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Sample records for linaire qui relie

  1. LinAir: A multi-element discrete vortex Weissinger aerodynamic prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    LinAir is a vortex lattice aerodynamic prediction method similar to Weissinger's extended lifting-line theory, except that the circulation around a wing is represented by discrete horseshoe vortices, not a continuous distribution of vorticity. The program calculates subsonic longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary aircraft geometries. It was originally written by Dr. Ilan Kroo of Stanford University, and subsequently modified by the author to simplify modeling of complex configurations. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy was added by the author to extend the range of applicability of LinAir to low aspect ratio (i.e., fighter-type) configurations. A brief discussion of the theory of LinAir is presented, and details on how to run the program are given along with some comparisons with experimental data to validate the code. Example input and output files are given in the appendices to aid in understanding the program and its use. This version of LinAir runs in the VAX/VMS, Cray UNICOS, and Silicon Graphics Iris workstation environments at the time of this writing.

  2. Les etoiles qui ne veulent pas vieillir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    Qu'est-ce qui fait courir Jean-Claude Pecker ? Ses travaux sur les atmospheres stellaires qu'il poursuit aujourd'hui ? Son combat pour les droits de l'homme, ou contre le sceau du secret qui pese encore sur la recherche fondamentale ? Tout a la fois. Pour cette figure emblematique de l'astrophysique francaise, aujourd'hui a la retraite, pas question de raccrocher les armes...

  3. Maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Passer en revue les facteurs de risque, la prise en charge et la prévention des maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques en pratique familiale. Sources des données Des articles originaux et de synthèse entre janvier 1998 et février 2012 ont été identifiés à l’aide de PubMed et des expressions de recherche en anglais water-related illness, recreational water illness et swimmer illness. Message principal Il y a un risque de 3 % à 8 % de maladies gastrointestinales (MGI) après la baignade. Les groupes à risque élevé de MGI sont les enfants de moins de 5 ans, surtout s’ils n’ont pas été vaccinés contre le rotavirus, les personnes âgées et les patients immunodéficients. Les enfants sont à plus grand risque parce qu’ils avalent plus d’eau quand ils nagent, restent dans l’eau plus longtemps et jouent dans l’eau peu profonde et le sable qui sont plus contaminés. Les adeptes des sports dans lesquels le contact avec l’eau est abondant comme le triathlon et le surf cerf-volant sont aussi à risque élevé et même ceux qui s’adonnent à des activités impliquant un contact partiel avec l’eau comme la navigation de plaisance et la pêche ont un risque de 40 % à 50 % fois plus grand de MGI par rapport à ceux qui ne pratiquent pas de sports aquatiques. Il y a lieu de faire une culture des selles quand on soupçonne une maladie reliée aux loisirs aquatiques et l’échelle clinique de la déshydratation est utile pour l’évaluation des besoins de traitement chez les enfants affectés. Conclusion Les maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques est la principale cause de MGI durant la saison des baignades. La reconnaissance que la baignade est une source importante de maladies peut aider à prévenir les cas récurrents et secondaires. On recommande fortement le vaccin contre le rotavirus chez les enfants qui se baignent souvent.

  4. Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160407.html Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep Study shows ... internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. ...

  5. Recent results for the Raytheon RELI program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgas, David; Clatterbuck, Todd; Cashen, Matt; Daniele, Andrew; Hughes, Steve; Mordaunt, David

    2012-06-01

    We describe our approach and latest results for Raytheon's RELI (Robust Electric Laser Initiative) program. Our architecture leverages a slab-based, Master Oscillator / Power Amplifier (MOPA) architecture based on Raytheon's unique planar waveguide amplifier. Technical objectives for this effort are to demonstrate > 25 kW output with excellent beam quality and an electrical to optical efficiency > 30%. The planar waveguide architecture provides compact packaging and is inherently scalable to 100 kW or greater in a single beam line. We report on the latest progress and test results for the program.

  6. Rely and Toxic Shock Syndrome: A Technological Health Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Vostral, Sharra L.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines factors leading to the identification of Toxic Shock Syndrome with the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in 1978 and the specific role of Rely tampons in generating a technologically rooted health crisis. The concept biologically incompatible technology is offered to explain the relationship between constituent bacteria, women’s menstrual cycles, and a reactive technology that converged to create the ideal environment for the S. aureus bacteria to live and flourish in some women. The complicated and reactive relationship of the Rely tampon to emergent disease, corporate interests, public health, and injury law reveals the dangers of naturalizing technologies. PMID:22180682

  7. Campaigns Are Getting Longer and Relying on Fewer Donors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John L.

    1999-01-01

    Figures published by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) indicate that colleges and universities are engaging in longer capital campaigns while relying on fewer donors. The report identifies 18 colleges that currently fail to comply with CASE standards. A chart summarizes results of fund-raising campaigns at 138 U.S.…

  8. Water resources of the Lac Qui Parle River Watershed, Southwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cotter, R.D.; Bidwell, L.E.

    1968-01-01

    The Lac qui Parle River watershed is underlain by thick water-bearing sections of glacial drift and Cretaceous rocks. Drainage is from the Coteau des Praries, a plateau in the southwest, to the Lac qui Parle reservoir, about 800 feet lower than the plateau. The term "watershed" as used in this report refers to that part of the drainage basin (767 square miles) within Minnesota. The total area of the drainage basin, including South Dakota, is 1110 square miles. Most waters from the watershed are of good quality.

  9. Robust Sensing of Approaching Vehicles Relying on Acoustic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Mizumachi, Mitsunori; Kaminuma, Atsunobu; Ono, Nobutaka; Ando, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The latest developments in automobile design have allowed them to be equipped with various sensing devices. Multiple sensors such as cameras and radar systems can be simultaneously used for active safety systems in order to overcome blind spots of individual sensors. This paper proposes a novel sensing technique for catching up and tracking an approaching vehicle relying on an acoustic cue. First, it is necessary to extract a robust spatial feature from noisy acoustical observations. In this paper, the spatio-temporal gradient method is employed for the feature extraction. Then, the spatial feature is filtered out through sequential state estimation. A particle filter is employed to cope with a highly non-linear problem. Feasibility of the proposed method has been confirmed with real acoustical observations, which are obtained by microphones outside a cruising vehicle. PMID:24887038

  10. 77 FR 27245 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN... comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge...: r3planning@fws.gov . Include ``Big Stone Draft CCP/ EA'' in the subject line of the message. Fax:...

  11. Qui tam claims: threat to voluntary compliance programs in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Ruhnka, J C; Gac, E J; Boerstler, H

    2000-04-01

    The Department of Justice (DOJ) reports that after violent crime, health care fraud is the department's top priority. The number of health care fraud investigations pending at the DOJ increased from 270 cases in 1992 to more than 4,000 in 1997. The DOJ's primary weapon in prosecuting health care fraud is the federal False Claims Act (FCA) of 1863 (31 U.S.C. secs. 3729-3733). Almost unique among federal antifraud provisions, the FCA may also be used by "private prosecutors" to file lawsuits on behalf of the federal government charging organizations with submitting false claims to the government. The FCA rewards such whistle-blowers with a share of any resulting recoveries as a bounty and protects them from discharge for filing false claims lawsuits against their employers. It also requires defendants to pay the costs and attorneys fees of successful claimants. Although the private "bounty hunter" features of the FCA data back to the Civil War, these so-called qui tam claims were nearly dormant until 1986, when Congress amended the FCA to revive their use. Following the 1986 amendments, and paralleling the rapid increase in federal reimbursements for health care costs, private qui tam claims have far expanded beyond their traditional purview of defense contracts into the field of health care. By 1997, health care providers were the targets of 54 percent of the 530 private qui tam lawsuits field that year. PMID:10946381

  12. 47 CFR 15.717 - TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. 15.717... Television Band Devices § 15.717 TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. (a) Applications for certification. Parties may submit applications for certification of TVBDs that rely solely on spectrum sensing...

  13. 47 CFR 15.717 - TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. 15.717... Television Band Devices § 15.717 TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. (a) Applications for certification. Parties may submit applications for certification of TVBDs that rely solely on spectrum sensing...

  14. 47 CFR 15.717 - TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. 15.717... Television Band Devices § 15.717 TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. (a) Applications for certification. Parties may submit applications for certification of TVBDs that rely solely on spectrum sensing...

  15. 47 CFR 15.717 - TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. 15.717... Television Band Devices § 15.717 TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. (a) Parties may submit applications for certification of TVBDs that rely solely on spectrum sensing to identify available channels. Devices...

  16. 47 CFR 15.717 - TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. 15.717... Television Band Devices § 15.717 TVBDs that rely on spectrum sensing. (a) Applications for certification. Parties may submit applications for certification of TVBDs that rely solely on spectrum sensing...

  17. In Vitro Biosynthesis and Chemical Identification of UDP-N-acetyl-d-quinovosamine (UDP-d-QuiNAc)*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiezheng; Simonds, Laurie; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Noel, K. Dale

    2014-01-01

    N-acetyl-d-quinovosamine (2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-d-glucose, QuiNAc) occurs in the polysaccharide structures of many Gram-negative bacteria. In the biosynthesis of QuiNAc-containing polysaccharides, UDP-QuiNAc is the hypothetical donor of the QuiNAc residue. Biosynthesis of UDP-QuiNAc has been proposed to occur by 4,6-dehydration of UDP-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-d-xylo-4-hexulose followed by reduction of this 4-keto intermediate to UDP-QuiNAc. Several specific dehydratases are known to catalyze the first proposed step. A specific reductase for the last step has not been demonstrated in vitro, but previous mutant analysis suggested that Rhizobium etli gene wreQ might encode this reductase. Therefore, this gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting His6-tagged WreQ protein was purified. It was tested for 4-reductase activity by adding it and NAD(P)H to reaction mixtures in which 4,6-dehydratase WbpM had acted on the precursor substrate UDP-GlcNAc. Thin layer chromatography of the nucleotide sugars in the mixture at various stages of the reaction showed that WbpM converted UDP-GlcNAc completely to what was shown to be its 4-keto-6-deoxy derivative by NMR and that addition of WreQ and NADH led to formation of a third compound. Combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of acid hydrolysates of the final reaction mixture showed that a quinovosamine moiety had been synthesized after WreQ addition. The two-step reaction progress also was monitored in real time by NMR. The final UDP-sugar product after WreQ addition was purified and determined to be UDP-d-QuiNAc by one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments. These results confirmed that WreQ has UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-d-xylo-4-hexulose 4-reductase activity, completing a pathway for UDP-d-QuiNAc synthesis in vitro. PMID:24817117

  18. 78 FR 3911 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN... (CCP) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the environmental assessment (EA) for Big Stone.../FONSI on the planning Web site at http://www.fws.gov/midwest/planning/BigStoneNWR/index.html . A...

  19. Control of human African trypanosomiasis in the Quiçama focus, Angola.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, José Antonio; Simarro, Pere P.; Josenando, Teofilo

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update the epidemiological status of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, in the Quiçama focus, province of Bengo, Angola, and to establish a HAT control programme. METHODS: In 1997, 8796 people (the population of 31 villages) were serologically screened for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, the causative agent of HAT. In 1998 and 1999, surveys were carried out in villages where HAT cases had been identified in 1997. Individuals were screened using the card agglutination trypanosomiasis test (CATT), and then examined for the presence of the parasite. CATT- positive individuals in whom the presence of the parasite could not be confirmed were further tested with the CATT using serum dilutions, and those with a positive antibody end titre of 1-in-4 or above were followed-up. Patients with < or =10 white cells/micro l and no trypanosomes in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were classified as being in the first stage of the disease. Vector control was not considered necessary or feasible. FINDINGS: The main transmission areas were on the Kwanza riverbanks, where 5042 inhabitants live. In 1997, the HAT prevalence was 1.97%, but this decreased to 0.55% in 1998 and to 0.33% in 1999. The relapse rate was 3% in patients treated with pentamidine and 3.5% in patients treated with melarsoprol. In patients treated with pentamidine, there was no difference in the relapse rate for patients with initial CSF white cell counts of 0-5 cells/ micro l or 6-10 cells/micro l. The overall mortality rate was 0.6% and the rate of reactive arsenical encephalopathy among the melarsoprol-treated patients was 1.7%. CONCLUSION: The epidemiological status of the disease was updated and the transmission areas were defined. The control methods implemented allowed the disease prevalence to be reduced. PMID:12378293

  20. Overstepping the garnet isograd: a comparison of QuiG barometry and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Frank S.; Thomas, Jay B.; Hallett, Benjamin W.

    2014-09-01

    The consequences of overstepping the garnet isograd reaction have been investigated by comparing the composition of garnet formed at overstepped P-T conditions (the overstep or "OS" model) with the P-T conditions that would be inferred by assuming garnet nucleated in equilibrium with the matrix assemblage at the isograd (the equilibrium or "EQ" model). The garnet nucleus composition formed at overstepped conditions is calculated as the composition that produces the maximum decrease in Gibbs free energy from the equilibrated, garnet-absent, matrix assemblage for the bulk composition under study. Isopleths were then calculated for this garnet nucleus composition assuming equilibrium with the matrix assemblage (the EQ model). Comparison of the actual P-T conditions of nucleation (the OS model) with those inferred from the EQ model reveals considerable discrepancy between the two. In general, the inferred garnet nucleation P-T conditions (the EQ model) are at a lower temperature and higher or lower pressure (depending on the coexisting calcic phase(s)) than the actual (OS model) nucleation conditions. Moreover, the degree of discrepancy increases with the degree of overstepping. Independent estimates of the pressure of nucleation of garnet were made using the Raman shift of quartz inclusions in garnet (quartz-in-garnet or QuiG barometry). To test the validity of this method, an experimental synthesis of garnet containing quartz inclusions was made at 800 °C, 20 kbar, and the measured Raman shift reproduced the synthesis conditions to within 120 bars. Raman band shifts from three natural samples were then used to calculate an isochore along which garnet was presumed to have nucleated. Model calculations were made at several temperatures along this isochore (the OS model), and these P-T conditions were compared to those computed assuming equilibrium nucleation (the EQ model) to estimate the degree of overstepping displayed by these samples. A sample from the garnet

  1. 77 FR 39561 - Advanced Braking Technologies That Rely on Forward-Looking Sensors; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... Sensors; Request for Comments AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department... technologies that rely on forward-looking sensors to supplement driver braking or to actuate automatic braking... information from forward-looking sensors, usually a camera or radar, to determine whether or not a crash...

  2. 77 FR 70117 - Purchase of Certain Debt Securities by Business and Industrial Development Companies Relying on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 270 RIN 3235-AL02 Purchase of Certain Debt Securities by Business and Industrial Development Companies Relying on an Investment Company Act Exemption AGENCY: Securities and...

  3. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: Concept and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Enrique Cano, Juan L.; Cagigas, Jaime; Pérez, Ana R.; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J. Vicente; Fuente, Luisa de la; Artal, Eduardo; Mediavilla, Ángel

    2015-02-15

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching.

  4. The thirty gigahertz instrument receiver for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment: concept and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Villa, Enrique; Cano, Juan L; Cagigas, Jaime; Ortiz, David; Casas, Francisco J; Pérez, Ana R; Aja, Beatriz; Terán, J Vicente; de la Fuente, Luisa; Artal, Eduardo; Hoyland, Roger; Mediavilla, Ángel

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the analysis, design, and characterization of the thirty gigahertz instrument receiver developed for the Q-U-I Joint Tenerife experiment. The receiver is aimed to obtain polarization data of the cosmic microwave background radiation from the sky, obtaining the Q, U, and I Stokes parameters of the incoming signal simultaneously. A comprehensive analysis of the theory behind the proposed receiver is presented for a linearly polarized input signal, and the functionality tests have demonstrated adequate results in terms of Stokes parameters, which validate the concept of the receiver based on electronic phase switching. PMID:25725865

  5. Bidirectional Regulation of Innate and Learned Behaviors That Rely on Frequency Discrimination by Cortical Inhibitory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Mark; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Briguglio, John J.; Natan, Ryan G.; Geffen, Maria N.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to discriminate tones of different frequencies is fundamentally important for everyday hearing. While neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AC) respond differentially to tones of different frequencies, whether and how AC regulates auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination remains poorly understood. Here, we find that the level of activity of inhibitory neurons in AC controls frequency specificity in innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. Photoactivation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) improved the ability of the mouse to detect a shift in tone frequency, whereas photosuppression of PVs impaired the performance. Furthermore, photosuppression of PVs during discriminative auditory fear conditioning increased generalization of conditioned response across tone frequencies, whereas PV photoactivation preserved normal specificity of learning. The observed changes in behavioral performance were correlated with bidirectional changes in the magnitude of tone-evoked responses, consistent with predictions of a model of a coupled excitatory-inhibitory cortical network. Direct photoactivation of excitatory neurons, which did not change tone-evoked response magnitude, did not affect behavioral performance in either task. Our results identify a new function for inhibition in the auditory cortex, demonstrating that it can improve or impair acuity of innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. PMID:26629746

  6. Liberals and conservatives rely on common moral foundations when making moral judgments about influential people.

    PubMed

    Frimer, Jeremy A; Biesanz, Jeremy C; Walker, Lawrence J; MacKinlay, Callan W

    2013-06-01

    Do liberals and conservatives have qualitatively different moral points of view? Specifically, do liberals and conservatives rely on the same or different sets of moral foundations-care, fairness, loyalty, authority, and purity (Haidt, 2012)-when making moral judgments about influential people? In Study 1, 100 experts evaluated the impact that 40 influential figures had on each moral foundation, yielding stimulus materials for the remaining studies. In Study 2, 177 American liberal and conservative professors rated the moral character of the same figures. Liberals and conservatives relied on the same 3 moral foundations: For both groups, promoting care, fairness, and purity-but not authority or loyalty-predicted moral judgments of the targets. For liberals, promoting authority negatively predicted moral judgments. Political ideology moderated the purity-moral and especially authority-moral relationships, implying that purity and authority are grounds for political disagreement. Study 3 replicated these results with 222 folk raters. Folk liberals and conservatives disagreed even less about the moral standing of the targets than did experts. Together, these findings imply that moral foundation theory may have exaggerated differences between liberals and conservatives. The moral codes of liberals and conservatives do differ systematically; however, their similarities outweigh their differences. Liberals and conservatives alike rely on care, fairness, and purity when making moral judgments about influential people. PMID:23586414

  7. Bidirectional Regulation of Innate and Learned Behaviors That Rely on Frequency Discrimination by Cortical Inhibitory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg, Mark; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Briguglio, John J; Natan, Ryan G; Geffen, Maria N

    2015-12-01

    The ability to discriminate tones of different frequencies is fundamentally important for everyday hearing. While neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AC) respond differentially to tones of different frequencies, whether and how AC regulates auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination remains poorly understood. Here, we find that the level of activity of inhibitory neurons in AC controls frequency specificity in innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. Photoactivation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) improved the ability of the mouse to detect a shift in tone frequency, whereas photosuppression of PVs impaired the performance. Furthermore, photosuppression of PVs during discriminative auditory fear conditioning increased generalization of conditioned response across tone frequencies, whereas PV photoactivation preserved normal specificity of learning. The observed changes in behavioral performance were correlated with bidirectional changes in the magnitude of tone-evoked responses, consistent with predictions of a model of a coupled excitatory-inhibitory cortical network. Direct photoactivation of excitatory neurons, which did not change tone-evoked response magnitude, did not affect behavioral performance in either task. Our results identify a new function for inhibition in the auditory cortex, demonstrating that it can improve or impair acuity of innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. PMID:26629746

  8. DISCOURS QUI RÉSISTENT À L’OBJECTIVATION : QUE PEUT-ON EN TIRER POUR L’ÉVALUATION?

    PubMed Central

    Brousselle, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Résumé L’évaluateur doit porter attention aux distorsions qu’il contribue à créer lorsqu’il utilise l’entrevue comme méthode de collecte de données. L’évaluation est un exercice politique qui, placé dans un contexte politique, peut favoriser l’émergence de discours de résistance à l’objectivation. À partir des entrevues que nous avons effectuées lors de l’évaluation du processus d’implantation de l’initiative ONUSIDA d’accès aux médicaments au Chili, nous illustrons différentes tactiques que les acteurs utilisent et qui peuvent soit attirer la sympathie de l’évaluateur, soit faire obstacle à son besoin d’information. Nous présentons une méthode d’analyse que l’évaluateur peut utiliser pour redonner du sens aux discours de résistance. PMID:23997421

  9. Poison frogs rely on experience to find the way home in the rainforest.

    PubMed

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Warrington, Ian; Ringler, Max; Hödl, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Among vertebrates, comparable spatial learning abilities have been found in birds, mammals, turtles and fishes, but virtually nothing is known about such abilities in amphibians. Overall, amphibians are the most sedentary vertebrates, but poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) routinely shuttle tadpoles from terrestrial territories to dispersed aquatic deposition sites. We hypothesize that dendrobatid frogs rely on learning for flexible navigation. We tested the role of experience with the local cues for poison frog way-finding by (i) experimentally displacing territorial males of Allobates femoralis over several hundred metres, (ii) using a harmonic direction finder with miniature transponders to track these small frogs, and (iii) using a natural river barrier to separate the translocated frogs from any familiar landmarks. We found that homeward orientation was disrupted by the translocation to the unfamiliar area but frogs translocated over similar distances in their local area showed significant homeward orientation and returned to their territories via a direct path. We suggest that poison frogs rely on spatial learning for way-finding in their local area. PMID:25411379

  10. Wild chimpanzees rely on cultural knowledge to solve an experimental honey acquisition task.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud; Muller, Martin N; Strimling, Pontus; Wrangham, Richard; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2009-11-17

    Population and group-specific behavioral differences have been taken as evidence for animal cultures, a notion that remains controversial. Skeptics argue that ecological or genetic factors, rather than social learning, provide a more parsimonious explanation. Work with captive chimpanzees has addressed this criticism by showing that experimentally created traditions can be transmitted through social learning. Recent fieldwork further suggests that ecological and genetic factors are insufficient to explain the behavioral differences seen between communities, but the data are only observational. Here, we present the results of a field experiment that compared the performance of chimpanzees (P. t. schweinfurthii) from two Ugandan communities, Kanyawara and Sonso, on an identical task in the physical domain-extracting honey from holes drilled into horizontal logs. Kanyawara chimpanzees, who occasionally use sticks to acquire honey, spontaneously manufactured sticks to extract the experimentally provided honey. In contrast, Sonso chimpanzees, who possess a considerable leaf technology but no food-related stick use, relied on their fingers, but some also produced leaf sponges to access the honey. Our results indicate that, when genetic and environmental factors are controlled, wild chimpanzees rely on their cultural knowledge to solve a novel task. PMID:19853447

  11. 12 CFR 221.117 - When bank in “good faith” has not relied on stock as collateral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When bank in âgood faithâ has not relied on... bank in “good faith” has not relied on stock as collateral. (a) The Board has received questions... “indirectly secured” by stock as indicated by the phrase, “if the lender, in good faith, has not relied...

  12. Subliminal access to abstract face representations does not rely on attention.

    PubMed

    Harry, Bronson; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

    2012-03-01

    The present study used masked repetition priming to examine whether face representations can be accessed without attention. Two experiments using a face recognition task (fame judgement) presented masked repetition and control primes in spatially unattended locations prior to target onset. Experiment 1 (n=20) used the same images as primes and as targets and Experiment 2 (n=17) used different images of the same individual as primes and targets. Repetition priming was observed across both experiments regardless of whether spatial attention was cued to the location of the prime. Priming occurred for both famous and non-famous targets in Experiment 1 but was only reliable for famous targets in Experiment 2, suggesting that priming in Experiment 1 indexed access to view-specific representations whereas priming in Experiment 2 indexed access to view-invariant, abstract representations. Overall, the results indicate that subliminal access to abstract face representations does not rely on attention. PMID:22200591

  13. Do conscious perception and unconscious processing rely on independent mechanisms? A meta-contrast study.

    PubMed

    Peremen, Ziv; Lamy, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding what measures are most valid to demonstrate perceptual processing without awareness. Likewise, whether conscious perception and unconscious processing rely on independent mechanisms or lie on a continuum remains a matter of debate. Here, we addressed these issues by comparing the time courses of subjective reports, objective discrimination performance and response priming during meta-contrast masking, under similar attentional demands. We found these to be strikingly similar, suggesting that conscious perception and unconscious processing cannot be dissociated by their time course. Our results also demonstrate that unconscious processing, indexed by response priming, occurs, and that objective discrimination performance indexes the same conscious processes as subjective visibility reports. Finally, our results underscore the role of attention by showing that how much attention the stimulus receives relative to the mask, rather than whether processing is measured by conscious discrimination or by priming, determines the time course of meta-contrast masking. PMID:24398259

  14. Copy-when-uncertain: bumblebees rely on social information when rewards are highly variable

    PubMed Central

    Alem, Sylvain; Chittka, Lars; Shultz, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    To understand the relative benefits of social and personal information use in foraging decisions, we developed an agent-based model of social learning that predicts social information should be more adaptive where resources are highly variable and personal information where resources vary little. We tested our predictions with bumblebees and found that foragers relied more on social information when resources were variable than when they were not. We then investigated whether socially salient cues are used preferentially over non-social ones in variable environments. Although bees clearly used social cues in highly variable environments, under the same conditions they did not use non-social cues. These results suggest that bumblebees use a ‘copy-when-uncertain’ strategy. PMID:27303053

  15. Copy-when-uncertain: bumblebees rely on social information when rewards are highly variable.

    PubMed

    Smolla, Marco; Alem, Sylvain; Chittka, Lars; Shultz, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    To understand the relative benefits of social and personal information use in foraging decisions, we developed an agent-based model of social learning that predicts social information should be more adaptive where resources are highly variable and personal information where resources vary little. We tested our predictions with bumblebees and found that foragers relied more on social information when resources were variable than when they were not. We then investigated whether socially salient cues are used preferentially over non-social ones in variable environments. Although bees clearly used social cues in highly variable environments, under the same conditions they did not use non-social cues. These results suggest that bumblebees use a 'copy-when-uncertain' strategy. PMID:27303053

  16. 16 CFR 1115.5 - Reporting of failures to comply with a voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by the Commission under section 9 of the CPSA. 1115.5 Section 1115.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... with a voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by the Commission under section 9 of...

  17. 40 CFR 26.1706 - Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. 26.1706 Section 26.1706 Protection of... decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. This section establishes... stringent regulatory restriction that would improve protection of public health, such as a limitation on...

  18. 40 CFR 26.1706 - Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. 26.1706 Section 26.1706 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Standards for Assessing Whether To Rely on the Results...

  19. 40 CFR 26.1706 - Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. 26.1706 Section 26.1706 Protection of... for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. This section... would impose a more stringent regulatory restriction that would improve protection of public...

  20. 40 CFR 26.1706 - Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. 26.1706 Section 26.1706 Protection of... for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. This section... would impose a more stringent regulatory restriction that would improve protection of public...

  1. 40 CFR 26.1706 - Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria and procedure for decisions to protect public health by relying on otherwise unacceptable research. 26.1706 Section 26.1706 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Ethical Standards for Assessing Whether To Rely on...

  2. Defining the buffering process by a triprotic acid without relying on Stewart-electroneutrality considerations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution, a component of the H+ load will be bound i.e. buffered. In an aqueous solution containing a triprotic acid, H+ can be bound to three different states of the acid as well as to OH- ions that are derived from the auto-ionization of H2O. In quantifying the buffering process of a triprotic acid, one must define the partitioning of H+ among the three states of the acid and also the OH- ions in solution in order to predict the equilibrium pH value. However, previous quantitative approaches that model triprotic acid titration behaviour and used to predict the equilibrium pH rely on the mathematical convenience of electroneutrality/charge balance considerations. This fact has caused confusion in the literature, and has led to the assumption that charge balance/electroneutrality is a causal factor in modulating proton buffering (Stewart formulation). However, as we have previously shown, although charge balance can be used mathematically as a convenient tool in deriving various formulae, electroneutrality per se is not a fundamental physicochemical parameter that is mechanistically involved in the underlying buffering and proton transfer reactions. The lack of distinction between a mathematical tool, and a fundamental physicochemical parameter is in part a reason for the current debate regarding the Stewart formulation of acid-base analysis. We therefore posed the following question: Is it possible to generate an equation that defines and predicts the buffering of a triprotic acid that is based only on H+ partitioning without incorporating electroneutrality in the derivation? Towards this goal, we derived our new equation utilizing: 1) partitioning of H+ buffering; 2) conservation of mass; and 3) acid-base equilibria. In validating this model, we compared the predicted equilibrium pH with the measured pH of an aqueous solution consisting of Na2HPO4 to which HCl was added. The measured pH values were in excellent agreement

  3. Frugivorous bats maintain functional habitat connectivity in agricultural landscapes but rely strongly on natural forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Simon P; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal; Mayer, Frieder; Tschapka, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes in land use threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning by the conversion of natural habitat into agricultural mosaic landscapes, often with drastic consequences for the associated fauna. The first step in the development of efficient conservation plans is to understand movement of animals through complex habitat mosaics. Therefore, we studied ranging behavior and habitat use in Dermanura watsoni (Phyllostomidae), a frugivorous bat species that is a valuable seed disperser in degraded ecosystems. Radio-tracking of sixteen bats showed that the animals strongly rely on natural forest. Day roosts were exclusively located within mature forest fragments. Selection ratios showed that the bats foraged selectively within the available habitat and positively selected natural forest. However, larger daily ranges were associated with higher use of degraded habitats. Home range geometry and composition of focal foraging areas indicated that wider ranging bats performed directional foraging bouts from natural to degraded forest sites traversing the matrix over distances of up to three hundred meters. This behavior demonstrates the potential of frugivorous bats to functionally connect fragmented areas by providing ecosystem services between natural and degraded sites, and highlights the need for conservation of natural habitat patches within agricultural landscapes that meet the roosting requirements of bats. PMID:25830222

  4. Hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale Relies on a Different Metal Storage Mechanism for Cobalt than for Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Tappero, R.; Peltier, E; Grafe, M; Heidel, K; Ginder-Vogel, M; Livi, K; Rivers, M; Marcus, M; Chaney, R; Sparks, D

    2007-01-01

    The nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale has been developed as a commercial crop for phytoremediation/phytomining Ni from metal-enriched soils. Here, metal co-tolerance, accumulation and localization were investigated for A. murale exposed to metal co-contaminants. A. murale was irrigated with Ni-enriched nutrient solutions containing basal or elevated concentrations of cobalt (Co) or zinc (Zn). Metal localization and elemental associations were investigated in situ with synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (SXRF) and computed-microtomography (CMT). A. murale hyperaccumulated Ni and Co (> 1000 {micro}g g{sup -1} dry weight) from mixed-metal systems. Zinc was not hyperaccumulated. Elevated Co or Zn concentrations did not alter Ni accumulation or localization. SXRF images showed uniform Ni distribution in leaves and preferential localization of Co near leaf tips/margins. CMT images revealed that leaf epidermal tissue was enriched with Ni but devoid of Co, that Co was localized in the apoplasm of leaf ground tissue and that Co was sequestered on leaf surfaces near the tips/margins. Cobalt-rich mineral precipitate(s) form on leaves of Co-treated A. murale. Specialized biochemical processes linked with Ni (hyper)tolerance in A. murale do not confer (hyper)tolerance to Co. A. murale relies on a different metal storage mechanism for Co (exocellular sequestration) than for Ni (vacuolar sequestration).

  5. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  6. Host adaptation to viruses relies on few genes with different cross-resistance properties

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Nelson E.; Faria, Vítor G.; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian; Teixeira, Luis; Sucena, Élio; Magalhães, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Host adaptation to one parasite may affect its response to others. However, the genetics of these direct and correlated responses remains poorly studied. The overlap between these responses is instrumental for the understanding of host evolution in multiparasite environments. We determined the genetic and phenotypic changes underlying adaptation of Drosophila melanogaster to Drosophila C virus (DCV). Within 20 generations, flies selected with DCV showed increased survival after DCV infection, but also after cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and flock house virus (FHV) infection. Whole-genome sequencing identified two regions of significant differentiation among treatments, from which candidate genes were functionally tested with RNAi. Three genes were validated—pastrel, a known DCV-response gene, and two other loci, Ubc-E2H and CG8492. Knockdown of Ubc-E2H and pastrel also led to increased sensitivity to CrPV, whereas knockdown of CG8492 increased susceptibility to FHV infection. Therefore, Drosophila adaptation to DCV relies on few major genes, each with different cross-resistance properties, conferring host resistance to several parasites. PMID:24711428

  7. Design of α-Selective Glycopyranosyl Donors Relying on Remote Anchimeric Assistance.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Bozhena S; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E

    2016-02-01

    Oligosaccharides have a variety of versatile biological effects, but unlike peptides and oligonucleotides, investigation of the roles of oligosaccharides is not easy. Since biosynthesis of oligosaccharides does not comply with direct genetic control, their isolation from natural sources and biotechnological preparation are complicated, due to the heterogeneous composition of raw carbohydrates. Oligosaccharide synthesis is needed for the establishment or confirmation of the structure of natural glycocompounds. Also, synthetically prepared, defined oligosaccharides and their derivatives are becoming increasingly important tools for many biological and immunological research projects. The key step of oligosaccharide synthesis involves glycosylation, a reaction that builds glycosidic bonds. Usually, construction of 1,2-trans-bonds is easy, and therefore, this reaction can even be included into automated syntheses. At this time, installation of the 1,2-cis-bond remains simultaneously frustrating and compelling. In our and other laboratories, a strategy of α-selective (1,2-cis) glycosylation, relying on remote anchimeric assistance with acyl groups, is studied. The state of the art in this work is summarized in this review. PMID:26785933

  8. Drug-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) rely on cell membrane properties to exert anticancer effects

    PubMed Central

    Molavian, Hamid R.; Goldman, Aaron; Phipps, Colin J.; Kohandel, Mohammad; Wouters, Bradly G.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological concentrations of small molecule natural products, such as ascorbic acid, have exhibited distinct cell killing outcomes between cancer and normal cells whereby cancer cells undergo apoptosis or necrosis while normal cells are not adversely affected. Here, we develop a mathematical model for ascorbic acid that can be utilized as a tool to understand the dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell death. We determine that not only do endogenous antioxidants such as catalase contribute to ROS-induced cell death, but also cell membrane properties play a critical role in the efficacy of ROS as a cytotoxic mechanism against cancer cells vs. normal cells. Using in vitro assays with breast cancer cells, we have confirmed that cell membrane properties are essential for ROS, in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to induce cell death. Interestingly, we did not observe any correlation between intracellular H2O2 and cell survival, suggesting that cell death by H2O2 is triggered by interaction with the cell membrane and not necessarily due to intracellular levels of H2O2. These findings provide a putative mechanistic explanation for the efficacy and selectivity of therapies such as ascorbic acid that rely on ROS-induced cell death for their anti-tumor properties. PMID:27278439

  9. Pneumococcal Competence Coordination Relies on a Cell-Contact Sensing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Prudhomme, Marc; Berge, Mathieu; Martin, Bernard; Polard, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various inducible genetic programs to face many types of stress that challenge their growth and survival. Competence is one such program. It enables genetic transformation, a major horizontal gene transfer process. Competence development in liquid cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae is synchronized within the whole cell population. This collective behavior is known to depend on an exported signaling Competence Stimulating Peptide (CSP), whose action generates a positive feedback loop. However, it is unclear how this CSP-dependent population switch is coordinated. By monitoring spontaneous competence development in real time during growth of four distinct pneumococcal lineages, we have found that competence shift in the population relies on a self-activated cell fraction that arises via a growth time-dependent mechanism. We demonstrate that CSP remains bound to cells during this event, and conclude that the rate of competence development corresponds to the propagation of competence by contact between activated and quiescent cells. We validated this two-step cell-contact sensing mechanism by measuring competence development during co-cultivation of strains with altered capacity to produce or respond to CSP. Finally, we found that the membrane protein ComD retains the CSP, limiting its free diffusion in the medium. We propose that competence initiator cells originate stochastically in response to stress, to form a distinct subpopulation that then transmits the CSP by cell-cell contact. PMID:27355362

  10. Proper synaptic vesicle formation and neuronal network activity critically rely on syndapin I

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Dennis; Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Sabanov, Victor; Sinning, Anne; Dugladze, Tamar; Stellmacher, Anne; Ahuja, Rashmi; Grimm, Julia; Schüler, Susann; Müller, Anke; Angenstein, Frank; Ahmed, Tariq; Diesler, Alexander; Moser, Markus; tom Dieck, Susanne; Spessert, Rainer; Boeckers, Tobias Maria; Fässler, Reinhard; Hübner, Christian Andreas; Balschun, Detlef; Gloveli, Tengis; Kessels, Michael Manfred; Qualmann, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on effective and accurate compensatory endocytosis. F-BAR proteins may serve as membrane curvature sensors and/or inducers and thereby support membrane remodelling processes; yet, their in vivo functions urgently await disclosure. We demonstrate that the F-BAR protein syndapin I is crucial for proper brain function. Syndapin I knockout (KO) mice suffer from seizures, a phenotype consistent with excessive hippocampal network activity. Loss of syndapin I causes defects in presynaptic membrane trafficking processes, which are especially evident under high-capacity retrieval conditions, accumulation of endocytic intermediates, loss of synaptic vesicle (SV) size control, impaired activity-dependent SV retrieval and defective synaptic activity. Detailed molecular analyses demonstrate that syndapin I plays an important role in the recruitment of all dynamin isoforms, central players in vesicle fission reactions, to the membrane. Consistently, syndapin I KO mice share phenotypes with dynamin I KO mice, whereas their seizure phenotype is very reminiscent of fitful mice expressing a mutant dynamin. Thus, syndapin I acts as pivotal membrane anchoring factor for dynamins during regeneration of SVs. PMID:21926968

  11. Preschoolers' brains rely on semantic cues prior to the mastery of syntax during sentence comprehension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiao-Yi; Vissiennon, Kodjo; Friederici, Angela D; Brauer, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Sentence comprehension requires the integration of both syntactic and semantic information, the acquisition of which seems to have different trajectories in the developing brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural correlates underlying syntactic and semantic processing during auditory sentence comprehension as well as its development in preschool children by manipulating case marking and animacy hierarchy cues, respectively. A functional segregation was observed within Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus for adults, where the pars opercularis was involved in syntactic processing and the pars triangularis in semantic processing. By contrast, five-year-old children sensitive to animacy hierarchy cues showed diffuse activation for semantic processing in the left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortices. While no main effect of case marking was found in the left fronto-temporal language network, children with better syntactic skills showed greater neural responses for syntactically complex sentences, most prominently in the posterior superior temporal cortex. The current study provides both behavioral and neural evidence that five-year-old children compared to adults rely more on semantic information than on syntactic cues during sentence comprehension, but with the development of syntactic abilities, their brain activation in the left fronto-temporal network increases for syntactic processing. PMID:26497266

  12. Frugivorous Bats Maintain Functional Habitat Connectivity in Agricultural Landscapes but Rely Strongly on Natural Forest Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Ripperger, Simon P.; Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal; Mayer, Frieder; Tschapka, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic changes in land use threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning by the conversion of natural habitat into agricultural mosaic landscapes, often with drastic consequences for the associated fauna. The first step in the development of efficient conservation plans is to understand movement of animals through complex habitat mosaics. Therefore, we studied ranging behavior and habitat use in Dermanura watsoni (Phyllostomidae), a frugivorous bat species that is a valuable seed disperser in degraded ecosystems. Radio-tracking of sixteen bats showed that the animals strongly rely on natural forest. Day roosts were exclusively located within mature forest fragments. Selection ratios showed that the bats foraged selectively within the available habitat and positively selected natural forest. However, larger daily ranges were associated with higher use of degraded habitats. Home range geometry and composition of focal foraging areas indicated that wider ranging bats performed directional foraging bouts from natural to degraded forest sites traversing the matrix over distances of up to three hundred meters. This behavior demonstrates the potential of frugivorous bats to functionally connect fragmented areas by providing ecosystem services between natural and degraded sites, and highlights the need for conservation of natural habitat patches within agricultural landscapes that meet the roosting requirements of bats. PMID:25830222

  13. Mouse V1 population correlates of visual detection rely on heterogeneity within neuronal response patterns

    PubMed Central

    Montijn, Jorrit S; Goltstein, Pieter M; Pennartz, Cyriel MA

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of the primary sensory cortex for the detection, discrimination, and awareness of visual stimuli, but it is unknown how neuronal populations in this area process detected and undetected stimuli differently. Critical differences may reside in the mean strength of responses to visual stimuli, as reflected in bulk signals detectable in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalogram, or magnetoencephalography studies, or may be more subtly composed of differentiated activity of individual sensory neurons. Quantifying single-cell Ca2+ responses to visual stimuli recorded with in vivo two-photon imaging, we found that visual detection correlates more strongly with population response heterogeneity rather than overall response strength. Moreover, neuronal populations showed consistencies in activation patterns across temporally spaced trials in association with hit responses, but not during nondetections. Contrary to models relying on temporally stable networks or bulk signaling, these results suggest that detection depends on transient differentiation in neuronal activity within cortical populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10163.001 PMID:26646184

  14. Aquaporins in the antarctic midge, an extremophile that relies on dehydration for cold survival.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shin G; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2015-08-01

    The terrestrial midge Belgica antarctica relies extensively on dehydration to survive the low temperatures and desiccation stress that prevail in its Antarctic habitat. The loss of body water is thus a critical adaptive mechanism employed at the onset of winter to prevent injury from internal ice formation; a rapid mechanism for rehydration is equally essential when summer returns and the larva resumes the brief active phase of its life. This important role for water movement suggests a critical role for aquaporins (AQPs). Recent completion of the genome project on this species revealed the presence of AQPs in B. antarctica representing the DRIP, PRIP, BIB, RPIP, and LHIP families. Treatment with mercuric chloride to block AQPs also blocks water loss, thereby decreasing cell survival at low temperatures. Antibodies directed against mammalian or Drosophila AQPs suggest a wide tissue distribution of AQPs in the midge and changes in protein abundance in response to dehydration, rehydration, and freezing. Thus far, functional studies have been completed only for PRIP1. It appears to be a water-specific AQP, but expression levels are not altered by dehydration or rehydration. Functional assays remain to be completed for the additional AQPs. PMID:26338869

  15. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  16. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  17. Preschoolers' brains rely on semantic cues prior to the mastery of syntax during sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiao-Yi; Vissiennon, Kodjo; Friederici, Angela D.; Brauer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sentence comprehension requires the integration of both syntactic and semantic information, the acquisition of which seems to have different trajectories in the developing brain. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural correlates underlying syntactic and semantic processing during auditory sentence comprehension as well as its development in preschool children by manipulating case marking and animacy hierarchy cues, respectively. A functional segregation was observed within Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus for adults, where the pars opercularis was involved in syntactic processing and the pars triangularis in semantic processing. By contrast, five-year-old children sensitive to animacy hierarchy cues showed diffuse activation for semantic processing in the left inferior frontal and posterior temporal cortices. While no main effect of case marking was found in the left fronto-temporal language network, children with better syntactic skills showed greater neural responses for syntactically complex sentences, most prominently in the posterior superior temporal cortex. The current study provides both behavioral and neural evidence that five-year-old children compared to adults rely more on semantic information than on syntactic cues during sentence comprehension, but with the development of syntactic abilities, their brain activation in the left fronto-temporal network increases for syntactic processing. PMID:26497266

  18. Morning and evening peaks of activity rely on different clock neurons of the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Grima, Brigitte; Chélot, Elisabeth; Xia, Ruohan; Rouyer, François

    2004-10-14

    In Drosophila, a 'clock' situated in the brain controls circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. This clock relies on several groups of neurons that express the Period (PER) protein, including the ventral lateral neurons (LN(v)s), which express the Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) neuropeptide, and the PDF-negative dorsal lateral neurons (LN(d)s). In normal cycles of day and night, adult flies exhibit morning and evening peaks of activity; however, the contribution of the different clock neurons to the rest-activity pattern remains unknown. Here, we have used targeted expression of PER to restore the clock function of specific subsets of lateral neurons in arrhythmic per(0) mutant flies. We show that PER expression restricted to the LN(v)s only restores the morning activity, whereas expression of PER in both the LN(v)s and LN(d)s also restores the evening activity. This provides the first neuronal bases for 'morning' and 'evening' oscillators in the Drosophila brain. Furthermore, we show that the LN(v)s alone can generate 24 h activity rhythms in constant darkness, indicating that the morning oscillator is sufficient to drive the circadian system. PMID:15483616

  19. Drug-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) rely on cell membrane properties to exert anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    Molavian, Hamid R; Goldman, Aaron; Phipps, Colin J; Kohandel, Mohammad; Wouters, Bradly G; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sivaloganathan, Sivabal

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological concentrations of small molecule natural products, such as ascorbic acid, have exhibited distinct cell killing outcomes between cancer and normal cells whereby cancer cells undergo apoptosis or necrosis while normal cells are not adversely affected. Here, we develop a mathematical model for ascorbic acid that can be utilized as a tool to understand the dynamics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cell death. We determine that not only do endogenous antioxidants such as catalase contribute to ROS-induced cell death, but also cell membrane properties play a critical role in the efficacy of ROS as a cytotoxic mechanism against cancer cells vs. normal cells. Using in vitro assays with breast cancer cells, we have confirmed that cell membrane properties are essential for ROS, in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to induce cell death. Interestingly, we did not observe any correlation between intracellular H2O2 and cell survival, suggesting that cell death by H2O2 is triggered by interaction with the cell membrane and not necessarily due to intracellular levels of H2O2. These findings provide a putative mechanistic explanation for the efficacy and selectivity of therapies such as ascorbic acid that rely on ROS-induced cell death for their anti-tumor properties. PMID:27278439

  20. Secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Comenge, Yannick; Ruby, Vincent; Amsellem, Raymonde; Nicolas, Valérie; Servin, Alain L

    2011-07-01

    The secreted autotransporter toxin, Sat, which belongs to the subfamily of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae, acts as a virulence factor in extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. We observed that HeLa cells exposed to the cell-free culture supernatant of recombinant strain AAEC185p(Sat-IH11128) producing the Sat toxin (CFCS(Sat) ), displayed dramatic disorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton before loosening cell-to-cell junctions and detachment. Examination of the effect of Sat on GFP-microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) HeLa cells revealed that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy follows CFCS(Sat) -induced F-actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. The induced autophagy shows an acceleration of the autophagy flux soon after Sat treatment, followed later by a blockade of the flux leading to the accumulation of large GFP-LC3-positive vacuoles in the cell cytoplasm. CFCS(Sat) did not induce cell detachment in autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts in contrast with wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The CFCS(Sat) -induced large GFP-LC3 dots do not display the characteristics of autophagolysosomes including expression of cathepsin D and Lamp-1 and 2 proteins, and Lysotracker Red- and DQ-BSA-positive labelling. We provide evidences that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy is not a cell response intended to get rid of the intracellular toxin. By a pharmacological blockers approach, we found that the blockade of Erk1/2 and p38 MAPKs, but not JNK, inhibited the CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy and cell detachment whereas phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase blockers inhibiting canonical autophagy were inactive. When attached CFCS(Sat) -treated cells start to detach they showed caspase-independent cell death and rearrangements of the focal adhesion-associated vinculin and paxillin. Collectively, our results support that Sat triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on its cell-detachment effect. PMID:21501364

  1. The Effect of Instruction on Children's Perceived Musical Tension in Debussy's "Noel des enfants qui n'ont plus de maisons"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackworth, Rhonda S.; Fredrickson, William E.

    2012-01-01

    The study explored possible effects of instruction (highlighting a choral composition's historical and social context) on perceived musical tension recorded by children (N = 62). Children listened to a recording of Debussy's "Noel des enfants qui n'ont plus de maisons" (The Christmas Carol of the Children who No Longer Have a House/Home) performed…

  2. You can't rely on color, yet we all do 2.0 (Manuscript Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2014-01-01

    Everybody views and uses color from early childhood onwards. But this magnificent property of all objects around us turns out to be elusive if you try to specify it and communicate it to another person. Also, people often don't know what effects color may have under different conditions. However, color is so important and omnipresent, that people can hardly avoid to 'rely on it' - so they do, in particular on its predictability. Thus, there is a discrepancy between the seeming self-evidence of color and the difficulty in specifying it accurately, for the prevailing circumstances. In order to analyze this situation, and possibly remedy it, a short historic perspective of the utilization and specification of color is given. The 'utilization' includes the emotional effects of color, which are important in, for instance, interior decorating but also play a role in literature and religion. 'Specification' begins with the early efforts by scientists, philosophers and artists to bring some order and understanding in what was observed with and while using color. Color has a number of basic functions: embellishment; attracting attention; coding; and bringing order in text by causing text parts presented in the same color to be judged as belonging together. People with a profession that involves color choices for many others, such as designers and manufacturers of products, including electronic visual displays, should have a fairly thorough knowledge of colorimetry and color perception. Unfortunately, they often don't, simply because for 'practitioners' whose work involves different aspects, applying color being only one of those, the available tools for specifying and applying color turn out to be too difficult to use. Two consequences of an insufficient knowledge of the effects color may have are given here. The first of these consequences, on color blindness, relates to 8% of the population, but the second one, on reading colored text, bears on everyone. Practical

  3. Immobilization of α-Amylase from Anoxybacillus sp. SK3-4 on ReliZyme and Immobead Supports.

    PubMed

    Kahar, Ummirul Mukminin; Sani, Mohd Helmi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Kian Mau

    2016-01-01

    α-Amylase from Anoxybacillus sp. SK3-4 (ASKA) is a thermostable enzyme that produces a high level of maltose from starches. A truncated ASKA (TASKA) variant with improved expression and purification efficiency was characterized in an earlier study. In this work, TASKA was purified and immobilized through covalent attachment on three epoxide (ReliZyme EP403/M, Immobead IB-150P, and Immobead IB-150A) and an amino-epoxide (ReliZyme HFA403/M) activated supports. Several parameters affecting immobilization were analyzed, including the pH, temperature, and quantity (mg) of enzyme added per gram of support. The influence of the carrier surface properties, pore sizes, and lengths of spacer arms (functional groups) on biocatalyst performances were studied. Free and immobilized TASKAs were stable at pH 6.0-9.0 and active at pH 8.0. The enzyme showed optimal activity and considerable stability at 60 °C. Immobilized TASKA retained 50% of its initial activity after 5-12 cycles of reuse. Upon degradation of starches and amylose, only immobilized TASKA on ReliZyme HFA403/M has comparable hydrolytic ability with the free enzyme. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an immobilization study of an α-amylase from Anoxybacillus spp. and the first report of α-amylase immobilization using ReliZyme and Immobeads as supports. PMID:27618002

  4. 78 FR 29392 - Embedded Digital Devices in Safety-Related Systems, Systems Important to Safety, and Items Relied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment Draft Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2013-XX, ``Embedded Digital Devices in Safety-Related Systems, Systems Important to Safety, and Items Relied on For Safety.'' The NRC staff has developed the draft RIS to clarify the NRC's technical position on existing regulatory requirements for the quality and reliability of basic......

  5. 39 CFR 3050.12 - Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports to the Commission. 3050.12 Section 3050.12 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.12 Obsolescence of...

  6. 39 CFR 3050.12 - Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports to the Commission. 3050.12 Section 3050.12 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.12 Obsolescence of...

  7. 39 CFR 3050.12 - Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports to the Commission. 3050.12 Section 3050.12 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.12 Obsolescence of...

  8. 39 CFR 3050.12 - Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports to the Commission. 3050.12 Section 3050.12 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.12 Obsolescence of...

  9. 39 CFR 3050.12 - Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obsolescence of special studies relied on to produce the Postal Service's annual periodic reports to the Commission. 3050.12 Section 3050.12 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.12 Obsolescence of...

  10. A zinc(II) quinolinone complex (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2]: Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectral properties and in vitro cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchtík, Roman; Nemec, Ivan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-02-01

    A new zinc(II) complex with 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone (Hqui) of the composition (Et3NH)[Zn(qui)Cl2] was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray analysis. The molecular structure is composed of the triethylammonium (Et3NH+) cations and tetrahedral [ZnII(qui)Cl2]- complex anions, in which the Zn(II) atoms are bidentate coordinated by one qui ligand through keto (OK) and phenolate (OP) oxygen atoms and by two chlorido ligands, thus forming the {O2Cl2} donor set, with Zn-OK = 1.9860(14) Å, Zn-OP 1.9961(14) Å and Zn-Cl = 2.2509(6) Å and 2.2266(6) Å. The complex cations are aligned into 1D supramolecular chains through the NH⋯Cl hydrogen bonding between the amine group of the quinolinone ligand and the chlorido ligand of the adjacent complex anion. The amine group from the Et3NH+ cations provides the NH⋯OP hydrogen bond with the phenolate oxygen atoms from the complex anion. Screening of in vitro cytotoxicity of the compound was studied on human osteosarcoma (HOS) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines, with IC50 > 50 μM. The fluorescence study showed that the complex exhibits a relatively high integral intensity (29%) as compared to the standard quinine sulfate, and 1.6-fold enhancement of emission with respect to free Hqui.

  11. Do intuitive and deliberate judgments rely on two distinct neural systems? A case study in face processing

    PubMed Central

    Mega, Laura F.; Gigerenzer, Gerd; Volz, Kirsten G.

    2015-01-01

    Arguably the most influential models of human decision-making today are based on the assumption that two separable systems – intuition and deliberation – underlie the judgments that people make. Our recent work is among the first to present neural evidence contrary to the predictions of these dual-systems accounts. We measured brain activations using functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants were specifically instructed to either intuitively or deliberately judge the authenticity of emotional facial expressions. Results from three different analyses revealed both common brain networks of activation across decision mode and differential activations as a function of strategy adherence. We take our results to contradict popular dual-systems accounts that propose a clear-cut dichotomy of the processing systems, and to support rather a unified model. According to this, intuitive and deliberate judgment processes rely on the same rules, though only the former are thought to be characterized by non-conscious processing. PMID:26379523

  12. Episodic feeling-of-knowing relies on noncriterial recollection and familiarity: Evidence using an online remember-know procedure.

    PubMed

    Isingrini, Michel; Sacher, Mathilde; Perrotin, Audrey; Taconnat, Laurence; Souchay, Céline; Stoehr, Hélène; Bouazzaoui, Badiâa

    2016-04-01

    We examined the hypothesis that feeling-of-knowing judgments rely on recollection as well as on familiarity prompted by the cue presentation. A remember-know-no memory procedure was combined with the episodic FOK procedure employing a cue-target pair memory task. The magnitude of FOK judgments and FOK accuracy were examined as a function of recollection, familiarity, or the "no memory" option. Results showed that the proportion of R and K responses was similar. FOK accuracy and magnitude of FOK judgments were higher for R and K responses than for N responses. FOK accuracy related to R and K responses were above chance level, but FOK was not accurate in the "no memory" condition. Finally, both FOK magnitude and FOK accuracy were related more to recollection than to familiarity. These results support the hypothesis that both recollection and familiarity are determinants of the FOK process, although they suggest that recollection has a stronger influence. PMID:26849420

  13. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ruani N; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry-diameter and length-is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy(2j/2j) mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  14. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  15. Humans rely on the same rules to assess emotional valence and intensity in conspecific and dog vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Faragó, Tamás; Andics, Attila; Devecseri, Viktor; Kis, Anna; Gácsi, Márta; Miklósi, Adám

    2014-01-01

    Humans excel at assessing conspecific emotional valence and intensity, based solely on non-verbal vocal bursts that are also common in other mammals. It is not known, however, whether human listeners rely on similar acoustic cues to assess emotional content in conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations, and which acoustical parameters affect their performance. Here, for the first time, we directly compared the emotional valence and intensity perception of dog and human non-verbal vocalizations. We revealed similar relationships between acoustic features and emotional valence and intensity ratings of human and dog vocalizations: those with shorter call lengths were rated as more positive, whereas those with a higher pitch were rated as more intense. Our findings demonstrate that humans rate conspecific emotional vocalizations along basic acoustic rules, and that they apply similar rules when processing dog vocal expressions. This suggests that humans may utilize similar mental mechanisms for recognizing human and heterospecific vocal emotions. PMID:24402716

  16. Humans rely on the same rules to assess emotional valence and intensity in conspecific and dog vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Faragó, Tamás; Andics, Attila; Devecseri, Viktor; Kis, Anna; Gácsi, Márta; Miklósi, Ádám

    2014-01-01

    Humans excel at assessing conspecific emotional valence and intensity, based solely on non-verbal vocal bursts that are also common in other mammals. It is not known, however, whether human listeners rely on similar acoustic cues to assess emotional content in conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations, and which acoustical parameters affect their performance. Here, for the first time, we directly compared the emotional valence and intensity perception of dog and human non-verbal vocalizations. We revealed similar relationships between acoustic features and emotional valence and intensity ratings of human and dog vocalizations: those with shorter call lengths were rated as more positive, whereas those with a higher pitch were rated as more intense. Our findings demonstrate that humans rate conspecific emotional vocalizations along basic acoustic rules, and that they apply similar rules when processing dog vocal expressions. This suggests that humans may utilize similar mental mechanisms for recognizing human and heterospecific vocal emotions. PMID:24402716

  17. Influence of Computerized Sounding Out on Spelling Performance for Children who do and not rely on AAC

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Jillian H.; Hogan, Tiffany P.; Beukelman, David R.; Schwarz, Ilsa E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spelling is an important skill for individuals who rely on augmentative alternative communication (AAC). The purpose of this study was to investigate how computerized sounding out influenced spelling accuracy of pseudo-words. Computerized sounding out was defined as a word elongated, thus providing an opportunity for a child to hear all the sounds in the word at a slower rate. Methods Seven children with cerebral palsy, four who use AAC and three who do not, participated in a single subject AB design. Results The results of the study indicated that the use of computerized sounding out increased the phonologic accuracy of the pseudo-words produced by participants. Conclusion The study provides preliminary evidence for the use of computerized sounding out during spelling tasks for children with cerebral palsy who do and do not use AAC. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:24512195

  18. Relying on nature's pharmacy in rural Burkina Faso: empirical evidence of the determinants of traditional medicine consumption.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Mariève

    2011-11-01

    Traditional medicine is believed to constitute a crucial healthcare option for poor or remote households in developing countries that have limited access to allopathic medicine and/or a strong cultural attachment to traditional medicine. However, little research has been performed on medicinal plant reliance in developing countries, and the determinants of medicinal plant consumption at the household level in these countries have not been empirically studied. Quantifying the use of traditional medicine at the household level is, therefore, essential to the development of sustainable healthcare policies in the developing world. This paper quantifies household-level use of traditional medicine and identifies determinants of the choice of traditional treatment in the south central region of Burkina Faso. Structured household interviews (n = 205) were conducted in nine villages of rural Burkina Faso from November 2007 to November 2008 and in November 2009 to collect data on household characteristics (e.g., income, education, demographics), illness frequencies, illness types, and treatment strategies employed. Comprehensive analysis of treatment choice was performed through bivariate analyses. Results indicate that traditional medicine was primarily relied on by middle-aged individuals from relatively uneducated households who were living in villages with limited allopathic medicine service provision. Moreover, a differential approach to medicinal plant consumption was used to distinguish between patients using traditional medicine as a self-care treatment and those visiting a traditional healer. Although poorer households were shown to use traditional medicine as a self-treatment, traditional healers' services were relied on by wealthier households. PMID:21992735

  19. 49 CFR 40.371 - On what information does an initiating official rely in deciding whether to start a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rely in deciding whether to start a PIE proceeding? 40.371 Section 40.371 Transportation Office of the... start a PIE proceeding? (a) An initiating official may rely on credible information from any source as the basis for starting a PIE proceeding. (b) Before sending a correction notice (see § 40.373),...

  20. Social Plasticity Relies on Different Neuroplasticity Mechanisms across the Brain Social Decision-Making Network in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Cardoso, Sara D; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Social living animals need to adjust the expression of their behavior to their status within the group and to changes in social context and this ability (social plasticity) has an impact on their Darwinian fitness. At the proximate level social plasticity must rely on neuroplasticity in the brain social decision-making network (SDMN) that underlies the expression of social behavior, such that the same neural circuit may underlie the expression of different behaviors depending on social context. Here we tested this hypothesis in zebrafish by characterizing the gene expression response in the SDMN to changes in social status of a set of genes involved in different types of neural plasticity: bdnf, involved in changes in synaptic strength; npas4, involved in contextual learning and dependent establishment of GABAergic synapses; neuroligins (nlgn1 and nlgn2) as synaptogenesis markers; and genes involved in adult neurogenesis (wnt3 and neurod). Four social phenotypes were experimentally induced: Winners and Losers of a real-opponent interaction; Mirror-fighters, that fight their own image in a mirror and thus do not experience a change in social status despite the expression of aggressive behavior; and non-interacting fish, which were used as a reference group. Our results show that each social phenotype (i.e., Winners, Losers, and Mirror-fighters) present specific patterns of gene expression across the SDMN, and that different neuroplasticity genes are differentially expressed in different nodes of the network (e.g., BDNF in the dorsolateral telencephalon, which is a putative teleost homolog of the mammalian hippocampus). Winners expressed unique patterns of gene co-expression across the SDMN, whereas in Losers and Mirror-fighters the co-expression patterns were similar in the dorsal regions of the telencephalon and in the supracommissural nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area, but differents in the remaining regions of the ventral telencephalon. These results

  1. Social Plasticity Relies on Different Neuroplasticity Mechanisms across the Brain Social Decision-Making Network in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Magda C.; Cardoso, Sara D.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2016-01-01

    Social living animals need to adjust the expression of their behavior to their status within the group and to changes in social context and this ability (social plasticity) has an impact on their Darwinian fitness. At the proximate level social plasticity must rely on neuroplasticity in the brain social decision-making network (SDMN) that underlies the expression of social behavior, such that the same neural circuit may underlie the expression of different behaviors depending on social context. Here we tested this hypothesis in zebrafish by characterizing the gene expression response in the SDMN to changes in social status of a set of genes involved in different types of neural plasticity: bdnf, involved in changes in synaptic strength; npas4, involved in contextual learning and dependent establishment of GABAergic synapses; neuroligins (nlgn1 and nlgn2) as synaptogenesis markers; and genes involved in adult neurogenesis (wnt3 and neurod). Four social phenotypes were experimentally induced: Winners and Losers of a real-opponent interaction; Mirror-fighters, that fight their own image in a mirror and thus do not experience a change in social status despite the expression of aggressive behavior; and non-interacting fish, which were used as a reference group. Our results show that each social phenotype (i.e., Winners, Losers, and Mirror-fighters) present specific patterns of gene expression across the SDMN, and that different neuroplasticity genes are differentially expressed in different nodes of the network (e.g., BDNF in the dorsolateral telencephalon, which is a putative teleost homolog of the mammalian hippocampus). Winners expressed unique patterns of gene co-expression across the SDMN, whereas in Losers and Mirror-fighters the co-expression patterns were similar in the dorsal regions of the telencephalon and in the supracommissural nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area, but differents in the remaining regions of the ventral telencephalon. These results

  2. Robust intestinal homeostasis relies on cellular plasticity in enteroblasts mediated by miR-8–Escargot switch

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Ballesta-Illan, Esther; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is remarkably robust despite perturbations and demand uncertainty. Here, we investigate the basis of such robustness using novel tracing methods that allow simultaneously capturing the dynamics of stem and committed progenitor cells (called enteroblasts) and intestinal cell turnover with spatiotemporal resolution. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) divide “ahead” of demand during Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Their newborn enteroblasts, on the other hand, take on a highly polarized shape, acquire invasive properties and motility. They extend long membrane protrusions that make cell–cell contact with mature cells, while exercising a capacity to delay their final differentiation until a local demand materializes. This cellular plasticity is mechanistically linked to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme mediated by escargot, a snail family gene. Activation of the conserved microRNA miR-8/miR-200 in “pausing” enteroblasts in response to a local cell loss promotes timely terminal differentiation via a reverse MET by antagonizing escargot. Our findings unveil that robust intestinal renewal relies on hitherto unrecognized plasticity in enteroblasts and reveal their active role in sensing and/or responding to local demand. PMID:26077448

  3. fMRI-activation patterns in the detection of concealed information rely on memory-related effects.

    PubMed

    Gamer, Matthias; Klimecki, Olga; Bauermann, Thomas; Stoeter, Peter; Vossel, Gerhard

    2012-06-01

    Recent research on potential applications of fMRI in the detection of concealed knowledge primarily ascribed the reported differences in hemodynamic response patterns to deception. This interpretation is challenged by the results of the present study. Participants were required to memorize probe and target items (a banknote and a playing card, each). Subsequently, these items were repeatedly presented along with eight irrelevant items in a modified Guilty Knowledge Test design and participants were instructed to simply acknowledge item presentation by pressing one button after each stimulus. Despite the absence of response monitoring demands and thus overt response conflicts, the experiment revealed a differential physiological response pattern as a function of item type. First, probes elicited the largest skin conductance responses. Second, differential hemodynamic responses were observed in bilateral inferior frontal regions, the right supramarginal gyrus and the supplementary motor area as a function of item type. Probes and targets were accompanied by a larger signal increase than irrelevant items in these regions. Moreover, the responses to probes differed substantially from targets. The observed neural response pattern seems to rely on retrieval processes that depend on the depth of processing in the encoding situation. PMID:19258375

  4. Efficient energy transmission and amplification in the cochlea relies on frequency-dependent material properties of the tectorial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gareth P.; Lukashkina, Victoria A.; Russell, Ian J.; Elliott, Stephen J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, frequency selectivity, and dynamic range of the mammalian cochlea relies on longitudinal transmission of minuscule amounts of energy as passive, pressure-driven, basilar membrane (BM) traveling waves which are actively amplified at frequency-specific locations. Transmission of passive waves through viscous tissue situated in a viscous media is not an easy task. Here we describe mechanical properties of the tectorial membrane (TM) which facilitate this transmission. From mechanical measurements of isolated segments of the TM, we discovered that the stiffness of the TM is reduced when it is mechanically stimulated at physiologically relevant magnitudes and at frequencies below their frequency place in the cochlea. The reduction in stiffness functionally uncouples the TM from the organ of Corti, thereby minimizing energy losses during passive traveling wave propagation. Stiffening and decreased viscosity of the TM at high stimulus frequencies can potentially facilitate active amplification, especially in the high-frequency, basal turn, where energy loss due to internal friction within the TM is less than in the apex. This prediction is confirmed by neural recordings from several frequency regions of the cochlea.

  5. Robust intestinal homeostasis relies on cellular plasticity in enteroblasts mediated by miR-8-Escargot switch.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Ballesta-Illan, Esther; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal epithelium is remarkably robust despite perturbations and demand uncertainty. Here, we investigate the basis of such robustness using novel tracing methods that allow simultaneously capturing the dynamics of stem and committed progenitor cells (called enteroblasts) and intestinal cell turnover with spatiotemporal resolution. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) divide "ahead" of demand during Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Their newborn enteroblasts, on the other hand, take on a highly polarized shape, acquire invasive properties and motility. They extend long membrane protrusions that make cell-cell contact with mature cells, while exercising a capacity to delay their final differentiation until a local demand materializes. This cellular plasticity is mechanistically linked to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme mediated by escargot, a snail family gene. Activation of the conserved microRNA miR-8/miR-200 in "pausing" enteroblasts in response to a local cell loss promotes timely terminal differentiation via a reverse MET by antagonizing escargot. Our findings unveil that robust intestinal renewal relies on hitherto unrecognized plasticity in enteroblasts and reveal their active role in sensing and/or responding to local demand. PMID:26077448

  6. The good, the bad, and the ugly: the unnecessarily broad impact of qui tam civil False Claims Act cases on rural health care providers.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    The civil False Claims Act (FCA) imposes harsh penalties against parties who misappropriate federal funds. The statute's qui tam whistle-blower provisions create strong financial incentives for private individuals to bring and pursue FCA cases against health providers on the government's behalf--even where government attorneys decline to intervene. FCA cases where the government declined to intervene account for less than 2 percent of all recoveries in health care FCA cases. Yet the costs of defending such cases may be very high, especially for rural providers with small operating margins. Federal provider self-referral and anti-kickback laws carve out various exceptions to support the financial viability of rural providers. The FCA, however, contains no such exceptions. Although Department of Justice (DOJ) policy directs officials to take into account community access to care in pursuing FCA cases against rural providers, the ability for private whistleblowers to pursue cases where the government declines to intervene undermines the DOJ's ability to achieve that aim. This Article highlights the liability risks rural providers commonly face under the FCA and argues for amending the FCA to allow a whistleblower claim to proceed against providers serving designated underserved areas only where government authorities intervene in the case. PMID:24341079

  7. When Child Welfare Agencies Rely on Voluntary Kinship Placements: New Federalism Issues and Options for States. An Urban Institute Program to Assess Changing Social Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malm, Karin; Geen, Rob

    Summarizing findings from a forthcoming book, this policy brief examines when and how child welfare agencies rely on kin to care for children who are taken into state custody. The discussion is based on intensive case studies of local kinship care policies and practices; the case studies were conducted in 13 counties in Alabama, California,…

  8. Research Advances: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Finds New Way to Detect Destructive Enzyme Activity--Hair Dye Relies on Nanotechnology--Ways to Increase Shelf Life of Milk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in various research fields are described. Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found a new way to detect destructive enzyme activity, scientists in France have found that an ancient hair dye used by ancient people in Greece and Rome relied on nanotechnology and in the U.S. scientists are developing new…

  9. 21 CFR 314.122 - Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed drug that is no longer marketed. 314.122 Section 314.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications...

  10. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and... property? If the amount of the estimated residual value you rely upon to satisfy the full payout lease requirement of § 714.4(b) exceeds 25% of the original cost of the leased property, a financially capable...

  11. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and... property? If the amount of the estimated residual value you rely upon to satisfy the full payout lease requirement of § 714.4(b) exceeds 25% of the original cost of the leased property, a financially capable...

  12. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and... property? If the amount of the estimated residual value you rely upon to satisfy the full payout lease requirement of § 714.4(b) exceeds 25% of the original cost of the leased property, a financially capable...

  13. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and... property? If the amount of the estimated residual value you rely upon to satisfy the full payout lease requirement of § 714.4(b) exceeds 25% of the original cost of the leased property, a financially capable...

  14. 12 CFR 714.5 - What is required if you rely on an estimated residual value greater than 25% of the original cost...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... residual value greater than 25% of the original cost of the leased property? 714.5 Section 714.5 Banks and... property? If the amount of the estimated residual value you rely upon to satisfy the full payout lease requirement of § 714.4(b) exceeds 25% of the original cost of the leased property, a financially capable...

  15. Comparison of Characteristics and Outcomes of Dabigatran Versus Warfarin in Hypertensive Patients With Atrial Fibrillation (from the RE-LY Trial).

    PubMed

    Nagarakanti, Rangadham; Wallentin, Lars; Noack, Herbert; Brueckmann, Martina; Reilly, Paul; Clemens, Andreas; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim; Ezekowitz, Michael D

    2015-10-15

    Hypertension is frequent in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and is an independent risk factor for stroke. The Randomized Evaluation of Long Term Anticoagulant TherapY (RE-LY) trial found dabigatran 110 mg (D110) and 150 mg twice daily (D150) noninferior or superior to warfarin for stroke reduction in patients with AF, with either a reduction (D110) or similar rates (D150) of major bleeding. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared in patients with and without hypertension. The quality of blood pressure control was also assessed. In RE-LY, 14,283 patients (78.9%) had hypertension. The mean blood pressure at baseline was 132.6 ± 17.6/77.7 ± 10.6 and 124.8 ± 16.7/74.6 ± 10.0 mm Hg for patients with and without hypertension, respectively. More patients with hypertension were diabetic (25.6% vs 14.8%, p <0.001), women (38.6% vs 28.3%, p <0.001), and had greater CHADS2 (2.3 vs 1.4, p <0.001) and CHA2DS2-VASc scores (3.8 vs 2.8, p <0.001). Mean blood pressure in all treatment arms in hypertensive patients was similar (130 ± 18/76 ± 11 mm Hg) during the trial. The efficacy and safety of D110 and D150 compared to warfarin were similar (p = nonsignificant) in hypertensive (stroke/systemic embolism rate of 1.47%, 1.20%, and 1.81% and major bleed rate of 2.89%, 3.70%, and 3.69% in the D110, D150, and W, respectively) and normotensive patients (stroke/systemic embolism rate of 1.79%, 0.78%, and 1.36% and major bleed rate of 2.84%, 2.37%, and 3.03% per year in the D110, D150, and W, respectively). Hypertensive patients had more major bleeds (3.39% vs 2.76%; p = 0.007). Intracranial bleeds were similar (0.47% vs 0.31%; p = 0.12). In conclusion, patients with hypertension in RE-LY were more likely female, diabetic, with a greater CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores. Blood pressure control in RE-LY was excellent. The benefits of dabigatran over warfarin, including a substantial reduction of intracranial hemorrhage, were similar in both hypertensive

  16. Questions about complementary and alternative medicine to the Regional Medicines Information and Pharmacovigilance Centres in Norway (RELIS): a descriptive pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of clinically relevant information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to health care professionals is not well described. The aim of the study was to assess questions about CAM to the Regional Medicines Information and Pharmacovigilance Centres in Norway (RELIS). Methods All question-answers pairs (QAPs) in the RELIS database indexed with alternative medicine from 2005-2010 constituted the study material. A randomly selected sample of 100 QAPs was characterized with regard to type of question (category, patient-specific or general), occupation and workplace of enquirer, the type of information search performed (simple or advanced), and if the answers contained information to provide factual or consultative replies (facts about or advice on clinical use of CAM, respectively). Proportions were compared with Fisher’s exact test with significance at the 0.05 level. Results One thousand and thirty-eight (7.7%) out of 13 482 questions involved CAM. Eighty-two out of 100 questions concerned products containing one or more herbs, vitamins and minerals as well as other substances. Thirty-eight out of 100 questions concerned the category documentation (substance identification and/or literature reports about clinical effects), 36 interactions, 16 adverse effects, 9 pregnancy and lactation, and 1 question concerned contraindications. Sixty-three questions were patient-specific and 37 general. Fifty-four questions came from physicians, 33 from pharmacists and 13 from others (including nurses, midwives, students, CAM practitioners, and the public). Pharmacists asked more frequently about interactions while physicians asked more frequently about adverse effects (p < 0.05). Seventy-six of the questions came from outside hospital, mainly general practice and community pharmacies. Fifty-nine answers were based on a simple and 41 on an advanced information search. Thirty-three factual and 38 consultative answers were provided. In 29 answers

  17. Influence of secreted frizzled receptor protein 1 (SFRP1) on neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer does not rely on WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by lack of expression of both estrogen and progesterone receptor as well as lack of overexpression or amplification of HER2. Despite an increased probability of response to chemotherapy, many patients resistant to current chemotherapy regimens suffer from a worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. However, molecular determinants of response to chemotherapy specific to TNBC remain largely unknown. Thus, there is a high demand for biomarkers potentially stratifying triple negative breast cancer patients for neoadjuvant chemotherapies or alternative therapies. Methods In order to identify genes correlating with both the triple negative breast cancer subtype as well as response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy we employed publicly available gene expression profiles of patients, which had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Analysis of tissue microarrays as well as breast cancer cell lines revealed correlation to the triple negative breast cancer subtype. Subsequently, effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown on response to standard chemotherapeutic agents as well as radiation therapy were analyzed. Additionally, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms by which SFRP1 alters the carcinogenic properties of breast cancer cells. Results SFRP1 was identified as being significantly overexpressed in TNBC compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Additionally, SFRP1 expression is significantly correlated with an increased probability of positive response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Knockdown of SFRP1 in triple negative breast cancer cells renders the cells more resistant to standard chemotherapy. Moreover, tumorigenic properties of the cells are modified by knockdown, as shown by both migration or invasion capacity as well reduced apoptotic events. Surprisingly, we found that these effects do not rely on Wnt signaling. Furthermore, we show that pro-apoptotic as well as migratory pathways are differentially

  18. The layered antimonides RELi3Sb2 (RE=Ce-Nd, Sm, Gd-Ho). Filled derivatives of the CaAl2Si2 structure type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Marion C.; Suen, Nian-Tzu; Raglione, Michaella; Bobev, Svilen

    2014-02-01

    Reported are the synthesis and the structural characterization of an extended family of rare-earth metal-lithium-antimonides with the formula RELi3Sb2 (RE=Ce-Nd, Sm, Gd-Ho). They crystallize in the trigonal space group P3barm1 (No. 164, Pearson symbol hP6) with a structure, best viewed as a filled derivative of the common CaAl2Si2 structure type (ternary variant of α-La2O3). Across the series, the lattice parameters monotonically decrease, following the lanthanide contraction. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements for CeLi3Sb2, PrLi3Sb2 and TbLi3Sb2 reveal paramagnetic behavior in the high temperature range, and the obtained effective moments are consistent with the expected ones for the free-ion RE3+ ground state. Possible ferromagnetic ordering for PrLi3Sb2 and antiferromagnetic ordering for TbLi3Sb2 are observed in the low temperature range (below 20 K). Tight-binding muffin-tin orbital electronic band structure calculations for LaLi3Sb2 are presented and discussed as well.

  19. D-dimer and factor VIIa in atrial fibrillation - prognostic values for cardiovascular events and effects of anticoagulation therapy. A RE-LY substudy.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, Agneta; Oldgren, Jonas; Andersson, Ulrika; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Reilly, Paul A; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim; Wallentin, Lars; Eikelboom, John W

    2016-05-01

    Coagulation markers may improve monitoring the risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) during anticoagulant treatment. We examined baseline levels of D-dimer and their association with stroke, cardiovascular death and major bleeding in 6,202 AF patients randomised to dabigatran or warfarin in the RE-LY trial. The effects of treatment on serial levels of D-dimer and coagulation factor (F) VIIa in 2,567 patients were also analysed. Baseline D-dimer levels were related to the rate of stroke/systemic embolism (SEE) with 0.64 % in the lowest quartile (Q1, as reference) (D-dimer < 298 µg/l), 1.38 % Q2 (D-dimer 298-473 µg/l), 1.71 % Q3 (D-dimer 474-822 µg/l) and 2.00 % in Q4 (D-dimer > 822 µg/l) (p=0.0007). Similar associations were shown for cardiovascular death and major bleeding. Addition of baseline D-dimer to established clinical risk factors improved prediction of stroke/SEE, cardiovascular death and major bleeding (C-index increased from 0.66 to 0.68, 0.71 to 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.67, respectively). Dabigatran provided a greater reduction of D-dimer levels than warfarin regardless of baseline anticoagulant treatment. On-treatment levels of FVIIa were markedly reduced by warfarin (median 12.1-13.8 mU/ml) but significantly higher with dabigatran (median 39.4-49.0 mU/ml) at all-time points. Dabigatran is associated with greater reduction in D-dimer without the pronounced reduction of FVIIa seen with warfarin. These different effects on the coagulation system might explain the better efficacy and less intracranial bleeding observed with dabigatran compared with warfarin. PMID:26818781

  20. How and When Do Insects Rely on Endogenous Protein and Lipid Resources during Lethal Bouts of Starvation? A New Application for 13C-Breath testing.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Guzman, R Marena; Passement, Celeste A; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2015-01-01

    Most of our understanding about the physiology of fasting and starvation comes from studies of vertebrates; however, for ethical reasons, studies that monitor vertebrates through the lethal endpoint are scant. Insects are convenient models to characterize the comparative strategies used to cope with starvation because they have diverse life histories and have evolved under the omnipresent challenge of food limitation. Moreover, we can study the physiology of starvation through its natural endpoint. In this study we raised populations of five species of insects (adult grasshoppers, crickets, cockroaches, and larval beetles and moths) on diets labeled with either 13C-palmitic acid or 13C-leucine to isotopically enrich the lipids or the proteins in their bodies, respectively. The insects were allowed to become postabsorptive and then starved. We periodically measured the δ13C of the exhaled breath to characterize how each species adjusted their reliance on endogenous lipids and proteins as energy sources. We found that starving insects employ a wide range of strategies for regulating lipid and protein oxidation. All of the insects except for the beetle larvae were capable of sharply reducing reliance on protein oxidation; however, this protein sparing strategy was usually unsustainable during the entire starvation period. All insects increased their reliance on lipid oxidation, but while some species (grasshoppers, cockroaches, and beetle larvae) were still relying extensively on lipids at the time of death, other species (crickets and moth larvae) allowed rates of lipid oxidation to return to prestarvation levels. Although lipids and proteins are critical metabolic fuels for both vertebrates and insects, insects apparently exhibit a much wider range of strategies for rationing these limited resources during starvation. PMID:26465334

  1. Synthesis and structure determination of seven ternary bismuthides: crystal chemistry of the RELi3Bi2 family (RE = La-Nd, Sm, Gd, and Tb).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jai; Schäfer, Marion C; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-10-01

    Zintl phases are renowned for their diverse crystal structures with rich structural chemistry and have recently exhibited some remarkable heat- and charge-transport properties. The ternary bismuthides RELi3Bi2 (RE = La-Nd, Sm, Gd, and Tb) (namely, lanthanum trilithium dibismuthide, LaLi3Bi2, cerium trilithium dibismuthide, CeLi3Bi2, praseodymium trilithium dibismuthide, PrLi3Bi2, neodymium trilithium dibismuthide, NdLi3Bi2, samarium trilithium dibismuthide, SmLi3Bi2, gadolinium trilithium dibismuthide, GdLi3Bi2, and terbium trilithium dibismuthide, TbLi3Bi2) were synthesized by high-temperature reactions of the elements in sealed Nb ampoules. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that all seven compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the LaLi3Sb2 type structure in the trigonal space group P-3m1 (Pearson symbol hP6). The unit-cell volumes decrease monotonically on moving from the La to the Tb compound, owing to the lanthanide contraction. The structure features a rare-earth metal atom and one Li atom in a nearly perfect octahedral coordination by six Bi atoms. The second crystallographically unique Li atom is surrounded by four Bi atoms in a slightly distorted tetrahedral geometry. The atomic arrangements are best described as layered structures consisting of two-dimensional layers of fused LiBi4 tetrahedra and LiBi6 octahedra, separated by rare-earth metal cations. As such, these compounds are expected to be valance-precise semiconductors, whose formulae can be represented as (RE(3+))(Li(1+))3(Bi(3-))2. PMID:26422218

  2. Can grass phytoliths and indices be relied on during vegetation and climate interpretations in the eastern Himalayas? Studies from Darjeeling and Arunachal Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Oindrila; Ghosh, Ruby; Paruya, Dipak Kumar; Mukherjee, Biswajit; Thapa, Kishore Kumar; Bera, Subir

    2016-02-01

    While documenting the vegetation response to climatic changes in mountains, the use of grass phytolith data relies on the ability of phytolith assemblages or indices to differentiate the elevationally stratified vegetation zones. To infer the potential and limitations of grass phytolith assemblages and indices to reconstruct vegetation vis-à-vis climate in the Himalayan mountain regions, we analyzed phytolith assemblages from 66 dominant grasses and 153 surface soils from four different forest types along the c. 130-4000 m a.s.l. elevation gradients in the Darjeeling and Arunachal Himalayas. Grass short cell phytolith assemblages from modern grasses show significant variability with rising elevation. To test the reliability of the above observation, phytoliths from the soil samples were subjected to linear discriminant analysis (DA). DA classified 85.3% and 92.3% of the sites to their correct forest zones in the Darjeeling and Arunachal Himalayas respectively. Relative abundance of bilobate, cross, short saddle, plateau saddle, rondel and trapeziform types allow discrimination of the phytolith assemblage along the elevation gradient. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) on the soil phytolith data further revealed their relationships with the climatic variables. Temperature and evapotranspiration were found to be the most influential for differential distribution of grass phytolith assemblages with rising elevation in the eastern Himalayas. We also tested the reliability of phytolith indices (Ic, Iph and Fs) for tracing the dominance of different grass subfamilies in the eastern Himalayas. Ic proved to be most reliable in discriminating C3/C4 grass along the elevation gradient while Iph and Fs proved to be less reliable. We observed that in the monsoon dominated eastern Himalayas, a little adjustment in Ic index may enhance the accuracy of interpretations. In future studies more precise identification of phytolith sub-types from additional sites in the eastern

  3. How and When Do Insects Rely on Endogenous Protein and Lipid Resources during Lethal Bouts of Starvation? A New Application for 13C-Breath testing

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Marshall D.; Guzman, R. Marena; Passement, Celeste A.; Davidowitz, Goggy

    2015-01-01

    Most of our understanding about the physiology of fasting and starvation comes from studies of vertebrates; however, for ethical reasons, studies that monitor vertebrates through the lethal endpoint are scant. Insects are convenient models to characterize the comparative strategies used to cope with starvation because they have diverse life histories and have evolved under the omnipresent challenge of food limitation. Moreover, we can study the physiology of starvation through its natural endpoint. In this study we raised populations of five species of insects (adult grasshoppers, crickets, cockroaches, and larval beetles and moths) on diets labeled with either 13C-palmitic acid or 13C-leucine to isotopically enrich the lipids or the proteins in their bodies, respectively. The insects were allowed to become postabsorptive and then starved. We periodically measured the δ13C of the exhaled breath to characterize how each species adjusted their reliance on endogenous lipids and proteins as energy sources. We found that starving insects employ a wide range of strategies for regulating lipid and protein oxidation. All of the insects except for the beetle larvae were capable of sharply reducing reliance on protein oxidation; however, this protein sparing strategy was usually unsustainable during the entire starvation period. All insects increased their reliance on lipid oxidation, but while some species (grasshoppers, cockroaches, and beetle larvae) were still relying extensively on lipids at the time of death, other species (crickets and moth larvae) allowed rates of lipid oxidation to return to prestarvation levels. Although lipids and proteins are critical metabolic fuels for both vertebrates and insects, insects apparently exhibit a much wider range of strategies for rationing these limited resources during starvation. PMID:26465334

  4. An optimized single chain TCR scaffold relying on the assembly with the native CD3-complex prevents residual mispairing with endogenous TCRs in human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Diana; Klobuch, Sebastian; Xue, Shao-An; Birtel, Matthias; Echchannaoui, Hakim; Yildiz, Oezlem; Omokoko, Tana; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Stauss, Hans; Sahin, Ugur; Herr, Wolfgang; Theobald, Matthias; Thomas, Simone; Voss, Ralf-Holger

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer envisions the adoptive transfer of T-cells genetically engineered with tumor-specific heterodimeric α/β T-cell receptors (TCRα/β). However, potential mispairing of introduced TCRα/β-chains with endogenous β/α-ones may evoke unpredictable autoimmune reactivities. A novel single chain (sc)TCR format relies on the fusion of the Vα-Linker-Vβ-fragment to the TCR Cβ-domain and coexpression of the TCR Cα-domain capable of recruiting the natural CD3-complex for full and hence, native T-cell signaling. Here, we tested whether such a gp100(280-288)- or p53(264-272) tumor antigen-specific scTCR is still prone to mispairing with TCRα. In a human Jurkat-76 T-cell line lacking endogenous TCRs, surface expression and function of a scTCR could be reconstituted by any cointroduced TCRα-chain indicating mispairing to take place on a molecular basis. In contrast, transduction into human TCRα/β-positive T-cells revealed that mispairing is largely reduced. Competition experiments in Jurkat-76 confirmed the preference of dcTCR to selfpair and to spare scTCR. This also allowed for the generation of dc/scTCR-modified cytomegalovirus/tumor antigen-bispecific T-cells to augment T-cell activation in CMV-infected tumor patients. Residual mispairing was prevented by strenghtening the Vα-Li-Vβ-fragment through the design of a novel disulfide bond between a Vα- and a linker-resident residue close to Vβ. Multimer-stainings, and cytotoxicity-, IFNγ-secretion-, and CFSE-proliferation-assays, the latter towards dendritic cells endogenously processing RNA-electroporated gp100 antigen proved the absence of hybrid scTCR/TCRα-formation without impairing avidity of scTCR/Cα in T-cells. Moreover, a fragile cytomegalovirus pp65(495-503)-specific scTCR modified this way acquired enhanced cytotoxicity. Thus, optimized scTCR/Cα inhibits residual TCR mispairing to accomplish safe adoptive immunotherapy for bulk endogenous TCRα/β-positive T-cells. PMID:27028870

  5. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. Results In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Conclusion Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of

  6. Optimization of covalent immobilization of Trichoderma reesei cellulase onto modified ReliZyme HA403 and Sepabeads EC-EP supports for cellulose hydrolysis, in buffer and ionic liquids/buffer media.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ramazan; Yalcin, M Serkan; Yildirim, Deniz

    2016-08-01

    The covalent immobilization of Trichoderma reesei cellulase onto modified ReliZyme HA403 and Sepabeads EC-EP supports were carried out. The optimal immobilization conditions were determined using response surface methodology. The hydrolysis of cellulose using the free and immobilized cellulase preparations in ionic liquids (IL) using cosolvents was investigated. The hydrolytic activities in buffer medium containing 25% (v/v) of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate were around 2.6-, 1.6-, and 5.5-fold higher than the activities in buffer medium. The retained initial activities were 32% and 57%, respectively for cellulase preparations immobilized onto Sepabeads EC-EP support and onto modified ReliZyme HA403 support after 5 reuses. PMID:25811997

  7. Mathematical Ability Relies on Knowledge, Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweller, John; Clark, Richard E.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent "reform" curricula both ignore the absence of supporting data and completely misunderstand the role of problem solving in cognition. If, the argument goes, teachers are not really teaching people mathematics but rather are teaching them some form of general problem solving, then mathematical content can be reduced in importance. According…

  8. Swimming Upstream: Relying on Teachers' Summative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, J. Myron

    2007-01-01

    The Black and Wiliam 1998 paper, "Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards through Classroom Assessment," was a landmark article. It crystallized hundred of studies to advance an argument that certain kinds of assessment by teachers and students in their own classrooms is one of the most effective ways to improve educational achievement. More than…

  9. The RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, and Gd; 0≤x<1) series revisited. Synthesis, crystal chemistry, and magnetic susceptibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Makongo, Julien P.A.; Suen, Nian-Tzu; Guo, Shengping; Saha, Shanta; Greene, Richard; Paglione, Johnpierre; Bobev, Svilen

    2014-03-15

    This study is concerned with the ternary compounds RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, and Gd; 0≤x<1), which have been previously thought to be the stoichiometric RELiSn{sub 2} phases. These materials crystallize with the base-centered orthorhombic space group Cmcm (No. 63), and can be formally assigned with the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type (Pearson symbol oC16). Our systematic single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed substantial Li-deficiencies in all cases, with SmSn{sub 2} (space group Cmmm, ZrGa{sub 2} structure type, Pearson symbol oC12) and GdSn{sub 2} (space group Cmcm, ZrSi{sub 2} structure type, Pearson symbol oC12) being completely lithium-free. The structure refinements also uncovered positional disorder on the Sn site neighboring the vacancies. The Sn-disorder and the Li-deficiency correlate, and vary monotonically with the decreased size of the rare-earth atoms in the order RE=La–Nd. The SmSn{sub 2} and GdSn{sub 2} structures are devoid of any disorder. Temperature-dependent studies of the magnetic response of the title compounds are also presented and discussed. -- Graphical abstract: RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, 0≤x<1) crystallize in a defect variants of the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type (a). The Sn-disorder and the Li-deficiency correlate, and vary monotonically with the decreased size of the rare-earth atoms in the order RE=La–Nd. The SmSn{sub 2} (b) and GdSn{sub 2} (c) structures are devoid of any disorder. Highlights: • The crystal structures of the RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, 0≤x<1) compounds are revised using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. • The structure is a filled derivative of the ZrSi{sub 2} structure type or defect variant of the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type. • SmSn{sub 2} is isotypic with the ZrGa{sub 2} structure, while RESn{sub 2} (RE=Gd–Lu) are isotypic with the ZrSi{sub 2} structure.

  10. The layered antimonides RELi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} (RE=Ce–Nd, Sm, Gd–Ho). Filled derivatives of the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, Marion C.; Suen, Nian-Tzu; Raglione, Michaella; Bobev, Svilen

    2014-02-15

    Reported are the synthesis and the structural characterization of an extended family of rare-earth metal–lithium–antimonides with the formula RELi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} (RE=Ce–Nd, Sm, Gd–Ho). They crystallize in the trigonal space group P3{sup ¯}m1 (No. 164, Pearson symbol hP6) with a structure, best viewed as a filled derivative of the common CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type (ternary variant of α-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Across the series, the lattice parameters monotonically decrease, following the lanthanide contraction. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements for CeLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}, PrLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} and TbLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} reveal paramagnetic behavior in the high temperature range, and the obtained effective moments are consistent with the expected ones for the free-ion RE{sup 3+} ground state. Possible ferromagnetic ordering for PrLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} and antiferromagnetic ordering for TbLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} are observed in the low temperature range (below 20 K). Tight-binding muffin-tin orbital electronic band structure calculations for LaLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} are presented and discussed as well. - Graphical abstract: The large family of rare-earth metal–lithium–antimonides with the formula RELi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} (RE=Ce–Nd, Sm, Gd–Ho) crystallize in the trigonal space group P3{sup ¯}m1 (No. 164, Pearson symbol hP6) with a structure that is a filled derivative of the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type (ternary variant of α-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Display Omitted - Highlights: • RELi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} (RE=Ce–Nd, Sm, Gd–Ho) constitute an extended family of rare-earth metal–lithium–antimonides. • The layered structure is a filled derivative of the common CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type. • The valence electron count follows the Zintl–Klemm rules. • Electronic band structure calculations for LaLi{sub 3}Sb{sub 2} indicate small band-gap semiconducting behavior.

  11. Does the Spatial Distribution of the Parasitic Mite Varroa jacobsoni Oud. (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) in Worker Brood of Honey Bee Apis Mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Rely on an Aggregative Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvy, M.; Capowiez, Y.; Le Conte, Y.; Salvy, M.; Clément, J.-L.

    Varroa jacobsoni is an ectoparasite of honey bees which reproduces in capped brood cells. Multi-infestation is frequently observed in worker brood and can be interpreted as an aggregative phenomenon. The aim of this study was to determine whether the distribution of V. jacobsoni in worker brood cells relies on a random or an aggregative process. We studied the distribution of Varroa females in capped worker brood at similar age by comparing, by a Monte Carlo test, the observed frequency distribution of mites per cell to simulated distributions based on a random process. A complementary approach, using the "nearest neighbor distances" (NND) with Monte Carlo tests, was investigated to study the spatial distribution (a) between mites in different cells and (b) between infested cells in brood. The observed distributions did not differ significantly from that expected by a random process, and we conclude that there is no aggregation during invasion of V. jacobsoni in worker brood.

  12. Spatial imagery relies on a sensory independent, though sensory sensitive, functional organization within the parietal cortex: a fMRI study of angle discrimination in sighted and congenitally blind individuals.

    PubMed

    Bonino, Daniela; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Bernardi, Giulio; Sani, Lorenzo; Gentili, Claudio; Vecchi, Tomaso; Pietrini, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Although vision offers distinctive information to space representation, individuals who lack vision since birth often show perceptual and representational skills comparable to those found in sighted individuals. However, congenitally blind individuals may result in impaired spatial analysis, when engaging in 'visual' spatial features (e.g., perspective or angle representation) or complex spatial mental abilities. In the present study, we measured behavioral and brain responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging in sighted and congenitally blind individuals during spatial imagery based on a modified version of the mental clock task (e.g., angle discrimination) and a simple recognition control condition, as conveyed across distinct sensory modalities: visual (sighted individuals only), tactile and auditory. Blind individuals were significantly less accurate during the auditory task, but comparable-to-sighted during the tactile task. As expected, both groups showed common neural activations in intraparietal and superior parietal regions across visual and non-visual spatial perception and imagery conditions, indicating the more abstract, sensory independent functional organization of these cortical areas, a property that we named supramodality. At the same time, however, comparisons in brain responses and functional connectivity patterns across experimental conditions demonstrated also a functional lateralization, in a way that correlated with the distinct behavioral performance in blind and sighted individuals. Specifically, blind individuals relied more on right parietal regions, mainly in the tactile and less in the auditory spatial processing. In sighted, spatial representation across modalities relied more on left parietal regions. In conclusions, intraparietal and superior parietal regions subserve supramodal spatial representations in sighted and congenitally blind individuals. Differences in their recruitment across non-visual spatial processing in

  13. Quis custodiet ipsos custodies: who watches the watchmen?

    SciTech Connect

    Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Meier, Roland; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Should this be said again? No cell is an island and in tissue-specificity and cancer, context is supreme. Decades ago, seminal recombination experiments illustrated the dominant role of mammary mesenchyme in directing epithelial development, and strongly suggested that the microenvironment plays a significant role also in the manifestation of carcinoma. More direct evidence for such functions came from a study demonstrating that an unadulterated microenvironment can suppress the malignant phenotype and re-direct tumor cells to give rise to normally functioning tissues and indeed healthy mice. One may wonder why such a stunning finding did not convince the scientific community to pay more attention to the role of context. The answers are complex, not the least of which is that concomitantly with this finding, the roles of oncogenes and mutations were being discovered. That excitement carried the day, specially because no one subsequently determined whether or not these mice generated from malignant cells contained tumorigenic mutations, and no new group reproduced the work. The following decade saw the discovery that even potent oncogenes could be ruled by context, and another couple of decades later it was shown that similar reprogramming of metastatic melanoma by an embryonic microenvironment was possible. There are many more examples which are not as clear cut, but are nevertheless compelling. The extensive literature of two-stage carcinogenesis, namely initiation and progression, indeed clearly indicates that 'initiation' and DNA damage alone are not sufficient to allow carcinogenesis. Implicit in these findings is: once a tumor or an oncogene, not always a tumor or an oncogene. A renewed focus on the tumor microenvironment as a therapeutic target has also led to the recognition that markers within the microenvironment could have predictive power. Two recently published reports identifying 'stromal signatures' in breast cancer patients prognostic for patient survival and predictive of response to chemotherapeutic treatment provide proof of this concept. In the current issue of The American Journal of Pathology, two independent studies identify a novel stromal marker, caveolin (Cav)-1, which predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer patients irrespective of its expression in tumor epithelium. Cav-1 is a scaffolding protein essential to the structure of caveolae, 'little caves' or invaginations in cellular plasma membranes. Cav-1 recruits and arranges lipids and proteins to these membrane sites to function in endocytosis and signal transduction. The observation that Cav-1 expression is attenuated in oncogenically transformed cells led to exploration of whether Cav-1 loss in mammary epithelium was causative. Although mechanistic data suggested that Cav-1 null mice exhibited aberrant epithelial growth, and that forcing Cav-1 expression in breast cancer cell lines inhibited growth and metastases in xenograft models, a clinical link proved elusive. However, MMTV-PyMT tumors transplanted into the fat pads of Cav-1 knockout mice displayed significantly enhanced growth (vs. wild-type mice), motivating investigation of whether stromal Cav-1 expression correlates with human breast cancer patient survival. This is precisely what Sloan et al. and Witkiewicz, Dasgupta, et al. demonstrate in this issue of AJP. Using tissue microarray data in conjunction with breast tumor sections and extensive patient survival data, Sloan et al. demonstrate that strong stromal Cav-1 expression is associated with smaller breast tumor size and grade, and is highly predictive of increased survival (Fig. 1). Patients with positive expression of stromal Cav-1 had a 91% ten year survival rate, vs. a 43% survival rate for patients lacking stromal Cav-1 expression. Importantly, there was no correlation between Cav-1 expression in the tumor epithelium and clinical outcome in either tissue arrays or tumor sections.

  14. Questionable Practices? Relying on Individual Teacher Resilience in Remote Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Anna; Johnson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Early career teachers eager to find employment are often encouraged by employers to accept positions in remote locations which are traditionally difficult to staff. This paper reports research that examined a case study of a graduate teacher employed in a remote school. Drawing on resilience theory, we challenge the profession to consider whether…

  15. Mosquitoes rely on their gut microbiota for development

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Kerri L.; Vogel, Kevin J.; Brown, Mark R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Field studies indicate adult mosquitoes (Culicidae) host low diversity communities of bacteria that vary greatly among individuals and species. In contrast, it remains unclear how adult mosquitoes acquire their microbiome, what influences community structure, and whether the microbiome is important for survival. Here we used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to characterize the bacterial communities of three mosquito species reared under identical conditions. Two of these species, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are anautogenous and must blood feed to produce eggs, while one, Georgecraigius atropalpus, is autogenous and produces eggs without blood feeding. Each mosquito species contained a low diversity community comprised primarily of aerobic bacteria acquired primarily from the aquatic habitat in which larvae developed. Our results suggested the communities in Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae larvae share more similarities with one another than with Ge. atropalpus. Studies with Ae. aegypti also strongly suggested that adults transstadially acquired several members of the larval bacterial community, but only four genera of bacteria present in blood fed females were detected on eggs. Functional assays showed that axenic larvae of each species failed to develop beyond the first instar. Experiments with Ae. aegypti indicated several members of the microbial community and Escherichia coli successfully colonized axenic larvae and rescued development. Overall, our results provide new insights about the acquisition and structure of bacterial communities in mosquitoes. They also indicate three mosquito species spanning the breadth of the Culicidae depend on their gut microbiome for development. PMID:24766707

  16. Relying on electronic journals: Reading patterns of astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenopir, Carol; King, Donald W.; Boyce, Peter; Grayson, Matt; Paulson, Keri-Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Surveys of the members of the American Astronomical Society identify how astronomers use journals and what features and formats they prefer. While every work field is distinct, the patterns of use by astronomers may provide a glimpse of what to expect of journal patterns and use by other scientists. Astronomers, like other scientists, continue to invest a large amount of their time in reading articles and place a high level of importance on journal articles. They use a wide variety of formats and means to get access to materials that are essential to their work in teaching, service, and research. They select access means that are convenient - whether those means be print, electronic, or both. The availability of a mature electronic journals system from their primary professional society has surely influenced their early adoption of e-journals.

  17. Colleges Rely on Consortia, Contractors, and Ingenuity to Cut Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    2006-01-01

    The US colleges are struggling with soaring tuition costs as state support is unable to keep up with enrollment growth, and college officials are becoming more creative in finding ways to reduce expenses. Higher education institutions are increasingly outsourcing non-academic activities, collaborating with other institutions to share goods and…

  18. Mosquitoes rely on their gut microbiota for development.

    PubMed

    Coon, Kerri L; Vogel, Kevin J; Brown, Mark R; Strand, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Field studies indicate adult mosquitoes (Culicidae) host low diversity communities of bacteria that vary greatly among individuals and species. In contrast, it remains unclear how adult mosquitoes acquire their microbiome, what influences community structure, and whether the microbiome is important for survival. Here, we used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to characterize the bacterial communities of three mosquito species reared under identical conditions. Two of these species, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are anautogenous and must blood-feed to produce eggs, while one, Georgecraigius atropalpus, is autogenous and produces eggs without blood feeding. Each mosquito species contained a low diversity community comprised primarily of aerobic bacteria acquired from the aquatic habitat in which larvae developed. Our results suggested that the communities in Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae larvae share more similarities with one another than with G. atropalpus. Studies with Ae. aegypti also strongly suggested that adults transstadially acquired several members of the larval bacterial community, but only four genera of bacteria present in blood fed females were detected on eggs. Functional assays showed that axenic larvae of each species failed to develop beyond the first instar. Experiments with Ae. aegypti indicated several members of the microbial community and Escherichia coli successfully colonized axenic larvae and rescued development. Overall, our results provide new insights about the acquisition and structure of bacterial communities in mosquitoes. They also indicate that three mosquito species spanning the breadth of the Culicidae depend on their gut microbiome for development. PMID:24766707

  19. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Vitela, A Davi; Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  20. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy

    PubMed Central

    Vitela, A. Davi; Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  1. An efficient circle detector not relying on edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and efficient detection of circular modules fixed on non-cooperative target is a key technology for Tethered Space Robot. This paper presents an efficient circle detector based on region-growing of gradient and histogram distribution of Euclidean distance. Region-growing of gradient is applied to generate arc support regions from single point. And the corresponding square fitting areas are defined to accelerate the detection and decrease storage. A histogram is then used to count frequency of the distances that participates in the accumulator and the parameters of each circle are acquired. Finally, a verification strategy of circular integrity is designed to test the detection results. We have tested our algorithm on 35 images dealing with kinds of circles and ellipses. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to detect circular objects under occlusion, image noises and moderate shape deformations with a good precision.

  2. Reinforcement Learning in Multidimensional Environments Relies on Attention Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Reka; Geana, Andra; Gershman, Samuel J.; Leong, Yuan Chang; Radulescu, Angela; Wilson, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, ideas from the computational field of reinforcement learning have revolutionized the study of learning in the brain, famously providing new, precise theories of how dopamine affects learning in the basal ganglia. However, reinforcement learning algorithms are notorious for not scaling well to multidimensional environments, as is required for real-world learning. We hypothesized that the brain naturally reduces the dimensionality of real-world problems to only those dimensions that are relevant to predicting reward, and conducted an experiment to assess by what algorithms and with what neural mechanisms this “representation learning” process is realized in humans. Our results suggest that a bilateral attentional control network comprising the intraparietal sulcus, precuneus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in selecting what dimensions are relevant to the task at hand, effectively updating the task representation through trial and error. In this way, cortical attention mechanisms interact with learning in the basal ganglia to solve the “curse of dimensionality” in reinforcement learning. PMID:26019331

  3. Hepatitis C virus relies on lipoproteins for its life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Germana; Di Caprio, Giorgia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Marco; Alonzi, Tonino

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 150 million people worldwide. In most cases, HCV infection becomes chronic causing liver disease ranging from fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral persistence and pathogenesis are due to the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, mainly lipid metabolism and innate immunity. In particular, HCV exploits the lipoprotein machineries for almost all steps of its life cycle. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge concerning the interplay between HCV and lipoprotein metabolism. We discuss the role played by members of lipoproteins in HCV entry, replication and virion production. PMID:26877603

  4. Pantomimes are special gestures which rely on working memory.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, A; Cubelli, R; Della Sala, S; Drei, S

    2003-12-01

    The case of a patient is reported who presented consistently with overt deficits in producing pantomimes in the absence of any other deficits in producing meaningful gestures. This pattern of spared and impaired abilities is difficult to reconcile with the current layout of cognitive models for praxis. This patient also showed clear impairment in a dual-task paradigm, a test taxing the co-ordination aspect of working memory, though performed normally in a series of other neuropsychological measures assessing language, visuo-spatial functions, reasoning function, and executive function. A specific working memory impairment associated with a deficit of pantomiming in the absence of any other disorders in the production of meaningful gestures suggested a way to modify the model to account for the data. Pantomimes are a particular category of gestures, meaningful, yet novel. We posit that by their very nature they call for the intervention of a mechanism to integrate and synthesise perceptual inputs together with information made available from the action semantics (knowledge about objects and functions) and the output lexicon (stored procedural programmes). This processing stage conceived as a temporary workspace where gesture information is actively manipulated, would generate new motor programmes to carry out pantomimes. The model of gesture production is refined to include this workspace. PMID:14642299

  5. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  6. Elastin Peptides Signaling Relies on Neuraminidase-1-Dependent Lactosylceramide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Rusciani, Anthony; Duca, Laurent; Sartelet, Hervé; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Bobichon, Hélène; Ploton, Dominique; Le Naour, Richard; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The sialidase activity of neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1) is responsible for ERK 1/2 pathway activation following binding of elastin peptide on the elastin receptor complex. In this work, we demonstrate that the receptor and lipid rafts colocalize at the plasma membrane. We also show that the disruption of these microdomains as well as their depletion in glycolipids blocks the receptor signaling. Following elastin peptide treatment, the cellular GM3 level decreases while lactosylceramide (LacCer) content increases consistently with a GM3/LacCer conversion. The use of lactose or Neu-1 siRNA blocks this process suggesting that the elastin receptor complex is responsible for this lipid conversion. Flow cytometry analysis confirms this elastin peptide-driven LacCer generation. Further, the use of a monoclonal anti-GM3 blocking antibody shows that GM3 is required for signaling. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that Neu-1-dependent GM3/LacCer conversion is the key event leading to signaling by the elastin receptor complex. As a consequence, we propose that LacCer is an early messenger for this receptor. PMID:21103358

  7. Engineers rely on distribution automation to be competitive

    SciTech Connect

    Beaty, W.

    1995-01-01

    A few years ago, the plea of vendors was {open_quotes}Don`t wait-automate.{close_quotes} Utilities are now entering a new era of competition and customer satisfaction. Designing and operating distribution systems of today has developed into a very challenging experience for engineers. They have always been concerned with reliability, efficiency and customer satisfaction. However, in today`s financial, social and political environment-and certainly tomorrow`s-these issues take on a heightened challenge. Automating the distribution system is a key factor in achieving all the goals of the designer and operator to today`s systems. Distribution automation (DA) provides at least two capabilities to operate systems with less capacity margin. First is the ability to monitor loading and electrical performance on a real-time basis, permitting operation very near to upper limit of acceptable loading.

  8. Mitochondrial translocation of APE1 relies on the MIA pathway.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, Arianna; Wasilewski, Michal; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Tell, Gianluca; Vascotto, Carlo

    2015-06-23

    APE1 is a multifunctional protein with a fundamental role in repairing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions caused by oxidative and alkylating agents. Unfortunately, comprehensions of the mechanisms regulating APE1 intracellular trafficking are still fragmentary and contrasting. Recent data demonstrate that APE1 interacts with the mitochondrial import and assembly protein Mia40 suggesting the involvement of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on the disulfide transfer system, to be responsible of APE1 trafficking into the mitochondria. The MIA pathway is an import machinery that uses a redox system for cysteine enriched proteins to drive them in this compartment. It is composed by two main proteins: Mia40 is the oxidoreductase that catalyzes the formation of the disulfide bonds in the substrate, while ALR reoxidizes Mia40 after the import. In this study, we demonstrated that: (i) APE1 and Mia40 interact through disulfide bond formation; and (ii) Mia40 expression levels directly affect APE1's mitochondrial translocation and, consequently, play a role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity. In summary, our data strongly support the hypothesis of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on Mia40, in controlling APE1 translocation into the mitochondrial inner membrane space and thus highlight the role of this protein transport pathway in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA stability and cell survival. PMID:25956655

  9. Visual predictions in the orbitofrontal cortex rely on associative content.

    PubMed

    Chaumon, Maximilien; Kveraga, Kestutis; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Bar, Moshe

    2014-11-01

    Predicting upcoming events from incomplete information is an essential brain function. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) plays a critical role in this process by facilitating recognition of sensory inputs via predictive feedback to sensory cortices. In the visual domain, the OFC is engaged by low spatial frequency (LSF) and magnocellular-biased inputs, but beyond this, we know little about the information content required to activate it. Is the OFC automatically engaged to analyze any LSF information for meaning? Or is it engaged only when LSF information matches preexisting memory associations? We tested these hypotheses and show that only LSF information that could be linked to memory associations engages the OFC. Specifically, LSF stimuli activated the OFC in 2 distinct medial and lateral regions only if they resembled known visual objects. More identifiable objects increased activity in the medial OFC, known for its function in affective responses. Furthermore, these objects also increased the connectivity of the lateral OFC with the ventral visual cortex, a crucial region for object identification. At the interface between sensory, memory, and affective processing, the OFC thus appears to be attuned to the associative content of visual information and to play a central role in visuo-affective prediction. PMID:23771980

  10. Estimation of the impact of warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range on stroke and major bleeding rates and its influence on the medical cost avoidance associated with novel oral anticoagulant use-learnings from ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Deitelzweig, Steve; Jing, Yonghua; Makenbaeva, Dinara; Wiederkehr, Daniel; Lin, Jay; Graham, John

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin's time-in-therapeutic range (TTR) is highly variable among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of variations in wafarin's TTR on rates of stroke/systemic embolism (SSE) and major bleedings among NVAF patients in the ARISTOTLE, ROCKET-AF, and RE-LY trials. Additionally, differences in medical costs for clinical endpoints when novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used instead of warfarin at different TTR values were estimated. Quartile ranges of TTR values and corresponding event rates (%/patient - year = %/py) of SSE and major bleedings among NVAF patients treated with warfarin were estimated from published literature and FDA documents. The associations of SSE and major bleeding rates with TTR values were evaluated by regression analysis and then the calculated regression coefficients were used in analysis of medical cost differences associated with use of each NOAC versus warfarin (2010 costs; US payer perspective) at different TTRs. Each 10 % increase in warfarin's TTR correlated with a -0.32%/py decrease in SSE rate (R(2) = 0.61; p < 0.001). Although, the rate of major bleedings decreased as TTR increased, it was not significant (-0.035%/py, p = 0.63). As warfarin's TTR increased from 30 to 90% the estimated medical cost decreased from -$902 to -$83 for apixaban, from -$506 to +$314 for rivaroxaban, and from -$596 to +$223 for dabigatran. Among NVAF patients there is a significant negative correlation between warfarin's TTR and SSE rate, but not major bleedings. The variations in warfarin's TTR impacted the economic comparison of use of individual NOACs versus warfarin. PMID:24477787

  11. Qui sera le nouvel Einstein ? Vers une nouvelle theorie de la gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J. M.

    1999-10-01

    Un debat de plus d'un siecle a resurgi ces toutes dernieres annees avec une vigueur nouvelle. L'enjeu ? Mettre fin, ni plus ni moins, a l'une des contradictions les plus inouies de la physique fondamentale, en reconciliant mecanique quantique et relativite generale. En effet, a l'heure ou la gravitation semble enfin sur le point de fusionner avec les trois autres forces de la nature. il est certain que la relativite d'Einstein doit etre bientot remplacer par une autre theorie... Reste quye tous les physiciens sont loin de s'accorder sur la marche a suivree. Gravitation quantique, relativite d'echelle, supersymetrie, les candidates ne manquent pas.

  12. Brazilian Federal Police drug chemical profiling - the PeQui project.

    PubMed

    Zacca, Jorge J; Botelho, Elvio Dias; Vieira, Maurício L; Almeida, Fernanda L A; Ferreira, Luciana S; Maldaner, Adriano O

    2014-07-01

    Over the past six years the Brazilian Federal Police has undertaken major efforts in order to implement and to develop its own drug chemical profiling program. This paper aims to provide a broad perspective regarding the managerial strategies and some examples of subsequent technical issues involved in the implementation of such a project. Close collaboration with local drug enforcement and investigation teams, establishment of proper worldwide partnerships with well recognized institutions in the field of drug analysis and the attainment of suitable funding and human resources are shown to be key success factors. Some preliminary results concerning the chemical profile of cocaine seizures in Brazil during this process are presented. PMID:25002048

  13. Who Cares for Children? Notes, Comments... No. 188 = Les enfants, qui s'en soucie?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    The finding of positive effects of developmentally sensitive interaction on children's physical health is discussed and expanded in terms of five propositions. The first is that development requires participation in progressively more complex reciprocal activities on a regular basis over an extended period of time, with at least one person…

  14. "Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes?" The Review of the Australian Universities Quality Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmur, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    A review of the performance of the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) was undertaken in 2005-2006. It was commissioned by AUQA and the review report was published in May 2006. This article explores whether the AUQA review can be regarded internationally as an exemplar and thus used with confidence by governments or other principals as a…

  15. Le verbe qui vole; mot de l'enterprete (The Flying Verb; The Interpreter's Word)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romer, Therese

    1975-01-01

    After a brief discussion on the nature of the interpreter's work, a survey is made of the beginnings of interpreting as a profession in 1953 and its growth since then in North America and Europe. Attention is called to the problem of incompetence brought about by the growing number of interpreters; and to the need for professional interpreter…

  16. Tools for the job: why relying on risk assessment tools is still a risky business.

    PubMed

    Webb, L

    2012-03-01

    This theoretical review paper examines the applicability of assessment tools, guidelines and protocols in mental health and substance use care on the basis of the construction of such tools and their reliance on aggregate and actuarial methodologies. Evidence-based practice leads clinicians to increasing reliance on tools for assessment of health status, risk and prediction for a range of clinical needs for individual clients. In the longer-term management of people with enduring and chronic mental health and substance misuse problems, clinicians are often dealing with complex and unstable health needs. The tools available, however, are developed on the basis of majority population evidence and on presumptions of similarity and stability over time. This paper provides explanation of the basis for the development of such tools and argues that clinicians need to be able to evaluate the applicability of tools used for their clients and not just evaluate the internal validity of the tools used to make individual and contextual decisions about individual clients. PMID:22070462

  17. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  18. Hyperaccumulator Alyssum Murale Relies on a Different Metal Storage Mechanism for Cobalt than for Nickel.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nickel hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale has been developed as a commercial crop for phytoremediation/phytomining Ni-enriched soils (anthropogenic/geogenic) containing elevated concentrations of other metals. Metal co-tolerance, accumulation, and localization were investigated for Alyssum exposed to c...

  19. Relying on fin erosion to identify hatchery-reared brown trout in a Tennessee river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meerbeek, Jonathan R.; Bettoli, Phillip William

    2012-01-01

    Hatchery-induced fin erosion can be used to identify recently stocked catchable-size brown trout Salmo trutta during annual surveys to qualitatively estimate contributions to a fishery. However, little is known about the longevity of this mark and its effectiveness as a short-term (≤ 1 year) mass-marking technique. We evaluated hatchery-induced pectoral fin erosion as a mass-marking technique for short-term stocking evaluations by stocking microtagged brown trout in a tailwater and repeatedly sampling those fish to observe and measure their pectoral fins. At Dale Hollow National Fish Hatchery, 99.1% (228 of 230) of microtagged brown trout in outdoor concrete raceways had eroded pectoral fins 1 d prior to stocking. Between 34 and 68 microtagged and 26-35 wild brown trout were collected during eight subsequent electrofishing samples. In a blind test based on visual examination of pectoral fins at up to 322 d poststocking, one observer correctly identified 91.7% to 100.0% (mean of 96.9%) of microtagged brown trout prior to checking for microtags. In the laboratory, pectoral fin length and width measurements were recorded to statistically compare the fin measurements of wild and microtagged hatchery brown trout. With only one exception, all pectoral fin measurements on each date averaged significantly larger for wild trout than for microtagged brown trout. Based on the number of pectoral fin measurements falling below 95% prediction intervals, 93.7% (148 of 158) of microtagged trout were correctly identified as hatchery fish based on regression models up to 160 d poststocking. Only 72.2% (70 of 97) of microtagged trout were identified correctly after 160 d based on pectoral fin measurements and the regression models. We concluded that visual examination of pectoral fin erosion was a very effective way to identify stocked brown trout for up to 322 d poststocking.

  20. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, K-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  1. Analysis of nanoporous membrane fouling relying on experimental observation and theoretical model for landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Peyravi, Majid; Shafaei, Nader; Mirani, Hatef

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the fouling behaviour of the ultrafiltration membrane for landfill leachate treatment. Natural organic matter fouling is considered a critical factor controlling the membrane performance. In this regard, the polyethersulphone nanoporous membrane was fabricated by phase inversion. In order to investigate the effects of operating conditions on fouling, landfilled leachate treatment was done at different transmembrane pressure and feed concentration. At high concentration of landfill leachate, the effect of operating pressure can be negligible. The maximum amount of RFR was 0.961 for raw landfill leachate. Flux decline data were also obtained for the filtration of landfill leachate. The rates of flux decline drastically dropped to about 46-48% of the initial values in the first 30 minutes of the experiment at all the examined pressures. The data were also analyzed using a model in order to provide explanations for simultaneous pore blockage and cake formation. The model showed very good agreement with the data for all transmembrane pressures and feed concentrations. The initial fouling due to pore blockage is related to the feed concentration at constant pressure, so by diluting the feed concentration, the effect of pore blocking was increased. PMID:26744929

  2. Relies of reconciliation: the Confederate Museum and Civil War memory in the New South.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Reiko

    2011-11-01

    This article examines the Confederate Memorial Literary Society (CMLS), an organization of elite white women in Richmond, Virginia who founded the Confederate Museum in the 1890s. Faced with the plunder of Civil War relics and cultural homogenization on northern terms, the CMLS founded the Confederate Museum to document and defend the Confederate cause and to uphold the antebellum mores that the New South's business ethos threatened to erode. In the end, however, the museum's version of the Lost Cause served the New South. By focusing on military sacrifice, the Confederate Museum aided the process of sectional reconciliation. By depicting slavery as benevolent, the museum's exhibits reinforced the notion that Jim Crow was a just and effective means of managing postwar southern society. Lastly, by glorifying the common soldier and portraying the South as "solid," the museum promoted obedience to the mandates of industrial capitalism. Thus, the Confederate Museum both critiqued and eased the economic transformations of the New South. PMID:22400484

  3. Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Kelly M; Clemens, Jan; Berman, Gordon J; Murthy, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Many animal species, including insects, are capable of acoustic duetting, a complex social behavior in which males and females tightly control the rate and timing of their courtship song syllables relative to each other. The mechanisms underlying duetting remain largely unknown across model systems. Most studies of duetting focus exclusively on acoustic interactions, but the use of multisensory cues should aid in coordinating behavior between individuals. To test this hypothesis, we develop Drosophila virilis as a new model for studies of duetting. By combining sensory manipulations, quantitative behavioral assays, and statistical modeling, we show that virilis females combine precisely timed auditory and tactile cues to drive song production and duetting. Tactile cues delivered to the abdomen and genitalia play the larger role in females, as even headless females continue to coordinate song production with courting males. These data, therefore, reveal a novel, non-acoustic, mechanism for acoustic duetting. Finally, our results indicate that female-duetting circuits are not sexually differentiated, as males can also produce 'female-like' duets in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26046297

  4. To what extent does organic farming rely on nutrient inflows from conventional farming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Benjamin; Nesme, Thomas; David, Christophe; Pellerin, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    Organic farming is increasingly recognized as a prototype for sustainable agriculture. Its guidelines ban the use of artificial fertilizers. However, organic farms may import nutrients from conventional farming through material exchanges. In this study, we aimed at estimating the magnitude of these flows through the quantification of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium inflows from conventional farming to organic farming. Material inflows and outflows were collected for two cropping years on 63 farms. The farms were located in three French agricultural districts distributed over a gradient of farming activity defined by both the stocking rate and the ratio of the farm area under arable crops. Our results showed that on average, inflows from conventional farming were 23%, 73% and 53% for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, respectively. These inflows were strongly determined by the farm production systems. However, for farms similar in terms of production systems, the inflows also depended on the local context, such as the proximity of organic livestock farms: the reliance of organic farming on conventional farming was lower in mixed than in specialized districts. These results highlight the necessity to quantify the contribution of nutrient inflows from conventional farming when assessing organic farming and development scenarios.

  5. Paperless strategies rely on document imaging. Document imaging provides a bridge to the paperless hospital.

    PubMed

    Rogoski, Richard R

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals that have tried to shed their reliance on paper have found the task fraught with challenges. Some have found that document imaging provides a useful interim step in meeting their goal. PMID:21309338

  6. Evaluating Parental Disagreement In ADHD Diagnosis: Can We Rely On A Single Report From Home?

    PubMed

    Caye, Arthur; Machado, Julia D; Rohde, Luís A

    2013-10-01

    Objective: Few studies assessed factors associated with the agreement/disagreement between fathers and mothers when rating ADHD symptoms of their offspring. Method: Teachers and both parents assessed a referred sample of 98 children and adolescents aged 6 to 16 years (M age = 9.79, SD = 2.59) using the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham (SNAP-IV) rating scale. The agreement was assessed for each of the items of the scale and correlated with variables measuring children's features, socioeconomic adversity, family functioning, and parental psychopathology. Results: Mean agreement between parents was moderate for the inattentive and good for the hyperactive-impulsive construct. Mothers tended to report more symptoms than fathers. The agreement was lower in those families where parents had discrepant educational levels. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a significant cross-informant disagreement between parents on symptoms of ADHD. Discrepant parental education has a relevant role in explaining parental disagreement in reporting ADHD symptoms. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) XX-XX). PMID:24097846

  7. Engineering Signaling Aptamers That Rely on Kinetic Rather Than Equilibrium Competition.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Bingling; Byrom, Michelle; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D

    2016-02-16

    During the past decade, aptasensors have largely been designed on the basis of the notion that ligand-modulated equilibration between aptamer conformations could be exploited for sensing. One implementation of this strategy has been to denature the aptamer with an antisense oligonucleotide, wait for dissociation of the antisense oligonucleotide, and stabilize the folded, signaling conformer with a ligand. However, there is a large kinetic barrier associated with releasing the oligonucleotide from the aptamer to again obtain an active, binding conformation. If the length of the antisense oligonucleotide is decreased to make dissociation from the aptamer more favorable, higher background signals are observed. To improve the general methodology for developing aptasensors, we have developed a novel and robust strategy for aptasensor design in which an oligonucleotide kinetically competes with the ligand for binding rather than having to be released from a stable duplex. While the oligonucleotide can induce conformational change, it initially chooses between the aptamer and a molecular beacon (MB), a process that does not require a lengthy pre-equilibration. Using an anti-ricin aptamer as a starting point, we developed a "competitive" aptasensor with a measured limit of detection (LOD) of 30 nM with an optical readout and as low as 3 nM for ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) detection on an electrochemical platform. PMID:26750592

  8. Microsporidia Intracellular Development Relies on Myc Interaction Network Transcription Factors in the Host

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Michael R.; Cohen, Lianne B.; Probert, Christopher S.; Wu, Fengting; Troemel, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites that infect a wide range of animal hosts, and these fungal-related microbes undergo their entire replicative lifecycle inside of host cells. Despite being widespread in the environment and causing medical and agricultural harm, virtually nothing is known about the host factors important to facilitate their growth and development inside of host cells. Here, we perform a genetic screen to identify host transcription factors important for development of the microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii inside intestinal cells of its natural host, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Through this screen, we identified the C. elegans Myc family of transcription factors as key host regulators of microsporidia growth and development. The Mad-like transcription factor MDL-1, and the Max-like transcription factors MXL-1 and MXL-2 promote pathogen levels, while the Myc-Mondo-like transcription factor MML-1 inhibits pathogen levels. We used epistasis analysis to show that MDL-1 and MXL-1, which are thought to function as a heterodimer, appear to be acting canonically. In contrast, MXL-2 and MML-1, which are also thought to function as a heterodimer, appear to be acting in separate pathways (noncanonically) in the context of pathogen infection. We also found that both MDL-1::GFP and MML-1::GFP are expressed in intestinal cells during infection. These findings provide novel insight into the host transcription factors that regulate microsporidia development. PMID:27402359

  9. A Portrait of Older Californians With Disabilities Who Rely on Public Services to Remain Independent

    PubMed Central

    KIETZMAN, KATHRYN G.; WALLACE, STEVEN P.; DURAZO, EVA M.; TORRES, JACQUELINE M.; CHOI, ANNE SOON; BENJAMIN, A. E.; MENDEZ-LUCK, CAROLYN

    2013-01-01

    Low-income older adults with disabilities in California depend on a variety of public programs to help them remain in their own homes. The availability of those services has been in flux since 2009 because of cuts caused by the recession. This article reports on a qualitative study of 33 California seniors who depend on fragile arrangements of paid and unpaid assistance. Thematic analyses of in-depth interviews conducted with these older adults and their caregivers indicate that the disability needs of these individuals are often unstable, with both physical and mental health status sometimes changing day to day. Most have nowhere else to turn for help if their public services are cut. All share the common goal of staying at home and maintaining their independence. Public services serve as a crucial link in the support networks of these individuals. PMID:23216515

  10. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Wang, Yuru; Le Roux, Julien; Yang, Yang; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal. PMID:24779765

  11. Heralding a Renaissance for Corporate America--Relying on the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    1984-01-01

    The key to an American corporate renaissance is the development of "participation management" skills and environments that allow for the full use of ideas that arise from within the corporation itself. Companies must relearn to trust their people and encourage them to use neglected creative capacities. (Author/MLW)

  12. Evolution of a thienopyrimidine antitubercular relying on medicinal chemistry and metabolomics insights#

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-Gang; Vilchèze, Catherine; Chakraborty, Sumit; Wang, Xin; Kim, Hiyun; Anisetti, Monica; Ekins, Sean; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Jacobs, William R.; Freundlich, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic instability of an antitubercular small molecule CD117 was addressed through iterative alteration of a key sulfide substituent and interrogation of the effect on growth inhibition of cultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This process was informed by studies of the intramycobacterial metabolism of CD117 and its inactive carboxylic acid derivative. Isoxazole 4e and thiazole 4m demonstrated significant gains in mouse liver microsomal stability with slight losses in whole-cell activity. This work illustrates the challenges of antitubercular hit evolution, requiring a balance of chemical and biological insights. PMID:26257441

  13. Delayed Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice Relies on Intrinsic Glutathione Resource

    PubMed Central

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in β-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer. PMID:20696779

  14. Gustatory Habituation in "Drosophila" Relies on "Rutabaga" (Adenylate Cyclase)-Dependent Plasticity of GABAergic Inhibitory Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paranjpe, Pushkar; Rodrigues, Veronica; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani

    2012-01-01

    In some situations, animals seem to ignore stimuli which in other contexts elicit a robust response. This attenuation in behavior, which enables animals to ignore a familiar, unreinforced stimulus, is called habituation. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, it is generally poorly understood in terms of the underlying neural circuitry. Hungry…

  15. Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Kelly M; Clemens, Jan; Berman, Gordon J; Murthy, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Many animal species, including insects, are capable of acoustic duetting, a complex social behavior in which males and females tightly control the rate and timing of their courtship song syllables relative to each other. The mechanisms underlying duetting remain largely unknown across model systems. Most studies of duetting focus exclusively on acoustic interactions, but the use of multisensory cues should aid in coordinating behavior between individuals. To test this hypothesis, we develop Drosophila virilis as a new model for studies of duetting. By combining sensory manipulations, quantitative behavioral assays, and statistical modeling, we show that virilis females combine precisely timed auditory and tactile cues to drive song production and duetting. Tactile cues delivered to the abdomen and genitalia play the larger role in females, as even headless females continue to coordinate song production with courting males. These data, therefore, reveal a novel, non-acoustic, mechanism for acoustic duetting. Finally, our results indicate that female-duetting circuits are not sexually differentiated, as males can also produce ‘female-like’ duets in a context-dependent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07277.001 PMID:26046297

  16. Desiccation Tolerance in the Tardigrade Richtersius coronifer Relies on Muscle Mediated Structural Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Jørgensen, Aslak; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    Life unfolds within a framework of constraining abiotic factors, yet some organisms are adapted to handle large fluctuations in physical and chemical parameters. Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans well known for their ability to endure hostile conditions, such as complete desiccation – a phenomenon called anhydrobiosis. During dehydration, anhydrobiotic animals undergo a series of anatomical changes. Whether this reorganization is an essential regulated event mediated by active controlled processes, or merely a passive result of the dehydration process, has not been clearly determined. Here, we investigate parameters pivotal to the formation of the so-called "tun", a state that in tardigrades and rotifers marks the entrance into anhydrobiosis. Estimation of body volume in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer reveals an 87 % reduction in volume from the hydrated active state to the dehydrated tun state, underlining the structural stress associated with entering anhydrobiosis. Survival experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial energy production and muscle contractions show that i) mitochondrial energy production is a prerequisite for surviving desiccation, ii) uncoupling the mitochondria abolishes tun formation, and iii) inhibiting the musculature impairs the ability to form viable tuns. We moreover provide a comparative analysis of the structural changes involved in tun formation, using a combination of cytochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions as well as scanning electron microscopy. Our data reveal that the musculature mediates a structural reorganization vital for anhydrobiotic survival, and furthermore that maintaining structural integrity is essential for resumption of life following rehydration. PMID:24391987

  17. Monkeys Rely on Recency of Stimulus Repetition When Solving Short-Term Memory Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittig, John H., Jr.; Richmond, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Seven monkeys performed variants of two short-term memory tasks that others have used to differentiate between selective and nonselective memory mechanisms. The first task was to view a list of sequentially presented images and identify whether a test matched any image from the list, but not a distractor from a preceding list. Performance was best…

  18. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  19. Towards improved exact exchange functionals relying on G W quasiparticle methods for parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.

    2015-07-01

    We use fully self-consistent GW calculations on diamond and silicon carbide to reparametrize the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) exact exchange density functional for use in band structure calculations of semiconductors and insulators. We show that the thus modified functional is able to calculate the band structure of bulk Si, Ge, GaAs, and CdTe with good quantitative accuracy at a significantly reduced computational cost as compared to G W methods, and also gives significantly improved band gap predictions in wide-gap ionic crystals as compared to the HSE06 parametrization. We discuss the limitations of this functional in low dimensions by calculating the band structures of single-layer hexagonal BN and MoS2, and by demonstrating that the diameter scaling of curvature induced band gaps in single-walled carbon nanotubes is still physically incorrect using our functional; we consider possible remedies to this problem.

  20. Whom Do Centenarians Rely on for Support? Findings From the Second Heidelberg Centenarian Study.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Kathrin; Jopp, Daniela S; Park, Min-Kyung S; Rott, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed picture of the sources and types of informal support available to centenarians, depending on their housing and care arrangements. Participants were 112 centenarians and 96 primary contacts of centenarians enrolled in the population-based Second Heidelberg Centenarian Study. Findings indicate that children of centenarians were their primary source of support in daily life. Those without living children had overall less help. Most frequently reported was help with administrative tasks, regardless of centenarians' residence or living arrangement. All other types of help (e.g., with activities of daily living and housework) were reported by about one-third and were mostly provided by children; centenarians without children were more likely to have friends/neighbors involved in some of these tasks. The one category reported by a third of the centenarians regardless of residence, living arrangements, or presence of a child was help with socializing/companionship. Findings constitute an important step toward identifying and meeting the support needs of centenarians and their families. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:26959657

  1. Detecting Bias in Meta-Analyses of Distance Education Research: Big Pictures We Can Rely On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robert M.; Borokhovski, Eugene; Tamim, Rana M.

    2014-01-01

    This article has two interrelated purposes. The first is to explain how various forms of bias, if introduced during any stage of a meta-analysis, can provide the consumer with a misimpression of the state of a research literature. Five of the most important bias-producing aspects of a meta-analysis are presented and discussed. Second, armed with…

  2. Cellular mechanotransduction relies on tension-induced and chaperone-assisted autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Anna; Eppler, Felix J; Tapia, Victor E; van der Ven, Peter F M; Hampe, Nico; Hersch, Nils; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Stadel, Daniela; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul; Behrends, Christian; Fürst, Dieter O; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kolanus, Waldemar; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical tension is an ever-present physiological stimulus essential for the development and homeostasis of locomotory, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Tension sensing contributes to stem cell differentiation, immune cell recruitment, and tumorigenesis. Yet, how mechanical signals are transduced inside cells remains poorly understood. Here, we identify chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) as a tension-induced autophagy pathway essential for mechanotransduction in muscle and immune cells. The CASA complex, comprised of the molecular chaperones Hsc70 and HspB8 and the cochaperone BAG3, senses the mechanical unfolding of the actin-crosslinking protein filamin. Together with the chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP, the complex initiates the ubiquitin-dependent autophagic sorting of damaged filamin to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagosome formation during CASA depends on an interaction of BAG3 with synaptopodin-2 (SYNPO2). This interaction is mediated by the BAG3 WW domain and facilitates cooperation with an autophagosome membrane fusion complex. BAG3 also utilizes its WW domain to engage in YAP/TAZ signaling. Via this pathway, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription to maintain actin anchoring and crosslinking under mechanical tension. By integrating tension sensing, autophagosome formation, and transcription regulation during mechanotransduction, the CASA machinery ensures tissue homeostasis and regulates fundamental cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, and proliferation. PMID:23434281

  3. Single-Molecule Motions of MHC Class II Rely on Bound Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kozono, Haruo; Matsushita, Yufuku; Ogawa, Naoki; Kozono, Yuko; Miyabe, Toshihiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto; Kanagawa, Osami; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II protein can bind peptides of different lengths in the region outside the peptide-binding groove. Peptide-flanking residues (PFRs) contribute to the binding affinity of the peptide for MHC and change the immunogenicity of the peptide/MHC complex with regard to T cell receptor (TCR). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are currently unknown. The molecular flexibility of the peptide/MHC complex may be an important determinant of the structures recognized by certain T cells. We used single-molecule x-ray analysis (diffracted x-ray tracking (DXT)) and fluorescence anisotropy to investigate these mechanisms. DXT enabled us to monitor the real-time Brownian motion of the peptide/MHC complex and revealed that peptides without PFRs undergo larger rotational motions than peptides with PFRs. Fluorescence anisotropy further revealed that peptides without PFRs exhibit slightly larger motions on the nanosecond timescale. These results demonstrate that peptides without PFRs undergo dynamic motions in the groove of MHC and consequently are able to assume diverse structures that can be recognized by T cells. PMID:25606683

  4. Portable paper-based device for quantitative colorimetric assays relying on light reflectance principle.

    PubMed

    Li, Bowei; Fu, Longwen; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a novel paper-based analytical device based on the colorimetric paper assays through its light reflectance. The device is portable, low cost (<20 dollars), and lightweight (only 176 g) that is available to assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of the original health care or on-site detection information. Based on the light reflectance principle, the signal can be obtained directly, stably and user-friendly in our device. We demonstrated the utility and broad applicability of this technique with measurements of different biological and pollution target samples (BSA, glucose, Fe, and nitrite). Moreover, the real samples of Fe (II) and nitrite in the local tap water were successfully analyzed, and compared with the standard UV absorption method, the quantitative results showed good performance, reproducibility, and reliability. This device could provide quantitative information very conveniently and show great potential to broad fields of resource-limited analysis, medical diagnostics, and on-site environmental detection. PMID:24375226

  5. A Multiple-Choice Mushroom: Schools, Colleges Rely More than Ever on Standardized Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    1995-01-01

    This discussion of college entrance examinations reviews differences between the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the American College Test. It then focuses on the SAT, discussing numbers of students taking the tests, changes in test construction to recognize contributions of women and minorities, involvement of African Americans in…

  6. Self-awareness in neurodegenerative disease relies on neural structures mediating reward-driven attention.

    PubMed

    Shany-Ur, Tal; Lin, Nancy; Rosen, Howard J; Sollberger, Marc; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2014-08-01

    Accurate self-awareness is essential for adapting one's tasks and goals to one's actual abilities. Patients with neurodegenerative diseases, particularly those with right frontal involvement, often present with poor self-awareness of their functional limitations that may exacerbate their already jeopardized decision-making and behaviour. We studied the structural neuroanatomical basis for impaired self-awareness among patients with neurodegenerative disease and healthy older adults. One hundred and twenty-four participants (78 patients with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, right-temporal frontotemporal dementia, semantic variant and non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia, and 46 healthy controls) described themselves on the Patient Competency Rating Scale, rating observable functioning across four domains (daily living activities, cognitive, emotional control, interpersonal). All participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. Informants also described subjects' functioning on the same scale. Self-awareness was measured by comparing self and informant ratings. Group differences in discrepancy scores were analysed using general linear models, controlling for age, sex and disease severity. Compared with controls, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia overestimated their functioning in all domains, patients with Alzheimer's disease overestimated cognitive and emotional functioning, patients with right-temporal frontotemporal dementia overestimated interpersonal functioning, and patients with non-fluent aphasia overestimated emotional and interpersonal functioning. Patients with semantic variant aphasia did not overestimate functioning on any domain. To examine the neuroanatomic correlates of impaired self-awareness, discrepancy scores were correlated with brain volume using voxel-based morphometry. To identify the unique neural correlates of overlooking versus exaggerating deficits, overestimation and underestimation scores were analysed separately, controlling for age, sex, total intracranial volume and extent of actual functional decline. Atrophy related to overestimating one's functioning included bilateral, right greater than left frontal and subcortical regions, including dorsal superior and middle frontal gyri, lateral and medial orbitofrontal gyri, right anterior insula, putamen, thalamus, and caudate, and midbrain and pons. Thus, our patients' tendency to under-represent their functional decline was related to degeneration of domain-general dorsal frontal regions involved in attention, as well as orbitofrontal and subcortical regions likely involved in assigning a reward value to self-related processing and maintaining accurate self-knowledge. The anatomic correlates of underestimation (right rostral anterior cingulate cortex, uncorrected significance level) were distinct from overestimation and had a substantially smaller effect size. This suggests that underestimation or 'tarnishing' may be influenced by non-structural neurobiological and sociocultural factors, and should not be considered to be on a continuum with overestimation or 'polishing' of functional capacity, which appears to be more directly mediated by neural circuit dysfunction. PMID:24951639

  7. The "contemporary synthesis": when politically inclusive genomic science relies on biological notions of race.

    PubMed

    Fullwiley, Duana

    2014-12-01

    This essay outlines the emergence of a contemporary synthesis regarding racial thinking in genetic science and in society more broadly. A departure from what Julian Huxley in 1942 termed the "modern synthesis," the contemporary version does not purport to leave race thinking behind in favor of evolution, population genetics, and population-based accounts of natural selection and human diversity. Specifically, the contemporary synthesis blends old concepts (such as that of pure human "types," located within continental land masses) with new attitudes (democratic inclusion, multicultural diversity, and anti-racism). Through various examples, the essay shows how this new synthesis combines ideas about human biological difference that draw on measures of physical characteristics and human genetic material that are both race and population based, yet conflated. This specific amalgam allows old notions of racial types to thrive through conceptual framings that comprise ideas that were once imagined to have the potential to liberate society from racial thinking--and that today remain attached to ideas of progress. As an emergent dynamic, the contemporary synthesis holds the possibility of reinvigorating racism, while simultaneously possessing the potential to promote antiracist science education, disease awareness, and social justice efforts. PMID:25665387

  8. Motor learning and cross-limb transfer rely upon distinct neural adaptation processes.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Tino; Carroll, Timothy J; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Performance benefits conferred in the untrained limb after unilateral motor practice are termed cross-limb transfer. Although the effect is robust, the neural mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study we used noninvasive brain stimulation to reveal that the neural adaptations that mediate motor learning in the trained limb are distinct from those that underlie cross-limb transfer to the opposite limb. Thirty-six participants practiced a ballistic motor task with their right index finger (150 trials), followed by intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to the trained (contralateral) primary motor cortex (cM1 group), the untrained (ipsilateral) M1 (iM1 group), or the vertex (sham group). After stimulation, another 150 training trials were undertaken. Motor performance and corticospinal excitability were assessed before motor training, pre- and post-iTBS, and after the second training bout. For all groups, training significantly increased performance and excitability of the trained hand, and performance, but not excitability, of the untrained hand, indicating transfer at the level of task performance. The typical facilitatory effect of iTBS on MEPs was reversed for cM1, suggesting homeostatic metaplasticity, and prior performance gains in the trained hand were degraded, suggesting that iTBS interfered with learning. In stark contrast, iM1 iTBS facilitated both performance and excitability for the untrained hand. Importantly, the effects of cM1 and iM1 iTBS on behavior were exclusive to the hand contralateral to stimulation, suggesting that adaptations within the untrained M1 contribute to cross-limb transfer. However, the neural processes that mediate learning in the trained hemisphere vs. transfer in the untrained hemisphere appear distinct. PMID:27169508

  9. Redundant mechanisms to form silent chromatin at pericentromeric regions rely on BEND3 and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Saksouk, Nehmé; Barth, Teresa K; Ziegler-Birling, Celine; Olova, Nelly; Nowak, Agnieszka; Rey, Elodie; Mateos-Langerak, Julio; Urbach, Serge; Reik, Wolf; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Imhof, Axel; Déjardin, Jérome; Simboeck, Elisabeth

    2014-11-20

    Constitutive heterochromatin is typically defined by high levels of DNA methylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9Me3), whereas facultative heterochromatin displays DNA hypomethylation and high H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27Me3). The two chromatin types generally do not coexist at the same loci, suggesting mutual exclusivity. During development or in cancer, pericentromeric regions can adopt either epigenetic state, but the switching mechanism is unknown. We used a quantitative locus purification method to characterize changes in pericentromeric chromatin-associated proteins in mouse embryonic stem cells deficient for either the methyltransferases required for DNA methylation or H3K9Me3. DNA methylation controls heterochromatin architecture and inhibits Polycomb recruitment. BEND3, a protein enriched on pericentromeric chromatin in the absence of DNA methylation or H3K9Me3, allows Polycomb recruitment and H3K27Me3, resulting in a redundant pathway to generate repressive chromatin. This suggests that BEND3 is a key factor in mediating a switch from constitutive to facultative heterochromatin. PMID:25457167

  10. Mitochondrial permeabilization relies on BH3 ligands engaging multiple prosurvival Bcl-2 relatives, not Bak.

    PubMed

    Uren, Rachel T; Dewson, Grant; Chen, Lin; Coyne, Stephanie C; Huang, David C S; Adams, Jerry M; Kluck, Ruth M

    2007-04-23

    The Bcl-2 family regulates apoptosis by controlling mitochondrial integrity. To clarify whether its prosurvival members function by sequestering their Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only ligands or their multidomain relatives Bak and Bax, we analyzed whether four prosurvival proteins differing in their ability to bind specific BH3 peptides or Bak could protect isolated mitochondria. Most BH3 peptides could induce temperature-dependent cytochrome c release, but permeabilization was prevented by Bcl-x(L), Bcl-w, Mcl-1, or BHRF1. However, their protection correlated with the ability to bind Bak rather than the added BH3 peptide and could be overcome only by BH3 peptides that bind directly to the appropriate prosurvival member. Mitochondria protected by both Bcl-x(L)-like and Mcl-1 proteins were disrupted only by BH3 peptides that engage both. BH3-only reagents freed Bak from Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1 in mitochondrial and cell lysates. The findings support a model for the control of apoptosis in which certain prosurvival proteins sequester Bak/Bax, and BH3-only proteins must neutralize all protective prosurvival proteins to allow Bak/Bax to induce mitochondrial disruption. PMID:17452531

  11. "Depend on, Rely on, Count on": Economic Subjectivities Aboard "The Polar Express"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Christmas literature and film produced for children is an important, albeit under-researched, site for the production of cultural values and norms. This paper analyses Chris Van Allsburg's 1985 picture book "The Polar Express", the 2004 Warner Brothers feature film of the same title, the film's official website, and resources for teachers…

  12. An Esterification Kinetics Experiment that Relies on the Sense of Smell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromfield-Lee, Deborah C.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    This experiment involves an esterification synthesis to study reaction kinetics where students explore these topics utilizing the sense of smell rather than the traditional approach of using spectroscopic methods. Students study the effects of various factors including the concentration of the carboxylic acid and the amounts of the catalyst or…

  13. Determinants of cognitive performance in children relying on cyanogenic cassava as staple food

    PubMed Central

    Bumoko, G. M.; Sombo, M.T.; Okitundu, L.D.; Mumba, D. N.; Kazadi, K. T.; Tamfum-Muyembe, J.J.; Lasarev, M.R.; Boivin, M.J.; Banea, J.P; Tshala-Katumbay, D.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background While risk factors for konzo are known, determinants of cognitive impairment in konzo-affected children remain unknown. Method We anchored cognitive performance (KABC-II scores) to serum levels of free-thyroxine (free-T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), albumin, and motor proficiency (BOT-2 scores) in 40 children including 21 with konzo (median age: 9 years) and 19 without konzo (median age: 8 years). A multiple regression model was used to determine variables associated with changes in KABC-II scores. Results Age (β: − 0.818, 95%CI: − 1.48, − 0.152) (p=0.018), gender (β: − 5.72; 95% CI: − 9.87, −1.57 for females) (p=0.009), BOT-2 score (β: 0.390; 95% CI: 0.113, 0.667) (p=0.008), and free-T4 (β: 1.88; 95% CI: 0.009, 3.74) (p=0.049) explained 61.1% of variation in KABC-II scores. Subclinical hypothyroidism was not associated with poor cognition. A crude association was found between serum albumin and KABC-II scores (β: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.136, 2.39) (p=0.029). On spot urinary thiocyanate reached 688 μmol/l in children without konzo and 1032 μmol/L in those with konzo. Conclusion Female gender and low serum albumin are risk factors common to cognitive and proportionally associated motor deficits in children exposed to cassava cyanogens. The two types of deficits may share common mechanisms. PMID:24481810

  14. Microsporidia Intracellular Development Relies on Myc Interaction Network Transcription Factors in the Host.

    PubMed

    Botts, Michael R; Cohen, Lianne B; Probert, Christopher S; Wu, Fengting; Troemel, Emily R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites that infect a wide range of animal hosts, and these fungal-related microbes undergo their entire replicative lifecycle inside of host cells. Despite being widespread in the environment and causing medical and agricultural harm, virtually nothing is known about the host factors important to facilitate their growth and development inside of host cells. Here, we perform a genetic screen to identify host transcription factors important for development of the microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii inside intestinal cells of its natural host, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans Through this screen, we identified the C. elegans Myc family of transcription factors as key host regulators of microsporidia growth and development. The Mad-like transcription factor MDL-1, and the Max-like transcription factors MXL-1 and MXL-2 promote pathogen levels, while the Myc-Mondo-like transcription factor MML-1 inhibits pathogen levels. We used epistasis analysis to show that MDL-1 and MXL-1, which are thought to function as a heterodimer, appear to be acting canonically. In contrast, MXL-2 and MML-1, which are also thought to function as a heterodimer, appear to be acting in separate pathways (noncanonically) in the context of pathogen infection. We also found that both MDL-1::GFP and MML-1::GFP are expressed in intestinal cells during infection. These findings provide novel insight into the host transcription factors that regulate microsporidia development. PMID:27402359

  15. A comparison of three additive tree algorithms that rely on a least-squares loss criterion.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J

    1998-11-01

    The performances of three additive tree algorithms which seek to minimize a least-squares loss criterion were compared. The algorithms included the penalty-function approach of De Soete (1983), the iterative projection strategy of Hubert & Arabie (1995) and the two-stage ADDTREE algorithm, (Corter, 1982; Sattath & Tversky, 1977). Model fit, comparability of structure, processing time and metric recovery were assessed. Results indicated that the iterative projection strategy consistently located the best-fitting tree, but also displayed a wider range and larger number of local optima. PMID:9854946

  16. Rapid anti-pathogen response in ant societies relies on high genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ugelvig, Line V; Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen; Cremer, Sylvia

    2010-09-22

    Social organisms are constantly exposed to infectious agents via physical contact with conspecifics. While previous work has shown that disease susceptibility at the individual and group level is influenced by genetic diversity within and between group members, it remains poorly understood how group-level resistance to pathogens relates directly to individual physiology, defence behaviour and social interactions. We investigated the effects of high versus low genetic diversity on both the individual and collective disease defences in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. We compared the antiseptic behaviours (grooming and hygienic behaviour) of workers from genetically homogeneous and diverse colonies after exposure of their brood to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. While workers from diverse colonies performed intensive allogrooming and quickly removed larvae covered with live fungal spores from the nest, workers from homogeneous colonies only removed sick larvae late after infection. This difference was not caused by a reduced repertoire of antiseptic behaviours or a generally decreased brood care activity in ants from homogeneous colonies. Our data instead suggest that reduced genetic diversity compromises the ability of Cardiocondyla colonies to quickly detect or react to the presence of pathogenic fungal spores before an infection is established, thereby affecting the dynamics of social immunity in the colony. PMID:20444720

  17. Managing invasive fungal infections: relying on clinical instincts or on a rational navigation system?

    PubMed

    de Pauw, Ben E; Viscoli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The management of invasive fungal disease in the immunocompromised host is complex and requires the specialized knowledge of physicians whose primary interest is actually the underlying disease rather than infectious complications. This Supplement aims to provide these physicians with some tools that may help to guide them through the maze of suspicion that an invasive fungal disease is present by offering an integrated care pathway of rational patient management. Such pathways will inevitably vary in detail in different centres and depend for their success on the presence of multidisciplinary teams and an explicit agreement on at least the minimum requirements for effective management. The integrated care pathways presented constitute an objective instrument to allow regular audits for recognizing opportunities to change practice if and when weaknesses are identified. PMID:21177405

  18. An Unexpected Route to an Essential Cofactor: Escherichia coli Relies on Threonine for Thiamine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto, Jannell V.; Farley, Kristen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolism consists of biochemical reactions that are combined to generate a robust metabolic network that can respond to perturbations and also adapt to changing environmental conditions. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are closely related enterobacteria that share metabolic components, pathway structures, and regulatory strategies. The synthesis of thiamine in S. enterica has been used to define a node of the metabolic network by analyzing alternative inputs to thiamine synthesis from diverse metabolic pathways. To assess the conservation of metabolic networks in organisms with highly conserved components, metabolic contributions to thiamine synthesis in E. coli were investigated. Unexpectedly, we found that, unlike S. enterica, E. coli does not use the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase (PurF) as the primary enzyme for synthesis of phosphoribosylamine (PRA). In fact, our data showed that up to 50% of the PRA used by E. coli to make thiamine requires the activities of threonine dehydratase (IlvA) and anthranilate synthase component II (TrpD). Significantly, the IlvA- and TrpD-dependent pathway to PRA functions in S. enterica only in the absence of a functional reactive intermediate deaminase (RidA) enzyme, bringing into focus how these closely related bacteria have distinct metabolic networks. PMID:26733068

  19. Wide dispersal of aphid-pathogenic Entomophthorales among aphids relies upon migratory alates.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-Guang; Chen, Chun; Chen, Bin

    2004-05-01

    Entomophthoralean mycoses are of general importance in the natural control of aphids, but mechanisms involved in their dissemination are poorly understood. Despite several possible means of fungal survival, the dispersal of the mycoses in aphids has never been related to the flight of their migratory alates that are able to locate suitable host plants. In this study, aphid-pathogenic fungi proved to be widely disseminated among various aphids by their alates through migratory flight based on the following findings. First, up to 36.6% of the 7139 migratory alates (including nine species of vegetable or cereal aphids) trapped from air > 30 m above the ground in three provinces of China were found bearing eight species of fungal pathogens. Of those, six were aphid-specific Entomophthorales dominated in individual cases by Pandora neoaphidis, which occurs globally but has no resting spores discovered to date. Secondly, infected alates were confirmed to be able to fly for hours, to initiate colonies on plants after flight and to transmit fungal infection to their offspring in a laboratory experiment, in which 238 Sitobion avenae alates were individually flown in a computer-monitoring flight mill system after exposure to a spore shower of P. neoaphidis and then allowed to colonize host plants. PMID:15049924

  20. Video reframing relying on panoramic estimation based on a 3D representation of the scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Simon, Agnes; Figue, Jean; Nicolas, Henri

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for creating mosaic images from an original video and for computing a new sequence modifying some camera parameters like image size, scale factor, view angle... A mosaic image is a representation of the full scene observed by a moving camera during its displacement. It provides a wide angle of view of the scene from a sequence of images shot with a narrow angle of view camera. This paper proposes a method to create a virtual sequence from a calibrated original video and a rough 3D model of the scene. A 3D relationship between original and virtual images gives pixel correspondent in different images for a same 3D point in model scene. To texture the model with natural textures obtained in the original sequence, a criterion based on constraints related to the temporal variations of the background and 3D geometric considerations is used. Finally, in the presented method, the textured 3D model is used to recompute a new sequence of image with possibly different point of view and camera aperture angle. The algorithm is being proven with virtual sequences and, obtained results are encouraging up to now.

  1. First N-Heterocyclic Carbenes Relying on the Triazolone Structural Motif: Syntheses, Modifications and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Jonek, Markus; Diekmann, Janina; Ganter, Christian

    2015-10-26

    4-Phenylsemicarbazide and 1,5-diphenylcarbazide are suitable starting materials for the syntheses of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) compounds with new backbone structures. In the first case, cyclisation and subsequent methylation leads to a cationic precursor whose deprotonation affords the triazolon-ylidene 2, which was converted to the corresponding sulfur and selenium adducts and a range of metal complexes. In contrast, cyclisation of diphenylcarbazide affords a neutral betain-type NHC-precursor 7, which is not in equilibrium with its carbene tautomer 7a. Precursor 7 can either be deprotonated to give the anionic NHC 8 or methylated at the N or O atom of the backbone resulting in two isomeric cationic species 16 and 20. Deprotonation of the latter two provides neutral NHC compounds with a carboxamide or carboximidate backbone, respectively. The ligand properties of the new NHC compounds were evaluated by IR and (77) Se NMR spectroscopy. Tolman electronic parameter (TEP) values range from 2050 to 2063 cm(-1) with the anionic NHC 8 being the best overall donor. PMID:26395132

  2. Potential pitfalls of relying on hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production to identify Salmonella in feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella can be difficult to assess and isolate in poultry feed due to stress, uneven distribution and poor growth. Previous studies have shown that several strains of Salmonella can be affected by environmental changes, resulting in H2S-negative colonies. This is a major concern, as H2S productio...

  3. JET (3He)-D scenarios relying on RF heating: survey of selected recent experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Andrew, Y.; Biewer, T. M.; Casati, A.; Crombé, K.; de la Luna, E.; Ericsson, G.; Felton, R.; Giacomelli, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Joffrin, E.; Källne, J.; Kiptily, V.; Lomas, P.; Mantica, P.; Marinoni, A.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.; Puiatti, M.-E.; Santala, M.; Sharapov, S.; Valisa, M.; JET EFDA contributors

    2009-04-01

    Recent JET experiments have been devoted to the study of (3He)-D plasmas involving radio frequency (RF) heating. This paper starts by discussing the RF heating efficiency theoretically expected in such plasmas, covering both relevant aspects of wave and of particle dynamics. Then it gives a concise summary of the main conclusions drawn from recent experiments that were either focusing on studying RF heating physics aspects or that were adopting RF heating as a tool to study plasma behavior. Depending on the minority concentration chosen, different physical phenomena are observed. At very low concentration (X[3He] < 1%), energetic tails are formed which trigger MHD activity and result in loss of fast particles. Alfvén cascades were observed and gamma ray tomography indirectly shows the impact of sawtooth crashes on the fast particle orbits. Low concentration (X[3He] < 10%) favors minority heating while for X[3He] Gt 10% electron mode conversion damping becomes dominant. Evidence for the Fuchs et al standing wave effect (Fuchs et al 1995 Phys. Plasmas 2 1637-47) on the absorption is presented. RF induced deuterium tails were observed in mode conversion experiments with large X[3He] (≈18%). As tentative modeling shows, the formation of these tails can be explained as a consequence of wave power absorption by neutral beam particles that efficiently interact with the waves well away from the cold D cyclotron resonance position as a result of their substantial Doppler shift. As both ion and electron RF power deposition profiles in (3He)-D plasmas are fairly narrow—giving rise to localized heat sources—the RF heating method is an ideal tool for performing transport studies. Various of the experiments discussed here were done in plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs). ITBs are identified as regions with locally reduced diffusivity, where poloidal spinning up of the plasma is observed. The present know-how on the role of RF heating for impurity transport is also briefly summarized.

  4. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P.; Duong, Connie P. M.; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis–specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  5. Coupled level set segmentation using a point-based statistical shape model relying on correspondence probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, Heike; Ehrhardt, Jan; Pennec, Xavier; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we propose a unified statistical framework for image segmentation with shape prior information. The approach combines an explicitely parameterized point-based probabilistic statistical shape model (SSM) with a segmentation contour which is implicitly represented by the zero level set of a higher dimensional surface. These two aspects are unified in a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimation where the level set is evolved to converge towards the boundary of the organ to be segmented based on the image information while taking into account the prior given by the SSM information. The optimization of the energy functional obtained by the MAP formulation leads to an alternate update of the level set and an update of the fitting of the SSM. We then adapt the probabilistic SSM for multi-shape modeling and extend the approach to multiple-structure segmentation by introducing a level set function for each structure. During segmentation, the evolution of the different level set functions is coupled by the multi-shape SSM. First experimental evaluations indicate that our method is well suited for the segmentation of topologically complex, non spheric and multiple-structure shapes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by experiments on kidney segmentation as well as on hip joint segmentation in CT images.

  6. An axial displacement measurement relying on the double-helix light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yitian; Li, Shuai; Kuang, Cuifang; Xiu, Peng; Ge, Jianhong; Liu, Xu

    2014-07-01

    A novel method of axial displacement measurement based on the double-helix (DH) beam is proposed in this paper. The DH point spread function (DH-PSF) with two prominent lobes which consist of optical beam modes superposing with each other in the Gauss-Laguerre (GL) modal plane has the characteristic that the two lobes can rotate like a binary star about the center of each other in the propagation of the light beam. We figure out the axial displacement with the variation of the rotated angle of the connection line of the two lobes. In this method, a CCD and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) are used in a relatively reliable and simple experimental configuration, with which we can manage to realize high axial measuring resolution. One superb advantage is that the system is immune to the energy fluctuations of the laser source. As a result, the axial displacement measurement has a remarkable application prospect in modern engineering and scientific researches.

  7. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P; Duong, Connie P M; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-11-27

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis-specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of 17β-Estradiol Rely on Estrogen Receptor Membrane Initiated Signals

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchetti, Marco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Besides its crucial role in many physiological events, 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts protective effects in the central nervous system. The E2 effects are not restricted to the brain areas related with the control of reproductive function, but rather are widespread throughout the developing and the adult brain. E2 actions are mediated through estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ) belonging to the nuclear receptor super-family. As members of the ligand-regulated transcription factor family, classically, the actions of ERs in the brain were thought to mediate only the E2 long-term transcriptional effects. However, a growing body of evidence highlighted rapid, membrane initiated E2 effects in the brain that are independent of ER transcriptional activities and are involved in E2-induced neuroprotection. The aim of this review is to focus on the rapid effects of E2 in the brain highlighting the specific role of the signaling pathway(s) of the ERβ subtype in the neuroprotective actions of E2. PMID:22493583

  9. Rapid anti-pathogen response in ant societies relies on high genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ugelvig, Line V.; Kronauer, Daniel J. C.; Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen; Cremer, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Social organisms are constantly exposed to infectious agents via physical contact with conspecifics. While previous work has shown that disease susceptibility at the individual and group level is influenced by genetic diversity within and between group members, it remains poorly understood how group-level resistance to pathogens relates directly to individual physiology, defence behaviour and social interactions. We investigated the effects of high versus low genetic diversity on both the individual and collective disease defences in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. We compared the antiseptic behaviours (grooming and hygienic behaviour) of workers from genetically homogeneous and diverse colonies after exposure of their brood to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. While workers from diverse colonies performed intensive allogrooming and quickly removed larvae covered with live fungal spores from the nest, workers from homogeneous colonies only removed sick larvae late after infection. This difference was not caused by a reduced repertoire of antiseptic behaviours or a generally decreased brood care activity in ants from homogeneous colonies. Our data instead suggest that reduced genetic diversity compromises the ability of Cardiocondyla colonies to quickly detect or react to the presence of pathogenic fungal spores before an infection is established, thereby affecting the dynamics of social immunity in the colony. PMID:20444720

  10. During intense exercise, obese women rely more than lean women on aerobic energy.

    PubMed

    Ardévol, A; Adán, C; Franco, L; García-Lorda, P; Rubio, F; Remesar, X; Fernández-López, J A; Salas-Salvadó, J; Alemany, M

    1998-03-01

    A series of untrained, healthy, obese women (body mass index 32.5 +/- 0.9 kg.m-2) were subjected to a protocol of intense exercise on a cycloergometer and compared with lean controls (body mass index 20. 9 +/- 0.5 kg.m-2). Physiological parameters, blood lactate, bicarbonate, plasma metabolites, oxygen consumption and CO2 production were measured. Impedance-derived extracellular water and plasma changes in lactate and bicarbonate were used to determine changes in bicarbonate pools and lactate-displaced CO2. From these and respiratory gases, the respiratory quotient was calculated and thence overall fuel consumption. Anaerobic energy during exercise accounted for about 1.8% of all energy consumed in the lean but only 0.7% in the obese. Obese women fatigued at lower workloads and energy expenditure levels than did the lean, and their lactate buildup was similar when compared on the basis of fat-free mass. The data support the postulation of fatigue being triggered by a combination of factors: stretched cardiovascular work would be the main factor for obese women, in part limiting lactate production. For lean women, the triggering factor for fatigue could be the loss of buffering capacity; but it is the combination of stretching cardiovascular capacity, exhaustion of glycogen and available glucose and increase in lactate/loss of bicarbonate buffer that determines the onset of fatigue. PMID:9446696

  11. Potential for bias in epidemiologic studies that rely on glass-based retrospective assessment of radon.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, C R

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective assessment of exposure to radon remains the greatest challenge in epidemiologic efforts to assess lung cancer risk associated with residential exposure. An innovative technique based on measurement of alpha-emitting, long-lived daughters embedded by recoil into household glass may one day provide improved radon dosimetry. Particulate air pollution is known, however, to retard the plate-out of radon daughters. This would be expected to result in a differential effect on dosimetry, where the calibration curve relating the actual historical radon exposure to the remaining alpha-activity in the glass would be different in historically smoky and nonsmoky environments. The resulting "measurement confounding" can distort inferences about the effect of radon and can also produce spurious evidence for synergism between radon exposure and cigarette smoking. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8605854

  12. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  13. Extinction of cue-evoked drug-seeking relies on degrading hierarchical instrumental expectancies

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Lee; Retzler, Chris; Munafò, Marcus R.; Tran, Dominic M.D.; Troisi, Joseph R.; Rose, Abigail K.; Jones, Andrew; Field, Matt

    2014-01-01

    There has long been need for a behavioural intervention that attenuates cue-evoked drug-seeking, but the optimal method remains obscure. To address this, we report three approaches to extinguish cue-evoked drug-seeking measured in a Pavlovian to instrumental transfer design, in non-treatment seeking adult smokers and alcohol drinkers. The results showed that the ability of a drug stimulus to transfer control over a separately trained drug-seeking response was not affected by the stimulus undergoing Pavlovian extinction training in experiment 1, but was abolished by the stimulus undergoing discriminative extinction training in experiment 2, and was abolished by explicit verbal instructions stating that the stimulus did not signal a more effective response-drug contingency in experiment 3. These data suggest that cue-evoked drug-seeking is mediated by a propositional hierarchical instrumental expectancy that the drug-seeking response is more likely to be rewarded in that stimulus. Methods which degraded this hierarchical expectancy were effective in the laboratory, and so may have therapeutic potential. PMID:25011113

  14. Chunking Improves Symbolic Sequence Processing and Relies on Working Memory Gating Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solopchuk, Oleg; Alamia, Andrea; Olivier, Etienne; Zénon, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Chunking, namely the grouping of sequence elements in clusters, is ubiquitous during sequence processing, but its impact on performance remains debated. Here, we found that participants who adopted a consistent chunking strategy during symbolic sequence learning showed a greater improvement of their performance and a larger decrease in cognitive…

  15. Do Young and Older Adults Rely on Different Processes in Source Memory Tasks? A Neuropsychological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisky, Elizabeth L.; Kong, Lauren L.

    2008-01-01

    Source memory has consistently been associated with prefrontal function in both normal and clinical populations. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of this brain region to source memory remains uncertain, and evidence suggests that processes used by young and older adults may differ. The authors explored the extent to which scores on composite…

  16. Plant tolerance to excess light energy and photooxidative damage relies on plastoquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ksas, Brigitte; Becuwe, Noëlle; Chevalier, Anne; Havaux, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Plastoquinone-9 is known as a photosynthetic electron carrier to which has also been attributed a role in the regulation of gene expression and enzyme activities via its redox state. Here, we show that it acts also as an antioxidant in plant leaves, playing a central photoprotective role. When Arabidopsis plants were suddenly exposed to excess light energy, a rapid consumption of plastoquinone-9 occurred, followed by a progressive increase in concentration during the acclimation phase. By overexpressing the plastoquinone-9 biosynthesis gene SPS1 (SOLANESYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 1) in Arabidopsis, we succeeded in generating plants that specifically accumulate plastoquinone-9 and its derivative plastochromanol-8. The SPS1-overexpressing lines were much more resistant to photooxidative stress than the wild type, showing marked decreases in leaf bleaching, lipid peroxidation and PSII photoinhibition under excess light. Comparison of the SPS1 overexpressors with other prenyl quinone mutants indicated that the enhanced phototolerance of the former plants is directly related to their increased capacities for plastoquinone-9 biosynthesis. PMID:26039552

  17. Breast cancer stem cells rely on fermentative glycolysis and are sensitive to 2-deoxyglucose treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ciavardelli, D; Rossi, C; Barcaroli, D; Volpe, S; Consalvo, A; Zucchelli, M; De Cola, A; Scavo, E; Carollo, R; D'Agostino, D; Forlì, F; D'Aguanno, S; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V; Urbani, A

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies suggest that cancer stem cells are essential for tumour growth, and failure to target these cells can result in tumour relapse. As this population of cells has been shown to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, it is essential to understand their biology and identify new therapeutic approaches. Targeting cancer metabolism is a potential alternative strategy to counteract tumour growth and recurrence. Here we applied a proteomic and targeted metabolomic analysis in order to point out the main metabolic differences between breast cancer cells grown as spheres and thus enriched in cancer stem cells were compared with the same cells grown in adherent differentiating conditions. This integrated approach allowed us to identify a metabolic phenotype associated with the stem-like condition and shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation towards fermentative glycolysis. Functional validation of proteomic and metabolic data provide evidences for increased activities of key enzymes of anaerobic glucose fate such as pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, lactate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phopshate dehydrogenase in cancer stem cells as well as different redox status. Moreover, we show that treatment with 2-deoxyglucose, a well known inhibitor of glycolysis, inhibits BCSC proliferation when used alone and shows a synergic effect when used in combination with doxorubicin. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of glycolysis may be a potentially effective strategy to target BCSCs. PMID:25032859

  18. 76 FR 69545 - Conditions and Requirements for Relying on Component Part Testing or Certification, or Another...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28208), we published a proposed rule that would establish... are the risks and benefits of allowing such an arrangement? 75 FR at 28209. (Comment 1)--Some... for issuing their finished product certificates (75 FR 28209). The final rule allows this...

  19. Diagnosing underweight in adolescent girls: should we rely on self-reported height and weight?

    PubMed

    Ohlmer, Ricarda; Jacobi, Corinna; Fittig, Eike

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the reliability of self-reported height, weight and weight change in underweight versus normal weight adolescent females. Self-reported height and weight were obtained from 162 schoolgirls without an eating disorder (12-16 years), and compared to objective measurements afterwards. Weight change was assessed 4 months later. The influence of age and current BMI on the reliability of self-reports was analyzed by linear regression analyses. With increasing age, height and BMI were reported more accurately. With increasing BMI, the underestimation of weight increased. Underweight girls overestimated their weight significantly compared to normal weight girls. Only 41% of the girls with a weight loss (>1 kg) in the past 4 months reported this accurately. Therefore, especially in younger girls with low body weight, information on height and weight as well as weight changes should be obtained objectively to identify a developing or subthreshold anorexia nervosa. PMID:22177388

  20. Spider orb webs rely on radial threads to absorb prey kinetic energy.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Andrew T; Lorentz, Kimberly A; Kelly, Sean P; Blackledge, Todd A

    2012-08-01

    The kinetic energy of flying insect prey is a formidable challenge for orb-weaving spiders. These spiders construct two-dimensional, round webs from a combination of stiff, strong radial silk and highly elastic, glue-coated capture spirals. Orb webs must first stop the flight of insect prey and then retain those insects long enough to be subdued by the spiders. Consequently, spider silks rank among the toughest known biomaterials. The large number of silk threads composing a web suggests that aerodynamic dissipation may also play an important role in stopping prey. Here, we quantify energy dissipation in orb webs spun by diverse species of spiders using data derived from high-speed videos of web deformation under prey impact. By integrating video data with material testing of silks, we compare the relative contributions of radial silk, the capture spiral and aerodynamic dissipation. Radial silk dominated energy absorption in all webs, with the potential to account for approximately 100 per cent of the work of stopping prey in larger webs. The most generous estimates for the roles of capture spirals and aerodynamic dissipation show that they rarely contribute more than 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the total work of stopping prey, respectively, and then only for smaller orb webs. The reliance of spider orb webs upon internal energy absorption by radial threads for prey capture suggests that the material properties of the capture spirals are largely unconstrained by the selective pressures of stopping prey and can instead evolve freely in response to alternative functional constraints such as adhering to prey. PMID:22431738

  1. Optical Frequency Measurements Relying on a Mid-Infrared Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovera, G. Daniele; Acef, Ouali

    Only a small number of groups are capable of measuring optical frequencies throughout the world. In this contribution we present some of the underlying philosophy of such frequency measurement systems, including some important theoretical hints. In particular, we concentrate on the approach that has been used with the BNM-LPTF frequency chain, where a separate secondary frequency standard in the mid-infrared has been used. The low-frequency section of the chain is characterized by a measurement of the phase noise spectral density Sφ at 716GHz.Most of the significant measurements performed in the last decade are briefly presented, together with a report on the actual stability and reproducibility of the CO2/ OsO4 frequency standard.Measuring the frequency of an optical frequency standard by direct comparison with the signal available at the output of a primary frequency standard (usually between 5MHz and 100MHz) requires a multiplication factor greater than 107. A number of possible configurations, using harmonic generation, sum or difference frequency generation, have been proposed and realized in the past [1,2,3,4,5,6] and in more recent times [7]. A new technique, employing a femtosecond laser, is presently giving its first impressive results [8].All of the classical frequency chains require a large amount of manpower, together with a great deal of simultaneously operating hardware. This has the consequence that only a very few systems are actually in an operating condition throughout the world.

  2. Response to “Accurate Risk-Based Chemical Screening Relies on Robust Exposure Estimates”

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a correspondence (letter to the editor) with reference to comments by Rudel and Perovich on the article "Integration of Dosimetry, Exposure, and High-Throughput Screening Data in Chemical Toxicity Assessment". Article Reference: SI # 238882

  3. Pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica in Caenorhabditis elegans relies on disseminated oxidative stress in the infected host.

    PubMed

    Sem, XiaoHui; Rhen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Feeding Caenorhabditis elegans with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium significantly shortens the lifespan of the nematode. S. Typhimurium-infected C. elegans, stained with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate which fluoresces upon exposure to reactive oxygen species, revealed intestinal luminal staining that along with the time of infection progressed to a strong staining in the hypodermal tissues of the nematode. Still, we could not detect invasion beyond the nematode's intestinal epithelium at any stage of the infection. A similar dispersion of oxidative response was also noted in nematodes infected with S. Dublin, but not with non-pathogenic Escherichia coli or the defined pathogen Burkholderia thailandensis. Addition of catalase or the reductant ascorbic acid significantly restored the lifespan of S. Typhimurium-infected nematodes. Mutational inactivation of the bacterial thioredoxin 1 resulted in total ablation of the hypodermal oxidative response to infection, and in a strong attenuation of virulence. Virulence of the thioredoxin 1 mutant was restored by trans-complementation with redox-active variants of thioredoxin 1 or, surprisingly, by exposing the thioredoxin 1 mutant to sublethal concentrations of the disulphide catalyst copper chloride prior to infection. In summary, our observations define a new aspect in virulence of S. enterica that apparently does not involve the classical invasive or intracellular phenotype of the pathogen, but that depends on the ability to provoke overwhelming systemic oxidative stress in the host through the redox activity of bacterial thioredoxin 1. PMID:23028994

  4. Deciduous and Evergreen Trees Rely on Deep Water Throughout the Year in a Subtropical Seasonal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, P.

    2010-12-01

    In subtropical and tropical seasonal forests, trees have adapted to low shallow soil water availability during the dry season by modifying root density, rooting depth, and leaf phenology. Here we test the well known hypothesis that water uptake in deciduous trees is restricted to the shallow soil layer, which prevents them from sustaining transpiring leaves during the dry season. Evergreens, on the other hand, access perennially available deep water sources, allowing them to maintain their transpiring leaves during the dry season. To determine where in the soil profile deciduous and evergreen trees take up water, we used stable isotope analysis to measure water source use of two deciduous and three evergreen species for a period of 13 months. In addition, to test the possibility that leaflessness could alter the isotopic composition of stem water, we measured the isotopic variation in stem water caused by artificial defoliation of an evergreen species. Deciduous and evergreen trees took up water from the same depths in both the wet and dry seasons. Deciduous and evergreen trees used approximately 51% deep water (50-150cm) throughout the year, while soil from 0-20cm was the least important water source with 24 and 6% of water uptake for wet and dry seasons, respectively. Low use of shallow water (0-20cm) in the wet season was due to inconstant water availability. Though the top 20cm of soil is the location of most nutrients, the soil’s limited water availability requires plants to have access to a more reliable deep water source to meet both their dry and wet season transpirational demands. This apparent spatial uncoupling in water and nutrient uptake denotes separate resource allocation for nutrient and water acquisition. Deciduous trees showed isotopic enrichment of stem water compared to evergreen plants only during the period that deciduous trees were leafless. We explain this as isotopic enrichment of fixed pool of stem water by evaporation as our defoliation experiment demonstrated. The δ18O and δ2H values of stem water from defoliated Q. virginiana branches were significantly higher than those of stem water from branches with leaves on the same tree (P < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively) and remained higher until the defoliated branches grew new leaves. Low sap flow in stems due to leaflessness or minimal transpiration can increase δ18O and δ2H values of stem water through evaporative enrichment. Using stem water to measure water source use in this situation would be misleading because it would infer usage of a water source more isotopically enriched than is actually the case.

  5. Catestatin and GABAAR related feeding habits rely on dopamine, ghrelin plus leptin neuroreceptor expression variations.

    PubMed

    Mele, Maria; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Carelli, Antonio; Laforgia, Vincenza; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Catestatin (CST), an endogenously small sympathoinhibitory peptide is capable of interfering with the major cerebral neuroreceptor-blocking site, i.e. γ-aminobutyric acidA receptor (GABAAR) system especially in limbic brain areas that are involved with feeding behaviors. The GABAARergic-related effects seem to derive from its interaction with other molecular neuroreceptors such as dopaminergic, ghrelin and leptinergic. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate probable feeding responses (eating and drinking) induced by treatment with CST and the GABAAR antagonist bicucullin (BIC) alone or simultaneously (CST+BIC) in the Syrian hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) model. Hamsters that received these compounds via intracerebroventricular infusions displayed notable variations of feeding and drinking bouts. In particular, an anorexigenic response was evident following treatment with CST while BIC evoked a significant increase of eating and drinking behaviors. Surprisingly when both agents were given simultaneously, a predominating anorexigenic response was detected as shown by evident CST-dependent reduction of feeding bouts. Contextually such behaviors, especially those following the combined treatment were tightly correlated with the significantly increased cerebral dopamine receptor 1 (D1) plus reduced ghrelin receptor (GhsR) and leptin receptor (LepR) transcript levels. Overall, the anorexigenic effect of CST deriving from its tight interaction with GABAARs activity plus D1 and GhsR transcripts tends to propose these neuronal elements as pivotal factors responsible for feeding disorders. PMID:26875516

  6. How do groundwater-dependent lakes react if the aquifer they rely on is being pumped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainu, Marko; Terasmaa, Jaanus

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is a valuable source of drinking water, but at the same time it is the primary contributor to the existence of many surface water bodies. If the latter truth is overlooked in water resources management, and ground- and surface water are not considered as a single resource, then the sustainability of groundwater-dependent ecosystems will become under threat. The necessity for implementing an integrated management of ground- and surface water has also been stressed in the EU Water Framework Directive. This study aims to evaluate the effect of increased groundwater abstraction to groundwater and lake levels; and to evaluate the effect of increased groundwater abstraction to the seepage patterns in one example lake. The Kurtna Lake District in northeastern Estonia contains almost 40 small lakes which are situated in and around the Kurtna Kame Field and constitute an EU Special Area of Conservation. The sands that form the kame field contain a Quaternary groundwater aquifer. Water has been pumped from the aquifer for household use with varying rates since the 1970s, but starting from the summer of 2012 the average pumping rate was increased by 51% compared to the year before. During the current study the water levels of five lakes were monitored regularly from May 2012 to June 2013 - before and after the increase in the pumping rate. The water levels dropped 0.3 to 0.7 m during the year in three closed-basin lakes closest to the abstraction wells, but did not change neither in a flow-through lake nor in a closed-basin lake situated 1.6 km from the wells. Groundwater level in the aquifer (monitored by the Estonian Geological Survey) dropped up to 0.8 m near the abstraction wells in the course of the year, but did not change further from the wells. The estimates of average annual groundwater recharge were derived for the twelve months before both June 2012 and June 2013. Although the recharge rate was lower in the first year, the water-level drop was nevertheless caused by the higher pumping rate, because the effects of lower recharge would have affected the whole aquifer, not just a part of it. At the beginning of June 2012 and June 2013 also lake-bed seepage was directly measured in the bottom of one of the lakes (Lake Martiska). Seepage measurements in the first year showed that outseepage from L. Martiska occurred in the northern part of the lake, which is situated closest to the abstraction wells. For the second year the area of outseepage had widened towards the western shore of the lake. Therefore the increased abstraction rate had initiated the shrinking of these lakes near the abstraction wells that were hydraulically connected to the aquifer. The results of the rare opportunity to analyse lake-groundwater interactions both before and after increased human intervention provide a cautionary example of what may happen to and in groundwater-dependent lakes if the surface water-groundwater interactions are not fully clarified before the intervention.

  7. Relying on Your Own Best Judgment: Imputing Values to Missing Information in Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard D.; And Others

    Processes involved in making estimates of the value of missing information that could help in a decision making process were studied. Hypothetical purchases of ground beef were selected for the study as such purchases have the desirable property of quantifying both the price and quality. A total of 150 students at the University of Iowa rated the…

  8. Deferring Higher Education Fees without Relying on Contributions from Non-Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rey, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of deferring the payment of higher-education costs are increasingly acknowledged as a way to overcome student-borrowing constraints. Since higher education is a risky investment and students are generally risk averse, the repayment arrangements proposed in the literature frequently include some insurance. In a competitive environment,…

  9. When to rely on maternal effects and when on phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, Bram; Hoyle, Rebecca B.

    2015-01-01

    Existing insight suggests that maternal effects have a substantial impact on evolution, yet these predictions assume that maternal effects themselves are evolutionarily constant. Hence, it is poorly understood how natural selection shapes maternal effects in different ecological circumstances. To overcome this, the current study derives an evolutionary model of maternal effects in a quantitative genetics context. In constant environments, we show that maternal effects evolve to slight negative values that result in a reduction of the phenotypic variance (canalization). By contrast, in populations experiencing abrupt change, maternal effects transiently evolve to positive values for many generations, facilitating the transmission of beneficial maternal phenotypes to offspring. In periodically fluctuating environments, maternal effects evolve according to the autocorrelation between maternal and offspring environments, favoring positive maternal effects when change is slow, and negative maternal effects when change is rapid. Generally, the strongest maternal effects occur for traits that experience very strong selection and for which plasticity is severely constrained. By contrast, for traits experiencing weak selection, phenotypic plasticity enhances the evolutionary scope of maternal effects, although maternal effects attain much smaller values throughout. As weak selection is common, finding substantial maternal influences on offspring phenotypes may be more challenging than anticipated. PMID:25809121

  10. Persistent identifiers for web service requests relying on a provenance ontology design pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Car, Nicholas; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley; Si, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Delivering provenance information for datasets produced from static inputs is relatively straightforward: we represent the processing actions and data flow using provenance ontologies and link to stored copies of the inputs stored in repositories. If appropriate detail is given, the provenance information can then describe what actions have occurred (transparency) and enable reproducibility. When web service-generated data is used by a process to create a dataset instead of a static inputs, we need to use sophisticated provenance representations of the web service request as we can no longer just link to data stored in a repository. A graph-based provenance representation, such as the W3C's PROV standard, can be used to model the web service request as a single conceptual dataset and also as a small workflow with a number of components within the same provenance report. This dual representation does more than just allow simplified or detailed views of a dataset's production to be used where appropriate. It also allow persistent identifiers to be assigned to instances of a web service requests, thus enabling one form of dynamic data citation, and for those identifiers to resolve to whatever level of detail implementers think appropriate in order for that web service request to be reproduced. In this presentation we detail our reasoning in representing web service requests as small workflows. In outline, this stems from the idea that web service requests are perdurant things and in order to most easily persist knowledge of them for provenance, we should represent them as a nexus of relationships between endurant things, such as datasets and knowledge of particular system types, as these endurant things are far easier to persist. We also describe the ontology design pattern that we use to represent workflows in general and how we apply it to different types of web service requests. We give examples of specific web service requests instances that were made by systems at Australia's National Computing Infrastructure and show how one can 'click' through provenance interfaces to see the dual representations of the requests using provenance management tooling we have built.

  11. Altruism via kin-selection strategies that rely on arbitrary tags with which they coevolve.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Robert; Hammond, Ross A; Grafen, Alan

    2004-08-01

    Hamilton's rule explains when natural selection will favor altruism between conspecifics, given their degree of relatedness. In practice, indicators of relatedness (such as scent) coevolve with strategies based on these indicators, a fact not included in previous theories of kin recognition. Using a combination of simulation modeling and mathematical extension of Hamilton's rule, we demonstrate how altruism can emerge and be sustained in a coevolutionary setting where relatedness depends on an individual's social environment and varies from one locus to another. The results support a very general expectation of widespread, and not necessarily weak, conditional altruism in nature. PMID:15446434

  12. Et pourquoi pas une education aux sciences qui aborde la participation des acteurs sociaux aux controverses sociotechniques?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouliot, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    In this article we discuss research that was conducted as part of a project on citizen science education. We present the research and some of the results, and then take a position on the pertinence of examining, in science classes, questions on citizen participation in socio-technical debates and the roles and capacities of the social actors…

  13. Regulators and regulations: who will guard the guards? (or 'Quis custodiet ipsos custodes' as old Juvenal used to say).

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Overbearing regulators with their various labyrinthine regulations have had adverse impacts on dentists and their teams' behaviours. This has produced the perverse outcomes of demoralizing dental teams as well as reducing their capacity and/or desire to deliver compassionate oral healthcare. These adverse outcomes do not seem to have benefited patients, or dentists, or their teams, in any sensible or measurable way. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The vastly increased burdens on the UK dental profession of intrusive, bullying regulations, emanating from the various UK agencies, such as the supposedly fair and independent GDC, but including the increasingly politically controlled NHS and the CQC, have had unfortunate, perverse, effects on many dentists' clinical practices and affected dental teams' desires, or willingness, to be as compassionate as they used to be about helping to solve some patients' dental or oral problems. PMID:26964442

  14. Spinopelvic pathways to bipedality: why no hominids ever relied on a bent-hip–bent-knee gait

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, C. Owen; McCollum, Melanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the last common ancestor of African apes and humans was presumed to resemble living chimpanzees and bonobos. This was frequently extended to their locomotor pattern leading to the presumption that knuckle-walking was a likely ancestral pattern, requiring bipedality to have emerged as a modification of their bent-hip-bent-knee gait used during erect walking. Research on the development and anatomy of the vertebral column, coupled with new revelations from the fossil record (in particular, Ardipithecus ramidus), now demonstrate that these presumptions have been in error. Reassessment of the potential pathway to early hominid bipedality now reveals an entirely novel sequence of likely morphological events leading to the emergence of upright walking. PMID:20855303

  15. Postprandial insulin action relies on meal composition and hepatic parasympathetics: dependency on glucose and amino acids: Meal, parasympathetics & insulin action.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Ricardo A; Gaspar, Joana M; Lamarão, Iva; Lautt, W Wayne; Macedo, M Paula

    2016-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity (IS) increases following a meal. Meal composition affects postprandial glucose disposal but still remains unclear which nutrients and mechanisms are involved. We hypothesized that gut-absorbed glucose and amino acids stimulate hepatic parasympathetic nerves, potentiating insulin action. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were 24 h fasted and anesthetized. Two series of experiments were performed. (A) IS was assessed before and after liquid test meal administration (10 ml.kg(-1), intraenteric): glucose + amino acids + lipids (GAL, n=6); glucose (n=5); amino acids (n=5); lipids (n=3); glucose + amino acids (GA, n=9); amino acids + lipids (n=3); and glucose + lipids (n=4). (B) Separately, fasted animals were submitted to hepatic parasympathetic denervation (DEN); IS was assessed before and after GAL (n=4) or GA administration (n=4). (A) Both GAL and GA induced significant insulin sensitization. GAL increased IS from 97.9±6.2 mg glucose/kg bw (fasting) to 225.4±18.3 mg glucose/kg bw (P<0.001; 143.6±26.0% potentiation of IS); GA increased IS from 109.0±6.6 to 240.4±18.0 mg glucose/kg bw (P<0.001; 123.1±13.4% potentiation). None of the other meals potentiated IS. (B) GAL and GA did not induce a significant insulin sensitization in DEN animal. To achieve maximal insulin sensitization following a meal, it is required that gut-absorbed glucose and amino acids trigger a vagal reflex that involves hepatic parasympathetic nerves. PMID:26410344

  16. Bridge-Induced Chromosome Translocation in Yeast Relies upon a Rad54/Rdh54-Dependent, Pol32-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Valentina; Sidari, Sabrina; Bruschi, Carlo V.

    2013-01-01

    While in mammalian cells the genetic determinism of chromosomal translocation remains unclear, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become an ideal model system to generate ad hoc translocations and analyze their cellular and molecular outcome. A linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by perfect homologies to two chromosomes triggers a bridge-induced translocation (BIT) in budding yeast, with variable efficiency. A postulated two-step process to produce BIT translocants is based on the cooperation between the Homologous Recombination System (HRS) and Break-Induced Replication (BIR); however, a clear indication of the molecular factors underlying the genetic mechanism is still missing. In this work we provide evidence that BIT translocation is elicited by the Rad54 helicase and completed by a Pol32-independent replication pathway. Our results demonstrate also that Rdh54 is involved in the stability of the translocants, suggesting a mitotic role in chromosome pairing and segregation. Moreover, when RAD54 is over-expressed, an ensemble of secondary rearrangements between repeated DNA tracts arise after the initial translocation event, leading to severe aneuploidy with loss of genetic material, which prompts the identification of fragile sites within the yeast genome. PMID:23613757

  17. Multiple Molecular Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Critically Rely on Androgen Receptor and Respond to Enzalutamide In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Valerie N.; D’Amato, Nicholas C.; Gordon, Michael A.; Lind, Hanne T.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Babbs, Beatrice L.; Heinz, Richard E.; Elias, Anthony; Jedlicka, Paul; Jacobsen, Britta M.; Richer, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the lowest 5-year survival rate of invasive breast carcinomas, and currently there are no approved targeted therapies for this aggressive form of the disease. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in up to one third of TNBC and we find that all AR+ TNBC primary tumors tested display nuclear localization of AR, indicative of transcriptionally active receptors. While AR is most abundant in the “luminal AR (LAR)” molecular subtype of TNBC, here, for the first time, we use both the new-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide and AR knockdown to demonstrate that the other non-LAR molecular subtypes of TNBC are critically dependent on AR protein. Indeed, AR inhibition significantly reduces baseline proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, and invasion and increases apoptosis in four TNBC lines (SUM159PT, HCC1806, BT549, and MDA-MB-231), representing three non-LAR TNBC molecular subtypes (mesenchymal-like, mesenchymal stem–like, and basal-like 2). In vivo, enzalutamide significantly decreases viability of SUM159PT and HCC1806 xenografts. Furthermore, mechanistic analysis reveals that AR activation upregulates secretion of the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG), an effect abrogated by enzalutamide in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous AREG partially rescues the effects of AR knockdown on proliferation, migration, and invasion, demonstrating that upregulation of AREG is one mechanism by which AR influences tumorigenicity. Together, our findings indicate that non-LAR subtypes of TNBC are AR dependent and, moreover, that enzalutamide is a promising targeted therapy for multiple molecular subtypes of AR+ TNBC. PMID:25713333

  18. Age of Onset: Can We Rely on Essential Tremor Patients to Report This? Data from a Prospective, Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) is among the most prevalent neurological diseases. Age of onset, a key variable in neuroepidemiological and genetic research, is chiefly assessed by self-report rather than medical record review; the latter may be of little use. As a researcher, one wonders about the quality of this self-report. Is age of onset something which can be reproducibly self-reported by patients? There are few published data to aid researchers. Methods Age of onset was self-reported at two time points (baseline and follow-up) in 86 ET cases in a longitudinal epidemiological study in New York. Results The mean follow-up interval was 5.7 ± 2.5 (maximum = 14) years. Overall, agreement between the baseline and follow-up reports was high (ρ = 0.85, p < 0.001). Yet the difference (age of onset baseline − age of onset follow-up) ranged widely (from −47 to 32 years), and in one fifth of cases was ≥10 years. Greater agreement was associated with several clinical factors including age, medication use, embarrassment, depressive symptoms, cognitive test score and disease duration. Conclusions Differences in reported age of onset in ET may vary widely, and in up to one fifth of patients may be substantial. Investigators should approach these self-reports with caution. PMID:23095658

  19. Radiation Sensitivity in a Preclinical Mouse Model of Medulloblastoma Relies on the Function of the Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Andrew J; Ocasio, Jennifer K; Fang, Fang; Meidinger, Jessica; Wu, Jaclyn; Deal, Allison M; Chang, Sha X; Yuan, Hong; Schmid, Ralf; Davis, Ian; Gershon, Timothy R

    2016-06-01

    While treatments that induce DNA damage are commonly used as anticancer therapies, the mechanisms through which DNA damage produces a therapeutic response are incompletely understood. Here we have tested whether medulloblastomas must be competent for apoptosis to be sensitive to radiotherapy. Whether apoptosis is required for radiation sensitivity has been controversial. Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is a biologically heterogeneous set of tumors typically sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy; 80% of medulloblastoma patients survive long-term after treatment. We used functional genetic studies to determine whether the intrinsic apoptotic pathway is required for radiation to produce a therapeutic response in mice with primary, Shh-driven medulloblastoma. We found that cranial radiation extended the survival of medulloblastoma-bearing mice and induced widespread apoptosis. Expression analysis and conditional deletion studies showed that Trp53 (p53) was the predominant transcriptional regulator activated by radiation and was strictly required for treatment response. Deletion of Bax, which blocked apoptosis downstream of p53, was sufficient to render tumors radiation resistant. In apoptosis-incompetent, Bax-deleted tumors, radiation activated p53-dependent transcription without provoking cell death and caused two discrete populations to emerge. Most radiated tumor cells underwent terminal differentiation. Perivascular cells, however, quickly resumed proliferation despite p53 activation, behaved as stem cells, and rapidly drove recurrence. These data show that radiation must induce apoptosis in tumor stem cells to be effective. Mutations that disable the intrinsic apoptotic pathways are sufficient to impart radiation resistance. We suggest that medulloblastomas are typically sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies, because they retain apoptosis competence. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3211-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197166

  20. So you want to work? What employers say about job skills, recruitment and hiring employees who rely on AAC.

    PubMed

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Potts, Blyden B; Carey, Allison C

    2007-06-01

    In order to better understand employer perspectives with respect to hiring and working with people who use AAC and the kinds of employment barriers they believe exist for these individuals, a study into the job requirements, recruitment processes, and hiring processes of 27 employers in the United States was conducted. Interviews with the 27 employers focused on 48 jobs in 25 unique categories, many of which had previously been identified as desirable by 38 adults who used AAC (some of whom were employed and some of whom were seeking employment). Findings suggest that, while level of education is still important to employers, skills such as time management, problem solving, communication, use of an understandable and standard voice, and basic technology may be even more so. The study also found that having an effective job-related network is important, as is the ability to provide credible references and do well during in-person interviews with potential employers. PMID:17487626

  1. Adaptation of the symbiotic Mesorhizobium-chickpea relationship to phosphate deficiency relies on reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Kusano, Miyako; Nguyen, Kien Huu; Watanabe, Yasuko; Ha, Chien Van; Saito, Kazuki; Sulieman, Saad; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-08-01

    Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability is a major constraint for efficient nitrogen fixation in legumes, including chickpea. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in nodule acclimation to low Pi availability, two Mesorhizobium-chickpea associations exhibiting differential symbiotic performances, Mesorhizobium ciceri CP-31 (McCP-31)-chickpea and Mesorhizobium mediterranum SWRI9 (MmSWRI9)-chickpea, were comprehensively studied under both control and low Pi conditions. MmSWRI9-chickpea showed a lower symbiotic efficiency under low Pi availability than McCP-31-chickpea as evidenced by reduced growth parameters and down-regulation of nifD and nifK These differences can be attributed to decline in Pi level in MmSWRI9-induced nodules under low Pi stress, which coincided with up-regulation of several key Pi starvation-responsive genes, and accumulation of asparagine in nodules and the levels of identified amino acids in Pi-deficient leaves of MmSWRI9-inoculated plants exceeding the shoot nitrogen requirement during Pi starvation, indicative of nitrogen feedback inhibition. Conversely, Pi levels increased in nodules of Pi-stressed McCP-31-inoculated plants, because these plants evolved various metabolic and biochemical strategies to maintain nodular Pi homeostasis under Pi deficiency. These adaptations involve the activation of alternative pathways of carbon metabolism, enhanced production and exudation of organic acids from roots into the rhizosphere, and the ability to protect nodule metabolism against Pi deficiency-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, the adaptation of symbiotic efficiency under Pi deficiency resulted from highly coordinated processes with an extensive reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism. The findings of this study will enable us to design effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to enhance symbiotic efficiency in legume crops. PMID:27450089

  2. Adaptation of the symbiotic Mesorhizobium–chickpea relationship to phosphate deficiency relies on reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Kusano, Miyako; Nguyen, Kien Huu; Watanabe, Yasuko; Ha, Chien Van; Saito, Kazuki; Sulieman, Saad; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2016-01-01

    Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability is a major constraint for efficient nitrogen fixation in legumes, including chickpea. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in nodule acclimation to low Pi availability, two Mesorhizobium–chickpea associations exhibiting differential symbiotic performances, Mesorhizobium ciceri CP-31 (McCP-31)–chickpea and Mesorhizobium mediterranum SWRI9 (MmSWRI9)–chickpea, were comprehensively studied under both control and low Pi conditions. MmSWRI9–chickpea showed a lower symbiotic efficiency under low Pi availability than McCP-31–chickpea as evidenced by reduced growth parameters and down-regulation of nifD and nifK. These differences can be attributed to decline in Pi level in MmSWRI9-induced nodules under low Pi stress, which coincided with up-regulation of several key Pi starvation-responsive genes, and accumulation of asparagine in nodules and the levels of identified amino acids in Pi-deficient leaves of MmSWRI9-inoculated plants exceeding the shoot nitrogen requirement during Pi starvation, indicative of nitrogen feedback inhibition. Conversely, Pi levels increased in nodules of Pi-stressed McCP-31–inoculated plants, because these plants evolved various metabolic and biochemical strategies to maintain nodular Pi homeostasis under Pi deficiency. These adaptations involve the activation of alternative pathways of carbon metabolism, enhanced production and exudation of organic acids from roots into the rhizosphere, and the ability to protect nodule metabolism against Pi deficiency-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, the adaptation of symbiotic efficiency under Pi deficiency resulted from highly coordinated processes with an extensive reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism. The findings of this study will enable us to design effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to enhance symbiotic efficiency in legume crops. PMID:27450089

  3. Self-control depletion in tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.): does delay of gratification rely on a limited resource?

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Francesca De; Gori, Emanuele; Truppa, Valentina; Ariely, Dan; Addessi, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Self-control failure has enormous personal and societal consequences. One of the most debated models explaining why self-control breaks down is the Strength Model, according to which self-control depends on a limited resource. Either previous acts of self-control or taking part in highly demanding cognitive tasks have been shown to reduce self-control, possibly due to a reduction in blood glucose levels. However, several studies yielded negative findings, and recent meta-analyses questioned the robustness of the depletion effect in humans. We investigated, for the first time, whether the Strength Model applies to a non-human primate species, the tufted capuchin monkey. We tested five capuchins in a self-control task (the Accumulation task) in which food items were accumulated within individual’s reach for as long as the subject refrained from taking them. We evaluated whether capuchins’ performance decreases: (i) when tested before receiving their daily meal rather than after consuming it (Energy Depletion Experiment), and (ii) after being tested in two tasks with different levels of cognitive complexity (Cognitive Depletion Experiment). We also tested, in both experiments, how implementing self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task affected this capacity within each session and/or across consecutive sessions. Repeated acts of self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task progressively reduced this capacity within each session, as predicted by the Strength Model. However, neither experiencing a reduction in energy level nor taking part in a highly demanding cognitive task decreased performance in the subsequent Accumulation task. Thus, whereas capuchins seem to be vulnerable to within-session depletion effects, to other extents our findings are in line with the growing body of studies that failed to find a depletion effect in humans. Methodological issues potentially affecting the lack of depletion effects in capuchins are discussed. PMID:26322001

  4. Numerical analysis of 50 Gbaud homodyne coherent receivers relying on line-coding and injection locking in lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xydas, Yannis; Ressopoulos, Constantinos; Bogris, Adonis

    2015-12-01

    We present a numerical analysis of 50 Gbaud coherent detection enabled by injection locked lasers and line coding. The coherent receiver was tested with respect to an ideal receiver for two higher order modulation formats (16-QAM, QPSK) and under diverse operating regimes relating to the slave laser linewidth properties, the injection level and the frequency detuning between the incoming signal and the slave laser. The impact of the slave laser properties and line coding techniques on the receiver performance is highlighted showing that the technique could be used as a practical solution in order to enable low-cost and short reach n × 100 Gb/s Ethernet communication systems with the potential of flexibility in terms of the data rate.

  5. Do Political and Economic Choices Rely on Common Neural Substrates? A Systematic Review of the Emerging Neuropolitics Literature.

    PubMed

    Krastev, Sekoul; McGuire, Joseph T; McNeney, Denver; Kable, Joseph W; Stolle, Dietlind; Gidengil, Elisabeth; Fellows, Lesley K

    2016-01-01

    The methods of cognitive neuroscience are beginning to be applied to the study of political behavior. The neural substrates of value-based decision-making have been extensively examined in economic contexts; this might provide a powerful starting point for understanding political decision-making. Here, we asked to what extent the neuropolitics literature to date has used conceptual frameworks and experimental designs that make contact with the reward-related approaches that have dominated decision neuroscience. We then asked whether the studies of political behavior that can be considered in this light implicate the brain regions that have been associated with subjective value related to "economic" reward. We performed a systematic literature review to identify papers addressing the neural substrates of political behavior and extracted the fMRI studies reporting behavioral measures of subjective value as defined in decision neuroscience studies of reward. A minority of neuropolitics studies met these criteria and relatively few brain activation foci from these studies overlapped with regions where activity has been related to subjective value. These findings show modest influence of reward-focused decision neuroscience on neuropolitics research to date. Whether the neural substrates of subjective value identified in economic choice paradigms generalize to political choice thus remains an open question. We argue that systematically addressing the commonalities and differences in these two classes of value-based choice will be important in developing a more comprehensive model of the brain basis of human decision-making. PMID:26941703

  6. Carbon storage assessment of U.S. Great Plains relies on data from Landsat and other sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    A new assessment of carbon storage in the U.S. Great Plains region helps to improve the understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas fluxes in parts of 14 states. It is the first of a series of such assessments, with the entire national assessment set for completion around 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announced at a 6 December press briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The assessment, based on measured and observed data collected by USGS from Landsat and other sources, also indicates the value of the troubled Landsat satellites, according to USGS director Marcia McNutt. The assessment of the 2.17-million-square-kilometer region of the country, which contains a number of different ecosystems, examines carbon storage as well as carbon, methane, and nitrous oxide fluxes in all terrestrial ecosystems in the region during a baseline period. Projections of these fluxes also were extended to 2050. The report was carried out to fulfill a section of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  7. 16 CFR 1115.5 - Reporting of failures to comply with a voluntary consumer product safety standard relied upon by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... developing mandatory ones. In recognition of the role of voluntary standards under the CPSA, section 15(b)(1... public with a fair opportunity to comment upon such proposed action. (b) Reporting requirement. A...

  8. Immigrant and Refugee Students across "Receiving" Nations: To What Extent Can Educators Rely on PISA for Answers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Massive population shift is a current global reality--especially given some of the latest development on European shores; some are calling it a humanitarian crisis. Although the United States (US) receives a large number of immigrants (documented and not) and about 70,000 refugees each year, it is certainly not the only nation to do so.…

  9. Attending to multiple objects relies on both feature- and dimension-based control mechanisms: Evidence from human electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Töllner, Thomas; Conci, Markus; Müller, Hermann J; Mazza, Veronica

    2016-10-01

    Numerous everyday search tasks require humans to attentionally select and temporally store more than one object present in the visual environment. Recently, several enumeration studies sought to isolate the mechanisms underlying multiple object processing by means of electrophysiological measures, which led to a more fine-grained picture as to which processing stages are modulated by object numerosity. One critical limitation that most of these studies share is that they used stimulus designs in which multiple targets were exclusively defined by the same feature value. Accordingly, it remains an open issue whether these findings generalize to search scenarios in which multiple targets are physically not identical. To systematically address this issue, we introduced three target context conditions in which multiple targets were defined randomly by (1) the same feature (sF), (2) different features within the same dimension (dFsD), or (3) different features across dimensions (dD). Our findings revealed that participants' ability to enumerate multiple targets was remarkably influenced by inter-target relationships, with fastest responses for sF trials, slowest responses for dD trials, and responses of intermediate speed for dFsD trials. Our electrophysiological analyses disclosed that one source of this response slowing was feature-based and originated from the stage of attentional selection (as indexed by PCN waves), whereas another source was dimension-based and associated with working memory processes (as indexed by P3b waves). Overall, our results point to a significant role of physical inter-target relationships in multiple object processing-a factor that has been largely neglected in most studies on enumeration. PMID:27299342

  10. Reflex vasoconstriction in aged human skin increasingly relies on Rho kinase-dependent mechanisms during whole body cooling

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, John D.; Holowatz, Lacy A.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Primary human aging may be associated with augmented Rho kinase (ROCK)-mediated contraction of vascular smooth muscle and ROCK-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that the contribution of ROCK to reflex vasoconstriction (VC) is greater in aged skin. Cutaneous VC was elicited by 1) whole body cooling [mean skin temperature (Tsk) = 30.5°C] and 2) local norepinephrine (NE) infusion (1 × 10−6 M). Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of eight young (Y) and eight older (O) subjects for infusion of 1) Ringer solution (control), 2) 3 mM fasudil (ROCK inhibition), 3) 20 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (NOS inhibition), and 4) both ROCK + NOS inhibitors. Red cell flux was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry over each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to baseline CVC (%ΔCVCbaseline). VC was reduced at the control site in O during cooling (Y, −34 ± 3; and O, −18 ± 3%ΔCVCbaseline; P < 0.001) and NE infusion (Y, −53 ± 4, and O, −41 ± 9%ΔCVCbaseline; P = 0.006). Fasudil attenuated VC in both age groups during mild cooling; however, this reduction remained only in O but not in Y skin during moderate cooling (Y, −30 ± 5; and O, −7 ± 1%ΔCVCbaseline; P = 0.016) and was not altered by NOS inhibition. Fasudil blunted NE-mediated VC in both age groups (Y, −23 ± 4; and O, −7 ± 3%ΔCVCbaseline; P < 0.01). Cumulatively, these data indicate that reflex VC is more reliant on ROCK in aged skin such that approximately half of the total VC response to whole body cooling is ROCK dependent. PMID:19717729

  11. Position-dependent splicing activation and repression by SR and hnRNP proteins rely on common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Mueller, William F.; Evans, Melanie S.; Busch, Anke; Schöneweis, Katrin; Hertel, Klemens J.; Schaal, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by splicing factors that modulate splice site selection. In some cases, however, splicing factors show antagonistic activities by either activating or repressing splicing. Here, we show that these opposing outcomes are based on their binding location relative to regulated 5′ splice sites. SR proteins enhance splicing only when they are recruited to the exon. However, they interfere with splicing by simply relocating them to the opposite intronic side of the splice site. hnRNP splicing factors display analogous opposing activities, but in a reversed position dependence. Activation by SR or hnRNP proteins increases splice site recognition at the earliest steps of exon definition, whereas splicing repression promotes the assembly of nonproductive complexes that arrest spliceosome assembly prior to splice site pairing. Thus, SR and hnRNP splicing factors exploit similar mechanisms to positively or negatively influence splice site selection. PMID:23175589

  12. Yeast Tolerance to Various Stresses Relies on the Trehalose-6P Synthase (Tps1) Protein, Not on Trehalose*

    PubMed Central

    Petitjean, Marjorie; Teste, Marie-Ange; François, Jean M.; Parrou, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a stable disaccharide commonly found in nature, from bacteria to fungi and plants. For the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, claims that trehalose is a stress protectant were based indirectly either on correlation between accumulation of trehalose and high resistance to various stresses or on stress hypersensitivity of mutants deleted for TPS1, which encodes the first enzyme in trehalose biosynthetic pathway. Our goal was to investigate more directly which one, between trehalose and/or the Tps1 protein, may serve yeast cells to withstand exposure to stress. By employing an original strategy that combined the use of mutant strains expressing catalytically inactive variants of Tps1, with MAL+ yeast strains able to accumulate trehalose from an exogenous supply, we bring for the first time unbiased proof that trehalose does not protect yeast cells from dying and that the stress-protecting role of trehalose in this eukaryotic model was largely overestimated. Conversely, we identified the Tps1 protein as a key player for yeast survival in response to temperature, oxidative, and desiccation stress. We also showed by robust RT-quantitative PCR and genetic interaction analysis that the role of Tps1 in thermotolerance is not dependent upon Hsf1-dependent transcription activity. Finally, our results revealed that the Tps1 protein is essential to maintain ATP levels during heat shock. Altogether, these findings supported the idea that Tps1 is endowed with a regulatory function in energy homeostasis, which is essential to withstand adverse conditions and maintain cellular integrity. PMID:25934390

  13. Travelling light: white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) rely on body lipid stores to power ocean-basin scale migration

    PubMed Central

    Del Raye, Gen; Jorgensen, Salvador J.; Krumhansl, Kira; Ezcurra, Juan M.; Block, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Many species undertake long-distance annual migrations between foraging and reproductive areas. Such migrants depend on the efficient packaging, storage and utilization of energy to succeed. A diverse assemblage of organisms accomplishes this through the use of lipid reserves; yet, it remains unclear whether the migrations of elasmobranchs, which include the largest gill breathers on Earth, depend on such a mechanism. We examine depth records from pop-up satellite archival tags to discern changes in buoyancy as a proxy for energy storage in Eastern Pacific white sharks, and assess whether lipid depletion fuels long-distance (approx. 4000 km) migrations. We develop new algorithms to assess body condition, buoyancy and drift rate during drift dives and validate the techniques using a captive white shark. In the wild, we document a consistent increase in drift rate over the course of all migrations, indicating a decrease in buoyancy caused by the depletion of lipid reserves. These results comprise, to our knowledge, the first assessment of energy storage and budgeting in migrating sharks. The methods provide a basis for further insights into using electronic tags to reveal the energetic strategies of a wide range of elasmobranchs. PMID:23864595

  14. Concerted removal of the Erb1-Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-29

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7-Erb1-Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1-Bop1-Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1-Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1-Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1-Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  15. Embracing Advancement: You Can't Rely on Outside Funding. How to Build a Strong Internal Fundraising Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the past 7 years of working at and in community colleges, the author has seen two distinct trends: (1) Community colleges appear to be ushering in a new era of advancement; and (2) Community colleges themselves are often the biggest impediment to successful advancement efforts. Despite millions of grateful learners and business and community…

  16. Etiology of distinct membrane excitability in pre- and posthearing auditory neurons relies on activity of Cl− channel TMEM16A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lee, Jeong-Han; Lv, Ping; Chen, Wei Chun; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Wei, Dongguang; Wang, Wenying; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Doyle, Karen Jo; Rock, Jason R.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Yamoah, Ebenezer N.

    2015-01-01

    The developmental rehearsal for the debut of hearing is marked by massive changes in the membrane properties of hair cells (HCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Whereas the underlying mechanisms for the developing HC transition to mature stage are understood in detail, the maturation of SGNs from hyperexcitable prehearing to quiescent posthearing neurons with broad dynamic range is unknown. Here, we demonstrated using pharmacological approaches, caged-Ca2+ photolysis, and gramicidin patch recordings that the prehearing SGN uses Ca2+-activated Cl− conductance to depolarize the resting membrane potential and to prime the neurons in a hyperexcitable state. Immunostaining of the cochlea preparation revealed the identity and expression of the Ca2+-activated Cl− channel transmembrane member 16A (TMEM16A) in SGNs. Moreover, null deletion of TMEM16A reduced the Ca2+-activated Cl− currents and action potential firing in SGNs. To determine whether Cl− ions and TMEM16A are involved in the transition between pre- and posthearing features of SGNs we measured the intracellular Cl− concentration [Cl−]i in SGNs. Surprisingly, [Cl−]i in SGNs from prehearing mice was ∼90 mM, which was significantly higher than posthearing neurons, ∼20 mM, demonstrating discernible altered roles of Cl− channels in the developing neuron. The switch in [Cl−]i stems from delayed expression of the development of intracellular Cl− regulating mechanisms. Because the Cl− channel is the only active ion-selective conductance with a reversal potential that lies within the dynamic range of SGN action potentials, developmental alteration of [Cl−]i, and hence the equilibrium potential for Cl− (ECl), transforms pre- to posthearing phenotype. PMID:25675481

  17. Paper-based biosensor relying on flower-like reduced graphene guided enzymatically deposition of polyaniline for Pb(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shenguang; Wu, Kaiqing; Zhang, Yan; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2016-06-15

    A multi-amplified paper-based electrochemical strategy using Pb(2+) dependent DNAzyme as the recognition unit for Pb(2+) detection was developed. In this work, flower-like reduced graphene (FrGO) was prepared utilizing flower-like ZnO as template, which was first one step grown on the gold nanoparticles modified paper working electrode (Au-PWE). After being treated with acid and then modified with Au, a novel sensor platform named Au/FrGO/Au-PWE with large specific surface area and good electrical conductivity was fabricated. The Mn2O3 nanoparticle-assembled hierarchical hollow spheres (H-Mn2O3) was served as nanocarrier to immobilize GOx, HRP and signal strand (S3), resulting to the formation of S3/H-Mn2O3/HRP/GOx bioconjugations. In the presence of Pb(2+), the DNAzyme (S1) was activated and the substrate strand (S2) was cleaved. After the incubation with S3/H-Mn2O3/HRP/GOx in 0.1M HAc-NaAc solution (pH 4.3) containing 30 mM aniline and 15 mM glucose, a readily measurable "turn-on" electrochemical signal could be measured. On the basis of the signal amplification strategy of Au/FrGO/Au-PWE sensing platform and S3/H-Mn2O3/HRP/GOx bioconjugations, the developed biosensor exhibited a good linear response toward over a wide range of concentration from 0.005 to 2000 nM. PMID:26851578

  18. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Exhibiting the Warburg Effect Relies on Glycolytic ATP*

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew D.; Patel, Waseema; Butt, Zohra; Adiamah, Magretta; Dakhel, Raga; Latif, Ayse; Uggenti, Carolina; Swanton, Eileithyia; Imamura, Hiromi; Siriwardena, Ajith K.; Bruce, Jason I. E.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), which is critical for maintaining a low intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), utilizes glycolytically derived ATP in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and that inhibition of glycolysis in PDAC cell lines results in ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and an irreversible [Ca2+]i overload. We explored whether this is a specific weakness of highly glycolytic PDAC by shifting PDAC cell (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) metabolism from a highly glycolytic phenotype toward mitochondrial metabolism and assessing the effects of mitochondrial versus glycolytic inhibitors on ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and [Ca2+]i overload. The highly glycolytic phenotype of these cells was first reversed by depriving MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells of glucose and supplementing with α-ketoisocaproate or galactose. These culture conditions resulted in a significant decrease in both glycolytic flux and proliferation rate, and conferred resistance to ATP depletion by glycolytic inhibition while sensitizing cells to mitochondrial inhibition. Moreover, in direct contrast to cells exhibiting a high glycolytic rate, glycolytic inhibition had no effect on PMCA activity and resting [Ca2+]i in α-ketoisocaproate- and galactose-cultured cells, suggesting that the glycolytic dependence of the PMCA is a specific vulnerability of PDAC cells exhibiting the Warburg phenotype. PMID:26294767

  19. Nocturnal Foraging by Red-Legged Kittiwakes, a Surface Feeding Seabird That Relies on Deep Water Prey During Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kokubun, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kikuchi, Dale M.; Kitaysky, Alexander; Takahashi, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Narrow foraging specialization may increase the vulnerability of marine predators to climate change. The red-legged kittiwake (Rissa brevirostris) is endemic to the Bering Sea and has experienced drastic population fluctuations in recent decades, presumably due to climate-driven changes in food resources. Red-legged kittiwakes are presumed to be a nocturnal surface-foraging seabird that feed almost entirely on deep water Myctophidae fishes. However, there is little empirical evidence confirming their nocturnal foraging activity during the breeding season. This study investigated the foraging behavior of red-legged kittiwakes by combining GPS tracking, accelerometry, and dietary analyses at the world’s largest breeding colony of red-legged kittiwakes on St. George I. GPS tracking of 5 individuals revealed that 82.5% of non-flight behavior (including foraging and resting) occurred over the ocean basin (bottom depth >1,000 m). Acceleration data from 4 birds showed three types of behaviors during foraging trips: (1) flight, characterized by regular wing flapping, (2) resting on water, characterized by non-active behavior, and (3) foraging, when wing flapping was irregular. The proportions of both foraging and resting behaviors were higher at night (14.1 ± 7.1% and 20.8 ± 14.3%) compared to those during the day (6.5 ± 3.0% and 1.7 ± 2.7%). The mean duration of foraging (2.4 ± 2.9 min) was shorter than that of flight between prey patches (24.2 ± 53.1 min). Dietary analyses confirmed myctophids as the dominant prey (100% by occurrence and 98.4 ± 2.4% by wet-weight). Although the sample size was limited, these results suggest that breeding red-legged kittiwakes concentrated their foraging on myctophids available at the surface during nighttime in deep water regions. We propose that the diel patterns and ephemeral nature of their foraging activity reflected the availability of myctophids. Such foraging specialization may exacerbate the vulnerability of red-legged kittiwakes to climate change in the Bering Sea. PMID:26465335

  20. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal and bacterial inocula on nitrate concentration in mesocosms simulating a wastewater treatment system relying on phytodepuration.

    PubMed

    Lingua, Guido; Copetta, Andrea; Musso, Davide; Aimo, Stefania; Ranzenigo, Angelo; Buico, Alessandra; Gianotti, Valentina; Osella, Domenico; Berta, Graziella

    2015-12-01

    High nitrogen concentration in wastewaters requires treatments to prevent the risks of eutrophication in rivers, lakes and coastal waters. The use of constructed wetlands is one of the possible approaches to lower nitrate concentration in wastewaters. Beyond supporting the growth of the bacteria operating denitrification, plants can directly take up nitrogen. Since plant roots interact with a number of soil microorganisms, in the present work we report the monitoring of nitrate concentration in macrocosms with four different levels of added nitrate (0, 30, 60 and 90 mg l(-1)), using Phragmites australis, inoculated with bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, to assess whether the use of such inocula could improve wastewater denitrification. Higher potassium nitrate concentration increased plant growth and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi or bacteria resulted in larger plants with more developed root systems. In the case of plants inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, a faster decrease of nitrate concentration was observed, while the N%/C% ratio of the plants of the different treatments remained similar. At 90 mg l(-1) of added nitrate, only mycorrhizal plants were able to decrease nitrate concentration to the limits prescribed by the Italian law. These data suggest that mycorrhizal and microbial inoculation can be an additional tool to improve the efficiency of denitrification in the treatment of wastewaters via constructed wetlands. PMID:26423290

  1. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, S. I.; Huang, Y. C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Yang, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here – soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world. PMID:27426677

  2. The Importance of Relying on the Manual: Scoring Error Variance in the WISC-IV Vocabulary Subtest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdodi, Laszlo A.; Richard, David C. S.; Hopwood, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Classical test theory assumes that ability level has no effect on measurement error. Newer test theories, however, argue that the precision of a measurement instrument changes as a function of the examinee's true score. Research has shown that administration errors are common in the Wechsler scales and that subtests requiring subjective scoring…

  3. If the results of an article are noteworthy, read the entire article; do not rely on the abstract alone.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, R; Castell, M V; García-Puig, J

    2015-11-01

    Clinicians typically update their knowledge by reading articles on the Internet. Easy access to the articles' abstracts and a lack of time to access other information sources creates a risk that therapeutic or diagnostic decisions will be made after reading just the abstracts. Occasionally, however, the abstracts of articles from clinical trials that have not obtained statistically significant differences in the primary study endpoint have reported other positive results, for example, of a secondary endpoint or a subgroup analysis. The article, however, correctly reports all results, including those of the primary endpoint. In the abstract, the safety information of the experimental treatment is usually deficient. The whole article should be read if a clinical decision is to be made. PMID:26165166

  4. Etiology of distinct membrane excitability in pre- and posthearing auditory neurons relies on activity of Cl- channel TMEM16A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lee, Jeong-Han; Lv, Ping; Chen, Wei Chun; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Wei, Dongguang; Wang, Wenying; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Doyle, Karen Jo; Rock, Jason R; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2015-02-24

    The developmental rehearsal for the debut of hearing is marked by massive changes in the membrane properties of hair cells (HCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Whereas the underlying mechanisms for the developing HC transition to mature stage are understood in detail, the maturation of SGNs from hyperexcitable prehearing to quiescent posthearing neurons with broad dynamic range is unknown. Here, we demonstrated using pharmacological approaches, caged-Ca(2+) photolysis, and gramicidin patch recordings that the prehearing SGN uses Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance to depolarize the resting membrane potential and to prime the neurons in a hyperexcitable state. Immunostaining of the cochlea preparation revealed the identity and expression of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel transmembrane member 16A (TMEM16A) in SGNs. Moreover, null deletion of TMEM16A reduced the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents and action potential firing in SGNs. To determine whether Cl(-) ions and TMEM16A are involved in the transition between pre- and posthearing features of SGNs we measured the intracellular Cl(-) concentration [Cl(-)]i in SGNs. Surprisingly, [Cl(-)]i in SGNs from prehearing mice was ∼90 mM, which was significantly higher than posthearing neurons, ∼20 mM, demonstrating discernible altered roles of Cl(-) channels in the developing neuron. The switch in [Cl(-)]i stems from delayed expression of the development of intracellular Cl(-) regulating mechanisms. Because the Cl(-) channel is the only active ion-selective conductance with a reversal potential that lies within the dynamic range of SGN action potentials, developmental alteration of [Cl(-)]i, and hence the equilibrium potential for Cl(-) (ECl), transforms pre- to posthearing phenotype. PMID:25675481

  5. Visual repetition priming for words relies on access to the visual input lexicon: evidence from a dyslexic patient.

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, G A; Fadda, L; Sabbadini, M; Caltagirone, C

    1994-09-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that visual repetition priming for words depends upon the accessibility of lexical units in the visual input lexicon. For this purpose, we investigated a dyslexic patient, A.M., whose neuropsychological performances suggested an impaired access to the lexical route of reading. According to the predictions, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated deficient priming in tests involving the visual presentation of words (Word Identification and Stem Completion). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that A.M.'s deficient priming was specific for visually presented words, in that the auditory presentation elicited a normal priming effect (auditory Stem Completion). These data are discussed in the light of a theoretical framework suggesting a fractionation of the modalities by which repetition priming can be elicited, each mediated by a particular memory subsystem. PMID:7991076

  6. Do Adults with Cochlear Implants Rely on Different Acoustic Cues for Phoneme Perception than Adults with Normal Hearing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.; Tarr, Eric; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Welling, D. Bradley; Shahin, Antoine J.; Nittrouer, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Several acoustic cues specify any single phonemic contrast. Nonetheless, adult, native speakers of a language share weighting strategies, showing preferential attention to some properties over others. Cochlear implant (CI) signal processing disrupts the salience of some cues: In general, amplitude structure remains readily available, but…

  7. Can we rely on the Dermatology Life Quality Index as a measure of the impact of psoriasis or atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Twiss, James; Meads, David M; Preston, Elizabeth P; Crawford, Sigrid R; McKenna, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) is a widely used health-related quality of life measure. However, little research has been conducted on its dimensionality. The objectives of the current study were to apply Rasch analysis to DLQI data to determine whether the scale is unidimensional, to assess its measurement properties, test the response format, and determine whether the measure exhibits differential item functioning (DIF) by disease (atopic dermatitis versus psoriasis), gender, or age group. The results show that there were several problems with the scale, including misfitting items, DIF by disease, age, and gender, disordered response thresholds, and inadequate measurement of patients with mild illness. As the DLQI did not benefit from the application of Rasch analysis in its development, it is argued that a new measure of disability related to dermatological disease is required. Such a measure should use a coherent measurement model and ensure that items are relevant to all potential respondents. The current use of the DLQI as a guide to treatment selection is of concern, given its inadequate measurement properties. PMID:21881588

  8. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S I; Huang, Y C; Cheng, C H; Cheng, C M; Yang, J T

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here - soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world. PMID:27426677

  9. Inhibitory motor control based on complex stopping goals relies on the same brain network as simple stopping

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jan R.; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has modeled action-stopping using the stop-signal task (SST), in which an impending response has to be stopped when an explicit stop-signal occurs. A limitation of the SST is that real-world action-stopping rarely involves explicit stop-signals. Instead, the stopping-system engages when environmental features match more complex stopping goals. For example, when stepping into the street, one monitors path, velocity, size, and types of objects; and only stops if there is a vehicle approaching. Here, we developed a task in which participants compared the visual features of a multidimensional go-stimulus to a complex stopping-template, and stopped their go-response if all features matched the template. We used independent component analysis of EEG data to show that the same motor inhibition brain network that explains action-stopping in the SST also implements motor inhibition in the complex-stopping task. Furthermore, we found that partial feature overlap between go-stimulus and stopping-template lead to motor slowing, which also corresponded with greater stopping-network activity. This shows that the same brain system for action-stopping to explicit stop-signals is recruited to slow or stop behavior when stimuli match a complex stopping goal. The results imply a generalizability of the brain’s network for simple action-stopping to more ecologically valid scenarios. PMID:25270603

  10. Nicotinic Transmission onto Layer 6 Cortical Neurons Relies on Synaptic Activation of Non-α7 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hay, Y Audrey; Lambolez, Bertrand; Tricoire, Ludovic

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic excitation in neocortex is mediated by low-affinity α7 receptors and by high-affinity α4β2 receptors. There is evidence that α7 receptors are synaptic, but it is unclear whether high-affinity receptors are activated by volume transmission or synaptic transmission. To address this issue, we characterized responses of excitatory layer 6 (L6) neurons to optogenetic release of acetylcholine (ACh) in cortical slices. L6 responses consisted in a slowly decaying α4β2 current and were devoid of α7 component. Evidence that these responses were mediated by synapses was 4-fold. 1) Channelrhodopsin-positive cholinergic varicosities made close appositions onto responsive neurons. 2) Inhibition of ACh degradation failed to alter onset kinetics and amplitude of currents. 3) Quasi-saturation of α4β2 receptors occurred upon ACh release. 4) Response kinetics were unchanged in low release probability conditions. Train stimulations increased amplitude and decay time of responses and these effects appeared to involve recruitment of extrasynaptic receptors. Finally, we found that the α5 subunit, known to be associated with α4β2 in L6, regulates short-term plasticity at L6 synapses. Our results are consistent with previous anatomical observations of widespread cholinergic synapses and suggest that a significant proportion of these small synapses operate via high-affinity nicotinic receptors. PMID:25934969