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Sample records for linac automated beam

  1. IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-03

    Multi-particle tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies are performed with the IMPACT code. Beam measurement results are compared with the computer simulations, including beam longitudinal halo and beam losses in the superconducting linac, transverse beam Courant-Snyder parameters and the longitudinal beam emittance in the linac. In most cases, the simulations show good agreement with the measured results.

  2. Beam breakup in superconducting recirculating linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph J. Bisognano

    1988-05-01

    The performance and operational flexibility of superconducting recirculating linacs can be limited by a variety of collective phenomena which are grouped under the name beam breakup. In this note the various beam breakup phenomena found in recirculating superconducting radio frequency linacs are described and appraised relative to beam performance.

  3. BEAM HALO IN PROTON LINAC BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    T. WANGLER; K. CRANDALL

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we review the present picture of km halo in proton linacs. Space-charge forces acting in mismatched beams have been identified as a major cause of beam-halo. We present a definition of halo based on a ratio of moments of the distribution of the beam coordinates. We find from our initial studies that for halo detined in this way, a beam can have rms emittance growth without halo growth, but halo growth is always accompanied by rms emittance growth. We describe the beam-halo experiment that is in preparation at Los Alamos, which will address questions about the beam profiles, maximum particle amplitudes, and rms emittance growth associated with the halo.

  4. BEAM DYNAMICS ISSUES IN THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2011-01-01

    A review of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac beam dynamics is presented. It describes transverse and longitudinal beam optics, losses, activation, and comparison between the initial design and the existing accelerator. The SNS linac consists of normal conducting and superconducting parts. The peculiarities in operations with the superconducting part of the SNS linac (SCL), estimations of total losses in SCL, the possible mechanisms of these losses, and the progress in the transverse matching are discussed.

  5. Beam dynamics design of a pion linac

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, S; Swain, G.; Garnett, R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a study of a superconducting linac to accelerate pions produced at LAMPF from 400 or 500 MeV to 925 MeV kinetic energy. For such a linac, it is necessary to keep the machine as short as practical in order to minimize the loss of beam due to particle decay, and to tailor the beam to achieve the maximum flux within the desired momentum bite at the exit. The interplay of these and other considerations with the transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics is discussed, and is illustrated with the simulated performance of reference pion-linac designs.

  6. Multipass Beam Breakup in Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev; Christopher Tennant; Joseph Bisognano; M Sawamura; R. Hajima; T.I. Smith

    2005-03-19

    This paper is a compilation of several presentations on multipass beam breakup (BBU) in energy recovery linacs (ERL) given at the 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Workshop on ERLs. The goal of this paper is to summarize the progress achieved in analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the instability and outline available and proposed BBU mitigation techniques. In this paper, a simplified theory of multipass BBU in recirculating linacs is presented. Several BBU suppression techniques and their working principles are discussed. The paper presents an overview of available BBU codes. Results of experimental studies of multipass BBU at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) FEL Upgrade are described.

  7. Beam steering in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Lee, M.J.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.; Woodley, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    In order to control emittance growth due to transverse wakefields it will be necessary to transport electrons and positrons through the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) linac to within a hundred ..mu..m of the centers of the linac irises. Beam centering will be accomplished using computer routines to read stripline beam position monitors and in turn correct the orbits with dipole magnets. Several different steering algorithms have been investigated using electrons in the first third of the SLC linac lattice. The most promising scheme is a cascade of modified ''three-bumps'' in conjunction with long spanning harmonic corrections. General features of the orbit correcting software are discussed along with the mathematical recipes for correction. Experimental results and a discussion of future plans are presented.

  8. Beam steering in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Lee, M.J.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.; Woodley, M.D.

    1985-10-01

    In order to control emittance growth due to transverse wakefields it will be necessary to transport electrons and positrons through the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) linac to within a hundred ..mu..m of the centers of the linac irises. Beam centering will be accomplished using computer routines to read stripline beam position monitors and in turn correct the orbits with dipole magnets. Several different steering algorithms have been investigated using electrons in the first third of the SLC linac lattice. The most promising scheme is a cascade of modified ''three-bumps'' in conjunction with long spanning harmonic corrections. General features of the orbit correcting software are discussed along with the mathematical recipes for correction. Experimental results and a discussion of future plans are presented.

  9. Multiple beam induction linac research at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, T.; Eylon, S.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Keefe, D.

    1990-06-01

    We present results of progress on the LBL multiple beam induction linac experiment (MBE-4). This machine models the accelerator physics of the electric-focused portion of a driver for heavy ion inertial confinement fusion. Four beams of cesium ions are accelerated in common through twenty four induction gaps while being separately focused in individual electrostatic AG focusing channels. Early experiments have demonstrated current amplification in the linac, from 10 mA to 90 mA per beam. This is achieved both by acceleration (from 200 keV to 1 MeV) and by carefully controlled bunch compression. Recent experiments have concentrated on studies of beams extracted from an ion source which produces 5 mA cesium beams at emittances near 0.03 {pi} mm-mrad (normalized). Experiments and theory show a growth of emittance (by about a factor of 2) as these beams are accelerated through the linac. Results of recent measurements of the transverse emittance behavior of these strongly space-charge-dominated ion beams are reviewed and compared with theory. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  10. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  11. Beam dynamics in heavy ion induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.

    1981-10-01

    Interest in the use of an induction linac to accelerate heavy ions for the purpose of providing the energy required to initiate an inertially confined fusion reaction has stimulated a theoretical effort to investigate various beam dynamical effects associated with high intensity heavy ion beams. This paper presents a summary of the work that has been done so far; transverse, longitudinal and coupled longitudinal transverse effects are discussed.

  12. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  13. Beam position correction in the Fermilab Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junck, K. L.; McCrory, E.

    1994-08-01

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95 percent of the beam occupies only 35 percent of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95 percent of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths.

  14. Beam position correction in the Fermilab linac

    SciTech Connect

    Junck, K.L.; McCrory, E.

    1994-08-01

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95% of the beam occupies only 35% of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95% of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths.

  15. Production of slow-positron beams with an electron linac

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Stanek, M.

    1982-03-26

    Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency for low-energy positrons has been determined for electrons with 60 to 120 MeV energy, low-energy positron beams from a linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources.

  16. Error analysis in post linac to driver linac transport beam line of RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of magnet errors in the beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator in Korea (RAON). The P2DT beam line is bent by 180-degree to send the radioactive Isotope Separation On-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in Linac-3 to Linac-2. This beam line transports beams with multi-charge state 132Sn45,46,47. The P2DT beam line includes 42 quadrupole, 4 dipole and 10 sextupole magnets. We evaluate the effects of errors on the trajectory of the beam by using the TRACK code, which includes the translational and the rotational errors of the quadrupole, dipole and sextupole magnets in the beam line. The purpose of this error analysis is to reduce the rate of beam loss in the P2DT beam line. The distorted beam trajectories can be corrected by using six correctors and seven monitors.

  17. SSC Linac Beam Position Monitor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, G. Roberto; Jones, Alan A.; Mills, Mark R.

    1994-10-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), Linac Beam Position Monitor System is designed to measure beam position and phase. Forty-three monitors will be installed in the Linac and Transfer Line. The position measurement provides information on the transverse beam position in the beam pipe with respect to a mechanical reference. The phase measurement provides information on the difference between the longitudinal phase of the beam and the radio frequency reference signal (rf reference), to be used for phase scanning and time of flight measurement. The system design and the prototypes are complete, and the series is under fabrication. The signals to be processed are extracted from four striplines, down-converted to a convenient intermediate frequency and fed into position and phase electronics. The position electronics is realized with the log-ratio technique, and the phase electronics uses a new digital technique that overcomes most of the problems of existing systems. Both position and phase analog electronics are mounted on identical VXI motherboards, containing analog-to-digital converters (ADC's) and digital circuitry.

  18. SSC Linac Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, G.R.; Jones, A.A.; Mills, M.R. )

    1994-10-10

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), Linac Beam Position Monitor System is designed to measure beam position and phase. Forty-three monitors will be installed in the Linac and Transfer Line. The position measurement provides information on the transverse beam position in the beam pipe with respect to a mechanical reference. The phase measurement provides information on the difference between the longitudinal phase of the beam and the radio frequency reference signal (rf reference), to be used for phase scanning and time of flight measurement. The system design and the prototypes are complete, and the series is under fabrication. The signals to be processed are extracted from four striplines, down-converted to a convenient intermediate frequency and fed into position and phase electronics. The position electronics is realized with the log-ratio technique, and the phase electronics uses a new digital technique that overcomes most of the problems of existing systems. Both position and phase analog electronics are mounted on identical VXI motherboards, containing analog-to-digital converters (ADC's) and digital circuitry.

  19. Design of post linac to driver linac transport beam line in rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanmi; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the design of a beam transport line connecting the post linac to the driver linac (P2DT) in the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RAON). P2DT beam line is designed by 180° bending scheme to send the radioactive isotope separation on-line (ISOL) beams accelerated in the Linac-3 to Linac-2. The beam line is designed as a 180° bend for the transport of a multi-charge state 132Sn+45,+46,+47 beam. We used the TRACE 3-D, TRACK, and ORBIT codes to design the optics system, which also includes two bunchers and ten sextupole magnets for chromaticity compensation. The transverse emittance growth is minimized by adopting mirror symmetric optics and by correcting second-order aberrations using sextupoles. We report on the multi-charge state beam transport performance of the designed beam line. The main characteristics of the P2DT line are to minimize beam loss and the growth of emittance, and for charge stripping. Beam optics for P2DT is optimized for reducing beam loss and charge stripping. As Linac-3 may accelerate the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously, P2DT line also transports the stable beam and radioactive beam simultaneously. Thus, we need a RF switchyard to send the stable beam to the ISOL target and the radioactive beam to the high-energy experimental area in Linac-2 end.

  20. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Baily, Scott A.

    2012-05-14

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  1. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  2. RF linac designs with beams in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Martin; Brown, Nathan

    1996-06-01

    Beams in conventional radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf linacs) usually have a transverse temperature which is much larger than the longitudinal temperature. With high currents, space charge forces couple the transverse and longitudinal particle motions, driving the beam toward thermal equilibrium, which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. A design strategy is proposed in which the beam has equal transverse and longitudinal temperatures through the entire linac, avoiding these undesirable effects. For such equipartitioned linac beams, simple analytical relationships can be derived for the bunch size, tune depression, and other parameters as a function of beam intensity, emittance, and external focusing. These relations were used to develop three conceptual designs for a 938 MeV, 100 mA proton linac with different tune depressions, which are presented in this paper.

  3. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  4. Beam dynamics aspects for the APT integrated linac

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, S.; Gray, E.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1997-08-01

    The accelerator-based production of tritium calls for a high-power cw proton linac. The current Los Alamos design uses an integrated approach in terms of accelerating structure. The front part of the accelerator uses normal-conducting (NC) structures while most (>80%) of the linac structure is superconducting (SC). Here, the authors report the beam-dynamics rationale used in the integrated design and present particle simulation results.

  5. DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR BEAM HALO INVESTIGATION IN SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2012-01-01

    Uncontrolled beam loss is a major concern in the operation of a high intensity hadron linac. A low density cloud of particles with large oscillation amplitudes, so called halo, can form around the dense regular beam core. This halo can be a direct or indirect cause of beam loss. There is experimental evidence of halo growing in the SNS linac and limiting the further reduction of beam loss. A set of tools is being developed for detecting of the halo and investigating its origin and dynamics. The set includes high resolution emittance measurements in the injector, laser based emittance measurements at 1 GeV, and high resolution profile measurements along the linac. We will present our experience with useful measurement techniques and data analysis algorithms.

  6. Beam based alignment of sector-1 of the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.

    1992-03-01

    A technique is described which uses the beam to simultaneously measure quadrupole magnet and beam position monitor (BPM) transverse misalignments. The technique is applied to sector-1 of the SLC linac where simultaneous acceleration of electron and positron beams with minimal steering elements and BPMs makes quadrupole alignment critical for high transmission of the large transverse emittance positron beam. Simulation results as well as measurements are presented.

  7. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  8. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  9. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, R. Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T.

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  10. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  11. Optics and beam transport in energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstaetter, Georg H.; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Owen, Hywel

    2006-02-01

    Here, we report on the working group "Optics and Beam Transport" of the 2005 Energy-Recovery-Linac Workshop. This workshop also had working groups on "Electron Guns and Injector Designs", "Superconducting RF and RF Control", and "Synchronization and Diagnostics/Instrumentation". Here, we are concerned with the many different ERL proposals that international laboratories have been working on. Subjects of concern are optics, accelerator design and modeling, stability requirements, designs of the merger that connects the conventional injector linac with the Energy Recovery Linac, longitudinal phase space manipulations to produce short pulses, beam dynamics and limitations by beam instabilities, and computational aspects of space-charge and synchrotron radiation effects. A coarse grain overview is given and reference is made to more detailed articles that were presented in this working group. Subjects are identified where collaborations should be encouraged and areas of future R&D are prioritized.

  12. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  13. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  14. Beam position monitor readout and control in the SLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, J.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; Yaffe, D.

    1985-04-01

    A beam position monitoring system has been implemented in the first third of the SLC linac which provides a complete scan of the trajectory on a single beam pulse. The data is collected from the local micro-computers and viewed with an updating display at a console or passed on to application programs. The system must operate with interlaced beams so the scans are also interlaced, providing each user with the ability to select the beam, the update rate, and the attenuation level in the digitizing hardware. In addition each user calibrates the hardware for his beam. A description of the system architecture will be presented. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A Cure for Multipass Beam Breakup in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Byung C. Yunn

    2004-07-02

    We investigate a method to control the multipass dipole beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac including energy recovery. Effectiveness of an external feedback system for such a goal is shown clearly in a simplified model. We also verify the theoretical result with a simulation study.

  16. A METHOD TO CONTROL MULTIPASS BEAM BREAKUP IN RECIRCULATING LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Byung Yunn

    2003-05-01

    We investigate a method to control the multipass dipole beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac including energy recovery. Effectiveness of an external feedback system for such a goal is shown clearly in a simplified model. We also verify the theoretical result with a simulation study.

  17. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  18. Beam Dynamics Aspects of High Current Beams in a Superconducting Proton Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Giovanni; Pagani, Carlo; Pierini, Paolo

    1997-05-01

    High current CW proton linac accelerators have been recently proposed for nuclear waste transmutation and concurrent energy production. In most of the designs the high energy part (100 MeV up to 1-2 GeV) of the linac employs low frequency superconducting structures (352-700 MHz). Here we present beam dynamics issues for the high current (10-50 mA) beams in the superconducting section of such an accelerator, based on 352 MHz β-graded, LEP style cavities, as proposed at Linac 96(C. Pagani, G. Bellomo, P. Pierini, ``Linac96/Proceedings/Monday/MOP23/Paper.html>A High Current Proton Linac with 352 MHz SC Cavities'', Proceedings of the XVIII Int. Linear Acc. Conf., eds. C. Hill, M. Vretenar, CERN 96-07, 15 November 1996). In particular, smooth beam propagation along the linac has been reached with decreasing phase advances along the linac, and the design has been updated to match the beam dynamics results. Mismatching oscillations are discussed, as they are considered to cause beam halo and, consequently, beam losses.

  19. Transverse beam dynamics studies of a heavy ion induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, T.; Eylon, S.; Fessenden, T.J.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Keefe, D.

    1990-08-01

    The multiple beam induction linac experiment (MBE-4) was built to study the accelerator physics of the low energy, electrostatically focussed end of a driver for heavy ion inertial confinement fusion. In this machine four beams of Cs{sup +} ions are accelerated through 24 common induction gaps while being focussed in separate AG focussing channels. Each channel consists of a syncopated FODO lattice of 30 periods. We report results of the most recent studies of the transverse beam dynamics of a single drifting (180 keV) beam in this machine. The dependence of the emittance on the zero-current phase advance shows systematic variations which may be understood in the light of previous theoretical work on this topic. This result, unique to the beam parameters of a linac for heavy ion fusion, will be discussed in the context of its implications for a driver design. In addition we will discuss recent measurements of the motion of the beam centroid through the linac. These measurements, coupled with simulations, have proven to be a powerful tool in determining the presence of misalignment errors in the lattice of the accelerator. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  1. Tools to Predict Beam Breakup in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Nikolitsa Merminga; Byung Yunn

    2003-05-01

    An important limitation on the maximum beam current in a recirculating linac is due to beam breakup caused by higher order modes (HOM) excited in the RF cavities. A HOM delivers a transverse kick to a beam bunch, the bunch on the next pass can then drive the HOM and cause it to grow until the beam is lost. Two codes, MATBBU1 and TDBBU2, have been written to estimate the threshold current for a set of HOMs and accelerator optics. The relative merits and limitations of each is discussed in detail.

  2. Beam-based alignment measurements of the LANSCE linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, R. C.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have made measurements of the alignment of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Drift Tube linac (DTL) and Side Coupled linac (SCL) using beam position measurements and analyzing them with linear models. In the DTL, we varied the injection steering and focusing lattice strengths, measured the beam position after each DTL tank, and analyzed the data with a linear model using R-matrices that were either computed by the Trace-3D computer program or extracted from analysis of the data. The analysis model allowed for tank-to-tank misalignments. The measurements were made similarly in the SCL, where the analysis model allowed for misalignments of each quadrupole doublet lens. We present here the analysis techniques and the resulting beam-based alignment measurements.

  3. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Electron Beam Focusing in the Linear Accelerator (linac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis

    2015-10-01

    To produce consistent data with an electron accelerator, it is critical to have a well-focused beam. To keep the beam focused, quadrupoles (quads) are employed. Quads are magnets, which focus the beam in one direction (x or y) and defocus in the other. When two or more quads are used in series, a net focusing effect is achieved in both vertical and horizontal directions. At start up there is a 5% calibration error in the linac at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This means that the momentum of particles passing through the quads isn't always what is expected, which affects the focusing of the beam. The objective is to find exactly how sensitive the focusing in the linac is to this 5% error. A linac was simulated, which contained 290 RF Cavities with random electric fields (to simulate the 5% calibration error), and a total momentum kick of 1090 MeV. National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, Old Dominion University.

  5. BEAM POSITION AND PHASE MONITORS FOR THE LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, Rodney C.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Power, John F.

    2011-01-01

    New beam-position and phase monitors are under development for the linac at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Transducers have been designed and are being fabricated. We are considering many options for the electronic instrumentation to process the signals and provide position and phase data with the necessary precision and flexibility to serve the various required functions. We'll present the various options under consideration for instrumentation along with the advantages and shortcomings of these options.

  6. BEAM POSITION AND PHASE MONITORS FOR THE LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, Rodney C.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Watkins, Heath A.

    2012-04-11

    New beam-position and phase monitors are under development for the linac at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE.) Transducers have been designed and are being installed. We are considering many options for the electronic instrumentation to process the signals and provide position and phase data with the necessary precision and flexibility to serve the various required functions. We'll present the various options under consideration for instrumentation along with the advantages and shortcomings of these options.

  7. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  8. Cumulative beam breakup in radio-frequency linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic model of cumulative beam breakup has been developed which is applicable to both low-velocity ion and high-energy electron linear accelerators. The model includes arbitrary velocity, acceleration, focusing, initial conditions, beam-cavity resonances, and variable cavity geometry and spacing along the accelerator. The model involves a continuum approximation'' in which the transverse kicks in momentum imparted by the cavities are smoothed over the length of the linac. The resulting equation of transverse motion is solved via the WKBJ method. Specific examples are discussed which correspond to limiting cases of the solution. 16 refs.

  9. Study of space charge-dominated beam bunching and some aspects of SSF linac designs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report is made up from works under the Agreement 1083P0015-35 between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Moscow Radiotechnical Institute. There are five report parts. In the 1-st, 2-nd, and 3-d parts works on SCD-beam dynamics understanding were continued. In the 4-th and 5-th parts two conceptual linac designs were considered: for deutron linac with energy of 40 MeV and for proton linac with energy 1 GeV. The both linacs have focusing by superconducting solenoids (SSF linacs). The 1 GeV proton CW linac design is an extension of the design from.

  10. Tentative design of beam focusing for the AHF linac and transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Proposals for an advanced hadron facility include building afterburner linacs for LAMPF. A first afterburner, Add-on Linac number 1, is proposed to accelerate the beam from 0.8 to 1.6 GeV. The output beam would then be fed to a compressor ring and to another afterburner, Add-on Linac number 2. We make a rough estimate of the transverse focusing strength needed in these linacs, and consider the transport line from the end of the LAMPF 805-MHz linac to the start of Add-on Linac number 1. A rebuncher is needed in this transport line for proper acceptance of the beam into the add-on linac. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  11. A driver linac for the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory : physics design and beam dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) being developed at ANL consists of an 833 MV heavy-ion driver linac capable of producing uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. We have designed all accelerator components including a two charge state LEBT, an RFQ, a MEBT, a superconducting linac, a stripper station and chicane. We present the results of an optimized linac design and end-to-end simulations including machine errors and detailed beam loss analysis. The Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL) has been proposed at ANL as a reduced scale of the original Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project with about half the cost but the same beam power. AEBL will address 90% or more of RIA physics but with reduced multi-users capabilities. The focus of this paper is the physics design and beam dynamics simulations of the AEBL driver linac. The reported results are for a multiple charge state U{sup 238} beam.

  12. Beam-energy and laser beam-profile monitor at the BNL LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Briscoe, B.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.; Raparia, D.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    We are developing a non-interceptive beam profile and energy monitor for H{sup -} beams in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. Electrons that are removed from the beam ions either by laser photodetachment or stripping by background gas are deflected into a Faraday cup. The beam profile is measured by stepping a narrow laser beam across the ion beam and measuring the electron charge vs. transverse laser position. There is a grid in front of the collector that can be biased up to 125kV. The beam energy spectrum is determined by measuring the electron charge vs. grid voltage. Beam electrons have the same velocity as the beam and so have an energy of 1/1836 of the beam protons. A 200MeV H{sup -} beam yields 109keV electrons. Energy measurements can be made with either laser-stripped or gas-stripped electrons.

  13. SU-E-T-48: Automated Quality Assurance for XML Controlled Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, G; Morin, O; Pouliot, J; Chuang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To automate routine imaging QA procedures so that complying with TG 142 and TG 179 can be efficient and reliable. Methods: Two QA tests for a True Beam Linac were automatized. A Winston Lutz test as described by Lutz et al{sup 1} using the Winston Lutz test kit from BrainLab, Germany and a CBCT Image Quality test as described in TG 179 using the EMMA phantom, Siemens Medical Physics, Germany were performed in our True Beam. For each QA procedure tested, a 3 step paradigm was used. First, the data was automatically acquired using True Beam Developer Mode and XML scripting. Second, the data acquired in the first step was automatically processed using in-home grown Matlab GUIs. Third, Machine Learning algorithms were used to automatically classify the processed data and reports generated. Results: The Winston Luzt test could be performed by an experienced medical physicist in 29.0 ± 8.0 min. The same test, if automated using our paradigm, could be performed in 3.0 ± 0.1 min. In the same lieu, time could be substantially saved for image quality tests. In this case, the amount of time saved will depend on the phantoms used and the initial localization method. Additionally, machine learning algorithms could automatically identify the roots of the problems if any and possibly help reduce machine down time. Conclusion: Modern linear accelerators are equipped with advanced 2D and 3D imaging that are used for patient alignment substantially improving IGRT protocols. However, this extra complexity exponentially increases the number of QA tests needed. Using the new paradigm described above, not only bare minimum but best practice QA programs could be implemented with the same manpower. This work is supported by Varian, Palo Alto, CA.

  14. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  15. Acceleration of high charge density electron beams in the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Jobe, R.K.; Lueth, V.G.; Millich, A.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) will require both electron and positron beams of very high charge density and low emittance to be accelerated to about 50 GeV in the SLAC 3-km linac. The linac is in the process of being improved to meet this requirement. The program to accelerate an electron beam of high charge density through the first third of the SLC linac is described and the experimental results are discussed. 7 references, 5 figures.

  16. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  17. Multipass beam breakup in the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.; Krafft, G.A.

    1986-06-02

    Multipass beam breakup can severely limit current in superconducting linear accelerators due to the inherently high Q's of transverse deflecting modes of the rf cavities. The success of higher-order-mode damping in increasing threshold currents for the 4-pass CEBAF SRF linac design is investigated with computer modeling. This simulation is shown to be in agreement with theoretical analyses which have successfully described beam breakup in the Stanford superconducting, recirculating linac. Numerical evaluation of an analytic treatment by Gluckstern of multipass beam breakup with distributed cavities is also found to be consistent with the computer model. Application of the simulation to the design array of 400 five-cell CEBAF/Cornell cavities with measured higher-order-mode damping indicates that the beam breakup threshold current is at least an order of magnitude above the CEBAF design current of 200 ..mu..A.

  18. Studies of multipass beam breakup and energy recovery using the CEBAF injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.; Cardman, L.S.; Krafft, G.A.; Sinclair, C.K.; Bisognano, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Beam breakup (BBU) instabilities in superconducting linacs are a significant issue due to the potentially high Q values of the cavity higher order modes (HOMs). The CEBAF accelerator, which employs high CW current and 5-pass recirculation through two superconducting linacs, poses unique instability problems. An experimental investigation of multipass BBU along with energy recovery has been completed using a single recirculation through the CEBAF injector linac. Experimental results are compared with computer simulation of multipass BBU.

  19. Capacitive beam position monitors for the low-β beam of the Chinese ADS proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jun-Xia; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Jia, Huan; Xue, Zong-Heng; Zheng, Hai; Xie, Hong-Ming; Kang, Xin-Cai; He, Yuan; Li, Lin; Denard, Jean Claude

    2016-02-01

    Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) for the low-β beam of the Chinese Accelerator Driven Subcritical system (CADS) Proton linac are of the capacitive pick-up type. They provide higher output signals than that of the inductive type. This paper will describe the design and tests of the capacitive BPM system for the low-β proton linac, including the pick-ups, the test bench and the read-out electronics. The tests done with an actual proton beam show a good agreement between the measurements and the simulations in the time domain. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405240) and “Western Light” Talents Training Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  20. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  1. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  2. Beam-based alignment technique for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) linac

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.E.; Lavine, T.L.; Atwood, W.B.; Himel, T.M.; Lee, M.J.; Mattison, T.S.; Pitthan, R.; Seeman, J.T.; Williams, S.H.; Trilling, G.H.

    1989-03-01

    Misalignment of quadrupole magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs) in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) cause the electron and positron beams to be steered off-center in the disk-loaded waveguide accelerator structures. Off-center beams produce wakefields which limit the SLC performance at high beam intensities by causing emittance growth. Here, we present a general method for simultaneously determining quadrupole magnet and BPM offsets using beam trajectory measurements. Results from the application of the method to the SLC linac are described. The alignment precision achieved is approximately 100 ..mu..m, which is significantly better than that obtained using optical surveying techniques. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  3. New beam-charge interlock system for radiation safety at the KEKB injector linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwada, T.; Kadokura, E.; Satoh, M.; Furukawa, K.

    2008-02-01

    A new beam-charge interlock system is under development for radiation safety and machine protection at the KEKB injector linac. A hardware-based interlock system is required instead of the present software-based interlock system in order to boost its reliability. This system restricts the integrated amount of beam charges delivered to four different storage rings. The beam charges are measured using wall-current monitors and detection electronics at six locations along the linac. The detection electronics independently transmits a beam-abort request through a twisted hardwire cable directly to the safety control system of the linac, when the integrated amount of beam charges exceeds a certain threshold level prescribed for each location. We describe the characteristics and performance of the new beam-charge interlock system along with the details of the experimental tests.

  4. Beam Dynamics Studies for the First Muon Linac of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    C. Bontoiu,M. Aslaninejad,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    Within the Neutrino Factory Project the muon acceleration process involves a complex chain of accelerators including a (single-pass) linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The linac consists of RF cavities and iron shielded solenoids for transverse focusing and has been previously designed relying on idealized field models. However, to predict accurately the transport and acceleration of a high emittance 30 cm wide beam with 10 % energy spread requires detailed knowledge of fringe field distributions. This article presents results of the front-to-end tracking of the muon beam through numerically simulated realistic field distributions for the shielded solenoids and the RF fields. Real and phase space evolution of the beam has been studied along the linac and the results are presented and discussed.

  5. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  6. Linac code benchmarking of HALODYN and PARMILA based on beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X.; Bayer, W.; Hofmann, I.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the 'High Intensity Pulsed Proton Injector' (HIPPI) project in the European Framework Programme, a program for the comparison and benchmarking of 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) linac codes with experiment has been implemented. HALODYN and PARMILA are two of the codes involved in this program. In this study, the initial Twiss parameters were obtained from the results of beam experiments that were conducted using the GSI UNILAC in low-beam-current. Furthermore, beam dynamics simulations of the Alvarez Drift Tube Linac (DTL) section were performed by HALODYN and PARMILA codes and benchmarked for the same beam experiments. These simulation results exhibit some agreements with the experimental results for the low-beam-current case. The similarities and differences between the experimental and simulated results were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, various physical aspects of the simulation codes and the linac design strategy are also discussed.

  7. Coherent Effects of High Current Beam in Project-X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhanov, A.; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Saini, A.; Solyak, N.; Yostrikov, A.

    2012-09-01

    Resonance excitation of longitudinal high order modes in superconducting RF structures of Project-X continuous wave linac is studied. We analyze regimes of operation of the linac with high beam current, which can be used to provide an intense muon source for the future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider, and also important for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical systems. We calculate power loss and associated heat load to the cryogenic system. Longitudinal emittance growth is estimated. We consider an alternative design of the elliptical cavity for the high energy part of the linac, which is more suitable for high current operation.

  8. NOVEL METHODS FOR EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 3D SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC BEAM DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to measure initial Twiss parameters in transverse and longitudinal directions at the entrance of a linac with independent short accelerating cavities. For the transverse plane the usual technique of transverse profiles is used, and for the longitudinal direction a recently developed non-intercepting method is applied. The new method is based on a beam position monitor amplitudes analysis. The applicability of the methods are discussed and demonstrated on an example of the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting linac.

  9. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  10. LINAC BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PY-ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    Linac dynamics simulation capabilities of the PyORBIT code are discussed. PyORBIT is an open source code and a further development of the original ORBIT code that was created and used for design, studies, and commissioning of the SNS ring. The PyORBIT code, like the original one, has a two-layer structure. C++ is used to perform time-consuming computations, and the program flow is controlled from a Python language shell. The flexible structure makes it possible to use PyORBIT also for linac dynamics simulations. A benchmark of PyORBIT with Parmila and the XAL Online model is presented.

  11. Toward automated beam optics control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

  12. Beam physics of the 8-GeV H-minus linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-11-01

    Fermilab is developing the concept and design of an 8-GeV superconducting H-minus linac with the primary mission of increasing the intensity of the Main Injector for the production of neutrino superbeams. The front-end of the linac up to 420 MeV operates at 325 MHz and accelerates beam from the ion source using a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole followed by short CH type resonators and superconducting spoke resonators. In the high energy section, the acceleration is provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style superconducting elliptical 1.3 GHz cavities. The beam physics for the linac is presented in this paper using two beam dynamics codes: TRACK and ASTRA.

  13. Beam loading compensation of traveling wave linacs through the time dependence of the rf drive

    SciTech Connect

    Towne N.; Rose J.

    2011-09-30

    Beam loading in traveling-wave linear accelerating structures leads to unacceptable spread of particle energies across an extended train of bunched particles due to beam-induced field and dispersion. Methods for modulating the rf power driving linacs are effective at reducing energy spread, but for general linacs do not have a clear analytic foundation. We report here methods for calculating how to modulate the rf drive in arbitrarily nonuniform traveling-wave linacs within the convective-transport (power-diffusion) model that results in no additional energy spread due to beam loading (but not dispersion). Varying group velocity, loss factor, and cell quality factor within a structure, and nonzero particle velocity, are handled.

  14. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-12-31

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven`s Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  15. Beam position monitoring in the AGS Linac to Booster transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Brodowski, J.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    A beam position monitor system has been developed and used in the commissioning of Brookhaven's Linac to Booster transfer line. This line transports a chopped, RF modulated H- beam from the 200 MeV Linac to the AGS Booster. Over a 15dB dynamic range in beam current, the position monitor system provides a real-time, normalized position signal with an analog bandwidth of about 20 MHz. Seven directional coupler style pickups are installed in the line with each pickup sensing both horizontal and vertical position. Analog processing electronics are located in the tunnel and incorporate the amplitude modulation to phase modulation normalization technique. To avoid interference from the 200 MHz linac RF system, processing is performed at 400 MHz. This paper will provide a system overview and report results from the commissioning experience.

  16. Parallel Beam Dynamics Simulation Tools for Future Light SourceLinac Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Pogorelov, Ilya v.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2007-06-25

    Large-scale modeling on parallel computers is playing an increasingly important role in the design of future light sources. Such modeling provides a means to accurately and efficiently explore issues such as limits to beam brightness, emittance preservation, the growth of instabilities, etc. Recently the IMPACT codes suite was enhanced to be applicable to future light source design. Simulations with IMPACT-Z were performed using up to one billion simulation particles for the main linac of a future light source to study the microbunching instability. Combined with the time domain code IMPACT-T, it is now possible to perform large-scale start-to-end linac simulations for future light sources, including the injector, main linac, chicanes, and transfer lines. In this paper we provide an overview of the IMPACT code suite, its key capabilities, and recent enhancements pertinent to accelerator modeling for future linac-based light sources.

  17. Beam dynamics studies in the driver LINAC pre-Stripper section of the RIA facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E. S.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2003-07-10

    The RIA facility driver linac consists of about 400 superconducting (SC) independently phased rf cavities. The linac is designed to accelerate simultaneously several-charge-state beams to generate as much as 400 kW of uranium beam power. The linac beam dynamics is most sensitive to the focusing and accelerating-structure parameters of the prestripper section, where the uranium beam is accelerated from 0.17 keV/u to 9.4 MeV/u. This section is designed to accept and accelerate 2 charge states (28 and 29) of uranium beam from an ECR ion source. The prestripper section must be designed to minimize the beam emittance distortion of this two-charge-state beam. In particular, the inter-cryostat spaces must be minimized and beam parameters near transitions of the accelerating and focusing lattices must be matched carefully. Several sources of possible effective emittance growth are considered in the design of the prestripper section and a tolerance budget is established. Numerical beam dynamics studies include realistic electric and magnetic 3-dimensional field distributions in the SC rf cavities and SC solenoids. Error effects in the longitudinal beam parameters are studied.

  18. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  19. Beam break up analysis for the Berkeley Recirculating Linac Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, Stefano; Zholents, Alexander A.

    2002-01-20

    We describe here a study of a single bunch Beam Break Up (BBU) instability for a proposed Berkeley fast x-ray facility based on a recirculating linac [1]. The recirculating linac employs a 600 MeV superconducting RF linear accelerator and the electron beam energy of {approx} 2.5 GeV is reached over four beam passes through the linac. A 120 MeV superconducting RF linear accelerator is used as an injector to the recirculating linac. The machine parameters are listed in Appendix A. The equation describing the transverse displacement x(s,z) of the electrons in an accelerated bunch, as a function of their longitudinal position within the bunch z, can be written in the form [2]: d/ds[{gamma}(s) dx/ds] + k{sup 2}(s){gamma}(s)x(s,z) = r{sub 0}{integral}{sub z}{sup {infinity}}{rho}(z')W{sub {perpendicular}}(z'-z)x(s,z')dz' (1) where {gamma} is the relativistic factor, k the focusing strength, r{sub 0} the classical electron radius, {rho} the bunch density, W{sub {perpendicular}} the transverse wake function per unit length and s indicates the position along the linac. We assume infinitesimally small transverse beam dimensions (a good approximation, when the bunch dimensions are much less than the size of the beam pipe), so that x has to be interpreted as the displacement of the centre of a bunch slice. We also assume a bunch length much less than the betatron wavelength, therefore the displacement in the RHS of Eq.(1) is not retarded and, finally, we use an average transverse wake function obtained averaging the calculated short range wake of a single cavity [2] over the linac length. At first we consider the effect associated with a displacement of the electron bunch at the injection into the perfectly aligned linac. Later we extend the analysis to the case of misalignments of the linac RF cavities and cryomodules. Throughout the paper we compare the results obtained to the output of a simple tracking code, written as a Mathematical notebook. In order to keep the

  20. A Beam Breakup Instability in a Recirculating Linac Caused by a Quadrupole Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Byung Yunn

    2003-05-01

    Following the successful demonstration of energy recovery in a recirculating linac with superconducting cavities at the Jefferson Lab FEL[1], several ambitious electron accelerator projects have recently been proposed or are in study for either a light source or a collider based on this novel technology. These projects all intend to utilize a high quality linac electron beam generated with an average beam current typically in the range of 100's of mA. As is well known, a recirculating linac suffers from a beam breakup instability of a regenerative type caused by a Higher Order Mode (HOM) in an accelerating cavity, which can have a very high Q (quality factor) when superconducting. The instability can degrade the beam quality significantly. We investigate one such beam breakup instability in a recirculating linac that could arise as a result of high Q quadrupole modes excited in the cavity. In a simple model we derive a relation which allows one to deduce the upper limit on tolerable Q ....

  1. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  2. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-23

    The LHeC study is a possible upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multi-pass superconducting energy-recovery linac operating in a continuous wave mode. Here, we summarize the overall layout of such ERL complex located on the LHC site and introduce the most recent developments. We review of the lattice components, presenting their baseline design along with possible alternatives that aims at improving the overall machine performance. The detector bypass has been designed and integrated into the lattice. Tracking simulations allowed us to verify the high current (~150 mA in the linacs) beam operation required for the LHeC to serve as an Higgs Factory. The impact of single and multi-bunch wake-fields, synchrotron radiation and beam-beam effects has been assessed in this paper.

  3. A Non-Interfering Beam Radius Diagnostic Suitable For Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Nexsen, W E

    2005-06-07

    High current electron induction linacs operate in a parameter regime that allows the use of a diamagnetic loop (DML) to measure the beam magnetic moment. Under certain easily met conditions the beam radius can be derived from the moment measurement. The DML has the advantage over the present methods of measuring beam radius in that it is an electrical measurement with good time resolution that does not interfere with the beam transport. I describe experiments on the LLNL accelerators, ETA-II and FXR that give confidence in the use of a DML as a beam diagnostic.

  4. Conceptual design of a linac-stretcher ring to obtain a 2-GeV continuous electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Khoe, T.K.; Mavrogenes, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain a high duty factor, > 100 ..mu..A 2-GeV electron beam, we have designed a linac-stretcher ring system. The system is an attractive option because it draws heavily on the existing accelerator technology. The linac-stretcher ring consists of a 2-GeV SLAC-type pulsed linac which injects into a storage ring. In between linac pulses, the stored electron beam is to extract resonantly. This design differs from those discussed recently in several important respects. The storage ring includes an RF system whose purpose is to control the beam orbit and rate of extraction from the ring. With an RF system in the ring, the injection scheme consists of a few turns of synchronous transfers of beam between the linac and storage ring.

  5. A RF--linac, FEL based drive beam injector for CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A. Department of Physics, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, California ); Bonifacio, R. )

    1992-07-01

    We describe a means of producing at train of 40 kA pulses of 3 ps duration as the drive beam for CLIC using an RF--linac driven free electron laser (FEL) buncher. Potential debunching effecs are discussed. Finally we describe a low energy test experiment.

  6. Beam optimization of helium injector for coupled RFQ-SFRFQ linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, W. L.; Wang, Z.; Lu, Y. R.; Chen, J.; Zhao, J.; Ren, H. T.; Zhu, K.; Peng, S. X.; Chen, J. E.

    2014-08-01

    The coupled RFQ-SFRFQ (CRS) cavity designed in Peking University is a new type linac that coupled radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) structure into a single cavity. An upgraded helium injector for the CRS cavity consisting of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source and a 1.16 m low energy beam transport (LEBT) has been constructed and tested. The beam conditions of the injector were carefully optimized to satisfy the requirements of the CRS linac, the corresponding control system and a two-dimension scanner code CRSv1.0 were developed for optimizing the beam transmission from LEBT section to the entrance of the CRS cavity. The beam transmission efficiency has reached to approximately 87.5% as well as the optimized operating parameters were obtained by means of the scanner code.

  7. Optimization of the beam extraction systems for the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D. A.; Lettry, J.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.; Midttun, Ø.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.

    2015-04-08

    The development of the Linac 4 and its integration into CERN’s acceleration complex is part of the foreseen luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The goal is to inject a 160 MeV H{sup −} beam into the CERN PS Booster (PSB) in order to increase the beam brightness by a factor of 2 compared to the 50 MeV proton linac, Linac 2, that is currently in operation. The requirements for the ion source are a 45 keV H{sup −} beam of 80 mA intensity, 2 Hz repetition rate and 0.5 ms pulse length within a normalized rms-emittance of 0.25 mm· mrad. The previously installed beam extraction system has been designed for an H{sup −} ion beam intensity of 20 mA produced by an RF-volume source with an electron to H{sup −} ratio of up to 50. For the required intensity upgrades of the Linac4 ion source, a new beam extraction system is being produced and tested; it is optimized for a cesiated surface RF-source with a nominal beam current of 40 mA and an electron to H{sup −} ratio of 4. The simulations, based on the IBSIMU code, are presented. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a peak beam current of more than 100 mA was demonstrated with a magnetron H{sup −} source at an energy of 35 keV and a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A new extraction system is required to operate at an energy of 45 keV; simulation of a two stage extraction system dedicated to the magnetron is presented.

  8. A method for measuring dark current electron beams in an rf linac

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, X.K.; Fasanello, T.; Rietdyk, H.; Piestrup, M.A.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence from thin foils inserted into the NPS linac has been used to measure the integrated electron beam intensity when the accelerator is operating with dark current. The measured x-ray flux, the known inner shell ionization cross sections and radiative transition probabilities are used to obtain measurements of dark currents of the order of 10{sup -14} amperes. The same arrangement allows continuous, in-situ energy calibration of our SiLi detector in the electromagnetic noise environment of the linac. This technique was orginally developed to perform absolute production efficiency measurements of parametric x-ray generation in the 5-50 keV range.

  9. High beam current shut-off systems in the APS linac and low energy transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Knott, M.; Lumpkin, A.

    1994-11-01

    Two independent high beam current shut-off current monitoring systems (BESOCM) have been installed in the APS linac and the low energy transport line to provide personnel safety protection in the event of acceleration of excessive beam currents. Beam current is monitored by a fast current transformer (FCT) and fully redundant supervisory circuits connected to the Access Control Interlock System (ACIS) for beam intensity related shutdowns of the linac. One FCT is located at the end of the positron linac and the other in the low energy transport line, which directs beam to the positron accumulator ring (PAR). To ensure a high degree of reliability, both systems employ a continuous self-checking function, which injects a test pulse to a single-turn test winding after each ``real`` beam pulse to verify that the system is fully functional. The system is designed to be fail-safe for all possible system faults, such as loss of power, open or shorted signal or test cables, loss of external trigger, malfunction of gated integrator, etc. The system has been successfully commissioned and is now a reliable part of the total ACIS.

  10. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  11. Beam Compression in Heavy-Ion Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A.X.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the LBNL Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) experiment with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. The achieved peak beam current and energy can be used in experiments to heat targets and create warm dense matter. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50x current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss experiments that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities and the associated beam diagnostics.

  12. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Sempau, J.; Fogliata, A.; Cozzi, L.; Sauerwein, W.; Brualla, L.

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm2 at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for the

  13. A geometrical model for the Monte Carlo simulation of the TrueBeam linac.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Fogliata, A; Cozzi, L; Sauerwein, W; Brualla, L

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of linear accelerators (linacs) depends on the accurate geometrical description of the linac head. The geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac is not available to researchers. Instead, the company distributes phase-space files of the flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams tallied at a plane located just upstream of the jaws. Yet, Monte Carlo simulations based on third-party tallied phase spaces are subject to limitations. In this work, an experimentally based geometry developed for the simulation of the FFF beams of the Varian TrueBeam linac is presented. The Monte Carlo geometrical model of the TrueBeam linac uses information provided by Varian that reveals large similarities between the TrueBeam machine and the Clinac 2100 downstream of the jaws. Thus, the upper part of the TrueBeam linac was modeled by introducing modifications to the Varian Clinac 2100 linac geometry. The most important of these modifications is the replacement of the standard flattening filters by ad hoc thin filters. These filters were modeled by comparing dose measurements and simulations. The experimental dose profiles for the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams were obtained from the Varian Golden Data Set and from in-house measurements performed with a diode detector for radiation fields ranging from 3  ×  3 to 40  ×  40 cm(2) at depths of maximum dose of 5 and 10 cm. Indicators of agreement between the experimental data and the simulation results obtained with the proposed geometrical model were the dose differences, the root-mean-square error and the gamma index. The same comparisons were performed for dose profiles obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the phase-space files distributed by Varian for the TrueBeam linac as the sources of particles. Results of comparisons show a good agreement of the dose for the ansatz geometry similar to that obtained for the simulations with the TrueBeam phase-space files for all fields and depths considered, except for

  14. Theory of longitudinal beam halo in RF linacs: II. envelope-particle resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S.M.; Barnard, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    Using the core/test-particle model described in a companion paper in these proceedings (``Theory of Longitudinal Halo in rf Linacs: I. Core/Test Particle Formulation,`` by J. J. Barnard and S. M. Lund), we analyze longitudinal beam halo produced by resonant self-field interactions in intense, ion-beam rf linacs. It is shown that particles moving in the presence of the space-charge forces of an oscillating, mismatched ellipsoidal beam bunch can be resonantly driven to large longitudinal amplitude. This resonantly produced halo is first analyzed in a limit where it is most simply understood, with particles moving purely longitudinally and with linear rf focusing. Then modifications of the resonance induced by nonlinear rf and transverse-longitudinal coupling are explored.

  15. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  16. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics

  17. Beam transport design for a recirculating-linac FEL driver

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.; Cornacchia, M.; Garren, A.

    1996-07-01

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF Industrial FEL includes a two-pass transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that context, the authors discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tunable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance transport systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Various possible designs are presented, and results of dynamic analyses are discussed.

  18. Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 ma to 49 Milliamperes

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Tomlin

    2002-06-05

    On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 ma of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 ma. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 ma by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 ma and the 26th and 27th at 49 ma. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.

  19. Beam Simulation Studies of the LEBT for RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.; Wu, X.; Andreev, V.; Balabin, A.; Doleans, M.; Gorelov, D.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.; Marti, F.; Schriber, S.O.; York, R.C.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2005-03-15

    The low energy beam transport (LEBT) system in the front-end of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) uses a 70 kV platform to pre-accelerate the ion beam from a 30 kV Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, followed by an achromatic charge selection system. The selected beam is then pre-bunched and matched into the entrance of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a multi-harmonic buncher. To meet the beam power requirements for heavy ions, high current (several mA), multi-species beams will be extracted from the ECR. Therefore, it is crucial to control space charge effects in order to obtain the low emittance beam required for RIA. The PARMELA code is used to perform the LEBT simulations for the multi-species beams with 3D space charge calculations. The results of the beam dynamics simulations are presented, and the key issues of emittance growth in the LEBT and its possible compensation are discussed.

  20. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-01

    The LHeC is envisioned as a natural upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multipass superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) operating in a continuous wave mode. The unprecedently high energy of the multipass ERL combined with a stringent emittance dilution budget poses new challenges for the beam optics. Here, we investigate the performances of a novel arc architecture based on a flexible momentum compaction lattice that mitigates the effects of synchrotron radiation while containing the bunch lengthening. Extensive beam-dynamics investigations have been performed with placet2, a recently developed tracking code for recirculating machines. They include the first end-to-end tracking and a simulation of the machine operation with a continuous beam. This paper briefly describes the Conceptual Design Report lattice, with an emphasis on possible and proposed improvements that emerged from the beam-dynamics studies. The detector bypass section has been integrated in the lattice, and its design choices are presented here. The stable operation of the ERL with a current up to ˜150 mA in the linacs has been validated in the presence of single- and multibunch wakefields, synchrotron radiation, and beam-beam effects.

  1. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  2. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Li, Zenghai; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  3. Mechanisms of beam-halo formation in high-intensity linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    An rms-mismatched beam with space-charge forces can evolve rapidly, and during the course of evolution its emittance grows and a diffuse halo forms. The halo is of particular concern for long-term operation of linacs such as those envisioned for accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) because too much particle impingement on the accelerating structures would cause enough radioactivation to prohibit routine hands-on maintenance. Thus, halo suppression is a design consideration for these linacs. In this paper, the authors summarize both the physical processes associated with the rapid evolution of the rms-mismatched beam and a semianalytic formalism which was recently developed to account for them. They also provide representative results derived from the formalism.

  4. LARGE-SCALE SIMULATION OF BEAM DYNAMICS IN HIGH INTENSITY ION LINACS USING PARALLEL SUPERCOMPUTERS

    SciTech Connect

    R. RYNE; J. QIANG

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we present results of using parallel supercomputers to simulate beam dynamics in next-generation high intensity ion linacs. Our approach uses a three-dimensional space charge calculation with six types of boundary conditions. The simulations use a hybrid approach involving transfer maps to treat externally applied fields (including rf cavities) and parallel particle-in-cell techniques to treat the space-charge fields. The large-scale simulation results presented here represent a three order of magnitude improvement in simulation capability, in terms of problem size and speed of execution, compared with typical two-dimensional serial simulations. Specific examples will be presented, including simulation of the spallation neutron source (SNS) linac and the Low Energy Demonstrator Accelerator (LEDA) beam halo experiment.

  5. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  6. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; Huning, M.; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  7. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-01

    The H- magnetron source provides about 100 mA H- beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H- beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H- beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H- beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  8. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    PubMed

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  9. Summary of Linac Group discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses upgrading of the LAMPF I linac. Particular topics discussed are: sources of and cures for linac beam halos, ion source, RFQ, chopper and drift-tube linac, cavity-coupled linac, superconducting linac structure, new rf power sources, EHF linac design, and cost projections. (LSP)

  10. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guimei

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  11. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  12. Halo Formation of a Mismatched Beam in an Induction LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun Fai

    1996-11-01

    Beam halo formation and emittance growth due to initial envelope mismatch are studied with particle-in-cell simulation for a planned high current experiment with a 2 MeV, 0.8 amp K^+ beam. Transport over 15 m is provided by 55 sets of electrostatic quadrupoles and acceleration could be incorporated with induction modules at drift spaces. The tool used in the study is a (2+1)d code HIBEAM. Clearly visible beam halos are formed in the phase space and real space plots beyond 6 m, if the beam is initially mismatched in the envelope radius and angle by about 20% or more. Furthermore, we present the argument that the physical reason for the effect is due to successive aberration, described earlier by J.D. Lawson.(J.D. Lawson, The Physics of Charged-Particle Beams, p. 200, 1977.) Existing experimental data(M.G. Tiefenback, Proceedings of the 1987 Particle Accelerator Conference, p.1046, 1987.) of halo formation supports this interpretation.

  13. A study of beam chopping options for the ATLAS Positive Ion Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.

    1996-10-01

    Unbunched beam components from the injection beam bunching system must be removed prior to acceleration in the ATLAS Positive Ion Injector Linac (PII). A sine wave chopper has been used for this purpose up to now. Such a device can have a significant detrimental effect on the longitudinal and transverse beam emittance of heavy-ion beams which can be sufficiently severe to limit the overall beam quality from the ATLAS accelerator. A study of the optimum chopper configuration and chopper type was undertaken as part of a new ion source project for ATLAS. A transmission line chopper and a two harmonic chopper were investigated as alternatives to the conventional sine wave chopper. This paper reports the results of that investigation and discusses the design of the selected transmission line chopper.

  14. Cavity Alighment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Frisch, J.; Hacker, K.E.; Jones, R.M.; McCormick, D.; O'Connell, C.; Smith, T.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.; Baboi, N.; Wendt, M.; /DESY

    2005-07-06

    Each nine cell superconducting (SC) accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY [1] has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power [2]. They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and tested a time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present a preliminary experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  15. Influence of higher order modes on the beam stability in the high power superconducting proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Marcel; Gerigk, Frank; Tückmantel, Joachim; Welsch, Carsten P.

    2011-05-01

    Higher order modes (HOMs) can severely limit the operation of superconducting cavities in a linear accelerator with high beam current, high duty factor, and complex pulse structure. The full HOM spectrum has to be analyzed in order to identify potentially dangerous modes already during the design phase and to define their damping requirements. For this purpose a dedicated beam simulation code simulation of higher order mode dynamics (SMD) focused on beam-HOM interaction was developed, taking into account important effects like the HOM frequency spread, beam input jitter, different chopping patterns, as well as klystron and alignment errors. Here, SMD is used to investigate the influence of HOMs in detail in the superconducting proton linac at CERN and their potential to drive beam instabilities in the longitudinal and transverse plane.

  16. Study of transient self-consistent beam dynamics in RF linacs using a particle tracing code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mytrochenko, V. V.; Opanasenko, A.

    2006-03-01

    The paper describes a simulation technique for study of unsteady self-consistent dynamics of charged particles in RF linacs that consist of cavities and travelling wave sections. The approach proposed is based on unsteady theories of the excitation of cavities and waveguides by a beam of charged particles and RF feeders. The theory of waveguide excitation is extended to the case of spatially inhomogeneous travelling-wave structures. The SUPERFISH code is used to evaluate the characteristics of the axisymmetric travelling-wave sections. The PARMELA code is applied for simulation of particle motion and to obtain data required for solving the equations for excitation of the RF structures by the beam.

  17. Beam-dynamics driven design of the LHeC energy-recovery linac

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pellegrini, Dario; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Bogacz, S. Alex

    2015-12-23

    The LHeC study is a possible upgrade of the LHC that aims at delivering an electron beam for collisions with the existing hadronic beams. The current baseline design for the electron facility consists of a multi-pass superconducting energy-recovery linac operating in a continuous wave mode. Here, we summarize the overall layout of such ERL complex located on the LHC site and introduce the most recent developments. We review of the lattice components, presenting their baseline design along with possible alternatives that aims at improving the overall machine performance. The detector bypass has been designed and integrated into the lattice. Trackingmore » simulations allowed us to verify the high current (~150 mA in the linacs) beam operation required for the LHeC to serve as an Higgs Factory. The impact of single and multi-bunch wake-fields, synchrotron radiation and beam-beam effects has been assessed in this paper.« less

  18. A CW superconducting linac as the proton driver for a medium baseline neutrino beam in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Tang, Jing-Yu

    2014-12-01

    In a long-term planning for neutrino experiments in China, a medium baseline neutrino beam is proposed which uses a continue wave (CW) superconducting linac of 15 MW in beam power as the proton driver. The linac will be based on the technologies which are under development by the China-ADS project, namely it is also composed of a 3.2 MeV normal conducting RFQ and five different types of superconducting cavities. However, the design philosophy is quite different from the China-ADS linac because of the much weaker requirement on reliability here. The nominal design energy and current are 1.5 GeV and 10 mA, respectively. The general considerations and preliminary results on the physics design will be presented here. In addition, the alternative designs such as 2.0 GeV and 2.5 GeV, which may be required by the general design, can be easily extended from the nominal one.

  19. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  20. Beam dynamic simulation and optimization of the CLIC positron source and the capture linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayar, C.; Doebert, S.; Ciftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The CLIC Positron Source is based on the hybrid target composed of a crystal and an amorphous target. Simulations have been performed from the exit of the amorphous target to the end of pre-injector linac which captures and accelerates the positrons to an energy of 200 MeV. Simulations are performed by the particle tracking code PARMELA. The magnetic field of the AMD is represented in PARMELA by simple coils. Two modes are applied in this study. The first one is accelerating mode based on acceleration after the AMD. The second one is decelerating mode based on deceleration in the first accelerating structure. It is shown that the decelerating mode gives a higher yield for the e+ beam in the end of the Pre-Injector Linac.

  1. Chromaticity of the lattice and beam stability in energy-recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2011-12-23

    Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators promising to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and hold the promise of delivering electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. Use of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities converts ERLs into nearly perfect 'perpetuum mobile' accelerators, wherein the beam is accelerated to a desirable energy, used, and then gives the energy back to the RF field. One potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam break-up instability that could severely limit the available beam current. In this paper, I present a method of suppressing these dangerous effects using a natural phenomenon in the accelerators, viz., the chromaticity of the transverse motion.

  2. Use of off-axis injection as an alternative to geometrically merging beams in an energy-recovering linac

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.

    2012-01-10

    A method of using off-axis particle beam injection in energy-recovering linear accelerators that increases operational efficiency while eliminating the need to merge the high energy re-circulating beam with an injected low energy beam. In this arrangement, the high energy re-circulating beam and the low energy beam are manipulated such that they are within a predetermined distance from one another and then the two immerged beams are injected into the linac and propagated through the system. The configuration permits injection without geometric beam merging as well as decelerated beam extraction without the use of typical beamline elements.

  3. Laser wire beam profile monitor in the spallation neutron source (SNS) superconducting linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Blokland, W.; Deibele, C.; Grice, W.; Long, C.; Pelaia, T.; Webster, A.

    2010-01-01

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based, neutron-scattering facility. SNS uses a large-scale, high-energy superconducting linac (SCL) to provide high beam power utilizing hydrogen ion (H -) beams. For the diagnostics of high-brightness H - beams in the SCL, nonintrusive methods are preferred. This paper describes design, implementation, theoretical analysis, and experimental demonstration of a nonintrusive profile monitor system based on photodetachment, also known as laser wire, installed in the SNS SCL. The SNS laser wire system is the world's largest of its kind with a capability of measuring horizontal and vertical profiles of an operational H - beam at each of the 23 cryomodule stations along the SCL beam line by employing a single light source. Presently 9 laser wire stations have been commissioned that measure profiles of the H - beam at energy levels from 200 MeV to 1 GeV. The laser wire diagnostics has no moving parts inside the beam pipe, causes no contamination on the superconducting cavity, and can be run parasitically on an operational neutron production H - beam.

  4. Theory of longitudinal beam halo in RF linacs: I. core/test-particle formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    1997-05-01

    For intense beams, the analysis of tenuous halo components of the particle distribution that surround the main core of the distribution can be challenging. So-called core/test particle models in which a test particle is evolved in the applied and space-charge forces of the beam core have been instrumental in understanding the structure and extent of transverse beam halo produced by resonant particle interactions with the oscillating space-charge forces of a mismatched beam core. Here we present a core/test particle model developed for the analysis of longitudinal beam halo in intense, ion-beam rf linacs. Equations of motion are derived for a test particle moving interior to, and exterior to, a uniform density ellipsoidal beam bunch. Coupled transverse-longitudinal mismatch modes of the ellipsoidal beam envelope are analyzed. Typical parameters suggest the possibility of a low-order resonant interaction between longitudinal particle oscillations and a low-frequency envelope mode. Properties of this resonance are in an accompanying paper by the authors in these proceedings.

  5. Photon spectra calculation for an Elekta linac beam using experimental scatter measurements and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Campayo, J M; Diez, S; Verdu, G

    2008-01-01

    The present work is centered in reconstructing by means of a scatter analysis method the primary beam photon spectrum of a linear accelerator. This technique is based on irradiating the isocenter of a rectangular block made of methacrylate placed at 100 cm distance from surface and measuring scattered particles around the plastic at several specific positions with different scatter angles. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate the particles transport of mono-energetic beams to register the scatter measurement after contact the attenuator. Measured ionization values allow calculating the spectrum as the sum of mono-energetic individual energy bins using the Schiff Bremsstrahlung model. The measurements have been made in an Elekta Precise linac using a 6 MeV photon beam. Relative depth and profile dose curves calculated in a water phantom using the reconstructed spectrum agree with experimentally measured dose data to within 3%. PMID:19163410

  6. An improvement in IMRT QA results and beam matching in linacs using statistical process control.

    PubMed

    Gagneur, Justin D; Ezzell, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the principles of statistical process control (SPC) in the context of patient specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA to set clinic-specific action limits and evaluate the impact of changes to the multileaf collimator (MLC) calibrations on IMRT QA results. Ten months of IMRT QA data with 247 patient QAs collected on three beam-matched linacs were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the gamma pass rate (GPR) and the average ratio between the measured and planned doses. Initial control charts and action limits were calculated. Based on this data, changes were made to the leaf gap parameter for the MLCs to improve the consistency between linacs. This leaf gap parameter is tested monthly using a MLC sweep test. A follow-up dataset with 424 unique QAs were used to evaluate the impact of the leaf gap parameter change. The initial data average GPR was 98.6% with an SPC action limit of 93.7%. The average ratio of doses was 1.003, with an upper action limit of 1.017 and a lower action limit of 0.989. The sweep test results for the linacs were -1.8%, 0%, and +1.2% from nominal. After the adjustment of the leaf gap parameter, all sweep test results were within 0.4% of nominal. Subsequently, the average GPR was 99.4% with an SPC action limit of 97.3%. The average ratio of doses was 0.997 with an upper action limit of 1.011 and a lower action limit of 0.981. Applying the principles of SPC to IMRT QA allowed small differences between closely matched linacs to be identified and reduced. Ongoing analysis will monitor the process and be used to refine the clinical action limits for IMRT QA. PMID:25207579

  7. Transfer of the UK absorbed dose primary standard for photon beams from the research linac to the clinical linac at NPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. A. D.; Shipley, D. R.; Duane, S.

    2011-10-01

    An Elekta Synergy clinical linac facility is now in routine use at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL). For the purpose of therapy-level dosimetry, this has replaced the NPL research linac, which is over 40 years old, and in which the NPL absorbed dose primary standard for high-energy photons was established. This standard has been disseminated to clinical beams by interpolation of the calibration factor as a function of tissue phantom ratio TPR20/10. In this work the absorbed dose standard has been commissioned in all the beams produced by the Elekta Synergy linac. Reference standard ionization chambers have been calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to graphite and this calibration has been converted to one in terms of absorbed dose to water. The results have been combined with the calibration in 60Co γ-rays to obtain measured values for the quality-dependent correction, kQ, for these reference standard chambers used in the Elekta beams. The resulting data are consistent with the interpolated kQ to within 0.4%, which is less than the combined standard uncertainty of kQ, 0.56%.

  8. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  9. Beam dynamic design of a high intensity injector for proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Fang-Jian; He, Yuan; Wang, Zhi; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2016-08-01

    A compact room-temperature injector is designed to accelerate 100 mA proton beam from 45 keV to 4.06 MeV for the proposed high intensity proton linac at State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology in Peking university. The main feature is that the Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ) and the Drift Tube linac (DTL) sections are merged in one piece at the total length of 276 cm. The beam is matched in transverse directions with an compact internal doublet instead of an external matching section in between. The design has reached a high average accelerating gradient up to 1.55 MV/m with transmission efficiency of 95.9% at the consideration of high duty factor operation. The operation frequency is chose to be 200 MHz due to the already available RF power source. The injector combines a 150 cm long 4-vanes RFQ internal section from 45 keV to 618 keV with a 126 cm long H-type DTL section to 4.06 MeV. In general the design satisfy the challenges of the project requirements. And the details are presented in this paper.

  10. Present status of the electron beam diagnostics system of the PLS-II linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Mungyung; Kim, Dotae; Kim, Jae Myung; Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Shin, Seunghwan; Huang, Jung Yun

    2015-02-01

    The PLS-II, the upgraded PLS (Pohang Light Source), has been providing users with photon beams in the top-up mode since March 2013. The requirements for the PLS-II linac to achieve the top-up injection are very demanding because it is a full energy injector with a very limited energy margin. One of the requirements is to ensure high injection efficiency in order to minimize the beam loss at the storage ring injection point and the experimental hall during injection because loss leads to a high radiation level in the experimental hall. The energy stability and energy spread of the accelerated electron beam are fundamental parameters to monitor and manage for high injection efficiency. An energy feedback system consisting of a stripline-type beam position monitor and the last klystron was implemented. To diagnose the injected beam's energy and energy spread in real time during top-up mode injection, we installed an optical transition radiation (OTR) monitor system upstream of the beam transport line (BTL) after the first bending magnet. The energy and the energy spread ranges can be controlled with a horizontal slit installed after the OTR monitor. The vertical beam size of the accelerated beam must be decreased for efficient injection because the electron beam is injected into the storage ring with many in-vacuum undulators of small gaps. For this purpose, two vertical slits were installed in the BTL region. We will describe mainly those instruments closely related to top-up operation, though other beam diagnostic instruments have been used since PLS.

  11. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Liang, L; DeBlois, F; Evans, M; Licea, A; Dubeau, J; Witharana, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy, 0.026 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy and 0.59 × 101{sup 2} n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co

  12. 10MeV 25KW industrial electron LINAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamino, Y.

    1998-06-01

    A 10MeV 25KW plus class electron LINAC was developed for sterilisation of medical devices. The LINAC composed of a standing wave type single cavity prebuncher and a 2m electro-plated travelling wave guide uses a 5MW 2856MHz pulse klystron as an RF source and provides 25KW beam power at the Ti alloy beam window stably after the energy analysing magnet with 10MeV plus-minus 1 MeV energy slit. The practical maximum beam power reached 29 KW and this demonstrated the LINAC as one of the most powerful S-band electron LINACs in the world. The control of the LINAC is fully automated and the "One-Button Operation" is realised, which is valuable for easy operation as a plant system. 2 systems have been delivered and are being operated stably.

  13. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Diling Feng, Yiping; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J. M.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Robert, Aymeric; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Driel, Tim B. van

    2014-06-15

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ∼100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  14. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  15. Wall-plug efficiency and beam dynamics in free-electron lasers using energy recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Penano, J.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-08-01

    In a high average power free-electron laser (FEL) the wall-plug efficiency is of critical importance in determining the size, complexity, and cost of the overall system. The wall-plug efficiency for the FEL oscillator and amplifier (uniform and tapered wiggler) is strongly dependent on the energy recovery process. A theoretical model for electron beam dynamics in the energy recovery linac is derived and applied to the acceleration and deceleration of nano-Coulomb electron bunches for a tapered FEL amplifier. For the tapered amplifier, the spent electron beam exiting the wiggler consists of trapped and untrapped electrons. Decelerating these two populations using different phases of the radio-frequency wave in the recovery process enhances wall-plug efficiency. For the parameters considered here, the wall-plug efficiency for the tapered amplifier can be {approx}10% using this approach.

  16. Heavy-Ion Driver Linac for the RIA Facility and the Feasibility of Producing Multi-Megawatt Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Nolen, J.A.; Shepard, K.W.

    2005-06-08

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  17. Heavy-ion driver linac for the RIA facility and the feasibility of producing multi-megawatt beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility is a top priority project in the U.S. RIA is a next generation facility for basic research with radioactive beams that utilizes both standard isotope-separator on-line and in-flight fragmentation methods with novel approaches to handle high primary-beam power and remove existing limitations in the extraction of short-lived isotopes. A versatile primary accelerator, a 1.4-GV, CW superconducting linac, will provide beams from protons at 1 GeV to uranium at 400 MeV/u at power levels of 400 kW. Novel features include the acceptance of two charge states of heavy ions from the ion source and the acceleration of five charge states following the stripper foils. To achieve these goals, comprehensive beam dynamics studies have been performed to optimize the design of the driver linac. Recently we have investigated the feasibility of increasing the currents of light ions to deliver megawatts of beam power. This option is entirely possible from the beam dynamics point of view. It would require higher power from the rf system, as well as, increased shielding at the beam loss points with respect to the existing baseline design. Preliminary indications of the limitations of beam power for this class of CW superconducting linac for light ion beams will be presented.

  18. Automation of neutral beam source conditioning with artificial intelligence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.; Canales, T.W.; Lager, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system that automates neutral beam source conditioning. The system achieves this with artificial intelligence techniques. The architecture of the system is presented followed by a description of its performance.

  19. Electron beam energy stabilization using a neural network hybrid controller at the Australian Synchrotron Linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E.; Morgan, M. J.; Biedron, S. G.; LeBlanc, G.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a neural network hybrid controller for energy stabilization at the Australian Synchrotron Linac. The structure of the controller consists of a neural network (NNET) feed forward control, augmented by a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) feedback controller to ensure stability of the system. The system is provided with past states of the machine in order to predict its future state, and therefore apply appropriate feed forward control. The NNET is able to cancel multiple frequency jitter in real-time. When it is not performing optimally due to jitter changes, the system can successfully be augmented by the PI controller to attenuate the remaining perturbations. With a view to control the energy and bunch length at the FERMI{at}Elettra Free Electron Laser (FEL), the present study considers a neural network hybrid feed forward-feedback type of control to rectify limitations related to feedback systems, such as poor response for high jitter frequencies or limited bandwidth, while ensuring robustness of control. The Australian Synchrotron Linac is equipped with a beam position monitor (BPM), that was provided by Sincrotrone Trieste from a former transport line thus allowing energy measurements and energy control experiments. The present study will consequently focus on correcting energy jitter induced by variations in klystron phase and voltage.

  20. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  1. Beam dynamics studies of the 8 GeV Linac at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Mustapha, B.; Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The proposed 8-GeV proton driver (PD) linac at FNAL includes a front end up to {approx}420 MeV operating at 325 MHz and a high energy section at 1300 MHz. A normal conducting RFQ and short CH type resonators are being developed for the initial acceleration of the H-minus or proton beam up to 10 MeV. From 10 MeV to {approx}420 MeV, the voltage gain is provided by superconducting (SC) spoke-loaded cavities. In the high-energy section, the acceleration will be provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style SC elliptical cell cavities. To employ existing, readily available klystrons, an RF power fan out from high-power klystrons to multiple cavities is being developed. The beam dynamics simulation code TRACK, available in both serial and parallel versions, has been updated to include all known H-minus stripping mechanisms to predict the exact location of beam losses. An iterative simulation procedure is being developed to interact with a transient beam loading model taking into account RF feedback and feedforward systems.

  2. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  3. Stripping of H- beams by residual gas in the linac at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Mccrady, Rodney C; Ito, Takeyasu; Cooper, Martin D; Alexander, Saunders

    2010-09-07

    The linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerates both protons and H{sup -} ions using Cockroft-Walton-type injectors, a drift-tube linac and a coupled-cavity linac. The vacuum is maintained in the range of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} Torr; the residual gas in the vacuum system results in some stripping of the electrons from the H{sup -} ions resulting in beam spill and the potential for unwanted proton beams delivered to experiments. We have measured the amount of fully-stripped H{sup -} beam (protons) that end up at approximately 800 MeV in the beam switchyard at LANSCE using image plates as very sensitive detectors. We present here the motivation for the measurement, the measurement technique and results.

  4. Therapeutic dose simulation of a 6 MV Varian Linac photon beam using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, E.; Ali, A. S.; Khaled, N. E.; Radi, A.

    2015-10-01

    A developed program in C++ language using GEANT4 libraries was used to simulate the gantry of a 6 MV high energy photon linear accelerator (Linac). The head of a clinical linear accelerator based on the manufacturer's detailed information is simulated. More than 2× 109 primary electrons are used to create the phase space file. Evaluation of the percentage depth dose (PDD) and flatness symmetry (lateral dose profiles) in water phantom were performed. Comparisons between experimental and simulated data were carried out for three field sizes; 5 × 5, 10 × 10 and 15 × 15 cm2. A relatively good agreement appeared between computed and measured PDD. Electron contamination and spatial distribution for both photons and electrons in the simulated beam are evaluated. Moreover, the obtained lateral dose profiles at 15, 50, and 100 mm depth are compatible with the measured values. The obtained results concluded that, GEANT4 code is a promising applicable Monte Carlo program in radiotherapy applications.

  5. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  6. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  7. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  8. Dark Currents and Their Effect on the Primary Beam in an X-band Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wu, J.H.; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    We numerically study properties of primary dark currents in an X-band accelerating structure. For the H60VG3 structure considered for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) we first perform a fairly complete (with some approximations) calculation of dark current trajectories. These results are used to study properties of the dark current leaving the structure. For example, at accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m, considering two very different assumptions about dark current emission around the irises, we find that the fraction of emitted current leaving the structure to be a consistent {approx} 1%. Considering that {approx} 1 mA outgoing dark current is seen in measurement, this implies that {approx} 100 mA (or 10 pC per period) is emitted within the structure itself. Using the formalism of the Lienard-Wiechert potentials, we then perform a systematic calculation of the transverse kick of dark currents on a primary linac bunch. The result is {approx} 1 V kick per mA (or per 0.1 pC per period) dark current emitted from an iris. For an entire structure we estimate the total kick on a primary bunch to be {approx} 15 V. For the NLC linac this translates to a ratio of (final) vertical beam offset to beam size of about 0.2. However, with the assumptions that needed to be made--particularly the number of emitters and their distribution within a structure--the accuracy of this result may be limited to the order of magnitude.

  9. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (2×2,4×4,10×10cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10

  10. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  11. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  12. Variation of patient imaging doses with scanning parameters for linac-integrated kilovoltage cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiongfei; Wang, Yunlai; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Ge, Ruigang; Yang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the Elekta kilovoltage CBCT doses and the associated technical protocols with patient dosimetry estimation. Image guidance technique with cone-beam CT (CBCT) in radiation oncology on a daily basis can deliver a significant dose to the patient. To evaluate the patient dose from LINAC-integrated kV cone beam CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. CT dose index (CTDI) were measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in air, in head phantom and body phantom, respectively; with different combinations of tube voltage, current, exposure time per frame, collimator and gantry rotation range. Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated to account for volume integration effects. The CTDI and DLP were also compared to AcQSim™ simulator CT for routine clinical protocols. Both CTDIair and CTDIw depended quadratically on the voltage, while linearly on milliampere x seconds (mAs) settings. It was shown that CTDIw and DLP had very close relationship with the collimator settings and the gantry rotation ranges. Normalized CTDIw for Elekta XVI™ CBCT was lower than that of ACQSim simulator CT owing to its pulsed radiation output characteristics. CTDIw can be used to assess the patient dose in CBCT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility. Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program. Optimal image parameters should be chosen to reduce patient dose during CBCT. PMID:26405932

  13. Cavity Misalignment and Off-Axis Field Effects on Transverse Beam Dynamic in Spallation Neutron Source Superconducting Linac

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stovall; Marc Doleans; J. Galambos; Eugene Tanke; Sang-ho Kim; Ronald Sundelin

    2001-05-01

    For highly relativistic beams, transverse motion due to off-axis fields is not a concern because the transverse RF magnetic and electric forces for off-axis particles cancel each other. Since The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will accelerate moderately relativistic H- particle beam, transverse motion due to off-axis fields has to be checked. Misaligned cavities have physically the same transverse effect on particles moving on axis as off-axis particles passing through perfectly aligned cavities. The main purpose of this paper is to calculate the impact on the transverse motion of the beam from the superconducting cavity (SC) misalignment in SNS. Quadrupole misalignment is then added to obtain a more general statement for the transverse behavior of the beam under alignment errors. For this issue, we use on-axis and off-axis electromagnetic field data from Superfish to calculate beam properties of the SNS beam all along the SC linac with misaligned cavities.

  14. Beam Measurement of 11.424 GHz X-Band Linac for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Natsui, Takuya; Mori, Azusa; Masuda, Hirotoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Fumito

    2010-11-04

    An inverse Compton scattering X-ray source for medical applications, consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) linac and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, is currently being developed at the University of Tokyo. This system uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun for electron beam generation. We can obtain a multi-bunch electron beam with this gun. The beam is accelerated to 30 MeV by a traveling-wave accelerating tube. So far, we have verified stable beam generation (around 2.3 MeV) by using the newly designed RF gun and we have succeeded in beam transportation to a beam dump.

  15. SU-D-19A-04: Parameter Characterization of Electron Beam Monte Carlo Phase Space of TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For TrueBeam Monte Carlo simulations, Varian does not distribute linac head geometry and material compositions, instead providing a phase space file (PSF) for the users. The PSF has a finite number of particle histories and can have very large file size, yet still contains inherent statistical noises. The purpose of this study is to characterize the electron beam PSF with parameters. Methods: The PSF is a snapshot of all particles' information at a given plane above jaws including type, energy, position, and directions. This study utilized a preliminary TrueBeam PSF, of which validation against measurement is presented in another study. To characterize the PSF, distributions of energy, position, and direction of all particles are analyzed as piece-wise parameterized functions of radius and polar angle. Subsequently, a pseudo PSF was generated based on this characterization. Validation was assessed by directly comparing the true and pseudo PSFs, and by using both PSFs in the down-stream MC simulations (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) and comparing dose distributions for 3 applicators at 15 MeV. Statistical uncertainty of 4% was limited by the number of histories in the original PSF. Percent depth dose (PDD) and orthogonal (PRF) profiles at various depths were evaluated. Results: Preliminary results showed that this PSF parameterization was accurate, with no visible differences between original and pseudo PSFs except at the edge (6 cm off axis), which did not impact dose distributions in phantom. PDD differences were within 1 mm for R{sub 7} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, R{sub 3} {sub 0}, and R{sub 1} {sub 0}, and PRF field size and penumbras were within 2 mm. Conclusion: A PSF can be successfully characterized by distributions for energy, position, and direction as parameterized functions of radius and polar angles; this facilitates generating sufficient particles at any statistical precision. Analyses for all other electron energies are under way and results will be

  16. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, Wojciech; O'Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  17. High-Brightness Beam Generation and Characterization at the Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewellen, John; Biedron, Sandra; Borland, Michael; Hahne, Michael; Harkay, Katherine; Lumpkin, Alex; Milton, Stephen; Sereno, Nicholas; Travish, Gil

    2000-04-01

    Improvements to the Advanced Photon Source injector linac have been made to allow for the production and characterization of high-brightness beams in support of fourth-generation light source research. In particular, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) free-electron laser (FEL). We describe the enhancements to the linac operational and diagnostic capabilities that enabled self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm. Electron beam measurement techniques and recent results will be discussed. Beam properties are measured under the same operational conditions as those used for FEL studies. The nominal FEL beam parameters are as follows: 217 MeV beam energy; less than 0.15 mm-mrad normalized emittance; 100 A peak current from a 0.7-nC charge at a 7-psec bunch. * Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38

  18. The RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    2002-09-23

    The driver linac for the U.S. RIA project will be a 1.4 GV superconducting linac capable of accelerating the full mass range of ions from 900 MeV protons to 400 MeV/u uranium, and delivering a cw beam of 400 kW shared by at least two targets simultaneously. Elements of the linac are being developed at several U.S. laboratories. The current status of linac design and development is reviewed with emphasis on changes in the baseline design since the last linac conference.

  19. Effect of Magnetic Fringe Field and Interference on Beam Matching in a Medium Energy Beam Transport Line of the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    A Medium-Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line is employed in the SNS linac to match the beam from an RFQ to a DTL and to perform other functions. The MEBT lattice consists of fourteen electromagnetic quadrupoles and other devices. The quads have very small aspect ratios (steel length over aperture diameter), and they are densely packed in the lattice. Significant fringe fields and magnetic interference cause difficulties in beam matching. We have performed 3D simulations of the magnets, computed their optical properties, and compared their performance with what predicted by simple hard edge models. This paper reports our findings and a general solution to the problem.

  20. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  2. Multicomponent measurements of the Jefferson Lab energy recovery linac electron beam using optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, M. A.; Fiorito, R. B.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; O'Shea, P. G.; Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.

    2008-08-01

    High brightness electron accelerators, such as energy recovery linacs (ERL), often have complex particle distributions that can create difficulties in beam transport as well as matching to devices such as wigglers used to generate radiation from the beam. Optical transition radiation (OTR), OTR interferometry (OTRI), and optical diffraction-transition radiation interferometry (ODTRI) have proven to be effective tools for diagnosing both the spatial and angular distributions of charged particle beams. OTRI and ODTRI have been used to measure rms divergences, and optical transverse phase space mapping has been demonstrated using OTRI. In this work we present the results of diagnostic experiments using OTR and optical diffraction radiation conducted at the Jefferson Laboratory’s 115 MeV ERL which show the presence of two separate components within the beam’s spatial and angular distributions. By assuming a correlation between the spatial and angular features, we estimate an rms emittance value for each of the two components.

  3. Measurements and Simulations of Ultra-Low Emittance and Ultra-Short Electron Beams in the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2009-02-03

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently in a commissioning phase at SLAC. We report here on very low emittance measurements made at low bunch charge, and a few femtosecond bunch length produced by the LCLS bunch compressors. Start-to-end simulations associated with these beam parameters show the possibilities of generating hundreds of GW at 1.5 {angstrom} x-ray wavelength and nearly a single longitudinally spike at 1.5 nm with 2-fs duration.

  4. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  5. Activation caused by proton beam losses in Accelerator Production of Tritium LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.A.; Eaton, S.L.; Daemen, L.L.; Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-03-01

    A variety of accelerator designs are being considered for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Alamos National Laboratory. Because activation of the structural components of the accelerator is considered a major radiation protection issue, we have developed a computational methodology to estimate quantitatively radionuclide inventories and gamma dose rates resulting from accelerator operation. The work presented here illustrates the use of our computational methodology by focusing on the 20 and 100 MeV sections of the Bridge-Coupled Drift Tube LINAC (BCDTL), and the 100 and 1000 MeV sections of the Coupled Cavity LINAC (CCL).

  6. Recirculated and Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-05-01

    Linacs that are recirculated share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, including the ability to accelerate electron beams from an injector to high energy with relatively little (normalized) emittance growth and the ability to deliver ultrashort bunch duration pulses to users. When such linacs are energy recovered, the additional possibility of accelerating very high average beam current arises. Because this combination of beam properties is not possible from either a conventional linac, or from storage rings where emittance and pulse length are set by the equilibrium between radiation damping and quantum excitation of oscillations about the closed orbit, energy recovered linacs are being considered for an increasing variety of applications. These possibilities extend from high power free-electron lasers and recirculated linac light sources, to electron coolers for high energy colliders or actual electron-ion colliding- beam machines based on an energy recovered linac for the electrons.

  7. Space charge in proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Merrill, F.; Rybarcyk, L.; Ryne, R.

    1998-12-31

    There are at least two reasons for the interest in space-charge effects in proton linacs. First, it can be expected that there are some areas of commonality in the space-charge physics of linacs and circular machines. Second, a linac delivers the input beam to a circular machine, so understanding the linac physics helps to explain the limitations for the input beam quality to a ring. This presentation is divided into three parts. First, the authors discuss space-charge effects form the linac point of view. Second, they discuss practical methods of calculation of linac beam dynamics that include space-charge forces. Finally, they summarize the status of experimental studies of the beam performance in the LANSCE linac including space-charge effects.

  8. Stochastic formulation of patient positioning using linac-mounted cone beam imaging with prior knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegele, W.; Loeschel, R.; Dobler, B.; Hesser, J.; Koelbl, O.; Zygmanski, P.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In this work, a novel stochastic framework for patient positioning based on linac-mounted CB projections is introduced. Based on this formulation, the most probable shifts and rotations of the patient are estimated, incorporating interfractional deformations of patient anatomy and other uncertainties associated with patient setup. Methods: The target position is assumed to be defined by and is stochastically determined from positions of various features such as anatomical landmarks or markers in CB projections, i.e., radiographs acquired with a CB-CT system. The patient positioning problem of finding the target location from CB projections is posed as an inverse problem with prior knowledge and is solved using a Bayesian maximum a posteriori (MAP) approach. The prior knowledge is three-fold and includes the accuracy of an initial patient setup (such as in-room laser and skin marks), the plasticity of the body (relative shifts between target and features), and the feature detection error in CB projections (which may vary depending on specific detection algorithm and feature type). For this purpose, MAP estimators are derived and a procedure of using them in clinical practice is outlined. Furthermore, a rule of thumb is theoretically derived, relating basic parameters of the prior knowledge (initial setup accuracy, plasticity of the body, and number of features) and the parameters of CB data acquisition (number of projections and accuracy of feature detection) to the expected estimation accuracy. Results: MAP estimation can be applied to arbitrary features and detection algorithms. However, to experimentally demonstrate its applicability and to perform the validation of the algorithm, a water-equivalent, deformable phantom with features represented by six 1 mm chrome balls were utilized. These features were detected in the cone beam projections (XVI, Elekta Synergy) by a local threshold method for demonstration purposes only. The accuracy of estimation

  9. Effect of high current electron beam in a 30 MeV radio frequency linac for neutron-time-of-flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, B.; Acharya, S.; Rajawat, R. K.; DasGupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    A high power pulsed radio frequency electron linac is designed by BARC, India to accelerate 30 MeV, 10 A, 10 ns beam for neutron-time-of-flight applications. It will be used as a neutron generator and will produce ˜1012-1013 n/s. It is essential to reduce the beam instability caused by space charge effect and the beam cavity interaction. In this paper, the wakefield losses in the accelerating section due to bunch of RMS (Root mean square) length 2 mm (at the gun exit) is analysed. Loss and kick factors are numerically calculated using CST wakefield solver. Both the longitudinal and transverse wake potentials are incorporated in beam dynamics code ELEGANT to find the transverse emittance growth of the beam propagating through the linac. Beam loading effect is examined by means of numerical computation carried out in ASTRA code. Beam break up start current has been estimated at the end of the linac which arises due to deflecting modes excited by the high current beam. At the end, transverse beam dynamics of such high current beam has been analysed.

  10. Automation of the electron-beam welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, E.; Dzharov, V.; Kardjiev, M.; Mladenov, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the automatic control is considered of the vacuum and cooling systems of the located in the IE-BAS equipment for electron-beam welding, evaporation and surface modification. A project was elaborated for the control and management based on the development of an engineering support system using existing and additional technical means of automation. Optimization of the indicators, which are critical for the duration of reaching the working regime and stopping the operation of the installation, can be made using experimentally obtained transient characteristics. The automation of the available equipment aimed at improving its efficiency and the repeatability of the obtained results, as well as at stabilizing the process parameters, should be integrated in an Engineering Support System which, besides the operator supervision, consists of several subsystems for equipment control, data acquisition, information analysis, system management and decision-making support.

  11. An accurate method for energy spectrum reconstruction of Linac beams based on EPID measurements of scatter radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, B.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Santos, A.

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a methodology to reconstruct a Linac high energy photon spectrum beam. The method is based on EPID scatter images generated when the incident photon beam impinges onto a plastic block. The distribution of scatter radiation produced by this scattering object placed on the external EPID surface and centered at the beam field size was measured. The scatter distribution was also simulated for a series of monoenergetic identical geometry photon beams. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the scattered photons for monoenergetic photon beams at 92 different locations, with 0.5 cm increments and at 8.5 cm from the centre of the scattering material. Measurements were performed with the same geometry using a 6 MeV photon beam produced by the linear accelerator. A system of linear equations was generated to combine the polyenergetic EPID measurements with the monoenergetic simulation results. Regularization techniques were applied to solve the system for the incident photon spectrum. A linear matrix system, A×S=E, was developed to describe the scattering interactions and their relationship to the primary spectrum (S). A is the monoenergetic scatter matrix determined from the Monte Carlo simulations, S is the incident photon spectrum, and E represents the scatter distribution characterized by EPID measurement. Direct matrix inversion methods produce results that are not physically consistent due to errors inherent in the system, therefore Tikhonov regularization methods were applied to address the effects of these errors and to solve the system for obtaining a consistent bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  12. Space charge in proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T. P.; Merrill, F.; Rybarcyk, L.; Ryne, R.

    1998-11-05

    Space charge effects on beam dynamics in linear accelerators are discussed. Practical linac beam dynamics calculation methods which include space charge effects are discussed. Also, the status of beam performance experiments including space charge studies are summarized.

  13. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications. PMID:25006356

  14. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  15. Design of neutron beams at the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL) for boron neutron capture therapy and neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.L.; McMichael, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    Neutron beams are designed for capture therapy based on p-Li and p-Sc reactions using the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL). The p-Li beam will provide a 2.5 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s epithermal flux with 7 {times} 10{sup 5} {gamma}/cm{sup 2}s contamination. On a human brain phantom, this beam allows an advantage depth (AD) of 10 cm, an advantage depth dose rate (ADDR) of 78 cGy/min and an advantage ratio (AR) of 3.2. The p-Sc beam offers 5.9 {times} 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s and a dose performance of AD = 8 cm and AR = 3.5, suggesting the potential of near-threshold (p,n) reactions such as the p-Li reaction at E{sub p} = 1.92 MeV. A thermal radiography beam could also be obtained from ACWL.

  16. Beam dynamics and longitudinal instabilities in heavy ion fusion induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1992-08-01

    An induction linac accelerating a high-current pulse of heavy ions at subrelativistic velocities is predicted to exhibit unstable growth of current fluctuations. An overview is given of the mode character, estimates of growth rates, and their application to an IFE driver. The present and projected effort to understand and ameliorate the instability is described. This includes particle-in-cell simulations, calculation and measurements of impedance, and design of feedback controls.

  17. Local compensation-rematch for major element failures in superconducting linacs with very high reliability and low beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Biao; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Li, Zhihui; Meng, Cai; Pei, Shilun

    2015-06-01

    In order to achieve the extremely high reliability and availability in superconducting linacs required by some applications such as in accelerator-driven systems (ADS), a fault tolerance design is usually pursued. With the example of the China-ADS main linac, the failure effects of key elements such as RF cavities and focusing elements in different locations along the linac have been studied and the schemes of compensation by means of the local compensation-rematch method have been proposed. For cavity failures, by adjusting the settings of the neighboring cavities and focusing elements one can make sure that the Twiss parameters and beam energy are recovered to the nominal ones at the matching point. For solenoid failures in the low energy section, a novel method by using a neighbor cavity with reverse phase is used to maintain simultaneous acceleration and focusing in both the transverse and longitudinal phase planes. For quadrupole failures in the warm transitions in the high energy section, triplet focusing structure is adopted which can be converted locally into a doublet focusing in case of one quadrupole failure and the rematch method is proven very effective. With macro-particle simulations by TraceWin, it is found that the normalized rms emittance has no obvious growth and the halo emittance has modest growth after applying the local compensation-rematch in the cases mentioned above. In addition, a self-made code based on MATLAB has been developed to double check the simulations by TraceWin for the local compensation and rematch method.

  18. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  19. Positron source investigation by using CLIC drive beam for Linac-LHC based e+p collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arιkan, Ertan; Aksakal, Hüsnü

    2012-08-01

    Three different methods which are alternately conventional, Compton backscattering and Undulator based methods employed for the production of positrons. The positrons to be used for e+p collisions in a Linac-LHC (Large Hadron Collider) based collider have been studied. The number of produced positrons as a function of drive beam energy and optimum target thickness has been determined. Three different targets have been used as a source investigation which are W75-Ir25, W75-Ta25, and W75-Re25 for three methods. Estimated number of the positrons has been performed with FLUKA simulation code. Then, these produced positrons are used for following Adiabatic matching device (AMD) and capture efficiency is determined. Then e+p collider luminosity corresponding to the methods mentioned above have been calculated by CAIN code.

  20. Summary of Working Group 7, Part II: Linac protection and collimation of megawatt micron sized 250--500 GeV electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-11-01

    The average beam powers and beam size anticipated for next generation linear colliders make them awesome tools of destruction. Systems for protection will be crucial. A scheme for linac structure protection by sacrificial collimators is presented in Section 3. No matter what precautionary measures are taken, the tails of the beam will be populated by hard coulomb collisions along the linac. To remove these halos before reaching the final focus system optics, where particle showers can blind the detector, it will be necessary to collimate these beams. Section 5 discusses the equations governing the parameters of a conventional collimation system. Wakefields determine gap sizes and lattice functions. Materials properties dictate minimum beam sizes at collimators so they can withstand occasionally mis-steered beams. Spoiler scattering and edge scattering effects mandate that the final doublet phase be collimated twice, and depending on the results of further tracking studies, it may be necessary to collimate each phase two times. Section 6 describes a nonlinear collimation system that can collimate beams to smaller apertures than the conventional system. The tolerances for such systems resemble final focus tolerances. Section T addresses the problem of repopulation of the tails after the collimation system. The main conclusions are that it appears possible to collimate the beams for these machines with conventional passively protected collimation systems. However the length of present designs, which collimate energy and both transverse planes and meet the requirements of complete tail scraping, exceed one kilometer per linac. A collimation system may also be desirable at the low energy end of the linac to minimize collimation of high energy particles.

  1. CSNS LINAC DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    FU, S.; FANG, S.; WEI, J.

    2006-08-21

    China Spallation Neutron Source has been approved in principle by the Chinese government. CSNS can provide a beam power of 100kW on the target in the first phase, and then 200kW in the second phase. The accelerator complex of CSNS consists of an H- linac of 81MeV and a rapid cycling synchrotron of 1.6GeV at 25Hz repetition rate. In the second phase, the linac energy will be upgraded to 132MeV and the average current will be doubled. The linac has been designed, and some R&D studies have started under the support from Chinese Academy of Sciences. The linac comprises a H- ion source, an RFQ and a conventional DTL with EMQs. This paper will present our major design results and some progresses in the R&D of the linac.

  2. Embedded design based virtual instrument program for positron beam automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapandian, J.; Gururaj, K.; Abhaya, S.; Parimala, J.; Amarendra, G.

    2008-10-01

    Automation of positron beam experiment with a single chip embedded design using a programmable system on chip (PSoC) which provides easy interfacing of the high-voltage DC power supply is reported. Virtual Instrument (VI) control program written in Visual Basic 6.0 ensures the following functions (i) adjusting of sample high voltage by interacting with the programmed PSoC hardware, (ii) control of personal computer (PC) based multi channel analyzer (MCA) card for energy spectroscopy, (iii) analysis of the obtained spectrum to extract the relevant line shape parameters, (iv) plotting of relevant parameters and (v) saving the file in the appropriate format. The present study highlights the hardware features of the PSoC hardware module as well as the control of MCA and other units through programming in Visual Basic.

  3. SSC linac injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, T.S.; Guy, F.W.; Neuschaefer, G.H.; Pabst, M.; Schriber, S.O.; Stovall, J.E.; Wangler, T.P.; Wilson, M.T.; Worth, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    The parameters for the proposed SSC linac injector system are obtained from the established requirements of the low-energy booster (LEB). The first element of this injector system is a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) that bunches the H/sup /minus// ions and accelerates these ion bunches to 2.5 MeV. With a suitable matching section, this beam is injected into a drift-tube linac (DTL), which takes the ions to 120 MeV. The final element is a coupled-cavity linac (CCL) designed to accelerate the H/sup /minus// ions to 600 MeV for injection into the LEB. The conceptual beam dynamics design for the various elements of this linac injector system are described. 4 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Review of induction LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.

    1981-10-01

    There has been a recent upsurge of activity in the field of induction linacs, with several new machines becoming operational and others in the design stages. The performance levels of electron machines have reached 10's of kiloamps of current and will soon reach 10's of MeV's of energy. Acceleration of ion current has been demonstrated, and the study of a 10 GeV heavy ion induction linac for ICF continues. The operating principles of induction linacs are reviewed with the emphasis on design choices which are important for increasing the maximum beam currents.

  5. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Eide, Anders; Zimmermann, Frank; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can get a maximum energy of 140 GeV. Alternatively, in the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) option the beam passes through a CW linac four times (two passes for acceleration and two for deceleration) for a maximum energy of 60 GeV.

  6. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan

    2016-08-01

    An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR) in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC). In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10–1/30 (150mA–50 mA) of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A). Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetitionmore » rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. In conclusion, off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.« less

  7. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, A.; Pourfallah, T. Allahverdi; Akbari, M. R.; Babapour, H.; Shahidi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10-6 (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10-8 Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9” and 3” moderators were 1.6 × 10-5 and 1.74 × 10-5 Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons. PMID:26170555

  8. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission

    PubMed Central

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  9. Electron-beam manipulation techniques in the SINBAD Linac for external injection in plasma wake-field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, B.; Assmann, R.; Behrens, C.; Brinkmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Floettmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Huening, M.; Nie, Y.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short and INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at Desy) is foreseen to host various experiments in the field of production of ultra-short electron bunches and novel high gradient acceleration techniques. Besides studying novel acceleration techniques aiming to produce high brightness short electron bunches, the ARD group at DESY is working on the design of a conventional RF accelerator that will allow the production of low charge (0.5 pC - few pC) ultra-short electron bunches (having full width half maximum, FWHM, length ≤ 1 fs - few fs). The setup will allow the direct experimental comparison of the performance achievable by using different compression techniques (velocity bunching, magnetic compression, hybrid compression schemes). At a later stage the SINBAD linac will be used to inject such electron bunches into a laser driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator, which imposes strong requirements on parameters such as the arrival time jitter and the pointing stability of the beam. In this paper we review the compression techniques that are foreseen at SINBAD and we underline the differences in terms of peak current, beam quality and arrival time stability.

  10. Simulation of the 6 MV Elekta Synergy Platform linac photon beam using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission.

    PubMed

    Didi, Samir; Moussa, Abdelilah; Yahya, Tayalati; Mustafa, Zerfaoui

    2015-01-01

    The present work validates the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6 MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The simulation includes the major components of the linear accelerator (LINAC) with multi-leaf collimator and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for the photon beam with several treatment field sizes ranging from 5 cm × 5 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm at 100 cm distance from the source. The simulation was successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 0.02% and 2.5% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. This agreement was also emphasized by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test and by the gamma-index comparisons where more than 99% of the points for all simulations fulfill the quality assurance criteria of 2 mm/2%. PMID:26500399

  11. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons. PMID:26170555

  12. Special SLC linac developments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1986-04-01

    The linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is required to accelerate several intense electron and positron bunches to high energy while maintaining their small transverse dimensions and energy spectra. Many of the linac systems have been upgraded to the new stringent SLC design criteria. The remaining systems will be completed in the summer of 1986. Special instruments and controls have been developed to monitor and manipulate these small but potent beams. A brief review of the SLC requirements is given. A broad survey of the recent development is made encompassing longitudinal and transverse wakefield reductions, Landau damping, energy and position feedback systems, beam diagnostic and beam current fluctuations.

  13. Study on transient beam loading compensation for China ADS proton linac injector II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Wang, Xian-Wu; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-Feng; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Chen, Qi; Powers, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Significant transient beam loading effects were observed during beam commissioning tests of prototype II of the injector for the accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, which took place at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, between October and December 2014. During these tests experiments were performed with continuous wave (CW) operation of the cavities with pulsed beam current, and the system was configured to make use of a prototype digital low level radio frequency (LLRF) controller. The system was originally operated in pulsed mode with a simple proportional plus integral and deviation (PID) feedback control algorithm, which was not able to maintain the desired gradient regulation during pulsed 10 mA beam operations. A unique simple transient beam loading compensation method which made use of a combination of proportional and integral (PI) feedback and feedforward control algorithm was implemented in order to significantly reduce the beam induced transient effect in the cavity gradients. The superconducting cavity field variation was reduced to less than 1.7% after turning on this control algorithm. The design and experimental results of this system are presented in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303, 11525523)

  14. Visual Analysis of the Daily QA Results of Photon and Electron Beams of a Trilogy Linac over a Five-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Maria F.; Li, Qiongge; Tang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiang; Li, Jingdong; Tang, Grace; Hunt, Margie A.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2016-01-01

    Data visualization technique was applied to analyze the daily QA results of photon and electron beams. Special attention was paid to any trend the beams might display. A Varian Trilogy Linac equipped with dual photon energies and five electron energies was commissioned in early 2010. Daily Linac QA tests including the output constancy, beam flatness and symmetry (radial and transverse directions) were performed with an ionization chamber array device (QA BeamChecker Plus, Standard Imaging). The data of five years were collected and analyzed. For each energy, the measured data were exported and processed for visual trending using an in-house Matlab program. These daily data were cross-correlated with the monthly QA and annual QA results, as well as the preventive maintenance records. Majority of the output were within 1% of variation, with a consistent positive/upward drift for all seven energies (~+0.25% per month). The baseline of daily device is reset annually right after the TG-51 calibration. This results in a sudden drop of the output. On the other hand, the large amount of data using the same baseline exhibits a sinusoidal behavior (cycle = 12 months; amplitude = 0.8%, 0.5% for photons, electrons, respectively) on symmetry and flatness when normalization of baselines is accounted for. The well known phenomenon of new Linac output drift was clearly displayed. This output drift was a result of the air leakage of the over-pressurized sealed monitor chambers for the specific vendor. Data visualization is a new trend in the era of big data in radiation oncology research. It allows the data to be displayed visually and therefore more intuitive. Based on the visual display from the past, the physicist might predict the trend of the Linac and take actions proactively. It also makes comparisons, alerts failures, and potentially identifies causalities.

  15. TH-E-BRE-09: TrueBeam Monte Carlo Absolute Dose Calculations Using Monitor Chamber Backscatter Simulations and Linac-Logged Target Current

    SciTech Connect

    A, Popescu I; Lobo, J; Sawkey, D; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate and measure radiation backscattered into the monitor chamber of a TrueBeam linac; establish a rigorous framework for absolute dose calculations for TrueBeam Monte Carlo (MC) simulations through a novel approach, taking into account the backscattered radiation and the actual machine output during beam delivery; improve agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors. Methods: The ‘monitor backscatter factor’ is an essential ingredient of a well-established MC absolute dose formalism (the MC equivalent of the TG-51 protocol). This quantity was determined for the 6 MV, 6X FFF, and 10X FFF beams by two independent Methods: (1) MC simulations in the monitor chamber of the TrueBeam linac; (2) linac-generated beam record data for target current, logged for each beam delivery. Upper head MC simulations used a freelyavailable manufacturer-provided interface to a cloud-based platform, allowing use of the same head model as that used to generate the publicly-available TrueBeam phase spaces, without revealing the upper head design. The MC absolute dose formalism was expanded to allow direct use of target current data. Results: The relation between backscatter, number of electrons incident on the target for one monitor unit, and MC absolute dose was analyzed for open fields, as well as a jaw-tracking VMAT plan. The agreement between the two methods was better than 0.15%. It was demonstrated that the agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors improves across all field sizes when backscatter is taken into account. Conclusion: For the first time, simulated monitor chamber dose and measured target current for an actual TrueBeam linac were incorporated in the MC absolute dose formalism. In conjunction with the use of MC inputs generated from post-delivery trajectory-log files, the present method allows accurate MC dose calculations, without resorting to any of the simplifying assumptions previously made in the TrueBeam

  16. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  17. Developmental Status of Beam Position and Phase Monitor for PEFP Proton Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungju; Park, Jangho; Yu, Inha; Kim, Dotae; Hwang, Jung-Yun; Nam, Sanghoon

    2004-11-01

    The PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) at the KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is building a high-power proton linear accelerator aiming to generate 100-MeV proton beams with 20-mA peak current. (Pulse width and max. repetition rate of 1 ms and 120 Hz respectively.) We have developed the Beam Position and Phase Monitor (BPPM) for the machine that features the button-type PU, the full-analog processing electronics, and the EPICS-based control system. The beam responses of the button-type PU have been obtained using the MAGIC (Particle-In-Cell) code. The processing electronics has been developed in collaboration with Bergoz Instrumentation. In this article, we report the present status of the system developments except the control system.

  18. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  19. All-diamond optical assemblies for a beam-multiplexing X-ray monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Stoupin, S; Terentyev, S A; Blank, V D; Shvyd'ko, Yu V; Goetze, K; Assoufid, L; Polyakov, S N; Kuznetsov, M S; Kornilov, N V; Katsoudas, J; Alonso-Mori, R; Chollet, M; Feng, Y; Glownia, J M; Lemke, H; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Zhu, D

    2014-08-01

    A double-crystal diamond (111) monochromator recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) enables splitting of the primary X-ray beam into a pink (transmitted) and a monochromatic (reflected) branch. The first monochromator crystal, with a thickness of ∼100 µm, provides sufficient X-ray transmittance to enable simultaneous operation of two beamlines. This article reports the design, fabrication and X-ray characterization of the first and second (300 µm-thick) crystals utilized in the monochromator and the optical assemblies holding these crystals. Each crystal plate has a region of about 5 × 2 mm with low defect concentration, sufficient for use in X-ray optics at the LCLS. The optical assemblies holding the crystals were designed to provide mounting on a rigid substrate and to minimize mounting-induced crystal strain. The induced strain was evaluated using double-crystal X-ray topography and was found to be small over the 5 × 2 mm working regions of the crystals. PMID:25242912

  20. All-diamond optical assemblies for a beam-multiplexing X-ray monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Stoupin, S.; Terentyev, S. A.; Blank, V. D.; Shvyd’ko, Yu. V.; Goetze, K.; Assoufid, L.; Polyakov, S. N.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Kornilov, N. V.; Katsoudas, J.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Chollet, M.; Feng, Y.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Zhu, D.

    2014-01-01

    A double-crystal diamond (111) monochromator recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) enables splitting of the primary X-ray beam into a pink (transmitted) and a monochromatic (reflected) branch. The first monochromator crystal, with a thickness of ∼100 µm, provides sufficient X-ray transmittance to enable simultaneous operation of two beamlines. This article reports the design, fabrication and X-ray characterization of the first and second (300 µm-thick) crystals utilized in the monochromator and the optical assemblies holding these crystals. Each crystal plate has a region of about 5 × 2 mm with low defect concentration, sufficient for use in X-ray optics at the LCLS. The optical assemblies holding the crystals were designed to provide mounting on a rigid substrate and to minimize mounting-induced crystal strain. The induced strain was evaluated using double-crystal X-ray topography and was found to be small over the 5 × 2 mm working regions of the crystals. PMID:25242912

  1. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  2. Beam Position Monitoring with Cavity Higher Order Modes in the Superconducting Linac FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Molloy, S.; Eddy, N.; Frisch, J.; Hendrickson, L.; Hensler, O.; McCormick, D.; May, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.C.; Petrosian, L.; Piccolli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Ross, M.; Simon, C.; Smith, T.; Watanabe, K.; Wendt, M.; /DESY /SLAC /Fermilab /DAPNIA, Saclay /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-03-20

    FLASH (Free Electron Laser in Hamburg) is a user facility for a high intensity VUV-light source [1]. The radiation wavelength is tunable in the range from about 40 to 13 nm by changing the electron beam energy from 450 to 700 MeV. The accelerator is also a test facility for the European XFEL (X-ray Free Electron Laser) to be built in Hamburg [2] and the project study ILC (International Linear Collider) [3]. The superconducting TESLA technology is tested at this facility, together with other accelerator components.

  3. SRF test facility for the superconducting LINAC ``RAON'' — RRR property and e-beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joo, Jongdae; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-02-01

    Equipment, such as a vacuum furnace, high pressure rinse (HPR), eddy current test (ECT) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP), are installed in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) test facility. Three different sizes of cryostats (diameters of 600 mm for a quarter wave resonator (QWR), 900 mm for a half wave resonator (HWR), and 1200 mm for single spoke resonator 1&2 (SSR 1&2)) for vertical RF tests are installed for testing cavities. We confirmed that as-received niobium sheets (ASTM B393, RRR300) good electrical properties because they showed average residual resistance ratio (RRR) values higher than 300. However, serious RRR degradation occurred after joining two pieces of Nb by e-beam welding because the average RRR values of the samples were ˜179, which was only ˜60% of as-received RRR value. From various e-beam welding experiments in which the welding current and a speed at a fixed welding voltage were changed, we confirmed that good welding results were obtained at a 53 mA welding current and a 20-mm/s welding speed at a fixed welding voltage of 150 kV.

  4. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  5. Low-charge-state linac

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  6. The upgrade of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) and the BNL Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mausner, L.F.; Alessi, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    An upgrade project was recently completed on the 200 MeV H{sup -} linac and the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) in order to improve radioisotope production capacity and reliability. The average beam current has increased from 60 {mu}A to 150 {mu}A. The increased average current is the result of increases in peak current, from 25 mA to 37 mA, pulse repetition rate, from 5 to 7.5 Hz, and pulse width, from 500 to 530 ps. To achieve this performance the 35 keV, 750 keV and 200 MeV beam transport were improved, the RF transmission lines and RF power supplies replaced. Improvements to the linac control system, and the optics and vacuum system of the 200 MeV transport were implemented. A BLIP the target cooling system was upgraded to 35 kW and automated, the targets, and target mechanical systems replaced with a more robust design, and the control system upgraded. With these enhancements BLIP is ready to address the lack of availability of accelerator produced medical and research isotopes.

  7. A Monte Carlo approach to validation of FFF VMAT treatment plans for the TrueBeam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Bergman, Alanah Mary; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Mestrovic, Ante; Hyde, Derek; Teke, Tony

    2013-02-15

    1%. It is of note that excellent agreement in output factors for all field sizes including highly asymmetric fields was achieved without accounting for backscatter into the beam monitor chamber. For the SBRT VMAT plans, the agreement between Monte Carlo and ion chamber point dose measurements was within 1%. Excellent agreement between Monte Carlo, treatment planning system and Gafchromic film dose distribution was observed with over 99% of the points in the high dose volume passing the 3%, 3 mm gamma test. Conclusions: The authors have presented a method for making the Varian IAEA compliant 6 MV FFF phase space file of the TrueBeam linac compatible with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc. After benchmarking the modified phase space against measurement, they have demonstrated its potential for use in MC based quality assurance of complex delivery techniques.

  8. Space charge in proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Merrill, F.; Rybarcyk, L.; Ryne, R.

    1998-11-01

    Space charge effects on beam dynamics in linear accelerators are discussed. Practical linac beam dynamics calculation methods which include space charge effects are discussed. Also, the status of beam performance experiments including space charge studies are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. PROGRESS IN DESIGN OF THE SNS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. HARDEKOPF

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac will initially produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadruple (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-cavity linac (SCL). Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design, the cost and performance factors that drove architecture decisions, and the progress made in the R&D program.

  10. Progress in Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  11. SLS linac diagnostics—commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dach, M.; Dehler, M.; Jaggi, A.; Kramert, R.; Pedrozzi, P.; Schlott, V.; Streun, A.

    2000-11-01

    The paper presents the electron beam diagnostics along the 100 MeV pre-injector Linac for the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The concept of the different diagnostic monitors for current and current related measurements, optical measurements and beam position measurements are briefly described. Commissioning results of the pre-injector Linac are presented.

  12. Automated Sample Exchange Robots for the Structural Biology Beam Lines at the Photon Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Gaponov, Yurii; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2007-01-19

    We are now developing automated sample exchange robots for high-throughput protein crystallographic experiments for onsite use at synchrotron beam lines. It is part of the fully automated robotics systems being developed at the Photon Factory, for the purposes of protein crystallization, monitoring crystal growth, harvesting and freezing crystals, mounting the crystals inside a hutch and for data collection. We have already installed the sample exchange robots based on the SSRL automated mounting system at our insertion device beam lines BL-5A and AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory. In order to reduce the time required for sample exchange further, a prototype of a double-tonged system was developed. As a result of preliminary experiments with double-tonged robots, the sample exchange time was successfully reduced from 70 seconds to 10 seconds with the exception of the time required for pre-cooling and warming up the tongs.

  13. Design and performance of an automated video-based laser beam alignment system

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, W.J. ); Kartz, M.W. ); Bliss, E.S.; English, R.E. Jr.; Peterson, R.L.; Thompson, G.R.; Uhlich, D.M. )

    1992-07-14

    This paper describes the design and performance of an automated, closed-loop, laser beam alignment system. Its function is to sense a beam alignment error in a laser beam transport system and automatically steer mirrors preceding the sensor location as required to maintain beam alignment. The laser beam is sampled by an optomechanical package which uses video cameras to sense pointing and centering errors. The camera outputs are fed to an image processing module, which includes video digitizers and uses image storage and software to sense the centroid of the image. Signals are sent through a VMEbus to an optical device controller'' (ODC), which drives stepper-motor actuators on mirror mounts preceding the beam-sampling location to return the beam alignment to the prescribed condition. Photodiodes are also used to extend the control bandwidth beyond that which is achievable with video cameras. This system has been operated at LLNL in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program to maintain the alignment of copper and dye laser beams, the latter to within [plus minus]2 [mu]r in pointing and less than 1 mm in centering. The optomechanical design of the instrumented package, which includes lens, mirror, and video mounts in a rigid housing, the automated control system architecture, and the performance of this equipment is described.

  14. Design and performance of an automated video-based laser beam alignment system

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, W.J.; Kartz, M.W.; Bliss, E.S.; English, R.E. Jr.; Peterson, R.L.; Thompson, G.R.; Uhlich, D.M.

    1992-07-14

    This paper describes the design and performance of an automated, closed-loop, laser beam alignment system. Its function is to sense a beam alignment error in a laser beam transport system and automatically steer mirrors preceding the sensor location as required to maintain beam alignment. The laser beam is sampled by an optomechanical package which uses video cameras to sense pointing and centering errors. The camera outputs are fed to an image processing module, which includes video digitizers and uses image storage and software to sense the centroid of the image. Signals are sent through a VMEbus to an ``optical device controller`` (ODC), which drives stepper-motor actuators on mirror mounts preceding the beam-sampling location to return the beam alignment to the prescribed condition. Photodiodes are also used to extend the control bandwidth beyond that which is achievable with video cameras. This system has been operated at LLNL in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program to maintain the alignment of copper and dye laser beams, the latter to within {plus_minus}2 {mu}r in pointing and less than 1 mm in centering. The optomechanical design of the instrumented package, which includes lens, mirror, and video mounts in a rigid housing, the automated control system architecture, and the performance of this equipment is described.

  15. Linac mechanic QA using a cylindrical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A.

    2008-09-01

    Precise mechanical operation of a linear accelerator (linac) is critical for accurate radiation therapy dose delivery. Quantitative procedures for linac mechanical quality assurance (QA) used in the standard of care are time consuming and therefore conducted on a relatively infrequent basis. We present a method for evaluating the mechanical performance of a linac based on a series of projection portal images of a prototype cylindrical phantom with embedded radiopaque fiducial markers. The marker autodetection process included modeling imager response to the radiation beam where the projected cylinder attenuation yielded a non-uniform image background. The linac mechanical characteristics were estimated based on nonlinear multi-objective optimization of the projected marker locations. The estimated geometry parameters for the tested commercial model were gantry angle deviation 0.075 ± 0.076° (1 SD), gantry sag 0.026 ± 0.02°, source-to-axis distance SAD 998.3 ± 1.7 mm, source-to-detector distance SDD 1493 ± 5.0 mm, couch vertical motion 0.6 ± 0.45 mm, couch rotation 0.154 ± 0.1° and average linac rotation center (1.02, -0.27, -0.37) ± (0.36,0.333,1.20) mm relative to the laser intersection. The imager shift was [-0.44, 2.6] ± [0.20, 1.1] mm and the imager orientation was in-plane rotation 0.05 ± 0.03°, roll -0.14 ± 0.09° and pitch -0.9 ± 0.604°. The performance of this procedure concerning marker detection and optimization was examined by comparing the detected set of marker coordinates to its back-calculated counterpart for three subgroups of markers: central, wall and intermediate relative to the center of the phantom. The maximum difference was less than 0.25 mm with a mean of 0.146 mm and a standard deviation of 0.07 mm. The clinical use of this automated procedure will allow more efficient, more thorough, and more frequent mechanical linac QA.

  16. Linac mechanic QA using a cylindrical phantom.

    PubMed

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A

    2008-09-21

    Precise mechanical operation of a linear accelerator (linac) is critical for accurate radiation therapy dose delivery. Quantitative procedures for linac mechanical quality assurance (QA) used in the standard of care are time consuming and therefore conducted on a relatively infrequent basis. We present a method for evaluating the mechanical performance of a linac based on a series of projection portal images of a prototype cylindrical phantom with embedded radiopaque fiducial markers. The marker autodetection process included modeling imager response to the radiation beam where the projected cylinder attenuation yielded a non-uniform image background. The linac mechanical characteristics were estimated based on nonlinear multi-objective optimization of the projected marker locations. The estimated geometry parameters for the tested commercial model were gantry angle deviation 0.075 +/- 0.076 degrees (1 SD), gantry sag 0.026 +/- 0.02 degrees , source-to-axis distance SAD 998.3 +/- 1.7 mm, source-to-detector distance SDD 1493 +/- 5.0 mm, couch vertical motion 0.6 +/- 0.45 mm, couch rotation 0.154 +/- 0.1 degrees and average linac rotation center (1.02, -0.27, -0.37) +/- (0.36,0.333,1.20) mm relative to the laser intersection. The imager shift was [-0.44, 2.6] +/- [0.20, 1.1] mm and the imager orientation was in-plane rotation 0.05 +/- 0.03 degrees , roll -0.14 +/- 0.09 degrees and pitch -0.9 +/- 0.604 degrees . The performance of this procedure concerning marker detection and optimization was examined by comparing the detected set of marker coordinates to its back-calculated counterpart for three subgroups of markers: central, wall and intermediate relative to the center of the phantom. The maximum difference was less than 0.25 mm with a mean of 0.146 mm and a standard deviation of 0.07 mm. The clinical use of this automated procedure will allow more efficient, more thorough, and more frequent mechanical linac QA. PMID:18723927

  17. SU-E-T-273: Radiation Shielding for a Fixed Horizontal-Beam Linac in a Shipping Container and a Conventional Treatment Vault

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Balter, P; Beadle, B; Chi, P; Stingo, F; Court, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A fixed horizontal-beam linac, where the patient is treated in a seated position, could lower the overall costs of the treatment unit and room shielding substantially. This design also allows the treatment room and control area to be contained within a reduced space, such as a shipping container. The main application is the introduction of low-cost, high-quality radiation therapy to low- and middle-income regions. Here we consider shielding for upright treatments with a fixed-6MV-beam linac in a shipping container and a conventional treatment vault. Methods: Shielding calculations were done for two treatment room layouts using calculation methods in NCRP Report 151: (1) a shipping container (6m × 2.4m with the remaining space occupied by the console area), and (2) the treatment vault in NCRP 151 (7.8m by 5.4m by 3.4m). The shipping container has a fixed gantry that points in one direction at all times. For the treatment vault, various beam directions were evaluated. Results: The shipping container requires a primary barrier of 168cm concrete (4.5 TVL), surrounded by a secondary barrier of 3.6 TVL. The other walls require between 2.8–3.3 TVL. Multiple shielding calculations were done along the side wall. The results show that patient scatter increases in the forward direction and decreases dramatically in the backward direction. Leakage scatter also varies along the wall, depending largely on the distance between the gantry and the wall. For the treatment room, fixed-beam requires a slightly thicker primary barrier than the conventional linac (0.6 TVL), although this barrier is only needed in the center of one wall. The secondary barrier is different only by 0–0.2 TVL. Conclusion: This work shows that (1) the shipping container option is achievable, using indigenous materials for shielding and (2) upright treatments can be performed in a conventional treatment room with minimal additional shielding. Varian Medical Systems.

  18. SU-E-I-72: First Experimental Study of On-Board CBCT Imaging Using 2.5MV Beam On a Radiotherapy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q; Li, R; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantom with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.

  19. Automating linear accelerator quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhause, Tobias; Thorwarth, Ryan; Moran, Jean M.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Farrey, Karl; Ritter, Timothy; DeMarco, John; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Popple, Richard; Sharma, Vijeshwar; Park, SungYong; Perez, Mario; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was 2-fold. One purpose was to develop an automated, streamlined quality assurance (QA) program for use by multiple centers. The second purpose was to evaluate machine performance over time for multiple centers using linear accelerator (Linac) log files and electronic portal images. The authors sought to evaluate variations in Linac performance to establish as a reference for other centers. Methods: The authors developed analytical software tools for a QA program using both log files and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. The first tool is a general analysis tool which can read and visually represent data in the log file. This tool, which can be used to automatically analyze patient treatment or QA log files, examines the files for Linac deviations which exceed thresholds. The second set of tools consists of a test suite of QA fields, a standard phantom, and software to collect information from the log files on deviations from the expected values. The test suite was designed to focus on the mechanical tests of the Linac to include jaw, MLC, and collimator positions during static, IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery. A consortium of eight institutions delivered the test suite at monthly or weekly intervals on each Linac using a standard phantom. The behavior of various components was analyzed for eight TrueBeam Linacs. Results: For the EPID and trajectory log file analysis, all observed deviations which exceeded established thresholds for Linac behavior resulted in a beam hold off. In the absence of an interlock-triggering event, the maximum observed log file deviations between the expected and actual component positions (such as MLC leaves) varied from less than 1% to 26% of published tolerance thresholds. The maximum and standard deviations of the variations due to gantry sag, collimator angle, jaw position, and MLC positions are presented. Gantry sag among Linacs was 0.336 ± 0.072 mm. The

  20. Three-dimensional thermal simulations of thin solid carbon foils for charge stripping of high current uranium ion beams at a proposed new heavy-ion linac at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Kim, V.; Schlitt, B.; Barth, W.; Groening, L.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Stöhlker, Th.; Vormann, H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an extensive numerical study of heating of thin solid carbon foils by 1.4 MeV/u uranium ion beams to explore the possibility of using such a target as a charge stripper at the proposed new Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy-ion linac. These simulations have been carried out using a sophisticated 3D computer code that accounts for physical phenomena that are important in this problem. A variety of beam and target parameters have been considered. The results suggest that within the considered parameter range, the target will be severely damaged by the beam. Thus, a carbon foil stripper does not seem to be a reliable option for the future Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung high energy heavy-ion linac, in particular, at FAIR design beam intensities.

  1. Automation of beam based alignment for the PAL-XFEL undulator line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parc, Yong Woon; Hwang, Ilmoon; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2015-05-01

    An automated method of quadrupole beam based alignment in an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) undulator line is proposed. To realize the automatic beam based alignment (BBA) independently of operator's skill and efforts, the procedure is simplified. Simulation results on the BBA technique using two alignment stages for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory XFEL's (PAL-XFEL) undulator line is carried out. After a standard mechanical alignment the quadrupoles are expected to be aligned to 100 μm rms from our previous experience. A rough alignment method in this study is able to align the quadrupoles to about 40 μm rms without any pre-handling of electron beam orbit or quadrupoles position. At the second stage, the singular value decomposition (SVD) method is applied to perform a fine alignment in which the trajectory of an electron beam is controlled within 5 μm rms to the ideal orbit. All procedures are programmable to perform the BBA automatically.

  2. Linac Energy Management for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chungming; Iverson, Richard; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; White, Greg; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  3. Modeling the TrueBeam linac using a CAD to Geant4 geometry implementation: Dose and IAEA-compliant phase space calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Magdalena; Perl, Joseph; LoSasso, Tom; Salop, Arthur; Whittum, David; Narula, Anisha; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate 6 MV Monte Carlo simulation phase space for the Varian TrueBeam treatment head geometry imported from cad (computer aided design) without adjusting the input electron phase space parameters. Methods: geant4 v4.9.2.p01 was employed to simulate the 6 MV beam treatment head geometry of the Varian TrueBeam linac. The electron tracks in the linear accelerator were simulated with Parmela, and the obtained electron phase space was used as an input to the Monte Carlo beam transport and dose calculations. The geometry components are tessellated solids included in geant4 as gdml (generalized dynamic markup language) files obtained via STEP (standard for the exchange of product) export from Pro/Engineering, followed by STEP import in Fastrad, a STEP-gdml converter. The linac has a compact treatment head and the small space between the shielding collimator and the divergent arc of the upper jaws forbids the implementation of a plane for storing the phase space. Instead, an IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) compliant phase space writer was implemented on a cylindrical surface. The simulation was run in parallel on a 1200 node Linux cluster. The 6 MV dose calculations were performed for field sizes varying from 4 x 4 to 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}. The voxel size for the 60x60x40 cm{sup 3} water phantom was 4x4x4 mm{sup 3}. For the 10x10 cm{sup 2} field, surface buildup calculations were performed using 4x4x2 mm{sup 3} voxels within 20 mm of the surface. Results: For the depth dose curves, 98% of the calculated data points agree within 2% with the experimental measurements for depths between 2 and 40 cm. For depths between 5 and 30 cm, agreement within 1% is obtained for 99% (4x4), 95% (10x10), 94% (20x20 and 30x30), and 89% (40x40) of the data points, respectively. In the buildup region, the agreement is within 2%, except at 1 mm depth where the deviation is 5% for the 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field. For the lateral dose profiles, within the field size

  4. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  5. Analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment in FACET commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    In this note, the analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment is presented for the FACET linac section LI05-09 plus LI11-19. The effectiveness of the beam-based alignment technique is preliminarily confirmed by the measurement. Beam-based alignment technique was adopted at SLAC linac since SLC time. Here the beam-based alignment algorithms are further developed and applied in the FACET commissioning during 2012 run.

  6. EXPERIENCE WITH THE SNS SC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Allen, Christopher K; Campisi, Isidoro E; Cousineau, Sarah M; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Galambos, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Jeon, Dong-O; Kim, Sang-Ho; Pelaia II, Tom; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2008-01-01

    The SNS superconducting linac (SCL) is designed to deliver 1 GeV, up to 1.56-MW pulsed H- beams for neutron production. Commissioning of the accelerator systems was completed in June 2006, and the maximum beam energy achieved was approximately 952 MeV. In 2007, the SCL was successfully tuned for 1.01-GeV beam during a test operation. In the linac tune-up, phase scan signature matching, drifting beam measurement, and linac radio frequency cavity phase scaling were applied. In this paper, we will introduce the experiences with the SCL, including the tune-up, beam loss, and beam activation, and briefly discuss beam parameter measurements

  7. Acquisition and Analysis of Megavoltage Linac Beam Transmission Data for Direct Verification of Photon Spectra Models in a Treatment Planning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leheta, Dimitra S.

    . While in most cases switching the model spectrum with the measured one did not result in drastic differences in the calculated dose, plans with deviations of 4 to 8% in the maximum dose values for critical structures were discovered. Since spectrum information is used by TPS in evaluation of the scatter dose, the anatomical sites with large scatter contributions are the most vulnerable to inaccuracies in the modeled spectrum. The developed approach of using readily available attenuators and build-up caps in combination with streamlined data processing confirmed feasibility of acquisition of megavoltage linac beam spectra in a typical radiation oncology clinic, offering an independent check of the TPS model.

  8. Scaling of Wakefield Effects in Recirculating Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    L. Merminga; G. R. Neil; B. C. Yunn; J. J. Bisognano

    2001-07-01

    Expressions for the induced energy spread and emittance degradation of a single bunch due to the longitudinal and transverse impedance of rf cavities at the end of a linac structure are presented. Scaling of the formulae with rf frequency is derived. Scaling of the threshold current for the multibunch, multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability in recirculating linacs with accelerator and beam parameters is also derived.

  9. A cryomodule for the RIA driver linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Shepard, K. W.

    2002-10-25

    We present a cryomodule design for the superconducting linacs for the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility (RIA). This paper discusses the design of a cryomodule for all the drift-tube-loaded superconducting cavities required for the machine. The same basic design will be used for the low and medium velocity sections of the driver linac and also for sections of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) linac. Fundamental design choices such as separate vs. common beam and insulating vacuum spaces are driven by the clean fabrication techniques required for optimum cavity performance. The design can be adapted to a variety of cavity geometries.

  10. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  11. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, E; Fast, M F; Oelfke, U; Nill, S

    2015-06-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76 ± 6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images. PMID:25280891

  12. Intrabeam stripping in H- Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.; Solyak, N.; Ostigy, J.-F.; Alexandrov, A.; Shishlo, A.; /Oak Ridge

    2010-09-01

    A beam loss in the superconducting part of the SNS linac has been observed during its commissioning and operation. Although the loss does not prevent the SNS high power operation, it results in an almost uniform irradiation of linac components and increased radiation levels in the tunnel. Multi-particle tracking could neither account for the magnitude of the observed loss nor its dependence on machine parameters. It was recently found that the loss is consistent with the intrabeam particle collisions resulting in stripping of H{sup -} ions. The paper describes experimental observations and corresponding analytical estimates of the intrabeam stripping.

  13. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  14. Comments on a linac based beauty factory

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Heifets; Geoffrey Krafft; C. McDowell; M. Fripp

    1990-02-01

    A consistent set of parameters is given for a B-factory based on collisions of an electron beam from a SRF linac with the positron beam in a storage ring. An optimized lattice, an impedance estimate, a study of beam stability, and a discussion of collisions with large disruption parameters are included.

  15. Electron cloud effects in intense, ion beam linacs theory and experimental planning for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Cohen, R.H.; Lund, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Lee, E.P.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-21

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation a large fractional electron population ({approx}>1%) is predicted in the High-Current Experiment (HCX), but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron flow is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as the their effect on the ion beam.

  16. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-01

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  17. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S. G.; Edelen, A. L.; Milton, S. V.; Benson, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C. D.; Carlsten, B. E.

    2015-03-01

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with the measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.

  18. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with the measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.

  19. SNS LINAC Wire Scanner System : Signal Levels and Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M. A.; Christensen, W.; Myer, R. E.; Rose, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The linac wire scanner system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, TN, USA, calls for 5 units in the medium energy beam transport (MEBT), 5 in the drift tube linac (DTL), and 10 in the coupled cavity linac (CCL). In this paper we present expected signal levels and an analysis of the error in the beam size measurement as functions of wire position and electrical signal errors.

  20. Commissioning of the LCLS LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Miahnahri, A.; Molloy, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser project is currently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). A new injector and upgrades to the existing accelerator were installed in two phases in 2006 and 2007. We report on the commissioning of the injector, the two new bunch compressors at 250MeV and 4.3 GeV, and transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics up to the end of the existing linac at 13.6 GeV. The commissioning of the new transfer line from the end of the linac to the undulator is scheduled to start in November 2008 and for the undulator in March 2009 with first light to be expected in July 2009.

  1. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  2. Design of the SLC damping ring to linac transport lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.H.; Murray, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    The first and second order optics for the damping ring to linac transport line are designed to preserve the damped transverse emittance while simultaneously compressing the bunch length of the beam to that length required for reinjection into the linac. This design, including provisions for future control of beam polarization, is described.

  3. Concepts, features, and design of a sixteen-to-four beam combiner for ILSE (Induction Linac Systems Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.L.; Celata, C.; Close, E.; Faltens, A.; Hahn, K.; La Mon, K.; Lee, E.P.; Smith, L.; Thur, W.

    1989-03-01

    Sixteen intense parallel ion beams are to be transversely combined into four by dispersionless double bends. Emittance growth due to electrostatic energy redistribution and to the geometry is evaluated. Most bending elements are electric, and alternate with AG electrostatic quadrupoles similar to those upstream. The final elements are magnetic, combining focusing and ''unbending''. Electrode shapes and pulsed-current arrays (having very small clearances), and mechanical and electric features of the combiner, and described. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  4. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with themore » measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.« less

  5. ESS SC Linac Design Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdinand, Robin

    2002-12-01

    The ESS project (European Spallation Source) aims to produce high power beams for condensed matter studies. One option consists in having both H+ and H- beams. They have to be accelerated and guided to the different spallation targets. Beam power up to 5 MW at 50 Hz plus 5 MW at 16.2/3 Hz, will be delivered on respectively the Short Pulse Target Station and the Long Pulse Target Station. Two 50 mA H- branches are funnelled with one 100 mA H+ beam at around 20 MeV. A chopper line between two RFQs and DTLs constitutes the H- front end. The H+ front end is composed of one RFQ and one DTL. After the funnel, the two species are transported through the same linac up to 1.334 GeV. This common part is composed of a SDTL and a CCL from 20 to 185 MeV and followed by a SuperConducting Linac (SCL) to reach the final energy. Up to recently (ESS Volume III 1996), a NC version of the linac had been extensively studied and constituted the reference option. However, given the fantastic progresses made on SC technology and the many potential advantages, a SC alternative was developed. We concentrate on this option.

  6. SIMULATIONS OF A MUON LINAC FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard, Alex Bogacz ,Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin

    2011-04-01

    The Neutrino Factory baseline design involves a complex chain of accelerators including a single-pass linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The first linac follows the capture and bunching section and accelerates the muons from about 244 to 900 MeV. It must accept a high emittance beam about 30 cm wide with a 10% energy spread. This linac uses counterwound, shielded superconducting solenoids and 201 MHz superconducting cavities. Simulations have been carried out using several codes including Zgoubi, OptiM, GPT, Elegant and G4beamline, both to determine the optics and to estimate the radiation loads on the elements due to beam loss and muon decay.

  7. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Rolland; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  8. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.

  9. New medical linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, R. G.; Mishin, A. V.

    1997-02-01

    X-band linacs designed and manufactured by Schonberg Research Corporation that are currently used by two spin-off companies for radiation therapy systems. Accuray employs a basic 6 MeV design with 300 R/min nominal dose rate at 80 cm from a tungsten target. The designed stereoscopic radiosurgery system is known as the Cyberknife. The Cyberknife combines a treatment planning, imaging and treatment delivery features. The treatment delivery system enclosure incorporates an accelerator head, RF components, pulse transformer and electronics mounted on a robotic arm. Intraop Medical, Inc. has introduced a system for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) called Mobetron (Mobile Electron Beam Intraoperative Treatment System). Mobetron is based on a 12 MeV two section X-band linac also designed by Schonberg Research Corporation. The accelerator design permits smooth energy variation from 4 to 12 MeV, but will be used at 4 specific energies. A self-shielded concept is applied to the system design. It will be used in conventional operating rooms without added shielding.

  10. Optimization of SRF Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Tom

    2013-09-01

    This work describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project.[1] The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs. The work was first published in an ICFA Beam Dynamics News Letter.[2] More recent additions to the software include the ability to save and restore input parameters as well as to adjust the Qo versus E parameters in order to explore the potential costs savings associated with doing so. Additionally, program changes now allow one to model the costs associated with a linac that makes use of energy recovery mode of operation.