 4 days). On each occasion, the subjects were fasted overnight on Day 3 and were given an oral dose of Inderal (40 mg propranolol hydrochloride) 30 min following the administration of the morning dose of etintidine or placebo on Day 4. Blood samples were collected prior to and up to 24 hr following the administration of propranolol. The plasma samples were analyzed for propranolol and 4-hydroxypropranolol by HPLC. Comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of propranolol between etintidine and the placebo groups indicates that etintidine significantly increased the AUC0-infinity values (573.5 vs. 146.4 ng.hr/ml, p = 0.0001) and prolonged the elimination half-life (4.61 vs. 2.33 hr) of propranolol. Statistical evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters of 4-hydroxypropranolol indicates that etintidine also increased the AUC0-24 values (43.8 vs. 16.4 ng.hr/ml, p = 0.0028) and prolonged the elimination half-life (4.87 vs. 1.97 hr) of 4-hydroxypropranolol. The data suggest that etintidine, like cimetidine, impaired the elimination of propranolol. Etintidine also protracted the elimination of 4-hydroxypropranolol, an active metabolite of propranolol. PMID:2897462

  7. Impact of Design Trade Studies on System Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Gary V.; Askren, William B.

    This study focused on two objectives. The first objective was to identify and classify the characteristics of conceptual design trade studies that have high potential impact on human resource requirements of Air Force weapon systems. The approach used was a case history review and analysis of 129 F-15 aircraft design trade studies. The analysis…

  8. A qualitative case study to identify possible barriers that limit effective elementary science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Donald Carey

    The purpose of this case study was to identify barriers that limit the effectiveness of elementary teachers in the teaching of science. It is of the utmost urgency that barriers be first identified, so that possible solutions can be explored to bring about the improvement of elementary science education. This urgency has been imposed by the scheduled national testing of students in science by 2007, as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Using qualitative case study methods, the researcher conducted interviews with 8 elementary teachers from two schools within one school district who taught 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade. These interviews were designed to gain insight into barriers these elementary teachers perceived as factors limiting their effectiveness in teaching science and preparing students for high-stakes testing. Barriers in the areas of teacher background, typical teaching day, curriculum, inservices, and legislative influences were explored. This study concluded that the barriers explored do have a substantial negative affect on the teaching and learning of science in the elementary grades. Specifically, the barriers revealed in this study include the limited science background of elementary teachers, inadequate class time devoted to science, non-comprehensive curriculum, ineffective or lack of inservice training, and pressures from legislated mandates. But it is also clear that these barriers are so intertwined that one cannot remove these barriers one at a time. It will take a collective effort from all involved, including legislators, administrators, teachers, parents, and students, to alleviate these barriers and discover effective solutions to improve elementary science education.

  9. Trend of different molecular markers in the last decades for studying human migrations.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-02-10

    Anatomically modern humans are known to have widely migrated throughout history. Different scientific evidences suggest that the entire human population descended from just several thousand African migrants. About 85,000 years ago, the first wave of human migration was out of Africa, that followed the coasts through the Middle East, into Southern Asia via Sri Lanka, and in due course around Indonesia and into Australia. Another wave of migration between 40,000 and 12,000 years ago brought humans northward into Europe. However, the frozen north limited human expansion in Europe, and created a land bridge, "Bering land bridge", connecting Asia with North America about 25,000 years ago. Although fossil data give the most direct information about our past, it has certain anomalies. So, molecular archeologists are now using different molecular markers to trace the "most recent common ancestor" and also the migration pattern of modern humans. In this study, we have studied the trend of molecular markers and also the methodologies implemented in the last decades (2003-2014). From our observation, we can say that D-loop region of mtDNA and Y chromosome based markers are predominant. Nevertheless, mtDNA, especially the D-loop region, has some unique features, which makes it a more effective marker for tracing prehistoric footprints of modern human populations. Although, natural selection should also be taken into account in studying mtDNA based human migration. As per technology is concerned, Sanger sequencing is the major technique that is being used in almost all studies. But, the emergence of different cost-effective-and-easy-to-handle NGS platforms has increased its popularity over Sanger sequencing in studying human migration. PMID:25510397

  10. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  11. The utilization of humanized mouse models for the study of human retroviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Pedati, Caitlin; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel techniques and systems to study human infectious diseases in both an in vitro and in vivo settings is always in high demand. Ideally, small animal models are the most efficient method of studying human afflictions. This is especially evident in the study of the human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, in that current simian animal models, though robust, are often expensive and difficult to maintain. Over the past two decades, the construction of humanized animal models through the transplantation and engraftment of human tissues or progenitor cells into immunocompromised mouse strains has allowed for the development of a reconstituted human tissue scaffold in a small animal system. The utilization of small animal models for retroviral studies required expansion of the early CB-17 scid/scid mouse resulting in animals demonstrating improved engraftment efficiency and infectivity. The implantation of uneducated human immune cells and associated tissue provided the basis for the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and hu-PBL-SCID models. Engraftment efficiency of these tissues was further improved through the integration of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mutation leading to the creation of NODSCID, NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγ-/-, and NOD/SCID β2-microglobulinnull animals. Further efforts at minimizing the response of the innate murine immune system produced the Rag2-/-γc-/- model which marked an important advancement in the use of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Together, these animal models have revolutionized the investigation of retroviral infections in vivo. PMID:19674458

  12. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-03-01

    Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  13. Drosophila tools and assays for the study of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Berrak; Chen, Kuchuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many of the internal organ systems of Drosophila melanogaster are functionally analogous to those in vertebrates, including humans. Although humans and flies differ greatly in terms of their gross morphological and cellular features, many of the molecular mechanisms that govern development and drive cellular and physiological processes are conserved between both organisms. The morphological differences are deceiving and have led researchers to undervalue the study of invertebrate organs in unraveling pathogenic mechanisms of diseases. In this review and accompanying poster, we highlight the physiological and molecular parallels between fly and human organs that validate the use of Drosophila to study the molecular pathogenesis underlying human diseases. We discuss assays that have been developed in flies to study the function of specific genes in the central nervous system, heart, liver and kidney, and provide examples of the use of these assays to address questions related to human diseases. These assays provide us with simple yet powerful tools to study the pathogenic mechanisms associated with human disease-causing genes. PMID:26935102

  14. Predicting the limits of the endoscopic endonasal approach in children: a radiological anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Carl A; Smotherman, Carmen R; Kraemer, Dale F; Aldana, Philipp R

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) has been established as an alternative approach to craniovertebral junction (CVJ) pathology in adults. The authors have previously described the nasoaxial line (NAxL) as an accurate predictor of the lower limit of the EEA to the CVJ in adults. The surgical anatomy limiting the EEA to the pediatric CVJ has not been well studied. Furthermore, predicting the lower limit of the EEA in various pediatric age groups is important in surgical planning. To better understand the anatomy affecting the EEA to the CVJ, the authors examined the skull base anatomy relevant to the EEA in children of different age groups and used the NAxL to predict the EEA lower limit in children. METHODS Axial brain CT scans of 39 children with normal skull base anatomy were reconstructed sagittally. Children were divided into 4 groups according to age: 3-6, 7-10, 11-14, and 15-18 years old. The intersection of the NAxL with the odontoid process of C-2 was described for each group. Analyses of variance were used to estimate the effect of age, sex, interaction between age and sex on different anatomical parameters relevant to the endonasal corridor (including the length of the hard palate [HPLe]), dimensions of choana and piriform aperture, and the length of the NAxL to C-2. The effect of the HPLe on the working distance of NAxL to the odontoid was also estimated using analysis of covariance, controlling for age, sex, and their interaction. RESULTS The NAxL extended to the odontoid process in 38 of the 39 children. Among the 39 children, the NAxL intersected the upper third of the odontoid process in 25 while intersecting the middle third in the remaining 13 children. The measurements of the inferior limits did not differ with age, varying between 9 and 11 mm below the hard palate line at the ventral surface of C-2. Significant increases in the size of the piriform aperture and choana and the HPLe were observed after age 10. The HPLe predicted the length of the NAxL (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The caudal limit of the EEA extends as far as the middle third of the odontoid process in children, as predicted by the NAxL. The most prominent increase in the size of the choana and piriform aperture occurs after age 10. The HPLe is a significant predictor of the working distance to C-2. Utilizing the NAxL preoperatively may help in planning the EEA to the CVJ in children. PMID:26613277

  15. Features of wild-type human SOD1 limit interactions with misfolded aggregates of mouse G86R Sod1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) account for about 20% of the cases of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). It is well established that mutations in SOD1, associated with fALS, heighten the propensity of the protein to misfold and aggregate. Although aggregation appears to be a factor in the toxicity of mutant SOD1s, the precise nature of this toxicity has not been elucidated. A number of other studies have now firmly established that raising the levels of wild-type (WT) human SOD1 (hSOD1) proteins can in some manner augment the toxicity of mutant hSOD1 proteins. However, a recent study demonstrated that raising the levels of WT-hSOD1 did not affect disease in mice that harbor a mouse Sod1 gene (mSod1) encoding a well characterized fALS mutation (G86R). In the present study, we sought a potential explanation for the differing effects with WT-hSOD1 on the toxicity of mutant hSOD1 versus mutant mSod1. In the cell culture models used here, we observe poor interactions between WT-hSOD1 and misfolded G86R-mSod1, possibly explaining why over-expression of WT-hSOD1 does not synergize with mutant mSod1 to accelerate the course of the disease in mice. PMID:24341866

  16. Study of electrical properties of meridian on human body surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Uematsu, Haruyuki; Otani, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the study of the subcutaneous electrical impedance on the human body surface. Measurements of the electrical impedance on five adult male subjects were carried out and analyzed for the possible detection of the acupuncture meridian lines of ancient Chinese medicine on the human body. The distribution of electrical impedance measured at 40 points over the volar side of the right upper limb of the subjects. The results show that electrical impedance varies at different locations of the human body surface, and the locations with lower electrical impedance coincide with the locations where the meridian is believed to exist.

  17. Brain activity and human unilateral chewing: an FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Quintero, A; Ichesco, E; Myers, C; Schutt, R; Gerstner, G E

    2013-02-01

    Brain mechanisms underlying mastication have been studied in non-human mammals but less so in humans. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate brain activity in humans during gum chewing. Chewing was associated with activations in the cerebellum, motor cortex and caudate, cingulate, and brainstem. We also divided the 25-second chew-blocks into 5 segments of equal 5-second durations and evaluated activations within and between each of the 5 segments. This analysis revealed activation clusters unique to the initial segment, which may indicate brain regions involved with initiating chewing. Several clusters were uniquely activated during the last segment as well, which may represent brain regions involved with anticipatory or motor events associated with the end of the chew-block. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for specific brain areas associated with chewing in humans and demonstrated that brain activation patterns may dynamically change over the course of chewing sequences. PMID:23103631

  18. A Comparative Study Between Strain And Stress Based Forming Limit Analysis By Applying Several Phenomenological Yield Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Butuc, Marilena C.; Vincze, Gabriela T.; Gracio, Jose J.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2005-08-05

    The present work aims at analyzing a comparative study between the strain-based forming limit criterion (FLD) and the stress-based forming limit criterion (FLSD), under linear and complex strain paths. The selected material is an AA5182-0 aluminium alloy. Some relevant remarks about stress-based forming limit criterion concept are presented.

  19. HUMEX. A study on the survivability and adaptation of humans to long-duration exploratory missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert A.

    2003-11-01

    After the realisation of the International Space Station (ISS), human exploratory missions to the Moon or Mars, i.e. beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), are widely considered as the next logical step in worldwide peaceful cooperation in space. The HUMEX study has concentrated on human health related aspects: it provides a critical assessment of the human responses, limits and needs with regard to the stress environments of interplanetary and planetary missions. Emphasis has been put on human health, well-being and performance care, such as radiation health issues, adaptation to microgravity and reduced gravity, psychology issues and health, well-being and performance care, such as radiation health issues, adaptation to microgravity and reduced gravity, psychology issues and health maintenance and on advanced life support developments. The overall study goals are: to define reference scenarios for European participation in human exploration and to estimate their influence on the Life Sciences and Life Support requirements; for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the limiting factors for human health, well-being, and performance and to recommend relevant countermeasures; for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the potential of advanced life support developments and to propose a European strategy for this field, including terrestrial applications; to critically assess the applicability of existing facilities and technologies on the ground and in space as test beds for human exploratory missions and to develop a test plan for ground and ISS campaigns; to develop a roadmap for future European activities, in preparation for human exploratory missions, including preparatory activities and terrestrial applications and benefits.

  20. Animal Models to Study Placental Development and Function throughout Normal and Dysfunctional Human Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grigsby, Peta L.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of placental development and function are known to underlie many pathologies of pregnancy, including spontaneous preterm birth, fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. A growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental dysfunction in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring. However, our knowledge regarding placental structure and function throughout pregnancy remains limited. Understanding the temporal growth and functionality of the human placenta throughout the entirety of gestation is important if we are to gain a better understanding of placental dysfunction. The utilization of new technologies and imaging techniques that could enable safe monitoring of placental growth and function in vivo has become a major focus area for the National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development, as evident by the establishment of the “Human Placenta Project”. Many of the objectives of the Human Placenta Project will necessitate pre-clinical studies and testing in appropriately designed animal models that can be readily translated to the clinical setting. This review will describe the advantages and limitations of relevant animals such as the guinea pig, sheep and non-human primate models that have been used to study the role of the placenta in fetal growth disorders, preeclampsia or other maternal diseases during pregnancy. PMID:26752715

  1. Perfluorochemicals and Human Semen Quality: The LIFE Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Kim, Sungduk; Sweeney, Anne M.; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Lynch, Courtney D.; Gore-Langton, Robert E.; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relation between persistent environmental chemicals and semen quality is evolving, although limited data exist for men recruited from general populations. Objectives: We examined the relation between perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) and semen quality among 501 male partners of couples planning pregnancy. Methods: Using population-based sampling strategies, we recruited 501 couples discontinuing contraception from two U.S. geographic regions from 2005 through 2009. Baseline interviews and anthropometric assessments were conducted, followed by blood collection for the quantification of seven serum PFCs (perfluorosulfonates, perfluorocarboxylates, and perfluorosulfonamides) using tandem mass spectrometry. Men collected a baseline semen sample and another approximately 1 month later. Semen samples were shipped with freezer packs, and analyses were performed on the day after collection. We used linear regression to estimate the difference in each semen parameter associated with a one unit increase in the natural log–transformed PFC concentration after adjusting for confounders and modeling repeated semen samples. Sensitivity analyses included optimal Box-Cox transformation of semen quality end points. Results: Six PFCs [2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetate (Me-PFOSA-AcOH), perfluorodecanoate (PFDeA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)] were associated with 17 semen quality end points before Box-Cox transformation. PFOSA was associated with smaller sperm head area and perimeter, a lower percentage of DNA stainability, and a higher percentage of bicephalic and immature sperm. PFDeA, PFNA, PFOA, and PFOS were associated with a lower percentage of sperm with coiled tails. Conclusions: Select PFCs were associated with certain semen end points, with the most significant associations observed for PFOSA but with results in varying directions. Citation: Buck Louis GM, Chen Z, Schisterman EF, Kim S, Sweeney AM, Sundaram R, Lynch CD, Gore-Langton RE, Barr DB. 2015. Perfluorochemicals and human semen quality: the LIFE Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:57–63; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307621 PMID:25127343

  2. A Phylogenetic Comparative Study of Bantu Kinship Terminology Finds Limited Support for Its Co-Evolution with Social Organisation

    PubMed Central

    Guillon, Myrtille; Mace, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The classification of kin into structured groups is a diverse phenomenon which is ubiquitous in human culture. For populations which are organized into large agropastoral groupings of sedentary residence but not governed within the context of a centralised state, such as our study sample of 83 historical Bantu-speaking groups of sub-Saharan Africa, cultural kinship norms guide all aspects of everyday life and social organization. Such rules operate in part through the use of differing terminological referential systems of familial organization. Although the cross-cultural study of kinship terminology was foundational in Anthropology, few modern studies have made use of statistical advances to further our sparse understanding of the structuring and diversification of terminological systems of kinship over time. In this study we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods of phylogenetic comparison to investigate the evolution of Bantu kinship terminology and reconstruct the ancestral state and diversification of cousin terminology in this family of sub-Saharan ethnolinguistic groups. Using a phylogenetic tree of Bantu languages, we then test the prominent hypothesis that structured variation in systems of cousin terminology has co-evolved alongside adaptive change in patterns of descent organization, as well as rules of residence. We find limited support for this hypothesis, and argue that the shaping of systems of kinship terminology is a multifactorial process, concluding with possible avenues of future research. PMID:27008364

  3. A Phylogenetic Comparative Study of Bantu Kinship Terminology Finds Limited Support for Its Co-Evolution with Social Organisation.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Myrtille; Mace, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The classification of kin into structured groups is a diverse phenomenon which is ubiquitous in human culture. For populations which are organized into large agropastoral groupings of sedentary residence but not governed within the context of a centralised state, such as our study sample of 83 historical Bantu-speaking groups of sub-Saharan Africa, cultural kinship norms guide all aspects of everyday life and social organization. Such rules operate in part through the use of differing terminological referential systems of familial organization. Although the cross-cultural study of kinship terminology was foundational in Anthropology, few modern studies have made use of statistical advances to further our sparse understanding of the structuring and diversification of terminological systems of kinship over time. In this study we use Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods of phylogenetic comparison to investigate the evolution of Bantu kinship terminology and reconstruct the ancestral state and diversification of cousin terminology in this family of sub-Saharan ethnolinguistic groups. Using a phylogenetic tree of Bantu languages, we then test the prominent hypothesis that structured variation in systems of cousin terminology has co-evolved alongside adaptive change in patterns of descent organization, as well as rules of residence. We find limited support for this hypothesis, and argue that the shaping of systems of kinship terminology is a multifactorial process, concluding with possible avenues of future research. PMID:27008364

  4. Scientific and ethical conflicts in cancer studies involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    Soskolne, C L

    1986-01-01

    Cancer studies involving human subjects present ethical conflicts which require a delicate balance to be struck between respect for fundamental human rights and the need to obtain sufficient data to satisfy study goals. Scientific and ethical conflicts at all stages of application of the scientific method are discussed. Legislative safeguards and ethical guidelines continue to evolve. Both must form an integral part of considerations regarding the feasibility of conducting cancer studies involving human subjects. Researchers, administrators, and legislators must be educated in and remain sensitive to two competing forces in epidemiologic research: the need to know versus respect for the individual's right to privacy, safety, dignity, and autonomy. An enhanced role for Institutional Review Boards to include an interactive monitoring function with ongoing studies is proposed. PMID:3564499

  5. Restless legs syndrome and functional limitations among American elders in the Health and Retirement Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common condition associated with decreased quality of life in older adults. This study estimates the prevalence, risk factors, and functional correlates of among U.S. elders. Methods Subjects (n = 1,008) were sub-sampled from the 2002 cross-sectional interview survey of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative study of U.S. elders. Symptoms and sleep disturbances consistent with RLS were identified. Activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and limitations for mobility, large muscle groups, gross and fine motor function were measured using standardized questions. Incident functional limitations were detected over six years of observation. Results The prevalence of RLS among U.S. elders born before 1947 was 10.6%. Factors associated with increased prevalence RLS at baseline included: overweight body mass index (multivariate adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.77; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.99); mild-to-moderate pain (2.67, 1.47-4.84) or pain inferring with activity (3.44, 2.00-5.93); three or more chronic medications (2.54, 1.26-5.12), highest quartile of out-of-pocket medical expenses (2.12, 1.17-3.86), frequent falls (2.63, 1.49-4.66), health limiting ability to work (2.91, 1.75-4.85), or problems with early waking or frequent wakening (1.69, 1.09-2.62 and 1.55, 1.00-2.41, respectively). Current alcohol consumption (0.59, 0.37-0.92) and frequent healthcare provider visits (0.49, 0.27-0.90) were associated with decreased RLS prevalence. RLS did not predict incident disability for aggregate measures but was associated with increased risk for specific limitations, including: difficulty climbing several stair flights (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.38, 95% CI 1.39-4.06), prolonged sitting (2.17, 1.25-3.75), rising from a chair (2.54, 1.62-3.99), stooping (2.66, 1.71-4.15), moving heavy objects (1.79, 1.08-2.99), carrying ten pounds (1.61, 1.05-2.97), raising arms (1.76, 1.05-2.97), or picking up a dime (1.97, 1.12-3.46). Conclusions RLS sufferers are more likely to have functional disability, even after adjusting for health status and pain syndrome correlates. PMID:22834914

  6. A mouse model replicating hippocampal sparing cranial irradiation in humans: A tool for identifying new strategies to limit neurocognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Wolfgang A; Gökhan, Şölen; Brodin, N Patrik; Gulinello, Maria E; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing cranial irradiation are at risk of developing neurocognitive impairments. Recent evidence suggests that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampi could play an important role in this cognitive decline. As a tool for studying the mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent cognitive decline, we developed a mouse model replicating the results of the recent clinical RTOG 0933 study of hippocampal sparing whole-brain irradiation. We irradiated 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice to a single dose of 10 Gy using either whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) or hippocampal sparing irradiation (HSI). These animals, as well as sham-irradiated controls, were subjected to behavioral/cognitive assessments distinguishing between hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent functions. Irradiation was well tolerated by all animals and only limited cell death of proliferating cells was found within the generative zones. Animals exposed to WBRT showed significant deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls in the hippocampal-dependent behavioral task. In contrast, HSI mice did not perform significantly different from sham-irradiated mice (control group) and performed significantly better when compared to WBRT mice. This is consistent with the results from the RTOG 0933 clinical trial, and as such this animal model could prove a helpful tool for exploring new strategies for mitigating cognitive decline in cancer patients receiving cranial irradiation. PMID:26399509

  7. A mouse model replicating hippocampal sparing cranial irradiation in humans: A tool for identifying new strategies to limit neurocognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Gökhan, Şölen; Brodin, N. Patrik; Gulinello, Maria E.; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F.; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing cranial irradiation are at risk of developing neurocognitive impairments. Recent evidence suggests that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampi could play an important role in this cognitive decline. As a tool for studying the mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent cognitive decline, we developed a mouse model replicating the results of the recent clinical RTOG 0933 study of hippocampal sparing whole-brain irradiation. We irradiated 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice to a single dose of 10 Gy using either whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) or hippocampal sparing irradiation (HSI). These animals, as well as sham-irradiated controls, were subjected to behavioral/cognitive assessments distinguishing between hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent functions. Irradiation was well tolerated by all animals and only limited cell death of proliferating cells was found within the generative zones. Animals exposed to WBRT showed significant deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls in the hippocampal-dependent behavioral task. In contrast, HSI mice did not perform significantly different from sham-irradiated mice (control group) and performed significantly better when compared to WBRT mice. This is consistent with the results from the RTOG 0933 clinical trial, and as such this animal model could prove a helpful tool for exploring new strategies for mitigating cognitive decline in cancer patients receiving cranial irradiation. PMID:26399509

  8. Human Resource Development Study of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia. Human Resources Center.

    In this 12-month study, an interdisciplinary research team comprehensively investigated the existing and projected Human Resource Development (HRD) needs of Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA). The general objectives of the study were to indicate how SEPTA's HRD program might be improved, and to outline the parameters of a…

  9. An Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were…

  10. Are animal models useful for studying human disc disorders/degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Stephen M.; Ito, Keita; Little, Christopher; Kettler, A. Annette; Masuda, Koichi; Melrose, James; Ralphs, Jim; Stokes, Ian; Wilke, Hans Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is an often investigated pathophysiological condition because of its implication in causing low back pain. As human material for such studies is difficult to obtain because of ethical and government regulatory restriction, animal tissue, organs and in vivo models have often been used for this purpose. However, there are many differences in cell population, tissue composition, disc and spine anatomy, development, physiology and mechanical properties, between animal species and human. Both naturally occurring and induced degenerative changes may differ significantly from those seen in humans. This paper reviews the many animal models developed for the study of IVD degeneration aetiopathogenesis and treatments thereof. In particular, the limitations and relevance of these models to the human condition are examined, and some general consensus guidelines are presented. Although animal models are invaluable to increase our understanding of disc biology, because of the differences between species, care must be taken when used to study human disc degeneration and much more effort is needed to facilitate research on human disc material. PMID:17632738

  11. Low power optical limiting studies of copper doped lithium tetraborate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanuskodi, S.; Mohandoss, R.; Vinitha, G.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2015-04-01

    The copper doped lithium tetraborate (LTB:Cu) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized by XRD (tetragonal structure) and by FESEM (sphere-like nanoparticle). UV-Vis studies show that there is no strong absorption in the visible region. In the luminescence spectrum, the emission peak at 370 nm reveals the presence of Cu+ in LTB lattice. The relative powder second harmonic generation efficiency of pure and doped LTB is equal to the standard NLO material, KDP. The nonlinear optical parameters of LTB:Cu nanoparticles say, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and third order nonlinear optical susceptibility were determined to be of the order of 10-8 cm2/W, 10-2 cm/W and 10-5 esu, respectively. The optical power limiting behavior of the samples were studied by Z-scan technique with (532 nm, 50 mW) Nd:YAG laser and the limiting threshold values are found to be 22.7 mW for 0.01 M and 24.9 mW for 0.03 and 0.05 M LTB:Cu nanoparticles.

  12. Passive optical limiting studies of nanostructured Cu doped ZnO-PVA composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-01-01

    We prepared undoped and Cu doped ZnO semiconducting nanoparticles (NPs) by chemical co-precipitation method and obtained Cu doped ZnO-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanocomposite thin films by spin coating to investigate third order nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties under cw laser excitation. Powder samples of NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. XRD pattern and FE-SEM micrograph revealed the presence of hexagonal wurtzite phase ZnO NPs having uniform morphology with average particle size of 20 nm. The presence of excitons and absorption peaks in the range 343-360 nm, revealed by UV-vis study, were attributed to excitons in n = 1 quantum state. Third order NLO properties of all composite thin films were investigated by He-Ne continuous wave (cw) laser of wavelength 632.8 nm using Z-scan technique. Thermally stimulated enhanced values of nonlinear refraction and absorption coefficients were obtained which may be attributed to self-defocusing effect, reverse saturable absorption, weak free carrier absorption and surface states properties originated from thermo optic effect. Optical limiting properties have been studied using cw diode laser of wavelength 808 nm and results are presented.

  13. Low power optical limiting studies of copper doped lithium tetraborate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dhanuskodi, S; Mohandoss, R; Vinitha, G; Pathinettam Padiyan, D

    2015-04-01

    The copper doped lithium tetraborate (LTB:Cu) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized by XRD (tetragonal structure) and by FESEM (sphere-like nanoparticle). UV-Vis studies show that there is no strong absorption in the visible region. In the luminescence spectrum, the emission peak at 370 nm reveals the presence of Cu+ in LTB lattice. The relative powder second harmonic generation efficiency of pure and doped LTB is equal to the standard NLO material, KDP. The nonlinear optical parameters of LTB:Cu nanoparticles say, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and third order nonlinear optical susceptibility were determined to be of the order of 10(-8)cm2/W, 10(-2) cm/W and 10(-5) esu, respectively. The optical power limiting behavior of the samples were studied by Z-scan technique with (532 nm, 50 mW) Nd:YAG laser and the limiting threshold values are found to be 22.7 mW for 0.01 M and 24.9 mW for 0.03 and 0.05 M LTB:Cu nanoparticles. PMID:25615676

  14. Distribution limits of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis: a case study in the Rocky Mountains, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Muths, E.; Anderson, C.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Corn, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the environmental constraints on a pathogen is critical to predicting its dynamics and effects on populations. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), an aquatic fungus that has been linked with widespread amphibian declines, is ubiquitous in the Rocky Mountains. As part of assessing the distribution limits of Bd in our study area, we sampled the water column and sediments for Bd zoospores in 30 high-elevation water bodies that lacked amphibians. All water bodies were in areas where Bd has been documented from neighboring, lower-elevation areas. We targeted areas lacking amphibians because existence of Bd independent of amphibians would have both ecologic and management implications. We did not detect Bd, which supports the hypothesis that it does not live independently of amphibians. However, assuming a detection sensitivity of 59.5% (based on sampling of water where amphibians tested positive for Bd), we only had 95% confidence of detecting Bd if it was in > or =16% of our sites. Further investigation into potential abiotic reservoirs is needed, but our results provide a strategic step in determining the distributional and environmental limitations of Bd in our study region.

  15. Distribution limits of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis: a case study in the Rocky Mountains, USA.

    PubMed

    Hossack, Blake R; Muths, Erin; Anderson, Chauncey W; Kirshtein, Julie D; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of the environmental constraints on a pathogen is critical to predicting its dynamics and effects on populations. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), an aquatic fungus that has been linked with widespread amphibian declines, is ubiquitous in the Rocky Mountains. As part of assessing the distribution limits of Bd in our study area, we sampled the water column and sediments for Bd zoospores in 30 high-elevation water bodies that lacked amphibians. All water bodies were in areas where Bd has been documented from neighboring, lower-elevation areas. We targeted areas lacking amphibians because existence of Bd independent of amphibians would have both ecologic and management implications. We did not detect Bd, which supports the hypothesis that it does not live independently of amphibians. However, assuming a detection sensitivity of 59.5% (based on sampling of water where amphibians tested positive for Bd), we only had 95% confidence of detecting Bd if it was in > or =16% of our sites. Further investigation into potential abiotic reservoirs is needed, but our results provide a strategic step in determining the distributional and environmental limitations of Bd in our study region. PMID:19901397

  16. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  17. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  18. A Simple Mouse Model for the Study of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chang; Park, Ki Hoon; Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Young Keol; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Sung Soon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-02-01

    Humanized mouse models derived from immune-deficient mice have been the primary tool for studies of human infectious viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the current protocol for constructing humanized mice requires elaborate procedures and complicated techniques, limiting the supply of such mice for viral studies. Here, we report a convenient method for constructing a simple HIV-1 mouse model. Without prior irradiation, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ-null (NSG) mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 × 10(7) adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMCs). Four weeks after PBMC inoculation, human CD45(+) cells, and CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were detected in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver, whereas human CD19(+) cells were observed in lymph nodes and spleen. To examine the usefulness of hu-PBMC-inoculated NSG (hu-PBMC-NSG) mice as an HIV-1 infection model, we intravenously injected these mice with dual-tropic HIV-1DH12 and X4-tropic HIV-1NL4-3 strains. HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice showed significantly lower human CD4(+) T cell counts and high HIV viral loads in the peripheral blood compared with noninfected hu-PBMC-NSG mice. Following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and neutralizing antibody treatment, HIV-1 replication was significantly suppressed in HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice without detectable viremia or CD4(+) T cell depletion. Moreover, the numbers of human T cells were maintained in hu-PBMC-NSG mice for at least 10 weeks. Taken together, our results suggest that hu-PBMC-NSG mice may serve as a relevant HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis model that could facilitate in vivo studies of HIV-1 infection and candidate HIV-1 protective drugs. PMID:26564392

  19. Limitations and relative utility of screening assays to assess engineered nanoparticle toxicity in a human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro-Riviere, N.A.; Inman, A.O.; Zhang, L.W.

    2009-01-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), fullerenes (C{sub 60}), carbon black (CB), nC{sub 60}, and quantum dots (QD) have been studied in vitro to determine their toxicity in a number of cell types. Here, we report that classical dye-based assays such as MTT and neutral red (NR) that determine cell viability produce invalid results with some NM (nanomaterials) due to NM/dye interactions and/or NM adsorption of the dye/dye products. In this study, human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) were exposed in vitro to CB, SWCNT, C{sub 60}, nC{sub 60}, and QD to assess viability with calcein AM (CAM), Live/Dead (LD), NR, MTT, Celltiter 96 AQueous One (96 AQ), alamar Blue (aB), Celltiter-Blue (CTB), CytoTox One{sup TM} (CTO), and flow cytometry. In addition, trypan blue (TB) was quantitated by light microscopy. Assay linearity (R{sup 2} value) was determined with HEK plated at concentrations from 0 to 25,000 cells per well in 96-well plates. HEK were treated with serial dilutions of each NM for 24 h and assessed with each of the viability assays. TB, CAM and LD assays, which depend on direct staining of living and/or dead cells, were difficult to interpret due to physical interference of the NM with cells. Results of the dye-based assays varied a great deal, depending on the interactions of the dye/dye product with the carbon nanomaterials (CNM). Results show the optimal high throughput assay for use with carbon and noncarbon NM was 96 AQ. This study shows that, unlike small molecules, CNM interact with assay markers to cause variable results with classical toxicology assays and may not be suitable for assessing nanoparticle cytotoxicity. Therefore, more than one assay may be required when determining nanoparticle toxicity for risk assessment.

  20. Ten-dimensional anthropomorphic arm control in a human brain-machine interface: difficulties, solutions, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodlinger, B.; Downey, J. E.; Tyler-Kabara, E. C.; Schwartz, A. B.; Boninger, M. L.; Collinger, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. In a previous study we demonstrated continuous translation, orientation and one-dimensional grasping control of a prosthetic limb (seven degrees of freedom) by a human subject with tetraplegia using a brain-machine interface (BMI). The current study, in the same subject, immediately followed the previous work and expanded the scope of the control signal by also extracting hand-shape commands from the two 96-channel intracortical electrode arrays implanted in the subject’s left motor cortex. Approach. Four new control signals, dictating prosthetic hand shape, replaced the one-dimensional grasping in the previous study, allowing the subject to control the prosthetic limb with ten degrees of freedom (three-dimensional (3D) translation, 3D orientation, four-dimensional hand shaping) simultaneously. Main results. Robust neural tuning to hand shaping was found, leading to ten-dimensional (10D) performance well above chance levels in all tests. Neural unit preferred directions were broadly distributed through the 10D space, with the majority of units significantly tuned to all ten dimensions, instead of being restricted to isolated domains (e.g. translation, orientation or hand shape). The addition of hand shaping emphasized object-interaction behavior. A fundamental component of BMIs is the calibration used to associate neural activity to intended movement. We found that the presence of an object during calibration enhanced successful shaping of the prosthetic hand as it closed around the object during grasping. Significance. Our results show that individual motor cortical neurons encode many parameters of movement, that object interaction is an important factor when extracting these signals, and that high-dimensional operation of prosthetic devices can be achieved with simple decoding algorithms. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01364480.

  1. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  2. Human trigeminal ganglionic explants as a model to study alphaherpesvirus reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Azarkh, Yevgeniy; Bos, Nathan; Gilden, Don

    2013-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) latency is characterized by limited virus gene expression and the absence of virus DNA replication. Investigations of VZV latency and reactivation have been hindered by the lack of an in vitro model of virus latency. Since VZV is an exclusively human pathogen, we used naturally infected human trigeminal ganglia (TG) obtained at autopsy to study virus latency. Herein, we report optimization of medium to maintain TG integrity as determined by histology and immunohisto-chemistry. Using the optimized culture medium, we also found that both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and VZV DNA replicated in TG explants after 5 days in culture. The increase in HSV-1 DNA was fourfold greater than the increase in VZV DNA. Overall, we present a model for alphaherpesvirus latency in human neurons in which the key molecular events leading to virus reactivation can be studied. PMID:22851387

  3. Ontology-based federated data access to human studies information.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson W; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James; Mollah, Shamim A; Burke, Karl; Lehmann, Harold P; Chakraborty, Swati; Wittkowski, Knut M; Pollock, Brad H; Johnson, Thomas M; Huser, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Human studies are one of the most valuable sources of knowledge in biomedical research, but data about their design and results are currently widely dispersed in siloed systems. Federation of these data is needed to facilitate large-scale data analysis to realize the goals of evidence-based medicine. The Human Studies Database project has developed an informatics infrastructure for federated query of human studies databases, using a generalizable approach to ontology-based data access. Our approach has three main components. First, the Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) provides the reference semantics. Second, a data model, automatically derived from OCRe into XSD, maintains semantic synchrony of the underlying representations while facilitating data acquisition using common XML technologies. Finally, the Query Integrator issues queries distributed over the data, OCRe, and other ontologies such as SNOMED in BioPortal. We report on a demonstration of this infrastructure on data acquired from institutional systems and from ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:23304360

  4. Study on Market Stability and Price Limit of Chinese Stock Index Futures Market: An Agent-Based Modeling Perspective.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiong; Nan, Ding; Yang, Yang; Yongjie, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a method of managing the risk of the stock index futures market and the cross-market through analyzing the effectiveness of price limits on the Chinese Stock Index 300 futures market. We adopt a cross-market artificial financial market (include the stock market and the stock index futures market) as a platform on which to simulate the operation of the CSI 300 futures market by changing the settings of price limits. After comparing the market stability under different price limits by appropriate liquidity and volatility indicators, we find that enhancing price limits or removing price limits both play a negative impact on market stability. In contrast, a positive impact exists on market stability if the existing price limit is maintained (increase of limit by10%, down by 10%) or it is broadened to a proper extent. Our study provides reasonable advice for a price limit setting and risk management for CSI 300 futures. PMID:26571135

  5. Study on Market Stability and Price Limit of Chinese Stock Index Futures Market: An Agent-Based Modeling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores a method of managing the risk of the stock index futures market and the cross-market through analyzing the effectiveness of price limits on the Chinese Stock Index 300 futures market. We adopt a cross-market artificial financial market (include the stock market and the stock index futures market) as a platform on which to simulate the operation of the CSI 300 futures market by changing the settings of price limits. After comparing the market stability under different price limits by appropriate liquidity and volatility indicators, we find that enhancing price limits or removing price limits both play a negative impact on market stability. In contrast, a positive impact exists on market stability if the existing price limit is maintained (increase of limit by10%, down by 10%) or it is broadened to a proper extent. Our study provides reasonable advice for a price limit setting and risk management for CSI 300 futures. PMID:26571135

  6. Baboons as a Model to Study Genetics and Epigenetics of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Havill, Lorena M.; Karere, Genesio M.; Spradling, Kimberly D.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Shade, Robert E.; Voruganti, Saroja; VandeBerg, John L.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for understanding susceptibility to common human diseases is determining genetic and environmental factors that influence mechanisms underlying variation in disease-related traits. The most common diseases afflicting the US population are complex diseases that develop as a result of defects in multiple genetically controlled systems in response to environmental challenges. Unraveling the etiology of these diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the many genetic and environmental factors involved. Studies of complex disease genetics in humans are challenging because it is not possible to control pedigree structure and often not practical to control environmental conditions over an extended period of time. Furthermore, access to tissues relevant to many diseases from healthy individuals is quite limited. The baboon is a well-established research model for the study of a wide array of common complex diseases, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and osteoporosis. It is possible to acquire tissues from healthy, genetically characterized baboons that have been exposed to defined environmental stimuli. In this review, we describe the genetic and physiologic similarity of baboons with humans, the ability and usefulness of controlling environment and breeding, and current genetic and genomic resources. We discuss studies on genetics of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and intrauterine growth restriction using the baboon as a model for human disease. We also summarize new studies and resources under development, providing examples of potential translational studies for targeted interventions and therapies for human disease. PMID:24174436

  7. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Paul S. Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-11-15

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals.

  8. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  9. An applied study of human detection in single images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ren; Xie, Xianghua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we perform an applied comparative study of popular HOG based human detection and a state-of-the-art pose adaptive method that uses shape-based model construction. Both methods are implemented with kernel SVM, instead of linear SVM. Detailed performance evaluation is carried out on MIT pedestrian dataset and INRIA person dataset. This study shows that, although pose adaptive method has no significant advantage compared to the HOG based approach on those datasets, the pose adaptive approach is more efficient in detection and it has the capability to segment the human shape from images while carrying out detection which can be advantageous in many applications.

  10. Ecologic studies of rodent reservoirs: their relevance for human health.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J. N.; Childs, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Within the past few years, the number of "new" human diseases associated with small-mammal reservoirs has increased dramatically, stimulating renewed interest in reservoir ecology research. A consistent, integrative approach to such research allows direct comparisons between studies, contributes to the efficient use of resources and data, and increases investigator safety. We outline steps directed toward understanding vertebrate host ecology as it relates to human disease and illustrate the relevance of each step by using examples from studies of hosts associated with rodent-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses. PMID:9866729

  11. A qualitative study of limited access permit dental hygienists in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Battrell, Ann M; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R

    2008-03-01

    Many states have adopted alternative oral health care delivery systems that include expanded roles for dental hygienists. This qualitative study was designed to evaluate the impact of the Limited Access Permit (LAP) legislation in Oregon and to understand the relationship between dental hygienists and dentists within this delivery system. The snowball sampling technique was used to identify LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists. The snowball sampling technique begins with the identification of a known expert in the field who serves as the initial "sampling unit." Subsequent individuals are then recommended, or nominated, to the investigator by the initial study participant and are selected based upon the need to fill in or extend information. The final sample consisted of seven LAP dental hygienists and two collaborating dentists. Interviews, field observations, and document analysis were utilized for data collection. Factors that led to the creation of LAP dental hygiene practice, current LAP practice, personal characteristics, relationships between LAP dental hygienists and dentists, and the impact that LAP dental hygienists have had on access to oral health care were explored. Data revealed that the Oregon legislature twice expanded the LAP scope of practice to increase access to oral health care services. LAP dental hygienists practice in community and school-based settings. Common characteristics of LAP dental hygienists include entrepreneurship, lifelong learning, and a commitment to underserved populations. The findings from this study indicate that LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists have positive relationships. No evidence of lower quality of care in unsupervised dental hygiene practices was found. However, the impact of the LAP legislation is still unknown due to the limited numbers of LAP dental hygienists and the early nature of the LAP practice. PMID:18316537

  12. Studies on new intracellular proteases in various organs of rat. 2. Mode of limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kominami, E; Banno, Y; Chichibu, K; Shiotani, T; Hamaguchi, Y

    1975-03-01

    1. The mechanism of proteolysis of ornithine transaminase apoenzyme II by group-specific protease and the relation between the confirmations of ornithine transaminase and its susceptibility to group-specific protease were studied to elucidate the mode of action of the protease. 2. Differences in the conformations of ornithine transaminase apoenzyme II, molecular weight 67000, and ornithine transaminase holoenzyme, molecular weight 140000, were shown by studies on difference spectra produced by various concentrations of ethylene glycol. Increase of the titratable sulfhydryl groups on resolution of the coenzyme from ornithine transaminase also supports this finding. These results are consistent with the facts that the apoenzyme was sensitive to group-specific protease, while the holoenzyme was not. 3. Kinetics studies showed that ornithine transaminase apoenzyme II was degraded by limited proteolysis. Reaction of the native enzyme with group-specific protease resulted in a nick in the enzyme molecule with formation of one homogeneous large product and small peptides. The large product was not degraded further. The large product was indistinguishable from native ornithine transaminase apoenzyme II in various properties including its elution volume on gel filtration, its mobility on disc electrophoresis, its antigenicity, its estimated number of exposed tryptophan residues, and its titratable number of sulfhydryl groups. But unlike the apoenzyme the product did not show tetramerization with coenzyme or catalytic activity, although it retained the ability to bind with coenzyme and had the same number of bound pyridoxal phosphate as the native ornithine transaminase molecule. Thus, native ornithine transaminase apoenzyme II was degraded by limited proteolysis. Unfolded enzyme, denatured by 8 M urea, was degraded extensively. 4. The initial step of intracellular proteins degradation is discussed on the basis of these results. PMID:1164914

  13. To boil or not to boil -- A study of bubble embryo dormancy limits

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Dominguez, I.R.; McDonald, T.W.

    1997-12-31

    In the literature, particularly for refrigerants, experimental studies on the superheat required to initiate nucleate boiling tend to be widely scattered, not only among investigators but even for repeated tests by the same investigator. This study provides an explanation of why this occurs and how to avoid such scatter in future tests. With few exceptions, only re-entrant surface cavities are capable of containing dormant vapor bubble embryos. These dormant embryos are essential to initiate nucleate boiling from a cavity. The temperature (wall superheat) range over which an embryo is stable depends upon the cavity shape, neck size, and the fluid surface tension and thermal properties. Above the upper wall-superheat limit, nucleate boiling occurs. Below the lower limit, the embryo will quench (vanish) and cannot be reactivated by increasing the wall superheat. This study makes the following points, for a given cavity shape, fluid, and pressure (1) The larger the cavity neck radius, the smaller the wall-superheat range over which an embryo can exist. (2) Upon cooling any surface, the boiling cavity with the smallest neck radius will be the first to stop boiling but will require the greatest reduction in wall superheat to quench its embryo. (3) Each site that retains a (dormant) vapor embryo will resume boiling at the same wall-superheat at which it ceased boiling. (4) Small cavities can have a shape such that their vapor embryos will always exist, regardless of the wall temperature. Boiling can always be reinitiated from them. (5) Any wall subject to boiling has a memory. The greater the past wall-subcooling, the greater will be the wall-superheat required to initiate boiling. (6) The wall memory can be erased with sufficient wall-superheat and the presence of vapor.

  14. Study of final state photons in hadronic Z 0 decay and limits on new phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adami, F.; Adye, T.; Akesson, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R. J.; Åsman, B.; Astier, P.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonapart, M.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Boratav, M.; Borgeaud, P.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campion, A.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castelli, E.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chan, A.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Cirio, R.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dagoret, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; de Angelis, A.; de Beer, M.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Defoix, C.; Delikaris, D.; Delorme, S.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; di Ciaccio, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Doll, O.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Dulinski, W.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Folegati, P.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Forsbach, H.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Galeazzi, G.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Glitza, K.-W.; Gokieli, R.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Gros, M.-H.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.; Grossetete, B.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Harris, F. J.; Heck, B. W.; Henkes, T.; Herbst, I.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hietanen, I.; Higgins, C. O.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hodgson, S. D.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holthuizen, D.; Honore, P. F.; Hooper, J. E.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Husson, D.; Ioannou, P.; Isenhower, D.; Iversen, P.-S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Johnson, D.; Jonker, M.; Jonsson, L.; Juillot, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klein, H.; Klempt, W.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koch-Mehrin, A.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Kopf, M.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Kostukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kreuzberger, T.; Krolikowski, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Krstic, J.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Krupinski, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Liko, D.; Lieb, E.; Lillethun, E.; Lindgren, J.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Llosa, R.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lounis, A.; Lozano, J. J.; Lucock, R.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Magnussen, N.; Maillard, J.; Maltezos, A.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; Menichetti, E.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Myatt, G.; Naraghi, F.; Nau-Korzen, U.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pape, L.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Perevozchikov, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Pyyhtia, J.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronjin, V.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybicki, K.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schaeffer, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Sissakian, A. N.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Spasoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tavernier, S.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Torassa, E.; Tortora, L.; Trainor, M. T.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turala, M.; Turchetta, R.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, B.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V. A.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van Doninck, W. K.; Vander Velde, C.; Varela, J.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vibert, L.; Vilanova, D.; Vishnevsky, N.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E. V.; Vlassopoulos, S.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Volponi, S.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Weilhmmer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wikne, J.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Wormald, D.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1992-12-01

    The differential cross section for final state radiation from primary quarks is obtained from a study of isolated energetic photons produced in the reaction e + e -→ Z 0→hadrons+γ, as measured in the DELPHI detector at the CERN LEP collider. When combined with the measurement of the total hadronic width of the Z 0, the observed rate determines the electroweak coupling constants of up and down type quarks, i.e., v_{{1 3}}^2 + a_{{1 3}}^2 = 1.13 ± 0.29 and v_{{2 3}}2 + a_{{2 3}}^2 = 1.65 ± 043. No evidence is seen for additional photon production from anomalous decays of the Z 0 or from decays of new particles. This measurement leads to upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction of (a) the Higgs boson in the reaction e + e -→ Z 0→ H +γ, H→hadrons, (b) an excited quark, q *→ q+γ, and (c) the contribution of an anomalous decay of the Z 0 into a photon and hadrons. These limits, all at the 95% confidence level, vary from 3 to 10pb as the mass of the intermediate state ( H, q * or Z *) varies from 10 GeV/c2 to 80 GeV/c2.

  15. Small-angle neutron scattering study of microemulsion-polymer mixtures in the protein limit.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Kevin J; Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van; Eastoe, Julian; Grillo, Isabelle; Heenan, Richard K

    2008-04-01

    Contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been employed to study complex fluids comprising model microemulsions and polymers. The systems are water-in-oil microemulsions with added non-adsorbing polymer, under good polymer solvency conditions and semidilute polymer concentrations. The polymer/colloid size ratio was q approximately 11, which is well within the "protein limit". Four scattering contrasts were produced by selective deuteration of the dispersed and continuous phases and also the surfactant. In this way, the separate partial structure factors (PSF) for colloid-colloid (c-c), polymer-polymer (p-p), and colloid-polymer (c-p) have been obtained. The c-c PSF has been compared with theoretical predictions, allowing determination of a polymer correlation length. This is compared with a similar correlation length obtained from the p-p PSF, which is shown to increase with colloid concentration. In this sense, adding microemulsion has a similar effect on the dissolved polymer as reducing the solvent quality, and an effective Flory-Huggins chi parameter has been calculated. The cross-term PSF shows a distinct anti-correlation. This is the first time such structure factors have been determined experimentally for colloid-polymer systems in the protein limit and these allow a more detailed understanding of the structural interactions in these systems. PMID:18275227

  16. Studies of Plasma Instabilities using Discontinuous Galerkin Method with Artificial Viscosity, Limiters and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed in this work to study plasma instabilities using high-order accuracy. The DG method has the advantage of resolving shocks and sharp gradients that occur in neutral fluids and plasmas. Artificial viscosity, limiters and filters are explored along with the DG method to mitigate numerical instabilities in the region of discontinuities. Artificial viscosity works in a simultaneous sense by adding a viscous term to the system to damp higher modes. Limiters are expected to reduce the numerical order one by one in regions of sharp gradients so that smooth solutions can be obtained while a fairly good numerical accuracy is maintained. Filters work physically the same as artificial viscosity but mathematically in a sequential way which will only filter the solution at the end of each time-step or at intermediate stages of a time-step. Computational tests are performed in one and two dimensions. Results are presented for Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor unstable plasmas using the code Gkeyll.

  17. Sub-Kelvin cooler configuration study for the Background Limited Infrared Submillimeter Spectrometer BLISS on SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W.; Bock, J. J.; Matt Bradford, C.; Chui, T. C. P.; Koch, T. C.; Lamborn, A. U.; Moore, D.; Paine, C. G.; Thelen, M. P.; Yazzie, A.

    2010-09-01

    The Background Limited Infrared Submillimeter Spectrometer (BLISS) is an instrument proposed for the Japanese space borne telescope mission SPICA. The BLISS concept is a suite of grating spectrometers which combine to cover the 40-400 μm range at resolving power R˜700 with detector sensitivity approaching the natural photon background limits. To achieve the high sensitivity, the BLISS detectors require cooling to 50 mK, well below the 1.7 K cold stage provided on the SPICA spacecraft. We present a thermal architecture for BLISS that includes a thermal intercept stage actively cooled to a temperature in between the 1.7 K cold tip and the detector stage at 50 mK. This architecture requires, essentially, two coolers; one to cool the intercept stage from 1.7 K and one to cool the detectors from the intercept stage temperature to 50 mK. We compared several configurations of flight-heritage coolers to cool the intercept and detector stages. Of the various configurations studied, a continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for each stage has the highest maturity, lowest heat dump at 1.7 K and total mass comparable to other approaches. Other options, such as a Herschel 3He sorption cooler-ADR hybrid and the recently demonstrated closed cycle version of the dilution cooler on Planck are also feasible for BLISS on SPICA.

  18. Electron trapping in neutron-irradiated silicon studied by space-charge-limited current.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quat, V. T.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1972-01-01

    The trapping and detrapping of electrons is studied through measurements of space-charge-limited current in the temperature range of 77 to 293 K in high-purity silicon after irradiation with 14-MeV neutrons. A model is developed which describes most of the results quantitatively and self-consistently, including dc characteristics. Two distinct trap levels exist: the fast levels lie at 0.14 (plus or minus 0.005) eV below the conduction band, and the slow levels lie at 0.47 (plus or minus 0.01) eV below the conduction band. At 77 K, injected free electrons are initially captured by the fast 0.14-eV traps and then sink into the deep 0.47-eV traps, predominantly without being reemitted into the band. Above approximately 110 K, the detrapping rate from the shallow traps becomes so fast that the deep traps dominate. The results also offer a direct verification of the simple model of space-charge-limited current dominated by shallow and deep traps.

  19. Studies of [ital WW] and [ital WZ] production and limits on anomalous [ital WW[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. ); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. ); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. ); Mao, H.S. ); Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. ); Hoeneisen, B. ); Parua, N. ); Ducros, Y. ); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. ); Shivpuri, R.K. ); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C. (Tata Inst.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in p[bar p] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of [radical] (s) =1.8 hthinsp;TeV. The final states WW(WZ)[r arrow][mu][nu] jet jet+X, WZ[r arrow][mu][nu]ee+X and WZ[r arrow]e[nu]ee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90 hthinsp;pb[sup [minus]1]. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WW[gamma] and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95[percent] confidence level anomalous coupling limits for [Lambda]=2 hthinsp;TeV are [minus]0.25[le][Delta][kappa][le]0.39 ([lambda]=0) and [minus]0.18[le][lambda][le]0.19 ([Delta][kappa]=0), assuming the WW[gamma] couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  20. Chronic illness and functional limitation in Ontario children: findings of the Ontario Child Health Study.

    PubMed Central

    Cadman, D; Boyle, M H; Offord, D R; Szatmari, P; Rae-Grant, N I; Crawford, J; Byles, J

    1986-01-01

    The Ontario Child Health Study (OCHS) was based on interviews of 1869 Ontario families who were selected by means of a stratified, multistaged sampling method from the 1981 census of Canada. Its primary purpose was to determine the prevalence and distribution of mental health problems in Ontario children aged 4 to 16 years and their families, but it also allowed an estimate of other significant medical conditions and provided an overview of these children's use of health care, education and social services. Our results are based on questionnaire responses concerning 3294 children. Limitation of function without a chronic illness or medical condition was reported in 1.9%, the converse in 14.0%, and a chronic illness or medical condition with limitation of function in 3.7%. When the three groups are considered together, 19.6% of Ontario children had a chronic health problem. Children of lower socioeconomic status were much more likely to have chronic health problems. Overall, children with chronic health problems were more likely to use physician, special education, social and mental health services. These findings have implications for those who provide services for children, plan community programs or train professionals in caring for children. PMID:3756702

  1. Motor imagery beyond the joint limits: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Bufalari, I; Sforza, A; Cesari, P; Aglioti, S M; Fourkas, A D

    2010-10-01

    The processes and neural bases used for motor imagery are also used for the actual execution of correspondent movements. Humans, however, can imagine movements they cannot perform. Here we explored whether plausibility of movements is mapped on the corticospinal motor system and whether the process is influenced by visuomotor vs. kinesthetic-motor first person imagery strategy. Healthy subjects imagined performing possible or biomechanically impossible right index finger movements during single pulse TMS of the left motor cortex. We found an increase of corticospinal excitability during motor imagery which was higher for impossible than possible movements and specific for the muscle involved in the actual execution of the imagined movement. We expand our previous action observation studies, suggesting that the plausibility of a movement is computed in regions upstream the primary motor cortex, and that motor imagery is a higher-order process not fully constrained by the rules that govern motor execution. PMID:20688131

  2. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-02-01

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome research, focusing on published epidemiological associations with gastric, oesophageal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and other cancers. Large, prospective studies of the microbiome that employ multidisciplinary laboratory and analysis methods, as well as rigorous validation of case status, are likely to yield translational opportunities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by improving prevention, screening, and treatment. PMID:26730578

  3. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome research, focusing on published epidemiological associations with gastric, oesophageal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and other cancers. Large, prospective studies of the microbiome that employ multidisciplinary laboratory and analysis methods, as well as rigorous validation of case status, are likely to yield translational opportunities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by improving prevention, screening, and treatment. PMID:26730578

  4. Use of primary cultures of human hepatocytes in toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, B E; Smith-Oliver, T; Earle, L; Loury, D J; White, R D; Doolittle, D J; Working, P K; Cattley, R C; Jirtle, R; Michalopoulos, G

    1989-03-01

    Often results from toxicological studies using rodent models cannot be directly extrapolated to probable effects in human beings. In order to examine the genotoxic potential of chemicals in human liver cells, a human hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been defined. Procedures were optimized to prepare primary cultures of human hepatocytes from discarded surgical material. On eight different occasions human hepatocyte cultures of sufficient viability to measure DNA repair were successfully prepared by collagenase perfusion techniques. The cells were allowed to attach to plastic or collagen substrata for periods of 1.5 to 24 h and subsequently incubated with [3H]thymidine and test chemicals for periods of 18 to 24 h. Chemically induced DNA repair, measured as unscheduled DNA synthesis, was quantitated autoradiographically. The following compounds were tested: 2-acetylaminofluorene, aflatoxin B1, 2-aminobenzyl alcohol, aniline, benzo(a)pyrene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, 2,4-diaminotoluene, 2,6-diaminotoluene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dimethylnitrosamine, 1,6-dinitropyrene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, methyl chloride, 5-methylchrysene, mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, 2-methyl-2-P-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl)phenoxypropionic acid (nafenopin), beta-naphthylamine, nitrobenzene, 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol, 2-nitrotoluene, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, unleaded gasoline, and 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2-pyrimidinylthioacetic acid (Wy-14,643). In only one of eight cases did some of the chemicals generally regarded as genotoxic fail to give a positive response. For purposes of comparison, all test chemicals were evaluated in the in vitro rat hepatocyte DNA repair assay. Individual-to-individual variation in the DNA repair response was far greater for the human cultures than for cultures derived from rats. For only three chemicals was there a qualitative difference in the response between the rodent and the human cells; beta-naphthylamine was positive in the rat but in none of the human cultures examined, whereas the opposite was seen for 2,6-diaminotoluene and 5-methylchrysene. Clofibric acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, and Wy-14,643 induced enzymes indicative of peroxisomal proliferation in primary rat hepatocyte cultures, but not in two human hepatocyte cultures. These results indicate that, in general, the in vitro rat hepatocyte DNA repair assay is a valid model for predicting potential genotoxic effects in human beings. However, rodent hepatocytes may not be appropriate for assessing the potential of chemicals to elicit nongenotoxic effects in human beings such as the induction of hepatocyte peroxisomal proliferation. PMID:2917345

  5. Magnetotransport studies of mobility limiting mechanisms in undoped Si/SiGe heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, X.; Hazard, T. M.; Payette, C.; Wang, K.; Zajac, D. M.; Cady, J. V.; Petta, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    We perform detailed magnetotransport studies on two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) formed in undoped Si/SiGe heterostructures in order to identify the electron mobility limiting mechanisms. By analyzing data from 26 different heterostructures, we observe a strong correlation between the background oxygen concentration in the Si quantum well and the maximum mobility. The highest-quality wafer supports a 2DEG with mobility μ =160 000 cm 2/Vs at a density n =2.17 ×1011 /cm 2 and exhibits a metal-to-insulator transition at a critical density nc=0.46 ×1011 /cm 2. We extract a valley splitting Δv˜150 μ eV at a magnetic field B =1.8 T. These results provide evidence that undoped Si/SiGe heterostructures are suitable for the fabrication of few-electron quantum dots.

  6. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  7. Understanding the limits of Marxist approaches to sociocultural studies of science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In the first three sections of this paper we comment on some of the ideas developed in the forum papers, pointing out possible misunderstandings and constructing new explanations that clarify arguments we made in the original article. In the last section we expand the discussion raised in the original paper, elaborating on the limits of the use of Marxist approaches to sociocultural studies of science education. Following insights suggested by Loxley et al. (Cult Stud Sci Edu. doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9554-z, 2013) and detailed by Zuss (Cult Stud Sci Edu, 2014) on the commodification of knowledge, we sketch an analysis of how knowledge is transformed into capital to understand why contemporary scholars are likely to be engaged in a relation of production that resembles capitalist exploitation.

  8. Understanding the limits of Marxist approaches to sociocultural studies of science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-12-01

    In the first three sections of this paper we comment on some of the ideas developed in the forum papers, pointing out possible misunderstandings and constructing new explanations that clarify arguments we made in the original article. In the last section we expand the discussion raised in the original paper, elaborating on the limits of the use of Marxist approaches to sociocultural studies of science education. Following insights suggested by Loxley et al. (Cult Stud Sci Educ. doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9554-z, 2013) and detailed by Zuss (Cult Stud Sci Educ. doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9555-y, 2014) on the commodification of knowledge, we sketch an analysis of how knowledge is transformed into capital to understand why contemporary scholars are likely to be engaged in a relation of production that resembles capitalist exploitation.

  9. Nitrogen Limitation of Terrestrial Net Primary Production: Global Patterns From Field Studies with Nitrogen Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebauer, D. S.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    Net primary production (NPP) transfers carbon from the atmospheric CO2 pool into the biosphere. Experimental evidence demonstrates that NPP is often limited by nitrogen availability. Hence, accelerated nitrogen availability due to fertilizer production, fossil fuel use, and biomass burning could stimulate global NPP. Over the next century, these nitrogen sources are expected to both increase in strength and expand from their current concentration in the temperate regions of Europe and the United States into the tropical regions of South America, Southeast Asia, and India. In order to predict future carbon budgets, it is necessary to quantify the impact of nitrogen on NPP. Currently there is no synthesis of ecosystem scale experiments that evaluates responses among biomes and across environmental gradients. The aim of this investigation is to test the prediction that nitrogen limitation is widespread, and to evaluate global patterns of NPP response to nitrogen. The present study compiles results from field-based nitrogen addition experiments in a comprehensive meta-analysis. Published studies were obtained through key word searches and referenced articles. A response metric was derived from each study based on measurements of plant growth under ambient nitrogen deposition (control) and experimental nitrogen addition (treatment). This metric is the response ratio (R): the ratio of mean growth in treatment divided by control plots. Therefore, a positive effect of nitrogen results in R>1. A meta-analysis was performed on ln(R) weighted by within-study variance. We found that most ecosystems are nitrogen limited (P<0.0001) and that average growth response to nitrogen was 32%. However, response was not uniform across biomes. Significant responses were observed in grasslands and forests (P<0.0001), but not wetlands and tundra (P=0.08 and P=0.16). While mean annual precipitation (MAP) was significantly correlated to R overall (P<0.0001), the direction of the effect varied among biomes. Correlations between R and MAP were positive for forest and tundra R (P=0.033 and P=0.0005) and negative for wetlands and grassland R (P=0.0018 and P<0.0001). Tundra and grassland R was also correlated to mean annual temperature (P=0.0002 and P=0.0009). Background nitrogen deposition was negatively correlated to R overall (P<0.0001) and within forests and wetlands (P=0.0007 and P=0.0002). These results suggest a strong interaction between the global nitrogen and carbon cycles, and support previous efforts to model the stimulation of NPP by nitrogen at the global scale. These results also indicate the importance of climate and biome type in mediating this response. The negative correlation between background deposition and R suggests that the strength of nitrogen limitation will decrease with increasing anthropogenic inputs.

  10. FY95 limited energy study for the area `a` package boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-03

    In March 1995, Affiliated Engineers SE, Inc. (AESE) was retained by the Mobile District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform a Limited Energy Study for Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line building drawings on Autocad. This report summarizes the results obtained from this field investigation and the analysis of various alternative Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s). To develop the field data into various alternative ECO concepts or models, we utilized an Excel spreadsheet to tabulate and compare energy consumption, installation and operating costs for various ECO`s. These ECO`s were then analyzed for suitability for the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) using the government`s software package called Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID).

  11. Animal Models to Study Placental Development and Function throughout Normal and Dysfunctional Human Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, Peta L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of placental development and function are known to underlie many pathologies of pregnancy, including spontaneous preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and preeclampsia. A growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental dysfunction in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring. However, our knowledge regarding placental structure and function throughout pregnancy remains limited. Understanding the temporal growth and functionality of the human placenta throughout the entirety of gestation is important if we are to gain a better understanding of placental dysfunction. The utilization of new technologies and imaging techniques that could enable safe monitoring of placental growth and function in vivo has become a major focus area for the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, as evident by the establishment of the "Human Placenta Project." Many of the objectives of the Human Placenta Project will necessitate preclinical studies and testing in appropriately designed animal models that can be readily translated to the clinical setting. This review will describe the advantages and limitations of relevant animals such as the guinea pig, sheep, and nonhuman primate models that have been used to study the role of the placenta in fetal growth disorders, preeclampsia, or other maternal diseases during pregnancy. PMID:26752715

  12. Third order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting studies of propane hydrazides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseema, K.; Manjunatha, K. B.; Sujith, K. V.; Umesh, G.; Kalluraya, Balakrishna; Rao, Vijayalakshmi

    2012-09-01

    Four hydrazones, 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[phenylmethylene] propanehydrazide (P1), 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[(4- tolyl)methylene] propane hydrazide (P2), 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[1-(4- chlorophenyl)ethylidene] propanehydrazide (P3) and 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[1-(4-Nitrrophenyl)ethylidene] propane hydrazide (P4) were synthesized and their third order nonlinear optical properties have been investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm. The measurement on the compound-P1 is not reported as there is no detectable nonlinear response. Open aperture data of the other three compounds indicate two photon absorption at this wavelength. The nonlinear refractive index n2, nonlinear absorption coefficient β, magnitude of effective third order susceptibility χ(3), the second order hyperpolarizability γh and the coupling factor ρ have been estimated. The values obtained are comparable with the values obtained for 4-methoxy chalcone derivatives and dibenzylideneacetone derivatives. The experimentally determined values of β, n2, Re χ(3) and Im χ(3), γh and ρ of the compound-P4 are 1.42 cm/GW, -0.619 × 10-11 esu, -0.663 × 10-13 esu, 0.22 × 10-13 esu, 0.34 × 10-32 esu and 0.33 respectively. Further the compound-P4 exhibited the best optical power limiting behavior at 532 nm among the compounds studied. Our studies suggest that compounds P2, P3 and P4 are potential candidates for the optical device applications such as optical limiters and optical switches.

  13. Impairment of a pregnant woman's acquired ability to limit Plasmodium falciparum by infection with human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    PubMed

    Steketee, R W; Wirima, J J; Bloland, P B; Chilima, B; Mermin, J H; Chitsulo, L; Breman, J G

    1996-01-01

    In Africa, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the most serious emerging infection and Plasmodium falciparum malaria is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases. Both infections have serious consequences in pregnant women, their fetuses, and infants. We examined the association between HIV and P. falciparum in pregnant women enrolled in a malaria chemoprophylaxis study in rural Malawi. Pregnant women (n = 2,946) were enrolled at their first antenatal clinic visit (mean 5.6 months of pregnancy), placed on one of three chloroquine regimens, and followed through delivery. Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia was measured at enrollment, monthly thereafter, at delivery, and 2-6 months postpartum; placental and newborn (umbilical cord blood) infection was measured for hospital-delivered infants. Serum collected during pregnancy was tested for antibodies to HIV by enzyme-linked immunoassay with Western blot confirmation. Parasitemia was detected in 46% of 2,946 women at enrollment and 19.1% at delivery; HIV seroprevalence was 5.5%. The prevalence and geometric mean density (GMPD) of parasitemia at enrollment and at delivery were higher in HIV-seropositive(+) than in HIV-seronegative(-) women (at enrollment: 57% prevalence and a GMPD of 1,558 parasites/mm3 versus 44% and 670/mm3, respectively; P < 0.0001; and at delivery: 35% and 1,589/mm3 versus 18% and 373/mm3; P < 0.0005). Placental infection rates were higher in HIV(+) compared with HIV(-) women, (38% versus 23%; P < 0.0005). This association was strongest in multigravidas. Compared with infants born to HIV(-) women, newborns born to HIV(+) women had higher rates of umbilical cord blood parasitemia. Both HIV(+) and HIV(-) women had similar rates of parasitemia 2-6 months postpartum. The HIV infection diminishes a pregnant woman's capacity to control P. falciparum parasitemia and placental and newborn infection, the major determinants of the impact of P. falciparum on fetal growth and infant survival. PMID:8702036

  14. Studying Identity in Learning Contexts from a Human Sciences Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasir, Na'ilah Suad

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, learning scientists have attended more and more to the study of learning as a uniquely human endeavor that occurs in the context of cultural practices and that is linked to values and future imagined selves. In so doing, the field has taken considerations of identity seriously. In this chapter, the author explores some of the…

  15. Preparing Global Citizens through the Study of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood-Tucker, Toni Fuss

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of students for global citizenship represents a central challenge to social studies educators in the twenty-first century. Two-thirds of the world's poor are steeped in abject poverty and its grim consequences. The world refugee problem has reached staggering proportions. There is an international epidemic of human trafficking, and…

  16. Contemporary Scholarship and Core Studies in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    If higher education is to have a coherent curriculum and a coherent way of thinking about the world, it may need to study premodern ways of thinking for both insights and the courage to think in new ways. The tradition of the humanities, which originated in fifteenth-century Italy, can help. (MSE)

  17. Ecology and Human Values: A Course of Study. (Working Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This interdisciplinary course is designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is made of the case study…

  18. Moral Disengagement in Business and Humanities Majors: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Suzanne N.; Hernandez, Abigail R.

    2014-01-01

    This study measures moral disengagement of undergraduate business and humanities students with a focus on differences in moral disengagement between genders. Students completed a survey that consisted of 32 statements and were asked to determine the degree to which they agreed with each, using a 7-point Likert scale. The questions measured moral…

  19. Arts & Humanities in the Social Studies. NCSS Publications Bulletin 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selwyn, Douglas

    This bulletin is designed to help teachers integrate the arts and humanities into the social studies curriculum. The volume includes three chapters. Chapter 1, "Learning Through the Arts," features the following sections: (1) "Integration"; (2) "Assessment"; and (3) "References and For Further Reading." Chapter 2, "Using Theater in the Classroom,"…

  20. ORD BEST PRACTICES FOR OBSERVATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a presentation for the 2007 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting in Charlotte, NC on March 27, 2007. It will be included in a special Issues Session titled "Scientific and Ethical Considerations in Human Exposure Studies." The presentation desc...

  1. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  2. Preparing Global Citizens through the Study of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood-Tucker, Toni Fuss

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of students for global citizenship represents a central challenge to social studies educators in the twenty-first century. Two-thirds of the world's poor are steeped in abject poverty and its grim consequences. The world refugee problem has reached staggering proportions. There is an international epidemic of human trafficking, and

  3. USE OF BIOMARKERS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HUMAN STUDIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In human studies, biomarkers can be employed to reflect environmental pro-oxidant exposures and dietary antioxidant intake or to serve as a surrogate measure of a disease process like carcinogenesis. While a number of challenges must be overcome in using biomarkers to obtain a better understanding ...

  4. Limited value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, C; Altfeld, M; Hegener, P; Hartmann, P; Arendt, G; Jablonowski, H; Rockstroh, J; Diehl, V; Salzberger, B; Fätkenheuer, G

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a common, opportunistic, and often life-threatening disease in HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis is supported mainly by clinical evidence and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans, but brain images may share features with other brain diseases occurring in HIV-infected patients. To determine the diagnostic value of PCR for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from HIV-infected patients, we examined 89 blood samples from 59 HIV-infected patients. PCR and Southern blot hybridization were done with DNA extracted from blood samples from 20 patients with confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis and from 10 patients with suspected but not confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis. The samples were taken before and 7 to 10 days after the beginning of antiparasitic therapy. For 9 patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis more than 6 months prior to the study and for 20 patients without any evidence for toxoplasmosis only one blood sample per patient was examined. PCR gave positive results with 5 of the 20 blood samples from patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis. After 7 to 10 days of therapy PCR results became negative in all these five cases. No amplification was seen with DNA from blood samples from the other 54 patients as the target. The results presented here show that PCR testing of blood samples from HIV-infected patients is of limited value for the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. The sensitivity was only 25%, but the specificity was very high (100%), so this technique may be useful for discriminating between cerebral toxoplasmosis and other brain diseases which may be mistaken for toxoplasmosis. PMID:9316922

  5. The association between exposure determined by radiofrequency personal exposimeters and human exposure: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Georg; Cecil, Stefan; Giczi, Wolfram; Petric, Benjamin; Preiner, Patrick; Fröhlich, Jürg; Röösli, Martin

    2010-10-01

    The selection of an adequate exposure assessment approach is imperative for the quality of epidemiological studies. The use of personal exposimeters turned out to be a reasonable approach to determine exposure profiles, however, certain limitations regarding the absolute values delivered by the devices have to be considered. Apart from the limited dynamic range, it has to be taken into account that these devices give only an approximation of the exposure due to the influence of the body of the person carrying the exposimeter, the receiver characteristics of the exposimeter, as well as the dependence of the measured value on frequency band, channel, slot configuration, and communication traffic. In this study, the relationship between the field strength measured close to the human body at the location of the exposimeter and the exposure, that is, the field strength at the location of the human body without the human body present, is investigated by numerical means using the Visible Human model as an anatomical phantom. Two different scenarios were chosen: (1) For FM, GSM, and UMTS an urban outdoor scenario was examined that included a transmitting antenna mounted on the roof of one of four buildings at a street crossing, (2) For WLAN an indoor scenario was investigated. For GSM the average degree of underestimation by the exposimeter (relation of the average field levels at the location of the exposimeter to the field level averaged over the volume of the human body without the body present) was 0.76, and for UMTS 0.87; for FM no underestimation was found, the ratio was 1. In the case of WLAN the degree of underestimation was more pronounced, the ratio was 0.64. This study clearly suggests that a careful evaluation of correction factors for different scenarios is needed prior to the definition of the study protocol. It has to be noted that the reference scenario used in this study does not allow for final conclusions on general correction factors. PMID:20564178

  6. [Problems and limitations of conventional and innovative methods for the diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis in humans and animals].

    PubMed

    Piergili Fioretti, D

    2004-06-01

    Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is useful for human and animal health. Several techniques are employed for the diagnosis in feline and canine population. Coprological tests for the detection of oocysts in cat faeces are of little significance owing to short patency (15 days). Histological examinations of biological samples show a lack of reliability when the animals are infected with few parasites; the mouse inoculation is the most reliable method even if the detection of cysts in mice brain require 40 days. However tachyzoites of virulent strains can be isolated from peritoneal exudate 3-4 days after inoculation. Samples inoculation in cell cultures (VERO, human fibroblasts) requires specialized laboratories and fails if non viable parasites are present due to tissutal autolysis. Serological tests are the most used diagnostic methods; Dye test and IFAT that require intact tachyzoites are more sensitive and specific compared to IHA, LA, ELISA because, during the infection, the first significant increase of IgM and IgG antibodies was observed against cuticolar antigens. A PCR to identify T. gondii DNA in canine and feline biological samples was developed. The B1 PCR performed on blood samples was less sensitive than when it was performed on other biological fluids requiring 100 tachyzoites, instead of 10. Aqueous humor PCR results could be negative if the infection is low grade or is restricted to the posterior segment or the animal was previously treated with anti-Toxoplasma drugs. SNC disease may be also difficult to diagnose because an high serum IgG titer may be associated with locally production or leakage from serum through a compromised blood-CSF barrier. AB1 PCR was successfully applied for the diagnosis of Toxoplasma abortion in ewes requiring only 10 parasites in placental cotyledon samples; the test compared with mouse inoculation showed similar sensitivity. Discrepancies may have been due to a low and focal distribution of parasites in the tissues or to the presence of non viable parasites if the tissues are autolysed. In regard to diagnostic methods adaptable to slaughter testing, several serological tests have been studied (IFAT, ELISA, IHA) for detection of IgG in sheep, pigs, cattle using also recombinant antigens (gene fragments H4 and H11) to lack the cross reactivity. The problem is the antibodies fall to near background levels as the infection became chronic (6-10 months p.-i.). A highly sensitive and specific method (Toxo Taq Man) has been developed to detect and quantitate T. gondii burden in animal tissue samples (0.1 pg of T. gondii genomic DNA, which is equivalent to 1 bradyzoite) using T. gondii ITS1-derived primers and a fluorogenic probe via Real-Time PCR. This assay is compatible with automation technology for potential slaughterhouse use. The diagnosis of acute infection in human pregnancy is difficult since IgM antibodies can be detected for a very long time after the acute phase; an IgA increase is of more diagnostic value because can be detected only for 6-7 months while the short kinetics of IgE can be useful only to date the infection precisely. In addition an IgG seroconversion is essential for the diagnosis. Among the most reliable tests, IgG avidity test is useful when a single serum sample, in the first months of gestation, is available, but low avidity results may persist for as long as 1 year. For this purpose a panel of serologic tests must be performed (ELISA, EIA, ISAGA, IgG avidity, IFAT, Dye test) for IgM, IgA, IgG and IgE. The serological diagnosis of prenatal infection is difficult since maternal IgG are passively transferred in utero to the foetus and caution must be exercised in interpretation of IgM or IgA results. A technique of Western blots of paired maternal and baby sera for evidencing different bands in the blots of two sera was developed for this purpose (specificity 97-100%, sensitivity 96-98%). The most reliable methods for prenatal diagnosis are PCR, mouse inoculation and cultural techniques performed on amniotic fluid, foetal blood and peripheral maternal blood in pregnants serologically positive. PCR (targets B1, SAG-1, rDNA) with amniotic fluid performed from 18 weeks of gestation is more sensitive and more rapid than conventional diagnostic procedures. PCR has been successfully used to diagnose Toxoplasma encephalitis in immunocompromised patients (cerebral biopsy is the only diagnostic method) and in ocular toxoplasmosis. In this evenience it is useful the study of IgG, IgM, IgA profile of paired serum and aqueous humor (Western blots). PMID:15305712

  7. Simplified detection system for neuroreceptor studies in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bice, A.N.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Frost, J.J.; Natarajan, T.K.; Lee, M.C.; Wong, D.F.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    A simple, inexpensive dual-detector system has been developed for measurement of positronemitting receptor-binding drugs in the human brain. This high efficiency coincidence counting system requires that only a few hundred microcuries of labeled drug be administered to the subject, thereby allowing for multiple studies without an excessive radiation dose. Measurement of the binding of (11C)carfentanil, a high affinity synthetic opiate, to opiate receptors in the presence and in the absence of a competitive opiate antagonist indicates the potential utility of this system for estimating different degrees of receptor occupation in the human brain.

  8. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care. PMID:26631634

  9. Comparison of methods for imputing limited-range variables: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple imputation (MI) was developed as a method to enable valid inferences to be obtained in the presence of missing data rather than to re-create the missing values. Within the applied setting, it remains unclear how important it is that imputed values should be plausible for individual observations. One variable type for which MI may lead to implausible values is a limited-range variable, where imputed values may fall outside the observable range. The aim of this work was to compare methods for imputing limited-range variables, with a focus on those that restrict the range of the imputed values. Methods Using data from a study of adolescent health, we consider three variables based on responses to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), a tool for detecting minor psychiatric illness. These variables, based on different scoring methods for the GHQ, resulted in three continuous distributions with mild, moderate and severe positive skewness. In an otherwise complete dataset, we set 33% of the GHQ observations to missing completely at random or missing at random; repeating this process to create 1000 datasets with incomplete data for each scenario. For each dataset, we imputed values on the raw scale and following a zero-skewness log transformation using: univariate regression with no rounding; post-imputation rounding; truncated normal regression; and predictive mean matching. We estimated the marginal mean of the GHQ and the association between the GHQ and a fully observed binary outcome, comparing the results with complete data statistics. Results Imputation with no rounding performed well when applied to data on the raw scale. Post-imputation rounding and imputation using truncated normal regression produced higher marginal means than the complete data estimate when data had a moderate or severe skew, and this was associated with under-coverage of the complete data estimate. Predictive mean matching also produced under-coverage of the complete data estimate. For the estimate of association, all methods produced similar estimates to the complete data. Conclusions For data with a limited range, multiple imputation using techniques that restrict the range of imputed values can result in biased estimates for the marginal mean when data are highly skewed. PMID:24766825

  10. Acute effects of steroid hormones and neuropeptides on human social-emotional behavior: a review of single administration studies.

    PubMed

    Bos, Peter A; Panksepp, Jaak; Bluthé, Rose-Marie; van Honk, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Steroids and peptides mediate a diverse array of animal social behaviors. Human research is restricted by technical-ethical limitations, and models of the neuroendocrine regulation of social-emotional behavior are therefore mainly limited to non-human species, often under the assumption that human social-emotional behavior is emancipated from hormonal control. Development of acute hormone administration procedures in human research, together with the advent of novel non-invasive neuroimaging techniques, have opened up opportunities to systematically study the neuroendocrinology of human social-emotional behavior. Here, we review all placebo-controlled single hormone administration studies addressing human social-emotional behavior, involving the steroids testosterone and estradiol, and the peptides oxytocin and vasopressin. These studies demonstrate substantial hormonal control over human social-emotional behavior and give insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. Finally, we propose a theoretical model that synthesizes detailed knowledge of the neuroendocrinology of social-emotional behavior in animals with the recently gained data from humans described in our review. PMID:21256859

  11. Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight Central simulator tower L-R: Dr Geoffrey Briggs; Jen Jasper (seated); Dr Jan Akins and Mr. Tony Gross, Ames

  12. Scanning acoustic microscopy study of human cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bumrerraj, S; Katz, J L

    2001-12-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) has been used in the burst mode to study the properties of human cortical and trabecular bone. An Olympus UH3 SAM (Olympus Co., Tokyo, Japan) was used with a 400 MHz burst mode lens (120 degrees aperture, nominal lateral resolution 2.5 microm). The human cortical bone was from the midshaft of a femur from a 60+ male cadaver; the trabecular bone specimens were obtained from the distal femoral condyles of another 60+ human male cadaver. Elastic moduli for both trabecular and cortical bone were obtained by means of a series of calibration curves correlating SAM gray levels of known materials with their elastic moduli; specimens included: polypropylene, PMMA, Teflon, aluminum, Pyrex glass, titanium, and stainless steel. Values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those obtained by nanoindentation techniques. The three critical findings earlier by Katz and Meunier were observed here as well in both the cortical and trabecular bone samples. PMID:11853252

  13. 40 CFR 26.1605 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1605 Operation of the Human Studies Review Board. EPA shall establish and operate a Human Studies Review Board as follows:...

  14. 40 CFR 26.1603 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1603 Operation of the Human Studies Review Board. EPA shall establish and operate a Human Studies Review Board as follows:...

  15. 40 CFR 26.1603 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1603 Operation of the Human Studies Review Board. EPA shall establish and operate a Human Studies Review Board as follows:...

  16. 40 CFR 26.1603 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1603 Operation of the Human Studies Review Board. EPA shall establish and operate a Human Studies Review Board as follows:...

  17. 40 CFR 26.1605 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Review of Proposed and Completed Human Research § 26.1605 Operation of the Human Studies Review Board. EPA shall establish and operate a Human Studies Review Board as follows:...

  18. Isolation of highly enriched primary human microglia for functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Park, Thomas I-H; Schweder, Patrick; Scotter, John; Correia, Jason; Smith, Amy M.; Gibbons, Hannah M.; Oldfield, Robyn L.; Bergin, Peter S.; Mee, Edward W.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Curtis, Maurice A.; Scott Graham, E.; Dragunow, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system play vital roles in brain homeostasis through clearance of pathogenic material. Microglia are also implicated in neurological disorders through uncontrolled activation and inflammatory responses. To date, the vast majority of microglial studies have been performed using rodent models. Human microglia differ from rodent counterparts in several aspects including their response to pharmacological substances and their inflammatory secretions. Such differences highlight the need for studies on primary adult human brain microglia and methods to isolate them are therefore required. Our procedure generates microglial cultures of >95% purity from both biopsy and autopsy human brain tissue using a very simple media-based culture procedure that takes advantage of the adherent properties of these cells. Microglia obtained in this manner can be utilised for research within a week. Isolated microglia demonstrate phagocytic ability and respond to inflammatory stimuli and their purity makes them suitable for numerous other forms of in vitro studies, including secretome and transcriptome analysis. Furthermore, this protocol allows for the simultaneous isolation of neural precursor cells during the microglial isolation procedure. As human brain tissue is such a precious and valuable resource the simultaneous isolation of multiple cell types is highly beneficial. PMID:26778406

  19. The Watershed as A Conceptual Framework for the Study of Environmental and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Kolok, Alan S.; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Chen, Xun-Hong; Shea, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The watershed provides a physical basis for establishing linkages between aquatic contaminants, environmental health and human health. Current attempts to establish such linkages are limited by environmental and epidemiological constraints. Environmental limitations include difficulties in characterizing the temporal and spatial dynamics of agricultural runoff, in fully understanding the degradation and metabolism of these compounds in the environment, and in understanding complex mixtures. Epidemiological limitations include difficulties associated with the organization of risk factor data and uncertainty about which measurable endpoints are most appropriate for an agricultural setting. Nevertheless, it is our contention that an adoption of the watershed concept can alleviate some of these difficulties. From an environmental perspective, the watershed concept helps identify differences in land use and application of agrichemicals at a level of resolution relevant to human health outcomes. From an epidemiological perspective, the watershed concept places data into a construct with environmental relevance. In this perspectives paper, we discuss how the watershed can provide a conceptual framework for studies in environmental and human health. PMID:20508751

  20. Controls on Hyporheic Nitrate Removal: Assessing Transport and Substrate Limitations with 15N Tracer Studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.; Baker, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    We examined transport time and substrate controls on hyporheic (HZ) nitrification and denitrification in an upland agricultural stream with a series of 15N tracer studies - whole-stream and in situ well-to-well steady-state 15NO3- and conservative tracer (Cl-) addition experiments. For the whole-stream experiment, we measured relevant solute, 15N isotope, and hydraulic transport conditions of the reach and along HZ flowpaths of an instrumented gravel bar. HZ exchange was observed across the entire gravel bar with flowpath lengths up to 4.2m and corresponding median residence times greater than 28.5h. The HZ transitioned from a net nitrification environment at its head (small residence times, <6.9h) to a net denitrification environment at its tail (large residence times, 6.9-28.5h). HZ denitrification was confirmed as 15N2 was produced across the entire gravel bar. Production of 15N2 across all observed flowpaths and residence times indicated that denitrification microsites are present even where net nitrification occurred. At large residence times, the rate of denitrification decreased despite persistent anoxic conditions, indicating substrate (NO3- and carbon) limitations. Consequently, we conducted in situ 15NO3-, conservative tracers (Cl- and Br), and acetate injection experiments to determine how the availability of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as acetate influences microbial denitrification in the HZ, especially along anoxic flowpaths with large residence times. The acetate addition to the HZ stimulated significant increases in 15N2 production by factors of 2.7 to 26.1 in all receiving wells, and significant decreases of NO3- and DOC aromaticity in the wells most hydrologically connected to the injection. Further, 100% of acetate was retained in the HZ, a portion of which is due to biological consumption. These studies demonstrate that: 1. the HZ is an active nitrogen sink in this study system, 2. the distinction between net nitrification and denitrification in the HZ is a function of residence time and exhibits threshold behavior, and 3. microbial denitrification in anaerobic portions of the HZ can be limited by labile DOC supply.

  1. Comparative study of objective functions to overcome noise and bandwidth limitations in full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Tejero, C. E.; Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    Ongoing works on full waveform inversion (FWI) are yielding an increasing number of objective functions as alternative to the traditional L2-waveform. These studies aim at designing more robust functions and inversion strategies to reduce the intrinsic dependence of the FWI results on (1) the initial model and (2) the lowest frequency present in field data. In this work, we perform a comparative study of five objective functions in time domain under a common 2-D-acoustic FWI scheme using the Marmousi model as benchmark. In particular, we compare results obtained with L2-based functions that consider the minimization of different wave attributes; the waveform-based, non-integration-method; instantaneous envelope; a modified version of the wrapped instantaneous phase and an improved version of the cross-correlation travel time (CCTT) method; and hybrid strategies combining some of them. We evaluate the robustness of these functionals as a function of their performance with and without low frequencies in the data and the presence of random white Gaussian noise. Our results reveal promising strategies to invert noisy data with limited low-frequency content (≥4 Hz), which is the single strategy using the instantaneous phase objective function followed by the hybrid strategies using the instantaneous phase or CCTT as initial models, in particular the combinations [I. Phase + Waveform], [CCTT + Waveform] and [CCTT + I. Phase].

  2. A comparative investigation of methods for longitudinal data with limits of detection through a case study.

    PubMed

    Fu, P; Hughes, J; Zeng, G; Hanook, S; Orem, J; Mwanda, O W; Remick, S C

    2016-02-01

    The statistical analysis of continuous longitudinal data may be complicated since quantitative levels of bioassay cannot always be determined. Values beyond the limits of detection (LOD) in the assays may not be observed and thus censored, rendering complexity to the analysis of such data. This article examines how both left-censoring and right censoring of HIV-1 plasma RNA measurements, collected for the study on AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AR-NHL) in East Africa, affects the quantification of viral load and explores the natural history of viral load measurements over time in AR-NHL patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. Data analyses using Monte Carlo EM algorithm (MCEM) are compared to analyses where the LOD or LOD/2 (left censoring) value is substituted for the censored observations, and also to other methods such as multiple imputation, and maximum likelihood estimation for censored data (generalized Tobit regression). Simulations are used to explore the sensitivity of the results to changes in the model parameters. In conclusion, the antiretroviral treatment was associated with a significant decrease in viral load after controlling the effects of other covariates. A simulation study with finite sample size shows MCEM is the least biased method and the estimates are least sensitive to the censoring mechanism. PMID:22504231

  3. Maximum Parsimony and the Skewness Test: A Simulation Study of the Limits of Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, Jussi; Roos, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    The maximum parsimony (MP) method for inferring phylogenies is widely used, but little is known about its limitations in non-asymptotic situations. This study employs large-scale computations with simulated phylogenetic data to estimate the probability that MP succeeds in finding the true phylogeny for up to twelve taxa and 256 characters. The set of candidate phylogenies are taken to be unrooted binary trees; for each simulated data set, the tree lengths of all (2n − 5)!! candidates are computed to evaluate quantities related to the performance of MP, such as the probability of finding the true phylogeny, the probability that the tree with the shortest length is unique, the probability that the true phylogeny has the shortest tree length, and the expected inverse of the number of trees sharing the shortest length. The tree length distributions are also used to evaluate and extend the skewness test of Hillis for distinguishing between random and phylogenetic data. The results indicate, for example, that the critical point after which MP achieves a success probability of at least 0.9 is roughly around 128 characters. The skewness test is found to perform well on simulated data and the study extends its scope to up to twelve taxa. PMID:27035667

  4. Maximum Parsimony and the Skewness Test: A Simulation Study of the Limits of Applicability.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Jussi; Roos, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    The maximum parsimony (MP) method for inferring phylogenies is widely used, but little is known about its limitations in non-asymptotic situations. This study employs large-scale computations with simulated phylogenetic data to estimate the probability that MP succeeds in finding the true phylogeny for up to twelve taxa and 256 characters. The set of candidate phylogenies are taken to be unrooted binary trees; for each simulated data set, the tree lengths of all (2n - 5)!! candidates are computed to evaluate quantities related to the performance of MP, such as the probability of finding the true phylogeny, the probability that the tree with the shortest length is unique, the probability that the true phylogeny has the shortest tree length, and the expected inverse of the number of trees sharing the shortest length. The tree length distributions are also used to evaluate and extend the skewness test of Hillis for distinguishing between random and phylogenetic data. The results indicate, for example, that the critical point after which MP achieves a success probability of at least 0.9 is roughly around 128 characters. The skewness test is found to perform well on simulated data and the study extends its scope to up to twelve taxa. PMID:27035667

  5. HUMEX, a study on the survivability and adaptation of humans to long- duration exploratory missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    ESA has recently initiated a study of the human responses, limits and needs with regard to the stress environments of interplanetary and planetary missions. Emphasis was laid on human health and performance care as well as Advanced Life Support Developments including Bioregenerative Life Support Systems and environmental monitoring. The overall study goals were as follows: (i) to define reference scenarios for a European participation in human exploration and to estimate their influence on the Life Sciences and Life Support requirements; (ii) for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the limiting factors for human health, wellbeing, and performance and to recommend relevant countermeasures; (iii) for selected mission scenarios, to critically assess the potential of Advanced Life Support Developments and to propose a European strategy including terrestrial applications; (iv) to critically assess the feasibility of existing facilities and technologies on ground and in space as testbeds in preparation for human exploratory missions and to develop a test plan for ground and ISS campaigns; (v) to develop a roadmap for a future European strategy towards human exploratory missions, including preparatory activities and terrestrial applications and benefits. A lunar base at the south pole where constant sunlight and potential water ice deposits could be assumed was selected as the moon scenario. the impact on human health, performance and well being has been investigated from the view point of the effects of microgravity (during space travel), reduced gravity (on the Moon) and abrupt gravity changes (during launch and landing), of the effects of cosmic radiation including solar particle events, of psychological issues as well as general health care. Countermeasures as well as necessary research using ground- based testbeds and/or the ISS have been defined. The need for highly intelligent autonomous diagnostic and therapy systems was considered as a driver also for terrestrial applications. Likewise advanced life support systems with a high degree of autonomy and regenerative capacity and synergy effects were considered where bioregenerative life support systems and biodiagnistic systems become essential especially for the long-term Mars scenario. A roadmap for a future European strategy leading to a potential European participation in a cooperative human exploratory mission, either to the Moon or to Mars, was produced. Ref. Horneck et al. HUMEX, study on the Survivability and Adaptation of Humans to Long-Duration Exploratory Missions, ESA SP (in press)

  6. Studying synapses in human brain with array tomography and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Kevin R.; Smith, Colin; Wright, Ann K.; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Pooler, Amy M.; Koffie, Robert; Bastin, Mark E.; Bak, Thomas H.; Abrahams, Sharon; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; McGuone, Declan; Frosch, Matthew P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Spires-Jones, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem studies of synapses in human brain are problematic due to the axial resolution limit of light microscopy and the difficulty preserving and analyzing ultrastructure with electron microscopy. Array tomography overcomes these problems by embedding autopsy tissue in resin and cutting ribbons of ultrathin serial sections. Ribbons are imaged with immunofluorescence, allowing high-throughput imaging of tens of thousands of synapses to assess synapse density and protein composition. The protocol takes approximately 3 days per case, excluding image analysis, which is done at the end of the study. Parallel processing for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a protocol modified to preserve structure in human samples allows complimentary ultrastructural studies. Incorporation of array tomography and TEM into brain banking is a potent way of phenotyping synapses in well-characterized clinical cohorts to develop clinico-pathological correlations at the synapse level. This will be important for research in neurodegenerative disease, developmental diseases, and psychiatric illness. PMID:23787894

  7. Reconstructed epidermis versus human and animal skin in skin absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, S; Mahmoud, A; Vuia, A; Rübbelke, M K; Schmidt, E; Schaller, M; Kandárová, H; Haberland, A; Schäfer, U F; Bock, U; Korting, H C; Liebsch, M; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2005-09-01

    European chemical policy in general and the REACH initiative in particular will increase the number of chemical substances submitted to toxicological evaluation by several orders of magnitude compared to the current status. To limit animal exposure the resulting enormous increase in testing, however, asks for validated in vitro test systems. While the OECD favours in vitro testing for cutaneous absorption using viable human and animal skin (Guideline 428) the availability of viable human skin is already limited today. We present a comparison of various in vitro techniques suitable for routine skin absorption studies including commercially available reconstructed human epidermis which may be a reliable alternative to excised human and animal skin. In order to develop a protocol for the subsequent transfer to partner laboratories the experimental set-up was analysed stepwise using the OECD reference compounds caffeine and testosterone. Franz cell type, the donor and receptor media for hydrophilic/lipophilic substances, albumin and tensid addition, and storage conditions of the excised skins were systematically varied. A protocol has been developed which now allows to proceed to the pre-validation process. PMID:15913948

  8. Integrative Review of the Literature on Adults with Limited Education and Skills and the Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, David W.; Torraco, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with limited education and skills--those who lack the education and skills needed for full participation in U.S. culture and economy--are increasing in numbers. However, the knowledge base addressing this population and their educational needs is fragmented across the literature of several disciplines. A comprehensive review and critique of

  9. Integrative Review of the Literature on Adults with Limited Education and Skills and the Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, David W.; Torraco, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with limited education and skills--those who lack the education and skills needed for full participation in U.S. culture and economy--are increasing in numbers. However, the knowledge base addressing this population and their educational needs is fragmented across the literature of several disciplines. A comprehensive review and critique of…

  10. Human population studies and the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    de Chadarevian, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    This essay draws attention to the role of the WHO in shaping research agendas in the biomedical sciences in the postwar era. It considers in particular the genetic studies of human populations that were pursued under the aegis of the WHO from the late 1950s to 1970s. The study provides insights into how human and medical genetics entered the agenda of the WHO. At the same time, the population studies become a focus for tracking changing notions of international relations, cooperation, and development and their impact on research in biology and medicine in the post-World War I era. After a brief discussion of the early history of the WHO and its position in Cold War politics, the essay considers the WHO program in radiation protection and heredity and how the genetic study of "vanishing" human populations and a world-wide genetic study of newborns fitted this broader agenda. It then considers in more detail the kind of support offered by the WHO for these projects. The essay highlights the role of single individuals in taking advantage of WHO support for pushing their research agendas while establishing a trend towards cooperative international projects in biology. PMID:26775433

  11. Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Mission: Human Research Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B. (Editor); Walker, Karen R. (Editor); Hargens, Alan (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Life Sciences, Microgravity Science and Spacelab Mission contains a number of human experiments directed toward identifying the functional, metabolic and neurological characteristics of muscle weakness and atrophy during space flight. To ensure the successful completion of the flight experiments, a ground-based pilot study, designed to mimic the flight protocols as closely as possible, was carried out in the head-down tilt bed rest model. This report records the rationales, procedures, preliminary results and estimated value of the pilot study, the first of its kind, for 12 of the 13 planned experiments in human research. The bed rest study was conducted in the Human Research Facility at Ames Research Center from July 11 - August 28, 1995. Eight healthy male volunteers performed the experiments before, during and after 17 days bed rest. The immediate purposes of this simulation were to integrate the experiments, provide data in a large enough sample for publication of results, enable investigators to review individual experiments in the framework of a multi-disciplinary study and relay the experience of the pilot study to the mission specialists prior to launch.

  12. Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration: Conclusions from Four Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya L. Le Blanc; John O'Hara; Jeffrey C. Joe; April M. Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-11-01

    The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) research project is investigating how advanced technologies that are planned for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR) will affect the performance and the reliability of the plant from a human factors and human performance perspective. The HAC research effort investigates the consequences of allocating functions between the operators and automated systems. More specifically, the research team is addressing how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. Oxstrand et al. (2013 - March) describes the efforts conducted by the researchers to identify the research needs for HAC. The research team reviewed the literature on HAC, developed a model of HAC, and identified gaps in the existing knowledge of human-automation collaboration. As described in Oxstrand et al. (2013 – June), the team then prioritized the research topics identified based on the specific needs in the context of AdvSMR. The prioritization was based on two sources of input: 1) The preliminary functions and tasks, and 2) The model of HAC. As a result, three analytical studies were planned and conduced; 1) Models of Teamwork, 2) Standardized HAC Performance Measurement Battery, and 3) Initiators and Triggering Conditions for Adaptive Automation. Additionally, one field study was also conducted at Idaho Falls Power.

  13. Microbial culturomics: paradigm shift in the human gut microbiome study.

    PubMed

    Lagier, J-C; Armougom, F; Million, M; Hugon, P; Pagnier, I; Robert, C; Bittar, F; Fournous, G; Gimenez, G; Maraninchi, M; Trape, J-F; Koonin, E V; La Scola, B; Raoult, D

    2012-12-01

    Comprehensive determination of the microbial composition of the gut microbiota and the relationships with health and disease are major challenges in the 21st century. Metagenomic analysis of the human gut microbiota detects mostly uncultured bacteria. We studied stools from two lean Africans and one obese European, using 212 different culture conditions (microbial culturomics), and tested the colonies by using mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. In parallel, we analysed the same three samples by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA amplicons targeting the V6 region. The 32 500 colonies obtained by culturomics have yielded 340 species of bacteria from seven phyla and 117 genera, including two species from rare phyla (Deinococcus-Thermus and Synergistetes, five fungi, and a giant virus (Senegalvirus). The microbiome identified by culturomics included 174 species never described previously in the human gut, including 31 new species and genera for which the genomes were sequenced, generating c. 10 000 new unknown genes (ORFans), which will help in future molecular studies. Among these, the new species Microvirga massiliensis has the largest bacterial genome so far obtained from a human, and Senegalvirus is the largest virus reported in the human gut. Concurrent metagenomic analysis of the same samples produced 698 phylotypes, including 282 known species, 51 of which overlapped with the microbiome identified by culturomics. Thus, culturomics complements metagenomics by overcoming the depth bias inherent in metagenomic approaches. PMID:23033984

  14. Uses of Remnant Human Lung Tissue for Mechanical Stretch Studies

    PubMed Central

    Davidovich, N.; Chhour, P.; Margulies, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    Human lung tissue donated for research purposes is a precious resource which can enhance the exploration of mechanisms involved in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The goal of this work was to establish methods and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining viable primary human type I-like alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) from remnant tissue, even after a significant lapse in post-mortem time, as well as human precision-cut lung slices (PCLSs), and stretch them at magnitudes correlated with mechanical ventilation volumes. Although after 3 days in culture many of the isolated cells stained for the type II AEC marker pro-surfactant Protein C (pro-SPC), after 6 days in culture the monolayer stained only weakly and non-specifically for pro-SPC, and stained brightly for the type I AEC marker aquaporin-5. A strong zona-occludin 1 stain demonstrated the formation of tight junctions between the cells in the epithelial monolayer after only 3 days in culture. To demonstrate the utility of the preparations for the study of lung injury, we stretched the cells and the PCLSs cyclically, uniformly, and equibiaxially and quantified their viability. Our data show that the described methods allow the utilization of human tissue in in vitro stretch studies investigating VILI. PMID:23833689

  15. Comparison of human- and model-observer LROC studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Howard C.; Pretorius, P. H.; King, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    We have investigated whether extensions of linear model observers can predict human performance in a localization ROC (LROC) study. The specific task was detection of gallium-avid tumors in SPECT images of a mathematical phantom, and the study was intended to quantify the effect of improved detector energy resolution on scatter-corrected images. The basis for our model observers is the latent perception measurement postulated for the LROC model. This measurement is obtained by cross-correlating the image with a kernel, and the LROC rating and localization data are the max and argmax, respectively, of this measurement made at all relevant search locations. The particular model observers tested were the nonprewhitening (NPW), channelized NPW (CNPW), and channelized Hotelling (CH) observers. Specification of the observer's search region was also part of the task definition, and several variations were considered that could approximate the training of human observers. The best agreement with the human observers was found with the CNPW observer, suggesting that the ability of human observers to prewhiten images may be degraded when the detection task requires signal localization.

  16. A validation study of a stochastic model of human interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Mitchel Talmadge

    The purpose of this dissertation is to validate a stochastic model of human interactions which is part of a developmentalism paradigm. Incorporating elements of ancient and contemporary philosophy and science, developmentalism defines human development as a progression of increasing competence and utilizes compatible theories of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, social psychology, curriculum development, neurology, psychophysics, and physics. To validate a stochastic model of human interactions, the study addressed four research questions: (a) Does attitude vary over time? (b) What are the distributional assumptions underlying attitudes? (c) Does the stochastic model, {-}N{intlimitssbsp{-infty}{infty}}varphi(chi,tau)\\ Psi(tau)dtau, have utility for the study of attitudinal distributions and dynamics? (d) Are the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein theories applicable to human groups? Approximately 25,000 attitude observations were made using the Semantic Differential Scale. Positions of individuals varied over time and the logistic model predicted observed distributions with correlations between 0.98 and 1.0, with estimated standard errors significantly less than the magnitudes of the parameters. The results bring into question the applicability of Fisherian research designs (Fisher, 1922, 1928, 1938) for behavioral research based on the apparent failure of two fundamental assumptions-the noninteractive nature of the objects being studied and normal distribution of attributes. The findings indicate that individual belief structures are representable in terms of a psychological space which has the same or similar properties as physical space. The psychological space not only has dimension, but individuals interact by force equations similar to those described in theoretical physics models. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to estimate Fermi-Dirac parameters from the data. The model explained a high degree of the variance in each probability distribution. The correlation between predicted and observed probabilities ranged from a low of 0.955 to a high value of 0.998, indicating that humans behave in psychological space as Fermions behave in momentum space.

  17. Limits on quark-lepton compositeness and studies of W asymmetry at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.

    1996-10-01

    Drell-Yan dilepton production at high invariant mass place strong limits on quark substructure. Compositeness limits from CDF Run 1, and expected sensitivity in Run II and TEV33 are presented. The W asymmetry data constrains the slope of the d/u quark distributions and significantly reduces the systematic error on the extracted value of the W mass.

  18. A Comparative Study of Definitions on Limit and Continuity of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in definitions of limit and continuity of functions as treated in courses on calculus and in rigorous undergraduate analysis yield contradictory outcomes and unexpected language. There are results about limits in calculus that are false by the definitions of analysis, functions not continuous by one definition and continuous by

  19. A Comparative Study of Definitions on Limit and Continuity of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in definitions of limit and continuity of functions as treated in courses on calculus and in rigorous undergraduate analysis yield contradictory outcomes and unexpected language. There are results about limits in calculus that are false by the definitions of analysis, functions not continuous by one definition and continuous by…

  20. Polarization and charge limit studies of strained GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    This thesis presents studies on the polarization and charge limit behavior of electron beams produced by strained GaAs photocathodes. These photocathodes are the source of high-intensity, high-polarization electron beams used for a variety of high-energy physics experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Recent developments on P-type, biaxially-strained GaAs photocathodes have produced longitudinal polarization in excess of 80% while yielding beam intensities of {approximately} 2.5 A/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage of 120 kV. The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory, which has a replica of the SLAC injector, was upgraded with a Mott polarimeter to study the polarization properties of photocathodes operating in a high-voltage DC gun. Both the maximum beam polarization and the maximum charge obtainable from these photocathodes have shown a strong dependence on the wavelength of illumination, on the doping concentration, and on the negative electron affinity levels. The experiments performed for this thesis included studying the effects of temperature, cesiation, quantum efficiency, and laser intensity on the polarization of high-intensity beams. It was found that, although low temperatures have been shown to reduce the spin relaxation rate in bulk semiconductors, they don`t have a large impact on the polarization of thin photocathodes. It seems that the short active region in thin photocathodes does not allow spin relaxation mechanisms enough time to cause depolarization. Previous observations that lower QE areas on the photocathode yield higher polarization beams were confirmed. In addition, high-intensity, small-area laser pulses were shown to produce lower polarization beams. Based on these results, together with some findings in the existing literature, a new proposal for a high-intensity, high-polarization photocathode is given. It is hoped that the results of this thesis will promote further investigation on the properties of GaAs photocathodes.

  1. The Background-Limited Infrared Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA: A Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Charles; BLISS-SPICA Study Team

    2010-05-01

    The far-IR waveband carries half of the photon energy ever produced in galaxies and quasars, evidence of the major role of dust-obscured processes in bringing about the modern Universe. The bulk of this appears to have occurred in the first half of the Universe's history (z>1). We are developing the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) to capitalize on SPICA's cold telescope and provide a breakthrough far-IR spectroscopy capability. BLISS-SPICA is 6 orders of magnitude faster than the spectrometers on Herschel and SOFIA in obtaining full-band spectra, and will observe dust-obscured galaxies at all epochs back to the first billion years after the Big Bang (redshift 6), BLISS-SPICA thus probes the complete history of dust-obscured star formation and black-hole growth. It will also be extremely powerful for studying ice-giant planet formation in protoplanetary disks, with its sensitivity to very small amounts of gas. BLISS covers the 38-433 micron range in five grating-spectrometer bands, with two simultaneous sky positions. The detector package is 4224 silicon-nitride micro-mesh leg-isolated bolometers with superconducting transition-edge-sensed (TES) thermistors, read out with a cryogenic time-domain multiplexer, all cooled to 50mK for optimal sensitivity. All technical elements of BLISS have heritage in mature scientific instruments, and many have flown. We report on our design study in which we are optimizing performance while accommodating SPICA's constraints, including the stringent cryogenic mass budget. We present the science case for BLISS, as well as our progress in all key technical aspects: 1) opto-mechanical instrument architecture, 2) detector and readout approach, and 3) sub-K cooling approach. We thank the NASA for support of the BLISS study.

  2. Experimental Study of RF Sheath Formation on a Fast Wave Antenna and Limiter in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Carter, Troy

    2015-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will be an essential component of heating power in ITER. During ICRH, radio frequency (RF) sheaths may form both at the exciting antenna and further away, e.g. in the divertor region, and may cause wall material sputtering and decreased RF power coupling to the plasma. It is important to do detailed laboratory experiments that fully diagnose the sheaths and wave fields. This is not possible in fusion devices. A new RF system has recently been constructed for performing such studies in the LAPD plasma column (ne ~1012 -1013cm-3 , Te ~ 1 - 10 eV ,B0 ~ 400 - 2000 G , diameter ~ 60cm , length ~ 18 m) . The RF system is capable of pulsing at the 1 Hz rep. rate of the LAPD plasma and operating between 2-6 MHz (1st - 9th harmonic of fci in H) with a power output of 200 kW. First results of this system driving a single-strap fast wave antenna will be presented. Emissive and Langmuir probe measurements in the vicinity of both the antenna and a remote limiter and wave coupling measured by magnetic pickup loops will be presented.

  3. Voice-Activated Lightweight Reacher to Assist with Upper Extremity Movement Limitations: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Umer; Conti, Gerry E; Erlandson, Robert F; Ellis, Richard D; Brown, Vince; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to design a functional and user-friendly reacher for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Engineering advancements have taken assistive robotics to new dimensions. Technologies such as wheelchair robotics and myo-electronically controlled systems have opened up a wide range of new applications to assist people with physical disabilities. Similarly, exo-skeletal limbs and body suits have provided new foundations from which technologies can aid function. Unfortunately, these devices have issues of usability, weight, and discomfort with donning. The Smart Assistive Reacher Arm (SARA) system, developed in this research, is a voice-activated, lightweight, mobile device that can be used when needed. SARA was built to help overcome daily reach challenges faced by individuals with limited arm and hand movement capability, such as people with cervical level 5-6 (C5-6) SCI. This article shows that a functional reacher arm with voice control can be beneficial for this population. Comparison study with healthy participants and an SCI participant shows that, when using SARA, a person with SCI can perform simple reach and grasp tasks independently, without someone else's help. This suggests that the interface is intuitive and can be easily used to a high level of proficiency by a SCI individual. PMID:26132355

  4. Suicide in the Greek penal system and the problem of various limitations in relevant studies.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Suicides in prison are not merely self-destructive acts or a "cry for help." They reflect the inherent need for freedom and the repercussions of imprisonment. SPACE statistics on suicides in prison reveal a rate above 10 per 10,000 in 10 European countries, 4 of which have a rate above 20. Greek data do not appear in all SPACE statistics. This fact has stimulated the present paper. Unpublished data obtained from the Greek Ministry of Justice reveal that Greece belongs to the group of countries with a rate below 10 in 1995 (the year of SPACE statistics). However, the suicide rates fluctuated widely in Greece from a low rate of 3.2 per 10,000 prisoners (convicted, on remand, or hospitalized) in 1982 to the incredibly high rate of nearly 40 in the year 1979 (11 suicides, 10 of which occurred in prison hospitals). A review of the literature indicates that various limitations mentioned in relevant studies lie in the unreliability of data (doubts about the validity of official statistics, missing data in archives, missing files on the victims, suicide in juvenile institutions not always recorded separately, etc.). The research emphasizes the importance of improving suicide statistics (recording, clearing up the incidents of deaths that are recorded without specification of cause, etc.) in order to plan and enforce suicide prevention and intervention strategies that seem to "work" in a particular milieu and are not debatable (e.g., the use of "suicide proof" cells). PMID:17091824

  5. Trait Mindfulness as a Limiting Factor for Residual Depressive Symptoms: An Explorative Study Using Quantile Regression

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Sholto; Eames, Catrin; Brennan, Kate; Lambert, Gwladys; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J. Mark G.; Duggan, Danielle S.; Barnhofer, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness has been suggested to be an important protective factor for emotional health. However, this effect might vary with regard to context. This study applied a novel statistical approach, quantile regression, in order to investigate the relation between trait mindfulness and residual depressive symptoms in individuals with a history of recurrent depression, while taking into account symptom severity and number of episodes as contextual factors. Rather than fitting to a single indicator of central tendency, quantile regression allows exploration of relations across the entire range of the response variable. Analysis of self-report data from 274 participants with a history of three or more previous episodes of depression showed that relatively higher levels of mindfulness were associated with relatively lower levels of residual depressive symptoms. This relationship was most pronounced near the upper end of the response distribution and moderated by the number of previous episodes of depression at the higher quantiles. The findings suggest that with lower levels of mindfulness, residual symptoms are less constrained and more likely to be influenced by other factors. Further, the limiting effect of mindfulness on residual symptoms is most salient in those with higher numbers of episodes. PMID:24988072

  6. A study of localization limiters and mesh dependency in earthquake rupture.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Kettle, Louise; Mühlhaus, Hans; Baillard, Christian

    2010-01-13

    No complete physically consistent model of earthquake rupture exists that can fully describe the rich hierarchy of scale dependencies and nonlinearities associated with earthquakes. We study mesh sensitivity in numerical models of earthquake rupture and demonstrate that this mesh sensitivity may provide hidden clues to the underlying physics generating the rich dynamics associated with earthquake rupture. We focus on unstable slip events that occur in earthquakes when rupture is associated with frictional weakening of the fault. Attempts to simulate these phenomena directly by introducing the relevant constitutive behaviour leads to mesh-dependent results, where the deformation localizes in one element, irrespective of size. Interestingly, earthquake models with oversized mesh elements that are ill-posed in the continuum limit display more complex and realistic physics. Until now, the mesh-dependency problem has been regarded as a red herring-but have we overlooked an important clue arising from the mesh sensitivity? We analyse spatial discretization errors introduced into models with oversized meshes to show how the governing equations may change because of these error terms and give rise to more interesting physics. PMID:19948546

  7. Study Towards Human Aided Construction of Large Lunar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanSusante, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    On the Moon, unique situations exist for observing the universe. The Polar areas contain permanently shadowed areas, which are among the coldest places in our solar system, within which the infrared background radiation that can disturb measurements is very low. Also disturbances generated on Earth are mostly out of view and thus the measurements can be much more sensitive in all wavelengths. The South Pole offers a good location for building such an observatory. Clementine mission data indicate that permanently shadowed areas are located within a few kilometers of a areas that are almost permanently lit by the sun. By placing a communication relay on one of the lunar mountains it is also possible to have a communications link for periods in which these shadowed areas can not be seen directly from Earth. The South Polar region of the Moon is also interesting geologically because it is located inside the largest basin on the moon (South Pole - Aitken Basin) as well as the possibility that ice may exist there. Shackleton Crater is suggested as a site for the placement and construction of the Lunar South Pole Infrared Telescope together with a communication relay lander at Malapert Mountain and another communication relay and energy supply lander at the Peak of Eternal Light, located near the rim of Shackleton. A near infrared telescope has been designed for emplacement in Shackleton that appears to have the same capabilities as the Next Generation Space Telescope except for sky coverage, which will be limited by the location and orientation. The telescope has a diameter of 8 meters and is an altitude-azimuth design. The bearings will be made of superconducting magnets that use fluxpinning to stabilize themselves while at the same time they are very energy-efficient. The foundation will be dug and constructed in-situ using robots and telepresence together with virtual reality and local laser rangefinders. If all goes well the telescope would have settlement no greater than 0,03 mm during operation. It would be possible for astronauts to maintain, repair and upgrade the telescope much in the same way that the Hubble Space Telescope has been maintained. When the telescope is built, an infrastructure will also have been created for energy supply and communications that can be used in subsequent missions. The total mission can be achieved by launching 3 Ariane 5 rockets in the year 2006 configuration that can launch 20,000 kg into GTO. New studies of the construction of even larger telescopes have also been undertaken.. One additional aspect that will be very important is the synergy between humans and robots and their role in transport, construction, operation, maintenance, etc. is addressed in these new studies. Also an attempt will be made to make a parametric cost model for different scenario's as well as the technology readiness levels for the techniques necessary to build a telescope with the capacity of the 'planet finder', equivalent up to 1000 sq m of photon collecting surface. Part of the scenario definition and conceptual design of a large lunar telescope has also been done in the lunar base design workshop, held from 10-21 of June at ESTEC, NL. After the conceptual phase there will be a more engineering oriented workshop, which will be held in the concurrent design facility at ESTEC. This paper includes discussion of recent progress on these studies.

  8. Biocompatibility of electrospun human albumin: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk, B H; Kowalczyk, T; Łyżniak, M; Zembrzycki, K; Mikułowski, G; Wysocki, J; Kawiak, J; Pojda, Z

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is rarely used for electrospinning because it does not form fibres in its native globular form. This paper presents a novel method for electrospinning human albumin from a solution containing pharmaceutical grade protein and 25% polyethylene oxide (PEO) used as the fibre-forming agent. After spontaneous cross-linking at body temperature, with no further chemicals added, the fibres become insoluble and the excess PEO can be washed out. Albumin deposited along the fibres retains its native characteristics, such as its non-adhesiveness to cells and its susceptibility for degradation by macrophages. To demonstrate this we evaluated the mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability of this novel product. After subcutaneous implantation in mice, albumin mats were completely resorbable within six days and elicited only a limited local inflammatory response. In vitro, the mats suppressed cell attachment and migration. As this product is inexpensive, produced from human pharmaceutical grade albumin without chemical modifications, retains its native protein properties and fulfils the specific requirements for anti-adhesive dressings, its clinical use can be expedited. We believe that it could specifically be used when treating paediatric patients with epidermolysis bullosa, in whom non-healing wounds occur after minor hand injuries which lead to rapid adhesions and devastating contractures. PMID:25727172

  9. Studies of culture conditions and environmental stability of human metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tollefson, Sharon J.; Cox, Reagan G.; Williams, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a paramyxovirus that is a leading cause of acute respiratory disease. HMPV is difficult to cultivate and limited published data describe the in vitro growth characteristics of the virus and its ability to replicate in different cell lines. Stability of HMPV to different temperatures or environmental conditions has not been described. Nosocomial infections due to HMPV have been reported, and thus the survival of infectious particles on environmental surfaces is important. We tested multiple cell lines for the ability to support HMPV replication both in the presence and absence of exogenous trypsin. The most permissive monkey kidney epithelial cells were LLC-MK2 and Vero, while the most permissive human airway epithelial cell line was BEAS-2B. LLC-MK2 cells were tolerant of trypsin and thus remain an ideal cell line for HMPV cultivation. Spinoculation significantly increased the infectivity of HMPV for cells in monolayer culture. Infectious virus was very stable to repeat freeze-thaw cycles and ambient room temperature or 4°C, while incubation at 37 °C led to degradation of virus titer. Finally, nonporous materials such as metal or plastic retained infectious virus for prolonged periods, while virus deposited on tissue and fabric rapidly lost infectivity. These findings provide guidance for laboratories attempting to culture HMPV and relevant information for infection control policies. PMID:20380856

  10. Machine Learning for Big Data: A Study to Understand Limits at Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Carlos Emilio

    2015-12-21

    This report aims to empirically understand the limits of machine learning when applied to Big Data. We observe that recent innovations in being able to collect, access, organize, integrate, and query massive amounts of data from a wide variety of data sources have brought statistical data mining and machine learning under more scrutiny, evaluation and application for gleaning insights from the data than ever before. Much is expected from algorithms without understanding their limitations at scale while dealing with massive datasets. In that context, we pose and address the following questions How does a machine learning algorithm perform on measures such as accuracy and execution time with increasing sample size and feature dimensionality? Does training with more samples guarantee better accuracy? How many features to compute for a given problem? Do more features guarantee better accuracy? Do efforts to derive and calculate more features and train on larger samples worth the effort? As problems become more complex and traditional binary classification algorithms are replaced with multi-task, multi-class categorization algorithms do parallel learners perform better? What happens to the accuracy of the learning algorithm when trained to categorize multiple classes within the same feature space? Towards finding answers to these questions, we describe the design of an empirical study and present the results. We conclude with the following observations (i) accuracy of the learning algorithm increases with increasing sample size but saturates at a point, beyond which more samples do not contribute to better accuracy/learning, (ii) the richness of the feature space dictates performance - both accuracy and training time, (iii) increased dimensionality often reflected in better performance (higher accuracy in spite of longer training times) but the improvements are not commensurate the efforts for feature computation and training and (iv) accuracy of the learning algorithms drop significantly with multi-class learners training on the same feature matrix and (v) learning algorithms perform well when categories in labeled data are independent (i.e., no relationship or hierarchy exists among categories).

  11. Treatment-limiting toxicities associated withnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy: A prospective, observational study**

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Rosario; Santos, Jesús; Camino, Xavier; Arazo, Piedad; Torres Perea, Rafael; Echevarrfa, Santiago; Ribera, Esteban; Sánchez de la Rosa, Rainel; Moreno Guillen, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Recover Study is an ongoing, prospective study designed 10 to assess toxicity associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (stavudine, zidovudine, lamivudine, didanosine, abacavir) in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinical practice. This project is being conducted at 120 HIV units at teaching hospitals across Spain. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most common treatment-limiting 10 moderate to severe clinical and laboratory adverse effects (AEs), and the individual NRTIs involved in the development of these effects, in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART who discontinued use of an NRTI in the Recover Study. Methods: Patients eligible for participation in the Recover Study are aged10 ≥18 years; have virologically documented HIV-1 infection; have sustained viral suppression (viral load <200 cells/mL or stable, heavily experienced [ie, have received ≥3 antiretroviral regimens] patients with viral load <5000 cells/mL) for ≥6 months; are receiving HAART; are undergoing active follow-up; and have developed 2:1 NRTI-associated AE that, in the opinion of a study investigator and under the conditions of routine clinical practice, justified discontinuation of treatment with the offending drug (principal AE/offending NRTI). The present study included patients recruited for the Recover Study between September 2002 and May 2003. Results: A total of 1391 patients were enrolled (966 men, 425 women; mean 1 age, 42 years [range, 18–67 years]). Five hundred six patients (36.4%) had been diagnosed with AIDS. The mean duration of treatment with the offending NRTI was 74 months (range, 6–156 months). Seven hundred nine patients (51.0%) were receiving fourth-line (or more) therapy. Eight hundred twenty-one patients (59.0%) were receiving nonnucleoside analogues, and 552 patients (39.7%), protease inhibitors, as components of their HAART regimens. The NRTIs with the highest discontinuation rates were stavudine (914 patients [65.7%]) and zidovudine (177 [12.7%]). The most frequent NRTI-related AEs were lipoatrophy (550 patients [39.5%]) and peripheral neuropathy (170 [12.2%]). Lipoatrophy was most commonly associated with stavudine (480/550 cases [87.3%]); periph eral neuropathy, with stavudine and didanosine (107/170 [62.9%] and 48/170 [28.2%] cases, respectively); and anemia, with zidovudine (70/77 cases [90.9%]). Conclusions: The results of this study in patients with HIV-1 recruited in the10 Recover Study and undergoing HAART suggest that long-term treatment with NRTIs is associated with AEs (lipoatrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and lipodystrophy), with morphologic disorders (lipoatrophy, lipodystrophy) being the most common AEs leading to discontinuation. Minimizing these AEs by switching to an NRTI not associated with these AEs (eg, tenofovir) would contribute to adherence and hence efficacy of long-term HAART. PMID:24672118

  12. Study of Light Scattering in the Human Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, I. Kelly; Bruce, N. C.; Valdos, L. R. Berriel

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of the human eye to be used in studies of the scattering of light in different components of the eye's optical system. Different parts of the eye are susceptible to produce scattering for different reasons; age, illness or injury. For example, cataracts can appear in the human lens or injuries or fungi can appear on the cornea. The aim of the study is to relate the backscattered light, which is what doctors measure or detect, to the forward scattered light, which is what affects the patient's vision. We present the model to be used, the raytrace procedure and some preliminary results for the image on the retina without scattering.

  13. Sequencing studies in human genetics: design and interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David B.; Allen, Andrew; Keebler, Jonathan; Margulies, Elliott H.; Petrou, Steven; Petrovski, Slavé; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2014-01-01

    Next-gene ration sequencing is becoming the primary discovery tool in human genetics. There have been many clear successes in identifying genes that are responsible for Mendelian diseases, and sequencing approaches are now poised to identify the mutations that cause undiagnosed childhood genetic diseases and those that predispose individuals to more common complex diseases. There are, however, growing concerns that the complexity and magnitude of complete sequence data could lead to an explosion of weakly justified claims of association between genetic variants and disease. Here, we provide an overview of the basic workflow in next-generation sequencing studies and emphasize, where possible, measures and considerations that facilitate accurate inferences from human sequencing studies. PMID:23752795

  14. Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Tamara T.; Allen, Amanda L.; Bardin, Joseph E.; Christian, Megan N.; Daimon, Kansei; Dozier, Kelsey D.; Hansen, Caom L.; Holcomb, Lisa M.; Ahlander, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Viruses are infectious particles whose viability is dependent on the cells of living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, and animals. It is of great interest to discover how viruses function inside host cells in order to develop therapies to treat virally infected organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of replication, amplification, and cellular consequences of human viruses. In this review, we describe the advantages of using Drosophila as a model system to study human viruses, and highlight how Drosophila has been used to provide unique insight into the gene function of several pathogenic viruses. We also propose possible directions for future research in this area. PMID:22177780

  15. Nitrobenzene potential human cancer risk based on animal studies.

    PubMed

    Holder, J W

    1999-08-01

    Inhaled nitrobenzene (NB) in animals produces cancer at eight sites in three rodent strains. B6C3F1 mice respond with mammary gland malignant tumors and male lung and thyroid benign tumors, and F344/N male rats respond with liver malignant tumors and thyroid and kidney benign tumors, while females respond with endometrial polyps. Male Sprague-Dawley male rats (CD strain) respond with liver benign tumors. NB is oxidized to various phenolic metabolites, while also being reduced to nitrosobenzene (NOB), phenylhydroxylamine (PH), related free radicals, and aniline (AN) in the cecum by bacteria and in the body by the microsomes. In reduction, NB first forms the nitroanion free radical, which can react with O2 to form O2*-. Repeated NB dosing produces a persistent redox couple NOB<==>PH in red blood cells that generates met-Hb and expends NAD(P)H. NOB forms activated glutathione conjugates. These biochemical effects may lead to critical redox imbalances and macromolecular binding. Known effects are hemosiderosis, methemoglobinemia, and anemia--and now dispersed cancer in rodents. Based on structural and mechanistic similarities, NB compares with other animal and human carcinogenic nitroarenes and aromatic amines. The cancer hazard evaluation of NB is that it is a probable human carcinogen by any route of exposure. The maximum response is in F344/N male rats which is used for dose-response modelling. The model to estimate the upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) of NB human carcinogenicity is a no-threshold, linear low-dose, and multistaged animal model (LMS). The UCL95% of cancer slope is estimated to be 0.11(6) mg/kg/day (mkd). At de minimus risk (1:10(6)), the virtually safe dose (VSD) is estimated to be 9.1 ng/kg/day (nkd). PMID:10487356

  16. Applications and limitations of inflammatory biomarkers for studies on neurocognitive impairment in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Gabuzda, Dana

    2013-12-01

    Despite reduced prevalence of severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) on current antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, milder forms of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remain prevalent in HIV-infected populations. These mild forms of HAND consist of subtypes, probably reflecting distinct, though possibly overlapping, pathophysiological mechanisms. Factors associated with HAND in HIV patients with prolonged viral suppression on ART include older age, low nadir CD4, active HCV co-infection, and cardiovascular risk factors, but underlying mechanisms and their relationship to innate immune activation, chronic inflammation, and other features of systemic disease are poorly understood. In this article, we discuss applications and limitations of plasma inflammatory biomarkers for studies on HAND in HIV patients on ART and describe an analysis pipeline to reduce common sources of noise and increase likelihood of identifying relevant inflammatory biomarkers. Clinical covariates and comorbidities that influence inflammatory biomarkers, such as aging, obesity, metabolic abnormalities, HCV co-infection, and substance abuse, are also reviewed. As an example for using this analytic pipeline, we present an exploratory study of 22 plasma inflammatory biomarkers (IFN-α 2b and -γ, 16 cytokines/chemokines, sIL-2R, sCD14, HA, and YKL-40) in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with advanced disease, frequent HCV co-infection, and viral suppression on ART. The identification of inflammatory biomarkers associated with HAND in HIV+ patients on ART may be useful to distinguish between HAND subtypes with distinct pathophysiology, and is important for achieving a systems-level understanding of the biology of these disorders, developing effective therapies, and evaluating therapeutic outcomes. PMID:24259252

  17. Mummified remains from the Archaeological Museum in Zagreb, Croatia - Reviewing peculiarities and limitations of human and non-human radiological identification and analysis in mummified remains.

    PubMed

    Petaros, Anja; Janković, Ivor; Cavalli, Fabio; Ivanac, Gordana; Brkljačić, Boris; Čavka, Mislav

    2015-10-01

    Forensic protocols and medico-legal techniques are increasingly being employed in investigations of museological material. The final findings of such investigations may reveal interesting facts on historical figures, customs and habits, as well as provide meaningful data for forensic use. Herein we present a case review where forensic experts were requested to identify taxonomic affinities, stage of preservation and provide skeletal analysis of mummified non-human archaeological remains, and verify whether two mummified hands are human or not. The manuscript offers a short review on the process and particularities of radiological species identification, the impact of post-mortem changes in the analysis and imaging of mummified remains as well as the macroscopical interpretation of trauma, pathology and authenticity in mummified remains, which can all turn useful when dealing with forensic cases. PMID:26344461

  18. Tamoxifen experimental carcinogenicity studies: Implications for human effects

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1995-02-01

    Tamoxifen is an effective antiestrogen in the treatment of breast cancer and is considered highly safe. In recent years, several trials have been initiated in women to evaluate its potential for the prevention of breast cancer. Such long-term administration of a medication to healthy people requires a substantial degree of safety. This review examines experimental carcinogenicity and mechanistic studies on tamoxifen and the implications for human effects. 25 refs.

  19. Genetically Engineered Humanized Mouse Models for Preclinical Antibody Studies

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V.; Roopenian, Derry C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies. PMID:24150980

  20. Lost in Virtual Space: Studies in Human and Ideal Spatial Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankiewicz, Brian J.; Legge, Gordon E.; Mansfield, J. Stephen; Schlicht, Erik J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe 3 human spatial navigation experiments that investigate how limitations of perception, memory, uncertainty, and decision strategy affect human spatial navigation performance. To better understand the effect of these variables on human navigation performance, the authors developed an ideal-navigator model for indoor navigation…

  1. Lost in Virtual Space: Studies in Human and Ideal Spatial Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankiewicz, Brian J.; Legge, Gordon E.; Mansfield, J. Stephen; Schlicht, Erik J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe 3 human spatial navigation experiments that investigate how limitations of perception, memory, uncertainty, and decision strategy affect human spatial navigation performance. To better understand the effect of these variables on human navigation performance, the authors developed an ideal-navigator model for indoor navigation

  2. The functional neuroanatomy of classic delayed response tasks in humans and the limitations of cross-method convergence in prefrontal function.

    PubMed

    Turner, G R; Levine, B

    2006-04-28

    Three classic delay tasks: spatial delayed response, delayed spatial alternation and delayed object-alternation are prototypical experimental paradigms for mapping the functional neuroanatomy of prefrontal cortex in animals. These tasks have been applied in human lesion studies, yet there have been very few studies investigating their functional neuroanatomy in healthy human subjects. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of these classic paradigms (and a fourth: object delayed response) in a single sample of healthy human participants. Consistent with previous animal, human lesion, and functional neuroimaging studies, activity was observed in prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices across all three delay tasks. Task-specific activations, however, were not entirely consistent with predictions drawn from animal lesion studies. For example, delayed object-alternation activated dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a region not generally implicated in animal lesion reports. Spatial delayed response, classically associated with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, did not activate this region; it rather activated posterior premotor cortices involved in response preparation, as did spatial alternation. All three tasks activated the frontopolar cortex, a region not considered crucial in animal research but associated with manipulation of internally generated information in recent human research. While cross-method convergence may be attained for lower level perceptual or motor tasks, the results of this study caution against the assumption that lesion-specific effects in animals generalize to human prefrontal cortex function. PMID:16324791

  3. Improved Detection Limit in Rapid Detection of Human Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 by a Novel Reverse Transcription–Isothermal Multiple-Self-Matching-Initiated Amplification Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiong; Nie, Kai; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Guan, Li; Zhang, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid detection of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) is important in the early phase of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). In this study, we developed and evaluated a novel reverse transcription–isothermal multiple-self-matching-initiated amplification (RT-IMSA) assay for the rapid detection of EV71 and CVA16 by use of reverse transcriptase, together with a strand displacement DNA polymerase. Real-time RT-IMSA assays using a turbidimeter and visual RT-IMSA assays to detect EV71 and CVA16 were established and completed in 1 h, and the reported corresponding real-time reverse transcription–loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays targeting the same regions of the VP1 gene were adopted as parallel tests. Through testing VP1 RNAs transcribed in vitro, the real-time RT-IMSA assays exhibited better linearity of quantification, with R2 values of 0.952 (for EV71) and 0.967 (for CVA16), than the real-time RT-LAMP assays, which had R2 values of 0.803 (for EV71) and 0.904 (for CVA16). Additionally, the detection limits of the real-time RT-IMSA assays (approximately 937 for EV71 and 67 for CVA16 copies/reaction) were higher than those of real-time RT-LAMP assays (approximately 3,266 for EV71 and 430 for CVA16 copies/reaction), and similar results were observed in the visual RT-IMSA assays. The new approaches also possess high specificities for the corresponding targets, with no cross-reactivity observed. In clinical assessment, compared to commercial reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) kits, the diagnostic sensitivities of the real-time RT-IMSA assays (96.4% for EV71 and 94.6% for CVA16) were higher than those of the real-time RT-LAMP assays (91.1% for EV71 and 90.8% for CVA16). The visual RT-IMSA assays also exhibited the same results. In conclusion, this proof-of-concept study suggests that the novel RT-IMSA assay is superior to the RT-LAMP assay in terms of detection limit and has the potential to rapidly detect EV71 and CVA16 viruses. PMID:24648558

  4. Biochemical Markers of Aging for Longitudinal Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Engelfriet, Peter M.; Jansen, Eugène H. J. M.; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Dollé, Martijn E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the past decades in unraveling the mechanisms that are responsible for aging. The discovery that particular gene mutations in experimental species such as yeast, flies, and nematodes are associated with longevity has led to many important insights into pathways that regulate aging processes. However, extrapolating laboratory findings in experimental species to knowledge that is valid for the complexity of human physiology remains a major challenge. Apart from the restricted experimental possibilities, studying aging in humans is further complicated by the development of various age-related diseases. The availability of a set of biomarkers that really reflect underlying aging processes would be of much value in disentangling age-associated pathology from specific aging mechanisms. In this review, we survey the literature to identify promising biochemical markers of aging, with a particular focus on using them in longitudinal studies of aging in humans that entail repeated measurements on easily obtainable material, such as blood samples. Our search strategy was a 2-pronged approach, one focused on general mechanisms of aging and one including studies on clinical biomarkers of age-related diseases. PMID:23382477

  5. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes as alternative in vitro model for cytochrome p450 induction studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Martha; Rager, Joseph; Wang, Qing; Strab, Robert; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Owen, Albert; Li, Jibin

    2003-01-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) by drugs is one of major concerns for drug-drug interactions. Thus, the assessment of CYP induction by novel compounds is a vital component in the drug discovery and development processes. Primary human hepatocytes are the preferred in vitro model for predicting CYP induction in vivo. However, their use is hampered by the erratic supply of human tissue and donor-to-donor variability. Although cryopreserved hepatocytes have been recommended for short-term applications in suspension, their use in studies on induction of enzyme activity has been limited because of poor attachment and response to enzyme inducers. In this study, we report culture conditions that allowed the attachment of cryopreserved human hepatocytes and responsiveness to CYP inducers. We evaluated the inducibility of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 enzymes in cryopreserved hepatocytes from three human donors. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium for 4 d. They exhibited normal morphology and measurable viability as evaluated by the reduction of tetrazolium salts (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) by cellular dehydrogenases. Treatment with beta-naphthoflavone (10 microM) for 3 d increased ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (CYP1A1/2) by 6- to 11-fold over untreated cultures and increased CYP1A2 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression by three- to eightfold. Similarly, treatment of cryopreserved human hepatocytes with rifampicin (25 microM) for 3 d increased testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activity (CYP3A4) by five- to eightfold over untreated cultures and increased CYP3A4 mRNA expression by four- to eightfold. The results suggest that cryopreserved human hepatocytes can be a suitable in vitro model for evaluating xenobiotics as inducers of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 enzymes. PMID:14599235

  6. Reconciling Human Smoking Behavior and Machine Smoking Patterns: Implications for Understanding Smoking Behavior and the Impact on Laboratory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marian, Catalin; O'Connor, Richard J.; Djordjevic, Mirjana; Rees, Vaughan W.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Shields, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent Food and Drug Administration legislation enables the mandating of product performance standards for cigarette smoke and the evaluation of manufacturers’ health claims for modified tobacco products. Laboratory studies used for these evaluations, and also to understand tobacco smoke toxicology, use machines to generate smoke. The goal of this review is to critically evaluate methods to assess human smoking behavior and replicate this in the laboratory. Methods Smoking behavior and smoking machine studies were identified using PubMed and publically available databases for internal tobacco company documents. Results The smoking machine was developed to generate smoke to allow for comparing cigarette tar and nicotine yields. The intent was to infer relative human disease risk, but this concept was flawed because humans tailor their smoking to the product and chemical yields and toxicological effects change with different smoking profiles. While smoking machines also allow for mechanistic assessments of smoking-related diseases, the interpretations also are limited. However, available methods to assess how humans puff could be used to provide better laboratory assessments, but these need to be validated. Separately, the contribution of smoke mouth-holding and inhalation to dose need to be assessed, because these parts of smoking are not captured by the smoking machine. Better comparisons of cigarettes might be done by tailoring human puff profiles to the product based on human studies and comparing results across regimens. Conclusions There are major research gaps that limit the use of smoking machine studies for informing tobacco control regulation and mechanistic studies. PMID:19959678

  7. Comparison of human exposures to selected chemicals with thresholds from NTP carcinogenicity studies in rodents.

    PubMed

    Waddell, William J

    2003-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Technical Reports online database was reviewed to find chemicals that were reported to show clear evidence of carcinogenicity in the NTP rodent studies and for which data on human exposure could be found. Six representative compounds were selected. Three volatile compounds: ethyl benzene, perchloroethylene, and methylene chloride; two drugs in current use: phenytoin and primidone; and one naturally occurring, widely used, flavor: allyl isothiocyanate, were selected. The carcinogenicity data from each of the NTP Technical Reports were plotted using the Rozman scale to determine the threshold for carcinogenicity from the rodent studies. The human exposures for each chemical were calculated and compared with that threshold. The thresholds for carcinogenicity of the three volatile compounds were several orders of magnitude above the levels present in ambient air in the USA. The Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) for these three compounds varied between several orders of magnitude below the carcinogenicity threshold to being at the threshold. The maximum recommended doses of both drugs were at the carcinogenicity threshold. The estimated mean daily human consumption of the natural flavor was less than 100 x below the carcinogenicity threshold. This method of comparison between human exposure and animal carcinogenicity studies is more objective and informative than those in current use. PMID:14580010

  8. Rapid-throughput glycomics applied to human milk oligosaccharide profiling for large human studies.

    PubMed

    Totten, Sarah M; Wu, Lauren D; Parker, Evan A; Davis, Jasmine C C; Hua, Serenus; Stroble, Carol; Ruhaak, L Renee; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2014-12-01

    Glycomic analysis is the comprehensive determination of glycan (oligosaccharide) structures with quantitative information in a biological sample. Rapid-throughput glycomics is complicated due to the lack of a template, which has greatly facilitated analysis in the field of proteomics. Furthermore, the large similarities in structures make fragmentation spectra (as obtained in electron impact ionization and tandem mass spectrometry) less definitive for identification as it has been in metabolomics. In this study, we develop a concept of rapid-throughput glycomics on human milk oligosaccharides, which have proven to be an important bioactive component of breast milk, providing the infant with protection against pathogenic infection and supporting the establishment of a healthy microbiota. To better understand the relationship between diverse oligosaccharides structures and their biological function as anti-pathogenic and prebiotic compounds, large human studies are needed, which necessitate rapid- to high-throughput analytical platforms. Herein, a complete glycomics methodology is presented, evaluating the most effective human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) extraction protocols, the linearity and reproducibility of the nano-liquid chromatography chip time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nano-LC chip-TOF MS) method, and the efficacy of newly developed, in-house software for chromatographic peak alignment that allows for rapid data analysis. High instrument stability and retention time reproducibility, together with the successful automated alignment of hundreds of features in hundreds of milk samples, allow for the use of an HMO library for rapid assignment of fully annotated structures. PMID:25358913

  9. Strengths and Limitations of Model Systems for the Study of Urinary Tract Infections and Related Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Barber, Amelia E; Norton, J Paul; Wiles, Travis J; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are some of the most common bacterial infections worldwide and are a source of substantial morbidity among otherwise healthy women. UTIs can be caused by a variety of microbes, but the predominant etiologic agent of these infections is uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). An especially troubling feature of UPEC-associated UTIs is their high rate of recurrence. This problem is compounded by the drastic increase in the global incidence of antibiotic-resistant UPEC strains over the past 15 years. The need for more-effective treatments for UTIs is driving research aimed at bettering our understanding of the virulence mechanisms and host-pathogen interactions that occur during the course of these infections. Surrogate models of human infection, including cell culture systems and the use of murine, porcine, avian, teleost (zebrafish), and nematode hosts, are being employed to define host and bacterial factors that modulate the pathogenesis of UTIs. These model systems are revealing how UPEC strains can avoid or overcome host defenses and acquire scarce nutrients while also providing insight into the virulence mechanisms used by UPEC within compromised individuals, such as catheterized patients. Here, we summarize our current understanding of UTI pathogenesis while also giving an overview of the model systems used to study the initiation, persistence, and recurrence of UTIs and life-threatening sequelae like urosepsis. Although we focus on UPEC, the experimental systems described here can also provide valuable insight into the disease processes associated with other bacterial pathogens both within the urinary tract and elsewhere within the host. PMID:26935136

  10. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW’s are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin. PMID:25057963

  11. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW's are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  12. Further Studies of Accretion onto Hot, Massive, White Dwarfs: The Growth to the Chandrasekhar Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.; Hix, W. R.; Sion, E. M.; Sparks, W. M.; Dwyer, S.

    2004-05-01

    We report on further studies of accretion (Solar Composition material) at a variety of rates onto hot, massive white dwarfs (WDs: Starrfield et al. 2003, Atlanta Meeting, poster 45.10). Our initial models are 1.0 M⊙, 1.25 M⊙, and 1.35 M⊙ WDs with luminosities of 30 L⊙. We have now run evolutionary sequences with mass accretion rates varying from 1.6×10-10 M⊙ yr-1 to 3.5×10-7 M⊙ yr-1 and, in all cases, the WDs grow in mass to near the Chandrasekhar Limit. We use the 1D, hydrodynamic computer code as described in Starrfield et al. (APJS, 127,485, 2000) and have updated the nuclear reaction network, since the calculations reported at Atlanta, to that found at www.cococubed.com/code_pages/net_hhe.shtml. This network combines the pp + hot cno + rp breakout network used previously with an alpha-chain that runs to 56Ni. This will allow us to report on whether or not elements such as Si, S, and Ca are produced in the outer layers during the evolution to explosion so that they do not have to be produced by the explosion. We will also report on simulations done with a lower metallicity for the accreting material - characteristic of that of the LMC. S. Starrfield acknowledges support from NSF and NASA grants to ASU, FXT is supported by the National Security Fellow program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, WRH is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under contracts PHY-0244783 and AST-9877130 and by the Department of Energy, through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. EMS is supported by NASA ADP grant NAG5-11182.

  13. Quantification of mequitazine in human plasma by gas chromatography- quadrupole mass spectrometry and its application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Maeng, Han-Joo

    2016-04-01

    A specific and sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with quadrupole mass analyzer type was developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of mequitazine in human plasma. After liquid-liquid extraction of plasma samples containing mequitazine and promethazine (internal standard, IS) using hexane with pH adjustment, the extract was evaporated and an aliquot of reconstituted residue was injected into the GC-MS system. The assay showed linearity over a concentration range from 1 to 50?ng/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision for mequitazine was <9.09 and 9.29%, respectively, and intra- and inter-day accuracy ranged from -7.97 to 9.05% and from -1.51 to 7.89%, respectively. The lower limit of quantification was 1?ng/mL in the present assay. The developed analytical method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study after a single oral administration of mequitazine in human subjects. Copyright 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26268745

  14. Studying the Human Immunome: The Complexity of Comprehensive Leukocyte Immunophenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Biancotto, Angélique

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the cellular components of the immune system requires both deep and broad immunophenotyping of numerous cell populations in an efficient and practical manner. In this chapter, we describe the technical aspects of studying the human immunome using high-dimensional (15 color) fluorescence-based immunophenotyping. We focus on the technical aspects of polychromatic flow cytometry and the initial stages in developing a panel for comprehensive leukocyte immunophenotyping (CLIP). We also briefly discuss how this panel is being used and the challenges of encyclopedic analysis of these rich data sets. PMID:23975032

  15. Study of the optical properties of human hair.

    PubMed

    Guiolet, A; Garson, J C; Levecque, J L

    1987-06-01

    Synopsis The optical properties of human hair were studied by photogoniometry. Starting from an optical model of hair, we developed a computerized method of decomposition of the goniophotometric curve. From our analysis we obtained structural parameters of the hair surface, average scale angle and cosmetic parameters like lustre and pigmentation. This method gave us new results in the following areas: - the effects of bleaching on scale and internally reflected light; - the study, from root to tip, of surface damage and hair pigmentation; - the effects of stretching the hair on scale angle and lustre; - the effects of sebum and dust on hair lustre. PMID:19456974

  16. A functional anatomical study of associative learning in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Molchan, S E; Sunderland, T; McIntosh, A R; Herscovitch, P; Schreurs, B G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to map the functional neuroanatomy of simple associative learning in humans. Eyeblink conditioning was studied in eight normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and H215O. Regional cerebral blood flow was assessed during three sequential phases: (i) explicitly unpaired presentations of the unconditioned stimulus (air puff to the right eye) and conditioned stimulus (binaural tone), (ii) paired presentations of the two stimuli (associative learning), and (iii) presentation of the conditioned stimulus alone. During associative learning, relative to the unpaired phase, blood flow was significantly increased in primary auditory and left posterior cingulate cortices and significantly decreased in areas of the right cerebellar, right prefrontal, right parietal, and insular cortices and right neostriatum. The lateralization of the changes may relate to the functional organization of memory and learning processes in the brain. The activation in primary auditory cortex is an example, using a neuroimaging technique, of a learning-related change in primary sensory cortex in humans. The changes in areas such as the cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, and neostriatum provide support for their roles in associative learning as proposed by animal models. Moreover, these findings show that in humans, even simple classical conditioning involves distributed changes in multiple neural systems. Images PMID:8058767

  17. Design, recruitment, and microbiological considerations in human challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Darton, Thomas C; Blohmke, Christoph J; Moorthy, Vasee S; Altmann, Daniel M; Hayden, Frederick G; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Levine, Myron M; Hill, Adrian V S; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    Since the 18th century a wealth of knowledge regarding infectious disease pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment has been accumulated from findings of infection challenges in human beings. Partly because of improvements to ethical and regulatory guidance, human challenge studies-involving the deliberate exposure of participants to infectious substances-have had a resurgence in popularity in the past few years, in particular for the assessment of vaccines. To provide an overview of the potential use of challenge models, we present historical reports and contemporary views from experts in this type of research. A range of challenge models and practical approaches to generate important data exist and are used to expedite vaccine and therapeutic development and to support public health modelling and interventions. Although human challenge studies provide a unique opportunity to address complex research questions, participant and investigator safety is paramount. To increase the collaborative effort and future success of this area of research, we recommend the development of consensus frameworks and sharing of best practices between investigators. Furthermore, standardisation of challenge procedures and regulatory guidance will help with the feasibility for using challenge models in clinical testing of new disease intervention strategies. PMID:26026195

  18. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  19. The Influences of Genetic and Environmental Factors on Methylome-wide Association Studies for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) is an essential epigenetic mechanism for normal development, and its variation may be associated with diseases. High-throughput technology allows robust measurement of DNA methylome in population studies. Methylome-wide association studies (MWAS) scan DNA methylome to detect new epigenetic loci affecting disease susceptibility. MWAS is an emerging approach to unraveling the mechanism linking genetics, environment, and human diseases. Here I review the recent studies of genetic determinants and environmental modifiers of DNAm, and the concept for partitioning genetic and environmental contribution to DNAm. These studies establish the correlation maps between genome and methylome, and enable the interpretation of epigenetic association with disease traits. Recent findings suggested that MWAS was a promising genomic method to identify epigenetic predictors accounting for unexplained disease risk. However, new study designs, analytical methods and shared resources need to be implemented to address the limitations and challenges in future epigenomic epidemiologic studies. PMID:25422794

  20. The Influences of Genetic and Environmental Factors on Methylome-wide Association Studies for Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan V

    2014-12-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) is an essential epigenetic mechanism for normal development, and its variation may be associated with diseases. High-throughput technology allows robust measurement of DNA methylome in population studies. Methylome-wide association studies (MWAS) scan DNA methylome to detect new epigenetic loci affecting disease susceptibility. MWAS is an emerging approach to unraveling the mechanism linking genetics, environment, and human diseases. Here I review the recent studies of genetic determinants and environmental modifiers of DNAm, and the concept for partitioning genetic and environmental contribution to DNAm. These studies establish the correlation maps between genome and methylome, and enable the interpretation of epigenetic association with disease traits. Recent findings suggested that MWAS was a promising genomic method to identify epigenetic predictors accounting for unexplained disease risk. However, new study designs, analytical methods and shared resources need to be implemented to address the limitations and challenges in future epigenomic epidemiologic studies. PMID:25422794

  1. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C. ); Sanders, J.; Maclin, E. ); Belliveau, J.W. ); Caprihan, A. )

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  2. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-09-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  3. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, Shadi; Suganthy, Mayuran; Burczynska, Beata; Dang, Vu; Choudhury, Manika; Pachenari, Azra

    2016-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  4. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzmiller, D.; Bradbury, M.; Cram, S.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratories Life Sciences Division and biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1991. Selected research highlights include: yeast artificial chromosome libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes 16 and 21; distances between the antigen binding sites of three murine antibody subclasses measured using neutron and x-ray scattering; NFCR 10th anniversary highlights; kinase-mediated differences found in the cell cycle regulation of normal and transformed cells; and detecting mutations that cause Gaucher's disease by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Project descriptions include: genomic structure and regulation, molecular structure, cytometry, cell growth and differentiation, radiation biology and carcinogenesis, and pulmonary biology.

  5. STUDIES ON THE STABILITY OF THE NORMAL HUMAN FECAL FLORA.

    PubMed

    Zubrzycki, L; Spaulding, E H

    1962-05-01

    Zubrzycki, Leonard (Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa.) and Earle H. Spaulding. Studies on the stability of the normal human fecal flora. J. Bacteriol. 83:968-974. 1962.-The results of two series of stool cultures show that members of the genus Bacteriodes constitute the most numerous group of bacteria in the normal human adult fecal flora. Together with the enterococci, coliform bacilli, diphtheroids, and lactobacilli, these major components account for more than 99% of the total counts. Wide fluctuations in the number and types of minor organisms observed suggest the probability that they are held in check by these major components which may also possess mechanisms for preventing pathogens from establishing themselves in the large bowel. PMID:16561946

  6. Simple instrument for biochemical studies of the living human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bice, A.N.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Lee, M.C.; Frost, J.J.

    1986-09-01

    A simple, relatively inexpensive radiation detection system was developed for measurement of positron-emitting receptor-binding drugs in the human brain. This high-efficiency coincidence counting system requires that only a few hundred microcuries of labeled drug be administered to the subject, thereby allowing for multiple studies without an excessive radiation dose. Measurement of the binding of (/sup 11/C)-carfentanil, a high-affinity synthetic opiate, to opiate receptors in the presence and in the absence of a competitive opiate antagonist exemplifies the use of this system for estimating different degrees of receptor binding of drugs in the human brain. The instrument has also been used for measurement of the transport into the brain of other positron-emitting radiotracers, such as large neutral amino acids.

  7. Resveratrol: A review of preclinical studies for human cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, Mohammad; Back, Jung Ho; Tang Xiuwei; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kopelovich, Levy; Bickers, David R.; Kim, Arianna L.

    2007-11-01

    The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds one of which is resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a phytoalexin derived from the skin of grapes and other fruits. Resveratrol is known to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and to inhibit platelet aggregation and the growth of a variety of cancer cells. Its potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities have been demonstrated in all three stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression), in both chemically and UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice, as well as in various murine models of human cancers. Evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies has confirmed its ability to modulate various targets and signaling pathways. This review discusses the current preclinical and mechanistic data available and assesses resveratrol's anticancer effects to support its potential as an anticancer agent in human populations.

  8. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  9. A PET study of human auditory spatial processing.

    PubMed

    Weeks, R A; Aziz-Sultan, A; Bushara, K O; Tian, B; Wessinger, C M; Dang, N; Rauschecker, J P; Hallett, M

    1999-03-12

    To learn more about human auditory spatial processing, we used positron emission tomography (PET) to measure regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers engaged in sound localization tasks. Spectral and binaural cues of localized sound were reproduced by a sound system and delivered via headphones. During localization tasks, subjects activated inferior parietal lobules (IPL) bilaterally. In a second experiment, matched in design to the first, subjects made non-spatial auditory discriminations based on frequency, activating the IPL bilaterally with left hemispheric predominance. A between-study comparison revealed that the right IPL was significantly more activated during the sound localization task compared with the feature discrimination task, suggesting a preferential role for the right IPL in auditory spatial processing. PMID:10218879

  10. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  11. Improving the Limit on the Electron EDM: Data Acquisition and Systematics Studies in the ACME Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Paul William

    The ACME collaboration has completed a measurement setting a new upper limit on the size of the electron's permanent electric dipole moment (EDM). The existence of the EDM is well motivated by theories extending the standard model of particle physics, with predicted sizes very close to the current experimental limit. The new limit was set by measuring spin precession within the metastable H state of the polar molecule thorium monoxide (ThO). A particular focus here is on the automated data acquisition system developed to search for a precession phase odd under internal and external reversal of the electric field. Automated switching of many different experimental controls allowed a rapid diagnosis of major systematics, including the dominant systematic caused by non-reversing electric fields and laser polarization gradients. Polarimetry measurements made it possible to quantify and minimize the polarization gradients in our state preparation and probe lasers. Three separate measurements were used to determine the electric field that did not reverse when we tried to switch the field direction. The new bound of | de| < 8.7 x 10--29 e·cm is over an order of magnitude smaller than previous limits, and strongly limits T-violating physics at TeV energy scales.

  12. Pollution gets personal! A first population-based human biomonitoring study in Austria.

    PubMed

    Hohenblum, Philipp; Steinbichl, Philipp; Raffesberg, Wolfgang; Weiss, Stefan; Moche, Wolfgang; Vallant, Birgit; Scharf, Sigrid; Haluza, Daniela; Moshammer, Hanns; Kundi, Michael; Piegler, Brigitte; Wallner, Peter; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2012-02-01

    Humans are exposed to a broad variety of man-made chemicals. Human biomonitoring (HBM) data reveal the individual body burden irrespective of sources and routes of uptake. A first population-based study was started in Austria in 2008 and was finished at the end of May 2011. This cross sectional study aims at documenting the extent, the distribution and the determinants of human exposure to industrial chemicals as well as proving the feasibility of a representative HBM study. Overall, 150 volunteers (50 families) were selected by stratified random sampling. Exposure to phthalates, trisphosphates, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), bisphenol A (along with nonyl- and octyl phenol) and methyl mercury was assessed. Sixteen of 18 PBDE determined were detected above the limit of quantification (LOQ) in blood samples with #153 and #197 the most abundant species. Bisphenol A in urine was measured in a subsample of 25 with only 4 samples found above the LOQ. In 3 of 100 urine samples at least one of 8 trisphosphate compounds assessed was above the LOQ. These first analytical results of the human biomonitoring data show that the body burden of the Austrian population with respect to the assessed compounds is comparable to or even lower than in other European countries. Overall, the study revealed that in order to develop a feasible protocol for representative human biomonitoring studies procedures have to be optimized to allow for non-invasive sampling of body tissues in accordance with the main metabolic pathways. Procedures of participants' recruitment were, however, labor intensive and have to be improved. PMID:21968335

  13. Density limit studies in the tokamak and the reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spizzo, G.; Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Zuin, M.; Agostini, M.; Alessi, E.; Auriemma, F.; Bin, W.; Buratti, P.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.; De Masi, G.; Esposito, B.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Granucci, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marrelli, L.; Martines, E.; Mazzotta, C.; Minelli, D.; Moro, A.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Sozzi, C.; Spolaore, M.; Schmitz, O.; Vianello, N.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER scenarios and the project of DEMO involve stable operation above the Greenwald density, which justifies efforts to understand and overcome the density limit, this last observed as a disruptive termination of tokamak discharges and a thermal crash (with no disruption) of stellarator and reversed-field pinch (RFP) ones. Both in the tokamak and the RFP, new findings show that the high density limit is not governed by a unique, theoretically well-determined physical phenomenon, but by a combination of complex mechanisms involving two-fluid effects, electrostatic plasma response to magnetic islands and plasma-wall interaction. In this paper we will show new evidence challenging the traditional picture of the ‘Greenwald limit’, in particular with reference to the role of thermal instabilities and the edge radial electric field Er in the development of this limit.

  14. Experimental study of flammability limits of natural gas-air mixture.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Y; Cheng, Q; Jiang, D M; Gao, J

    2005-03-17

    Flammability limits data are essential for a quantitative risk assessment of explosion hazard associated with the use of combustible gas. The present work is to obtain the fundamental flammability data for prevention of the hazards in the practical applications. Experiments have been conducted in a constant volume combustion bomb, and the fuel considered here is natural gas (NG). The pressure histories in the combustion bomb are recorded and a criterion of 7% pressure rise has been used to judge a flammable mixture. The effects of ethane on NG-air flammability limits have been investigated. By adding diluent (carbon dioxide, nitrogen or their mixture) into NG-air mixture, the dilution effects on the flammability limits have been explored as well, and the results are plotted as functions of diluent ratio. PMID:15752851

  15. Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk: evidence from human population studies.

    PubMed

    Kocic, B; Kitic, D; Brankovic, S

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids are biologically active polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in plants. More than 5000 individual flavonoids have been identified, which are classified into at least 10 subgroups according to their chemical structure. Flavonoids of 6 principal subgroups- flavonols, flavones, anthocyanidins, catechins, flavanones, and isoflavones- are relatively common in human diets. Flavonoids are a large and diverse group of phytochemicals and research into their anti-carcinogenic potential with animal and cellular model systems supports a protective role. Whether dietary intake of flavonoids is protective against colorectal cancer in humans cannot be easily extrapolated from cell line and animal findings. Epidemiological assessment of the relationship between dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer is limited, with different case-control and cohort study design investigating different combinations of flavonoids. Epidemiologic studies on flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk that were conducted yielded inconsistent results, with positive, inverse, and null associations. Because only a very limited number of epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the associations of dietary intake of flavonoids with colorectal cancer risk, it is premature to make public health recommendations at this time. However, the data to date are promising and emphasize the need for further investigation of these important bioactive plant compounds. This review summarises the epidemiological evidence from case-control and cohort studies on the associations of dietary flavonoid intake with the risk for colorectal cancer. The difficulties in investigating this topic and possibilities for further research are then discussed. PMID:23613386

  16. Limited heterogeneity in the T-cell receptor V-gene usage in lymphocytes infiltrating human colorectal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ostenstad, B.; Sioud, M.; Lea, T.; Schlichting, E.; Harboe, M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of T lymphocytes in solid tumours may reflect an ongoing immune response against the transformed cells. We have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to investigate the T-cell receptor variable-region gene (V-gene) usage in freshly isolated tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to look for a possible oligoclonality of T cells in the tumour area. We used 19 different V beta-family-specific primers. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes from the same patients were also tested by PCR. Our results demonstrate a limited heterogeneity in the V-gene usage of TILs from seven patients with colorectal cancers, suggesting a local antigen-driven immune response at the tumour site. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8198973

  17. Study and Analysis of Heat Transfer Limitation of Separated Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Qizheng; Mou, Kai

    2002-01-01

    satellite and spacecraft. evaporator, heat isolation and condenser along the axial direction. The working fluid absorbs heat and evaporates in evaporator, and then the vapor flows to condenser and gives out heat. The condensed liquid is pumped to evaporator by wick. By the circulation, the heat can by transferred continuously. heat pipe as follow: - Vapor-liquid two phase flow inside pipe; - The manner of latent heat to transfer heat; - Automatic circulation by working fluid flowing - A certain extent of vacuum. and the traditional heat pipe, that is, the vapor fluid and liquid fluid flow along the same direction. So it is obviously that the separated heat pipe has special internal heat transfer characteristic and crisis. This paper has regard for the heat transfer crisis of the separated heat pipe, and meanwhile relevant calculation and analysis have been done. 1. FLOW TYPE OF THE WORKING FLUID IN SEPARATED HEAT PIPE 2. HEAT TRANSFER CRISIS IN THE EVAPORATOR 3. CARRYING PHENOMENON INSIDE SEPARATED HEAT PIPE 4. THE STAGNANT FLOW PHENOMENON AND THE BACKWARD FLOW PHENOMENON IN EVAPORATOR CONCLUSION transfer limitation of location burn-out, and the heat transfer limitation of flow unconventionality in erective pipe. The carrying phenomenon can occurs not only in evaporator but also in condenser of separated heat pipe. It is in the evaporator that should take place the heat transfer limitation of liquid film dry-out at first. Then with the increasing of heat flux, the heat transfer limitation of location burn-out would happen. In order to avoid the heat transfer limitation of flow unconventionality in erective pipe, the length and diameter of the outflow tube and inflow tube must be reasonably calculated to control the flow velocity of the working fluid inside pipe. Key words:Separated Heat PipeHeat Transfer LimitationDry-OutCarryingStagnancy

  18. A critical review of epidemiologic studies of radiofrequency exposure and human cancers.

    PubMed

    Elwood, J M

    1999-02-01

    This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to radiofrequency (RF) transmissions and various types of human cancer. These studies include three cluster investigations and five studies relating to general populations; all of these studies consider place of residence at the time of cancer diagnosis in regard to proximity to radio or television transmitters. There are also five relevant occupational cohort studies and several case-control studies of particular types of cancer. These studies assessed a large number of possible associations. Several positive associations suggesting an increased risk of some types of cancer in those who may have had greater exposure to RF emissions have been reported. However, the results are inconsistent: there is no type of cancer that has been consistently associated with RF exposures. The epidemiologic evidence falls short of the strength and consistency of evidence that is required to come to a reasonable conclusion that RF emissions are a likely cause of one or more types of human cancer. The evidence is weak in regard to its inconsistency, the design of the studies, the lack of detail on actual exposures, and the limitations of the studies in their ability to deal with other likely relevant factors. In some studies there may be biases in the data used PMID:10229715

  19. A critical review of epidemiologic studies of radiofrequency exposure and human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Elwood, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to radiofrequency (RF) transmissions and various types of human cancer. These studies include three cluster investigations and five studies relating to general populations; all of these studies consider place of residence at the time of cancer diagnosis in regard to proximity to radio or television transmitters. There are also five relevant occupational cohort studies and several case-control studies of particular types of cancer. These studies assessed a large number of possible associations. Several positive associations suggesting an increased risk of some types of cancer in those who may have had greater exposure to RF emissions have been reported. However, the results are inconsistent: there is no type of cancer that has been consistently associated with RF exposures. The epidemiologic evidence falls short of the strength and consistency of evidence that is required to come to a reasonable conclusion that RF emissions are a likely cause of one or more types of human cancer. The evidence is weak in regard to its inconsistency, the design of the studies, the lack of detail on actual exposures, and the limitations of the studies in their ability to deal with other likely relevant factors. In some studies there may be biases in the data used PMID:10229715

  20. Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl levels across studies of human neurodevelopment.

    PubMed Central

    Longnecker, Matthew P; Wolff, Mary S; Gladen, Beth C; Brock, John W; Grandjean, Philippe; Jacobson, Joseph L; Korrick, Susan A; Rogan, Walter J; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Ayotte, Pierre; Stewart, Paul; Winneke, Gerhard; Charles, M Judith; Jacobson, Sandra W; Dewailly, Eric; Boersma, E Rudy; Altshul, Larisa M; Heinzow, Birger; Pagano, James J; Jensen, Allan A

    2003-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants that are ubiquitous in the food chain, and detectable amounts are in the blood of almost every person in most populations that have been examined. Extensive evidence from animal studies shows that PCBs are neurotoxins, even at low doses. Interpretation of human data regarding low-level, early-life PCB exposure and subsequent neurodevelopment is problematic because levels of exposure were not similarly quantified across studies. We expressed the exposure levels from 10 studies of PCB and neurodevelopment in a uniform manner using a combination of data from original investigators, laboratory reanalyses, calculations based on published data, and expert opinion. The mainstay of our comparison was the median level of PCB 153 in maternal pregnancy serum. The median concentration of PCB 153 in the 10 studies ranged from 30 to 450 ng/g serum lipid, and the median of the 10 medians was 110 ng/g. We found that (a)) the distribution of PCB 153 exposure in most studies overlapped substantially, (b)) exposure levels in the Faroe Islands study were about 3-4-fold higher than in most other studies, and (c)) the exposure levels in the two recent U.S. studies were about one-third of those in the four earlier U.S. studies or recent Dutch, German, and northern Qubec studies. Our results will facilitate a direct comparison of the findings on PCBs and neurodevelopment when they are published for all 10 studies. PMID:12515680