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Sample records for linac-based isocentric electron-photon

  1. Development of head docking device for linac-based radiosurgery with a Neptun 10 PC linac.

    PubMed

    Khoshbin Khoshnazar, Alireza; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Hashemian, Abdolreza; Salek, Roham

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is a method for focused irradiation of intracranial lesions. Linac-based radiosurgery is currently performed by two techniques: couch mounted and pedestal mounted. In the first technique a device is required to affix the patient's head to the couch and neoreover to translate it accurately. Structure of such a device constructed by the authors plus acceptance test performed for evaluation is described in the article. A head docking device has been designed and constructed according to geometry of linac's couch and also desired functions. The device is cornpletely made from aluminum and consists of four major components: attachment bar, lower structure with four moveing accuracy mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were assessed in the frame of acceptance test. Translating accuracy, mechanical stability and isocentric accuracy were found to be respectively: 1 mm, 1.64 mm and 3.2 mm with accuracy of 95%. According to AAPM report no. 54, a head docking device should translate head with an accuracy of 1 mm; this recommendation has been met. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the isocentric accuracy and mechanical stability of the device are sufficient that the device on confidently be used in stereotactic treatment. PMID:17664152

  2. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text format that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).

  3. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text formatmore » that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).« less

  4. Planning and delivery comparison of six linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Varun Singh

    This work presents planning and delivery comparison of linac-based SRS treatment techniques currently available for single lesion cranial SRS. In total, two dedicated SRS systems (Novalis Tx, Cyberknife) and a HI-ART TomoTherapy system with six different delivery techniques are evaluated. Four delivery techniques are evaluated on a Novalis Tx system: circular cones, dynamic conformal arcs (DCA), static non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (NCP-IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) techniques are compared with intensity modulation based helical Tomotherapy on the HI-ART Tomotherapy system and with non-isocentric, multiple overlapping based robotic radiosurgery using the CyberKnife system. Thirteen patients are retrospectively selected for the study. The target volumes of each patient are transferred to a CT scan of a Lucy phantom (Standard Imaging Inc., Middleton, WI, USA) designed for end-to-end SRS QA. In order to evaluate the plans, several indices scoring the conformality, homogeneity and gradients in the plan are calculated and compared for each of the plans. Finally, to check the clinical deliverability of the plans and the delivery accuracy of different systems, a few targets are delivered on each system. A comparison between planned dose on treatment planning system and dose delivered on Gafchromic EBT film (ISP, Wayne, New Jersey, USA) is carried out by comparing dose beam profiles, isodose lines and by calculating gamma index.

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 65: A dosimetric comparison of isocentric and non-isocentric coplanar SBRT VMAT plans for peripheral lung tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, L; Liu, HW; Lau, H; Smith, WL

    2014-08-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers lung sterotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in shorter treatment time and less monitor units with comparable coverage and organ at risk sparing compared to conventional SBRT treatments. Isocentric VMAT treatment of peripheral lung tumours occasionally requires couch shifts that can inhibit 360° gantry rotation, resulting in additional imaging shifts for each treatment session, and increased potential for involuntary in-fraction motion. Here, we investigate whether non-isocentric VMAT plans can achieve comparable plan quality to isocentric plans for peripheral lung tumours. Three patient plans were selected with targets displaced > 8.5 cm (range: 8.8 – 9.9 cm) laterally from patient midline. For each patient, a plan with isocentre placed within the target volume (isocentric plan) was created and optimized. The same optimization parameters were then used to create a plan with the isocentre at patient midline (non-isocentric plan). Plan quality was evaluated and compared based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, high dose spillage, dose homogeneity, intermediate dose spillage, dose fall-off gradient, and organ at risk contraints. Non-isocentric plans of equivalent plan quality to isocentric plans were achieved for all patients by optimizing collimator rotations. Field isocentres can be placed at patient midline, as opposed to inside the target volume, with no significant degradation in VMAT plan quality for lateral tumour displacements up to 10 cm. Non-isocentric treatment of peripheral lung tumours could result in decreased overall treatment session time and eliminate the need for imaging shifts prior to VMAT treatment.

  6. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-17

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport.

  7. Extended-Field Isocentric Irradiation for Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Good, Roger R.; Jones, Ernest O.; Somers, James E.; McAnulty, Bruce E.; McCaul, Gayle F.; Rogers, Sally S.; Reeves, Michael A.; Sanders, Cheryl K.

    1987-01-01

    Extended-field therapeutic irradiation is the treatment of choice for the majority of patients diagnosed with pathologic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease, and total nodal irradiation can be effectively used to treat selected stage III Hodgkin's patients. Standard 100-cm source-to-axis distance extended-field isocentric technique and results are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:3312619

  8. THz Hot-Electron Photon Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Sergeev, Andrei V.

    2004-01-01

    We present a concept for the hot-electron transition-edge sensor capable of counting THz photons. The main need for such a sensor is a spectroscopy on future space telescopes where a background limited NEP approx. 10(exp -20) W/H(exp 1/2) is expected at around 1 THz. Under these conditions, the rate of photon arrival is very low and any currently imaginable detector with sufficient sensitivity will operate in the photon counting mode. The Hot-Electron Photon Counter based on a submicron-size Ti bridge has a very low heat capacity which provides a high enough energy resolution (approx.140 GHz) at 0.3 K. With the sensor time constant of a few microseconds, the dynamic range would be approx. 30 dB. The sensor couples to radiation via a planar antenna and is read by a SQUID amplifier or by a 1-bit RSFQ ADC. A compact array of the antenna-coupled counters can be fabricated on a silicon wafer without membranes.

  9. Linac based photofission inspection system employing novel detection concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, John; Gozani, Tsahi; Elsalim, Mashal; Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig

    2011-10-01

    Rapiscan Systems is developing a LINAC based cargo inspection system for detection of special nuclear material (SNM) in cargo containers. The system, called Photofission Based Alarm Resolution (PBAR) is being developed under a DHD/DNDO Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) program. The PBAR system is based on the Rapiscan Eagle P9000 X-ray system, which is a portal system with a commercial 9 MeV LINAC X-ray source. For the purposes of the DNDO ATD program, a conveyor system was installed in the portal to allow scanning and precise positioning of 20 ft ISO cargo containers. The system uses a two step inspection process. In the first step, the basic scan, the container is quickly and completely inspected using two independent radiography arrays: the conventional primary array with high spatial resolution and a lower resolution spectroscopic array employing the novel Z-Spec method. The primary array uses cadmium tungstate (CdWO 4) detectors with conventional current mode readouts using photodiodes. The Z-Spec array uses small plastic scintillators capable of performing very fast (up to 10 8 cps) gamma-ray spectroscopy. The two radiography arrays are used to locate high-Z objects in the image such as lead, tungsten, uranium, which could be potential shielding materials as well as SNM itself. In the current system, the Z-Spec works by measuring the energy spectrum of transmitted X-rays. For high-Z materials the higher end of the energy spectrum is more attenuated than for low-Z materials and thus has a lower mean energy and a narrower width than low- and medium-Z materials. The second step in the inspection process is the direct scan or alarm clearing scan. In this step, areas of the container image, which were identified as high Z, are re-inspected. This is done by precisely repositioning the container to the location of the high-Z object and performing a stationary irradiation of the area with X-ray beam. Since there are a large number of photons in the 9 MV

  10. Quality improvement process to assess tattoo alignment, set-up accuracy and isocentre reproducibility in pelvic radiotherapy patients

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Kelly; Francis, Kate; Hruby, George; Roderick, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This quality improvement study tested three methods of tattoo alignment and isocentre definition to investigate if aligning lateral tattoos to minimise pitch, roll and yaw decreased set-up error, and if defining the isocentre using the lateral tattoos for cranio-caudal (CC) position improved isocentre reproducibility. The study population was patients receiving curative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. The results are applicable to all supine pelvic EBRT patients. Methods The three sequential cohorts recruited 11, 11 and 10 patients respectively. A data set of 20 orthogonal pairs of electronic portal images (EPI) was acquired for each patient. EPIs were matched offline to digitally reconstructed radiographs. In cohort 1, lateral tattoos were adjusted to minimise roll. The anterior tattoo was used to define the isocentre. In cohort 2, lateral tattoos were aligned to minimise roll and yaw. Isocentre was defined as per cohort 1. In cohort 3, lateral tattoos were aligned as per cohort 2 and the anterior tattoo was adjusted to minimise pitch. Isocentre was defined by the lateral tattoos for CC position and the anterior tattoo for the left–right position. Results Cohort 3 results were superior as CC systematic and random set-up errors reduced from −1.3 mm to −0.5 mm, and 3.1 mm to 1.4 mm respectively, from cohort 1 to cohort 3. Isocentre reproducibility also improved from 86.7% to 92.1% of treatment isocentres within 5 mm of the planned isocentre. Conclusion The methods of tattoo alignment and isocentre definition in cohort 3 reduced set-up errors and improved isocentre reproducibility. PMID:25598978

  11. Anterior-posterior treatment localization in pelvic radiotherapy: tattoos or fixed couch-to-isocentre distance.

    PubMed

    Greer, P B; Mortensen, T M

    1997-01-01

    The methods of determining the anterior-posterior isocentre location in pelvic radiotherapy are either by aligning lateral localization lasers to tattoo marks on skin, or by setting a constant daily couch-to-isocentre distance. While using the former method the day-to-day vertical couch movement was recorded and combined with measurements of day-to-day anterior-posterior patient movement made with an electronic portal imaging device to determine whether couch vertical movement contributes to anterior-posterior setup variation. Seven unimmobilized patients were studied, four supine prostate and three prone rectum patients. The two motions were found to be highly correlated (correlation coefficient = 0.82) which supports the constant couch-to-isocentre distance approach. When the day-to-day couch vertical movement was subtracted from the anterior-posterior movement results the setup variation was reduced in six of the seven patients. PMID:9136107

  12. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems.

  13. Electronic/photonic interfaces for ultrafast data processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, Mark E.; Geib, Kent Martin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2008-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-month program that explored the potential areas of impact for electronic/photonic integration technologies, as applied to next-generation data processing systems operating within 100+ Gb/s optical networks. The study included a technology review that targeted three key functions of data processing systems, namely receive/demultiplexing/clock recovery, data processing, and transmit/multiplexing. Various technical approaches were described and evaluated. In addition, we initiated the development of high-speed photodetectors and hybrid integration processes, two key elements of an ultrafast data processor. Relevant experimental results are described herein.

  14. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, H. Grady

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  15. On isocentre adjustment and quality control in linear accelerator based radiosurgery with circular collimators and room lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Luyken, K.; Gierich, A.; Kocher, M.; Müller, R.-P.; Sturm, V.

    2000-08-01

    We have developed a densitometric method for measuring the isocentric accuracy and the accuracy of marking the isocentre position for linear accelerator based radiosurgery with circular collimators and room lasers. Isocentric shots are used to determine the accuracy of marking the isocentre position with room lasers and star shots are used to determine the wobble of the gantry and table rotation movement, the effect of gantry sag, the stereotactic collimator alignment, and the minimal distance between gantry and table rotation axes. Since the method is based on densitometric measurements, beam spot stability is implicitly tested. The method developed is also suitable for quality assurance and has proved to be useful in optimizing isocentric accuracy. The method is simple to perform and only requires a film box and film scanner for instrumentation. Thus, the method has the potential to become widely available and may therefore be useful in standardizing the description of linear accelerator based radiosurgical systems.

  16. Electron photon verification calculations using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Adams, K.J.

    1998-07-01

    MCNP4B was released in February 1997 with significant enhancements to electron/photon transport methods. These enhancements have been verified against a wide range of published electron/photon experiments, spanning high energy bremsstrahlung production to electron transmission and reflection. Three sets of bremsstrahlung experiments were simulated. The first verification calculations for bremsstrahlung production used the experimental results in Faddegon for 15 MeV electrons incident on lead, aluminum, and beryllium targets. The calculated integrated bremsstrahlung yields, the bremsstrahlung energy spectra, and the mean energy of the bremsstrahlung beam were compared with experiment. The impact of several MCNP tally options and physics parameters was explored in detail. The second was the experiment of O`Dell which measured the bremsstrahlung spectra from 10 and 20.9 MeV electrons incident on a gold/tungsten target. The final set was a comparison of relative experimental spectra with calculated results for 9.66 MeV electrons incident on tungsten based on the experiment of Starfelt and Koch. The transmission experiments of Ebert were also studied, including comparisons of transmission coefficients for 10.2 MeV electrons incident on carbon, silver, and uranium foils. The agreement between experiment and simulation was usually within two standard deviations of the experimental and calculational errors.

  17. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are comparable with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down (CSD) portion and elastic-scattering portion of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion.

  18. Radial Moment Calculations of Coupled Electron-Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    FRANKE,BRIAN C.; LARSEN,EDWARD W.

    2000-07-19

    The authors consider the steady-state transport of normally incident pencil beams of radiation in slabs of material. A method has been developed for determining the exact radial moments of 3-D beams of radiation as a function of depth into the slab, by solving systems of 1-D transport equations. They implement these radial moment equations in the ONEBFP discrete ordinates code and simulate energy-dependent, coupled electron-photon beams using CEPXS-generated cross sections. Modified P{sub N} synthetic acceleration is employed to speed up the iterative convergence of the 1-D charged particle calculations. For high-energy photon beams, a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates method is examined. They demonstrate the efficiency of the calculations and make comparisons with 3-D Monte Carlo calculations. Thus, by solving 1-D transport equations, they obtain realistic multidimensional information concerning the broadening of electron-photon beams. This information is relevant to fields such as industrial radiography, medical imaging, radiation oncology, particle accelerators, and lasers.

  19. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Hot-Electron Photon Counters for Detecting Terahertz Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; Sergeyev, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    A document proposes the development of hot-electron photon counters (HEPCs) for detecting terahertz photons in spaceborne far-infrared astronomical instruments. These would be superconducting- transition-edge devices: they would contain superconducting bridges that would have such low heat capacities that single terahertz photons would cause transient increases in their electron temperatures through the superconducting- transition range, thereby yielding measurable increases in electrical resistance. Single devices or imaging arrays of the devices would be fabricated as submicron-sized bridges made from films of disordered Ti (which has a superconducting- transition temperature of .0.35 K) between Nb contacts on bulk silicon or sapphire substrates. In operation, these devices would be cooled to a temperature of .0.3 K. The proposed devices would cost less to fabricate and operate, relative to integrating bolometers of equal sensitivity, which must be operated at a temperature of approx. = 0.1 K.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomothearpy and linac-based IMRT in whole abdomen radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young-nam; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Choi, Byung Ock; Cho, Seok Goo; Jung, Ji-Young; Kay, Chul Seung

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy techniques have allowed a significant improvement in the therapeutic ratio of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) through linear-accelerator (Linac) based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). IMRT has been shown to reduce the dose to organs at risk (OAR) while adequately treating the tumor volume. HT operates by adjusting 51 beam directions, couch speed, pitch and shapes of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC), with the purpose of clinically increasing the befit to the patient. We incorporated helical tomotherapy as a new modality for WAI for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients whose disease involved the intestine and the mesenteric lymph nodes. Excellent tumor coverage with effective sparing of normal organ sparings, and homogeneous dose distribution could be achieved. This study dosimetrically compared HT and linac-based IMRT by using several indices, including the conformity index (CI) and the homogeneity index (HI) for the planning target volume (PTV), as well as the, max dose and the mean dose and the quality index (QI) for five organs at risk (OARs). The HI and the CI were used to compare the quality of target coverage while the QI was used compare the dosimetric performans for OAR systems. The target coverages between the two systems were similar, but the most QIs were lower than 1, what means that HT is batter at sparing OARs than IMRT. Tomotherapy enabled excellent target coverage, effective sparing of normal tissues, and homogeneous dose distribution without severe acute toxicity.

  2. Update on the Innovative Carbon/Proton Non-Scaling FFAG Isocentric gantries for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.

    2010-05-23

    There is a dramatic increase in numbers of proton/carbon cancer therapy facilities in recent years due to a clear advantage with respect to the other radiation therapy treatments. Cost of the ion cancer therapy is still to high for most of the hospitals and a dominating part comes from the delivery systems. We had previously presented design of the carbon and proton isocentric gantries using the principle of the non-scaling alternating gradient fixed field magnets (NS-FFAG), where a size and weight of the magnets should be dramatically reduced. The weight of the transport elements of the carbon isocentric gantry is estimated to be 1.5 tons compared to the 130 tons a weight of the Heidelberg gantry. The similar claim of 500 kg comes for the transport elements of the proton permanent magnet gantry. We present an update on these designs.

  3. NOTE: A method for determining the alignment accuracy of the treatment table axis at an isocentric irradiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Hartmann, Günther H.; Heeg, Peter; Jäkel, Oliver

    2001-01-01

    At an isocentric irradiation facility, the rotation axis of the treatment table has to be accurately aligned in vertical orientation to the isocentre, which is usually marked by three perpendicular laser planes. In particular, high precision radiotherapy techniques, such as radiosurgery or intensity modulated radiotherapy, require a higher alignment accuracy of the table axis than routinely specified by the manufacturers. A simple and efficient method is presented to measure the direction and the size of the displacement of the table axis from the isocentre as marked by the lasers. In addition, the inclination of the table axis against the vertical direction can be determined. The measured displacement and inclination provide the required data to correct for possible misalignments of the treatment table axis and to maintain its alignment. Measurements were performed over a period of two years for a treatment table located at the German heavy ion therapy facility. The mean radial distance between the table axis and the isocentre was found to be 0.25±0.25 mm. The mean inclination of the table axis in the XZ- and YZ-planes was measured to be -0.03±0.02° and -0.04±0.01°, respectively. The measurements demonstrate the good alignment of the treatment table over the analysed time period. The described method can be applied to any isocentric irradiation facility, especially including isocentric linear accelerators used for radiosurgery or other high precision irradiation techniques.

  4. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  5. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  6. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

    2008-12-01

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

  7. Time delay measurement for linac based treatment delivery in synchronized respiratory gating radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2005-05-01

    A time delay in a respiratory gating system could cause an unexpected phase mismatch for synchronized gating radiotherapy. This study presents a method of identifying and measuring the time delay in a gating system. Various port films were taken for a motion phantom at different gating window levels with a very narrow window size. The time delay for the gating system was determined by comparing the motion curve (the position of a moving object versus the gating time) measured in the port films to the motion curve determined by the video cameras. The measured time delay for a linac-based gating system was 0.17+/-0.03 s. This time delay could induce target missing if it was not properly taken into account for the synchronized gating radiotherapy. Measurement/verification of the time delay should be considered as an important part of the accepting/commissioning test before the clinical use of the gating system. PMID:15984681

  8. Proposal for a New Prognostic Score for Linac-Based Radiosurgery in Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Wiesbauer, Hannah; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Huber, Peter; Debus, Juergen; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: We evaluate patient-, angioma-, and treatment-specific factors for successful obliteration of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) to develop a new appropriate score to predict patient outcome after linac-based radiosurgery (RS). Methods and Materials: This analysis in based on 293 patients with cerebral AVM. Mean age at treatment was 38.8 years (4-73 years). AVM classification according Spetzler-Martin was 55 patients Grade I (20.5%), 114 Grade II (42.5%), 79 Grade III (29.5%), 19 Grade IV (7.1%), and 1 Grade V (0.4%). Median maximum AVM diameter was 3.0 cm (range, 0.3-10 cm). Median dose prescribed to the 80% isodose was 18 Gy (range, 12-22 Gy). Eighty-five patients (29.1%) had prior partial embolization; 141 patients (51.9%) experienced intracranial hemorrhage before RS. Median follow-up was 4.2 years. Results: Age at treatment, maximum diameter, nidus volume, and applied dose were significant factors for successful obliteration. Under presumption of proportional hazard in the dose range between 12 and 22 Gy/80% isodose, an increase of obliteration rate of approximately 25% per Gy was seen. On the basis of multivariate analysis, a prediction score was calculated including AVM maximum diameter and age at treatment. The prediction error up to the time point 8 years was 0.173 for the Heidelberg score compared with the Kaplan-Meier value of 0.192. An increase of the score of 1 point results in a decrease of obliteration chance by a factor of 0.447. Conclusion: The proposed score is linac-based radiosurgery-specific and easy to handle to predict patient outcome. Further validation on an independent patient cohort is necessary.

  9. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Márius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code.

  10. Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It was our purpose to analyze long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (Linac-based FSRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Materials and methods Between 10/1995 and 03/2009, 297 patients with a median age of 59 years were treated with FSRT for intracranial meningioma. 50 patients had a Grade I meningioma, 20 patients had a Grade II meningioma, 12 patients suffered from a Grade III tumor, and in 215 cases no histology was obtained (Grade 0). Of the 297 patients, 144 underwent FSRT as their primary treatment and 158 underwent postoperative FSRT. 179 patients received normofractionated radiotherapy (nFSRT), 92 patients received hypofractionated FSRT (hFSRT) and 26 patients underwent SRS. Patients with nFSRT received a mean total dose of 57.31 ± 5.82 Gy, patients with hFSRT received a mean total dose of 37.6 ± 4.4 Gy and patients who underwent SRS received a mean total dose of 17.31 ± 2.58 Gy. Results Median follow-up was 35 months. Overall progression free survival (PFS) was 92.3% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years and 84.1% at 10 years. Patients with adjuvant radiotherapy showed significantly better PFS-rates than patients who had been treated with primary radiotherapy. There was no significant difference between PFS-rates of nFSRT, hFSRT and SRS patients. PFS-rates were independent of tumor size. Patients who had received nFSRT showed less acute toxicity than those who had received hFSRT. In the Grade 0/I group the rate of radiologic focal reactions was significantly lower than in the atypical/malignant histology group. Conclusion This large study showed that FSRT is an effective and safe treatment modality with high PFS-rates for intracranial meningioma. We identified “pathological grading” and and “prior surgery” as significant prognostic factors. PMID:24650090

  11. Dosimetric analysis of isocentrically shielded volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tian; Xing, Lei; Chang, Daniel T.; Peng, Xun; Xie, Liang-Xi; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of an isocentrically shielded RapidArc (IS-RA) technique for treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer (lrNPC). In IS-RA, the isocenter was placed at the center of the pre-irradiated brainstem (BS)/spinal cord (SC) and the jaws were set to shield the BS/SC while ensuring the target coverage during the whole gantry rotation. For fifteen patients, the IS-RA plans were compared with the conventional RapidArc (C-RA) regarding target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The relationship between the dose reduction of BS/SC and some geometric parameters including the angle extended by the target with respect to the axis of BS/SC (Ang_BSSC), the minimum distance between the target and BS/SC (Dist_Min) and the target volume were evaluated. The IS-RA reduced the BS/SC doses by approximately 1–4 Gy on average over the C-RA, with more MUs. The IS-RA demonstrated similar target coverage and sparing of other OARs except for slightly improved sparing of optic structures. More dose reduction in the isocentric region was observed in the cases with larger Ang_BSSC or smaller Dist_Min. Our results indicated that the IS-RA significantly improves the sparing of BS/SC without compromising dosimetric requirements of other involved structures for lrNPC. PMID:27173670

  12. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Stock, M.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients.

  13. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riis, Hans L.; Moltke, Lars N.; Zimmermann, Sune J.; Ebert, Martin A.; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the megavoltage (MV) radiation isocentre of a linear accelerator (linac) is an important task in radiotherapy. The localization of the MV radiation isocentre is crucial for correct calibration of the in-room lasers and the cone-beam CT scanner used for patient positioning prior to treatment. Linac manufacturers offer tools for MV radiation isocentre localization. As a user, there is no access to the documentation for the underlying method and calculation algorithm used in the commercial software. The idea of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of the software tool for MV radiation isocentre calculation as delivered by Elekta using independent software. The image acquisition was based on the scheme designed by the manufacturer. Eight MV images were acquired in each series of a ball-bearing (BB) phantom attached to the treatment couch. The images were recorded at cardinal angles of the gantry using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Eight Elekta linacs with three different types of multileaf collimators (MLCs) were included in the test. The influence of MLC orientation, x-ray energy, and phantom modifications were examined. The acquired images were analysed using the Elekta x-ray volume imaging (XVI) software and in-house developed (IHD) MATLAB code. Results from the two different software were compared. A discrepancy in the longitudinal direction of the isocentre localization was found averaging 0.23 mm up to a maximum of 0.75 mm. The MLC orientation or the phantom asymmetry in the longitudinal direction do not appear to cause the discrepancy. The main cause of the differences could not be clearly identified. However, it is our opinion that the commercial software delivered by the linac manufacturer should be improved to reach better stability and precise results in the MV radiation isocentre calculations.

  14. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI.

    PubMed

    Riis, Hans L; Moltke, Lars N; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the megavoltage (MV) radiation isocentre of a linear accelerator (linac) is an important task in radiotherapy. The localization of the MV radiation isocentre is crucial for correct calibration of the in-room lasers and the cone-beam CT scanner used for patient positioning prior to treatment. Linac manufacturers offer tools for MV radiation isocentre localization. As a user, there is no access to the documentation for the underlying method and calculation algorithm used in the commercial software. The idea of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of the software tool for MV radiation isocentre calculation as delivered by Elekta using independent software. The image acquisition was based on the scheme designed by the manufacturer. Eight MV images were acquired in each series of a ball-bearing (BB) phantom attached to the treatment couch. The images were recorded at cardinal angles of the gantry using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Eight Elekta linacs with three different types of multileaf collimators (MLCs) were included in the test. The influence of MLC orientation, x-ray energy, and phantom modifications were examined. The acquired images were analysed using the Elekta x-ray volume imaging (XVI) software and in-house developed (IHD) MATLAB code. Results from the two different software were compared. A discrepancy in the longitudinal direction of the isocentre localization was found averaging 0.23 mm up to a maximum of 0.75 mm. The MLC orientation or the phantom asymmetry in the longitudinal direction do not appear to cause the discrepancy. The main cause of the differences could not be clearly identified. However, it is our opinion that the commercial software delivered by the linac manufacturer should be improved to reach better stability and precise results in the MV radiation isocentre calculations. PMID:27183466

  15. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Stock, M; Vatnitsky, S

    2015-10-21

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients. PMID:26418366

  16. Effects of irradiation geometry on treatment plan optimization with linac-based radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M H; Stelzer, K J; Mayberg, M R; Winn, H R

    1996-08-01

    A comparison was made of different treatment plans to determine the effect on the three-dimensional dose distributions of varying the allowed parameters in linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery with circular collimators; these parameters are arc position, length, and weighting, and collimator diameter. For the class of eccentrically shaped target volumes that are not so irregular as to require several separate isocenters, it was found that superior dose distributions could be achieved by varying arc length, arc position, arc weighting, and collimator diameter. An analysis of the results achieved with an automated planning program indicates that, in general, the variables of arc position and arc length are of greater importance than collimator size or beam weighting. However, there are cases where varying these latter two parameters does result in markedly better dose distributions. A deeper investigation into the effects of multiple collimators on the dose distribution in the area of steepest gradient demonstrated that multiple collimator sizes do not significantly degrade the dose falloff, which is in fact mostly determined by the effects of intersecting arcs. PMID:8873037

  17. Analytical bunch compression studies for a linac-based electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.; Wesolowski, P.

    2015-10-01

    The current paper deals with analytical bunch compression studies for FLUTE whose results are compared to simulations. FLUTE is a linac-based electron accelerator with a design energy of approximately 40 MeV currently being constructed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. One of the goals of FLUTE is to generate electron bunches with their length lying in the femtosecond regime. In the first phase this will be accomplished using a magnetic bunch compressor. This compressor forms the subject of the studies presented. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part deals with pure geometric investigations of the bunch compressor where space charge effects and the backreaction of bunches with coherent synchrotron radiation are neglected. The second part is dedicated to the treatment of space charge effects. The upshot is that the analytical results in the two parts agree quite well with what is obtained from simulations. This paper shall form the basis for future analytical studies of the FLUTE bunch compressor and of bunch compression, in general.

  18. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.; Stone, R.R.

    1988-08-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier design for producing multi-megawatt levels of microwave power for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak fusion devices such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The wiggler design strategy incorporates a tapering algorithm suitable for FEL systems with moderate space charge effects and minimizes spontaneous noise growth at frequencies below the fundamental, while enhancing the growth of the signal at the fundamental. In addition, engineering design considerations of the waveguide dimensions, the wiggler magnet gap spacing, the wiggler period, and the minimum magnetic field strength in the tapered region of the wiggler. This FEL is designed to produce an average power of about 10 MW at frequencies in the range from 380 GHz to 560 GHz. The achievement of this average power at a reasonable cost requires a high duty factor, which affects some component design. In addition, the desire to obtain a high extraction efficiency pushes the beam energy up and requires magnetic field strengths in the wiggler that are near or possibly larger than the Halbach limit. We used a methodology for our system study that had been developed earlier. We considered several FEL configurations and selected one that minimized total cost. We determined that increasing the beam energy requires that the wiggler use vanadium-permendur as the pole material. We discuss the basic design of the selected configuration and give the expected performance. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.; Placidi, M.; Pirkl, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2003-05-06

    We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX - Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10 s fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free-electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by four passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.

  20. A Recirculating Linac-Based Facility for Ultrafast X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect

    J. N. Corlett; W. A. Barletta; S. DeSantis; L. Doolittle; W. M. Fawley; M.A. Green; P. Heimann; S. Leone; S. Lidia; D. Li; A. Ratti; K. Robinson; R. Schoenlein; J. Staples; W. Wan; R. Wells; A.Wolski; A. Zholents; F. Parmigiani; M. Placidi; W. Pirkl; R. A. Rimmer; S. Wang

    2003-05-01

    We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac [1,2], in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX--Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10's fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by f our passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.

  1. Modeling of induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.; Fawley, W.M.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1988-12-01

    We describe the modeling of an induction-linac based free-electron laser (IFEL) amplifier for producing multimegawatt levels of microwave power. We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) free-electron laser simulation code, FRED, and the simulation code for sideband calculations, GINGER for this study. For IFEL amplifiers in the frequency range of interest (200 to 600 GHz), we have devised a wiggler design strategy which incorporates a tapering algorithm that is suitable for free-electron laser (FEL) systems with moderate space-charge effects and that minimizes spontaneous noise growth at frequencies below the fundamental, while enhancing the growth of the signal at the fundamental. In addition, engineering design considerations of the waveguide wall loading and electron beam fill factor in the waveguide set limits on the waveguide dimensions, the wiggler magnet gap spacing, the wiggler period, and the minimum magnetic field strength in the tapered region of the wiggler. As an example, we shall describe an FEL amplifier designed to produce an average power of about 10 MW at a frequency of 280 GHz to be used for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak fusion devices. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Modeling of induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.; Fawley, W. M.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    1988-12-01

    We describe the modeling of an induction-linac based free-electron laser (IFEL) amplifier for producing multimegawatt levels of microwave power. We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) free-electron laser simulation code, FRED, and the simulation code for sideband calculations, GINGER for this study. For IFEL amplifiers in the frequency range of interest (200 to 600 GHz), we have devised a wiggler design strategy which incorporates a tapering algorithm that is suitable for Free-Electron Laser (FEL) systems with moderate space-charge effects and that minimizes spontaneous noise growth at frequencies below the fundamental, while enhancing the growth of the signal at the fundamental. In addition, engineering design considerations of the waveguide wall loading and electron beam fill factor in the waveguide set limits on the waveguide dimensions, the wiggler magnet gap spacing, the wiggler period, and the minimum magnetic field strength in the tapered region of the wiggler. As an example, we shall describe an FEL amplifier designed to produce an average power of about 10 MW at a frequency of 280 GHz to be used for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak fusion devices.

  3. Modeling Of Induction-Linac Based Free-Electron Laser Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, Raynard A.; Fawley, William M.; Scharlemann, Ernst T.

    1989-05-01

    We describe the modeling of an induction-linac based free-electron laser (IFEL) amplifier for producing multi-megawatt levels of microwave power. We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) free-electron laser simulation code, FRED, and the simulation code for sideband calculations, GINGER for this study. For IFEL amplifiers in the frequency range of interest (200 to 600 GHz), we have devised a wiggler design strategy which incorporates a tapering algorithm that is suitable for free-electron laser (FEL) systems with moderate space-charge effects and that minimizes spontaneous noise growth at frequencies below the fundamental, while enhancing the growth of the signal at the fundamental. In addition, engineering design considerations of the waveguide wall loading and electron beam fill factor in the waveguide set limits on the waveguide dimensions, the wiggler magnet gap spacing, the wiggler period, and the minimum magnetic field strength in the tapered region of the wiggler. As an example, we shall describe an FEL amplifier designed to produce an average power of about 10 MW at a frequency of 280 GHz to be used for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak fusion devices.

  4. Project for the development of the linac based NCT facility in University of Tsukuba.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Matsumura, A; Sakurai, H; Sakae, T; Yoshioka, M; Kobayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Kiyanagi, Y; Shibata, T; Nakashima, H

    2014-06-01

    A project team headed by University of Tsukuba launched the development of a new accelerator based BNCT facility. In the project, we have adopted Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)+Drift Tube Linac (DTL) type linac as proton accelerators. Proton energy generated from the linac was set to 8MeV and average current was 10mA. The linac tube has been constructed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. For neutron generator device, beryllium is selected as neutron target material; high intensity neutrons are generated by the reaction with beryllium and the 80kW proton beam. Our team chose beryllium as the neutron target material. At present beryllium target system is being designed with Monte-Carlo estimations and heat analysis with ANSYS. The neutron generator consists of moderator, collimator and shielding. It is being designed together with the beryllium target system. We also acquired a building in Tokai village; the building has been renovated for use as BNCT treatment facility. It is noteworthy that the linac tube had been installed in the facility in September 2012. In BNCT procedure, several medical devices are required for BNCT treatment such as treatment planning system, patient positioning device and radiation monitors. Thus these are being developed together with the linac based neutron source. For treatment planning system, we are now developing a new multi-modal Monte-Carlo treatment planning system based on JCDS. The system allows us to perform dose estimation for BNCT as well as particle radiotherapy and X-ray therapy. And the patient positioning device can navigate a patient to irradiation position quickly and properly. Furthermore the device is able to monitor movement of the patient׳s position during irradiation. PMID:24637084

  5. Induction-linac based free electron laser amplifier for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.; Stone, R. R.

    1989-12-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free electron laser amplifier design for producing multi-megawatt levels of microwave power for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak fusion devices such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The wiggler design strategy incorporates a tapering algorithm suitable for FEL systems with moderate space charge effects and minimizes spontaneous noise growth at frequencies below the fundamental, while enhancing the growth of the signal at the fundamental. In addition, engineering design considerations of the waveguide wall loading and electron beam fill factor in the waveguide set limits on the waveguide dimensions, the wiggler magnet gap spacing, the wiggler period, and the minimum magnetic field strength in the tapered region of the wiggler. This FEL is designed to produce an average power of about 10 MW at frequencies in the range from 280 to 560 GHz. The achievement of this average power at a reasonable cost requires a high duty factor, which affects some component design. In addition, the desire to obtain a high extraction efficiency pushes the beam energy up and requires magnetic field strengths in the wiggler that are near or possibly larger than the Halbach limit. We used a methodology for our system study that had been developed earlier. We considered several FEL configurations and selected one that minimized total cost. We determined that increasing the beam energy requires that the wiggler use vanadium-permendur as the pole material. We discuss the basic design of the selected configuration and give the expected performance.

  6. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  7. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  8. Feasibility study on the use of uranium in photoneutron target and BSA optimization for Linac based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Shahriari, Majid; Minoochehr, Abdolhamid; Nedaie, Hasan

    2011-06-01

    A hybrid photoneutron target including natural uranium has been studied for a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator (Linac) based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) facility. In this study the possibility of using uranium to increase the neutron intensity has been investigated by focusing on the time dependence behavior of the build-up and decay of the delayed gamma rays from fission fragments and activation products through photo-fission reactions in the BSA (Beam Shaping Assembly) configuration design. Delayed components of neutrons and photons were calculated. The obtained BSA parameters are in agreement with the IAEA recommendation and compared to the hybrid photoneutron target without U. The epithermal flux in the suggested design is 2.67E9 (n/cm 2s/mA).

  9. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  10. Investigating a multi-purpose target for electron linac based photoneutron sources for BNCT of deep-seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Rasouli, Fatemeh S.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies in BNCT have focused on investigating appropriate neutron sources as alternatives for nuclear reactors. As the most prominent facilities, the electron linac based photoneutron sources benefit from two consecutive reactions, (e, γ) and (γ, n). The photoneutron sources designed so far are composed of bipartite targets which involve practical problems and are far from the objective of achieving an optimized neutron source. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple target for a photoneutron source based on an electron linac. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, tungsten is found to have the potential of utilizing as both photon converter and photoneutron target. Besides, it is shown that an optimized dimension for such a target slows-down the produced neutrons toward the desired energy range while keeping them economy, which makes achieving the recommended criteria for BNCT of deep-tumors more available. This multi-purpose target does not involve complicated designing, and can be considered as a significant step toward finding application of photoneutron sources for in-hospital treatments. In order to shape the neutron beam emitted from such a target, the beam is planned to pass through an optimized arrangement of materials composed of moderators, filters, reflector, and collimator. By assessment with the recommended in-air parameters, it is shown that the designed beam provides high intensity of desired neutrons, as well as low background contamination. The last section of this study is devoted to investigate the performance of the resultant beam in deep tissue. A typical simulated liver tumor, located within a phantom of human body, was subjected to the irradiation of the designed spectrum. The dosimetric results, including evaluated depth-dose curves and carried out in-phantom parameters show that the proposed configuration establishes acceptable agreement between the appropriate neutron intensity, and

  11. Single Fraction Versus Fractionated Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Collen, Christine; Ampe, Ben; Gevaert, Thierry; Moens, Maarten; Linthout, Nadine; De Ridder, Mark; Verellen, Dirk; D'Haens, Jean; Storme, Guy

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare outcomes for patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated in a single institution with linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred and nineteen patients (SRS = 78, SRT = 41) were treated. For both SRS and SRT, beam shaping is performed by a mini-multileaf collimator. For SRS, a median single dose of 12.5 Gy (range, 11-14 Gy), prescribed to the 80% isodose line encompassing the target, was applied. Of the 42 SRT treatments, 32 treatments consisted of 10 fractions of 3-4 Gy, and 10 patients received 25 sessions of 2 Gy, prescribed to the 100% with the 95% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Mean largest tumor diameter was 16.6 mm in the SRS and 24.6 mm in the SRT group. Local tumor control, cranial nerve toxicity, and preservation of useful hearing were recorded. Any new treatment-induced cranial nerve neuropathy was scored as a complication. Results: Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 6-136 months), 5 patients progressed, resulting in an overall 5-year local tumor control of 95%. The overall 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 88% and facial nerve neuropathy was statistically significantly higher after SRS, after prior surgery, for larger tumors, and in Koos Grade {>=}3. The overall 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability was 96%, not significantly influenced by any of the risk factors. The overall 4-year probability of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson score 1 or 2) was 68%, not significantly different between SRS or SRT (59% vs. 82%, p = 0.089, log rank). Conclusion: Linac-based RT results in good local control and acceptable clinical outcome in small to medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Radiosurgery for large VSs (Koos Grade {>=}3) remains a challenge because of increased facial nerve neuropathy.

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  13. LEPS2 : the second Laser-Electron Photon facility at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yosoi, M.

    2011-10-01

    A new project to construct the second beamline for the laser-electron photon beam at SPring-8 (LEPS2) has started. Based on the LEPS experience, the project aims to improve the intensity of the photon beam and to expand the detector acceptance by adopting the BNL-E949 detector, which is a hermetic detector in a large 1 T solenoid magnet. The central region of tracking chambers will be upgraded for the LEPS2. A new LEPS2 experimental building has just been constructed outside the experimental hall of the storage ring. The present status of the development of a frozen-spin polarized HD target is also reported.

  14. Novel layered two-dimensional semiconductors as the building blocks for nano-electronic/photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guoxiong; De, Debtanu; Hadjiev, Viktor G.; Peng, Haibing

    2014-06-01

    Layered two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors beyond graphene have been emerging as potential building blocks for the next-generation electronic/photonic applications. Representative metal chalcogenides, including the widely studied MoS2, possess similar layered crystal structures with weak interaction between adjacent layers, thus allowing the formation of stable thin-layer crystals with thickness down to a few or even single atomic layer. Other important chalcogenides, involving earth-abundant and environment-friendly materials desirable for sustainable applications, include SnS2 (band gap: 2.1 eV) and SnS (band gap: 1.1 eV). So far, commonly adopted for research purpose are mechanical and liquid exfoliation methods for creating thin layers of such 2D semiconductors. Most recently, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was attracting significant attention as a practical method for producing thin films or crystal grains of MoS2. However, critical yet still absent is an effective experimental approach for controlling the positions of thin crystal grains of layered 2D semiconductors during the CVD process. Here we report the controlled CVD synthesis of thin crystal arrays of representative layered semiconductors (including SnS2 and SnS) at designed locations on chip, promising large-scale optoelectronic applications. Our work opens a window for future practical applications of layered 2D semiconductors in integrated nano-electronic/photonic systems.

  15. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  16. Program EPICP: Electron photon interaction code, photon test module. Version 94.2

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    The computer code EPICP performs Monte Carlo photon transport calculations in a simple one zone cylindrical detector. Results include deposition within the detector, transmission, reflection and lateral leakage from the detector, as well as events and energy deposition as a function of the depth into the detector. EPICP is part of the EPIC (Electron Photon Interaction Code) system. EPICP is designed to perform both normal transport calculations and diagnostic calculations involving only photons, with the objective of developing optimum algorithms for later use in EPIC. The EPIC system includes other modules that are designed to develop optimum algorithms for later use in EPIC; this includes electron and positron transport (EPICE), neutron transport (EPICN), charged particle transport (EPICC), geometry (EPICG), source sampling (EPICS). This is a modular system that once optimized can be linked together to consider a wide variety of particles, geometries, sources, etc. By design EPICP only considers photon transport. In particular it does not consider electron transport so that later EPICP and EPICE can be used to quantitatively evaluate the importance of electron transport when starting from photon sources. In this report I will merely mention where we expect the results to significantly differ from those obtained considering only photon transport from that obtained using coupled electron-photon transport.

  17. Deflecting RF cavity design for a recirculating linac based facility for ultrafast X-ray science (LUX)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.N.

    2003-05-01

    We report on superconducting deflecting RF cavity designs for a Recirculating Linac Based Facility for Ultrafast X-ray Science (LUX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deflecting cavities operate in the lowest dipole mode and are required to produce a temporal correlation within flat electron bunches, as needed for x-ray compression in crystal optics. Deflecting voltage of up to 8.5-MV is required at 3.9-GHz. We present a 7-cell cavity design in this paper. Seven such cavities are required to generate the 8.5 MV deflecting voltage. Longitudinal and transverse impedance from LOM (lower order mode) and HOM (higher order mode) are simulated using the MAFIA code. Short-range and long-range wakefield excited through these impedances are calculated. Beam loading effects of the deflecting mode and LOM modes are estimated. Q values of the LOM monopole modes in the cavity may need to be damped to be below 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} levels in order to maintain the required energy spread.

  18. Intra-operative 3D guidance and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy using a non-isocentric C-arm

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Vikal, S.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy treatment planning system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40–100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45–87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on six patients with 48–82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of over four additional seeds in the six enrolled patients (minimum 1; maximum 9). Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a

  19. ITS; The intergrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes-version 3. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J. A.; Kensek, R.P. ); Valdez, G.D. ); Seltzer, S.M.; Berger, M.J. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports on the ITS system which is a powerful and use-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Version 3.0 is a major upgrade of the system with important improvements in the physical model, variance reduction, I/O, and user friendliness. Improvements to the cross-section generator include the replacement of Born-approximation bremsstrahlung cross sections with the results of numerical phase-shift calculations, the addition of coherent scattering and binding effects in incoherent scattering, an upgrade of collisional and radiative stopping powers, and a complete rewrite to Fortran 77 standards emphasizing Block-IF structure.

  20. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  1. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  2. Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron/Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-11-30

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. The Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects onemore » of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 95. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.« less

  3. Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron/Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes System.

    SciTech Connect

    VALDEZ, GREG D.

    2012-11-30

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. The Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 95. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  4. SU-E-J-70: Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Techniques Using Portal Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, K Raja; Pangam, S; Kolla, J; Ponaganti, S; Ali, M; Vuba, S; Mariyappan, P; Babaiah, M; Komanduri, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for verification of dose distribution in a patient during treatment using multiple isocentric Intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques with portal dosimetry. Methods: Varian True Beam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has an integrated image mode for portal dosimetry (PD). The source-to-imager distance was taken at 150 cm to avoid collision to the table. Fourteen fractions were analyzed for this study. During shift in a single plan from one isocenter to another isocenter, EPID also shifted longitudinally for each field by taking the extent of divergence of beam into the consideration for EPID distance of 150cm. Patients were given treatment everyday with EPID placed in proper position for each field. Several parameters were obtained by comparing the dose distribution between fractions to fraction. The impact of the intra-fraction and inter-fraction of the patient in combination with isocenter shift of the beams were observed. Results: During treatment, measurements were performed by EPID and were evaluated by the gamma method. Analysis was done between fractions for multiple isocenter treatments. The pass rates of the gamma analysis with a criterion of 3% and 3 mm for the 14 fractions were over 97.8% with good consistency. Whereas maximum gamma exceeded the criteria in few fractions (in<1 cc vol). Average gamma was observed in the criteria of 0.5%. Maximum dose difference and average dose differences were less than 0.22 CU and 0.01 CU for maximum tolerance of 1.0 CU and 0.2 CU respectively. Conclusion: EPID with extended distance is ideal method to verify the multiple isocentric dose distribution in patient during treatment, especially cold and hot spots in junction dose. Verification of shifts as well as the dose differences between each fraction due to inter-fraction and intra-fraction of the patient can be derived.

  5. Extension of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes to 100 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.G.

    1988-08-01

    Version 2.1 of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) of electron-photon Monte Carlo codes was modified to extend their ability to model interactions up to 100 GeV. Benchmarks against experimental results conducted at 10 and 15 GeV confirm the accuracy of the extended codes. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Utilization of optical tracking to validate a software-driven isocentric approach to robotic couch movements for proton radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C. E-mail: Wenchien.hsi@sphic.org.cn; Zeidan, Omar A.; Law, Aaron; Schreuder, Andreas N.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: An optical tracking and positioning system (OTPS) was developed to validate the software-driven isocentric (SDI) approach to control the six-degrees-of-freedom movement of a robotic couch. Methods: The SDI approach to movements rotating around a predefined isocenter, referred to as a GeoIso, instead of a mechanical pivot point was developed by the robot automation industry. With robotic couch-sag corrections for weight load in a traditional SDI approach, movements could be accurately executed for a GeoIso located within a 500 mm cubic volume on the couch for treatments. The accuracy of SDI movement was investigated using the OTPS. The GeoIso was assumed to align with the proton beam isocenter (RadIso) for gantry at the reference angle. However, the misalignment between GeoIso and RadIso was quantitatively investigated by measuring the displacements at various couch angles for a target placed at the RadIso at an initial couch angle. When circular target displacements occur on a plane, a relative isocenter shift (RIS) correction could be applied in the SDI movement to minimize target displacements. Target displacements at a fixed gantry angle without and with RIS correction were measured for 12 robotic couches. Target displacements for various gantry angles were performed on three couches in gantry rooms to study the gantry-induced RadIso shift. The RIS correction can also be applied for the RadIso shift. A new SDI approach incorporating the RIS correction with the couch sag is described in this study. In parallel, the accuracy of SDI translation movements for various weight loads of patients on the couch was investigated during positioning of patients for proton prostate treatments. Results: For a fixed gantry angle, measured target displacements without RIS correction for couch rotations in the horizontal plane varied from 4 to 20 mm. However, measured displacements perpendicular to couch rotation plane were about 2 mm for all couches. Extracted

  7. A simplified spherical harmonic method for coupled electron-photon transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Josef, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    In this thesis the author has developed a simplified spherical harmonic method (SP{sub N} method) and associated efficient solution techniques for 2-D multigroup electron-photon transport calculations. The SP{sub N} method has never before been applied to charged-particle transport. He has performed a first time Fourier analysis of the source iteration scheme and the P{sub 1} diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) scheme applied to the 2-D SP{sub N} equations. The theoretical analyses indicate that the source iteration and P{sub 1} DSA schemes are as effective for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. In addition, he has applied an angular multigrid acceleration scheme, and computationally demonstrated that it performs as well as for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. It has previously been shown for 1-D S{sub N} calculations that this scheme is much more effective than the DSA scheme when scattering is highly forward-peaked. The author has investigated the applicability of the SP{sub N} approximation to two different physical classes of problems: satellite electronics shielding from geomagnetically trapped electrons, and electron beam problems.

  8. Means and method for calibrating a photon detector utilizing electron-photon coincidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An arrangement for calibrating a photon detector particularly applicable for the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions is based on electron photon coincidence utilizing crossed electron beam atom beam collisions. Atoms are excited by electrons which lose a known amount of energy and scatter with a known remaining energy, while the excited atoms emit photons of known radiation. Electrons of the known remaining energy are separated from other electrons and are counted. Photons emitted in a direction related to the particular direction of scattered electrons are detected to serve as a standard. Each of the electrons is used to initiate the measurements of a time interval which terminates with the arrival of a photon exciting the photon detector. Only the number of time intervals related to the coincidence correlation and of electrons scattered in the particular direction with the known remaining energy and photons of a particular radiation level emitted due to the collisions of such scattered electrons are counted. The detector calibration is related to the number of counted electrons and photons.

  9. Anisotropic Electron-Photon and Electron-Phonon Interactions in Black Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Hasdeo, Eddwi; Parkin, William; Gracio, Jose; Tatsumi, Yuki; Nugraha, Ahmad; Puretzky, Alexander A; Das, Paul; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Saito, Riichiro; Drndic, Marija; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, M

    2016-01-01

    Orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and other layered materials, such as gallium telluride (GaTe) and tin selenide (SnSe), stand out among two-dimensional (2D) materials owing to their anisotropic in-plane structure. This anisotropy adds a new dimension to the properties of 2D materials and stimulates the development of angle-resolved photonics and electronics. However, understanding the effect of anisotropy has remained unsatisfactory to-date, as shown by a number of inconsistencies in the recent literatures. We use angle-resolved absorption and Raman spectroscopies to investigate the role of anisotropy on the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions in BP. We highlight a non-trivial dependence between anisotropies and flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. We show that once understood, the anisotropic optical absorption appears to be a reliable and simple way to identify the crystalline orientation of BP, which cannot be determined from Raman spectroscopy without the explicit consideration of excitation wavelength and flake thickness, as commonly used previously.

  10. Anisotropic Electron-Photon and Electron-Phonon Interactions in Black Phosphorus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Hasdeo, Eddwi; Liang, Liangbo; Parkin, William; Tatsumi, Yuki; Nugraha, Ahmad; Puretzky, Alexander A; Das, Paul; Sumpter, Bobby G; et al

    2016-03-10

    Orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and other layered materials, such as gallium telluride (GaTe) and tin selenide (SnSe), stand out among two-dimensional (2D) materials owing to their anisotropic in-plane structure. This anisotropy adds a new dimension to the properties of 2D materials and stimulates the development of angle-resolved photonics and electronics. However, understanding the effect of anisotropy has remained unsatisfactory to-date, as shown by a number of inconsistencies in the recent literatures. We use angle-resolved absorption and Raman spectroscopies to investigate the role of anisotropy on the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions in BP. We highlight a non-trivial dependence between anisotropies andmore » flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. We show that once understood, the anisotropic optical absorption appears to be a reliable and simple way to identify the crystalline orientation of BP, which cannot be determined from Raman spectroscopy without the explicit consideration of excitation wavelength and flake thickness, as commonly used previously.« less

  11. Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Equation for Coupled Electron-Photon Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum-Powell, J.L.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Morel, J.E.; Prinja, A.K.

    1999-07-08

    Recently, Morel and McGhee described an alternate second-order form of the transport equation called the self adjoint angular flux (SAAF) equation that has the angular flux as its unknown. The SAAF formulation has all the advantages of the traditional even- and odd-parity self-adjoint equations, with the added advantages that it yields the full angular flux when it is numerically solved, it is significantly easier to implement reflective and reflective-like boundary conditions, and in the appropriate form it can be solved in void regions. The SAAF equation has the disadvantage that the angular domain is the full unit sphere and, like the even- and odd- parity form, S{sub n} source iteration cannot be implemented using the standard sweeping algorithm. Also, problems arise in pure scattering media. Morel and McGhee demonstrated the efficacy of the SAAF formulation for neutral particle transport. Here we apply the SAAF formulation to coupled electron-photon transport problems using multigroup cross-sections from the CEPXS code and S{sub n} discretization.

  12. Measurement of the ionic emission generated by an electron-photon conversion target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Guilhem, D.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2002-08-01

    A time-of-flight diagnostic made of a double sheet sensor has been designed for the search of ions emitted by an electron-photon conversion target under the impact of an intense relativistic electron beam. This device was tested on the PIVAIR prototype accelerator. Signals attributed to ions emitted from the target were observed for different target elements. The ions C + and H + were identified by time-of-flight measurements, and their mean velocities were found to be equal to about 1.6×10 8 and 5×10 8 cm/s for C and Ta targets, respectively. The appearance, rise time and saturation values of the ionic current are close to those obtained from preliminary calculations based on an ionic emission model (VAPOR) which has been coupled to a Maxwell-Vlasov PIC code (M2V). The ionic current signal is characterised by a plateau, the level of which corresponds to the Child-Langmuir current (25 A for H + ions). Furthermore, the fall-off of this signal is synchronised with the electron beam one. This behaviour represents the de-confinement of the ion beam under the effect of its own space charge.

  13. Anisotropic Electron-Photon and Electron-Phonon Interactions in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Liang, Liangbo; Parkin, William M; Tatsumi, Yuki; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Puretzky, Alexander A; Das, Paul Masih; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Saito, Riichiro; Drndic, Marija; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-04-13

    Orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and other layered materials, such as gallium telluride (GaTe) and tin selenide (SnSe), stand out among two-dimensional (2D) materials owing to their anisotropic in-plane structure. This anisotropy adds a new dimension to the properties of 2D materials and stimulates the development of angle-resolved photonics and electronics. However, understanding the effect of anisotropy has remained unsatisfactory to date, as shown by a number of inconsistencies in the recent literature. We use angle-resolved absorption and Raman spectroscopies to investigate the role of anisotropy on the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions in BP. We highlight, both experimentally and theoretically, a nontrivial dependence between anisotropy and flake thickness and photon and phonon energies. We show that once understood, the anisotropic optical absorption appears to be a reliable and simple way to identify the crystalline orientation of BP, which cannot be determined from Raman spectroscopy without the explicit consideration of excitation wavelength and flake thickness, as commonly used previously. PMID:26963685

  14. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient ({Sigma}) and interfraction ({sigma}) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with {Sigma} = 1.1 mm and {sigma} = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups <1mm (PFX action level) the mean 3D positioning displacement reduced to 1.3 mm, with {Sigma} = 0.9 mm and {sigma} = 0.4 mm. The largest contributing systematic uncertainty was in the superior-inferior direction (mean displacement = -0.5 mm; {Sigma} = 0.9 mm). The largest mean rotation was 0.6{sup o} in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy

  15. Electron-Photon Polarization Correlation Study of Neon, Argon and Krypton Excitation by Electron Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shuanghai

    1993-01-01

    The electron impact excitation of the 3s ^' (1/2) ^0_1 state in neon, the 4s^' (1/2) ^0_1 state in argon and the 5s (3/2) ^0_1 state in krypton have been studied using the electron-photon polarization correlation technique. The two linear coherence parameters P_1 and P_2 have been measured and the alignment angle gamma and the linear polarization P ^+_{rm lin} of the angular part of the collisionally induced excited state charge cloud were extracted from the measured P _1 and P_2 parameters. We measured P_1 and P_2 in neon at an impact energy of 50 eV, in argon at impact energies of 50 eV, 40 eV, 30 eV and 25 eV, and in krypton at impact energies of 50 eV and 30 eV and electron scattering angles up to 55^circ in all cases. A comparison with theoretical predictions from first-order perturbative theories such as a Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) and a First Order Many Body Theory (FOMBT) was made. At 50 eV in neon and argon, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at small scattering angles up to 25^circ and somewhat poorer at larger scattering angles. At 50 eV in krypton, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at scattering angles up to 40 ^circ. The measurements in argon (40 eV, 30 eV, and 25 eV) generally follow the trend of the theoretical predictions, but it was found that the experimentally measured coherence parameters appear to be shifted towards larger scattering angles compared to the theoretical predictions as the impact energy is decreased. At 30 eV in krypton, very good agreement between experiment and theory was found over the entire range of electron scattering angles (up to 55^circ). The level of agreement between experiment and theory indicates that the DWBA and FOMBT appear to provide a better description of the collision process for a more complex target. We also found that the alignment angle gamma is the parameter which is perhaps least sensitive to the details of the collision.

  16. A simplified spherical harmonic method for coupled electron-photon transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Josef, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    In this thesis we have developed a simplified spherical harmonic method (SP{sub N} method) and associated efficient solution techniques for 2-D multigroup electron-photon transport calculations. The SP{sub N} method has never before been applied to charged-particle transport. We have performed a first time Fourier analysis of the source iteration scheme and the P{sub 1} diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) scheme applied to the 2-D SP{sub N} equations. Our theoretical analyses indicate that the source iteration and P{sub 1} DSA schemes are as effective for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. Previous analyses have indicated that the P{sub 1} DSA scheme is unstable (with sufficiently forward-peaked scattering and sufficiently small absorption) for the 2-D S{sub N} equations, yet is very effective for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. In addition, we have applied an angular multigrid acceleration scheme, and computationally demonstrated that it performs as well for the 2-D SP{sub N} equations as for the 1-D S{sub N} equations. It has previously been shown for 1-D S{sub N} calculations that this scheme is much more effective than the DSA scheme when scattering is highly forward-peaked. We have investigated the applicability of the SP{sub N} approximation to two different physical classes of problems: satellite electronics shielding from geomagnetically trapped electrons, and electron beam problems. In the space shielding study, the SP{sub N} method produced solutions that are accurate within 10% of the benchmark Monte Carlo solutions, and often orders of magnitude faster than Monte Carlo. We have successfully modeled quasi-void problems and have obtained excellent agreement with Monte Carlo. We have observed that the SP{sub N} method appears to be too diffusive an approximation for beam problems. This result, however, is in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  17. Results for local control and functional outcome after linac-based image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery in 190 patients with vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Böhmer, Dirk; Synowitz, Michael; Wiener, Edzard; Budach, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed local control (LC) and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods Between 1998 and 2008, 190 patients with VS were treated with SRS. All patients had tumors <2 cm diameter. Patients received 13.5 Gy prescribed to the 80th isodose at the tumor margin. The primary endpoint was LC. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. Results Median follow-up was 40 months. LC was achieved in 88% of patients. There were no acute reactions exceeding Grade I. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction was present in 21.6% (n = 41) prior to SRS. After treatment, 85% (n = 155) had no change, 4.4,% (n = 8) had a relief of symptoms, 10.4% (n = 19) had new symptoms. Facial nerve dysfunction was present in some patients prior to treatment, e.g. paresis (12.6%; n = 24) and dysgeusia (0.5%; n = 1). After treatment 1.1% (n = 2) reported improvement and 6.1% (n = 11) experienced new symptoms. Hearing problems before SRS were present in 69.5% of patients (n = 132). After treatment, 62.6% (n = 144) had no change, 10.4% (n = 19) experienced improvement and 26.9% (n = 49) became hearing impaired. Conclusion This series of SRS for small VS provided similar LC rates to microsurgery; thus, it is effective as a non-invasive, image-guided procedure. The functional outcomes observed indicate the safety and effectiveness of linac-based SRS. Patients may now be informed of the clinical equivalence of SRS to microsurgery. PMID:23979079

  18. SU-E-T-514: Simultaneously Determination of Radiation Isocentricity of Gantry, Collimator and Couch Using a Commercial Three-Dimensional Dosimetry QA Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S; Song, H; Wu, Q

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation isocentricity is an important benchmark for a LINAC and is typically determined by 3 separate film star-shots. We developed a technique to simultaneously determine the radiation isocenter of gantry, collimator and couch with a commercial 3D QA apparatus. Methods: The ArcCHECK from SunNuclear was used on two LINACs. It was aligned with room lasers. For gantry rotation, collimator and couch were set to zero and gantry was placed to 0, 49, 213 and 311 degrees. Similarly, a set of collimator/couch angles were chosen with the other two axes at neutral positions. The measured dose matrices were analyzed by an in-house MATLAB program. For each shot, the central axis was determined by computing the FWHM of the diode arrays. The largest inscribed circle from these central axis lines was used to determine isocenter: the radius as the benchmark of isocentricity and the coordinates of the center as the discrepancy of radiation isocenter to the origin defined by lasers. To validate the method, the couch was shifted by ~5 mm in all three directions and measurements were repeated. Results: The radius of the largest inscribed circle for gantry, collimator and couch are (0.3, 0.5, 0.2) mm for one LINAC and (0.2, 0.3, 0.1) mm for the other, in agreement with the film star-shots at annual QA. The discrepancies of radiation isocenter are generally within 1 mm, except gantry rotation on one LINAC due to the drift of foot laser. The differences in positions detected are consistent with the intentional predefined shift. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a technique for the simultaneous measurement of gantry, collimator, and couch isocentricity with a set of carefully chosen irradiation parameters based on the specific construction geometry of the 3D detector ArcCheck. This can replace the standard film star-shots. The future work includes improving operation efficiency.

  19. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  20. SU-E-T-567: A Three-Field Mono-Isocentric Inverse Treatment Planning Method for the Patients with Larger Breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Marina, O; Chen, P; Teahan, M; Liu, Q; Benedetti, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a three-field monoisocentric inverse breast treatment planning technique without the use of half-beam block. Methods: Conventional three-field breast treatment with supraclavicular half-beam blocked requires two isocenters when the breast is too large to be contained within half-beam. The inferior border of the supraclavicular field and superior borders of the breast fields are matched on patient's skin with the light field. This method causes a large dose variation in the matching region due to daily setup uncertainties and requires a longer treatment setup time. We developed a three-field mono-isocentric planning method for the treatment of larger breasts. The three fields share the same isocenter located in the breast. Beam matching is achieved by rotating collimator, couch and gantry. Furthermore, we employed a mixed open-IMRT inverse optimization method to improve dose uniformity and coverage. Results: Perfect geometric beam matching was achieved by rotating couch, collimator and gantry together. Treatment setup time was significantly reduced without light-field matching during treatment deliveries. Inverse mixed open-IMRT optimization method achieved better dose uniformity and PTV coverage while keeping sufficient air flash to compensate setup and breast shape changes in daily treatments. Conclusion: By eliminating light field matching, the three-field mono-isocentric treatment method can significantly reduce setup time and uncertainty for large breast patients. Plan quality is further improved by inverse IMRT planning.

  1. A deterministic electron, photon, proton and heavy ion transport suite for the study of the Jovian moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2011-02-01

    A Langley research center (LaRC) developed deterministic suite of radiation transport codes describing the propagation of electron, photon, proton and heavy ion in condensed media is used to simulate the exposure from the spectral distribution of the aforementioned particles in the Jovian radiation environment. Based on the measurements by the Galileo probe (1995-2003) heavy ion counter (HIC), the choice of trapped heavy ions is limited to carbon, oxygen and sulfur (COS). The deterministic particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron photon algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light heavy ion algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means to the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, photon, proton and heavy ion exposure assessment in a complex space structure. In this paper, the reference radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron and proton spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) Galileo interim radiation electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter system mission (EJSM), the JPL provided Europa mission fluence spectrum, is used to produce the corresponding depth dose curve in silicon behind a default aluminum shield of 100 mils (˜0.7 g/cm2). The transport suite can also accept a geometry describing ray traced thickness file from a computer aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point within the interior of the vehicle. In that regard, using a low fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe generated by the authors, the transport suite was verified versus Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for orbits JOI-J35 of the Galileo probe

  2. Silicon/III-V laser with super-compact diffraction grating for WDM applications in electronic-photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadong; Wei, Yongqiang; Huang, Yingyan; Tu, Yongming; Ng, Doris; Lee, Cheewei; Zheng, Yunan; Liu, Boyang; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2011-01-31

    We have demonstrated a heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-Silicon laser based on an ultra-large-angle super-compact grating (SCG). The SCG enables single-wavelength operation due to its high-spectral-resolution aberration-free design, enabling wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (EPICs). The SCG based Si/III-V laser is realized by fabricating the SCG on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Optical gain is provided by electrically pumped heterogeneous integrated III-V material on silicon. Single-wavelength lasing at 1550 nm with an output power of over 2 mW and a lasing threshold of around 150 mA were achieved. PMID:21369017

  3. SU-E-T-355: A Comparative Study of Robotic and Linac-Based Stereotactitc Body Radiation Therapy for Lumbar Spinal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, E; Monterroso, M; Couto, M; Ly, B; Mihaylov, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetrically compare CyberKnife (CK) and linac-based (LB) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans for lumbar spine. Methods: Ten patient plans with lumbar spine tumors treated with CK were selected and retrospectively optimized using three techniques: CK, volumetric modulated arc (VMAT, three arcs), and 9-field-intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For the LB plans, the target volume was expanded by 1mm to accommodate additional uncertainty in patient positioning. All plans were optimized to a prescription dose of 27Gy in 3 fractions covering 90% of the PTV. If the dose constraints to the cauda equina (cauda) were not met, the prescription dose was lowered to 24Gy. Parameters evaluated included Paddick Conformity-Index (CI) and Gradient-Index (GI). A two-tailed paired t-test was used to establish statistically significant differences in cauda doses. Results: Target volumes for LB plans were on average 38% larger. In terms of the indices, the closer the index values to unity the steeper the dose falloff and the higher the dose conformity to the target. The results showed that LB plans were in general statistically superior to CK plans. The IMRT plan showed the best average gradient index of 2.995, with VMAT and CK GI values of 3.699 and 5.476, respectively. Similarly, the same trend occurs with the average CI results: 0.821, 0.814, and 0.758, corresponding to IMRT, VMAT, and CK. Notably, in one CK plan the target dose was reduced to 24Gy to meet cauda constraints. Additionally, there was a statistically significant dose difference for the cauda between the CK and LB plans. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that LB plans for lumbar spine SBRT can be as effective or even better than CK plans. Despite the expansion of the target volume, the LB plans did not demonstrate dosimetric inferiority. The LB plans Resultin 2-to-3 fold decrease of treatment time.

  4. Development of a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Sempau, Josep; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate method for absorbed dose calculations in radiotherapy. Its efficiency still requires improvement for routine clinical applications, especially for online adaptive radiotherapy. In this paper, we report our recent development on a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport. We have implemented the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo dose calculation package (Sempau et al 2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 2263-91) on the GPU architecture under the CUDA platform. The implementation has been tested with respect to the original sequential DPM code on the CPU in phantoms with water-lung-water or water-bone-water slab geometry. A 20 MeV mono-energetic electron point source or a 6 MV photon point source is used in our validation. The results demonstrate adequate accuracy of our GPU implementation for both electron and photon beams in the radiotherapy energy range. Speed-up factors of about 5.0-6.6 times have been observed, using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. PMID:20463376

  5. Spectral broadening and electron-photon coupling in III-V infrared detectors of low dimensional quantum confined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Soumitra R.; Mohammedy, Farseem M.

    2016-05-01

    Present work explores the mid-IR photodetection mechanism in III-V quantum confined system in twofold ways. Firstly, it models the extent of spectral linewidth broadening of photo-detector. Secondly, it investigates whether a strong perturbation of light can modulate the electronic bandstructure. Photo-absorption mechanism in the detector correlated to reduced carrier lifetime in ground state leading to homogeneous spectral widening is calculated. Besides, contribution of non-uniform size and composition of quantum dots towards spectral broadening is modeled in order to get the envelop of inhomogeneously broadened photocurrent spectrum. Our model generates photocurrent spectrum with 1.4 μm broadening centered at 3.5 μm at 77 K for a DWELL-IP, which agrees with the experimental result. The calculated photocurrent spectral width of 1.3 μm for GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Well (QW) centered at 8.31 μm at 77 K also supports experimental data. In addition, our calculation reveals the emergence of a broad resonant peak in the spectrum of QW-IP in far infrared region (20-50 μm) as the photon volume density increases up to 0.1% of carrier density inside the active region. We introduce a hybrid density-of-states for strongly coupled electron-photon system to explain both mid and far IR peak.

  6. Importance of point-by-point back projection correction for isocentric motion in digital breast tomosynthesis: Relevance to morphology of structures such as microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ying; Lo, Joseph Y.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2007-10-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis is a three-dimensional imaging technique that provides an arbitrary set of reconstruction planes in the breast from a limited-angle series of projection images acquired while the x-ray tube moves. Traditional shift-and-add (SAA) tomosynthesis reconstruction is a common mathematical method to line up each projection image based on its shifting amount to generate reconstruction slices. With parallel-path geometry of tube motion, the path of the tube lies in a plane parallel to the plane of the detector. The traditional SAA algorithm gives shift amounts for each projection image calculated only along the direction of x-ray tube movement. However, with the partial isocentric motion of the x-ray tube in breast tomosynthesis, small objects such as microcalcifications appear blurred (for instance, about 1-4 pixels in blur for a microcalcification in a human breast) in traditional SAA images in the direction perpendicular to the direction of tube motion. Some digital breast tomosynthesis algorithms reported in the literature utilize a traditional one-dimensional SAA method that is not wholly suitable for isocentric motion. In this paper, a point-by-point back projection (BP) method is described and compared with traditional SAA for the important clinical task of evaluating morphology of small objects such as microcalcifications. Impulse responses at different three-dimensional locations with five different combinations of imaging acquisition parameters were investigated. Reconstruction images of microcalcifications in a human subject were also evaluated. Results showed that with traditional SAA and 45 deg. view angle of tube movement with respect to the detector, at the same height above the detector, the in-plane blur artifacts were obvious for objects farther away from x-ray source. In a human subject, the appearance of calcifications was blurred in the direction orthogonal to the tube motion with traditional SAA. With point-by-point BP, the

  7. Dosimetric comparison of Linac-based (BrainLAB®) and robotic radiosurgery (CyberKnife ®) stereotactic system plans for acoustic schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debnarayan; Balaji Subramanian, S; Murli, V; Sudahar, H; Gopalakrishna Kurup, P G; Potharaju, Mahadev

    2012-02-01

    A dosimetric comparison of linear accelerator (LA)-based (BrainLAB) and robotic radiosurgery (RS) (CyberKnife) systems for acoustic schwannoma (Acoustic neuroma, AN) was carried out. Seven patients with radiologically confirmed unilateral AN were planned with both an LA-based (BrainLAB) and robotic RS (CyberKnife) system using the same computed tomography (CT) dataset and contours. Gross tumour volume (GTV) was contoured on post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan [planning target volume (PTV) margin 2 mm]. Planning and calculation were done with appropriate calculation algorithms. The prescribed isodose in both systems was considered adequate to cover at least 95% of the contoured target. Plan evaluations were done by examining the target coverage by the prescribed isodose line, and high- and low-dose volumes. Isodose plans and dose volume histograms generated by the two systems were compared. There was no statistically significant difference between the contoured volumes between the systems. Tumour volumes ranged from 380 to 3,100 mm(3). Dose prescription was 13-15 Gy in single fraction (median prescribed isodose 85%). There were no significant differences in conformity index (CI) (0.53 versus 0.58; P = 0.225), maximum brainstem dose (4.9 versus 4.7 Gy; P = 0.935), 2.5-Gy volume (39.9 versus 52.3 cc; P = 0.238) or 5-Gy volume (11.8 versus 16.8 cc; P = 0.129) between BrainLAB and CyberKnife system plans. There were statistically significant differences in organs at risk (OAR) doses, such as mean cochlear dose (6.9 versus 5.4 Gy; P = 0.001), mean mesial temporal dose (2.6 versus 1.7 Gy; P = 0.07) and high-dose (10 Gy) volume (3.2 versus 5.2 cc; P = 0.017). AN patients planned with the CyberKnife system had superior OAR (cochlea and mesial temporal lobe) sparing compared with those planned with the Linac-based system. Further evaluation of these findings in prospective studies with clinical correlation will provide actual clinical benefit from the

  8. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-07-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  9. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  10. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  11. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  12. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  13. Development of high intensity laser-electron photon beams up to 2.9 GeV at the SPring-8 LEPS beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, N.; Kon, Y.; Daté, S.; Ohashi, Y.; Akimune, H.; Chen, J. Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hotta, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iwata, T.; Kato, Y.; Kohri, H.; Matsumura, T.; Mibe, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Morino, Y.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsugawa, Y.; Ohkuma, H.; Ohta, T.; Oka, M.; Sawada, T.; Wakai, A.; Yonehara, K.; Yoon, C. J.; Yorita, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2014-02-01

    A laser-Compton backscattering beam, which we call a 'Laser-Electron Photon' beam, was upgraded at the LEPS beamline of SPring-8. We accomplished the gains in backscattered photon beam intensities by factors of 1.5-1.8 with the injection of two adjacent laser beams or a higher power laser beam into the storage ring. The maximum energy of the photon beam was also extended from 2.4 GeV to 2.9 GeV with deep-ultraviolet lasers. The upgraded beams have been utilized for hadron photoproduction experiments at the LEPS beamline. Based on the developed methods, we plan the simultaneous injection of four high power laser beams at the LEPS2 beamline, which has been newly constructed at SPring-8. As a simulation result, we expect an order of magnitude higher intensities close to 107 s-1 and 106 s-1 for tagged photons up to 2.4 GeV and 2.9 GeV, respectively.

  14. Estimation of daily interfractional larynx residual setup error after isocentric alignment for head and neck radiotherapy: Quality-assurance implications for target volume and organ-at-risk margination using daily CT-on-rails imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Charles A.; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Akel, Imad; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S.; Dyer, Brandon A.; Court, Laurence; Sevak, Parag R; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Larynx may alternatively serve as a target or organ-at-risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study was to estimate IGRT parameters required for larynx positional error independent of isocentric alignment and suggest population–based compensatory margins. Ten HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with daily CT-on-rails imaging were assessed. Seven landmark points were placed on each daily scan. Taking the most superior anterior point of the C5 vertebra as a reference isocenter for each scan, residual displacement vectors to the other 6 points were calculated post-isocentric alignment. Subsequently, using the first scan as a reference, the magnitude of vector differences for all 6 points for all scans over the course of treatment were calculated. Residual systematic and random error, and the necessary compensatory CTV-to-PTV and OAR-to-PRV margins were calculated, using both observational cohort data and a bootstrap-resampled population estimator. The grand mean displacements for all anatomical points was 5.07mm, with mean systematic error of 1.1mm and mean random setup error of 2.63mm, while bootstrapped POIs grand mean displacement was 5.09mm, with mean systematic error of 1.23mm and mean random setup error of 2.61mm. Required margin for CTV-PTV expansion was 4.6mm for all cohort points, while the bootstrap estimator of the equivalent margin was 4.9mm. The calculated OAR-to-PRV expansion for the observed residual set-up error was 2.7mm, and bootstrap estimated expansion of 2.9mm. We conclude that the interfractional larynx setup error is a significant source of RT set-up/delivery error in HNC both when the larynx is considered as a CTV or OAR. We estimate the need for a uniform expansion of 5mm to compensate for set up error if the larynx is a target or 3mm if the larynx is an OAR when using a non-laryngeal bony isocenter. PMID:25679151

  15. LINAC-based transuranic waste characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Womble, P.C.; Vourvopoulos, G.; Roberts, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Remote-handled transuranic nuclear waste poses a particular challenge for assaying due to the high neutron and gamma ray background that emanates from the non-fissile, but highly radioactive material, contained with the waste. The utilization of a RFQ linac with a neutron flux has shown that, in principle, the differential die-away technique can reliably assay this special class of nuclear waste.

  16. Comments on a linac based beauty factory

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Heifets; Geoffrey Krafft; C. McDowell; M. Fripp

    1990-02-01

    A consistent set of parameters is given for a B-factory based on collisions of an electron beam from a SRF linac with the positron beam in a storage ring. An optimized lattice, an impedance estimate, a study of beam stability, and a discussion of collisions with large disruption parameters are included.

  17. Enigmatic electrons, photons, and ``empty`` waves

    SciTech Connect

    MacGregor, M.H.

    1995-08-22

    A spectroscopic analysis is made of electrons and photons from the standpoint of physical realism. In this conceptual framework, moving particles are portrayed as localized entities which are surrounded by ``empty`` waves. A spectroscopic model for the electron Stands as a guide for a somewhat similar, but in essential respects radically different, model for the photon. This leads in turn to a model for the ``zeron``. the quantum of the empty wave. The properties of these quanta mandate new basis states, and hence an extension of our customary framework for dealing with them. The zeron wave field of a photon differs in one important respect from the standard formalism for an electromagnetic wave. The vacuum state emerges as more than just a passive bystander. Its polarization properties provide wave stabilization, particle probability distributions, and orbit quantization. Questions with regard to special relativity are discussed.

  18. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Schwarz, M.; Plech, A.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Schmelling, M.; Müller, A.-S.

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (˜1 ps) THz pulses (up to ˜4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (˜100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  19. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Schwarz, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Plech, A.; Schmelling, M.; Mueller, A.-S.

    2013-02-15

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short ({approx}1 ps) THz pulses (up to {approx}4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range ({approx}100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  20. FLUTE: a versatile linac-based THz source.

    PubMed

    Nasse, M J; Schuh, M; Naknaimueang, S; Schwarz, M; Plech, A; Mathis, Y-L; Rossmanith, R; Wesolowski, P; Huttel, E; Schmelling, M; Müller, A-S

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (~1 ps) THz pulses (up to ~4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (~100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments. PMID:23464187

  1. Advances in Linac-Based Technology for Industrial Radiation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    Experience with the Industrial Materials Processing Electron Linear Accelerator, IMPELA, over 30,000 hours of 50 kW operation is reported for three irradiators, two of which are in commercial service. Operations are sufficiently mature that research is now concentrated on split beams, photon conversion, dose monitoring, beam scanning, new shielding designs and QA controls. The efficacy of increasing the incident electron energy on bremsstrahlung converters to 7.5 MeV, as proposed by an IAEA committee, is examined experimentally on an IMPELA accelerator over the energy range 7 MeV to 11 MeV to evaluate conversion efficiency, activation of machine components, converter engineering and the activation of red meat. Above 8 MeV the radioactive isotopes ^38Cl and ^24Na, formed primarily by neutrons produced in a tantalum converter, were clearly identified in the meat, while above 10.5 MeV the radiation from ^13N becomes dominant. Implications for the practicality of processing other high density products are discussed.

  2. Accurate eye center location through invariant isocentric patterns.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Roberto; Gevers, Theo

    2012-09-01

    Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location can be determined using commercial eye-gaze trackers, but additional constraints and expensive hardware make these existing solutions unattractive and impossible to use on standard (i.e., visible wavelength), low-resolution images of eyes. Systems based solely on appearance are proposed in the literature, but their accuracy does not allow us to accurately locate and distinguish eye centers movements in these low-resolution settings. Our aim is to bridge this gap by locating the center of the eye within the area of the pupil on low-resolution images taken from a webcam or a similar device. The proposed method makes use of isophote properties to gain invariance to linear lighting changes (contrast and brightness), to achieve in-plane rotational invariance, and to keep low-computational costs. To further gain scale invariance, the approach is applied to a scale space pyramid. In this paper, we extensively test our approach for its robustness to changes in illumination, head pose, scale, occlusion, and eye rotation. We demonstrate that our system can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy over state-of-the-art techniques for eye center location in standard low-resolution imagery. PMID:22813958

  3. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  4. Electron-Photon Coincidence Calibration Of Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute and relative detector efficiencies measured. Apparatus uses coincidence-counting techniques to measure efficiency of ultraviolet or vacuum ultraviolet detector at very low radiation intensity. Crossed electron and atomic beams generate photons used to calibrate photon detector. Pulses from electron counter and photon detector(s) processed by standard coincidence-counting techniques. Used to calibrate other detectors or make absolute measurements of incident photon fluxes.

  5. Electronic-photonic integrated circuits on the CMOS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimerling, L. C.; Ahn, D.; Apsel, A. B.; Beals, M.; Carothers, D.; Chen, Y.-K.; Conway, T.; Gill, D. M.; Grove, M.; Hong, C.-Y.; Lipson, M.; Liu, J.; Michel, J.; Pan, D.; Patel, S. S.; Pomerene, A. T.; Rasras, M.; Sparacin, D. K.; Tu, K.-Y.; White, A. E.; Wong, C. W.

    2006-02-01

    The optical components industry stands at the threshold of a major expansion that will restructure its business processes and sustain its profitability for the next three decades. This growth will establish a cost effective platform for the partitioning of electronic and photonic functionality to extend the processing power of integrated circuits. BAE Systems, Lucent Technologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Applied Wave Research are participating in a high payoff research and development program for the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) of DARPA. The goal of the program is the development of technologies and design tools necessary to fabricate an application-specific, electronicphotonic integrated circuit (AS-EPIC). As part of the development of this demonstration platform we are exploring selected functions normally associated with the front end of mixed signal receivers such as modulation, detection, and filtering. The chip will be fabricated in the BAE Systems CMOS foundry and at MIT's Microphotonics Center. We will present the latest results on the performance of multi-layer deposited High Index Contrast Waveguides, CMOS compatible modulators and detectors, and optical filter slices. These advances will be discussed in the context of the Communications Technology Roadmap that was recently released by the MIT Microphotonics Center Industry Consortium.

  6. Electron-photon coupling in mesoscopic quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.; Douçot, B.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interaction between cavity photons and electronic nanocircuits is crucial for the development of mesoscopic quantum electrodynamics (QED). One has to combine ingredients from atomic cavity QED, such as orbital degrees of freedom, with tunneling physics and strong cavity field inhomogeneities, specific to superconducting circuit QED. It is therefore necessary to introduce a formalism which bridges between these two domains. We develop a general method based on a photonic pseudopotential to describe the electric coupling between electrons in a nanocircuit and cavity photons. In this picture, photons can induce simultaneously orbital energy shifts, tunneling, and local orbital transitions. We study in detail the elementary example of a single quantum dot with a single normal metal reservoir, coupled to a cavity. Photon-induced tunneling terms lead to a nonuniversal relation between the cavity frequency pull and the damping pull. Our formalism can also be applied to multiple quantum dot circuits, molecular circuits, quantum point contacts, metallic tunnel junctions, and superconducting nanostructures enclosing Andreev bound states or Majorana bound states, for instance.

  7. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  8. Comparative analyses of linac and Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Kwok, Y.; Chin, L. S.; Yu, C.; Regine, W. F.

    2005-11-01

    Dedicated linac-based radiosurgery has been reported for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. In this study, we investigated the dose fall-off characteristics and setup error tolerance of linac-based radiosurgery as compared with standard Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In order to minimize the errors from different treatment planning calculations, consistent imaging registration, dose calculation and dose volume analysis methods were developed and implemented for both Gamma Knife and linac-based treatments. Intra-arc setup errors were incorporated into the treatment planning process of linac-based deliveries. The effects of intra-arc setup errors with increasing number of arcs were studied and benchmarked against Gamma Knife deliveries with and without plugging patterns. Our studies found equivalent dose fall-off properties between Gamma Knife and linac-based radiosurgery given a sufficient number of arcs (>7) and small intra-arc errors (<0.5 mm) were satisfied for linac-based deliveries. Increasing the number of arcs significantly decreased the variations in the dose fall-off curve at the low isodose region (e.g. from 40% to 10%) and also improved dose uniformity at the high isodose region (e.g. from 70% to 90%). As the number of arcs increased, the effects of intra-arc setup errors on the dose fall-off curves decreased. Increasing the number of arcs also reduced the integral dose to the distal normal brain tissues. In conclusion, linac-based radiosurgery produces equivalent dose fall-off characteristics to Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a high number of arcs. However, one must note the increased treatment time for a large number of arcs and isocentre accuracies.

  9. LUX — A Recirculating Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlett, J. N.; Barletta, W. A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W. M.; Green, M. A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S. R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2004-05-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme. We describe the facility major systems and peformance.

  10. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2009 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew Kinlaw; Scott Watson; James Johnson; Alan Hunt; Heather Seipel; Edward Reedy

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF), which is possible for nuclei with atomic numbers greater than helium (Z=2), occurs when a nuclear level is excited by resonant absorption of a photon and subsequently decays by reemission of a photon. The excited nuclear states can become readily populated, provided the incident photon’s energy is within the Doppler-broadened width of the energy level being excited. Utilizing continuous energy photon spectra, as is characteristic of a bremsstrahlung photon beam, as the inspection source, ensures that at least some fraction of the impinging beam will contribute to the population of the excited energy levels in the material of interest. Upon de-excitation, either to the ground state or to a lower-energy excited state, the emitted fluorescence photon’s energy will correspond to the energy difference between the excited state and the state to which it decays. As each isotope inherently contains unique nuclear energy levels, the NRF states for each isotope are also unique. By exploiting this phenomenon, NRF photon detection provides a well-defined signature for identifying the presence of individual nuclear species. This report summarizes the second year (Fiscal Year [FY] 2009) of a collaborative research effort between Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This effort focused on continuing to assess and optimize NRF-based detection techniques utilizing a slightly modified, commercially available, pulsed medical electron accelerator.

  11. Conformity of LINAC-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using Dynamic Conformal Arcs and Micro-Multileaf Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Hazard, Lisa J. Wang, Brian; Skidmore, Thomas B.; Chern, Shyh-Shi; Salter, Bill J.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the conformity of dynamic conformal arc linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery and to describe a standardized method of isodose surface (IDS) selection. Methods and Materials: In 174 targets, the conformity index (CI) at the prescription IDS used for treatment was calculated as CI = (PIV/PVTV)/(PVTV/TV), where TV is the target volume, PIV (prescription isodose volume) is the total volume encompassed by the prescription IDS, and PVTV is the TV encompassed by the IDS. In addition, a 'standardized' prescription IDS (sIDS) was chosen according to the following criteria: 95% of the TV was encompassed by the PIV and 99% of TV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose. The CIs at the sIDS were also calculated. Results: The median CI at the prescription IDS and sIDS was 1.63 and 1.47, respectively (p < 0.001). In 132 of 174 cases, the volume of normal tissue in the PIV was reduced by the prescription to the sIDS compared with the prescription IDS, in 20 cases it remained unchanged, and in 22 cases it was increased. Conclusion: The CIs obtained with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery are comparable to those previously reported for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Using a uniform method to select the sIDS, adequate target coverage was usually achievable with prescription to an IDS greater than that chosen by the treating physician (prescription IDS), providing sparing of normal tissue. Thus, the sIDS might aid physicians in identifying a prescription IDS that balances coverage and conformity.

  12. Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2002-12-21

    LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

  13. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  14. SU-E-T-536: LINAC-Based Single Isocenter Frameless SRT for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B; Zhang, L; Rigor, N; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter Stereotactic Radiotherapy of multiple brain metastases with Varian 21 IX LINAC, using Aktina Pinpoint system for patient setup. Methods: In 2014, five single-isocenter RapidArc SRT plans were delivered to five patients with 2 to 8 brain metastases using Varian 21 IX. Aktina Pinpoint system was used for setup and 2mm PTV margin were used. CBCT was acquired before and after the beam delivery. The prescription is 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Eclipse planning system was used for treatment planning. Depending on the number of metastases and their locations, 1 to 5 coplanar or non coplanar arcs were used. Typically, 2 or 3 arcs are used. IMRT QAs were performed by comparing an A1SL ion chamber point dose measurement in solid water phantom to point dose of the plan; also, based on EPID measurement, 3D spatial dose was calculated using DosimetryCheck software package from MathResolutions Inc. The EPID system has an active area of 40cm by 30cm with 1024 by 768 photodiodes, which corresponds to a resolution of 0.4mm by 0.4mm pixel dimension. Results: for all the plans, at least 95% PTV coverage was achieved for full prescription dose, with plan normalization > 75%. RTOG conformity indices are less than 1.1 and Paddick gradient indices are less than 4.5. The distance from prescription IDL to 50% IDL increases as the number of metastases increases, and it ranges from 0.6mm to 0.8mm. Treatment time varies from 10mins to 30mins, depending on the number of arcs and if the arcs are coplanar. IMRT QA shows that the ion chamber measurement agree with the eclipse calculation within 3%, and 95% of the points passed Gamma, using 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA Conclusion: High quality single isocenter RapidArc SRT plan can be optimized and accurately delivered using Eclipse and Varian 21IX.

  15. LUX - A recirculating linac-based ultrafast X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2003-08-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme.

  16. LUX - a recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Penn, G.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Stover, G.; Virostek, S.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A.

    2004-06-29

    We present recent developments in design concepts for LUX - a source of ultra-short synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac. The source produces high-flux x-ray pulses with duration of 100 fs or less at a 10 kHz repetition rate, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics across many fields of science [1]. Cascaded harmonic generation in free-electron lasers (FEL's) produces coherent radiation in the VUV-soft x-ray regime, and a specialized technique is used to compress spontaneous emission for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness electron bunches of 2-3 mm-mrad emittance at 1 nC charge in 30 ps duration are produced in an rf photocathode gun and compressed to 3 ps duration following an injector linac, and recirculated three times through a 1 GeV main linac. In each return path, independently tunable harmonic cascades are inserted to produce seeded FEL radiation in selected photon energy ranges from approximately 20 eV with a single stage of harmonic generation, to 1 keV with a four-stage cascade. The lattice is designed to minimize emittance growth from effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), and resistive wall wakefields. Timing jitter between pump lasers and x-ray pulses is minimized by use of a stable optical master oscillator, distributing timing signals over actively stabilized fiber-optic, phase-locking all lasers to the master oscillator, and generating all rf signals from the master oscillator. We describe technical developments including techniques for minimizing power dissipation in a high repetition rate rf photocathode gun, beam dynamics in two injector configurations, independently tunable beamlines for VUV and soft x-ray production by cascaded harmonic generation, a fast kicker design, timing systems for providing synchronization between experimental pump lasers and the x-ray pulse, and beamline design for maintaining nm-scale density modulation.

  17. Investigation of Linac-Based Image-Guided Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd . E-mail: tpaw@stanford.edu; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Hsu, Annie; Cotrutz, Cristian; Boyer, Arthur L.; Xing Lei; King, Christopher R.; Luxton, Gary

    2007-07-01

    A hypofractionation treatment protocol for prostate cancer was initiated in our department in December 2003. The treatment regimen consists of a total dose of 36.25 Gy delivered at 7.25 Gy per fraction over 10 days. We discuss the rationale for such a prostate hypofractionation protocol and the need for frequent prostate imaging during treatment. The CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA), a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm, is currently being used as the radiation delivery device for this protocol, due to its incorporation of near real-time kV imaging of the prostate via 3 gold fiducial seeds. Recently introduced conventional linac kV imaging with intensity modulated planning and delivery may add a new option for these hypofractionated treatments. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board kV imaging (Varian Medical Systems Inc., Palo Alto, CA) for treatment of our hypofractionated prostate patients. The dose-volume histograms and dose statistics of 2 patients previously treated on the CyberKnife were compared to 7-field IMRT plans. A process of acquiring images to observe intrafraction prostate motion was achieved in an average time of about 1 minute and 40 seconds, and IMRT beam delivery takes about 40 seconds per field. A complete 7-field IMRT plan can therefore be imaged and delivered in 10 to 17 minutes. The Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board imaging and IMRT is well suited for image-guided hypofractionated prostate treatments. During this study, we have also uncovered opportunities for improvement of the on-board imaging hardware/software implementation that would further enhance performance in this regard.

  18. Feasibility study for linac-based intensity modulated total marrow irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Joel R; Tiryaki, Hanifi; Smith, Brett D; Roeske, John C; Radosevich, James A; Aydogan, Bulent

    2008-12-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is used as a preconditioning regimen prior to bone marrow transplant for treatment of hematologic malignancies. During TBI, large volumes of normal tissue are irradiated, and this can lead to toxicities, most significantly in the lungs. Intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) may be able to reduce these toxicities by directly targeting the bone marrow while minimizing the dose to critical structures. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of IMTMI by following the planning and delivery process for a Rando phantom. A three isocenter technique was used to provide a full body plan for treatment on a linear accelerator. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 22 positions throughout the phantom to compare the delivered doses to the planned doses. Individual intensity modulated radiation therapy verification plans were delivered to a solid water phantom for the three isocenters, and doses measured from an ion chamber and film were compared to the planned doses. The treatment plan indicated that target coverage was achieved with this IMTMI technique, and that the doses to critical structures were reduced by 29%-65% compared to conventional TBI. TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with an average difference of 3.5% from the calculated dose. Ion chamber readings for the verification plans were all within 3% of the expected dose, and film measurements showed accurate dose distributions. Results from this study suggest that IMTMI using the three isocenter technique can be accurately delivered and may result in substantial dose reductions to critical structures. PMID:19175118

  19. Development and Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Technique for Craniospinal Axis Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young K.; Brooks, Corrinne J.; Bedford, James L.; Warrington, Alan P.; Saran, Frank H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To develop and compare a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique with conventional radiotherapy for craniospinal irradiation with respect to improved dose conformity and homogeneity in the planning target volume (PTV) and to reduced dose to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Conventional craniospinal axis radiotherapy plans of 5 patients were acquired. The median (range) length of the PTV was 58.9 (48.1-83.7) cm. The 6-MV VMAT plans were inversely planned with one isocenter near the base of the brain and the minimum number of isocenters required for the specified lengths of spine. The plans were optimized with high weighting for PTV coverage and low weighting for OAR sparing. Conformity and heterogeneity indices, dose-volume histograms, mean doses, and non-PTV integral doses from the two plans (prescription dose 23.4 Gy in 13 fractions) were compared. Results: The median (range) conformity index of VMAT was 1.22 (1.09-1.45), compared with 1.69 (1.44-2.67) for conventional plans (p = 0.04). The median (range) heterogeneity index was also lower for VMAT compared with conventional plans: 1.04 (1.03-1.07) vs. 1.12 (1.09-1.19), respectively (p = 0.04). A significant reduction of mean and maximum doses was observed in the heart, thyroid, esophagus, optic nerves, and eyes with VMAT when compared with conventional plans. A decrease in body V{sub 10Gy} was observed, but for 4 of 5 patients non-PTV integral dose was increased with VMAT when compared with the conventional plans. Conclusions: A VMAT technique to treat the craniospinal axis significantly reduces OAR dose, potentially leading to lower late organ toxicity. However, this is achieved at the expense of increased low-dose volumes, which is inherent to the technique, carrying a potentially increased risk of secondary malignancies.

  20. Robust Eye Center Localization through Face Alignment and Invariant Isocentric Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Dongdong; Chen, Dihu; Tan, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The localization of eye centers is a very useful cue for numerous applications like face recognition, facial expression recognition, and the early screening of neurological pathologies. Several methods relying on available light for accurate eye-center localization have been exploited. However, despite the considerable improvements that eye-center localization systems have undergone in recent years, only few of these developments deal with the challenges posed by the profile (non-frontal face). In this paper, we first use the explicit shape regression method to obtain the rough location of the eye centers. Because this method extracts global information from the human face, it is robust against any changes in the eye region. We exploit this robustness and utilize it as a constraint. To locate the eye centers accurately, we employ isophote curvature features, the accuracy of which has been demonstrated in a previous study. By applying these features, we obtain a series of eye-center locations which are candidates for the actual position of the eye-center. Among these locations, the estimated locations which minimize the reconstruction error between the two methods mentioned above are taken as the closest approximation for the eye centers locations. Therefore, we combine explicit shape regression and isophote curvature feature analysis to achieve robustness and accuracy, respectively. In practical experiments, we use BioID and FERET datasets to test our approach to obtaining an accurate eye-center location while retaining robustness against changes in scale and pose. In addition, we apply our method to non-frontal faces to test its robustness and accuracy, which are essential in gaze estimation but have seldom been mentioned in previous works. Through extensive experimentation, we show that the proposed method can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy and robustness over state-of-the-art techniques, with our method ranking second in terms of accuracy. According to our implementation on a PC with a Xeon 2.5Ghz CPU, the frame rate of the eye tracking process can achieve 38 Hz. PMID:26426929

  1. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics'— NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix— were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10-14 August, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) and the scope was expanded to include renewable energy research and development. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of semiconductor devices that are relevant to information technology (both electronics and photonics based) and renewable energy applications. The papers contained in this special issue are selected from the NGC/CSTC2009 symposium. Among them is a report by Ray LaPierre from McMaster University and colleagues at the University of Waterloo in Canada on the ability to manipulate single spins in nanowire quantum bits. The paper also reports the development of a testbed of a few qubits for general quantum information processing tasks [1]. Lower cost and greater energy conversion efficiency compared with thin film devices have led to a high level of activity in nanowire research related to photovoltaic applications. This special issue also contains results from an impedance spectroscopy study of core-shell GaAs nanowires to throw light on the transport and recombination mechanisms relevant to solar cell research [2]. Information technology research and renewable energy sources are research areas of enormous public interest. This special issue addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements and provides a stimulating outlook for technological developments in these highly topical fields of research. References [1] Caram J, Sandoval C, Tirado M, Comedi D, Czaban J, Thompson D A and LaPierre R R 2101 Nanotechnology 21 134007 [2] Baugh J, Fung J S and LaPierre RR 2010 Nanotechnology 21 134018

  2. SU-E-J-48: Imaging Origin-Radiation Isocenter Coincidence for Linac-Based SRS with Novalis Tx

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, C; Workie, D; Hasson, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To implement and evaluate an image-based Winston-Lutz (WL) test to measure the displacement between ExacTrac imaging origin and radiation isocenter on a Novalis Tx system using RIT V6.2 software analysis tools. Displacement between imaging and radiation isocenters was tracked over time. The method was applied for cone-based and MLC-based WL tests. Methods The Brainlab Winston-Lutz phantom was aligned to room lasers. The ExacTrac imaging system was then used to detect the Winston- Lutz phantom and obtain the displacement between the center of the phantom and the imaging origin. EPID images of the phantom were obtained at various gantry and couch angles and analyzed with RIT calculating the phantom center to radiation isocenter displacement. The RIT and Exactrac displacements were combined to calculate the displacement between imaging origin and radiation isocenter. Results were tracked over time. Results Mean displacements between ExacTrac origin and radiation isocenter were: VRT: −0.1mm ± 0.3mm, LNG: 0.5mm ± 0.2mm, LAT: 0.2mm ± 0.2mm (vector magnitude of 0.7 ± 0.2mm). Radiation isocenter was characterized by the mean of the standard deviations of the WL phantom displacements: σVRT: 0.2mm, σLNG: 0.4mm, σLAT: 0.6mm. The linac couch base was serviced to reduce couch walkout. This reduced σLAT to 0.2mm. These measurements established a new baseline of radiation isocenter-imaging origin coincidence. Conclusion The image-based WL test has ensured submillimeter localization accuracy using the ExacTrac imaging system. Standard deviations of ExacTrac-radiation isocenter displacements indicate that average agreement within 0.3mm is possible in each axis. This WL test is a departure from the tradiational WL in that imaging origin/radiation isocenter agreement is the end goal not lasers/radiation isocenter.

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Study on the characteristics of linac based THz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiong-Wei; Wang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Sen-Yu

    2009-10-01

    There are many methods based on linac for THz radiation production. As one of the options for the Beijing Advanced Light, an ERL test facility is proposed for THz radiation. In this test facility, there are 4 kinds of methods to produce THz radiation: coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR), synchrotron radiation (SR), low gain FEL oscillator, and high gain SASE FEL. In this paper, we study the characteristics of the 4 kinds of THz light sources.

  4. Feasibility study of a novel rotational and translational method for linac-based intensity modulated total marrow irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Dai, Jianrong; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Ke

    2012-06-01

    Conventional TBI is primarily limited by the toxicity to organs at risk because of impossibility of sparing critical organs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a novel rotational and translational IMRT method (RTM) which able to conform the radiation dose to target organs and reduce critical organ dose for TMI using linac. To assess the feasibility, we investigated the planning and delivery of total marrow irradiation (TMI) using this method. The treatment plannig study showed that target coverage was achieved with 90% of the target volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. Doses to critical structures indicated that a 1.28- to 2.35-fold reduction in median dose is achieved with total-marrow RTM compared with conventional TBI. Delivery of Rando phantom and TLD measurement demonstrated an accurate dose delivery (ranged from -6% to 7%) to the target and critical organs. Results from this study suggests that RTM can be accurately delivered and reduce irradiation to all critical organs with good target coverage. PMID:22376131

  5. SU-E-J-239: IMRT Planning of Prostate Cancer for a MRI-Linac Based On MRI Only

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Prior, P; Paulson, E; Lawton, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRI (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.

  6. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  7. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, P.

    2013-03-19

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 10{sup 10} positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of {sup 22}Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be {approx}70% by numerical simulations.

  8. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan

    2016-08-01

    An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL) based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR) in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC). In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10–1/30 (150mA–50 mA) of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A). Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetitionmore » rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR) based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. In conclusion, off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.« less

  9. Development of a Comprehensive Linac-based Quality Assurance Program for a Retrofitted Micro-MLC SRS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, George

    In Stereotactic Radiosurgery, one of the most import factors that must be measured is the accuracy of the localization system, whether it be lasers or camera system; and the coincidence of the localized isocenter to the radiation isocenter. According to TG-142 the minimum deviation between the isocenter determined by the localization device and the radiation isocenter of the machine must be no more that 1 mm. In addition, the minimum deviation, also recommended by TG-142, between the radiation isocenter and the mechanical isocenter of the machine must be no more that 1mm. The purpose of this research was to develop a method that both of these parameters could be measured and add these tests to our patient specific QA, monthly QA, and annual QA procedures. A plastic phantom was constructed with holes drilled in each of the sides to meet at a common point in the middle of the phantom. This common intersection was then set as the isocenter for the treatment beams, and the coordinates of the point were sent to the camera system. Measurements were than taken with both the EPID and GafChromic film with the use of rigid tungsten rods in each hole to mark the position of the holes on the film and EPID. The films were then scanned and the field edges and isocenter positions were determined by taking the coordinates of a point that was halfway between the minimum and maximum points in all cases.

  10. Universal I/O board for the laser-electron photons experiments at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Y.; Nomachi, M.

    1999-11-01

    A data acquisition system on the basis of network technologies has been developed for experiments using high-energy photons from backward-Compton scattering between laser lights and 8 GeV electrons at SPring-8. A universal I/O VME-board (UIO) is designed as a buffer-sequencer module with a reconfigurable logic circuit and a 1 Mbyte memory. The UIO is applied as a high-speed module for flexible data readout and buffering. Data from the various detectors are transferred from the UIO to a VME CPU-board in the common format. Altera Hardware Description Language is used to read data from a fast encoding and readout ADC (FERA) system for TOF counters and Cherenkov counters.

  11. Electron, Photon, and Ion Beams from the Relativistic Interaction of Petawatt Laser Pulses with Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.; Brown, C.G.; Cowan, T.E.; Henry, E.A.; Johnson, J.; Key, M.H.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Roth, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Yasuike, K.

    1999-11-12

    In our Petawatt laser experiments several hundred joules of 1 {micro}m laser light in 0.5-5.0 ps pulses with intensities up to 3 x 10{sup 20}Wcm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets producing a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations were diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. From the beamed bremsstrahlung we infer that about 40-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their direction centroid varies from shot to shot, but the beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3 x 10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion} {approx} several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. We observe ion energies up to at least 55 MeV. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron which apparently accelerate the ions.

  12. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Tianhuan

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  13. Discrete Chromatic Aberrations Arising from Photoinduced Electron-Photon Interactions in Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Flannigan, David J

    2016-05-26

    In femtosecond ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) experiments, the initial excitation period is composed of spatiotemporal overlap of the temporally commensurate pump photon pulse and probe photoelectron packet. Generation of evanescent near-fields at the nanostructure specimens produces a dispersion relation that enables coupling of the photons (ℏω = 2.4 eV, for example) and freely propagating electrons (200 keV, for example) in the near-field. Typically, this manifests as discrete peaks occurring at integer multiples (n) of the photon energy in the low-loss/gain region of electron-energy spectra (i.e., at 200 keV ± nℏω eV). Here, we examine the UEM imaging resolution implications of the strong inelastic near-field interactions between the photons employed in optical excitation and the probe photoelectrons. We find that the additional photoinduced energy dispersion occurring when swift electrons pass through intense evanescent near-fields results in a discrete chromatic aberration that limits the spatial resolving power to several angstroms during the excitation period. PMID:27111530

  14. Electron-photon transport using the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower) Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Hirayama, H.; Rogers, D.W.O.

    1986-01-01

    The EGS (Electron Gamma Shower) code system was formally introduced in 1978 as a package, most commonly referred to as ESG3. It was designed to simulate electromagnetic cascades in various geometries and at energies up to a few thousand gigaelectron volts and down to cutoff kinetic energies of 0.1 MeV (photons) and 1 MeV (electrons). There have been many requests to extend EGS3 down to lower energies and this is a major, but not the only, reason for creating EGS4, which is now available for general distribution and is the subject of this presentation. A summary is given of the main features of the ESG4 code system, including statements about the physics that has been put into it and what can be realistically simulated. 6 refs.

  15. Electron, photon, and ion beams from the relativistic interaction of Petawatt laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, Stephen P.; Brown, Curtis G.; Cowan, Thomas E.; Henry, Eugene A.; Johnson, Joy S.; Key, Michael H.; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Lasinski, Barbara F.; Lee, Richard W.

    2000-05-01

    In recent Petawatt laser experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, several hundred joules of 1 {mu}m laser light in 0.5-5.0-ps pulses with intensities up to 3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets and produced a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations have all been diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. About 40%-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their beam centroid direction varies from shot to shot, but the resulting bremsstrahlung beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams (primarily protons) almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3x10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion}{approx}several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. Ion energies up to at least 55 MeV are observed. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron, which apparently accelerate the ions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  17. Electron-photon interaction in a quantum point contact coupled to a microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Udson C.; Mora, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    We study a single-mode cavity weakly coupled to a voltage-biased quantum point contact. In a perturbative analysis, the lowest order predicts a thermal state for the cavity photons, driven by the emission noise of the conductor. The cavity is thus emptied as all transmission probabilities of the quantum point contact approach one or zero. Two-photon processes are identified at higher coupling, and pair absorption dominates over pair emission for all bias voltages. As a result, the number of cavity photons, the cavity damping rate, and the second-order coherence g(2 ) are all reduced and exhibit less bunching than the thermal state. These results are obtained with a Keldysh path-integral formulation and reproduced with rate equations. They can be seen as a backaction of the cavity measuring the electronic noise. Extending the standard P (E ) theory to a steady-state situation, we compute the modified noise properties of the conductor and find quantitative agreement with the perturbative calculation.

  18. Electrons, Photons, and Force: Quantitative Single-Molecule Measurements from Physics to Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule measurement techniques have illuminated unprecedented details of chemical behavior, including observations of the motion of a single molecule on a surface, and even the vibration of a single bond within a molecule. Such measurements are critical to our understanding of entities ranging from single atoms to the most complex protein assemblies. We provide an overview of the strikingly diverse classes of measurements that can be used to quantify single-molecule properties, including those of single macromolecules and single molecular assemblies, and discuss the quantitative insights they provide. Examples are drawn from across the single-molecule literature, ranging from ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy studies of adsorbate diffusion on surfaces to fluorescence studies of protein conformational changes in solution. PMID:21338175

  19. ITS Version 4.0: Electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Halbleib, J.A,; Kensek, R.P.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    The current publicly released version of the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS), Version 3.0, has been widely distributed both domestically and internationally, and feedback has been very positive. This feedback as well as our own experience have convinced us to upgrade the system in order to honor specific user requests for new features and to implement other new features that will improve the physical accuracy of the system and permit additional variance reduction. This presentation we will focus on components of the upgrade that (1) improve the physical model, (2) provide new and extended capabilities to the three-dimensional combinatorial-geometry (CG) of the ACCEPT codes, and (3) permit significant variance reduction in an important class of radiation effects applications.

  20. Comptonization of X-rays by low-temperature electrons. [photon wavelength redistribution in cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A.; Kallman, T.; Mccray, R.; Ross, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the spectrum that results from the Compton scattering of a monochromatic source of X-rays by low-temperature electrons, both for initial-value relaxation problems and for steady-state spatial diffusion problems. The method gives an exact solution of the inital-value problem for evolution of the spectrum in an infinite homogeneous medium if Klein-Nishina corrections to the Thomson cross section are neglected. This, together with approximate solutions for problems in which Klein-Nishina corrections are significant and/or spatial diffusion occurs, shows spectral structure near the original photon wavelength that may be used to infer physical conditions in cosmic X-ray sources. Explicit results, shown for examples of time relaxation in an infinite medium and spatial diffusion through a uniform sphere, are compared with results obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and by solving the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation.

  1. First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1986-04-01

    As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs.

  2. Integral functions of electron lateral distribution and their fluctuations in electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kirillov, A. A.; Linde, I. A.; Lyutov, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulated lateral distribution functions for electrons of EPC developing in lead, at superhigh energies (.1-1 PeV) for depths t or = 60 c.u. delta t=1t. c.u. are presented. The higher moment characteristics, i.e., variation, asymmetry, excess, are presented along with analytical solutions for the same characteristics at fixed observation level calculated to theory approximations A and B by using numerical inversion of the Laplace transformation. The conclusion is made of a complex, usually non-Gaussian shape of the function of the particle number distribution within a circle of given radius at fixed depth.

  3. Instrumentation and beam dynamics study of advanced electron-photon facility in Indiana University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tianhuan

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips' geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been speci ed. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  4. Electron-photon coupling in semimetals in a high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Albers, Robert C; Littlewood, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effect of electron-phonon coupling in semimetals in high magnetic fields, with regard to elastic modes that can lead to a redistribution of carriers between pockets. We show that in a clean three dimensional system, at each Landau level crossing, this leads to a discontinuity in the magnetostriction, and a divergent contribution to the elastic modulus. We estimate the magnitude of this effect in the group V semimetal Bismuth.

  5. An empirical method for deriving RBE values associated with electrons, photons and radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, M; Puskin, J; Hertel, N; Eckerman, K

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of >1 for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of 1. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similar low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few kiloelectron volts. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions. PMID:25636403

  6. Chaotic compound states in atomic processes: electron, photon and atom scattering, recombination, photoionization and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, Victor; Berengut, Julian; Dzuba, Vladimir; Gribakin, Gleb; Harabati, Celal; Kozlov, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Level density of many-body states exponentially increases with the number of excited particles. When residual interaction exceeds the interval between these levels, the eigenstates (compound states) become chaotic superpositions of of thousands, or even millions of Slater determinant basis states.This situation takes place in highly excited nuclei, rare-earth and actinide atoms, open f-shell ions excited by the electron recombination and in ultracold collisions of open f-shell atoms. We derived formulas for the resonant multi-electron recombination via di-electron doorway states leading to the many-electron compound resonances and performed numerical calculations for the electron recombination with gold (Au+25) and tungsten ions (W+1724). A recent experiment showed that the electron recombination of tungsten ion W20+exceeds the direct recombination by three order of magnitude. Our calculations agree with the experimental results for Au+25 and W20+. Other manifestation of chaos are enhancement of weak interactions and Raman photon scattering, and suppression of the photoionization.

  7. Semiconductor Nanotechnology: Novel Materials and Devices for Electronics, Photonics, and Renewable Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag S; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10 14 August, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) and the scope was expanded to include renewable energy research and development. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of semiconductor devices that are relevant to information technology (both electronics and photonics based) and renewable energy applications. The papers contained in this special issue are selected from the NGC/CSTC2009 symposium. Among them is a report by Ray LaPierre from McMaster University and colleagues at the University of Waterloo in Canada on the ability to manipulate single spins in nanowire quantum bits. The paper also reports the development of a testbed of a few qubits for general quantum information processing tasks [1]. Lower cost and greater energy conversion efficiency compared with thin film devices have led to a high level of activity in nanowire research related to photovoltaic applications. This special issue also contains results from an impedance spectroscopy study of core shell GaAs nanowires to throw light on the transport and recombination mechanisms relevant to solar cell research [2]. Information technology research and renewable energy sources are research areas of enormous public interest. This special issue addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements and provides a stimulating outlook for technological developments in these highly topical fields of research. References [1] Caram J, Sandoval C, Tirado M, Comedi D, Czaban J, Thompson D A and LaPierre R R 2010 Electrical characteristics of core shell p-n GaAs nanowire structures with Te as the n-dopant Nanotechnology 21 134007 [2] Baugh J, Fung J S and LaPierre R R 2010 Building a spin quantum bit register using semiconductor nanowires Nanotechnology 21 134018

  8. An Empirical Method for deriving RBE values associated with Electrons, Photons and Radionuclides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bellamy, Michael B; Puskin, J.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hertel, Nolan

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values greater than one for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer (LET) has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of one. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similarmore » low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few keV. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions.« less

  9. An Empirical Method for deriving RBE values associated with Electrons, Photons and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, Michael B; Puskin, J.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Hertel, Nolan

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values greater than one for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer (LET) has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of one. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similar low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few keV. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions.

  10. NOTE: Determination of isocentric machine parameters for inclined treatment volumes: a single solution for angled transverse or coronal treatment planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, F. L.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of the trigonometric equations necessary to calculate gantry, floor and collimator settings for a treatment plane at an angle φ to the transverse plane of the patient has been described previously. The derivation of a second set of equations to facilitate treatment in a plane at an angle φ to the coronal plane has also been described previously. This work reinterprets the geometry of inclined volumes and shows that essentially only one set of equations is required to determine the settings for treatment planes at an angle φ to either the transverse or coronal planes of the patient.

  11. Detection of dark states in two-dimensional electronic photon-echo signals via ground-state coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, Dassia

    2015-06-07

    Several recent experiments report on possibility of dark-state detection by means of so called beating maps of two-dimensional photon-echo spectroscopy [Ostroumov et al., Science 340, 52 (2013); Bakulin et al., Ultrafast Phenomena XIX (Springer International Publishing, 2015)]. The main idea of this detection scheme is to use coherence induced upon the laser excitation as a very sensitive probe. In this study, we investigate the performance of ground-state coherence in the detection of dark electronic states. For this purpose, we simulate beating maps of several models where the excited-state coherence can be hardly detected and is assumed not to contribute to the beating maps. The models represent strongly coupled electron-nuclear dynamics involving avoided crossings and conical intersections. In all the models, the initially populated optically accessible excited state decays to a lower-lying dark state within few hundreds femtoseconds. We address the role of Raman modes and of interstate-coupling nature. Our findings suggest that the presence of low-frequency Raman active modes significantly increases the chances for detection of dark states populated via avoided crossings, whereas conical intersections represent a more challenging task.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation estimates of neutron doses to critical organs of a patient undergoing 18 MV x-ray LINAC-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barquero, R.; Edwards, T.M.; Iniguez, M. P.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.

    2005-12-15

    Absorbed photoneutron dose to patients undergoing 18 MV x-ray therapy was studied using Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code. Two separate transport simulations were conducted, one for the photoneutron contribution and another for neutron capture gamma rays. The phantom model used was of a female patient receiving a four-field pelvic box treatment. Photoneutron doses were determinate to be higher for organs and tissues located inside the treatment field, especially those closest to the patient's skin. The maximum organ equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose achieved within each treatment port was 719 {mu}Sv/Gy to the rectum (180 deg. field), 190 {mu}Sv/Gy to the intestine wall (0 deg. field), 51 {mu}Sv/Gy to the colon wall (90 deg. field), and 45 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin (270 deg. field). The maximum neutron equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose received by organs outside the treatment field was 65 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin in the antero-posterior field. A mean value of 5{+-}2 {mu}Sv/Gy was obtained for organs distant from the treatment field. Distant organ neutron equivalent doses are all of the same order of magnitude and constitute a good estimate of deep organ neutron equivalent doses. Using the risk assessment method of the ICRP-60 report, the greatest likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy dose is estimated to be 0.02% for the pelvic postero-anterior field, the rectum being the organ representing the maximum contribution of 0.011%.

  13. Linac-based extracranial radiosurgery with Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy and an anatomy-based treatment planning system: Feasibility and initial experience.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Savino; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Ianiro, Anna; Viola, Pietro; Craus, Maurizio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Piermattei, Angelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2016-01-01

    We reported our initial experience in using Elekta volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and an anatomy-based treatment planning system (TPS) for single high-dose radiosurgery (SRS-VMAT) of liver metastases. This study included a cohort of 12 patients treated with a 26-Gy single fraction. Single-arc VMAT plans were generated with Ergo++ TPS. The prescription isodose surface (IDS) was selected to fulfill the 2 following criteria: 95% of planning target volume (PTV) reached 100% of the prescription dose and 99% of PTV reached a minimum of 90% of prescription dose. A 1-mm multileaf collimator (MLC) block margin was added around the PTV. For a comparison of dose distributions with literature data, several conformity indexes (conformity index [CI], conformation number [CN], and gradient index [GI]) were calculated. Treatment efficiency and pretreatment dosimetric verification were assessed. Early clinical data were also reported. Our results reported that target and organ-at-risk objectives were met for all patients. Mean and maximum doses to PTVs were on average 112.9% and 121.5% of prescribed dose, respectively. A very high degree of dose conformity was obtained, with CI, CN, and GI average values equal to 1.29, 0.80, and 3.63, respectively. The beam-on-time was on average 9.3 minutes, i.e., 0.36min/Gy. The mean number of monitor units was 3162, i.e., 121.6MU/Gy. Pretreatment verification (3%-3mm) showed an optimal agreement with calculated values; mean γ value was 0.27 and 98.2% of measured points resulted with γ < 1. With a median follow-up of 16 months complete response was observed in 12/14 (86%) lesions; partial response was observed in 2/14 (14%) lesions. No radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was observed in any patients as well no duodenal ulceration or esophagitis or gastric hemorrhage. In conclusion, this analysis demonstrated the feasibility and the appropriateness of high-dose single-fraction SRS-VMAT in liver metastases performed with Elekta VMAT and Ergo++ TPS. Preliminary clinical outcomes showed a high rate of local control and minimum incidence of acute toxicity. PMID:26994825

  14. Linac-based on-board imaging feasibility and the dosimetric consequences of head roll in head-and-neck IMRT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwe-Ya; Pawlicki, Todd Le, Quynh-Thu; Luxton, Gary

    2008-04-01

    Kilovoltage imaging systems on linear accelerators are used for patient localization in many clinics. The purpose of this work is to assess on-board imaging (OBI) detection of systematic setup errors and in particular, the dosimetric consequences of undetected head roll in head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans when using these systems. The system used in this study was the Trilogy linear accelerator and associated software (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Accuracy of OBI localization was evaluated using an anthropomorphic head phantom. The head phantom is rigidly attached to a specially designed positioning device with 5 deg. of freedom, 3 translational and 2 rotational in the axial and coronal planes. Simulated setup errors were 3 deg. and 5 deg. rotations in the axial plane and displacements of 5 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The coordinates set by the positioning device were compared with the coordinates obtained as measured by using the image matching tools of paired 2-dimensional (2D) orthogonal image matching, and 3D cone-beam computed tomography (CT) volume matching. In addition, 6 physician-approved IMRT plans of nasopharynx and tonsil carcinoma were recalculated to evaluate the impact of undetected 3 deg. and 5 deg. head roll. Application of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for patient localization was superior to 2D matching techniques for detecting rotational setup errors. The use of CBCT allowed the determination of translational errors to within 0.5 mm, whereas kV planar was within 1 to 2 mm. Head roll in the axial plane was not easily detected with orthogonal image sets. Compared to the IMRT plans with no head roll, dose-volume histogram analysis demonstrated an average increase in the maximal spinal cord dose of 3.1% and 6.4% for 3 deg. and 5 deg. angles of rotation, respectively. Dose to the contralateral parotid was unchanged with 3 deg. roll and increased by 2.7% with 5 deg. roll. The results of this study show that volumetric setup verification using CBCT can improve bony anatomy setup detection to millimeter accuracy, and is a reliable method to detect head roll. However, the magnitude of possible dose errors due to undetected head roll suggests that CBCT does not need to be performed on a daily basis but rather weekly or bi-weekly to ensure fidelity of the head position with the immobilization system.

  15. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  16. The lateral distributions of charged particles of energy greater than 0.3 E sub crit in electron-photon cascades in lead and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krys, E.; Wasilewski, A.

    1985-01-01

    In recent investigations, both theoretical and experimental, the agreement between cascade theory and experimental data is pointed out. The radial distributions obtained from the Monte Carlo simulation are compared ith the results of the analytical theory for all particles in cascades. The data on the mean radius of electron lateral distribution in air are compared with those in lead.

  17. Electron-photon correlations for e(-)-H(1 2S1/2 - 3 2Pj, 3 2Dj) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, A. K.; Srivastava, Rajesh

    1987-12-01

    The first theoretical data for the concidence rate N(theta/gamma/, phi/gamma/) between the scattered electrons and photons emitted in the direction (theta/gamma/, phi/gamma/) from the excited 3 2Dj(3 2Pj) states in hydrogen are presented. A consistent version of the distorted-wave Born approximation is used in the calculation. The results show good agreement with the photon coincidence measurements of Chwirot and Slevin (1985, 1987).

  18. Monte Carlo study of Siemens PRIMUS photoneutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pombar, M.

    2005-12-01

    Neutron production in radiotherapy facilities has been studied from the early days of modern linacs. Detailed studies are now possible using photoneutron capabilities of general-purpose Monte Carlo codes at energies of interest in medical physics. The present work studies the effects of modelling different accelerator head and room geometries on the neutron fluence and spectra predicted via Monte Carlo. The results from the simulation of a 15 MV Siemens PRIMUS linac show an 80% increase in the fluence scored at the isocentre when, besides modelling the components neccessary for electron/photon simulations, other massive accelerator head components are included. Neutron fluence dependence on inner treatment room volume is analysed showing that thermal neutrons have a 'gaseous' behaviour and then a 1/V dependence. Neutron fluence maps for three energy ranges, fast (E > 0.1 MeV), epithermal (1 eV < E < 0.1 MeV) and thermal (E < 1 eV), are also presented and the influence of the head components on them is discussed.

  19. Noninvasive referencing of intraocular tumors for external beam radiation therapy using optical coherence tomography: A proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Steiner, Patrick; Kowal, Jens H.; Geiser, Dominik; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy is currently considered the most common treatment modality for intraocular tumors. Localization of the tumor and efficient compensation of tumor misalignment with respect to the radiation beam are crucial. According to the state of the art procedure, localization of the target volume is indirectly performed by the invasive surgical implantation of radiopaque clips or is limited to positioning the head using stereoscopic radiographies. This work represents a proof-of-concept for direct and noninvasive tumor referencing based on anterior eye topography acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods: A prototype of a head-mounted device has been developed for automatic monitoring of tumor position and orientation in the isocentric reference frame for LINAC based treatment of intraocular tumors. Noninvasive tumor referencing is performed with six degrees of freedom based on anterior eye topography acquired using OCT and registration of a statistical eye model. The proposed prototype was tested based on enucleated pig eyes and registration accuracy was measured by comparison of the resulting transformation with tilt and torsion angles manually induced using a custom-made test bench. Results: Validation based on 12 enucleated pig eyes revealed an overall average registration error of 0.26 ± 0.08° in 87 ± 0.7 ms for tilting and 0.52 ± 0.03° in 94 ± 1.4 ms for torsion. Furthermore, dependency of sampling density on mean registration error was quantitatively assessed. Conclusions: The tumor referencing method presented in combination with the statistical eye model introduced in the past has the potential to enable noninvasive treatment and may improve quality, efficacy, and flexibility of external beam radiotherapy of intraocular tumors.

  20. Quality Assurance Results for a Commercial Radiosurgery System: A Communication.

    PubMed

    Ruschin, Mark; Lightstone, Alexander; Beachey, David; Wronski, Matt; Babic, Steven; Yeboah, Collins; Lee, Young; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this communication is to inform the radiosurgery community of quality assurance (QA) results requiring attention in a commercial FDA-approved linac-based cone stereo-tactic radiosurgery (SRS) system. Standard published QA guidelines as per the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) were followed during the SRS system's commissioning process including end-to-end testing, cone concentricity testing, image transfer verification, and documentation. Several software and hardware deficiencies that were deemed risky were uncovered during the process and QA processes were put in place to mitigate these risks during clinical practice. In particular, the present work focuses on daily cone concentricity testing and commissioning-related findings associated with the software. Cone concentricity/alignment is measured daily using both optical light field inspection, as well as quantitative radiation field tests with the electronic portal imager. In 10 out of 36 clini-cal treatments, adjustments to the cone position had to be made to align the cone with the collimator axis to less than 0.5 mm and on two occasions the pre-adjustment measured offset was 1.0 mm. Software-related errors discovered during commissioning included incorrect transfer of the isocentre in DICOM coordinates, improper handling of non-axial image sets, and complex handling of beam data, especially for multi-target treatments. QA processes were established to mitigate the occurrence of the software errors. With proper QA processes, the reported SRS system complies with tolerances set out in established guidelines. Discussions with the vendor are ongoing to address some of the hardware issues related to cone alignment. PMID:24945371

  1. Adaptation of telecobalt unit for stereotactic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I. Rabi Raja . E-mail: rabiraja@cmcvellore.ac.in; Ravindran, B. Paul; Ayyangar, K.M.

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using an isocentric telecobalt unit for advanced treatment techniques, such as stereotactic radiotherapy. To adapt the telecobalt unit (Th780 C) for stereotactic irradiation, collimator inserts of various sizes, collimator mount, and a couch mount suitable for the telecobalt unit were developed, and the characteristics of the narrow beams of Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co) were studied. Comparative study was carried out between the stereotactic radiotherapy plans of 6 MV and {sup 60}Co beams using a 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. The beam penumbra of {sup 60}Co beams was found to be larger than those of 6 MV beams. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) obtained from the {sup 60}Co beam plan were comparable to those obtained from the 6 MV plan. The DVH of nontarget tissue obtained from the plans of the 2 beams were found to be in good agreement to each other. The difference in equivalent fall-off distance (EFOD) for all 3 cases was found insignificant; hence, it can be concluded that the fall-off dose in the dose distribution of the {sup 60}Co stereotactic plan is as good as that of the 6 MV stereotactic plan. In all 3 cases for which the treatment plans were compared between {sup 60}Co and 6 MV beams, it was observed that the fall-off doses outside the target were similar; therefore, considering {sup 60}Co with 5-mm margin is a cost effective alternative for the linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy.

  2. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes from electron avalanches in thunderstorms - the detailed structure and time evolution of electron, photon, optical and radio emission - results from a new simulation software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    To design the MXGS coded mask imager of the ASIM mission to the ISS, to detect and locate TGF gamma-rays, a first order software package was written at UV to simulate the vertical expansion of gamma-ray photons from 15-20 km altitudes up to 300-600 km orbital altitudes, to make some estimate of the probable TGF spectra and diffuse beam structure that might be observed by MXGS. A new software package includes the simulation of the Runaway Electron Avalanche (REA) origin of TGFs by electron ionization and Bremsstrahlung scattering and photon emission. It uses the standard KeV-MeV scattering physics of electron and photon interactions, close range Moller electron ionization, Binary-Electron-Bethe models of electron scattering, positron Bhabha scattering and annihilation, electron excitation and photon emission. It also uses a super particle spatial mesh system to control particle-momentum flux densities, electric field evolution and exponential avalanche growth and falloff. The package takes care of all high energy scattering physics, leaving the user free to concentrate on defining the three components of scattering medium, electric-magnetic field geometry, and free electron flux field geometry whose details are the main unknown in TGF research. Results will be presented from TGF simulations using realistic electric fields expected within and above storm clouds, and will include video displays showing the evolving ionization structure of electron trajectories, the time evolution of photon flux fields, electron-positron flux fields, their important circular feedback movement in the local earth magnetic field, local molecular ion densities, and the dielectric effect of induced local electric fields. The second aim of the package is as a step in creating open source software which could evolve into a standard research software package approved by the REA-TGF research community to correctly simulate all the relevant physical processes involved in the complex phenomenon of REA in thunderstorms. TGF photon expansion in stratosphere TGF photon expansion to orbital altitudes

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING NON-SCALING FFAG GANTRY FOR CARBON-PROTON CANCER THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2007-06-25

    We report on improvements in the non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) gantry design. As we previously reported, a major challenge of the carbodproton cancer therapy facilities is isocentric gantry design. The weight of the isocentric gantry transport elements in the latest Heidelberg carbon/proton facility is 135 tons. In this report we detail improvements to the previous non-scaling gantry design. We estimate that this non-scaling FFAG gantry would be almost hundred times lighter than traditional heavy ion gantries. Very strong focusing with small dispersion permits passage of different energies of carbon beams through the gantry's fixed magnetic field.

  4. Neutron Spectra and H*(10) in a 15 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Benites, J.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Carrillo, A.; Mondragon, R.

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra and the ambient dose equivalent were calculated inside the bunker of a 15 MV Varian linac model CLINAC iX. Calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. Neutron spectra in the vicinity of isocentre show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons produced by the source term, while epithermal and thermal neutron remain constant regardless the distance respect to isocentre, due to room return. Along the maze neutron spectra becomes softer as the detector moves along the maze. The ambient dose equivalent is decreased but do not follow the 1/r{sup 2} rule due to changes in the neutron spectra.

  5. PRELIMINARY COMMUNICATION: Abutment region dosimetry for sequential arc IMRT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    1997-07-01

    Arc-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning and delivery is available as a commercial product (Nomos Corp.). The dose distribution is delivered to 1.68 cm thick regions, and the patient moved in a precise manner between treatments. Assuming accurate patient positioning, the abutment region dose distribution near the gantry isocentre is delivered with no undesired dose heterogeneities. However, for regions far from the isocentre, the dose distribution may exhibit high- or low-dose regions due to uncompensated beam divergence for arc treatments of less than gantry angle length. A study has been initiated to characterize abutment region dose distribution heterogeneities for sequential arc IMRT delivery. Five dose distributions were optimized, each using 8 cm diameter target volumes at different distances from the isocentre, and the arc delivery limited to symmetric about the vertical axis. The target lengths were sufficient to require a treatment consisting of five couch positions, yielding four abutment regions. The dose within the abutment regions was measured using film and analysed as a function of off-axis position along both the vertical and horizontal directions. Little dependence on the dose heterogeneity was seen along the horizontal axis passing through the isocentre. However, the abutment regions along the vertical axis contained 15% low and 7% high doses at 7 cm above and below the isocentre respectively. This dose heterogeneity is not predicted by the current clinical release of the treatment planning software due to limitations of the dose calculation algorithm. The intensity of dose heterogeneity is considered sufficient to warrant further study.

  6. Photon-Electron Interaction and Condense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1998-11-01

    We discuss beams of charged particles and radiation from multiple perspectives. These include fundamental acceleration and radiation mechanisms, underlying electron-photon interaction, various classical and quantum phase-space concepts and fluctuational interpretations.

  7. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This documents presents a programmatic overview and program element plan summaries for conceptual design and assessment; physics; computation and modeling; system engineering science and technology; electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components; chemistry and materials; special nuclear materials, tritium, and explosives.

  8. SU-E-T-376: 3-D Commissioning for An Image-Guided Small Animal Micro- Irradiation Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X; Wuu, C; Admovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A 3-D radiochromic plastic dosimeter has been used to cross-test the isocentricity of a high resolution image-guided small animal microirradiation platform. In this platform, the mouse stage rotating for cone beam CT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for sub-millimeter radiation delivery. A 3-D dosimeter can be used to verify both imaging and irradiation coordinates. Methods: A 3-D dosimeter and optical CT scanner were used in this study. In the platform, both mouse stage and gantry can rotate 360° with rotation axis perpendicular to each other. Isocentricity and coincidence of mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated using star patterns. A 3-D dosimeter was placed on mouse stage with center at platform isocenter approximately. For CBCT isocentricity, with gantry moved to 90°, the mouse stage rotated horizontally while the x-ray was delivered to the dosimeter at certain angles. For irradiation isocentricity, the gantry rotated 360° to deliver beams to the dosimeter at certain angles for star patterns. The uncertainties and agreement of both CBCT and irradiation isocenters can be determined from the star patterns. Both procedures were repeated 3 times using 3 dosimeters to determine short-term reproducibility. Finally, dosimeters were scanned using optical CT scanner to obtain the results. Results: The gantry isocentricity is 0.9 ± 0.1 mm and mouse stage rotation isocentricity is about 0.91 ± 0.11 mm. Agreement between the measured isocenters of irradiation and imaging coordinates was determined. The short-term reproducibility test yielded 0.5 ± 0.1 mm between the imaging isocenter and the irradiation isocenter, with a maximum displacement of 0.7 ± 0.1 mm. Conclusion: The 3-D dosimeter can be very useful in precise verification of targeting for a small animal irradiation research. In addition, a single 3-D dosimeter can provide information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  9. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Müller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-01

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  10. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Mueller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-10

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  11. Computer-aided design optimization with the use of a fast dose model for linear-accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Tae S.; Bova, Frank J.; Yoon, Sei C.; Choe, Bo Y.; Kim, Moon C.; Shinn, Kyung S.; Bahk, Yong W.; Ha, Sung W.; Park, Charn I.

    1996-04-01

    In order to efficiently plan non-spherical radiosurgical targets we have used computer-aided design optimization techniques with a fast dose model. A study of the spatial dose distribution for single or multiple non-coplanar arcs was carried out using a 18 cm diameter spherical head model. The dose distribution generated from the 3D dose computation algorithm can be represented by a simple analytic form. Two analytic dose models were developed to represent the dose for preset multiple non-coplanar arcs or a single arc: spherical and cylindrical. The spherical and cylindrical dose models compute dose quickly for each isocentre and single arc. Our approach then utilizes a computer-aided design optimization (CAD) with the use of two fast approximate dose models to determine the positions of isocentres and arcs. The implementation of CAD with fast dose models was demonstrated. While the fast dose models are only approximations of the true dose distribution, it is shown that this approximate model is sufficient to optimize isocentric position, collimator size and arc positions with CAD.

  12. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as 'no additional intervention group, ' absence of radiological growth was defined as 'radiological control group. ' Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% {+-} 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% {+-} 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  13. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  14. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  15. Automated treatment planning for a dedicated multi-source intra-cranial radiosurgery treatment unit accounting for overlapping structures and dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Kimia; Ghaffari, Hamid R.; Aleman, Dionne M.; Jaffray, David A.; Ruschin, Mark

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to advance the two-step approach for Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ (PFX) optimization to account for dose homogeneity and overlap between the planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs).Methods: In the first step, a geometry-based algorithm is used to quickly select isocentre locations while explicitly accounting for PTV-OARs overlaps. In this approach, the PTV is divided into subvolumes based on the PTV-OARs overlaps and the distance of voxels to the overlaps. Only a few isocentres are selected in the overlap volume, and a higher number of isocentres are carefully selected among voxels that are immediately close to the overlap volume. In the second step, a convex optimization is solved to find the optimal combination of collimator sizes and their radiation duration for each isocentre location.Results: This two-step approach is tested on seven clinical cases (comprising 11 targets) for which the authors assess coverage, OARs dose, and homogeneity index and relate these parameters to the overlap fraction for each case. In terms of coverage, the mean V{sub 99} for the gross target volume (GTV) was 99.8% while the V{sub 95} for the PTV averaged at 94.6%, thus satisfying the clinical objectives of 99% for GTV and 95% for PTV, respectively. The mean relative dose to the brainstem was 87.7% of the prescription dose (with maximum 108%), while on average, 11.3% of the PTV overlapped with the brainstem. The mean beam-on time per fraction per dose was 8.6 min with calibration dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min, and the computational time averaged at 205 min. Compared with previous work involving single-fraction radiosurgery, the resulting plans were more homogeneous with average homogeneity index of 1.18 compared to 1.47.Conclusions: PFX treatment plans with homogeneous dose distribution can be achieved by inverse planning using geometric isocentre selection and mathematical modeling and optimization techniques. The quality of the

  16. A PEDA approach for monolithic photonic BiCMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Stefan; Winzer, Georg; Roßmann, Helmut; Kroh, Marcel; Zimmermann, Lars; Mausolf, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes a novel approach to photonic electronic design automation (PEDA) based on the commercial design suite Laytools for circuit and physical layout design and simulation. The goal of this work is the integration of an electronic-photonic design flow into an existing electronic design automation (EDA) tool. Contrary to other solutions, with this approach, it is possible to minimize the required interfaces to other third party tools. In addition to existing electronic device models, photonic components are described with behavioral models. The mask layout has been extended to the needs of the electronic photonic integrated circuit (ePIC) designer and the verification flow was adapted to the photonic structures.

  17. Hybrid photoneutron source optimization for electron accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, F.; Shahriari, M.

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is being studied as a possible radiotherapic treatment for some cancer types. Neutron energy for penetrating into tissue should be in the epithermal range. Different methods are used for neutron production. Electron accelerators are an alternative way for producing neutrons in electron-photon-neutron processes. Optimization of electron/photon and photoneutron targets calculations with respect to electron energy, dimension (radius and thickness) and neutron yield were done by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. According to the results, a hybrid photoneutron source including BeD 2 and Tungsten has been introduced.

  18. Calculation of the radio emission from EAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, H. R.; Sun, M. P.; Crannell, C. J.; Hough, J. H.; Shutie, P. F.

    1975-01-01

    Time-varying features of an electron-photon cascade are considered, particularly those associated with radio emission. The cosmic ray shower is represented as a superposition of collinear 10 GeV electron-photon cascades launched at different heights in the atmosphere. Actual simulations are performed for only 10 cascades at each of 40 heights and the results are scaled to represent the total number of cascades required. The apparent angular motions of the cascade particles as detected by antennas located at various positions up to 300 m from the shower axis are simulated. The radio pulse waveform and the corresponding frequency spectrum are obtained from these motions.

  19. Dissipationless electron transport in photon-dressed nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kibis, O V

    2011-09-01

    It is shown that the electron coupling to photons in field-dressed nanostructures can result in the ground electron-photon state with a nonzero electric current. Since the current is associated with the ground state, it flows without the Joule heating of the nanostructure and is nondissipative. Such a dissipationless electron transport can be realized in strongly coupled electron-photon systems with the broken time-reversal symmetry--particularly, in quantum rings and chiral nanostructures dressed by circularly polarized photons. PMID:21981519

  20. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, Henry Grady

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  1. Design certification review assessment report. Electron/proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron-photon spectrometer developed for the Skylab program are presented. The spectrometer is externally mounted on the Skylab module complex and provides omnidirectional measurement of electrons and protons which result from solar flares or enhancement of the radiation belts. The data are applied to the determination of relative biological effectiveness factors as a safety factor for manned space flight.

  2. Comparison of big event with calculations of the air shower development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niwa, M.; Misaki, A.; Matano, T.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of high energy hadrons and electron-photons in air showers at various stages of development is calculated. Numerical calculation is used to solve the diffusion equation for a nuclear cascade and analytical calculation for cascade shower induced gamma rays. From these calculations, one can get the longitudinal development of the high energy hadron and electron-photon components, and the energy spectra of these components at various depths of air shower development. The total number of hadrons (N sub H) and electron-photon components (N sub gamma) are related according to stages of the air shower development and primary energy. The relation of the total energy of hadron and electron-photon component above the threshold energy is given. The energy balance between both components is also a useful parameter to study high energy events accompanying air showers. The relation of N sub H and fractional hadronic energy E (sum E sub H sup gamma/sum E sub H sup gamma + Sum E sub gamma) is calculated. This relation is helpful to understand the stage of air shower development(t) and primary energy (E sub p).

  3. Improved geometry representations for Monte Carlo radiation transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Matthew Ryan

    2004-08-01

    ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. ITS allows designers to predict product performance in radiation environments.

  4. 23 CFR 771.117 - Categorical exclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... actions which meet the definition contained in 40 CFR 1508.4, and, based on past experience with similar.... (20) Promulgation of rules, regulations, and directives. (21) Deployment of electronics, photonics.... (d) Additional actions which meet the criteria for a CE in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1508.4)...

  5. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-10-15

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied.

  6. Pilot study on interfractional and intrafractional movements using surface infrared markers and EPID for patients with rectal cancer treated in the prone position

    PubMed Central

    Eom, K-Y; Kim, K; Chang, J H; Koo, T R; Park, J I; Park, Y-G; Ye, S-J; Ha, S W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate interfractional and intrafractional movement of patients with rectal cancer during radiotherapy with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and surface infrared (IR) markers. Methods: 20 patients undergoing radiotherapy for rectal cancer with body mass index ranging from 18.5 to 30 were enrolled. Patients were placed in the prone position on a couch with a leg pillow. Three IR markers were put on the surface of each patient and traced by two stereo cameras during radiotherapy on a twice-weekly basis. Interfractional isocentre movement was obtained with EPID images on a weekly basis. Movement of the IR markers was analysed in correlation with the isocentre movement obtained from the EPID images. Results: The maximum right-to-left (R-L) movement of the laterally located markers in the horizontal isocentre plane was correlated with isocentre translocation with statistical significance (p = 0.018 and 0.015, respectively). Movement of the surface markers was cyclical. For centrally located markers, the 95% confidence intervals for the average amplitude in the R-L, cranial-to-caudal (C-C) and anterior-to-posterior (A-P) directions were 0.86, 2.25 and 3.48 mm, respectively. In 10 patients, intrafractional movement exceeding 5 mm in at least one direction was observed. Time-dependent systematic movement of surface markers during treatment, which consisted of continuous movement towards the cranial direction and a sail back motion in the A-P direction, was also observed. Conclusion: Intrafractional movement of surface markers has both cyclic components and time-dependent systematic components. Marker deviations exceeding 5 mm were mainly seen in the A-P direction. Pre- or post-treatment EPID images may not provide adequate information regarding intrafractional movement because of systematic movement in the A-P direction during radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: This work uncovered a sail back motion of patients in the A-P direction during

  7. Physical considerations in the treatment of advanced carcinomas of the larynx and pyriform sinuses using 10 MV x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Doppke, K.; Novack, D.; Wang, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    A technique for treating patients who have advanced tumors of the larynx and pyriform sinus was developed using isocentric anterior and posterior opposed fields with 10 MV x rays. This technique can be used to deliver a tumor dose of 45 Gray to the primary site and regional nodes and approximately 40 Gray to the spinal cord. The method eliminates problems of multi-field junctures and lowers the daily spinal cord dose when compared to the standard parallel opposed lateral portals and anterior neck fields.

  8. Digital tomosynthesis: technique modifications and clinical applications for neurovascular anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Maravilla, K.R.; Murry, R.C. Jr.; Diehl, J.; Suss, R.; Allen, L.; Chang, K.; Crawford, J.; McCoy, R.

    1984-09-01

    Digital tomosynthesis studies (DTS) using a linear tomographic motion can provide good quality clinical images when combined with subtraction angiotomography. By modifying their hardware system and the computer software algorithms, the authors were able to reconstruct tomosynthesis images using an isocentric rotation (IR) motion. Applying a combination of linear tomographic and IR techniques in clinical cases, they performed DTS studies in six patients, five with aneurysms and one with a hypervascular tumor. The results showed detailed definitions of the pathologic entities and the regional neurovascular anatomy. Based on this early experience, DTS would seem to be a useful technique for the preoperative surgical planning of vascular abnormalities.

  9. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  10. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; ET AL.

    2005-02-28

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linac. The highly successful development of an EBIS at BNL now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based pre-injectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The new RFQ and Linac that are used to accelerate beams from the EBIS to an energy sufficient for injection into the Booster are both very similar to existing devices already in operation at other facilities. Injection into the Booster will occur at the same location as the existing injection from the Tandem.

  11. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A.; Read, Paul W.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  12. Helical Tomotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-Any Advantages Over Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.C. Vincent Mui, Wing-lun A.; Fung, Wing-ki W.

    2010-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses different planning algorithm and dose delivery method from the linear accelerator (linac)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This study compared the dosimetric outcomes between the tomotherapy plans and conventional linac-based IMRT plans in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifteen stage II-III cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer) NPC patients treated by tomotherapy were conveniently recruited. Apart from the tomotherapy plans, a 7-field 6-MV photon conventional IMRT plan was computed for each patient with the same CT dataset and reference from the dose constraints and target dose prescriptions of the tomotherapy plans using the XiO treatment planning system. Average values of the dose parameters including the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), maximum and minimum doses of the target volumes, and the maximum and mean doses of the organs at risk (OAR) were compared between the two treatment methods. Better dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was demonstrated in the tomotherapy plans, in which the differences in the maximum and mean doses reached statistical significance (p < 0.05). Besides, the CI of the tomotherapy plans were significantly higher than the conventional linac-based plans for the nasopharynx PTV (NP-PTV) and neck lymphatics PTV (LN-PTV) (p = 0.017 and 0.010, respectively). The HI was significantly smaller in both NP-PTV and LN-PTV (p = 0.024 and < 0.001, respectively). Among the OAR, the brain stem and spinal cord doses in the tomotherapy plans were lower than that of the conventional IMRT plans. However, the doses to the other OAR did not show significant dosimetric differences. In the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, tomotherapy plans were superior to the 7-field conventional IMRT plans in PTV dose conformity and homogeneity and the sparing of the brain stem and spinal cord. However, no significant advantages were observed for the rest of the OAR.

  13. Thermal neutron cross section of liquid and solid mesitylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantargi, F.; Blostein, J. J.; Torres, L.; Granada, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    Total cross sections of mesitylene at 293 K and at 89 K were measured at the electron LINAC based pulsed neutron source of Centro Atómico Bariloche. Preliminary frequency spectra were proposed for liquid and solid mesitylene at those temperatures combining experimental and synthetic contributions. Scattering law data files were generated with the NJOY nuclear data processing system. Good agreement between experiments and calculations is found, which represents a primary validation of the scattering kernels which are now being used for the design and optimization of a cold moderator employing that material.

  14. Simultaneous optimization of the cavity heat load and trip rates in linacs using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzić, Balša; Hofler, Alicia S.; Reeves, Cody J.; Khan, Sabbir A.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Benesch, Jay; Freyberger, Arne; Ranjan, Desh

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based optimization is used to simultaneously minimize two competing objectives guiding the operation of the Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility linacs: cavity heat load and radio frequency cavity trip rates. The results represent a significant improvement to the standard linac energy management tool and thereby could lead to a more efficient Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility configuration. This study also serves as a proof of principle of how a genetic algorithm can be used for optimizing other linac-based machines.

  15. Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission and Exponential Growth at 530 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, S. V.; Gluskin, E.; Biedron, S. G.; Dejus, R. J.; den Hartog, P. K.; Galayda, J. N.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J. W.; Moog, E. R.; Sajaev, V.; Sereno, N. S.; Travish, G.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, W.; Biggs, J. A.; Borland, M.; Carwardine, J. A.; Chae, Y.-C.; Decker, G.; Deriy, B. N.; Erdmann, M. J.; Friedsam, H.; Gold, C.; Grelick, A. E.; Hahne, M. W.; Harkay, K. C.; Huang, Z.; Lessner, E. S.; Lill, R. M.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O. A.; Markovich, G. M.; Meyer, D.; Nassiri, A.; Noonan, J. R.; Pasky, S. J.; Pile, G.; Smith, T. L.; Soliday, R.; Tieman, B. J.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Trento, G. F.; Vasserman, I. B.; Walters, D. R.; Wang, X. J.; Wiemerslage, G.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.-X.

    2000-07-01

    Experimental evidence for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) at 530 nm is reported. The measurements were made at the low-energy undulator test line facility at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental setup and details of the experimental results are presented, as well as preliminary analysis. This experiment extends to shorter wavelengths the operational knowledge of a linac-based SASE free-electron laser and explicitly shows the predicted exponential growth in intensity of the optical pulse as a function of length along the undulator.

  16. Considerations on Beam Quality Control in MIT X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Graves, W.; Wang, D.; Zwart, T.; Emma, P.; Wu, J.; Huang, G.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-15

    The x-ray FEL at MIT is one example of a design for a new generation linac-based light source. Such a new machine requires very high quality electron beams. Besides the usual requirements on beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, peak current, there are new challenges emerging in the design studies, e.g., the arrival timing of electron beam must reach precision below tens of femtoseconds level to ensure the laser seed overlaps the desired sections of electron bunch in the multiple-stage HGHG process. In this paper we report the progress on design optimization towards high quality and low sensitivity beams.

  17. A Parameter Optimization for a National SASE FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, O.; Yigit, S.

    2007-04-23

    The parameter optimization for a national SASE FEL facility was studied. Turkish State Planing Organization (DPT) gave financial support as an inter-universities project to begin technical design studies and test facility of National Accelerator Complex starting from 2006. In addition to a particle factory, the complex will contain a linac based free electron laser, positron ring based synchrotron radiation facilities and a proton accelerator. In this paper, we have given some results of main parameters of SASE FEL facility based on 130 MeV linac, application potential in basic and applied research.

  18. High-Intensity Continuous Wave Slow Positron Source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel concept of an electron linac-based slow positron source with projected intensity on the order of 10^10 slow e^+/s. The key components of this concept are a Continuous Wave (CW) electron beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of positrons into a field-free area through a magnetic field terminator plug for moderation in a solid Neon moderator. The feasibility calculations were completed in the framework of GEANT4 simulation and OPERA-3D magnetic field calculation code.

  19. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  20. Development of 325 MHz single spoke resonators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; Lanfranco, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Ozelis, J.; Ristori, L.; Sergatskov, D.; Wagner, R.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project represents the current effort at Fermilab to produce an 8-GeV proton linac based on 400 independently phased superconducting cavities. Eighteen ?=0.21 single spoke resonators, operating at 325 MHz, comprise the first stage of the linac cold section. In this paper we present the current status of the production and testing of the first two prototype cavities. This includes descriptions of the fabrication, frequency tuning, chemical polishing, high pressure rinse, and high-gradient cold tests.

  1. The 4th generation light source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Bullard, D.; Coleman, J.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, F.; Evans, R.; Evtushenko, P.; Grippo, A.; Gould, C.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Klopf, J. M.; Moore, W.; Neil, G.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Sexton, D.; Shinn, M.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  2. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature. PMID:24376940

  3. A design study on high power RF system for the TARLA facility of TAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslı, Özlem; Yavaş, Ömer

    2012-11-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) is a superconducting electron linac based IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility and it is under construction in Ankara as the first facility of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. TARLA will compose of two optical cavity systems to produce oscillator FEL in infrared region (2-250 μm) and also Bremsstrahlung radiation to be used in basic and applied sciences. In this study, main parameters of TARLA's high power RF and power transmission line systems are defined and a 20 kW RF solid state power amplifier is optimized.

  4. An MCNP-based model for the evaluation of the photoneutron dose in high energy medical electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Carinou, Eleutheria; Stamatelatos, Ion Evangelos; Kamenopoulou, Vassiliki; Georgolopoulou, Paraskevi; Sandilos, Panayotis

    The development of a computational model for the treatment head of a medical electron accelerator (Elekta/Philips SL-18) by the Monte Carlo code mcnp-4C2 is discussed. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and a pmma phantom representing the patient body. Calculations were performed for a 14 MeV electron beam impinging on the accelerator target and a 10 cmx10 cm beam area at the isocentre. The model was used in order to predict the neutron ambient dose equivalent at the isocentre level and moreover the neutron absorbed dose distribution within the phantom. Calculations were validated against experimental measurements performed by gold foil activation detectors. The results of this study indicated that the equivalent dose at tissues or organs adjacent to the treatment field due to photoneutrons could be up to 10% of the total peripheral dose, for the specific accelerator characteristics examined. Therefore, photoneutrons should be taken into account when accurate dose calculations are required to sensitive tissues that are adjacent to the therapeutic X-ray beam. The method described can be extended to other accelerators and collimation configurations as well, upon specification of treatment head component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential. PMID:18348851

  5. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T B; Hoole, A C F; Burnet, N G; Thomas, S J

    2009-04-21

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord. PMID:19336846

  6. A comprehensive EPID-based 3D validation technique for TrueBeam-delivered VMAT plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansbacher, W.; Gagne, I. M.; Swift, C.-L.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a pre-treatment EPI dosimetry method on Varian TrueBeam linacs using continuous imaging, with reconstruction in a 3D cylindrical phantom geometry. Methods: Delivery of VMAT plans with continuous imaging is currently possible only in Research Mode on TrueBeam linacs, with images acquired in a proprietary format. An earlier technique was adapted to take advantage of technical improvements in EPID delivery, and was tested under various acquisition conditions. The dosimetry of VMAT plans was evaluated at isocentre and within patient volumes that had been transferred to the virtual phantom. Results: Approximately 60 portal image projections per arc were found to be adequate for 3D reconstruction in phantom volumes of 28cm diameter. Twelve prostate, CNS and Head & Neck deliveries were evaluated in Research mode relative to the corresponding Eclipse (v.10) treatment plans, and to measurements on an ArcCheck device in Treatment mode. Mean dose differences at isocentre were within 2% for the three-way comparison, and in PTV volumes were within 1% (s.d. 1%). However, some discrepancies were observed in ArcCheck results that may be related to the small dimensions of certain VMAT apertures. Conclusions: EPI dosimetry with 3D dose reconstruction is an accurate, comprehensive and efficient pre-treatment validation technique for VMAT delivery. Although currently limited to a research mode on TrueBeam, it has the potential to be implemented for clinical use.

  7. Effects of bone- and air-tissue inhomogeneities on the dose distributions of the Leksell Gamma Knife® calculated with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Rojas, E. Leticia; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2005-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE (version 2003) is applied to calculate Leksell Gamma Knife® dose distributions for heterogeneous phantoms. The usual spherical water phantom is modified with a spherical bone shell simulating the skull and an air-filled cube simulating the frontal or maxillary sinuses. Different simulations of the 201 source configuration of the Gamma Knife have been carried out with a simplified model of the geometry of the source channel of the Gamma Knife recently tested for both single source and multisource configurations. The dose distributions determined for heterogeneous phantoms including the bone- and/or air-tissue interfaces show non-negligible differences with respect to those calculated for a homogeneous one, mainly when the Gamma Knife isocentre approaches the separation surfaces. Our findings confirm an important underdosage (~10%) nearby the air-tissue interface, in accordance with previous results obtained with the PENELOPE code with a procedure different from ours. On the other hand, the presence of the spherical shell simulating the skull produces a few per cent underdosage at the isocentre wherever it is situated.

  8. Resampling: An optimization method for inverse planning in robotic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikard, Achim; Schlaefer, Alexander; Adler, John R. Jr.

    2006-11-15

    By design, the range of beam directions in conventional radiosurgery are constrained to an isocentric array. However, the recent introduction of robotic radiosurgery dramatically increases the flexibility of targeting, and as a consequence, beams need be neither coplanar nor isocentric. Such a nonisocentric design permits a large number of distinct beam directions to be used in one single treatment. These major technical differences provide an opportunity to improve upon the well-established principles for treatment planning used with GammaKnife or LINAC radiosurgery. With this objective in mind, our group has developed over the past decade an inverse planning tool for robotic radiosurgery. This system first computes a set of beam directions, and then during an optimization step, weights each individual beam. Optimization begins with a feasibility query, the answer to which is derived through linear programming. This approach offers the advantage of completeness and avoids local optima. Final beam selection is based on heuristics. In this report we present and evaluate a new strategy for utilizing the advantages of linear programming to improve beam selection. Starting from an initial solution, a heuristically determined set of beams is added to the optimization problem, while beams with zero weight are removed. This process is repeated to sample a set of beams much larger compared with typical optimization. Experimental results indicate that the planning approach efficiently finds acceptable plans and that resampling can further improve its efficiency.

  9. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.,; /SLAC

    2007-03-14

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  10. A Technique for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning with Helical Tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Emilie T.; Hoban, Peter W.; Kammeyer, Thomas; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M.; Westerly, David C.; Basavatia, Amar; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop an efficient and effective planning technique for stereotactic radiosurgery using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials Planning CTs and contours of twenty patients, previously treated in our clinic for brain metastases with Linac-based radiosurgery using circular collimators, were used to develop a robust Tomotherapy planning technique. Plan calculation times as well as delivery times were recorded for all patients to allow for an efficiency evaluation. In addition, conformation and homogeneity indices were calculated as metrics to compare plan quality to that which is achieved with conventional radiosurgery delivery systems. Results A robust and efficient planning technique was identified to produce plans of radiosurgical quality using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system. Dose calculation did not exceed a few hours and resulting delivery times were less than an hour, which allows the process to fit into a single day radiosurgery workflow. Plan conformity compared favorably with published results for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In addition, plan homogeneity was similar to Linac-based approaches. Conclusions The TomoTherapy planning software can be used to create plans of acceptable quality for stereotactic radiosurgery in a time that is appropriate for a radiosurgery workflow that requires that planning and delivery occur within one treatment day. PMID:20138501

  11. A Technique for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment Planning with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, Emilie T.; Hoban, Peter W.; Kammeyer, Thomas; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M.; Westerly, David C.; Basavatia, Amar; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an efficient and effective planning technique for stereotactic radiosurgery using helical tomotherapy. Planning CTs and contours of 20 patients, previously treated in our clinic for brain metastases with linac-based radiosurgery using circular collimators, were used to develop a robust TomoTherapy planning technique. Plan calculation times as well as delivery times were recorded for all patients to allow for an efficiency evaluation. In addition, conformation and homogeneity indices were calculated as metrics to compare plan quality with that which is achieved with conventional radiosurgery delivery systems. A robust and efficient planning technique was identified to produce plans of radiosurgical quality using the TomoTherapy treatment planning system. Dose calculation did not exceed a few hours and resulting delivery times were less than 1 hour, which allows the process to fit into a single day radiosurgery workflow. Plan conformity compared favorably with published results for gamma knife radiosurgery. In addition, plan homogeneity was similar to linac-based approaches. The TomoTherapy planning software can be used to create plans of acceptable quality for stereotactic radiosurgery in a time that is appropriate for a radiosurgery workflow that requires that planning and delivery occur within 1 treatment day.

  12. Optimized Effective Potential for Quantum Electrodynamical Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Flick, Johannes; Tokatly, Ilya V; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-08-28

    We propose an orbital exchange-correlation functional for applying time-dependent density functional theory to many-electron systems coupled to cavity photons. The time nonlocal equation for the electron-photon optimized effective potential (OEP) is derived. In the static limit our OEP energy functional reduces to the Lamb shift of the ground state energy. We test the new approximation in the Rabi model. It is shown that the OEP (i) reproduces quantitatively the exact ground-state energy from the weak to the deep strong coupling regime and (ii) accurately captures the dynamics entering the ultrastrong coupling regime. The present formalism opens the path to a first-principles description of correlated electron-photon systems, bridging the gap between electronic structure methods and quantum optics for real material applications. PMID:26371646

  13. Strongly enhanced effects of Lorentz symmetry violation in entangled Yb+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Safronova, M. S.; Porsev, S. G.; Pruttivarasin, T.; Hohensee, M. A.; Häffner, H.

    2016-05-01

    A number of theories aiming at unifying gravity with other fundamental interactions, including field theory, suggest the violation of Lorentz symmetry. Whereas the energy scale of such strongly Lorentz-symmetry-violating physics is much higher than that attainable at present by particle accelerators, Lorentz violation may nevertheless be detectable via precision measurements at low energies. Here, we carry out a systematic theoretical investigation to identify which atom shows the greatest promise for detecting a Lorentz symmetry violation in the electron-photon sector. We found that the ytterbium ion (Yb+) is an ideal system with high sensitivity, as well as excellent experimental controllability. By applying quantum-information-inspired technology to Yb+, we expect tests of local Lorentz invariance (LLI) violating physics in the electron-photon sector to reach levels of 10-23--five orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current best bounds.

  14. CEPXS

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    CEPXS is a multigroup-Legendre cross-section generating code. The cross sections produced by CEPXS enable coupled electron-photon transport calculations to be performed with multigroup radiation transport codes, e.g. MITS and SCEPTRE. CEPXS generates multigroup-Legendre cross sections for photons, electrons and positrons over the energy range from 100 MeV to 1.0 keV. The continuous slowing-down approximation is used for those electron interactions that result in small-energy losses. The extended transport correction is applied to the forward-peaked elastic scattering cross section for electrons. A standard multigroup-Legendre treatment is used for the other coupled electron-photon cross sections. CEPXS extracts electron cross-section information from the DATAPAC data set and photon cross-section information from Biggs-Lighthill data. The model that is used for ionization/relaxation in CEPXS is essentially the same as that employed in ITS.

  15. Data quality management system (DQMS) for BAC detector in the ZEUS experiment at the HERA accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszczak, Zbigniew; Jezynski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Kuthan, Marcin; Bigos, Grzegorz; Gierej, Artur

    2003-10-01

    The paper presents functional structure of database system of data measurement quality for BAC detector in ZEUS experiment. The system collects diagnostic and experimental data. Diagnostic data are: work parameters of the detector and electronics/photonics, tests of electronic/photonic blocks. These data are archived for certain period of time. The quality of current data collection process is estimated using these archived data. The result of such estimation is generated in a form of status map of the detector. Such maps, describing status of the hardware, are fundamental for elementary particle analysis by the calorimeter. The DAQ system, collecting data to the database, estimates data quality on-line during transmission and writing. This mechanism of fast on-line data quality management leads to early discoveries of detector work irregularities and faults.

  16. Lateral-angular and temporal characteristics of EAS optical radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Chuykova, T. A.; Galkin, V. I.; Roganova, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics of the direct and scattered components of electron-photon shower optical radiation for distances R 500 m from the shower core to a detector, allowing for the Cerenkov and fluorescent mechanism of photon generation are presented. The results of calculations are employed to clarify the techniques for determination of the shower parameters detected by both installations registering fluorescent light and those recording Cerenkov light.

  17. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10-3- 1 fb range.

  18. Single-chip microprocessor that communicates directly using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chen; Wade, Mark T.; Lee, Yunsup; Orcutt, Jason S.; Alloatti, Luca; Georgas, Michael S.; Waterman, Andrew S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Avizienis, Rimas R.; Lin, Sen; Moss, Benjamin R.; Kumar, Rajesh; Pavanello, Fabio; Atabaki, Amir H.; Cook, Henry M.; Ou, Albert J.; Leu, Jonathan C.; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Asanović, Krste; Ram, Rajeev J.; Popović, Miloš A.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.

    2015-12-01

    Data transport across short electrical wires is limited by both bandwidth and power density, which creates a performance bottleneck for semiconductor microchips in modern computer systems—from mobile phones to large-scale data centres. These limitations can be overcome by using optical communications based on chip-scale electronic-photonic systems enabled by silicon-based nanophotonic devices8. However, combining electronics and photonics on the same chip has proved challenging, owing to microchip manufacturing conflicts between electronics and photonics. Consequently, current electronic-photonic chips are limited to niche manufacturing processes and include only a few optical devices alongside simple circuits. Here we report an electronic-photonic system on a single chip integrating over 70 million transistors and 850 photonic components that work together to provide logic, memory, and interconnect functions. This system is a realization of a microprocessor that uses on-chip photonic devices to directly communicate with other chips using light. To integrate electronics and photonics at the scale of a microprocessor chip, we adopt a ‘zero-change’ approach to the integration of photonics. Instead of developing a custom process to enable the fabrication of photonics, which would complicate or eliminate the possibility of integration with state-of-the-art transistors at large scale and at high yield, we design optical devices using a standard microelectronics foundry process that is used for modern microprocessors. This demonstration could represent the beginning of an era of chip-scale electronic-photonic systems with the potential to transform computing system architectures, enabling more powerful computers, from network infrastructure to data centres and supercomputers.

  19. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  20. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  1. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  2. Proceeding of the 18th Intl. Workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions (IISC-18)

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, Carlos O; Krstic, Predrag S; Meyer, Fred W

    2011-01-01

    The main topics of this proceedings were: (1) Energy loss of particles at surfaces; (2) Scattering of atoms, ions, molecules and clusters; (3) Charge exchange between particles and surfaces; (4) Ion induced desorption, electronic and kinetic sputtering; (5) Defect formation, surface modification and nanostructuring; (6) Electron, photon and secondary ion emission due to particle impact on surfaces; (7) Sputtering, fragmentation, cluster and ion formation in SIMS and SNMS; (8) Cluster/molecular and highly charged ion beams; and (9) Laser induced desorption.

  3. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  4. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  5. Interpretation of the radioactive background observed in the OSO-7 gamma-ray monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Dunphy, P.; Forest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    Application of a spallation activation calculation to the OSO-7 gamma-ray monitor background shows that major line features and about 30% of the continuum can be understood as activation of the central detector crystal by trapped protons. Weaker line features arise from activation of materials unshielded by the anticoincidence cup, while the remaining continuum and annihilation line would seem to come largely from electron-photon cascades originating in the spacecraft.

  6. Study of photonuclear muon interactions at Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Dadykin, V. L.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Achkasov, V. M.; Semenov, A. M.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    The method of pion-muon-electron decays recording was used to distinguish between purely electron-photon and hadronic cascades, induced by high energy muons underground. At energy approx. 1 Tev a ratio of the number of hadronic to electromagnetic cascades was found equal 0.11 + or - .03 in agreement with expectation. But, at an energy approx. 4 Tev a sharp increase of this ratio was indicated though not statistically sound (0.52 + or - .13).

  7. Functionalization of metallic glasses through hierarchical patterning.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Molla; Schroers, Jan; Kumar, Golden

    2015-02-11

    Surface engineering over multiple length scales is critical for electronics, photonics, and enabling multifunctionality in synthetic materials. Here, we demonstrate a sequential embossing technique for building multi-tier patterns in metals by controlling the size-dependent thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses. Sub-100 nm to millimeter sized features are sculpted sequentially to allow an exquisite control of surface properties. The process can be integrated with net-shaping to transfer functional patterns on three-dimensional metal parts. PMID:25559737

  8. Stabilizing Semiconductor Devices With Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overhauser, Albert W.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Damage by radiation healed rapidly. Feature provides continuous, rapid recovery of devices from degradation caused by hot electrons, photons, and ionizing radiation. Several candidate sites for palladium film catalysts, inserted during manufacture as integral parts of devices. Paladium films made by evaporation, sputtering, or chemical-vapor deposition. If additional storage required, thick layer of palladium plated on inside of package surrounding device. Hydrogen stored by exposing palladium to hydrogen gas just before package sealed hermetically.

  9. Montecarlo simulation of photon induced air showers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Sciascio, G.

    The EPAS code (Electron Photon induced Air Showers) is a three dimensional Montecarlo simulation developed to study the properties of extensive air showers generated by the interaction of high energy photons (or electrons) in the atmosphere. Results of the present simulation concern the longitudinal, lateral, temporal and angular distributions of electrons in atmospheric cascades initiated by photons of energies up to 100 TeV.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of photon-induced air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Sciascio, G.

    1994-05-01

    The EPAS code (Electron Photon-induced Air Showers) is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the properties of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by the interaction of high energy photons (or electrons) in the atmosphere. Results of the present simulation concern the longitudinal, lateral, temporal and angular distributions of electrons in atmospheric cascades initiated by photons of energies up to 10^3 TeV.

  11. Photon drag effect in carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, Alexander N.; Lyashenko, Dmitry A.; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Obraztsov, Petr A.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Svirko, Yuri P.

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate that in graphitic nanocarbon materials, combination of ballistic conductivity and strong electron photon coupling opens a unique opportunity to observe transfer of momentum of the electromagnetic radiation to free carriers. The resulting drag of quasiballistically propagating electrons can be employed, in particular, to visualize the temporal profile, polarization, and propagation direction of the laser pulse. In this letter, we report the giant photon drag effect in yarns made of multiwall carbon nanotubes.

  12. Single-chip microprocessor that communicates directly using light.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Wade, Mark T; Lee, Yunsup; Orcutt, Jason S; Alloatti, Luca; Georgas, Michael S; Waterman, Andrew S; Shainline, Jeffrey M; Avizienis, Rimas R; Lin, Sen; Moss, Benjamin R; Kumar, Rajesh; Pavanello, Fabio; Atabaki, Amir H; Cook, Henry M; Ou, Albert J; Leu, Jonathan C; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Asanović, Krste; Ram, Rajeev J; Popović, Miloš A; Stojanović, Vladimir M

    2015-12-24

    Data transport across short electrical wires is limited by both bandwidth and power density, which creates a performance bottleneck for semiconductor microchips in modern computer systems--from mobile phones to large-scale data centres. These limitations can be overcome by using optical communications based on chip-scale electronic-photonic systems enabled by silicon-based nanophotonic devices. However, combining electronics and photonics on the same chip has proved challenging, owing to microchip manufacturing conflicts between electronics and photonics. Consequently, current electronic-photonic chips are limited to niche manufacturing processes and include only a few optical devices alongside simple circuits. Here we report an electronic-photonic system on a single chip integrating over 70 million transistors and 850 photonic components that work together to provide logic, memory, and interconnect functions. This system is a realization of a microprocessor that uses on-chip photonic devices to directly communicate with other chips using light. To integrate electronics and photonics at the scale of a microprocessor chip, we adopt a 'zero-change' approach to the integration of photonics. Instead of developing a custom process to enable the fabrication of photonics, which would complicate or eliminate the possibility of integration with state-of-the-art transistors at large scale and at high yield, we design optical devices using a standard microelectronics foundry process that is used for modern microprocessors. This demonstration could represent the beginning of an era of chip-scale electronic-photonic systems with the potential to transform computing system architectures, enabling more powerful computers, from network infrastructure to data centres and supercomputers. PMID:26701054

  13. The electron structure and magnetic properties of TiCo intermetallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, G. E.; Svechkarev, I. V.

    1987-05-01

    The energy band structure and magnetic and some thermodynamic characteristics of TiCo are investigated theoretically in the low-temperature region. The nature of the stability of this intermetallic is determined. It is shown that TiCo is characterized by a strong exchange enhancement of spin susceptibility. The factors responsible for the strong paramagnetism and superconductivity of TiCo are identified; the parameters of electron-photon and electron-paramagnon interactions are determined.

  14. Dynamic dosimetry and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods: Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy delivery system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results: In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40-100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45-87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on 6 patients with 48-82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of 4.17 (1-9) additional seeds. Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions: The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a significantly more homogeneous seed distribution, and has the potential to

  15. ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE PREINJECTOR PROJECT (EBIS) CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI, J.; BARTON, D.; BEEBE, E.; GASSNER, D.; GRANDINETTI, R.; HSEUH, H.; JAVIDFAR, A.; KPONOU, A.; LAMBIASE, R.; LESSARD, E.; LOCKEY, R.; LODESTRO, V.; MAPES, M.; MIRABELLA, D.; NEHRING, T.; OERTER, B.; PENDZICK, A.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; ROSER, T.; RUSSO, T.; SNYDSTRUP, L.; WILINSKI, M.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ZHANG, S.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) based on a high charge state Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, and a short Linear accelerator (Linac). The highly successful development of an EBIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) now makes it possible to replace the present pre-injector that is based on an electrostatic Tandem with a reliable, low maintenance Linac-based pre-injector. Linac-based preinjectors are presently used at most accelerator and collider facilities with the exception of RHIC, where the required gold beam intensities could only be met with a Tandem until the recent EBIS development. EBIS produces high charge state ions directly, eliminating the need for the two stripping foils presently used with the Tandem. Unstable stripping efficiencies of these foils are a significant source of luminosity degradation in RHIC. The high reliability and flexibility of the new Linac-based pre-injector will lead to increased integrated luminosity at RHIC and is an essential component for the long-term success of the RHIC facility. This new pre-injector, based on an EBIS, also has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium beams and, as part of a future upgrade, might also be used to produce polarized {sup 3}He beams. These capabilities will be critical to the future luminosity upgrades and electron-ion collisions in RHIC. The proposed pre-injector system would also provide for a major enhancement in capability for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), which utilizes heavy-ion beams from the RHIC complex. EBIS would allow for the acceleration of all important ion species for the NASA radiobiology program, such as, helium, argon, and neon which are unavailable with the present Tandem injector. In addition, the new system would allow for very rapid switching of ion species for

  16. Evaluation of a photon and an electron beam of a 6-MV linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S C; Modur, P; Basavatia, R

    1988-01-01

    The first Mitsubishi medical linear accelerator in the United States was commissioned in April 1985. This unit EXL-8 (marketed by Mitsubishi International Corporation) produces 8-MeV electron beams in addition to 6-MV x rays. It is a 100-cm source-axis distance isocentric machine. Acceptance testing and performance evaluation of this accelerator were completed. Our measurements included beam characteristics and dosimetry parameters for both modalities. Central axis % depth dose (% DD), tissue-maximum ratio, field size output factors, wedge factors, etc., for this Linac 6-MV beam, are reported. Characteristics of the 8-MeV electron beam, namely % DD data, isodose curves, and cone ratios for various electron applicators are presented. PMID:3211045

  17. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy with an active scanned delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Furukawa, T; Inaniwa, T

    2014-10-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, secondary neutrons contribute to an undesired dose outside the target volume, and consequently the increase of secondary cancer risk is a growing concern. In this study, neutron ambient dose equivalents in carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) with an active beam delivery system were measured with a rem meter, WENDI-II, at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When the same irradiation target was assumed, the measured neutron dose with an active beam was at most ∼15 % of that with a passive beam. This percentage became smaller as larger distances from the iso-centre. Also, when using an active beam delivery system, the neutron dose per treatment dose in CIRT was comparable with that in proton radiotherapy. Finally, it was experimentally demonstrated that the use of an active scanned beam in CIRT can greatly reduce the secondary neutron dose. PMID:24126486

  18. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauer, T.; Sokoll, J.; Cremers, F.; Harmansa, R.; Luzzara, M.; Schmidt, R.

    2008-02-01

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90° and 270° gantry angles. Compared to a 10 × 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 × 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In order to

  19. Two new DOSXYZnrc sources for 4D Monte Carlo simulations of continuously variable beam configurations, with applications to RapidArc, VMAT, TomoTherapy and CyberKnife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Julio; Antoniu Popescu, I.

    2010-08-01

    We present two new Monte Carlo sources for the DOSXYZnrc code, which can be used to compute dose distributions due to continuously variable beam configurations. These sources support a continuously rotating gantry and collimator, dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion, variable monitor unit (MU) rate, couch rotation and translation in any direction, arbitrary isocentre motion with respect to the patient and variable source-to-axis distance (SAD). These features make them applicable to Monte Carlo simulations for RapidArc™, Elekta VMAT, TomoTherapy™ and CyberKnife™. Unique to these sources is the synchronization between the motion in the DOSXYZnrc geometry and the motion within the linac head, represented by a shared library (either a BEAMnrc accelerator with dynamic component modules, or an external library). The simulations are achieved in single runs, with no intermediate phase space files.

  20. A design of a rotating gantry for non-symmetric ion-therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Márius

    1999-12-01

    An ion-optical design of a gantry for transport of ion beams having different emittances in the horizontal and vertical plane is presented. The ion-optical constraints making the beam spot at the gantry exit independent from the angle of gantry rotation are derived analytically. The generally formulated constraints are applied to an isocentric normal-conducting gantry transporting the beams with maximum beam rigidity of 6.6 Tm (e.g. 430 MeV/u carbon beam with a penetration range of 30 cm in water). The gantry is equipped with a two-direction magnetic raster scanning system. The ion-optical properties of the gantry are illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT code.

  1. Integrated megavoltage portal imaging with a 1.5 T MRI linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Knox, C.; Crijns, S. P. M.; Smit, K.; Stam, M. K.; van den Bosch, M. R.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2011-10-01

    In this note, the feasibility of complementing our hybrid 1.5 T MRI linac (MRL) with a megavoltage (MV) portal imager is investigated. A standard aSi MV detector panel is added to the system and both qualitative and quantitative performances are determined. Simultaneous MR imaging and transmission imaging can be performed without mutual interference. The MV image quality is compromised by beam transmission and longer isocentre distance; still, the field edges and bony anatomy can be detected at very low dose levels of 0.4 cGy. MV imaging integrated with the MRL provides an independent and well-established position verification tool, a field edge check and a calibration for alignment of the coordinate systems of the MRI and the accelerator. The portal imager can also be a valuable means for benchmarking MRI-guided position verification protocols on a patient-specific basis in the introductory phase.

  2. Investigation of a MOSFET dosimetry system for midpoint dose verification in prostate 3D CRT/IMRT.

    PubMed

    Wiese, T; Bezak, E; Nelligan, R

    2008-09-01

    The suitability of MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) for use in in-vivo dosimetry for IMRT prostate treatment and patient setup errors has been investigated in this work. MOSFETs were placed on entrance and exit surfaces of a number of different phantoms (with varying complexities from homogeneous to anthropomorphic). Dose measurements were then used to calculate a midpoint dose, which was compared with an IC placed at the isocentre. The agreements found between the calculated (MOSFETs) and the measured midpoint dose (IC) was: 0.7% for a prostate treatment verification and 3.5% for an IMRT treatment. MOSFETs placed on entry and exit surfaces can detect patient setup offsets of 2 cm, but do not have the sensitivity to confidently detect offsets of 1 cm or smaller. PMID:18946975

  3. The role of the concept of biologically effective dose (BED) in treatment planning in radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Millar, William T; Hopewell, John W; Paddick, Ian; Lindquist, Christer; Nordströn, Håkan; Lidberg, Pär; Gårding, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Radiosurgery (RS) treatment times vary, even for the same prescription dose, due to variations in the collimator size, the number of iso-centres/beams/arcs used and the time gap between each of these exposures. The biologically effective dose (BED) concept, incorporating fast and slow components of repair, was used to show the likely influence of these variables for Gamma Knife patients with Vestibular Schwannomas. Two patients plans were selected, treated with the Model B Gamma Knife, these representing the widest range of treatment variables; iso-centre numbers 3 and 13, overall treatment times 25.4 and 129.6 min, prescription dose 14 Gy. These were compared with 3 cases treated with the Perfexion(®) Gamma Knife. The iso-centre number varied between 11 and 18, treatment time 35.7 - 74.4 min, prescription dose 13 Gy. In the longer Model B Gamma Knife treatment plan the 14 Gy iso-dose was best matched by the 58 Gy2.47 iso-BED line, although higher and lower BED values were associated with regions on the prescription iso-dose. The equivalent value for the shorter treatment was 85 Gy2.47. BED volume histograms showed that a BED of 85 Gy2.47 only covered ∼65% of the target in the plan with the longer overall treatment time. The corresponding BED values for the 3 cases, treated with the Perfexion(®) Gamma Knife, were 59.5, 68.5 and 71.5 Gy2.47. In conclusion BED calculations, taking account of the repair of sublethal damage, may indicate the importance of reporting overall time to reflect the biological effectiveness of the total physical dose applied. PMID:25982304

  4. Angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lena R.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging imaging modality that combines tomography with conventional digital mammography. In developing DBT dosimetry, a direct application of mammographic dosimetry has appeal. However, DBT introduces rotation of the x-ray tube relative to the dosimeter, thus raising questions about the angular dependence of mammographic dosimeters. To measure this dependence, two ionization chambers, two solid-stated detectors, and one photodiode were rotated relative to an incident Mo/Mo x-ray beam. In this isocentric DBT simulation, the signal of each dosimeter was studied over an angular range of 180° for tube voltages of 26 to 34 kV. One ionization chamber was then modeled numerically to study the response to various monoenergetic beams. The results show that all dosimeters underestimate dose to varying degrees; solid-state detectors show the greatest angular dependence while ionization chambers show the least. Correction factors were computed from the data for isocentric DBT images using projection angles up to +/-25° these factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.1380. The magnitude of the angular dependence generally decreased with increasing energy, as shown with both the measured and modeled data. As a result, the error arising in measuring DBT dose with a mammographic dosimeter varies significantly; it cannot always be disregarded. The use of correction factors may be possible but is largely impractical, as they are specific to the dosimeter, x-ray beam, and DBT geometry. Instead, an angle-independent dosimeter may be more suitable for DBT.

  5. Clinical implementation and rapid commissioning of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ian M; Hansen, Vibeke N; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to perform in-vivo dosimetry is one of the most effective and efficient methods of verifying the safe delivery of complex radiotherapy treatments. Previous work has detailed the development of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system that was subsequently used to replace pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Here we show that this system can be readily implemented on a commercial megavoltage imaging platform without modification to EPID hardware and without impacting standard imaging procedures. The accuracy and practicality of the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was confirmed through a comparison with traditional TLD in-vivo measurements performed on five prostate patients.The commissioning time required for the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was initially prohibitive at approximately 10 h per linac. Here we present a method of calculating linac specific EPID dosimetry correction factors that allow a single energy specific commissioning model to be applied to EPID data from multiple linacs. Using this method reduced the required per linac commissioning time to approximately 30 min.The validity of this commissioning method has been tested by analysing in-vivo dosimetry results of 1220 patients acquired on seven linacs over a period of 5 years. The average deviation between EPID based isocentre dose and expected isocentre dose for these patients was (-0.7  ±  3.2)%.EPID based in-vivo dosimetry is now the primary in-vivo dosimetry tool used at our centre and has replaced nearly all pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT treatments. PMID:25211121

  6. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  7. Quality assurance devices for dynamic conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victy Y M

    2004-01-01

    Two quality control devices, light-field device and radiation-field device, have been specially designed to facilitate the clinical implementation of conformal dynamic arc treatment (CDAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). With the devices, the light field as well as the radiation field, projected from the individual beam at any treatment position (i.e. arbitrary gantry angle) can be evaluated. For application, the device was attached at the front end of the couch and was placed at the isocentre of the linear accelerator treatment system (LINAC). The devices are designed to be rotated parallel to the gantry head so that the light field and the radiation field projected from a direct beam can be assessed. The aim of the study is, with the aid of the devices, to evaluate the geometric precision of the beam placement and the dosimetric accuracy performed in CDAT and IMRT. The devices are placed separately from the LINAC during application and provide an independent check on the quality performance of the LINAC in three dimensions. The condition of gantry sag and any mechanical displacement resulting in field shift can be observed and traced during gantry rotation. Mistakes that occurred during the isocentre calibration can lead to significant displacement in the field projection, which would not be revealed with the conventional quality control setting (i.e. gantry 0(o)), was demonstrated with the aid of the devices here. The influence of gravitational acceleration in MLC leaf positioning error, which would consequently lead to inaccurate dose delivery, was investigated. The results of our study show that the existence of gravitational influence is statistically significant, although the magnitude of the dose inaccuracy has been found to be small. PMID:15753929

  8. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  9. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis with on-board imaging in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Oldham, Mark; Dobbins, James T., III

    2005-04-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating digital tomosynthesis into radiation oncology practice with the use of kilovoltage on-board imagers (OBI). Modern radiation oncology linear accelerators now include hardware options for the addition of OBI for on-line patient setup verification. These systems include an x-ray tube and detector mounted directly on the accelerator gantry that rotate with the same isocenter. Applications include cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fluoroscopy, and radiographs to examine daily patient positioning to determine if the patient is in the same location as the treatment plan. While CBCT provides the greatest anatomical detail, this approach is limited by long acquisition and reconstruction times and higher patient dose. We propose to examine the use of tomosynthesis reconstructed volumetric data from limited angle projection images for short imaging time and reduced patient dose. Initial data uses 61 projection images acquired over an isocentric arc of twenty degrees with the detector approximately fifty-four centimeters from isocenter. A modified filtered back projection technique, which included a mathematical correction for isocentric motion, was used to reconstruct volume images. These images will be visually and mathematically compared to volumetric computed tomography images to determine efficacy of this system for daily patient positioning verification. Initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for effective daily patient positioning verification with reduced patient dose and imaging time. Additionally, the fast image acquisition may allow for a single breath hold imaging sequence, which will have no breath motion.

  10. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories.

    PubMed

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans